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Sample records for meromictic temperate lake

  1. Bacterial Communities of Three Saline Meromictic Lakes in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Bayanmunkh; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Rogozin, Denis Yu; Wu, Yu-Ting; Tseng, Ching-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Oyuntsetseg, Bolormaa; Degermendzhy, Andrey G; Tang, Sen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Meromictic lakes located in landlocked steppes of central Asia (~2500 km inland) have unique geophysiochemical characteristics compared to other meromictic lakes. To characterize their bacteria and elucidate relationships between those bacteria and surrounding environments, water samples were collected from three saline meromictic lakes (Lakes Shira, Shunet and Oigon) in the border between Siberia and the West Mongolia, near the center of Asia. Based on in-depth tag pyrosequencing, bacterial communities were highly variable and dissimilar among lakes and between oxic and anoxic layers within individual lakes. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla, whereas three genera of purple sulfur bacteria (a novel genus, Thiocapsa and Halochromatium) were predominant bacterial components in the anoxic layer of Lake Shira (~20.6% of relative abundance), Lake Shunet (~27.1%) and Lake Oigon (~9.25%), respectively. However, few known green sulfur bacteria were detected. Notably, 3.94% of all sequencing reads were classified into 19 candidate divisions, which was especially high (23.12%) in the anoxic layer of Lake Shunet. Furthermore, several hydro-parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, H2S and salinity) were associated (P< 0.05) with variations in dominant bacterial groups. In conclusion, based on highly variable bacterial composition in water layers or lakes, we inferred that the meromictic ecosystem was characterized by high diversity and heterogenous niches. PMID:26934492

  2. Bacterial Communities of Three Saline Meromictic Lakes in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Baatar, Bayanmunkh; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Rogozin, Denis Yu; Wu, Yu-Ting; Tseng, Ching-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui; Oyuntsetseg, Bolormaa; Degermendzhy, Andrey G.; Tang, Sen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Meromictic lakes located in landlocked steppes of central Asia (~2500 km inland) have unique geophysiochemical characteristics compared to other meromictic lakes. To characterize their bacteria and elucidate relationships between those bacteria and surrounding environments, water samples were collected from three saline meromictic lakes (Lakes Shira, Shunet and Oigon) in the border between Siberia and the West Mongolia, near the center of Asia. Based on in-depth tag pyrosequencing, bacterial communities were highly variable and dissimilar among lakes and between oxic and anoxic layers within individual lakes. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla, whereas three genera of purple sulfur bacteria (a novel genus, Thiocapsa and Halochromatium) were predominant bacterial components in the anoxic layer of Lake Shira (~20.6% of relative abundance), Lake Shunet (~27.1%) and Lake Oigon (~9.25%), respectively. However, few known green sulfur bacteria were detected. Notably, 3.94% of all sequencing reads were classified into 19 candidate divisions, which was especially high (23.12%) in the anoxic layer of Lake Shunet. Furthermore, several hydro-parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, H2S and salinity) were associated (P< 0.05) with variations in dominant bacterial groups. In conclusion, based on highly variable bacterial composition in water layers or lakes, we inferred that the meromictic ecosystem was characterized by high diversity and heterogenous niches. PMID:26934492

  3. Holocene Fluctuations of a Meromictic Lake in Southern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D.; Northcote, Tom G.; Hall, Ken J.

    1997-07-01

    Holocene deposits of Mahoney Lake, a meromictic saline lake located in a closed basin in the semi-arid Okanagan Valley, contain evidence of frequent and marked changes in lake depth (up to >12 m/100 14C yr) probably caused by short-term changes in effective precipitation. We studied a 5.45-m-long core comprising a basal layer of inorganic mud overlain by a succession of layers of calcareous laminated and nonlaminated organic mud, marl, and sand. We used Mazama tephra to adjust nine radiocarbon ages for the hardwater effect. Meromixis developed ca. 9000 14C yr B.P., and the lake has been episodically meromictic for about half the time since. Because of close linkages between sediments and depositional environments in meromictic and saline lakes, we infer that laminated sediments indicate meromictic conditions and high lake levels (>ca. 12 m water depth), whereas thick marl layers and nonlaminated sediments indicate nonmeromictic conditions and thus low lake levels (

  4. [Microbiologic processes in meromictic Lake Sakovo].

    PubMed

    Gorlenko, V M; Chebotarev, E N

    1981-01-01

    The freshwater meromictic lake Sakovo located in the Vologda Region was investigated. Its maximal depth is 16 m. The lake contained very high sulfate concentrations up to 816 mg/l; however, the rate of sulfate reduction in the water was low (not more than 16 mg H2S/l/day, whereas 4.5 mg of H2S was produced per day in the sediments. Bacterial sulfate reduction was shown to be limited by the deficiency of an organic substrate. Not more than 11 mg of H2S/l was contained in the nonmixing layers of the monimolimnion. The boundary line of the H2S zone was at a depth of 3.5-4.5 m and coincided with the thermocline and chemocline. The water in this region was green due to the growth of two species of green sulfur bacteria: Pelodictyon luteolum (the maximum of 7.35 x 10(6) cells in 1 ml) and Chlorobium limicola in the symbiotic complex of Chlorobium aggregatum (the maximum of 0.42 x 10(6) aggregates in 1 ml). Phototrophic bacterial cells synthesized 320 microgram of C per litre per day at a depth of 4.25 m. The assimilation of carbon dioxide in the dark in the zone of contact between H2S and O2 containing waters constituted 100 mg of C per litre per day, and apparently was due to the chemosynthesis of thiobacteria (the maximum of 1000 cells in 1 ml). It has been calculated that 9 mg of H2S per 1 m2 per day is formed in the water, and 500 mg of H2S per 1 m2 per day is produced in the sediments. Green bacteria oxidize about 268 mg of H2S per 1 m2 per day while thiobacteria oxidize 250 mg of H2S pe2 1 m2 per day. Sulfur bacteria may be possibly supplied with supplied with sulfide by syntrophism with sulfate reducing and sulfur reducing bacteria as well as by diffusion of H2S from the sediments. PMID:6783819

  5. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary. PMID:18320431

  6. An integrative study of a meromictic lake ecosystem in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Federico M; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Yau, Sheree; Brown, Mark V; Ng, Charmaine; Wilkins, David; Raftery, Mark J; Gibson, John A E; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Lewis, Matthew; Hoffman, Jeffrey M; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2011-05-01

    In nature, the complexity and structure of microbial communities varies widely, ranging from a few species to thousands of species, and from highly structured to highly unstructured communities. Here, we describe the identity and functional capacity of microbial populations within distinct layers of a pristine, marine-derived, meromictic (stratified) lake (Ace Lake) in Antarctica. Nine million open reading frames were analyzed, representing microbial samples taken from six depths of the lake size fractionated on sequential 3.0, 0.8 and 0.1 μm filters, and including metaproteome data from matching 0.1 μm filters. We determine how the interactions of members of this highly structured and moderately complex community define the biogeochemical fluxes throughout the entire lake. Our view is that the health of this delicate ecosystem is dictated by the effects of the polar light cycle on the dominant role of green sulfur bacteria in primary production and nutrient cycling, and the influence of viruses/phage and phage resistance on the cooperation between members of the microbial community right throughout the lake. To test our assertions, and develop a framework applicable to other microbially driven ecosystems, we developed a mathematical model that describes how cooperation within a microbial system is impacted by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters on key populations of microorganisms. Our study reveals a mutualistic structure within the microbial community throughout the lake that has arisen as the result of mechanistic interactions between the physico-chemical parameters and the selection of individual members of the community. By exhaustively describing and modelling interactions in Ace Lake, we have developed an approach that may be applicable to learning how environmental perturbations affect the microbial dynamics in more complex aquatic systems. PMID:21124488

  7. Sources of carbon and sulfur nutrition for consumers in three meromictic lakes of New York State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Hayes, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The trophic importance of bacterioplankton as a source of carbon and sulfur nutrition for consumers in meromictic lakes was tested using stable carbon (delta 13C) and sulfur (delta 34S) isotopic measurements. Studies in three lakes near Syracuse, New York, showed that most consumers ultimately derive their C and S nutrition from a mixture of terrestrial detritus, phytoplankton, and littoral vegetation, rather than from bacterioplankton. Food webs in these meromictic lakes are thus similar to those in other lakes that lack dense populations of bacterioplankton.

  8. Protistan grazing in a meromictic freshwater lake with anoxic bottom water.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Andreas; Pachiadaki, Maria; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Phagotrophic protists are an important mortality factor of prokaryotes in most aquatic habitats. However, no study has assessed protistan grazing as loss factor of bacterial biomass across the stratification gradient of a temperate freshwater meromictic lake. Protistan grazing effect was quantified in the mixolimnion, the transition zone, and the sulfidic anoxic monimolimnion of Lake Alatsee (Germany). Grazing experiments were performed using prey analogues from the natural prokaryotic assemblage. Daily grazing effect declined from the mixolimnion to the monimolimnion. Heterotrophic flagellates were phagotrophically active in all three water horizons and the main grazers in the monimolimnion. Pigmented flagellates accounted for 70% of total grazing in the mixolimnion and ciliates only for a small fraction of grazing in each depth. Prokaryotic biomass removal peaked in the interface, but protistan impact on the respective prokaryotic abundance was low. Grazing in the anoxic monimolimnion was negligible, with prokaryotic turnover rate being only 0.4% of standing stock. Our results support the assumption that protistan predation in anoxic waters is lower than in oxygenated ones and identify the interface as a microhabitat that supports high grazer biomass, pinpointing the importance of purple sulfur bacteria as carbon source for the upper mixolimnion and the bottom monimolimnion. PMID:24256471

  9. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  10. Distribution and diversity of microbial communities in meromictic soda Lake Doroninskoe (Transbaikalia, Russia) during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyugina, Evgeniya; Belkova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    Meromictic soda and saline lakes are unique ecosystems characterized by the stability of physical, chemical and biological parameters, and they are distributed all over the world. Lakes located in regions with average annual negative air temperature are of particular interest because of the presence of two periods with intensive and dynamic processes: the so-called biological summer and the long ice season with the biological spring. Soda Lake Doroninskoe is located in Eastern Transbaikalia (51°14'N, 112°14'E) in the permafrost zone in an extreme continental climate, and is covered by ice for seven months per year. The structure and diversity of the microbial communities throughout the water column of the lake was studied by 16S rRNA gene amplicon metasequencing. Different species with specific functions were found to dominate at different depths. Metabolically flexible bacteria with a capacity to switch between anoxygenic photosynthesis and aerobic chemotrophic metabolism dominate in soda Lake Doroninskoe.

  11. Molecular organic tracers of biogeochemical processes in a saline meromictic lake (Ace Lake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, S.; Rijpstra, W. I. C.; Kok, M.; Hopmans, E. C.; Summons, R. E.; Volkman, J. K.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-05-01

    The chemical structures, distribution and stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in a sediment core taken in meromictic Ace Lake (Antarctica) were analyzed to trace past biogeochemical cycling. Biomarkers from methanogenic archaea, methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria were unambiguously assigned using organic geochemical understanding and by reference to what is known about the lake's present-day ecosystem. For instance, saturated and unsaturated 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane, archaeol and sn2-hydroxyarchaeol were derived from methanogenic archaea. Carotenoid analysis revealed chlorobactene and isorenieratene derived from the green-colored and brown-colored strains of the green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae); isotopic analyses showed that they were 13C-enriched. Phytenes appear to be derived from photoautotrophs that use the Calvin-Benson cycle, while phytane has a different source, possibly within the archaea. The most 13C-depleted compounds (ca. -55‰) identified were 4-methyl-5α-cholest-8(14)-en-3β-ol, identified using an authentic standard, and co-occurring 4-methylsteradienes: these originate from the aerobic methanotrophic bacterium Methylosphaera hansonii. Lipids of photoautotrophic origin, steranes and alkenones, are relatively depleted (ca. -28 to -36‰) whilst archaeal biomarkers are relatively enriched in 13C (ca. -17 to -25‰). The structural and carbon isotope details of sedimentary lipids thus revealed aspects of in situ biogeochemical processes such as methane generation and oxidation and phototrophic sulfide oxidation.

  12. Protistan diversity in a permanently stratified meromictic lake (Lake Alatsee, SW Germany).

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Andreas; Filker, Sabine; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Protists play a crucial role for ecosystem function(ing) and oxygen is one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, protistan diversity in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V9 region (18S rRNA gene) to provide a hitherto unique spatiotemporal analysis of protistan diversity along the oxygen gradient of a freshwater meromictic lake (Lake Alatsee, SW Germany). In the mixolimnion, the communities experienced most seasonal structural changes, with Stramenopiles dominating in autumn and Dinoflagellata in summer. The suboxic interface supported the highest diversity, but only 23 OTUs95% (mainly Euglenozoa, after quality check and removal of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with less than three sequences) were exclusively associated with this habitat. Eukaryotic communities in the anoxic monimolimnion showed the most stable seasonal pattern, with Chrysophyta and Bicosoecida being the dominant taxa. Our data pinpoint to the ecological role of the interface as a short-term 'meeting point' for protists, contributing to the coupling of the mixolimnion and the monimolimnion. Our analyses of divergent genetic diversity suggest a high degree of previously undescribed OTUs. Future research will have to reveal if this result actually points to a high number of undescribed species in such freshwater habitats. PMID:25330396

  13. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake with an unprecedented high sulfide content.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 10(7) cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  14. The sulfur cycle in a permanently meromictic haloalkaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkart, Holly C.; Simonsen, Brita; Peyton, Brent; Mormile, Melanie

    2006-08-01

    Soap Lake is a haloalkaline lake located in central Washington. This lake is a remnant of the Missoula flood events that created the landscape of western Montana, the southeastern portion of Washington state, and much of Oregon. It is 15,000 - 20,000 years old, and has maintained a stable meromixis for the last 10,000 years. This carbonate lake is characterized by a brackish mixolimnion, and a monimolimnion with a salinity of ~14%. The pH of both layers of the lake is approximately 10. Both layers also have a high concentration of dissolved sulfate, with the mineral mirabilite (Na IISO 4•10H IIO) found in the monimolimnion sediments. Sulfide concentrations in the monimolimnion exceed 100 mM. As part of the mission of the NSF Soap Lake Microbial Observatory, microorganisms involved in the sulfur cycle in this lake were studied in terms of their diversity and function. High rates of sulfate reduction were measured in both layers of the lake, with new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria seen in both areas. A particularly novel psychrophilic sulfur oxidizer was isolated from the monimolimnion. This organism has the ability to induce the formation of mirabilite, which was assumed to be an abiotically deposited evaporite mineral. This is the first evidence for a biogenic origin of this mineral. This leads to the possibility that related sulfate minerals, such as those reported on the Mars surface, may have a biogenic origin.

  15. Possible temperate lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; MacKenzie, Shannon; Wilson, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We analyze southern mid-latitude albedo-dark features on Titan observed by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). In exploring the nature of these features we consider their morphology, albedo, and specular reflectivity. We suggest that they represent candidates for potential temperate lakes. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes would indicate that surface liquid can accumulate and remain stable away from Titan's poles. Candidate lakes were identified by looking for possible shorelines with lacustrine morphology. Then, we applied an atmospheric correction that empirically solved for their surface albedo. Finally, we looked for a specular reflection of the sky in the identified candidates. Using this prescription, we find two candidates that remain as potential temperature lakes. If candidate features do represent temperate lakes on Titan, they have implications for formation mechanisms such as clouds and rainfall or, in low elevation areas, percolation and subsurface flow. Clouds were observed near candidate lake locations on the T66 flyby and this latitude band showed many clouds during southern summer. Our techniques can be applied to areas of Titan that lack RADAR coverage to search for mid- and low-latitude lakes in the future.

  16. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in a French meromictic lake (Lake Pavin): Who is responsible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, V.; Attard, E.; Birgel, D.; Schaeffer, P.; Jézéquel, D.; Lehours, A.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and its biogeochemical cycle is of primary significance to the global carbon cycle. The Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) has been estimated to be responsible for >90% of methane consumption. This biogeochemical process has been increasingly documented during the last two decades but the underlying microbial processes and their key agents remain incompletely understood. Freshwater lakes account for 2-10% of the total emissions of methane and are therefore an important part of the global methane cycle. Lake Pavin is a French meromictic crater lake with unusual hydrological characteristics: its morphology (depth >92m, mean diameter 750m) induce that waters below 60m are never mixed with overlying waters and remain permanently anoxic. The deep anoxic waters of Lake Pavin contain high concentrations (i.e. 4 mM) of methane but, contrary to other aquatic systems, almost no methane escapes from the lake. Previous biogeochemical and modeling studies suggest that methane is preferentially consumed within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (ca. 55-60 m depth) but that ca. 30% of methane oxidation occurs in the anoxic part of the lake. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) analyses showed that ANME generally involved in AOM (ANME-1, -2 and -3) are not present in Lake Pavin. Other archaeal groups that do not have any cultured representatives so far appear well represented in the anoxic parts of the lake but their implication in AOM is not demonstrated. The analysis of lipid biomarkers using GC-MS and LC-MS revealed the presence of a low diversity of archaeal-specific biomarkers in the superficial sediments and in the anoxic waters of the lake. Archaeol and caldarcheaol (GDGT-0) are the two main archaeal core lipids detected; other biomarkers generally present in ANME such as pentamethylicosane or hydroxyarchaeol are not present. However, the stable carbon isotopic composition of archaeol (δ13C = -18‰) and of the biphytane chain of GDGT-0 (δ13C

  17. Microbial Influences on Trace Metal Cycling in a Meromictic Lake, Fayetteville Green Lake, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A. L.; House, C.; Kump, L.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms can exist in aquatic environments at very high cell densities of up to 1011 cells/L, and can accumulate significant quantities of trace metals. Bacteria actively take up bioactive trace metals, including Fe, Zn, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Mo, which function as catalytic centers in metalloproteins and metal-activated enzymes involved in virtually all cellular functions. In addition, bacteria may catalyze the release of trace metals from inorganic substrates by processes such as the reduction of iron and manganese oxides, suggesting that trace metal distributions within a natural environment dominated by microbial processes may be controlled primarily by microbial ecology. Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), NY, is a permanently stratified meromictic lake that has a well-oxygenated surface water mass (mixolimnion) overlying a relatively stagnant, anoxic deep water mass (monimolimnion). A chemocline separates the water masses at around 20m depth, where oxygen concentrations decrease and sulfate and methane concentrations increase. In addition, previous studies have indicated that trace metals such as V, Cr, Co, Mn, and Fe reach elevated concentrations at the chemocline. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of FGL samples from depths of up to 40m with bacterial and archaeal probes, we have shown that fluctuating redox conditions within the FGL water column correlate with significant variations in the composition and distribution of microbial populations with depth. The mixolimnion is dominated by Eubacteria, with increasing concentrations of Archaea in the lower anoxic zone. Increases in microbial cell densities coincide with increases in trace metals at the chemocline, suggesting microbial activity may be responsible for trace metal release at this boundary. 16S rRNA PCR cloning techniques are currently being used to identify dominant microbial populations at various levels within the FGL water column. Future studies will focus on the potential for these

  18. Hydrogeochemistry of Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline meromictic desert lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Robinson, S.W.; Law, L.M.; Carothers, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    Big Soda Lake, located near Fallon, Nevada, occupies an explosion crater rimmed by basaltic debris; volcanic activity apparently ceased within the last 10,000 years. This lake has been selected for a detailed multidisciplinary study that will ultimately cover the organic and inorganic hydrogeochemistry of water and sediments because the time at which chemical stratification was initiated is known (~1920) and chemical analyses are available for a period of more than 100 years. Detailed chemical analyses of the waters show that the lake is at present alkaline (pH = 9.7), chemically stratified (meromictic) and is extremely anoxic (total reduced sulfur-410 mg/L as H2S) below a depth of about 35 m. The average concentrations (in mg/L) of Na, K, Mg, Ca, NH3, H2S, alkalinity (as HCO3), Cl, SO4, and dissolved organics (as C) in waters of the upper layer (depth 0 to 32 m) are 8,100, 320, 150, 5.0, < 0.1, < 0.5, 4,100, 7,100, 5,800, and 20 respectively; in the deeper layer (depth 37 to 64 m) they are 27,000, 1,200, 5.6, 0.8, 45, 410, 24,000, 27,500, 6,800, and 60, respectively. Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the waters, ??13C and ??14C values of dissolved total carbonate from this lake and surface and ground waters in the area together with mineral-water equilibrium computations indicate that the waters in the lake are primarily meteoric in origin with the present chemical composition resulting from the following geochemical processes: 1. (1) evaporation and exchange with atmosphere, the dominant processes, 2. (2) mineral-water interactions, including dissolution, precipitation and ion exchange, 3. (3) inflow and outflow of ground water and 4. (4) biological activity of macro- and microorganisms, including sulfate reduction in the water column of the deeper layer at a very high rate of 6.6 ??mol L-1 day-1. ?? 1984.

  19. Culturable diversity of aerobic halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae) from hypersaline, meromictic Transylvanian lakes.

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Cristea, Adorján; Muntean, Vasile; Teodosiu, Gabriela; Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Molnár, Imola; Alexe, Mircea; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-03-01

    Perennially stratified salt lakes situated in the Transylvanian Basin (Central Romania) were surveyed for the diversity of culturable halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae). The physical and chemical characteristics of the waters indicated that all the investigated lakes were meromictic and neutral hypersaline. Samples collected from upper, intermediate, and deeper water layers and sediments were used for the isolation of halophilic strains followed by 16S rRNA gene-based identification and phenotypic characterization. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all 191 isolates reported in this study and 43 strains previously isolated were affiliated with the family Halobacteriaceae and classified to 18 genera. Haloferax was the most frequently isolated genus (~47 %), followed by Halobacterium spp. (~12 %), and Halorubrum spp. (~11 %). Highest culturable diversity was detected in Brâncoveanu Lake, the oldest and saltiest of all studied lakes, while the opposite was observed in the most stable and least human-impacted Fără Fund Lake. One strain from Ursu Lake might possibly constitute a novel Halorubrum species as shown by phylogenetic analysis. Several haloarchaeal taxa recently described in Asian (i.e., Iran, China) saline systems were also identified as inhabiting the Transylvanian salt lakes thus expanding our knowledege on the geographic distribution of Halobacteriaceae. PMID:25680859

  20. Biogeochemistry of natural gases in three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Methane and associated light hydrocarbons are present as dissolved gases in the water columns of three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes: Big Soda Lake (Nevada), Mono Lake (California), and Soap Lake (Washington). Methane originates in the bottom sediments, but higher gaseous hydrocarbons (that is, gaseous hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight) have either microbial or thermal sources in the different lakes. Stable isotopic composition, hydrocarbon indices, radiocarbon dating, abundance-versus-depth profiles, and biological experiments indicate that methane is formed in the sediments by microbial processes. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction have much higher activity in the shallow littoral sediments than in the colder, more saline pelagic sediments of all three lakes. Methane-rich gas seeps are common in Mono Lake and emanate from a natural-gas deposit underlying the current lakebed. Seeps do not occur in either Big Soda Lake or Soap Lake. Ethane and higher alkanes are present in Big Soda Lake and Mono Lake, but are not present in significant quantities in Soap Lake. It is not clear if the presence of these higher alkanes is a consequence of biological activity, a result of mixing with thermogenic gases, or a combination of both factors. These results indicate the potential complexity and diversity encountered in studying light-hydrocarbon biogeochemistry in thermally and microbially active systems. Hence, in the case of methane, detailed multidisciplinary studies are often needed to determine its origin. For ethane and higher alkanes, there is currently a paucity of basic scientific information to allow for unequivocal identification of microbial and thermogenetic sources. 61 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Methanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Borges, A. V.; Roland, F. A. E.; Darchambeau, F.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2015-04-01

    biomass in the oxycline, suggest that methanotrophic bacteria could potentially sustain a significant fraction of the pelagic food web in the deep, meromictic Lake Kivu.

  2. Spatial and temporal distribution of archaeal diversity in meromictic, hypersaline Ocnei Lake (Transylvanian Basin, Romania).

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Andrei, Adrian Stefan; Muntean, Vasile; Keresztes, Zsolt Gyula; Păuşan, Manuela; Alexe, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Saline, meromictic lakes with significant depth are usually formed as a result of salt mining activity. Ocnei Lake is one of the largest Transylvanian (Central Romania) neutral, hypersaline lake of man-made origin. We aimed to survey the seasonal dynamics of archaeal diversity in the water column of Ocnei Lake by employing microbiological methods as well as molecular techniques based on the sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that archaeal diversity in the water column increased with depth and salinity, with 8 OTUs being detected in the epilimnion compared to 21 found in the chemocline, and 32 OTUs in the monimolimnion. Down to 3.5 m depth, the archaeal community was markedly dominated by the presence of an unclassified archaeon sharing 93% sequence identity to Halogeometricum spp. At the chemocline, the shift in archaeal community composition was associated with an increase in salinity, the main factor affecting the vertical distribution of archaeal assemblages. It appears that the microoxic and hypersaline monimolimnion is populated by several major haloarchaeal taxa, with minor fluctuations in their relative abundances throughout all seasons. The culturable diversity was reasonably correlated to the dominant OTUs obtained by molecular methods. Our results indicate that Ocnei Lake represents a relatively stable extreme habitat, accommodating a diverse and putatively novel archaeal community, as 30% of OTUs could not be classified at the genus level. PMID:24414798

  3. Quantitative analysis of biogeochemically controlled density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-11-01

    Lake stratification controls the cycling of dissolved matter within the water body. This is of particular interest in the case of meromictic lakes, where permanent density stratification of the deep water limits vertical transport, and a chemically different (reducing) milieu can be established. As a consequence, the geochemical setting and the mixing regime of a lake can stabilize each other mutually. We attempt a quantitative approach to the contribution of chemical reactions sustaining the density stratification. As an example, we chose the prominent case of iron meromixis in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from near-surface underground mining of lignite. From a data set covering 4 years of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed the changing of the chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we designed a lab experiment, in which we removed iron compounds and organic material from monimolimnetic waters by introducing air bubbles. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Eventually, the remaining solutes in the aerated water layer looked similar to mixolimnetic Waldsee water. Due to its reduced concentration of solutes, this water became less dense and remained floating on nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron-rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient for the formation of iron meromixis.

  4. Pyrosequencing analysis of the protist communities in a High Arctic meromictic lake: DNA preservation and change

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Comeau, André; Lovejoy, Connie

    2012-01-01

    High Arctic meromictic lakes are extreme environments characterized by cold temperatures, low nutrient inputs from their polar desert catchments and prolonged periods of low irradiance and darkness. These lakes are permanently stratified with an oxygenated freshwater layer (mixolimnion) overlying a saline, anoxic water column (monimolimnion). The physical and chemical properties of the deepest known lake of this type in the circumpolar Arctic, Lake A, on the far northern coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, have been studied over the last 15 years, but little is known about the lake’s biological communities. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to investigate the protist communities down the water column at three sampling times: under the ice at the end of winter in 2008, during an unusual period of warming and ice-out the same year, and again under the ice in mid-summer 2009. Sequences of many protist taxa occurred throughout the water column at all sampling times, including in the deep anoxic layer where growth is highly unlikely. Furthermore, there were sequences for taxonomic groups including diatoms and marine taxa, which have never been observed in Lake A by microscopic analysis. However, the sequences of other taxa such as ciliates, chrysophytes, Cercozoa, and Telonema varied with depth, between years and during the transition to ice-free conditions. These seasonally active taxa in the surface waters of the lake are thus sensitive to depth and change with time. DNA from these taxa is superimposed upon background DNA from multiple internal and external sources that is preserved in the deep, cold, largely anoxic water column. PMID:23267353

  5. Carotenoid biomarkers as an imperfect reflection of the anoxygenic phototrophic community in meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Macalady, J L; Fulton, J M; Kump, L R; Schaperdoth, I; Freeman, K H

    2011-07-01

    Organic biomarkers in marine sedimentary rocks hold important clues about the early history of Earth's surface environment. The chemical relicts of carotenoids from anoxygenic sulfur bacteria are of particular interest to geoscientists because of their potential to signal episodes of marine photic-zone euxinia such as those proposed for extended periods in the Proterozoic as well as brief intervals during the Phanerozoic. It is therefore critical to constrain the environmental and physiological factors that influence carotenoid production and preservation in modern environments. Here, we present the results of coupled pigment and nucleic acid clone library analyses from planktonic and benthic samples collected from a microbially dominated meromictic lake, Fayetteville Green Lake (New York). Purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) are abundant and diverse both in the water column at the chemocline and in benthic mats below oxygenated shallow waters, with different PSB species inhabiting the two environments. Okenone (from PSB) is an abundant carotenoid in both the chemocline waters and in benthic mats. Green sulfur bacteria and their primary pigment Bchl e are also represented in and below the chemocline. However, the water column and sediments are devoid of the green sulfur bacteria carotenoid isorenieratene. The unexpected absence of isorenieratene and apparent benthic production of okenone provide strong rationale for continued exploration of the microbial ecology of biomarker production in modern euxinic environments. PMID:21682840

  6. The geochemical cycling of trace elements in a biogenic meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Murray, J.W.; Paul, B.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical processes affecting the behavior and speciation of As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn in Hall Lake, Washington, USA, are assessed by examining dissolved and acid soluble particulate profiles of the elements and utilizing results from thermodynamic calculations. The water column of this meromictic lake is highly stratified and contains distinctive oxic, suboxic, and anoxic layers. Changes in the redox state of the water column with depth affect the distribution of all the elements studied. Most noticeable are increases in dissolved Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations across the oxic-suboxic boundary, increases in dissolved As, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, and V concentrations with depth in the anoxic layer, significant decreases in dissolved Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the anoxic region below the sulfide maximum, and large increases in acid soluble particulate concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn in the anoxic zone below the sulfide maximum. Thermodynamic calculations for the anoxic region indicate that all redox sensitive elements exist in their reduced forms, the primary dissolved forms of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn are metal sulfide solution complexes, and solid sulfide phases of Cu, Fe, Mo, and Pb are supersaturated. Calculations using a vertical diffusion and reaction model indicate that the oxidation rate constant for Mn(II) in Hall Lake is estimated to be 0.006 d-1 and is at the lower end of the range of microbial oxidation rates observed in other natural systems. The main geochemical processes influencing the distribution and speciation of trace elements in Hall Lake appear to be transformations of dissolved elements between their oxidation states (As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, V), cocycling of trace elements with Mn and Fe (As, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, Zn), formation of soluble metal sulfide complexes (Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), sorption (As, Co, Cr, Ni, V), and precipitation (Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Pb, Zn). ?? 1994.

  7. Strong influence of the littoral zone on sedimentary lipid biomarkers in a meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Bovee, R J; Pearson, A

    2014-11-01

    Planktonic sulfur bacteria growing in zones of photic zone euxinia (PZE) are important primary producers in stratified, sulfur-rich environments. The potential for export and burial of microbial biomass from anoxic photic zones remains relatively understudied, despite being of fundamental importance to interpreting the geologic record of bulk total organic carbon (TOC) and individual lipid biomarkers. Here we report the relative concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of lipid biomarkers from the water column and sediments of meromictic Mahoney Lake. The data show that organic matter in the central basin sediments is indistinguishable from material at the lake shoreline in both its lipid and carbon isotopic compositions. However, this material is not consistent with either the lipid profile or carbon isotope composition of biomass obtained directly from the region of PZE. Due to the strong density stratification and the intensive carbon and sulfur recycling pathways in the water column, there appears to be minimal direct export of the sulfur-oxidizing planktonic community to depth. The results instead suggest that basinal sediments are sourced via the littoral environment, a system that integrates an indigenous shoreline microbial community, the degraded remains of laterally rafted biomass from the PZE community, and detrital remains of terrigenous higher plants. Material from the lake margins appears to travel downslope, traverse the strong density gradient, and become deposited in the deep basin; its final composition may be largely heterotrophic in origin. This suggests an important role for clastic and/or authigenic minerals in aiding the burial of terrigenous and mat-derived organic matter in euxinic systems. Downslope or mineral-aided transport of anoxygenic, photoautotrophic microbial mats may have been a significant sedimentation process in early Earth history. PMID:25201322

  8. Vertical Distribution of Functional Potential and Active Microbial Communities in Meromictic Lake Kivu.

    PubMed

    İnceoğlu, Özgul; Llirós, Marc; Crowe, Sean A; García-Armisen, Tamara; Morana, Cedric; Darchambeau, François; Borges, Alberto V; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The microbial community composition in meromictic Lake Kivu, with one of the largest CH4 reservoirs, was studied using 16S rDNA and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pyrosequencing during the dry and rainy seasons. Highly abundant taxa were shared in a high percentage between bulk (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) bacterial communities, whereas a high proportion of rare species was detected only in either an active or bulk community, indicating the existence of a potentially active rare biosphere and the possible underestimation of diversity detected when using only one nucleic acid pool. Most taxa identified as generalists were abundant, and those identified as specialists were more likely to be rare in the bulk community. The overall number of environmental parameters that could explain the variation was higher for abundant taxa in comparison to rare taxa. Clustering analysis based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 0.03 cutoff) level revealed significant and systematic microbial community composition shifts with depth. In the oxic zone, Actinobacteria were found highly dominant in the bulk community but not in the metabolically active community. In the oxic-anoxic transition zone, highly abundant potentially active Nitrospira and Methylococcales were observed. The co-occurrence of potentially active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the anoxic zone may suggest the presence of an active yet cryptic sulfur cycle. PMID:25912922

  9. Thio-arsenic species in alkaline, hypersaline, meromictic Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollibaugh, J. T.; Carini, S.; Gürleyük, H.; Jellison, R.; Joye, S. B.; Lecleir, G.; Meile, C.; Vasquez, L.; Wallschläger, D.

    2004-12-01

    Mono Lake had been meromictic for 8 years when sampled (Feb-Nov, 2002). Arsenic speciation was determined by IC-ASRS-ICP-MS of samples preserved in the field by flash-freezing in liquid nitrogen. Arsenic speciation was dominated by arsenate when oxygen was detectable, but shifted to dominance by reduced species once oxygen was no longer detectable. Thio-arsenic species were the dominant form of As found in sulfidic waters. Maxima of thio-arsenic species with stoichiometries consistent with mono-, di- and tri-thio-arsenic occurred in succession as sulfide concentration increased. A compound with a stoichiometry consistent with tri-thio-arsenic was the dominant As species (>50% of total As) in high sulfide (>2 mM) bottom water. Comparison of the data with a simple equilibrium model suggested that the distributions do not represent simple chemical equilibria driven by sulfide concentration. Lower concentrations of total As in bottom water relative to surface water suggest precipitation of As/S mineral phases in response to sulfide accumulation during prolonged anoxia.

  10. Bacterial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate and sulfate in meromictic Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Dowdle, P.R.; Hoeft, S.; Sharp, J.O.; Schaefer, J.K.; Miller, L.G.; Switzer, Blum J.; Smith, R.L.; Bloom, N.S.; Wallschlaeger, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stratified (meromictic) water column of alkaline and hypersaline Mono Lake, California, contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic (~200 ??mol/L). Arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As (V)] to arsenite [As (III)] with the transition from oxic surface waters (misolimnion) to anoxic bottom waters (monimolimnion). A radioassay was devised to measure the reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) and tested using cell suspensions of the As (V)-respiring Bacillus selenitireducens, which completely reduced the 73As (V). In field experiments, no significant activity was noted in the aerobic mixolimnion waters, but reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) was observed in all the monimolimnion samples. Rate constants ranged from 0.02 to 0.3/day, with the highest values in the samples from the deepest depths (24 and 28 m). The highest activities occurred between 18 and 21 m, where As (V) abundant (rate, ~5.9 ??mol/L per day). In contrast, sulfate reduction occurred at depths below 21 m, with the highest rates attained at 28 m (rate, ~2.3 ??mol/L per day). These results indicate that As (V) ranks second in importance, after sulfate, as an electron acceptor for anaerobic bacterial respiration in the water column. Annual arsenate respiration may mineralize as much as 14.2% of the pelagic photosynthetic carbon fixed during meromixis. When combined with sulfate-reduction data, anaerobic respiration in the water column can mineralize 32-55% of this primary production. As lakes of this type approach salt saturation, As (V) can become the most important electron acceptor for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Xavier A.; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  12. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Walter, Xavier A; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns in the microbial diversity of a meromictic soda lake in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu, Pedro A; Pinkart, Holly C; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R

    2008-08-01

    The microbial community diversity and composition of meromictic Soap Lake were studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The water column and sediments were sampled monthly for a year. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed an increase in diversity with depth for both groups. Late-summer samples harbored the highest prokaryotic diversity, and the bacteria exhibited less seasonal variability than the archaea. Most-probable-number assays targeting anaerobic microbial guilds were performed to compare summer and fall samples. In both seasons, the anoxic samples appeared to be dominated by lactate-oxidizing sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. High numbers of lactate- and acetate-oxidizing iron-reducing bacteria, as well as fermentative microorganisms, were also found, whereas the numbers of methanogens were low or methanogens were undetectable. The bacterial community composition of summer and fall samples was also assessed by constructing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. A total of 508 sequences represented an estimated >1,100 unique operational taxonomic units, most of which were from the monimolimnion, and the summer samples were more diverse than the fall samples (Chao1 = 530 and Chao1 = 295, respectively). For both seasons, the mixolimnion sequences were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the chemocline and monimolimnion libraries were dominated by members of the low-G+C-content group, followed by the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group; the mixolimnion sediments contained sequences related to uncultured members of the Chloroflexi and the CFB group. Community overlap and phylogenetic analyses, however, not only demonstrated that there was a high degree of spatial turnover but also suggested that there was a degree of temporal variability due to differences in the members and structures of the communities. PMID:18552187

  14. Methanobacterium lacus sp. nov., isolated from the profundal sediment of a freshwater meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Borrel, Guillaume; Joblin, Keith; Guedon, Annie; Colombet, Jonathan; Tardy, Vincent; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Fonty, Gérard

    2012-07-01

    An autotrophic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, designated strain 17A1(T), was isolated from the profundal sediment of the meromictic Lake Pavin, France. The cells of the novel strain, which were non-motile, Gram-staining-negative rods that measured 2-15 µm in length and 0.2-0.4 µm in width, grew as filaments. Strain 17A1(T) grew in a mineral medium and its growth was stimulated by the addition of yeast extract, vitamins, acetate or rumen fluid. Penicillin, vancomycin and kanamycin reduced growth but did not completely inhibit it. Growth occurred at 14-41 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.0-8.5 (optimum pH 6.5) and with 0-0.4 M NaCl (optimum 0.1 M). The novel strain utilized H(2)/CO(2) and methanol/H(2) as substrates but not formate, acetate, methylamine/H(2), isobutanol or 2-propanol. Its genomic DNA G+C content was 37.0 mol%. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain 17A1(T) appeared to be a member of the genus Methanobacterium, with Methanobacterium beijingense 8-2(T) (96.3% sequence similarity) identified as the most closely related established species. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain 17A1(T) represents a novel species of methanogen within the genus Methanobacterium, for which the name Methanobacterium lacus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 17A1(T) (=DSM 24406(T)=JCM 17760(T)). PMID:21890730

  15. Vertical distribution of Archaea and Bacteria in a meromictic lake as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2012-01-01

    The prokaryotic cells distribution in the water column of the coastal saline meromictic Lake Faro (Messina, Italy) was investigated by microscopic counting techniques. Water samples were collected at a central station from the surface to the bottom, when waters were characterized by a marked stratification. A "red-water" layer, caused by a dense growth of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, was present at a depth of 15 m, defining a transition area between oxic (mixolimnion) and anoxic (monimolimnion) layers. Fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA oligonucleotide, group-specific probes were used to determine the abundance of Bacteria and Archaea, and their subgroups, Green Sulfur Bacteria (GSB), Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB), Cyanobacteria and Chromatium okenii, and Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, as key elements of the microbial community. Bacteria decreased from surface to bottom, while Archaea increased with depth and reached the maximum value at 30 m, where they outnumbered the Bacteria. Bacteria and picophytoplankton prevailed in the mixolimnion. At the chemocline high numbers of prokaryotic cells were present, mainly represented by Cyanobacteria, Chromatium okenii and Euryarchaeota. GSB, SRB, and Crenarchaeota prevailed below the chemocline. Although Archaea constitute a minor fraction of microbial community, they could represent active contributors to the meromictic Lake Faro ecosystem. PMID:22006072

  16. Carbon dynamics in eutrophic, temperate lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, B.; Sondergaard

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers dealing with pools, pathways, fluxes and transformation of organic matter in the pelagic zone of eutrophic, temperate lakes. It is a direct result of the work of a research group during the period 1981-85, whose aim was to summarize current understanding and specify gas in pelagic carbon metabolism.

  17. Nitrogen cycling and N2O production in the water column of the ferruginous meromictic Lake La Cruz (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischer, Jana; Zopfi, Jakob; Frame, Caitlin H.; Jegge, Corinne; Kirsten, Oswald; Andreas, Brand; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2016-04-01

    Ferruginous meromictic lakes are rare systems, considered potential modern analogues for an ancient Archean ferruginous Ocean. They may therefore represent valuable model ecosystems to study biogeochemical processes of early Earth history, in particular, the interaction between the iron (Fe) and other element cycles such as the complex nitrogen (N) cycle. In context of its exceptional water chemistry, we studied the N-cycling in the meromictic, ferruginous Lake La Cruz in the Central Iberian Ranges in Spain, combining i) general water column chemistry and detailed N speciation ii) stable isotope composition and intramolecular 15N distributions (site preference) of dissolved N2O and iii) 15N-isotope label incubation experiments, to identify and quantify biotic and abiotic N2O and N2 production pathways. Nitrification was identified as the main N2O production mechanism in the oxic zone, based on the N2O concentration profile and the isomeric composition of N2O (site preference = 24.7) at the depth of maximum concentration relative to the surface water. A second N2O peak of 23 nmol/L was observed within the chemocline, and relatively low values for the δ15N-N2O (-1.1) and a site preference of 16.1‰ with respect to the oxic water column suggest that here incomplete (nitrifier) denitrification is the dominant N2O production pathway. However, based on the bulk dual N-versus-O isotope signature, other production mechanisms cannot be excluded at this point. Within the anoxic water column, N2O is consumed quantitiatively to N2, consistent with 15N-NO3‑ incubation experiments, showing denitrification (and anammox) activity below the redox transition zone. The overlap of Fe and N-species (N2O, NO2‑) in the water column is small, therefore abiotic N2O production is most likely negligible. The planned analysis of the NO3‑ and NH4+ isotopic signatures will provide further insight into the origin of N2O. Additionally, molecular biological analyses will provide

  18. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline, meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution and isotopic composition (??13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake (depth = 64 m), an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion (depth = 20-35 m), reached uniform concentrations (55 ??M/l) in the monimolimnion (35-64 m) and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments (>400 ??M/kg below 1 m sub-bottom depth). The ??13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth (<-70 per mil) increased with vertical distance up the core (??13C[CH4] = -55 per mil at sediment surface). Monimolimnion ??13C[CH4] values (-55 to -61 per mil) were greater than most ??13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion (92% of samples had ??13C[CH4] values between -20 and -48 per mil). No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50-60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8] were high (250-620) in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased to ~161 in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment to values as high as 1736. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in ??13C[CH4] and CH4 (C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sediments are probably caused by bacteria] processes. These might include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis and C2 to C4 alkane production by microorganisms. ?? 1983.

  19. A Combined Molecular and Isotopic Study of Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Meromictic Lakes of the Northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. H., IV; Gilhooly, W., III; Crane, E. J., III; Steinman, B.; Shelton, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionations within the chemocline can be an indication of green and purple sulfur photosynthetic activity. This isotopic signal is, however, small and variable, on the order of +2-6‰ (Zerkle et al. 2009). It is therefore advantageous to investigate the environmental and ecological effects on this signal so that these influences can be taken into account when estimating the contribution of anoxygenic phototrophs to the sulfur cycle in aquatic environments. This project aims to investigate the ways in which anoxygenic phototroph community structure and lake water geochemistry impact the sulfur isotope fractionation expressed during anoxygenic photosynthesis in meromictic lakes. During the summer of 2013, water column profile analysis of six lakes in the Pacific Northwest (located in eastern Washington and western Montana) were conducted to assess photosynthetically available radiation, salinity, pH, temperature, dissolved solids, and specific conductivity. Water column samples were obtained to determine the sulfur isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate and sulfide, major ion and sulfide concentrations. Microbial samples were also collected for genetic sequencing. Initial results found green (e.g., Chlorobiaceae sp.) and purple (e.g., Lamprocystis purpurea) bacteria at the same depth in one of the study lakes. These data, in addition to the same suite of samples collected in the summer of 2014, provide insight into relationships between the isotopic composition of sulfur (in H2S, S0, and SO4), lake water chemistry, and the presence or absence of green and purple sulfur bacteria.

  20. Morphological, phylogenetic and physiological studies of pico-cyanobacteria isolated from the halocline of a saline meromictic lake, Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Kaori; Yamada, Kazumasa; Kamiya, Mitsunobu; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Small cyanobacteria (<2 µm, pico-cyanobacteria) are abundant in waters deeper than the oxic-anoxic zone in the halocline of a saline meromictic lake, Lake Suigetsu, Fukui, Japan. We have isolated 101 strains that were grouped into six groups by means of the phycobiliprotein composition and sequence homology of the intergenic spacer between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. Significant growth was observed under weak green light (1.5 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹, approx. 460 to 600 nm), whereas the cells died under white light at even moderate intensities. The isolates grew in a wide range of salinities (0.2 to 3.2%). Tolerance to sulfide varied: four groups grew in medium containing sulfide, however, two groups did not. None of the isolates were capable of anoxygenic photosynthetic (PS-II independent photosynthetic) growth using sulfide as an electron donor. All groups were included within fresh and brackish water of Synechococcus/Cyanobium clade, but they were not monophyletic in the 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic tree. The physiological properties of pico-cyanobacteria showed that they had the ability to survive in unique physicochemical environments in the halocline of this saline meromictic lake. PMID:22791050

  1. Forecasting cyanobacteria dominance in Canadian temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Anurani D; Paterson, Andrew M; Dillon, Peter J; Winter, Jennifer G; Palmer, Michelle; Somers, Keith M

    2015-03-15

    Predictive models based on broad scale, spatial surveys typically identify nutrients and climate as the most important predictors of cyanobacteria abundance; however these models generally have low predictive power because at smaller geographic scales numerous other factors may be equally or more important. At the lake level, for example, the ability to forecast cyanobacteria dominance is of tremendous value to lake managers as they can use such models to communicate exposure risks associated with recreational and drinking water use, and possible exposure to algal toxins, in advance of bloom occurrence. We used detailed algal, limnological and meteorological data from two temperate lakes in south-central Ontario, Canada to determine the factors that are closely linked to cyanobacteria dominance, and to develop easy to use models to forecast cyanobacteria biovolume. For Brandy Lake (BL), the strongest and most parsimonious model for forecasting % cyanobacteria biovolume (% CB) included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP, and % cyanobacteria biovolume two weeks prior. For Three Mile Lake (TML), the best model for forecasting % CB included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP concentration, and 7-d mean wind speed. The models for forecasting % CB in BL and TML are fundamentally different in their lag periods (BL = lag 1 model and TML = lag 2 model) and in some predictor variables despite the close proximity of the study lakes. We speculate that three main factors (nutrient concentrations, water transparency and lake morphometry) may have contributed to differences in the models developed, and may account for variation observed in models derived from large spatial surveys. Our results illustrate that while forecast models can be developed to determine when cyanobacteria will dominate within two temperate lakes, the models require detailed, lake-specific calibration to be effective as risk-management tools. PMID:25585147

  2. Methanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Borges, A. V.; Roland, F. A. E.; Darchambeau, F.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-11-01

    The permanently stratified Lake Kivu is one of the largest freshwater reservoirs of dissolved methane (CH4) on Earth. Yet CH4 emissions from its surface to the atmosphere has been estimated to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the CH4 upward flux to the mixed layer, showing that microbial CH4 oxidation is an important process within the water column. A combination of natural abundance carbon stable isotope analysis (δ13C) of several inorganic and organic carbon pools and 13CH4-labelling experiments was carried out during rainy and dry season to quantify (i) the contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the biomass, (ii) methanotrophic bacterial production (MBP), and (iii) methanotrophic bacterial growth efficiency (MBGE), defined as the ratio between MBP and gross CH4 oxidation. We also investigated the distribution and the δ13C of specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), used as biomarkers for aerobic methanotrophs. Data revealed that methanotrophic organisms oxidized within the water column most of the upward flux of CH4 to the mixed layer and a significant amount of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the microbial biomass in the oxycline. Maximal MBP rates were measured in the oxycline, suggesting that CH4 oxidation was mainly driven by oxic processes. The MBGE was variable (2-50%) and negatively related to CH4 : O2 molar ratios. Thus, a comparatively smaller fraction of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the cellular biomass in deeper waters, at the bottom of the oxycline where oxygen was scarce. The aerobic methanotrophic community was clearly dominated by type I methanotrophs and no evidence was found for an active involvement of type II methanotrophs in CH4 oxidation in Lake Kivu. Vertically integrated over the water column, the MBP was equivalent to 16-58% of the average phytoplankton primary production. This relatively high magnitude of MBP, and the substantial contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the overall biomass in the oxycline, suggest

  3. Diversity and Dynamics of Active Small Microbial Eukaryotes in the Anoxic Zone of a Freshwater Meromictic Lake (Pavin, France)

    PubMed Central

    Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Hugoni, Mylène; Vellet, Agnès; Debroas, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Microbial eukaryotes play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning and oxygen is considered to be one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, diversity of microbial eukaryotes in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients has previously received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing (V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene) in conjunction with quantitative PCR (DNA and RNA) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, to provide an unique spatio-temporal analysis of microbial eukaryotes diversity and potential activity in a meromictic freshwater lake (lake Pavin). This study revealed a high genetic diversity of unicellular eukaryotes in the permanent anoxic zone of lake Pavin and allowed the discrimination of active vs. inactive components. Forty-two percent of the OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) are exclusively present in the monimolimnion, where Alveolata (Ciliophora and Dinophyceae) and Fungi (Dikarya and Chytrids) are the most active phyla and are probably represented by species capable of anaerobic metabolism. Pigmented eukaryotes (Haptophyceae and Chlorophyceae) are also present and active in this zone, which opens up questions regarding their metabolism. PMID:26904006

  4. Diversity of freshwater Epsilonproteobacteria and dark inorganic carbon fixation in the sulphidic redoxcline of a meromictic karstic lake.

    PubMed

    Noguerola, Imma; Picazo, Antonio; Llirós, Marc; Camacho, Antonio; Borrego, Carles M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfidic redoxclines are a suitable niche for the growth and activity of different chemo- and photolithotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microbial groups such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). We have investigated the diversity, abundance and contribution to inorganic carbon uptake of Epsilonproteobacteria in a meromictic basin of Lake Banyoles. CARD-FISH counts revealed that Epsilonproteobacteria were prevalent at the redoxcline in winter (maximum abundance of 2 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), ≈60% of total cells) but they were nearly absent in summer, when GSB bloomed. This seasonal trend was supported by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag datasets, which revealed that the epsilonproteobacterial community was mainly composed of a member of the genus Arcobacter. In situ incubations using NaH(14)CO3 and MAR-CARD-FISH observations showed that this population assimilated CO2 in the dark, likely being mainly responsible for the autotrophic activity at the redoxcline in winter. Clone libraries targeting the aclB gene provided additional evidence of the potential capacity of these epsilonproteobacteria to fix carbon via rTCA cycle. Our data reinforce the key role of Epsilonproteobacteria in linking carbon and sulphur cycles, extend their influence to freshwater karstic lakes and raise questions about the actual contribution of chemolithotrophy at their redoxcline and euxinic water compartments. PMID:26195601

  5. Metagenome sequencing of the prokaryotic microbiota of the hypersaline and meromictic soap lake, washington.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Soap Lake is a small saline lake in central eastern Washington that is sharply stratified into two layers. In addition to being highly alkaline (~pH 10), Soap Lake also contains high concentrations of sulfide. Here, we report the community profile of the prokaryotic microbiota associated with Soap Lake surface water. PMID:24459273

  6. Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov., a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate Isolated from the Meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takahiko; Kondo, Ryuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel facultative anaerobic bacterivorous nanoflagellate was isolated from the water just below the permanent oxic-anoxic interface of the meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan. We characterized the isolate using light and transmission electron microscopy and molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred from 18S rDNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to class Placididea (stramenopiles). The isolate showed key ultrastructural features of the Placididea, such as flagellar hairs with two unequal terminal filaments, microtubular root 2 changing in shape from an arced to an acute-angled shape, and a lack of an x-fiber in root 2. However, the isolate had a single helix in the flagellar transition region, which is a double helix in the two known placidid nanoflagellates Placidia cafeteriopsis and Wobblia lunata. Moreover, the isolate had different intracellular features compared with these two genera, such as the arrangement of basal bodies, the components of the flagellar apparatus, the number of mitochondria, and the absence (or presence) of paranuclear bodies. The 18S rDNA sequence was also phylogenetically distant from the clades of the known Placididae W. lunata and P. cafeteriopsis. Consequently, the newly isolated nanoflagellate was described as Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov. PMID:26202992

  7. Early diagenetic processes of saline meromictic Lake Kai-ike, southwest Japan: III. Sulfur speciation and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Oguri, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Kai-ike is a saline meromictic lake located along the coast of Kami-Koshiki Island. The lake is isolated from ocean by a gravel bar, through which seawater infiltrates by tidal pumping. The lake is permanently redox (density)-stratified with a mid-depth development of photic zone anoxia and a dense community of photosynthetic bacteria pinkish "bacterial plate". The early diagenesis of sulfur in sediments overlain by an anoxic water body was investigated using a sediment core (KAI4) from the lake. We determined abundance of various S-bearing species (i.e., Cr-reducible sulfide (= pyrite S: Spy), acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), sulfate sulfur (SSO4), elemental sulfur (S0), and organic sulfur) by an improved sequential extraction method. Here we focus on drastic and rapid changes on sulfur biogeochemistry found in the uppermost 5cm layer. With increasing depth, abundance of Spy increased but that of SSO4 and δ34S value of Spy (δ34Spy) decreased. These results suggest progressive formation of bacteriogenic pyrite. The δ34S values of SSO4 (δ34SSO4) ranged from 25.1 ‰ (at sediment surface) to 3.8 ‰ in the uppermost 5 cm layer. This δ34SSO4 decrease in the top 5 cm sediment suggests that SSO4 in the surface sediment inherits SO42- with elevated δ34S values (higher than typical seawater δ34S value of 21‰) in the water column, which is due to extensive bacterial sulfate reduction with preferential removal of low-δ34S sulfur as sulfide. In the lower part of the uppermost 5 cm layer, SO42- formed by oxidation of S0, AVS, and/or Spy with low-δ34S values by SO42--bearing seawater introduced by infiltration through the gravel bar. Increasing δ34Spy values with increasing depth suggest near complete consumption of SO42- by active bacterial sulfate reduction, and this process could be explained by Rayleigh distillation model. Early diagenesis of sulfur does occur in whole section of 25cm-long KAI4 core that accumulated for the last ~60 years (Yamaguchi et al

  8. Dynamics of the anoxygenic phototrophic community in meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake (NY) and the associated sedimentary pigment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Fulton, J. M.; Hunter, S.; Macalady, J. L.; Kump, L.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic pigments and their diagenetic products in marine sedimentary rocks hold important clues about recent and ancient variability in the Earth's surface environment. The chemical relicts of carotenoids from anoxygenic sulfur bacteria are of particular interest to geoscientists because of their potential to signal episodes of marine photic-zone euxinia such as those proposed for extended periods in the Proterozoic as well as brief intervals during the Phanerozoic. It is therefore critical to constrain the environmental and physiological factors that influence carotenoid production and preservation in modern environments. Our work in redox stratified, microbially dominated Fayetteville Green Lake (New York) has spanned the past decade and included seasonal (2005-2006) and monthly (2011) pigment monitoring in the water column, as well as a coupled pigment and nucleic acid clone library analyses from planktonic and benthic samples in 2006. Populations of photosynthetic bacteria in the water column are dynamic on monthly and annual scales. In 2011, purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and green sulfur bacteria (GSB) were most abundant in spring and fall, respectively, responding to environmental conditions. PSB are diverse both at the chemocline and in benthic mats below oxygenated shallow waters, with different PSB species inhabiting the two environments. Okenone (from PSB) is an abundant carotenoid in both the chemocline waters and in benthic mats. GSB and their primary pigment Bchl e are also represented in and below the chemocline. However, the water column and sediments contain only trace concentrations of the GSB carotenoid isorenieratene, with concentrations relative to Bchl e being at least two orders of magnitude lower than we have observed in other meromictic lakes. Sediments deposited over the past ~550 years also reveal decadal to centennial scale variability in pigment production in the water column, possibly associated with hypothesized climatic and

  9. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in the Microbial Diversity of a Meromictic Soda Lake in Washington State▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriu, Pedro A.; Pinkart, Holly C.; Peyton, Brent M.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2008-01-01

    The microbial community diversity and composition of meromictic Soap Lake were studied using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The water column and sediments were sampled monthly for a year. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed an increase in diversity with depth for both groups. Late-summer samples harbored the highest prokaryotic diversity, and the bacteria exhibited less seasonal variability than the archaea. Most-probable-number assays targeting anaerobic microbial guilds were performed to compare summer and fall samples. In both seasons, the anoxic samples appeared to be dominated by lactate-oxidizing sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. High numbers of lactate- and acetate-oxidizing iron-reducing bacteria, as well as fermentative microorganisms, were also found, whereas the numbers of methanogens were low or methanogens were undetectable. The bacterial community composition of summer and fall samples was also assessed by constructing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. A total of 508 sequences represented an estimated >1,100 unique operational taxonomic units, most of which were from the monimolimnion, and the summer samples were more diverse than the fall samples (Chao1 = 530 and Chao1 = 295, respectively). For both seasons, the mixolimnion sequences were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the chemocline and monimolimnion libraries were dominated by members of the low-G+C-content group, followed by the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group; the mixolimnion sediments contained sequences related to uncultured members of the Chloroflexi and the CFB group. Community overlap and phylogenetic analyses, however, not only demonstrated that there was a high degree of spatial turnover but also suggested that there was a degree of temporal variability due to differences in the members and structures of the communities. PMID:18552187

  10. Dynamics of the methane profile through the water column of meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake, N.Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, B. E.; Havig, J. R.; Sowers, T. A.; Hamilton, T. L.; McCormick, M.; Kump, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    Green Lake in Fayetteville, N.Y. is a meromictic lake with a chemocline approximately 21 meters below the surface where redox chemistry shifts from micro-aerobic to euxinic, and a purple- and green- sulfur bacterial plate is a predominant feature. Historic data, mirrored by our recent (November 2012) high-resolution sampling and analysis, document a monimolimnion methane concentration profile that increases nearly linearly with depth to the bottom sediments. Gas chromatography (GC) and Flame Ionization Detection (FID) analyses reveal concentrations exceeding20 μM CH4 at 30 cm depth in the sediments, lower concentrations ranging from ~5 μM CH4 at 44 m to 1.5 μM CH4 at 21.75 m in the water column, and decreased concentrations with an average of 0.12 μM CH4 from 21 m through the chemocline and the oxic zone, demonstrating a diffusive trend from sediments to the chemocline. However, our findings exhibit a departure from linearity from 21-30 meters in which methane concentrations were higher than expected if the sediments were the sole source of methane. We incubated biomass collected from 24 m (June 2013) to examine the source of this unexpected ';hump' in methane concentrations in the water column. To date, no methane production has been observed. Isotopic analysis for δ 13C in CH4 of seven water samples collected from depths above, below and in the methane ';hump' indicate that methane present in the water column is biogenic. Furthermore, the δ 13C values observed, approximately -100‰, indicate biologically- mediated cycling of methane. δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate input of oxidized methane. These findings suggest that two sources of methane with similar isotopic compositions exist, one diffusing from lake-bottom sediments and the other laterally injected from seeps at or near the chemocline, with consumption near the base of the chemocline. Coupled geochemical analyses show that sulfide and ammonia exhibit a similar concentration

  11. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  12. Tracking photosynthetic sulfide oxidation in a meromictic lake using sulfate δ34S and δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T. W.; Glass, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and fix carbon dioxide in the presence of sunlight without producing oxygen. Environmental conditions in the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, when atmospheric oxygen concentrations were at low levels and portions of the oceans were anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic), were conducive to widespread carbon fixation by anoxygenic photosynthesis. This pathway may have helped sustain euxinic conditions in the Proterozoic water column. With limited organic biomarker and geochemical evidence for widespread production of anoxygenic phototrophs, however, additional proxies are needed to fingerprint paleoecological and biogeochemical signals associated with photic zone euxinia. Paired δ34S and δ18O from ancient sulfates (gypsum, barite, or CAS) may offer an added constraint on the history and ecological dominance of photosynthetic S-oxidation. Sulfate-oxygen can fractionate during sulfate reduction, but the extent of isotopic enrichment is controlled either by kinetic isotope effects imparted during intracellular enzymatic steps or equilibrium oxygen exchange with ambient water. An improved understanding of these processes can be gained from modern natural environments. Mahoney Lake is a density-stratified lake located within the White Lake Basin of British Columbia. The euxinic water column supports a dense plate of purple sulfur bacteria (Amoebobacter purpureus) that thrives where free sulfide intercepts the photic zone at ~7 m water depth. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4), sulfide (δ34SH2S), and water (δ18OH2O) to track the potentially coupled processes of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and phototrophic sulfide oxidation within this meromictic lake. Large isotopic offsets observed between sulfate and sulfide within the monimolimnion (δ34SSO4-H2S = 51‰) and within pore waters along the oxic margin (δ34SSO4-H2S >50‰) are consistent with sulfate reduction in both the sediments and the anoxic

  13. Quantifying, assessing and removing the extreme gas load from meromictic Guadiana pit lake, Southwest Spain.

    PubMed

    Boehrer, Bertram; Yusta, Iñaki; Magin, Katrin; Sanchez-España, Javier

    2016-09-01

    High gas charges in deep waters of lakes can represent a hazard to the lives of human beings and animals in the surrounding. As this danger was feared, we quantified the amount of dissolved gas in Guadiana pit lake (Las Herrerías, Huelva; southwest Spain) and documented the temporal evolution over a period of two years. Gas pressure due to dissolved gases, such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen was measured. Based on these data, we assessed the risk and the associated danger of limnic eruptions from the lake and concluded that the present situation cannot be considered safe. By deploying a vertical pipe, the updraft of degassing water was tested and demonstrated: the pilot plant provided enough energy to drive a self-sustained flow. Such a system could be implemented to remove the extreme gas pressure from the deep water. Measurements of discharges could be extrapolated to indicate the size for an efficient plant for the gas removal. The construction of such a system would be technically and economically viable. A reintroduction of degassed water into the monimolimnion would be advisable. PMID:27151503

  14. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  15. Distribution of Dehalococcoidia in the Anaerobic Deep Water of a Remote Meromictic Crater Lake and Detection of Dehalococcoidia-Derived Reductive Dehalogenase Homologous Genes.

    PubMed

    Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Mege, Mickaël; Parisot, Nicolas; Adrian, Lorenz; Moné, Anne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Peyretaillade, Eric; Debroas, Didier; Boucher, Delphine; Peyret, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the natural occurrence of bacteria of the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH) and their diversity at different depths in anoxic waters of a remote meromictic lake (Lake Pavin) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Detected DEH are phylogenetically diverse and the majority of 16S rRNA sequences have less than 91% similarity to previously isolated DEH 16S rRNA sequences. To predict the metabolic potential of detected DEH subgroups and to assess if they encode genes to transform halogenated compounds, we enriched DEH-affiliated genomic DNA by using a specific-gene capture method and probes against DEH-derived 16S rRNA genes, reductive dehalogenase genes and known insertion sequences. Two reductive dehalogenase homologous sequences were identified from DEH-enriched genomic DNA, and marker genes in the direct vicinity confirm that gene fragments were derived from DEH. The low sequence similarity with known reductive dehalogenase genes suggests yet-unknown catabolic potential in the anoxic zone of Lake Pavin. PMID:26734727

  16. Distribution of Dehalococcoidia in the Anaerobic Deep Water of a Remote Meromictic Crater Lake and Detection of Dehalococcoidia-Derived Reductive Dehalogenase Homologous Genes

    PubMed Central

    Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Mege, Mickaël; Parisot, Nicolas; Adrian, Lorenz; Moné, Anne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Peyretaillade, Eric; Debroas, Didier; Boucher, Delphine; Peyret, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the natural occurrence of bacteria of the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH) and their diversity at different depths in anoxic waters of a remote meromictic lake (Lake Pavin) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Detected DEH are phylogenetically diverse and the majority of 16S rRNA sequences have less than 91% similarity to previously isolated DEH 16S rRNA sequences. To predict the metabolic potential of detected DEH subgroups and to assess if they encode genes to transform halogenated compounds, we enriched DEH-affiliated genomic DNA by using a specific-gene capture method and probes against DEH-derived 16S rRNA genes, reductive dehalogenase genes and known insertion sequences. Two reductive dehalogenase homologous sequences were identified from DEH-enriched genomic DNA, and marker genes in the direct vicinity confirm that gene fragments were derived from DEH. The low sequence similarity with known reductive dehalogenase genes suggests yet-unknown catabolic potential in the anoxic zone of Lake Pavin. PMID:26734727

  17. Biogeochemical processes involving dissolved CO2 and CH4 at Albano, Averno, and Monticchio meromictic volcanic lakes (Central-Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Vaselli, Orlando; Fiebig, Jens; Nocentini, Matteo; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Rouwet, Dmitri; Bicocchi, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the chemical and isotopic features of dissolved gases (CH4 and CO2) from four meromictic lakes hosted in volcanic systems of Central-Southern Italy: Lake Albano (Alban Hills), Lake Averno (Phlegrean Fields), and Monticchio Grande and Piccolo lakes (Mt. Vulture). Deep waters in these lakes are characterized by the presence of a significant reservoir of extra-atmospheric dissolved gases mainly consisting of CH4 and CO2. The δ13C-CH4 and δD-CH4 values of dissolved gas samples from the maximum depths of the investigated lakes (from -66.8 to -55.6 ‰ V-PDB and from -279 to -195 ‰ V-SMOW, respectively) suggest that CH4 is mainly produced by microbial activity. The δ13C-CO2 values of Lake Grande, Lake Piccolo, and Lake Albano (ranging from -5.8 to -0.4 ‰ V-PDB) indicate a significant CO2 contribution from sublacustrine vents originating from (1) mantle degassing and (2) thermometamorphic reactions involving limestone, i.e., the same CO2 source feeding the regional thermal and cold CO2-rich fluid emissions. In contrast, the relatively low δ13C-CO2 values (from -13.4 to -8.2 ‰ V-PDB) of Lake Averno indicate a prevalent organic CO2. Chemical and isotopic compositions of dissolved CO2 and CH4 at different depths are mainly depending on (1) CO2 inputs from external sources (hydrothermal and/or anthropogenic); (2) CO2-CH4 isotopic exchange; and (3) methanogenic and methanotrophic activity. In the epilimnion, vertical water mixing, free oxygen availability, and photosynthesis cause the dramatic decrease of both CO2 and CH4 concentrations. In the hypolimnion, where the δ13C-CO2 values progressively increase with depth and the δ13C-CH4 values show an opposite trend, biogenic CO2 production from CH4 using different electron donor species, such as sulfate, tend to counteract the methanogenesis process whose efficiency achieves its climax at the water-bottom sediment interface. Theoretical values, calculated on the basis of δ13C-CO2 values, and

  18. Seasonal changes in the chemistry and biology of a meromictic lake (Big Soda Lake, Nevada, U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Big Soda Lake is an alkaline, saline lake with a permanent chemocline at 34.5 m and a mixolimnion that undergoes seasonal changes in temperature structure. During the period of thermal stratification, from summer through fall, the epilimnion has low concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients (N, Si) and CH4, and low biomass of phytoplankton (chlorophyll a ca. 1 mgm -3). Dissolved oxygen disappears near the compensation depth for algal photosynthesis (ca. 20 m). Surface water is transparent so that light is present in the anoxic hypolimnion, and a dense plate of purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria (Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata) is present just below 20 m (Bchl a ca. 200 mgm-3). Concentrations of N H4+, Si, and CH4 are higher in the hypolimnion than in the epilimnion. As the mixolimnion becomes isothermal in winter, oxygen is mixed down to 28 m. Nutrients (NH4+, Si) and CH4 are released from the hypolimnion and mix to the surface, and a diatom bloom develops in the upper 20 m (chlorophyll a > 40 mgm-3). The deeper mixing of oxygen and enhanced light attenuation by phytoplankton uncouple the anoxic zone and photic zone, and the plate of photosynthetic bacteria disappears (Bchl a ca.10mgm-3). Hence, seasonal changes in temperature distribution and mixing create conditions such that the primary producer community is alternately dominated by phytoplankton and photosynthetic bacteria: the phytoplankton may be nutrient-limited during periods of stratification and the photosynthetic bacteria are light-limited during periods of mixing. ?? 1983 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  19. The jellification of north temperate lakes

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Adam; Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Yan, Norman D.; Paterson, Andrew M.; Palmer, Michelle E.; Korosi, Jennifer B.; Rusak, James A.; Arts, Michael T.; Keller, Wendel (Bill); Ingram, Ron; Cairns, Allegra; Smol, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) concentrations are decreasing in softwater lakes across eastern North America and western Europe. Using long-term contemporary and palaeo-environmental field data, we show that this is precipitating a dramatic change in Canadian lakes: the replacement of previously dominant pelagic herbivores (Ca-rich Daphnia species) by Holopedium glacialis, a jelly-clad, Ca-poor competitor. In some lakes, this transformation is being facilitated by increases in macro-invertebrate predation, both from native (Chaoborus spp.) and introduced (Bythotrephes longimanus) zooplanktivores, to which Holopedium, with its jelly coat, is relatively invulnerable. Greater representation by Holopedium within cladoceran zooplankton communities will reduce nutrient transfer through food webs, given their lower phosphorus content relative to daphniids, and greater absolute abundances may pose long-term problems to water users. The dominance of jelly-clad zooplankton will likely persist while lakewater Ca levels remain low. PMID:25411451

  20. Distribution and diversity of bacteria in a saline meromictic lake as determined by PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA gene fragments.

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Lentini, Valeria; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2011-01-01

    The variations in vertical distribution and composition of bacteria in the meromictic Lake Faro (Messina, Italy) were analysed by culture-independent methods in two different mixing conditions. Water samples were collected from a central station from the surface to the bottom (30 m depth) on two different sampling dates--the first characterised by a well-mixed water mass and the second by a marked stratification. A 'red-water' layer, caused by a dense growth of photosynthetic sulphur bacteria, was present at a depth of 25 m in December 2005 and at 15 m in August 2006, defining two different zones in terms of their physicochemical properties. The vertical distribution of bacterioplankton showed that the interface zones were more densely populated than others. In both sampling periods, the highest numbers of live cells were observed within 'red water' layers. The dominant phylotypes of the bacterial community were determined by sequencing the Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) bands resulting from PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments. The number of DGGE bands, considered indicative of the total species richness, did not vary predictably across the two different sampling periods. Proteobacteria (α-, γ-, δ- and ε subclass members), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, green sulphur bacteria and Cyanobacteria were retrieved from Lake Faro. Most of the bands showed DNA sequences that did not match with other previously described organisms, suggesting the presence of new indigenous bacterial phylotypes. PMID:20544199

  1. Distribution of bacterioplankton in meromictic Lake Saelenvannet, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified gene fragments coding for 16S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ovreås, L; Forney, L; Daae, F L; Torsvik, V

    1997-01-01

    The community structure of bacterioplankton in meromictic Lake Saelenvannet was examined by PCR amplification of the V3 region of 16S rRNA from microbial communities recovered from various depths in the water column. Two different primer sets were used, one for amplification of DNA from the domain Bacteria and another specific for DNA from the domain Archaea. Amplified DNA fragments were resolved by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the resulting profiles were reproducible and specific for the communities from different depths. Bacterial diversity estimated from the number and intensity of specific fragments in DGGE profiles decreased with depth. The reverse was true for the Archaea, with the diversity increasing with depth. Hybridization of DGGE profiles with oligonucleotide probes specific for phylogenetic groups of microorganisms showed the presence of both sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens throughout the water column, but they appeared to be most abundant below the chemocline. Several dominant fragments in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. Among the dominant populations were representatives related to Chlorobium phaeovibrioides, chloroplasts from eukaryotic algae, and unidentified Archaea. PMID:9292986

  2. The behavior of biologically important trace elements across the oxic/euxinic transition of meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, Jeff R.; McCormick, Michael L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Kump, Lee R.

    2015-09-01

    Trace elements are central components of enzymes that catalyze many of the essential reactions mediated by life. The redox sensitive nature of trace elements also permits their use as a record of ancient ocean conditions preserved in the geologic record. Trace element geochemistry in modern stratified systems is often used as a proxy for the redox state of the ancient oceans, which are thought to have been largely anoxic. In the present study, we examined trace element behavior of simultaneously collected samples at a heretofore unprecedented depth resolution (1-0.25 m intervals) throughout the redox-stratified water column of Fayetteville Green Lake, N.Y. (FGL), a 53 m deep meromictic lake under euxinic conditions similar to those thought to have been prevalent in Proterozoic oceans. Among characterized Proterozoic ocean analogs, FGL represents an understudied proxy in terms of trace elements, with characteristics of low salinity and high sulfate. In the FGL water column, spikes in the concentration of dissolved Mn, Fe and Co are coincident with the transition from oxic to euxinic conditions, and are associated with a decrease in dissolved Mo concentration. In contrast, the concentration of dissolved Ni did not vary across this transition despite the dramatic shift in redox state. From these data we present a one dimensional model for element transport and cycling through the water column to the sediments. Collectively, this comprehensive analysis of water column geochemistry provides insight into the effects of biogeochemical cycling in stratified systems on dissolved trace element concentrations in the water column. This study, in concert with characterization of other early Earth analogs, will greatly enhance the use of trace elements in interpreting the geologic record.

  3. Carbon and Sulfur Cycling below the Chemocline in a Meromictic Lake and the Identification of a Novel Taxonomic Lineage in the FCB Superphylum, Candidatus Aegiribacteria.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bovee, Roderick J; Sattin, Sarah R; Mohr, Wiebke; Gilhooly, William P; Lyons, Timothy W; Pearson, Ann; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Mahoney Lake in British Columbia is an extreme meromictic system with unusually high levels of sulfate and sulfide present in the water column. As is common in strongly stratified lakes, Mahoney Lake hosts a dense, sulfide-oxidizing phototrophic microbial community where light reaches the chemocline. Below this "plate," the euxinic hypolimnion is anoxic, eutrophic, saline, and rich in sulfide, polysulfides, elemental sulfur, and other sulfur intermediates. While much is known regarding microbial communities in sunlit portions of euxinic systems, the composition and genetic potential of organisms living at aphotic depths have rarely been studied. Metagenomic sequencing of samples from the hypolimnion and the underlying sediments of Mahoney Lake indicate that multiple taxa contribute to sulfate reduction below the chemocline and that the hypolimnion and sediments each support distinct populations of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that differ from the SRB populations observed in the chemocline. After assembling and binning the metagenomic datasets, we recovered near-complete genomes of dominant populations including two Deltaproteobacteria. One of the deltaproteobacterial genomes encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the sulfur-disproportionating genus Dissulfuribacter and the other encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the fatty acid- and aromatic acid-degrading genus Syntrophus. We also recovered two near-complete genomes of Firmicutes species. Analysis of concatenated ribosomal protein trees suggests these genomes are most closely related to extremely alkaliphilic genera Alkaliphilus and Dethiobacter. Our metagenomic data indicate that these Firmicutes contribute to carbon cycling below the chemocline. Lastly, we recovered a nearly complete genome from the sediment metagenome which represents a new genus within the FCB (Fibrobacteres, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes) superphylum. Consistent with the geochemical data, we found

  4. Powering up the ``biogeochemical engine'': The impact of exceptional ventilation of a deep meromictic lake on the lacustrine redox, nutrient, and methane balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Moritz; Simona, Marco; Wyss, Silvia; Blees, Jan; Frame, Caitlin; Niemann, Helge; Veronesi, Mauro; Zopfi, Jakob

    2015-08-01

    The Lake Lugano North Basin has been meromictic for several decades, with anoxic waters below 100m depth. Two consecutive cold winters in 2005 and 2006 induced exceptional deep mixing, leading to a transient oxygenation of the whole water column. With the ventilation of deep waters and the oxidation of large quantities of reduced solutes, the lake's total redox-balance turned positive, and the overall hypolimnetic oxygen demand of the lake strongly decreased. The disappearance of 150 t dissolved phosphorous (P) during the first ventilation in March 2005 is attributed to the scavenging of water-column-borne P by newly formed metal oxyhydroxides and the temporary transfer to the sediments. The fixed nitrogen (N) inventory was reduced by ~30% (~1000 t). The water-column turnover induced the nitratation of the previously NO3--free deep hypolimnion by oxidation of large amounts of legacy NH4+ and by mixing with NO3--rich subsurface water masses. Sediments with a strong denitrifying potential, but NO3--starved for decades, were brought in contact with NO3--replete waters, invigorating benthic denitrification and rapid fixed N loss from the lake in spite of the overall more oxygenated conditions. Similarly, a large microbial aerobic CH4 oxidation (MOx) potential in the hypolimnion was capitalized with the ventilation of the deep basin. Almost all CH4, which had been built up over more than 40 years (~2800 t), was removed from the water column within 30 days. However, boosted MOx could only partly explain the disappearance of the CH4. The dominant fraction (75%) of the CH4 evaded to the atmosphere, through storage flux upon exposure of anoxic CH4-rich water to the atmosphere. As of today, the North Basin seems far from homeostasis regarding its fixed N and CH4 budgets, and the deep basin's CH4 pool is recharging at a net production rate of ~66 t y-1. The size of impending CH4 outbursts will depend on the frequency and intensity of exceptional mixing events in the future.

  5. Carbon and Sulfur Cycling below the Chemocline in a Meromictic Lake and the Identification of a Novel Taxonomic Lineage in the FCB Superphylum, Candidatus Aegiribacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Bovee, Roderick J.; Sattin, Sarah R.; Mohr, Wiebke; Gilhooly, William P.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Pearson, Ann; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Mahoney Lake in British Columbia is an extreme meromictic system with unusually high levels of sulfate and sulfide present in the water column. As is common in strongly stratified lakes, Mahoney Lake hosts a dense, sulfide-oxidizing phototrophic microbial community where light reaches the chemocline. Below this “plate,” the euxinic hypolimnion is anoxic, eutrophic, saline, and rich in sulfide, polysulfides, elemental sulfur, and other sulfur intermediates. While much is known regarding microbial communities in sunlit portions of euxinic systems, the composition and genetic potential of organisms living at aphotic depths have rarely been studied. Metagenomic sequencing of samples from the hypolimnion and the underlying sediments of Mahoney Lake indicate that multiple taxa contribute to sulfate reduction below the chemocline and that the hypolimnion and sediments each support distinct populations of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that differ from the SRB populations observed in the chemocline. After assembling and binning the metagenomic datasets, we recovered near-complete genomes of dominant populations including two Deltaproteobacteria. One of the deltaproteobacterial genomes encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the sulfur-disproportionating genus Dissulfuribacter and the other encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the fatty acid- and aromatic acid-degrading genus Syntrophus. We also recovered two near-complete genomes of Firmicutes species. Analysis of concatenated ribosomal protein trees suggests these genomes are most closely related to extremely alkaliphilic genera Alkaliphilus and Dethiobacter. Our metagenomic data indicate that these Firmicutes contribute to carbon cycling below the chemocline. Lastly, we recovered a nearly complete genome from the sediment metagenome which represents a new genus within the FCB (Fibrobacteres, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes) superphylum. Consistent with the geochemical data, we

  6. [Microbiological and isotopic geochemical investigation of Lake Kislo-Sladkoe, a meromictic water body at the Kandalaksha Bay Shore (White Sea)].

    PubMed

    Savvichev, A S; Lunina, O N; Rusanov, I I; Zakharova, E E; Veslopolova, E F; Ivanov, M V

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological, biogeochemical, and isotopic geochemical investigation of Lake Kislo-Sladkoe (Polusolenoe in early publications) at the Kandalaksha Bay shore (White Sea) was carried out in September 2010. Lake Kislo-Sladkoe was formed in the mid-1900s out of a sea gulf due to a coastal heave. At the time of investigation, the surface layer was saturated with oxygen, while near-bottom water contained sulfide (up to 32 mg/L). Total number of microorganisms was high (12.3 x 10(6) cells/mL on average). Light CO2 fixation exhibited two pronounced peaks. In the oxic zone, the highest rates of photosynthesis were detected at 1.0 and 2.0 m. The second, more pronounced peak of light CO2 fixation was associated with activity of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the anoxic layer at the depth of 2.9 m (413 μg C L(-1) day(-1)). Green-colored green sulfur bacteria (GSB) predominated in the upper anoxic layer (2.7-2.9 m), their numbers being as high as 1.12 x 10(4) cells/mL, while brown-colored GSB predominated in the lower horizons. The rates of both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis peaked in the 2.9 m horizon (1690 μg S L(-1) day(-1) and 2.9 μL CH4 L(-1) day(-1)). The isotopic composition of dissolved methane from the near-bottom water layer (δ13C (CH4) = -87.76 per thousand) was significantly lighter than in the upper horizons (δ13C (CH4) = -77.95 per thousand). The most isotopically heavy methane (δ13C (CH4) = -72.61 per thousand) was retrieved from the depth of 2.9 m. The rate of methane oxidation peaked in the same horizon. As a result of these reactions, organic matter (OM) carbon of the 2.9 m horizon became lighter (-36.36 per thousand), while carbonate carbon became heavier (-7.56 per thousand). Thus, our results demonstrated that Lake Kislo-Sladkoe is a stratified meromictic lake with active microbial cycles of carbon and sulfur. Suspended matter in the water column was mostly of autochthonous origin. Anoxygenic photosynthesis coupled to utilization of

  7. Combining sedimentological, trace metal (Mn, Mo) and molecular evidence for reconstructing past water-column redox conditions: The example of meromictic Lake Cadagno (Swiss Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Stefanie B.; Gilli, Adrian; Niemann, Helge; Dahl, Tais W.; Ravasi, Damiana; Sax, Nadja; Hamann, Yvonne; Peduzzi, Raffaele; Peduzzi, Sandro; Tonolla, Mauro; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2013-11-01

    Here, we present sedimentological, trace metal, and molecular evidence for tracking bottom water redox-state conditions during the past 12,500 years in nowadays sulfidic and meromictic Lake Cadagno (Switzerland). A 10.5 m long sediment core from the lake covering the Holocene period was investigated for concentration variations of the trace metals Mn and Mo (XRF core scanning and ICP-MS measurements), and for the presence of anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria (carotenoid pigment analysis and 16S rDNA real time PCR). Our trace metal analysis documents an oxic-intermediate-sulfidic redox-transition period beginning shortly after the lake formation ˜12.5 kyr ago. The oxic period is characterized by low sedimentary Mn and Mo concentrations, as well as by the absence of any remnants of anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria. Enhanced accumulation/preservation of Mn (up to 5.6 wt%) in the sediments indicates an intermediate, Mn-enriched oxygenation state with fluctuating redox conditions during a ˜2300-year long transition interval between ˜12.1 and 9.8 kyr BP. We propose that the high Mn concentrations are the result of enhanced Mn2+ leaching from the sediments during reducing conditions and subsequent rapid precipitation of Mn-(oxyhydr)oxide minerals during episodic and short-term water-column mixing events mainly due to flood-induced underflows. At 9800 ± 130 cal yr BP, a rapid transition to fully sulfidic conditions is indicated by the marked enrichment of Mo in the sediments (up to 490 ppm), accompanied by an abrupt drop in Mn concentrations and the increase of molecular biomarkers that indicate the presence of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the water column. Persistently high Mo concentrations >80 ppm provide evidence that sulfidic conditions prevailed thereafter until modern times, without any lasting hypolimnetic ventilation and reoxygenation. Hence, Lake Cadagno with its persistently stable chemocline offers a framework to study in great

  8. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  9. Biodiversity of Chironomidae at the North Temperate Lakes LTER Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. B.; Olson, S.; Hayford, B.; Gresens, S. E.; Kennedy, J.; Bouchard, R. W.; Ferrington, L. C.

    2005-05-01

    The National Science Foundation has established a network of Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites to enhance research at large spatial scales, extended temporal scales, and to facilitate intersite comparisons of system structure and processes. Present knowledge of Chironomidae community structure at LTER sites is insufficient to accomplish these goals. Our project objectives are to determine species composition of Chironomidae in a wide variety of aquatic habitats at LTERs, describe all undescribed species/life stage associations, determine the temporal seasonality of emergence and develop a data base of species by habitat and emergence times. Our methods include light trapping and sweep netting for adults, dip-netting and hand-picking wood/aquatic vegetation for larvae, collecting surface-floating pupal exuviae, and rearing to associate life stages. Our initial focus on the North Temperate Lakes LTER in Wisconsin and has documented 80 genera (representing > 125 species, including 18 undescribed species and/or unknown life stages) from 11 lakes, 5 streams and 2 bogs. Taxa include species with larvae that are: epiphytic, endophytic, xylophagic, phoretic on mollusks or other aquatic insects, specialized to feed on freshwater sponges, predators of black fly pupae, and those occurring in hyporheic zones, marginal semi-aquatic habitats or terrestrial soils.

  10. A comprehensive sulfur and oxygen isotope study of sulfur cycling in a shallow, hyper-euxinic meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, William P.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2016-09-01

    Mahoney Lake is a permanently anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) lake that has a dense plate of purple sulfur bacteria positioned at mid-water depth (∼7 m) where free sulfide intercepts the photic zone. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4), sulfide (δ34SH2S), and the water (δ18OH2O) to track the potentially coupled processes of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and phototrophic sulfide oxidation within an aquatic environment with extremely high sulfide concentrations (>30 mM). Large isotopic offsets observed between sulfate and sulfide within the monimolimnion (δ34SSO4-H2S = 51‰) and within pore waters along the oxic margin (δ34SSO4-H2S > 50‰) are consistent with sulfate reduction in both the sediments and the anoxic water column. Given the high sulfide concentrations of the lake, sulfur disproportionation is likely inoperable or limited to a very narrow zone in the chemocline, and therefore the large instantaneous fractionations are best explained by the microbial process of sulfate reduction. Pyrite extracted from the sediments reflects the isotopic composition of water column sulfide, suggesting that pyrite buried in the euxinic depocenter of the lake formed in the water column. The offset between sulfate and dissolved sulfide decreases at the chemocline (δ34SSO4-H2S = 37‰), a trend possibly explained by elevated sulfate reduction rates and inconsistent with appreciable disproportionation within this interval. Water column sulfate exhibits a linear response in δ18OSO4-δ34SSO4 and the slope of this relationship suggests relatively high sulfate reduction rates that appear to respond to seasonal changes in the productivity of purple sulfur bacteria. Although photosynthetic activity within the microbial plate influences the δ18OSO4-δ34SSO4 relationship, the biosignature for photosynthetic sulfur bacteria is restricted to the oxic/anoxic transition zone and is apparently minor relative to the more prevalent process of

  11. Spectroscopic study of the microbial community in chemocline zones of relic meromictic lakes separating from the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Voronov, Dmitry A.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2015-03-01

    As a result of a recent years study on the Karelia shore of the White Sea more than ten relict lakes in different stages of separation from the sea have been discovered. Five of them are located close to the Nikolai Pertsov White Sea Biological Station of Moscow State University. Such separated lakes are interesting to explore for their firm vertical stratification. Water layers differ not only by temperature, salinity and other physic and chemical characteristics and optical properties, but also by ibhabiting microorganisms and by the quality of dissolved organic matter. To study phototropic organisms in water sampled from different depths we used spectroscopic techniques. Identification of the main bands in the absorption and fluorescence spectra showed that there are two main groups of photosynthetic organisms in the redox zone (chemocline): unicellular algae containing chlorophyll a and green sulfur bacteria with bacteriochlorophylls c, d, e. Spectral data were compared with physical and chemical characteristics of the water layer (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and sunlight illumination at certain depth). It gave an opportunity to compare vertical profiles of oxygen and hydrogen sulphide concentration with the number and distribution of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophic microorganisms. Maximum abundance of both algae and green sulfur bacteria were achieved within the redox zone. Typical thickness of the layer with the highest concentration of microorganisms did not exceed 10-20 cm.

  12. Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic, alkaliphilic, xylanolytic bacterium from a meromictic soda lake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Chen, Shulin

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, motile, slender, flexible rod, designated SC/BZ-SP2(T), was isolated from mixed alkaline water and sediment of Soap Lake, Washington State, USA. Strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) formed salmon to pink colonies and was alkaliphilic. The isolate grew at pH(35 °C) 7.5-10.5 (optimum pH(35 °C) 9.7), at 8-40 °C (optimum 35-37 °C) and with 0.35-1.38 M Na(+) (optimum 0.44-0.69 M Na(+)). The isolate utilized L-arabinose, D-ribose, D-xylose, D-fructose, D-mannose, D-galactose, cellobiose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose, sorbitol, xylan, malate and yeast extract as carbon and energy sources; best growth was observed with L-arabinose, cellobiose, maltose and trehalose. The major fermentation products from beechwood xylan were propionate and acetate. The dominant fatty acids were iso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH, C(17:0) 3-OH and C(15:0) 3-OH. The cell-wall sugars were ribose, xylose, galactose and glucose. Thiosulfate and sulfite could be reduced to sulfide. The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.5 ± 0.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) belonged to the family Marinilabiliaceae of the order Bacteroidales, class Bacteroidia. The most closely related strains were Alkaliflexus imshenetskii Z-7010(T) (91.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Marinilabilia salmonicolor Cy s1(T) (91.0%) and Anaerophaga thermohalophila Fru22(T) (90.4%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) represents a novel species in a new genus of the family Marinilabiliaceae, for which the name Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alkalitalea saponilacus is SC/BZ-SP2(T) (=ATCC BAA-2172(T) =DSM 24412(T)). PMID:22199219

  13. Exogenously produced CO2 doubles the CO2 efflux from three north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Buelo, Cal D.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Pace, Michael L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that lakes are typically sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, it remains unclear what portion of CO2 efflux is from endogenously processed organic carbon or from exogenously produced CO2 transported into lakes. We estimated high-frequency CO2 and O2 efflux from three north temperate lakes in summer to determine the proportion of the total CO2 efflux that was exogenously produced. Two of the lakes were amended with nutrients to experimentally enhance endogenous CO2 uptake. In the unfertilized lake, 50% of CO2 efflux was from exogenous sources and hydrology had a large influence on efflux. In the fertilized lakes, endogenous CO2 efflux was negative (into the lake) yet exogenous CO2 made the lakes net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Shifts in hydrologic regimes and nutrient loading have the potential to change whether small lakes act primarily as reactors or vents in the watershed.

  14. Climatic forcing of carbon-oxygen isotopic covariance in temperate-region marl lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. N.; Patterson, W. P.; Walker, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of lacustrine carbonate from a southeastern Michigan marl lake display linear covariance over a range of 4.0% Peedee belemnite (PDB) in oxygen and 3.9% (PDB) in carbon. Mechanisms of delta 13 C-delta 18 O coupling conventionally attributed to lake closure in arid-region basins are inapplicable to hydrologically open lake systems. Thus, an alternative explanation of isotopic covariance in temperate region dimictic marl lakes is required. We propose that isotopic covariance is a direct record of change in regional climate. In short-residence-time temperate-region lake basins, summer meteoric precipitation is enriched in 18O relative to winter values, and summer organic productivity enriches epilimnic dissolved inorganic carbon in 13C. Thus, climate change toward longer summers and/or shorter winters could result in greater proportions of warm-month meteoric precipitation, longer durations of warm-month productivity, and net long-term enrichment in carbonate 18O and 13C. Isotopic covariance observed in the Michigan marl lake cores is interpreted to reflect postglacial warming from 10 to 3 ka followed by cooler mean annual temperature, a shift toward greater proportions of seasonal summer precipitation, a shortening of the winter season, or some combination of these three factors.

  15. Linking host prokaryotic physiology to viral lifestyle dynamics in a temperate freshwater lake (Lake Pavin, France).

    PubMed

    Palesse, S; Colombet, J; Pradeep Ram, A S; Sime-Ngando, T

    2014-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, fluctuations in environmental conditions and prokaryotic host physiological states can strongly affect the dynamics of viral life strategies. The influence of prokaryote physiology and environmental factors on viral replication cycles (lytic and lysogeny) was investigated from April to September 2011 at three different strata (epi, meta, and hypolimnion) in the mixolimnion of deep volcanic temperate freshwater Lake Pavin (France). Overall, the euphotic region (epi and metalimnion) was more dynamic and showed significant variation in microbial standing stocks, prokaryotic physiological state, and viral life strategies compared to the aphotic hypolimnion which was stable within sampled months. The prokaryotic host physiology as inferred from the nucleic acid content of prokaryotic cells (high or low nucleic acid) was strongly regulated by the chlorophyll concentration. The predominance of the high nucleic acid (HNA) prokaryotes (cells) over low nucleic acid (LNA) prokaryotes (cells) in the spring (HNA/LNA = 1.2) and vice versa in the summer period (HNA/LNA = 0.4) suggest that the natural prokaryotic communities underwent major shifts in their physiological states during investigated time period. The increase in the percentage of inducible lysogenic prokaryotes in the summer period was associated with the switch in the dominance of LNA over HNA cells, which coincided with the periods of strong resource (nutrient) limitation. This supports the idea that lysogeny represents a maintenance strategy for viruses in unproductive or harsh nutrient/host conditions. A negative correlation of percentage of lysogenic prokaryotes with HNA cell abundance and chlorophyll suggest that lysogenic cycle is closely related to prokaryotic cells which are stressed or starved due to unavailability of resources for its growth and activity. Our results provide support to previous findings that changes in prokaryote physiology are critical for the promotion and

  16. Acceleration of cyanobacterial dominance in north temperate-subarctic lakes during the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Taranu, Zofia E; Gregory-Eaves, Irene; Leavitt, Peter R; Bunting, Lynda; Buchaca, Teresa; Catalan, Jordi; Domaizon, Isabelle; Guilizzoni, Piero; Lami, Andrea; McGowan, Suzanne; Moorhouse, Heather; Morabito, Giuseppe; Pick, Frances R; Stevenson, Mark A; Thompson, Patrick L; Vinebrooke, Rolf D

    2015-04-01

    Increases in atmospheric temperature and nutrients from land are thought to be promoting the expansion of harmful cyanobacteria in lakes worldwide, yet to date there has been no quantitative synthesis of long-term trends. To test whether cyanobacteria have increased in abundance over the past ~ 200 years and evaluate the relative influence of potential causal mechanisms, we synthesised 108 highly resolved sedimentary time series and 18 decadal-scale monitoring records from north temperate-subarctic lakes. We demonstrate that: (1) cyanobacteria have increased significantly since c. 1800 ce, (2) they have increased disproportionately relative to other phytoplankton, and (3) cyanobacteria increased more rapidly post c. 1945 ce. Variation among lakes in the rates of increase was explained best by nutrient concentration (phosphorus and nitrogen), and temperature was of secondary importance. Although cyanobacterial biomass has declined in some managed lakes with reduced nutrient influx, the larger spatio-temporal scale of sedimentary records show continued increases in cyanobacteria throughout the north temperate-subarctic regions. PMID:25728551

  17. Physical Controls on Carbon Flux from a Temperate Lake During Autumn Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czikowsky, M. J.; Miller, S. D.; Tedford, E. W.; MacIntyre, S.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonally-stratified temperate lakes are a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during autumn overturning as CO2 trapped below the thermocline becomes available to the surface for release to the atmosphere. We made continuous measurements of the vertical profile of pCO2 in a ~600 ha temperate lake (Lake Pleasant, maximum depth ~24 m) in southwestern Adirondack Park, New York from mid-September to mid-October 2010 from a moored pontoon boat. Continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of momentum, sensible and latent heat, and CO2 were made in situ, and the water column thermal structure was measured using thermistor chains. The spatial variability (horizontal and vertical) of pCO2 throughout the lake was characterized periodically using a roving profiling system. At the beginning of the study interval, pCO2 at the pontoon boat varied from 500 ppm at the surface to > 3000 ppm below the thermocline. The vertical profile of pCO2 changed markedly during the campaign due to the effects of wind forcing and evaporation (buoyancy), with nearly uniform, high pCO2 throughout the water column at the end of the campaign (Figure 1). The elevated surface water pCO2 increased CO2 emission to the atmosphere.

  18. Limnological consequences of climate change in Wisconsin lakes: the North Temperate Lakes Long Term Ecological Research Program (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, E. H.; Beversdorf, L.; Carpenter, S. R.; Hanson, P. C.; Hsieh, Y. F.; Hunt, R. J.; Kara, E.; Kamarainen, A. M.; Kucharik, C. J.; Lathrop, R. C.; McMahon, K. D.; Miller, T.; Walker, J. F.; Wu, C. H.

    2009-12-01

    The North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research Program aims to understand change in lake districts in relation to relevant abiotic, biotic, and human processes. Within this broad mission, investigating the limnological consequences of climate dynamics has been a major research theme for this 25-year project. Here, we report on effects of climate change on dominant regional biogeochemical cycles: carbon in the Northern Highlands Lake District (NHLD) of Northern Wisconsin, and phosphorus in the Yahara Lake district of Southern Wisconsin. Lakes play a significant role in regional C cycling in the NHLD and are net sources to the atmosphere, thus, climate changes that affect lake C dynamics may have important large-scale consequences. Simulation models used to explore scenarios of wet and dry future climates indicate that CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere had the greatest sensitivity to precipitation changes. A wetter climate scenario resulted in a 31% increase in CO2 efflux, reaching an areal rate roughly equal to terrestrial CO2 uptake. In southern Wisconsin lakes, P cycling has been a major research focus because of its role in controlling lake productivity, with excess P inputs commonly leading to eutrophication. In years with extreme precipitation events, runoff P loadings are massive resulting in a high P status for the lake and worse summer blue-green algal blooms. During prolonged droughts when runoff P loadings are low, P concentrations in the lake decline with fewer algal blooms. Climate dynamics also have a major effect on internal P processes via their effects on lake stratification. Duration and stability of summer stratification has increased over the past 50 years, and greater lake stability is correlated with lower epilimnetic P, but higher hypolimnetic P. On balance, this has led to increased water clarity (lower productivity), but may also increase the likelihood of summertime algal blooms through episodic delivery of hypolimnetic P to the

  19. Is the frequency of algal blooms increasing in oligotrophic lakes in temperate forests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltsev, A.; Creed, I. F.

    2014-12-01

    Oligotrophic lakes in the temperate forests of eastern North America appear to be experiencing an increase in the frequency and duration of algal blooms. This has been the focus of numerous public and government reports, resulting in heightened public concern for reporting of algal blooms. There is a vital need for detailed historical survey of numerous lakes, covering large spatial scales (the scale of region, province, or entire country) and temporal scales (decades) to determine if public observations are accurate. We used a remote sensing approach to: (1) develop regression models that relate Landsat imagery reflectance to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) as a proxy of algal biomass of lakes; (2) apply these models to estimate Chl-a in lakes at the northern edge of the temperate forest biome in central Ontario over a 28 year period (1984-2011). The linear regression model was built on the basis of the normalized exoatmospheric reflectance values acquired from the utility of Landsat TM and ETM imagery and in situ measurements. Landsat band 3 (red) showed the strongest correlation with in situ data explaining 84% of the variance in Chl-a (r2 = 0.84, p <0.001). We applied this model to all lakes within the region selected from atmospherically corrected Landsat data for the peak algal bloom period (late July to early November) for the entire 28 years. A time series revealed a cyclic stationary pattern in the average Chl-a. This pattern followed the regional patterns of major droughts, especially for the first part of the time period, making climate a major driver in the formation of algal biomass in lakes that, in turn, can lead to the rise of algal blooms. However this climate driver appeared to become less predictable, with elevated algal biomass occurring in both normal and drought years, later in the record.

  20. [Spatial Distribution of Stable Isotope from the Lakes in Typical Temperate Glacier Region].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-yi; Pu, Tao; He, Yuan-qing; Lu, Hao; Niu, He-wen; Xia, Dun-sheng

    2016-05-15

    We focused mainly on the spatial variation and influencing factors of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes between water samples collected at the surface and different depths in the Lashi Lake in August, 2014. Hydrological supply characteristics of the lake in typical temperate glacier region were discussed. The results showed that the values of δ¹⁸O and δD in the Lashi Lake ranged from -12.98 per thousand to -8.16 per thousand with the mean of -9.75 per thousand and from -99.42 per thousand to -73.78 per thousand with the mean of -82.23 per thousand, respectively. There was a reversed spatial variation between δ¹⁸O and d. Relatively low values of δ¹⁸O with high values of d were found at the edge of the lake where the rivers drained into. Meanwhile, the values of d in the vertical profile varied little with depth, suggesting that the waters mixed sufficiently in the vertical direction. The d values increased at first and then decreased from east to west at different layers, but both increase and decrease exhibited different velocities, which were related to the river distribution, the locality of the lake and environmental conditions etc. River water and atmospheric precipitation were the main recharge sources of the Lashi Lake, and the melt-water of snow and ice might also be the supply resource. The δ¹⁸O values of lake water in glacier region decreased along the elevation (except for Lashi Lake), generally, this phenomenon was called "altitude effect". Moreover, high isotopic values of the lake water from non-glacier region were due to the evaporation effect. PMID:27506020

  1. Patterns and multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton species richness in temperate peri-urban lakes.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Arnaud; Selma, Maloufi; Mouillot, David; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2016-07-15

    richness in temperate lakes. This approach may prove useful and cost-effective for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27054495

  2. Cross-tolerance between osmotic and freeze-thaw stress in microbial assemblages from temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sandra L; Frazer, Corey; Cumming, Brian F; Nuin, Paulo A S; Walker, Virginia K

    2012-11-01

    Osmotic stress can accompany increases in solute concentrations because of freezing or high-salt environments. Consequently, microorganisms from environments with a high-osmotic potential may exhibit cross-tolerance to freeze stress. To test this hypothesis, enrichments derived from the sediment and water of temperate lakes with a range of salt concentrations were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Surviving isolates were identified and metagenomes were sampled prior to and following selection. Enrichments from alkali lakes were typically the most freeze-thaw resistant with only 100-fold losses in cell viability, and those from freshwater lakes were most susceptible, with cell numbers reduced at least 100,000-fold. Metagenomic analysis suggested that selection reduced assemblage diversity more in freshwater samples than in those from saline lakes. Survivors included known psychro-, halo- and alkali-tolerant bacteria. Characterization of freeze-thaw-resistant isolates from brine and alkali lakes showed that few isolates had ice-associating activities such as antifreeze or ice nucleation properties. However, all brine- and alkali-derived isolates had high intracellular levels of osmolytes and/or appeared more likely to form biofilms. Conversely, these phenotypes were infrequent amongst the freshwater-derived isolates. These observations are consistent with microbial cross-tolerance between osmotic and freeze-thaw stresses. PMID:22551442

  3. Physical Controls on Carbon Flux from a Temperate Lake During Autumn Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Czikowsky, M. J.; MacIntyre, S.; Tedford, E. W.

    2013-12-01

    Seasonally-stratified temperate lakes are a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during autumn overturning as CO2 trapped below the thermocline becomes available to the surface for release to the atmosphere. Wind-only based parameterizations of the gas transfer coefficient do not explicitly capture buoyancy-induced mixing in the water column caused by heat loss to the atmosphere, and CO2 fluxes may therefore be underestimated during fall cooling. We made continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of momentum, sensible and latent heat, and CO2 over a ~600 ha temperate lake (Lake Pleasant, maximum depth ~24 m) in southwestern Adirondack Park, New York from mid-September to mid-October 2010 from a moored pontoon boat. Continuous measurements of the vertical profile of pCO2 in the water column were made in situ, water column thermal structure was measured using thermistor chains, and the spatial variability (horizontal and vertical) of pCO2 in the lake was characterized using a roving profiling system. At the beginning of the study interval, pCO2 varied from 500 ppm at the surface to > 3000 ppm below the thermocline. By the end of the campaign the vertical profile of pCO2 had changed markedly, with nearly uniform, high pCO2 throughout the water column (Figure 1). The elevated surface water pCO2 increased CO2 emission to the atmosphere. The measured gas exchange coefficient was considerably higher than wind-only parameterizations, particularly when buoyancy was an important source of turbulence at the air-water interface. Figure 1: Lake-atmosphere coupling measured from a pontoon boat moored on Lake Pleasant, NY from 16 September to 11 October, 2010: a) wind speed adjusted to 10 m height; b) surface water temperature at 10 cm depth (blue) and air temperature at 2 m height (green); and c) vertical profile of pCO2 (ppm). Cooling periods when the lake heat loss to the atmosphere was >50 W m-2 are indicated by the horizontal blue bar along the upper border of panel

  4. Linking planktonic biomass and metabolism to net gas fluxes in northern temperate lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, P.A. del; Cole, J.J.; Caraco, N.F.; Peters, R.H.

    1999-06-01

    Plankton communities in oligotrophic waters are characteristically dominated by the biomass of heterotrophs, including bacteria, micro-, and macrozooplankton. It has been generally assumed that these inverted biomass pyramids are the direct result of high specific production rates of phytoplankton and a tight coupling between producers and consumers. There are, however, at least two alternative hypotheses: (1) heterotrophic biomass turnover is much slower in oligotrophic than eutrophic systems; and (2) oligotrophic planktonic communities are significantly subsidized by allochthonous organic matter. In this study the authors assessed these hypotheses by establishing the relationship between plankton biomass structure, plankton function, and whole-lake gas (O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) fluxes in 20 temperate lakes that span a large range in primary production. The authors show that the balance of phytoplankton production and community respiration (P/R ratio) is always below unity in unproductive lakes where heterotrophic biomass (H) is high relative to autotrophic biomass (A), suggesting that these planktonic food webs function as heterotrophic systems and must be subsidized by allochthonous organic matter. Further, rates of phytoplankton specific production are not highest in communities characterized by dominance of heterotrophic biomass. All except the most productive lakes were supersaturated in CO{sub 2} and undersaturated in O{sub 2}.

  5. Contrasted effects of climate change on temperate large lakes oxygen-depletion (Lakes Geneva, Bourget, Annecy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Arnaud, Fabien; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Alric, Benjamin; Sabatier, Pierre; Perga, Marie-Elodie

    2013-04-01

    Among manifestations of the entry in a new geological era -The Anthropocene- marked by the fingerprinting of human activities in global ecology, the development of persistent zones of oxygen-depletion particularly threatens aquatic ecosystems. This results in a loss of fisheries, a loss of biodiversity, an alteration of food-webs and even, in extreme cases, mass mortality of fauna1. Whereas hypoxia -defined as dissolved oxygen ≤2 mg/l- has long been considered as a consequence of the sole eutrophication, recent studies showed it also depends on climate change. Despite basic processes of oxygen-depletion are well-known, till now no study evaluated the contrasted effects of climate changes on a long-term perspective. Here we show that climate change paced fluctuation of hypoxia in 3 large lakes (Lake Geneva, Lake Bourget and Lake Annecy) that were previously disturbed by unprecedented nutrient input. Our approach couples century-scale paleo-reconstruction of 1) hypoxia, 2) flood regime and 3) nutrient level, thanks to an exceptional 80 sediment core data collection taken in three large lakes (Geneva, Bourget, Annecy), and monitoring data. Our results show that volume of hypoxia can be annually estimated according to varve records through large lakes. Quantitative additive models were then used to identify and hierarchy environmental forcings on hypoxia. Flood regime and air temperatures hence appeared as significant forcing factors of hypolimnetic hypoxia. Noticeably, their effects are highly contrasted between lakes, depending on specific lake morphology and local hydrological regime. We hence show that greater is the lake specific river discharge the more is the control of winter mixing and the lower is the control of thermal stratification on oxygen depletion. Our study confirms that the perturbation of food web due to nutrient input led to a higher vulnerability of aquatic ecosystems to climate change. We further show specific hydrological regime play a crucial

  6. Evidence for the respiration of ancient terrestrial organic C in northern temperate lakes and streams

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, S. Leigh; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Northern rivers and lakes process large quantities of organic and inorganic carbon from the surrounding terrestrial ecosystems. These external carbon inputs fuel widespread CO2 supersaturation in continental waters, and the resulting CO2 emissions from lakes and rivers are now recognized as a globally significant loss of terrestrial production to the atmosphere. Whereas the magnitude of emissions has received much attention, the pathways of C delivery and processing that generate these emissions are still not well-understood. CO2 outgassing in aquatic systems has been unequivocally linked to microbial degradation and respiration of terrestrial organic carbon (OC), but the nature (i.e., age and source) of this OC respired in surface waters is largely unknown. We present direct radiocarbon measurements of OC respired by bacteria in freshwater aquatic systems, specifically temperate lakes and streams in Québec. Terrestrial OC fuels much of the respiration in these systems, and our results show that a significant fraction of the respired terrestrial OC is old (in the range of 1,000–3,000 y B.P.). Because the bulk OC pools in these lakes is relatively young, our results also suggest selective removal of an old but highly bioreactive terrestrial OC pool and its conversion to CO2 by bacteria. The respiration of ancient 14C-depleted terrestrial C in northern lakes and rivers provides a biological link between contemporary aquatic carbon biogeochemistry and paleo-conditions in the watershed, and it implies the aquatic-mediated return to the atmosphere of C putatively considered permanently stored, thus challenging current models of long-term C storage in terrestrial reservoirs. PMID:23027957

  7. Habitat selection and abundance of young-of-year smallmouth bass in north temperate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Peter James; Bozek, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat use during early life history plays an important role in the ecology of smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu in north temperate lakes. The highest levels of mortality occur during the first year of life, and the habitat selected probably affects mortality. We used resource selection functions and abundance data from two northern Wisconsin lakes to determine the habitats that influence the survival of smallmouth bass. Coarse substrates were consistently important to both nesting locations and young-of-year smallmouth bass. Young smallmouth bass used woody structure after swimming from their nests but disassociated themselves from habitats with more complex woody structure by August. Nonwoody cobble areas offer protection for young-of-year smallmouth bass without attracting predators, as woody habitats do. The decline in the abundance of young-of-year smallmouth bass was best fit to an exponential decay function in woody habitats, but in rock habitats it was linear. Habitat selection by young-of-year smallmouth bass shifts over time, and the shift is linked to predation risk: woody habitats initially offer them an advantage with respect to spawning but eventually provide their predators greater opportunities for ambush. This shift underscores the importance of having a diversity of littoral habitats. This study provides the first quantifiable analyses describing the habitat features selected by young-of-year smallmouth bass and links these descriptions to population dynamics.

  8. Dissolved organic carbon concentration controls benthic primary production: results from in situ chambers in north-temperate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, Sean C.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated several potential drivers of primary production by benthic algae (periphyton) in north-temperate lakes. We used continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from in situ benthic chambers to quantify primary production by periphyton at multiple depths across 11 lakes encompassing a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations. Light-use efficiency (primary production per unit incident light) was inversely related to average light availability (% of surface light) in 7 of the 11 study lakes, indicating that benthic algal assemblages exhibit photoadaptation, likely through physiological or compositional changes. DOC alone explained 86% of the variability in log-transformed whole-lake benthic production rates. TP was not an important driver of benthic production via its effects on nutrient and light availability. This result is contrary to studies in other systems, but may be common in relatively pristine north-temperate lakes. Our simple empirical model may allow for the prediction of whole-lake benthic primary production from easily obtained measurements of DOC concentration.

  9. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes located above the tree line attenuate UV-A radiation more strongly than typical temperate alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Ximena; Lazzaro, Xavier; Coronel, Jorge S

    2013-09-01

    Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are physically harsh ecosystems. Located above the treeline (≥4000 m a.s.l.), they share common features with temperate alpine lakes, which impose extreme conditions on their aquatic organisms: e.g., strong winds, broad diel variations in water temperature, and intense solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, because of their latitude, they differ in two major ecological characteristics: they lack ice cover during the winter and they do not present summer water column stratification. We sampled 26 tropical high-altitude Andean lakes from three regions of the Bolivian Eastern Andes Cordillera during the wet period (austral summer). We performed an ordination to better describe the typology of Andean lakes in relation to the environmental variables, and we assessed the relationships among them, focussing on the UV-A transparency (360 nm) throughout the water column. We found a positive correlation between UV-A transparency calculated as Z(1%) (the depth which reaches 1% of the surface UV-A), the lake maximum depth and Secchi transparency (r = 0.61). Z(1%) of UV-A was smaller in shallow lakes than in deep lakes, indicating that shallow lakes are less transparent to UV-A than deep lakes. We hypothesize that, compared to shallow lakes, deep lakes (maximum depth > 10 m) may have lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (that absorb UV radiation) due to lower temperature and reduced macrophyte cover. Based on our data, tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are less transparent to UV-A (K(d) range = 1.4-11.0 m(-1); Z(1%) depth range = 0.4-3.2 m) than typical temperate alpine lakes (1-6 m(-1), 3-45 m, respectively). Moreover, they differ in vertical profiles of UV-A, chlorophyll-a, and temperature, suggesting that they may have a distinct ecological functioning. Such peculiarities justify treating tropical high-altitude Andean lakes as a separate category of alpine lakes. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes have been poorly

  10. Similarity scaling of turbulence in a temperate lake during fall cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedford, Edmund W.; MacIntyre, Sally; Miller, Scott D.; Czikowsky, Matthew J.

    2014-08-01

    Turbulence, quantified as the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ), was measured with 1400 temperature-gradient microstructure profiles obtained concurrently with time series measurements of temperature and current profiles, meteorology, and lake-atmosphere fluxes using eddy covariance in a 4 km2 temperate lake during fall cooling. Winds varied from near calm to 5 m s-1 but reached 10 m s-1 during three storm events. Near-surface values of ɛ were typically on the order of 10-8 to 10-7 m2 s-3 and reached 10-5 m2 s-3 during windy periods. Above a depth equal to |LMO|, the Monin-Obukhov length scale, turbulence was dominated by wind shear and dissipation followed neutral law of the wall scaling augmented by buoyancy flux during cooling. During cooling, ɛz = 0.56 u*w3/kz + 0.77 JB0 and during heating ɛz = 0.6 u*w3/kz, where u*w is the water friction velocity computed from wind shear stress, k is von Karman's constant, z is depth, and JB0 is surface buoyancy flux. Below a depth equal to |LMO| during cooling, dissipation was uniform with depth and controlled by buoyancy flux. Departures from similarity scaling enabled identification of additional processes that moderate near-surface turbulence including mixed layer deepening at the onset of cooling, high-frequency internal waves when the diurnal thermocline was adjacent to the air-water interface, and horizontal advection caused by differential cooling. The similarity scaling enables prediction of near-surface ɛ as required for estimating the gas transfer coefficient using the surface renewal model and for understanding controls on scalar transport.

  11. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and 13C content of north temperate and boreal lakes at spring ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Chanton, J.P.; Wickland, K.P.; Bugna, G.C.; Rantakari, M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulates under lake ice in winter and degasses to the atmosphere after ice melt. This large springtime CO2 pulse is not typically considered in surface-atmosphere flux estimates, because most field studies have not sampled through ice during late winter. Measured CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of lake surface water ranged from 8.6 to 4,290 Pa (85-4,230 ??atm) in 234 north temperate and boreal lakes prior to ice melt during 1998 and 1999. Only four lakes had surface pCO2 less than or equal to atmospheric pCO2, whereas 75% had pCO2 >5 times atmospheric. The ??13CDIC (DIC = ??CO2) of 142 of the lakes ranged from -26.28??? to +0.95.???. Lakes with the greatest pCO2 also had the lightest ??13CDIC, which indicates respiration as their primary CO2 source. Finnish lakes that received large amounts of dissolved organic carbon from surrounding peatlands had the greatest pCO2. Lakes set in noncarbonate till and bedrock in Minnesota and Wisconsin had the smallest pCO2 and the heaviest ??13CDIC, which indicates atmospheric and/or mineral sources of C for those lakes. Potential emissions for the period after ice melt were 2.36 ?? 1.44 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with average pCO2 values and were as large as 13.7 ?? 8.4 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with high pCO2 values.

  12. Fish and Phytoplankton Exhibit Contrasting Temporal Species Abundance Patterns in a Dynamic North Temperate Lake

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Carey, Cayelan C.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of “core” (common occurrence and high abundance) and “occasional” (rare occurrence and low abundance) species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions. PMID:25651399

  13. Fish and phytoplankton exhibit contrasting temporal species abundance patterns in a dynamic north temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Carey, Cayelan C

    2015-01-01

    Temporal patterns of species abundance, although less well-studied than spatial patterns, provide valuable insight to the processes governing community assembly. We compared temporal abundance distributions of two communities, phytoplankton and fish, in a north temperate lake. We used both 17 years of observed relative abundance data as well as resampled data from Monte Carlo simulations to account for the possible effects of non-detection of rare species. Similar to what has been found in other communities, phytoplankton and fish species that appeared more frequently were generally more abundant than rare species. However, neither community exhibited two distinct groups of "core" (common occurrence and high abundance) and "occasional" (rare occurrence and low abundance) species. Both observed and resampled data show that the phytoplankton community was dominated by occasional species appearing in only one year that exhibited large variation in their abundances, while the fish community was dominated by core species occurring in all 17 years at high abundances. We hypothesize that the life-history traits that enable phytoplankton to persist in highly dynamic environments may result in communities dominated by occasional species capable of reaching high abundances when conditions allow. Conversely, longer turnover times and broad environmental tolerances of fish may result in communities dominated by core species structured primarily by competitive interactions. PMID:25651399

  14. The influence of water quality variables on cyanobacterial blooms and phytoplankton community composition in a shallow temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tammy A; Rollwagen-Bollens, Gretchen; Bollens, Stephen M

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms and their detrimental effects on water quality have become a worldwide problem. Vancouver Lake, a tidally influenced shallow temperate freshwater lake in Washington state, U.S.A., exhibits annual summer cyanobacterial blooms that are of concern to local resource managers. Our objectives were to describe changes in phytoplankton community composition in Vancouver Lake over seasonal, annual, and interannual time scales, and to identify strong water quality predictors of phytoplankton community structure, with an emphasis on cyanobacterial blooms, from 2007 through 2010. Cluster analysis, indicator species analysis, and non-metric multidimensional scaling were used to identify significantly different phytoplankton community groupings and to determine which environmental factors influenced community changes. From 2007 through 2009, depletion of NO3-N followed by elevated PO4-P concentration was associated with increased biomass and duration of each cyanobacterial bloom. Time-lag analysis suggested that NO3-N availability contributed to interannual changes within the summer phytoplankton community. Specifically, in summer 2010, a distinct cyanobacteria community was not present, potentially due to increased NO3-N and decreased PO4-P and NH4-N availability. Our study provides a comprehensive assessment of species-level responses to water quality variables in a shallow non-stratifying temperate lake, contributes to a better understanding of phytoplankton dynamics, and may aid in predicting and managing cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:25937495

  15. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  16. Importance of the autumn overturn and anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion for the annual methane emissions from a temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Encinas Fernández, Jorge; Peeters, Frank; Hofmann, Hilmar

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the budget of dissolved methane measured in a small temperate lake over 1 year indicate that anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion and the autumn overturn period represent key factors for the overall annual methane emissions from lakes. During periods of stable stratification, large amounts of methane accumulate in anoxic deep waters. Approximately 46% of the stored methane was emitted during the autumn overturn, contributing ∼80% of the annual diffusive methane emissions to the atmosphere. After the overturn period, the entire water column was oxic, and only 1% of the original quantity of methane remained in the water column. Current estimates of global methane emissions assume that all of the stored methane is released, whereas several studies of individual lakes have suggested that a major fraction of the stored methane is oxidized during overturns. Our results provide evidence that not all of the stored methane is released to the atmosphere during the overturn period. However, the fraction of stored methane emitted to the atmosphere during overturn may be substantially larger and the fraction of stored methane oxidized may be smaller than in the previous studies suggesting high oxidation losses of methane. The development or change in the vertical extent and duration of the anoxic hypolimnion, which can represent the main source of annual methane emissions from small lakes, may be an important aspect to consider for impact assessments of climate warming on the methane emissions from lakes. PMID:24873684

  17. Potential methane emission from north-temperate lakes following ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michmerhuizen, C.M.; Striegl, R.G.; McDonald, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Methane, a radiatively active 'greenhouse' gas, is emitted from lakes to the atmosphere throughout the open-water season. However, annual lake CH4 emissions calculated solely from open-water measurements that exclude the time of spring ice melt may substantially underestimate the lake CH4 source strength. We estimated potential spring CH4 emission at the time of ice melt for 19 lakes in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Lakes ranged in area from 2.7 to 57,300 ha and varied in littoral zone sediment type. Regression analyses indicated that lake area explained 38% of the variance in potential CH4 emission for relatively undisturbed lakes; as lake area increases potential CH4 emission per unit area decreases. Inclusion of a second term accounting for the presence or absence of soft organic-rich littoral-zone sediments explained 83% of the variance in potential spring CH4 emission. Total estimated spring CH4 emission for 1993 for all Minnesota lakes north of 45?? with areas ???4 ha was 1.5 x 108 mol CH4 assuming a 1 : 1 ratio of soft littoral sediment to hard littoral sediment lakes. Emission estimates ranged from 5.3 x 107 tool assuming no lakes have soft organic-rich littoral sediments to 4.5 x 108 mol assuming all lakes have soft organic-rich littoral sediments. This spring CH4 pulse may make up as much as 40% of the CH4 annually emitted to the atmosphere by small lakes.

  18. Simulating 2,368 temperate lakes reveals weak coherence in stratification phenology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Winslow, Luke A.; Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Van Den Hoek, Jamon; Hanson, Paul C.; Bruce, Louise C; Markfort, Corey D

    2014-01-01

    Changes in water temperatures resulting from climate warming can alter the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. Lake-specific physical characteristics may play a role in mediating individual lake responses to climate. Past mechanistic studies of lake-climate interactions have simulated generic lake classes at large spatial scales or performed detailed analyses of small numbers of real lakes. Understanding the diversity of lake responses to climate change across landscapes requires a hybrid approach that couples site-specific lake characteristics with broad-scale environmental drivers. This study provides a substantial advancement in lake ecosystem modeling by combining open-source tools with freely available continental-scale data to mechanistically model daily temperatures for 2,368 Wisconsin lakes over three decades (1979-2011). The model accurately predicted observed surface layer temperatures (RMSE: 1.74°C) and the presence/absence of stratification (81.1% agreement). Among-lake coherence was strong for surface temperatures and weak for the timing of stratification, suggesting individual lake characteristics mediate some - but not all - ecologically relevant lake responses to climate.

  19. Upwelling of deep water during thermal stratification onset—A major mechanism of vertical transport in small temperate lakes in spring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschke, Franziska; Lewandowski, Jörg; Engelhardt, Christof; Preuß, Konrad; Oczipka, Martin; Ruhtz, Thomas; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2015-12-01

    Using airborne thermal infrared imaging and horizontally resolved in situ temperature monitoring at the lake surface, we estimated strength and duration of regular wind-driven upwelling of dense deep water to the lake surface in two small (in terms of Rossby radius) temperate lakes during the initial phase of summer thermal stratification. The onset and duration of the upwelling events correlated well with the balance between stratification (in terms of Schmidt stability) and wind forcing, as expressed by Lake and Wedderburn numbers. The period of regular upwelling appearances lasted 7-15 days, identified by Schmidt stabilities around 30 J m-2 and Lake numbers between 0 and 1, and resulted in persistent temperature gradients of up to 2°C across the lake surface. Our results suggest that spring upwelling should inevitably take place in all freshwater temperate lakes with mean temperatures crossing the maximum density value of freshwater on annual cycle, whereas duration and intensity of the upwelling would vary depending on lake morphometry and weather conditions. Our results suggest major contribution of upwelling in nutrient supply to the upper waters, oxygenation of the deep water column, and air-lake gas exchange, in particular, the release of the sediment-produced methane into the atmosphere.

  20. Similarity scaling of turbulence in a small temperate lake: implications for gas flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedford, E. W.; MacIntyre, S.; Vidal, J.; Miller, S. D.; Czikowsky, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) can be used to estimate the gas transfer coefficient (k600) using the surface renewal model . To enable predictions of k600 from surface meteorology, we obtained 1400 temperature-gradient microstructure profiles in a 4 km2 lake during fall cooling concurrently with time series measurements of meteorology and CO2 fluxes using an eddy covariance system. Conditions were typical for the fall in the temperate zone. Winds typically varied from near calm to 5 m s-1 but reached 10 m s-1 during three storm events. Currents measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler averaged 2.5 cm s-1 and were as high as 10 cm s-1. Dissipation estimates were on the order of 10-8 to 10-7 m2 s-3 during periods of heating and cooling and reached 10-6 m2 s-3 during windy periods. During calm morning heating, dissipation was on the order of 10-9 m2s-3. We scaled our results using similarity scaling and obtained: ɛ = 0.6 u*3 / k z + 0.3 JB0 where u* is the water friction velocity computed from shear stress, k is von Karmon's constant, z is depth, and JB0 is buoyancy flux at the surface. Thus, ɛ at each depth is a function of the wind stress and buoyancy flux. The Monin-Obukhov length scale, LMO = -u*3/(0.4 JB0), is used to separate the upper-mixed layer into two regions: an upper region, dominated by wind shear; and a lower region, dominated by buoyancy flux.. When transitions between cooling and heating were gradual and winds were moderate, ɛ predicted with the similarity scaling matched the observed ɛ. In other words, during both heating and cooling and above a depth equal to |LMO|, turbulence was dominated by wind shear and dissipation followed law of the wall scaling although was slightly augmented by buoyancy flux during cooling. Below a depth equal to |LMO| during cooling, dissipation was uniform with depth. Below a depth equal to |LMO| during heating, dissipation was strongly suppressed. When winds and heat flux varied rapidly

  1. Provenance of tetraether membrane lipids in a large temperate lake (Loch Lomond, UK): implications for GDGT-based palaeothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckles, L. K.; Weijers, J. W. H.; Tran, X.-M.; Waldron, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    The application of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT)-based palaeoenvironmental proxies, such as the BIT index, TEX86 and the MBT/CBT palaeothermometer, has lately been expanded to lacustrine sediments. Given recent research identifying the production of branched, bacterial GDGTs (brGDGTs) within lakes, it is necessary to ascertain the effect of this lacustrine production on GDGT-based proxies. This study profiles a temperate, monomictic lake (Loch Lomond, UK), analysing labile intact polar GDGT lipids (IPLs) and resilient core GDGT lipids (CLs) in catchment soils, small tributary rivers, lake water and lake sediments. Loch Lomond consists of two basins bisected by the Highland Boundary Fault, resulting in a mesotrophic to oligotrophic gradient from south to north. The north basin is fjord-like, while the south basin is shallow with a lowland catchment. Besides abundant influxes of allochthonous soil and peat-derived (CL) brGDGTs, brGDGTs are produced in a variety of settings in Loch Lomond. Rather than integrating a scattered soil signal, there is some evidence that small rivers may contribute to the brGDGT pool through addition of brGDGTs produced in situ in these streams. 300 days of settling particles and water column profiles of suspended particulate matter (SPM; March and September 2011) reveal brGDGT production throughout the water column, with (IPL and CL) brGDGT distributions varying by basin. In lake sediments, in situ brGDGT production affects the distributions of sedimentary brGDGTs despite high soil and peat-derived organic matter influxes from the catchment. MBT/CBT-derived mean annual air temperature (MAAT) estimates from soil, river and lake sediments vary widely. A strong bias towards higher MAATs in the south and lower MAATs in the north basin further complicates the application of the proxy. These results emphasise that caution must be exercised when applying the MBT/CBT palaeothermometer to individual lakes in which the use of the proxy

  2. Can ipids in lake sediments help to reconstruct changes in methane availability and methane fluxes in boreal and temperate lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoetter, T.; van Hardenbroek, M.; Rinta, P.; Schilder, J.; Schubert, C. J.; Heiri, O.

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is a major greenhouse gas and lakes are an important but poorly studied source of CH4 to the atmosphere. Lipid analysis was used before to identify and quantify CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB), giving insight into CH4 oxidation and production in lakes. However, few studies are available that examine how closely the distribution and the carbon isotopic signature (δ13C) of lipids are related to CH4 concentrations and fluxes in different lake ecosystems. In a multi-lake survey we quantified the relationship between lipids, mainly fatty acids (FAs), and CH4 concentrations or fluxes, with the aim of assessing whether FA analysis of lake sediment samples can provide information on past CH4 abundance and production in lakes. The study sites include small lakes in Sweden, Finland, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Surface sediments collected in the deepest point of the lakes were examined using gas chromatography with flame ionization for determining FA concentrations, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for identification of individual FAs, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) for determining compound specific δ13C values. Since CH4 is significantly more depleted in 13C than other carbon sources, δ13C is a good tracer for CH4 related processes. The analysis of the acid fraction in the sediments showed that mainly three FAs, identified as C16:1ω7, C16:1ω5 and C18:1ω7, were more depleted in 13C than the others, suggesting that they may originate from MOB. Comparison with literature sources indicated that these FAs are produced by MOB, however, not exclusively. The relative abundance of these depleted FAs showed clear relations to CH4 parameters. For example, increasing abundances were observed with increasing CH4 concentrations in the sediment or with increasing CH4 flux measured at the lake surface. An explanation for these relations would be an increase in MOB biomass with increasing CH4 availability, as they use CH4 as energy and carbon

  3. Live/Dead Comparisons of Ostracodes in Temperate Lakes Reveal Evidence of Human Impact and Provides a Tool to Measure the Progress of Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, J.; Kimball, K. C.; Fitzpatrick, S. A.; Michelson, A. V.; Leonard-Pingel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake ecosystems face a multitude of environmental threats including: eutrophication, overfishing, and heavy metal pollution. Tools to identify lakes impacted by human activity and quantify that impact are needed to combat their environmental degradation. One such promising tool has been the comparison between living communities and associated time-averaged death assemblages of mollusks in marine environments. Here we extend the reach of such live/dead comparisons using ostracodes in temperate lakes. We sampled six lakes in Wisconsin for living communities and associated death assemblages of ostracodes: two lakes impacted by human activity, two relatively "pristine" lakes, and two remediated lakes. We took sixteen grab samples of the upper centimeter of sediment in each lake, capturing simultaneously living benthic ostracodes and discarded valves of dead ostracodes. We found that impacted lakes had lower live/dead fidelity in taxonomic composition and rank-order abundance distributions and greater within-lake variation in death assemblages than "pristine" lakes. Additionally, the living communities in the impacted lakes tended to be lower in species richness and have lower evenness than "pristine" lakes. Remediated lakes displayed similar live/dead fidelity in taxonomic composition and rank-abundance distributions to "pristine" lakes and had lower within-lake variation in death assemblages than impacted lakes. Remediated lakes also contained living communities that tended to be richer and more even than impacted lakes. The lower live/dead fidelity of ostracodes in impacted lakes indicate live/dead ostracode comparisons can provide a tool to identify lake ecosystems impacted by humans. The similar results of remediated and "pristine" lakes indicate remediation efforts in these lakes have been successful in alleviating environmental impact detrimental to ostracode communities. This result indicates live/dead comparisons of ostracodes can be a useful tool to monitor

  4. Planktonic events may cause polymictic-dimictic regime shifts in temperate lakes

    PubMed Central

    Shatwell, Tom; Adrian, Rita; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2016-01-01

    Water transparency affects the thermal structure of lakes, and within certain lake depth ranges, it can determine whether a lake mixes regularly (polymictic regime) or stratifies continuously (dimictic regime) from spring through summer. Phytoplankton biomass can influence transparency but the effect of its seasonal pattern on stratification is unknown. Therefore we analysed long term field data from two lakes of similar depth, transparency and climate but one polymictic and one dimictic, and simulated a conceptual lake with a hydrodynamic model. Transparency in the study lakes was typically low during spring and summer blooms and high in between during the clear water phase (CWP), caused when zooplankton graze the spring bloom. The effect of variability of transparency on thermal structure was stronger at intermediate transparency and stronger during a critical window in spring when the rate of lake warming is highest. Whereas the spring bloom strengthened stratification in spring, the CWP weakened it in summer. The presence or absence of the CWP influenced stratification duration and under some conditions determined the mixing regime. Therefore seasonal plankton dynamics, including biotic interactions that suppress the CWP, can influence lake temperatures, stratification duration, and potentially also the mixing regime. PMID:27074883

  5. Planktonic events may cause polymictic-dimictic regime shifts in temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Shatwell, Tom; Adrian, Rita; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2016-01-01

    Water transparency affects the thermal structure of lakes, and within certain lake depth ranges, it can determine whether a lake mixes regularly (polymictic regime) or stratifies continuously (dimictic regime) from spring through summer. Phytoplankton biomass can influence transparency but the effect of its seasonal pattern on stratification is unknown. Therefore we analysed long term field data from two lakes of similar depth, transparency and climate but one polymictic and one dimictic, and simulated a conceptual lake with a hydrodynamic model. Transparency in the study lakes was typically low during spring and summer blooms and high in between during the clear water phase (CWP), caused when zooplankton graze the spring bloom. The effect of variability of transparency on thermal structure was stronger at intermediate transparency and stronger during a critical window in spring when the rate of lake warming is highest. Whereas the spring bloom strengthened stratification in spring, the CWP weakened it in summer. The presence or absence of the CWP influenced stratification duration and under some conditions determined the mixing regime. Therefore seasonal plankton dynamics, including biotic interactions that suppress the CWP, can influence lake temperatures, stratification duration, and potentially also the mixing regime. PMID:27074883

  6. Planktonic events may cause polymictic-dimictic regime shifts in temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatwell, Tom; Adrian, Rita; Kirillin, Georgiy

    2016-04-01

    Water transparency affects the thermal structure of lakes, and within certain lake depth ranges, it can determine whether a lake mixes regularly (polymictic regime) or stratifies continuously (dimictic regime) from spring through summer. Phytoplankton biomass can influence transparency but the effect of its seasonal pattern on stratification is unknown. Therefore we analysed long term field data from two lakes of similar depth, transparency and climate but one polymictic and one dimictic, and simulated a conceptual lake with a hydrodynamic model. Transparency in the study lakes was typically low during spring and summer blooms and high in between during the clear water phase (CWP), caused when zooplankton graze the spring bloom. The effect of variability of transparency on thermal structure was stronger at intermediate transparency and stronger during a critical window in spring when the rate of lake warming is highest. Whereas the spring bloom strengthened stratification in spring, the CWP weakened it in summer. The presence or absence of the CWP influenced stratification duration and under some conditions determined the mixing regime. Therefore seasonal plankton dynamics, including biotic interactions that suppress the CWP, can influence lake temperatures, stratification duration, and potentially also the mixing regime.

  7. Variations in Bacterial Community in a Temperate Lake Associated with an Agricultural Watershed.

    PubMed

    Song, Liyan; Li, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrially derived carbon and nutrients are washed into lakes, providing nutritional drivers for both microbial heterotrophy and phototrophy. Changes in the quantity and diversity of carbon and nutrients exported from watersheds in response to alterations in long-term land use have led to a need for evaluation of the linkage between watershed-exported carbon and nutrients and bacterial community structure in watershed associated lakes. To learn more about these interactions, we investigated Muskrat Lake in Michigan, which has a well-defined moderately sized watershed dominated by agriculture. We measured the water chemistry, characterized the dissolved organic carbon, and determined the structure of the bacterial communities at the inlet and center of this lake (five depths per site) over the summer and fall of 2008. The lake had temporal and rain event-based fluctuations in water chemistry, as well as temporal and rain event-dependent shifts in bacterial communities as measured by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Agricultural watershed inputs were observed in the lake during and after rain events. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities indicated that there were differences over time and that the dominant phylotypes shifted between summer and late fall. Some populations (e.g., Polynucleobacter and Mycobacterium) increased during fall, while others (e.g., Gemmatimonas) diminished. Redundancy and partitioning analyses showed that water chemistry is highly correlated with variations in the bacterial community of the lake, which explained 34 % of the variations in the bacterial community. Dissolved organic carbon had the greatest effects on variations in the Muskrat Lake bacterial community (2 %). The results of this study provide information that will enable a better understanding of the interaction between the bacterial community of lakes and changes in chemical properties as a

  8. Seasonal changes in the spatial distribution of phytoplankton in small, temperate-zone lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Alpine, A.E.; Cole, B.E.; Heller, T.

    1992-01-01

    Sampling across two N Minnesota small lakes shows that phytoplankton patchiness is greatly enhanced during winter ice-cover relative to the open-water seasons of exposure to wind stress and rapid turbulent mixing. -Authors

  9. Relationship between DOC photochemistry and mercury redox transformations in temperate lakes and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Edenise; Amyot, Marc; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2005-04-01

    We compared diurnal variations in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) concentration and in losses of dissolved organic carbon fluorescence (DOCF) in four boreal Canadian Shield lakes, in one beaver pond, and in filtered and unfiltered water from a wetland in Lake St. Pierre, a fluvial lake of the St. Lawrence River. These systems were chosen to represent a spectrum of DOC. We also determined the contribution of UVB, UVA and visible light on DGM photo-induced production in the four lakes. Our results showed a strong relationship between DGM concentrations and light intensity and between DGM production and losses in DOCF, in all study sites. We also observed higher rates of DGM formation and of DOCF bleaching in the presence of UV radiation. Under UVB light, production of DGM was higher in clear lakes than in the humic ones. Inversely, in the UVA range, DGM production tended to be higher in humic lakes. We suggest that DOCF bleaching can be used as a proxy for the rate of formation of reactive species that may alter the redox state of mercury in surface waters. We also have indications that DGM production is more important in clear than in humic waters.

  10. Seasonal variability of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) in a temperate lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Shannon E.; Russell, James M.; Heureux, Ana M.; D'Andrea, William J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative climate reconstructions are crucial for understanding the magnitude of and mechanisms behind natural and anthropogenic climate change, yet there are few proxies that can reliably reconstruct terrestrial temperature. Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are bacterial membrane lipids that are increasingly used to reconstruct paleotemperature from lake sediments, but despite their potential, we have a poor understanding of (1) autochthonous vs. allochthonous sources of brGDGTs in lakes and (2) the seasonality of and environmental controls on brGDGT production within lakes. To investigate these factors, we examined water column suspended particulate matter (SPM) and settling particles from a sediment trap collected on a biweekly to monthly basis over a period of three years at Lower King Pond, a small kettle lake in northern Vermont, USA. We also compared the concentration and fractional abundances of brGDGTs in SPM and settling particles with those of catchment soils, river sediments, and lake surface sediments to constrain the relative importance of brGDGTs derived from the landscape versus brGDGTs produced within the lake itself. We find significant differences in concentrations and fractional abundances of brGDGTs between soil and river sediment samples from the catchment and lake sediments, indicating a mostly autochthonous source for lacustrine brGDGTs. BrGDGT concentrations, fluxes, and fractional abundances in SPM vary over the annual cycle, indicating that brGDGTs are produced throughout the year and respond to changes within the water column. The total annual flux of brGDGTs settling through the water column is comparable to the brGDGT accumulation rates in surface sediments, indicating that in this lake brGDGTs are mostly produced within the water column, not in the sediment itself. While brGDGTs are produced in all seasons within the water column, the flux to the sediments is highest during periods of spring and fall

  11. A Multi-Parameter Approach to Assessing the Origin of Sediment-Magnetic Signatures in Small, Temperate-Climate Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Plank, C.; Banerjee, S. K.; Ito, E.

    2008-12-01

    To assess the controls on sedimentary magnetic signatures in lakes, we analyzed the characteristics of core, surface, sediment trap, and catchment samples collected from small, temperate-climate lakes, which are commonly used in paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Magnetic properties of sediments were evaluated using room temperature measurements (susceptibility, IRM, ARM), hysteresis parameters, low temperature magnetization curves, and modeling of bulk coercivity spectra, obtained from IRM and ARM acquisition and demagnetization curves. The results highlight several characteristics of lacustrine sediments: 1) Magnetic- mineral assemblages are dominated by low-coercivity minerals (e.g. magnetite); 2) Saturation magnetization, rather than remanent magnetization, is a better overall indicator of concentration, due to differences in grain size; 3) Shoreline samples contain almost exclusively detrital multi-domain (MD) magnetite grains, while littoral and profundal sediments contain a mixture of MD and in-lake produced single-domain (SD) grains; 4) Profundal sediments, deposited in seasonally-anoxic waters, exhibit dissolution of finer-grained particles; 5) Calculated contributions of a biogenic source differ depending on method utilized. ARM/IRM ratios and delta/delta ratios are more conservative in this aspect, indicating a maximum of 50% contribution of biogenic magnetite. Hysteresis and coercivity analyses yield up to 75% contribution of biogenic particles; 6) There is a direct linear relation between percent mass organic matter (OM) and ARM/IRM, showing a dependence of magnetic grain size on organic carbon concentration. This correlation highlights the role OM has in the process of production and preservation of magnetosomes. Organic matter decomposition depletes the dissolved oxygen and leads to temporary or permanent anoxic conditions in the sediment. If conditions are suboxic (e.g. in the littoral zone, where oxygen can diffuse into the sediment from the

  12. Salinization: the ultimate threat to temperate lakes, with particular reference to Southeastern Wisconsin (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Jeffrey A.; Slawski, Thomas M.; Lin, Hebin

    2015-11-01

    Many lakes in Southeastern Wisconsin (the metropolitan-Milwaukee area) are gradually becoming increasingly "salty". While these waterbodies would not be considered presently to be saline lakes, there has been a rapid increase in the chloride concentrations in most of these lakes over the last 30 years, with the lakes increasing from a mean chloride concentration of about 19 mg/L to over 100 mg/L in some cases. While ecological impacts can be expected when chloride values exceed 250 mg/L, the rate of increase presents a basis for concern, especially since the underlying geology of the region is based on limestone/dolomite which is deficient in chlorides. Thus, the origin of the chlorides is anthropogenic: human and industrial wastewaters (treatment of which has effected improvements in trophic status but has not affected other water-borne contaminants) and winter de-icing practices based upon large quantities of sodium chloride are major contributors to the increasing concentrations of chloride in the region's waterways. Without taking remedial measures, the rate of salinization is expected to continue to increase, resulting, ultimately, in the alteration of the freshwater systems in the region.

  13. Seasonal variations of phage life strategies and bacterial physiological states in three northern temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Maurice, C F; Bouvier, T; Comte, J; Guillemette, F; Del Giorgio, P A

    2010-03-01

    The current consensus concerning the prevalence of lytic and lysogenic phage life cycles in aquatic systems is that the host physiological state may influence viral strategies, lysogeny being favoured when hosts have reduced metabolic rates. We explored this hypothesis, by following phage cycle dynamics, host physiological state and metabolic activity over an annual cycle in three lakes subjected to strong seasonal fluctuations, including 4-5 months of ice cover. We observed marked seasonal dynamics of viral and bacterial communities, with low bulk and cell-specific bacterial metabolism in winter, and a dramatic increase in injured bacteria under the ice cover in all lakes. This period was accompanied by contrasting patterns in the proportion of lysogenic cells. In the eutrophic lake, times of low bacterial metabolic rates and high proportion of damaged cells corresponded to highest levels of lysogeny, supporting the notion that hosts are a 'refuge' for viruses. In the two unproductive lakes, peaks of injured cells corresponded to a minimum of lysogeny, suggesting an 'abandon the sinking ship' response, where the prophage replicates before the loss of genome. We suggest that these diverging responses to the host physiological state are not contradictory, but rather that there may be thresholds of cell stress and metabolic activity leading to one or the other response. PMID:20002137

  14. Contrasting patterns of allochthony among three major groups of crustacean zooplankton in boreal and temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Martin; Ziegler, Susan E; St-Gelais, Nicolas F; Beisner, Beatrix E; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2014-07-01

    The importance of terrestrial-derived organic matter for lake zooplankton communities remains debated, partly because little is known about the basic pathways by which allochthonous carbon is transferred to zooplankton, and whether these vary among the major taxonomic and functional groups. We quantified allochthony of three zooplankton groups (Cladocera, Calanoida, and Cyclopoida) across 18 lakes in Quebec, spanning broad gradients of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and lake trophy, using a multi-isotope (delta2H + delta13C), multi-source (terrestrial, phytoplanktonic, benthic) approach. All three zooplankton groups had significant levels of allochthony, but differed greatly in their respective patterns across lakes. Allochthony in Calanoida and Cyclopoida was linked to detrital food chains based on particulate organic matter (POM) and on DOM, respectively, whereas in Cladocera it appeared related to both pathways; not surprisingly this latter group had the highest mean allochthony (0.31; compared to 0.18 in Cyclopoida and 0.16 in Calanoida). This study highlights the complexity of the pathways of delivery and transfer of terrestrial organic matter in freshwaters, and underscores the role that microbial food webs play in this transfer. PMID:25163126

  15. Environmental influence on cyanobacteria abundance and microcystin toxin production in a shallow temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tammy A; Rollwagen-Bollens, Gretchen; Bollens, Stephen M; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J

    2015-04-01

    The increasing frequency of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater systems is a commonly recognized problem due to detrimental effects on water quality. Vancouver Lake, a shallow, tidally influenced lake in the flood plain of the Columbia River within the city of Vancouver, WA, USA, has experienced numerous summertime cyanobacterial blooms, dominated by Aphanizomenon sp. and Anabaena sp. Cyanobacteria abundance and toxin (microcystin) levels have been monitored in this popular urban lake for several years; however, no previous studies have identified which cyanobacteria species produce toxins, nor analyzed how changes in environmental variables contribute to the fluctuations in toxic cyanobacteria populations. We used a suite of molecular techniques to analyze water samples from Vancouver Lake over two summer bloom cycles (2009 and 2010). Both intracellular and extracellular microcystin concentrations were measured using an ELISA kit. Intracellular microcystin concentrations exceeded WHO guidelines for recreational waters several times throughout the sampling period. PCR results demonstrated that Microcystis sp. was the sole microcystin-producing cyanobacteria species present in Vancouver Lake, although Microcystis sp. was rarely detected in microscopical counts. qPCR results indicated that the majority of the Microcystis sp. population contained the toxin-producing gene (mcyE), although Microcystis sp. abundance rarely exceeded 1 percent of overall cyanobacteria abundance. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) revealed that PO4-P was the main environmental variable influencing the abundance of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria, as well as intracellular microcystin concentrations. Our study underscores the importance of using molecular genetic techniques, in addition to traditional microscopy, to assess the importance of less conspicuous species in the dynamics of harmful algal blooms. PMID:25060409

  16. The Role of Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacterial Bloom Toxicity in a Temperate, Eutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms threaten freshwaters worldwide but have proven difficult to predict because the mechanisms of bloom formation and toxin production are unknown, especially on weekly time scales. Water quality management continues to focus on aggregated metrics, such as chlorophyll and total nutrients, which may not be sufficient to explain complex community changes and functions such as toxin production. For example, nitrogen (N) speciation and cycling play an important role, on daily time scales, in shaping cyanobacterial communities because declining N has been shown to select for N fixers. In addition, subsequent N pulses from N2 fixation may stimulate and sustain toxic cyanobacterial growth. Herein, we describe how rapid early summer declines in N followed by bursts of N fixation have shaped cyanobacterial communities in a eutrophic lake (Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA), possibly driving toxic Microcystis blooms throughout the growing season. On weekly time scales in 2010 and 2011, we monitored the cyanobacterial community in a eutrophic lake using the phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) region to determine population dynamics. In parallel, we measured microcystin concentrations, N2 fixation rates, and potential environmental drivers that contribute to structuring the community. In both years, cyanobacterial community change was strongly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations, and Aphanizomenon and Microcystis alternated dominance throughout the pre-toxic, toxic, and post-toxic phases of the lake. Microcystin concentrations increased a few days after the first significant N2 fixation rates were observed. Then, following large early summer N2 fixation events, Microcystis increased and became most abundant. Maximum microcystin concentrations coincided with Microcystis dominance. In both years, DIN concentrations dropped again in late summer, and N2 fixation rates and Aphanizomenon abundance increased before the lake mixed in

  17. Environmental factors influencing the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation in temperate lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, D M; Brock, T D

    1976-01-01

    Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation were estimated by following oxygen uptake during mineral oil oxidation or oxidation of [1-14C]hexadecane to 14CO2, when these substrates were added to natural water samples from Wisconsin lakes. A lag phase preceded hydrocarbon oxidation, the length of which depended on population density or on factors influencing growth rate and on the presence of nonhydrocarbon organic compounds. Hydrocarbon oxidation was coincident with growth and presumably represented the development of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in response to hydrocarbon additions. In detailed studies in Lake Mendota, it was found that, despite the continued presence of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in water samples, seasonal variations in the rates of mineral oil and hexadecane oxidation occurred which correlated with seasonal changes in temperature and dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. The temperature optimum for oil biodegradation remained at 20 to 25 C throughout the year, so that temperature was the main limiting factor during winter, spring, and fall. During summer, when temperatures were optimal, nutrient deficiencies limited oil biodegradation, and higher rates could be obtained by addition of nitrogen and phosphorus. The rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation were thus high only for about 1 month of the ice-free period, when temperature and nutrient supply were optimal. Nutrient limitation of oil biodegradation was also demonstrated in 25 nutrient-poor lakes of northern Wisconsin, although in almost every case oil-degrading bacteria were detected. Knowledge of temperature and nutrient limitations thus will help in predicting the fate of hydrocarbon pollutants in freshwater. PMID:1275495

  18. Invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to Subtropical and Temperate Freshwater Lakes – Physiological, Regional, and Global Driving Forces

    PubMed Central

    Sukenik, Assaf; Hadas, Ora; Kaplan, Aaron; Quesada, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Similar to the increased number of studies on invasive plants and animals in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, many reports were recently published on the invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to freshwater environments worldwide. Invasion and proliferation of Nostocales in new habitats have the potential to significantly alter the structure of the native community and to modify ecosystem functioning. But most importantly, they influence the water quality due to a variety of toxic compounds that some species produce. Therefore a special attention was given to the invasion and persistence of toxic cyanobacteria in many aquatic ecosystems. Here we summarize the currently published records on the invasion of two Nostocales genera, Cylindrospermopsis and Aphanizomenon, to lakes and water reservoirs in subtropical and temperate zones. These invading species possess traits thought to be common to many invasive organisms: high growth rate, high resource utilization efficiency and overall superior competitive abilities over native species when local conditions vary. Assuming that dispersion routes of cyanobacteria have not been changed much in recent decades, their recent establishment and proliferation in new habitats indicate changes in the environment under which they can exploit their physiological advantage over the native phytoplankton population. In many cases, global warming was identified as the major driving force for the invasion of Nostocales. Due to this uncontrollable trend, invasive Nostocales species are expected to maintain their presence in new habitats and further expand to new environments. In other cases, regional changes in nutrient loads and in biotic conditions were attributed to the invasion events. PMID:22408640

  19. Acclimation of photosynthesis and dark respiration of a submersed angiosperm beneath ice in a temperate lake

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.E. ); Wetzel, R.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Ceratophyllum demersum L. remained physiologically active beneath ice of a southeastern Michigan lake. The effect of seasonally low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and cold but nonfreezing temperature on whole-plant physiology was studied. Net photosynthesis was measured at six temperatures and 12 PPFDs. Net photosynthesis, soluble protein concentration, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) protein concentration, and Rubisco activity of winter plants were 32, 31, 33, and 70% lower, respectively, than those of plants collected in the summer. Optimum temperatures for net photosynthesis of winter and summer plants were 5 and 30[degrees]C, respectively. Dark respiration of winter plants was up to 313% greater than that of summer plants. Reduced Rubisco activity and increased dark respiration interacted to reduce net photosynthesis. Interaction of reduced net photosynthesis and increased dark respiration increased CO[sub 2] and light compensation points and the light saturation point of winter plants. Growth of C. demersum was limited by the ambient phosphorus concentration of lake water during summer. Apical stem segments of winter-collected plants had 54 and 35% more phosphorus and nitrogen, respectively, than summer-collected plants. Physiologically active perennation beneath ice enabled C. demersum to accumulate phosphorus during the winter when it was most abundant. Partial uncoupling of phosphorus acquisition from utilization may reduce phosphorus limitation upon growth during the summer when phosphorus concentration is seasonally the lowest. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Food-web stability signals critical transitions in temperate shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Jan J; van Altena, Cassandra; de Ruiter, Peter C; van Gerven, Luuk P A; Janse, Jan H; Mooij, Wolf M

    2015-01-01

    A principal aim of ecologists is to identify critical levels of environmental change beyond which ecosystems undergo radical shifts in their functioning. Both food-web theory and alternative stable states theory provide fundamental clues to mechanisms conferring stability to natural systems. Yet, it is unclear how the concept of food-web stability is associated with the resilience of ecosystems susceptible to regime change. Here, we use a combination of food web and ecosystem modelling to show that impending catastrophic shifts in shallow lakes are preceded by a destabilizing reorganization of interaction strengths in the aquatic food web. Analysis of the intricate web of trophic interactions reveals that only few key interactions, involving zooplankton, diatoms and detritus, dictate the deterioration of food-web stability. Our study exposes a tight link between food-web dynamics and the dynamics of the whole ecosystem, implying that trophic organization may serve as an empirical indicator of ecosystem resilience. PMID:26173798

  1. Food-web stability signals critical transitions in temperate shallow lakes

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Jan J.; van Altena, Cassandra; de Ruiter, Peter C.; van Gerven, Luuk P. A.; Janse, Jan H.; Mooij, Wolf M.

    2015-01-01

    A principal aim of ecologists is to identify critical levels of environmental change beyond which ecosystems undergo radical shifts in their functioning. Both food-web theory and alternative stable states theory provide fundamental clues to mechanisms conferring stability to natural systems. Yet, it is unclear how the concept of food-web stability is associated with the resilience of ecosystems susceptible to regime change. Here, we use a combination of food web and ecosystem modelling to show that impending catastrophic shifts in shallow lakes are preceded by a destabilizing reorganization of interaction strengths in the aquatic food web. Analysis of the intricate web of trophic interactions reveals that only few key interactions, involving zooplankton, diatoms and detritus, dictate the deterioration of food-web stability. Our study exposes a tight link between food-web dynamics and the dynamics of the whole ecosystem, implying that trophic organization may serve as an empirical indicator of ecosystem resilience. PMID:26173798

  2. Do Daphnia use metalimnetic organic matter in a north temperate lake? An analysis of vertical migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosseau, Chase Julian; Cline, Timothy J.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Hodgson, James R.; Pace, Michael L.; Weidel, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Diel vertical migration of zooplankton is influenced by a variety of factors including predation, food, and temperature. Research has recently shifted from a focus on factors influencing migration to how migration affects nutrient cycling and habitat coupling. Here we evaluate the potential for Daphnia migrations to incorporate metalimnetic productivity in a well-studied northern Wisconsin lake. We use prior studies conducted between 1985 and 1990 and current diel migration data (2008) to compare day and night Daphnia vertical distributions with the depth of the metalimnion (between the thermocline and 1% light depth). Daphnia migrate from a daytime mean residence depth of between about 1.7 and 2.5 m to a nighttime mean residence depth of between 0 and 2.0 m. These migrations are consistent between the prior period and current measurements. Daytime residence depths of Daphnia are rarely deep enough to reach the metalimnion; hence, metalimnetic primary production is unlikely to be an important resource for Daphnia in this system.

  3. A chemically stratified lake in alaska.

    PubMed

    Likens, G E; Johnson, P L

    1966-08-19

    A meromictic (chemically stratified) lake occupies a thawed depression in a pingo in interior Alaska, near Circle City. Increased salt concentration and anaerobic conditions characterize the zone extending from a maximum depth of 3 to 8.8 meters. The concentration of strontium and lithium is unusually high for lake water. PMID:17780648

  4. Autotrophic processes in meromictic Big Soda Lake, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Daily rates of oxygenic photosynthesis (OP) by phytoplankton, anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) by purple sulfur bacteria, and chemoautotrophic productivity (CP = dark CO2 assimilation) were measured once each season. Total daily productivity and the relative importance of each autotrophic process varied with seasonal changes in vertical mixing, light availability, and the biomass of phototrophs. Daily productivity was highest (2830 mg C.m-2) and was dominated by OP in winter when the mixolimnion was isothermal, the biomass of phytoplankton was high, and the biomass of purple sulfur bacteria was low. During the summer-fall period of thermal stratification, phytoplankton biomass decreased, a plate of purple sulfur bacteria formed below the oxycline, and daily rates of dark CO2 assimilation (CP = 390-680 mg C.m-2) exceeded phototrophic productivity (OP + AP = 200-370 mg C.m-2). Total annual productivity was approx 500 g C.m-2, of which 60% was produced by phytoplankton (mostly in winter), 30% by chemoautotrophs (nitrifying and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria), and only 10% by photosynthetic bacteria. -Authors

  5. Provenance of tetraether membrane lipids in a large temperate lake (Loch Lomond, UK): implications for glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT)-based palaeothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckles, L. K.; Weijers, J. W. H.; Tran, X.-M.; Waldron, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    The application of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT)-based palaeoenvironmental proxies, such as the branched vs. isoprenoidal tetratether (BIT) index, TEX86 and the MBT-CBT palaeothermometer, has lately been expanded to lacustrine sediments. Given recent research identifying the production of branched, bacterial GDGTs (brGDGTs) within lakes, it is necessary to ascertain the effect of this lacustrine production on GDGT-based proxies. This study profiles a temperate, monomictic lake (Loch Lomond, UK), analysing labile intact polar GDGT lipids (IPLs) and resilient core GDGT lipids (CLs) in catchment soils, small tributary rivers, lake water and lake sediments. Loch Lomond consists of two basins bisected by the Highland Boundary Fault, resulting in a mesotrophic to oligotrophic gradient from south to north. The north basin is fjord-like, while the south basin is shallow with a lowland catchment. Besides abundant influxes of allochthonous soil- and peat-derived (CL) brGDGTs, brGDGTs are produced in a variety of settings in Loch Lomond. Rather than integrating a scattered soil signal, there is some evidence that small rivers may contribute to the brGDGT pool through addition of brGDGTs produced in situ in these streams. Three hundred days of settling particles and water column profiles of suspended particulate matter (SPM; March and September 2011) reveal brGDGT production throughout the water column, with (IPL and CL) brGDGT distributions varying by basin. In lake sediments, in situ brGDGT production affects the distributions of sedimentary brGDGTs despite high soil- and peat-derived organic matter influxes from the catchment. MBT-CBT-derived mean annual air temperature (MAAT) estimates from soil, river and lake sediments vary widely. A strong bias towards higher MAATs in the south and lower MAATs in the north basin further complicates the application of the proxy. These results emphasise that caution must be exercised when applying the MBT

  6. Summer depth distribution profiles of dissolved CO2 and O2 in shallow temperate lakes reveal trophic state and lake type specific differences.

    PubMed

    Laas, Alo; Cremona, Fabien; Meinson, Pille; Rõõm, Eva-Ingrid; Nõges, Tiina; Nõges, Peeter

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge about dissolved oxygen (DO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) distribution in lakes has increased considerably over the last decades. However, studies about high resolution dynamics of dissolved CO2 in different types of lakes over daily or weekly time scales are still very scarce. We measured summertime vertical DO and CO2 profiles at sub-hourly intervals during one week in eight Estonian lakes representing different lake types according to European Water Framework Directive. The lakes showed considerable differences in thermal stratification and vertical distribution of dissolved oxygen and CO2 as well as different diurnal dynamics over the measurement period. We observed a continuous CO2 supersaturation in the upper mixed layer of the alkalitrophic (calcareous groundwater-fed) lake and the dark soft-water lake showing them as CO2 emitting "chimneys" although with different underlying mechanisms. In three lake types strong undersaturation with CO2 occurred in the surface layer characterising them as CO2 sinks for the measurement period while in another three types the surface layer CO2 was mostly in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Factor analysis showed that DO% in the surface layer and the strength of its relationship with CO2% were positively related to alkalinity and negatively to trophic state and DOC gradients, whereas deeper lakes were characterised by higher surface concentration but smaller spatial and temporal variability of CO2. Multiple regression analysis revealed lake area, maximum depth and the light attenuation coefficient as variables affecting the largest number of gas regime indicators. We conclude that the trophic status of lakes in combination with type specific features such as morphometry, alkalinity and colour (DOC) determines the distribution and dynamics of dissolved CO2 and DO, which therefore may indicate functional differences in carbon cycling among lakes. PMID:27213672

  7. The altered ecology of Lake Christina: a record of regime shifts, land-use change, and management from a temperate shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Theissen, Kevin M; Hobbs, William O; Hobbs, Joy M Ramstack; Zimmer, Kyle D; Domine, Leah M; Cotner, James B; Sugita, Shinya

    2012-09-01

    We collected two sediment cores and modern submerged aquatic plants and phytoplankton from two sub-basins of Lake Christina, a large shallow lake in west-central Minnesota, and used stable isotopic and elemental proxies from sedimentary organic matter to explore questions about the pre- and post-settlement ecology of the lake. The two morphologically distinct sub-basins vary in their sensitivities to internal and external perturbations offering different paleoecological information. The record from the shallower and much larger western sub-basin reflects its strong response to internal processes, while the smaller and deeper eastern sub-basin record primarily reflects external processes including important post-settlement land-use changes in the area. A significant increase in organic carbon accumulation (3-4 times pre-settlement rates) and long-term trends in δ(13)C, organic carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N), and biogenic silica concentrations shows that primary production has increased and the lake has become increasingly phytoplankton-dominated in the post-settlement period. Significant shifts in δ(15)N values reflect land-clearing and agricultural practices in the region and support the idea that nutrient inputs have played an important role in triggering changes in the trophic status of the lake. Our examination of hydroclimatic data for the region over the last century suggests that natural forcings on lake ecology have diminished in their importance as human management of the lake increased in the mid-1900s. In the last 50 years, three chemical biomanipulations have temporarily shifted the lake from the turbid, algal-dominated condition into a desired clear water regime. Two of our proxies (δ(13)C and BSi) measured from the higher resolution eastern basin record responded significantly to these known regime shifts. PMID:22819884

  8. Population structure, persistence, and seasonality of autochthonous Escherichia coli in temperate, coastal forest soil from a Great Lakes watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Ishii, S.

    2006-01-01

    The common occurrence of Escherichia coli in temperate soils has previously been reported, however, there are few studies to date to characterize its source, distribution, persistent capability and genetic diversity. In this study, undisturbed, forest soils within six randomly selected 0.5 m2 exclosure plots (covered by netting of 2.3 mm2 mesh size) were monitored from March to October 2003 for E. coli in order to describe its numerical and population characteristics. Culturable E. coli occurred in 88% of the samples collected, with overall mean counts of 16 MPN g-1, ranging from <1 to 1657 (n = 66). Escherichia coli counts did not correlate with substrate moisture content, air, or soil temperatures, suggesting that seasonality were not a strong factor in population density control. Mean E. coli counts in soil samples (n = 60) were significantly higher inside than immediately outside the exclosures; E. coli distribution within the exclosures was patchy. Repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (Rep-PCR) demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of E. coli within and among exclosure sites, and the soil strains were genetically distinct from animal (E. coli) strains tested (i.e. gulls, terns, deer and most geese). These results suggest that E. coli can occur and persist for extended periods in undisturbed temperate forest soils independent of recent allochthonous input and season, and that the soil E. coli populations formed a cohesive phylogenetic group in comparison to the set of fecal strains with which they were compared. Thus, in assessing E. coli sources within a stream, it is important to differentiate background soil loadings from inputs derived from animal and human fecal contamination. ?? 2005 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Differentiating the degradation dynamics of algal and terrestrial carbon within complex natural dissolved organic carbon in temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemette, François; McCallister, S. Leigh; Giorgio, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    It has often been hypothesized that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool of algal origin in lakes is more bioavailable than its terrestrial counterpart, but this hypothesis has seldom been directly tested. Here we test this hypothesis by tracking the production and isotopic signature of bacterial respiratory CO2 in 2 week lake water incubations and use the resulting data to reconstruct and model the bacterial consumption dynamics of algal and terrestrial DOC. The proportion of algal DOC respired decreased systematically over time in all experiments, suggesting a rapid consumption and depletion of this substrate. Our results further show that the algal DOC pool was used in proportions and at rates twice and 10 times as high as the terrestrial DOC pool, respectively. On the other hand, the absolute amount of labile terrestrial DOC was on average four times higher than labile algal DOC, accounting for almost the entire long-term residual C metabolism, but also contributing to short-term bacterial C consumption. The absolute amount of labile algal DOC increased with chlorophyll a concentrations, whereas total phosphorus appeared to enhance the amount of terrestrial DOC that bacteria could consume, suggesting that the degradation of these pools is not solely governed by their respective chemical properties, but also by interactions with nutrients. Our study shows that there is a highly reactive pool of terrestrial DOC that is processed in parallel to algal DOC, and because of interactions with nutrients, terrestrial DOC likely supports high levels of bacterial metabolism and CO2 production even in more productive lakes.

  10. Quantity, structure, and habitat selection of natural spawning reefs by walleyes in a north temperate lake: A multiscale analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Joshua K.; Bozek, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Spawning habitat, the cornerstone of self-sustaining, naturally reproducing walleyeSander vitreus populations, has received limited quantitative research. Our goal was to quantitatively describe the structure and quantity of natural walleye spawning habitat and evaluate potential selection of habitat in Big Crooked Lake, Wisconsin. In 2004 and 2005, we located and delineated walleye egg deposition polygons through visual snorkel and scuba surveys. We also delineated recently deposited, adhesive egg patches daily along one spawning reef in 2005. To determine habitat selection, we quantified and compared spawning and lakewide available habitat at different scales. In both years, walleyes used similar spawning habitat, including three geomorphic types: linear shorelines, a point bar, and an island. Walleyes used only 14% of the entire lake shoreline and 39% of the shoreline comprised of gravel (6.4–76.0 mm), cobble (76.1–149.9 mm), or coarser substrates for spawning in 2005, indicating selection of specific spawning habitat. Lakewide, walleyes spawned close to shore (outer egg deposition polygon boundary mean distance = 2.7 m), in shallow water (outer egg deposition polygon boundary mean depth = 0.3 m), and over gravel substrate (percent coverage mean = 64.3) having low embeddedness (mean = 1.30). Our best nearshore (0–13-m) resource selection function predicted an increase in the relative probability of egg deposition with the increasing abundance of gravel, cobble, and rubble (150.0–303.9-mm) substrates and a decrease with increasing distance from shore and water depth (89.9% overall correct classification). Adhesive egg patches confirmed that walleyes actively chose nearshore, shallow-water, and coarse-substrate spawning habitat. The quantitative habitat information and predictive models will assist biologists in developing walleye spawning reef protection strategies and potentially aid in designing and evaluating artificial spawning reefs.

  11. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  12. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  13. Temper Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  14. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  15. Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program: Data availability and research at the Northern Temperate Lakes site in north-central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, John F.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Walker, John F.

    1992-01-01

    The NTL-WEBB study area includes seven lakes that are also the site of a Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) project, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. This project incorporates diverse research investigations conducted by faculty and research associates of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The research orientation of NTL-LTER is principally toward aquatic ecology and geochemistry of the lakes. The WEBB research plan, with its emphasis on hydrologic processes in the lake watersheds, is designed to complement and enhance the LTER work.

  16. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  17. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  18. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  19. Spatial variability of nutrients (N, P) in a deep, temperate lake with a low trophic level supported by global navigation satellite systems, geographic information system and geostatistics.

    PubMed

    Łopata, Michał; Popielarczyk, Dariusz; Templin, Tomasz; Dunalska, Julita; Wiśniewski, Grzegorz; Bigaj, Izabela; Szymański, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated changes in the spatial distribution of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the deep, mesotrophic Lake Hańcza. The raw data collection, supported by global navigation satellite system (GNSS) positioning, was conducted on 79 sampling points. A geostatistical method (kriging) was applied in spatial interpolation. Despite the relatively small area of the lake (3.04 km(2)), compact shape (shore development index of 2.04) and low horizontal exchange of water (retention time 11.4 years), chemical gradients in the surface waters were found. The largest variation concerns the main biogenic element - phosphorus. The average value was 0.032 at the extreme values of 0.019 to 0.265 mg L(-1) (coefficient of variation 87%). Smaller differences are related to nitrogen compounds (0.452-1.424 mg L(-1) with an average value of 0.583 mg L(-1), the coefficient of variation 20%). The parts of the lake which are fed with tributaries are the richest in phosphorus. The water quality of the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Hańcza has been deteriorating in recent years. Our results indicate that inferences about trends in the evolution of examined lake trophic status should be based on an analysis of the data, taking into account the local variation in water chemistry. PMID:24804657

  20. Population dynamics of Philureter trigoniopsis (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalinae) from urinary organs of Galaxias maculatus (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae) in a cold temperate Andean Patagonian lake (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Viozzi, Gustavo P; Semenas, Liliana G; Gutiérrez, Pablo

    2005-12-01

    Philureter trigoniopsis parasitizes the ureters and urinary bladder of Galaxias maculatus in Patagonian Andean lakes. To investigate factors associated with variation in the prevalence and intensity of this monogenean, fish were sampled periodically over 2 yr in Lake Gutiérrez. Prevalence and mean intensity are higher in smaller fishes than in larger ones. A seasonal pattern was observed, with peak recruitment and peak mean intensity occurring in early spring (September), followed by lows in late summer (January-February). Galaxias maculatus length classes are spatially segregated due to seasonal migrations, so the annual infection cycle is characterized by higher prevalence and intensity from late winter to early summer in the smaller fish from the deep zone of the lake. PMID:16539018

  1. The importance of year-to-year variation in meteorological and runoff forcing for water quality of a temperate, dimictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romarheim, A. T.; Tominaga, K.; Riise, G.; Andersen, T.

    2015-06-01

    Natural stochasticity can pose challenges in managing the quality of the environment, or hinder understanding of the system structure. It is problematic because unfavourable stochastic events cancel management efforts and because a favourable stochastic event may overestimate perceived success. This paper presents a variance-based modelling method that can be used to quantify the extent to which natural stochasticity can affect the target environment. We use a case study of a eutrophication assessment of a Norwegian lake, Årungen, using a lake model, MyLake, in order to present the method, and to investigate how this method could assist in answering scientific and management questions. Here we contrasted two effects of nutrient loading in runoff (partially controllable by policies) and meteorology (purely natural stochastic events), illustrated in the case study, in order to achieve the season-by-season quantification of mutually confounding factors of stochastic events. The results indicate that, for example, variation in runoff volume was most prevalent during autumn and winter, while variation in phosphorus inflow was most extensive from late winter to early spring. Thermal-related properties in the lake were well predicted by the model, and showed that the time of thermocline formation varied among years by more than 1 month, from mid-April to mid-May, whereas loading was the most important factor for phytoplankton biomass and water transparency. Mild winters and greater inputs of suspended matter and phosphorus were followed by increased phytoplankton biomass and light attenuation. These findings also suggest that future changes in the global climate may have important implications for local water management decision-making. The present method of disentangling mutually confounding factors is not limited to lake water quality studies and may also provide utility in other types of aquatic system modelling.

  2. Within-lake distribution patterns of fish assemblages: the relative roles of spatial, temporal and random environmental factors in assessing fish assemblages using gillnets in a large and shallow temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Specziár, A; György, A I; Erős, T

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the relative role of spatio-temporal factors and associated environmental variables (water transparency and temperature) were quantified in relation to gillnet samples of fishes in a large and shallow lake (Lake Balaton, Hungary). Most of the variance (56·1%) in the relative abundance data (%) was related to the vertical segregation of fishes. This gradient substantially affected the catch per unit effort (CPUE) by number of the dominant species, the surface-oriented bleak Alburnus alburnus and the benthic common bream Abramis brama. It also influenced total CPUE, mean fish mass and species richness and diversity. At the lake level, horizontal habitat heterogeneity (i.e. littoral v. offshore) accounted for only 8·3% of the total variance in relative abundance data, but was important in structuring the CPUE of the ruffe Gymnocephalus cernua and the pikeperch Sander lucioperca. The longitudinal environmental gradient (i.e. lake basin), year and season of sampling, water transparency and temperature had significant effects on relative abundance only at the habitat level, but were also important components of variability of CPUE in some species at the lake level. As sampling schemes need to consider the main gradients in fish assemblage distributions, the use of surface and pelagic gillnets should be more intensively incorporated in the study and monitoring of fish assemblages in shallow lakes and lake habitats. PMID:23464547

  3. Ice cover extent drives phytoplankton and bacterial community structure in a large north-temperate lake: implications for a warming climate.

    PubMed

    Beall, B F N; Twiss, M R; Smith, D E; Oyserman, B O; Rozmarynowycz, M J; Binding, C E; Bourbonniere, R A; Bullerjahn, G S; Palmer, M E; Reavie, E D; Waters, Lcdr M K; Woityra, Lcdr W C; McKay, R M L

    2016-06-01

    Mid-winter limnological surveys of Lake Erie captured extremes in ice extent ranging from expansive ice cover in 2010 and 2011 to nearly ice-free waters in 2012. Consistent with a warming climate, ice cover on the Great Lakes is in decline, thus the ice-free condition encountered may foreshadow the lakes future winter state. Here, we show that pronounced changes in annual ice cover are accompanied by equally important shifts in phytoplankton and bacterial community structure. Expansive ice cover supported phytoplankton blooms of filamentous diatoms. By comparison, ice free conditions promoted the growth of smaller sized cells that attained lower total biomass. We propose that isothermal mixing and elevated turbidity in the absence of ice cover resulted in light limitation of the phytoplankton during winter. Additional insights into microbial community dynamics were gleaned from short 16S rRNA tag (Itag) Illumina sequencing. UniFrac analysis of Itag sequences showed clear separation of microbial communities related to presence or absence of ice cover. Whereas the ecological implications of the changing bacterial community are unclear at this time, it is likely that the observed shift from a phytoplankton community dominated by filamentous diatoms to smaller cells will have far reaching ecosystem effects including food web disruptions. PMID:25712272

  4. Vertical distribution of microbial communities in a perennially stratified Arctic lake with saline, anoxic bottom waters

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, André M.; Harding, Tommy; Galand, Pierre E.; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Meromictic lakes are useful biogeochemical models because of their stratified chemical gradients and separation of redox reactions down the water column. Perennially ice-covered meromictic lakes are particularly stable, with long term constancy in their density profiles. Here we sampled Lake A, a deep meromictic lake at latitude 83°N in High Arctic Canada. Sampling was before (May) and after (August) an unusual ice-out event during the warm 2008 summer. We determined the bacterial and archaeal community composition by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing. Both prokaryote communities were stratified by depth and the Bacteria differed between dates, indicating locally driven selection processes. We matched taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions and found a close correspondence between the depth of functional specialists and chemical gradients. These results indicate a rich microbial diversity despite the extreme location, with pronounced vertical structure in taxonomic and potential functional composition, and with community shifts during ice-out. PMID:22930670

  5. Biotransference and biomagnification of selenium copper, cadmium, zinc, arsenic and lead in a temperate seagrass ecosystem from Lake Macquarie Estuary, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Barwick, M; Maher, W

    2003-10-01

    In this study the biotransference of selenium copper, cadmium, zinc, arsenic and lead was measured in a contaminated seagrass ecosystem in Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia, to determine if biomagnification of these trace metals is occurring and if they reach concentrations that pose a threat to the resident organisms or human consumers. Selenium was found to biomagnify, exceeding maximum permitted concentrations for human consumption within carnivorous fish tissue, the highest trophic level examined. Selenium concentrations measured within carnivorous fish were also above those shown to elicit sub-lethal effects in freshwater fish. As comparisons are made to selenium concentrations known to effect freshwater fish, inferences must be made with caution. There was no evidence of copper, cadmium, zinc or lead biomagnification within the food web examined. Copper, cadmium, zinc and lead concentrations were below concentrations shown to elicit adverse responses in biota. Copper concentrations within crustaceans M. bennettae and P. palagicus were found to exceed maximum permitted concentrations for human consumption. It is likely that copper concentrations within these species were accumulated due to the essential nature of this trace metal for many species of molluscs and crustaceans. Arsenic showed some evidence of biomagnification. Total arsenic concentrations are similar to those found in other uncontaminated marine ecosystems, thus arsenic concentrations are unlikely to cause adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Inorganic arsenic concentrations are below maximum permitted concentrations for human consumption. PMID:12860434

  6. Diversity of extremophilic purple phototrophic bacteria in Soap Lake, a Central Washington (USA) Soda Lake.

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Pinkart, Holly C; Madigan, Michael T

    2011-08-01

    Culture-based and culture-independent methods were used to explore the diversity of phototrophic purple bacteria in Soap Lake, a small meromictic soda lake in the western USA. Among soda lakes, Soap Lake is unusual because it consists of distinct upper and lower water bodies of vastly different salinities, and its deep waters contain up to 175 mM sulfide. From Soap Lake water new alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacteria of the families Chromatiaceae and Ectothiorhodospiraceae were cultured, and one purple non-sulfur bacterium was isolated. Comparative sequence analysis of pufM, a gene that encodes a key photosynthetic reaction centre protein universally found in purple bacteria, was used to measure the diversity of purple bacteria in Soap Lake. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of pufMs amplified from Soap Lake water revealed that a significant diversity of purple bacteria inhabit this soda lake. Although close relatives of several of the pufM phylotypes obtained from cultured species could also be detected in Soap Lake water, several other more divergent pufM phylotypes were also detected. It is possible that Soap Lake purple bacteria are major contributors of organic matter into the ecosystem of this lake, especially in its extensive anoxic and sulfidic deep waters. PMID:21410624

  7. From Leaf Synthesis to Senescence: n-Alkyl Lipid Abundance and D/H Composition Among Plant Species in a Temperate Deciduous Forest at Brown's Lake Bog, Ohio, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, E. J.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Lowell, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotope composition (D/H, δD) of terrestrial plant leaf waxes is a promising paleohydrology proxy because meteoric water (e.g., precipitation) is the primary hydrogen source for wax synthesis. However, secondary environmental and biological factors modify the net apparent fractionation between precipitation δD and leaf wax δD, limiting quantitative reconstruction of paleohydrology. These secondary factors include soil evaporation, leaf transpiration, biosynthetic fractionation, and the seasonal timing of lipid synthesis. Here, we investigate the influence of each of these factors on n-alkyl lipid δD in five dominant deciduous angiosperm tree species as well as shrubs, ferns and grasses in the watershed surrounding Brown's Lake Bog, Ohio, USA. We quantified n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid concentrations and δD in replicate individuals of each species at weekly to monthly intervals from March to October 2014 to assess inter- and intraspecific isotope variability throughout the growing season. We present soil, xylem and leaf water δD from each individual, and precipitation and atmospheric water vapor δD throughout the season to directly examine the relationship between source water and lipid isotope composition. These data allow us to assess the relative influence of soil evaporation and leaf transpiration among plant types, within species, and along a soil moisture gradient throughout the catchment. We use leaf water δD to approximate biosynthetic fractionation for each individual and test whether this is a species-specific and seasonal constant, and to evaluate variation among plant types with identical growth conditions. Our high frequency sampling approach provides new insights into the seasonal timing of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid synthesis and subsequent fluctuations in concentration and δD in a temperate deciduous forest. These results will advance understanding of the magnitude and timing of secondary influences on the modern leaf wax

  8. Recent Warming of Lake Kivu

    PubMed Central

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A.; Crowe, Sean A.; Hecky, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient. PMID:25295730

  9. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973–2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations. PMID:26173734

  10. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-07-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973-2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations.

  11. Extreme events in the sedimentary record of maar Lake Pavin: Implications for natural hazards assessment in the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassiot, Léo; Chapron, Emmanuel; Di Giovanni, Christian; Albéric, Patrick; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Meybeck, Michel

    2016-06-01

    A set of sedimentary cores, high resolution swath bathymetry and subbottom profiler data provides new insights on sedimentary processes in meromictic maar Lake Pavin, France. Three sedimentary environments (i.e., littoral, plateau and basin) have been identified in the lake from sediment composition using bulk organic geochemistry and the analysis of hydroacoustic images. Various forms of rapidly deposited layers (RDLs) have been identified and radiocarbon dated. An up to date stratigraphy of sedimentary events matching coeval RDLs across the lake is presented and illustrates a wide range of natural hazards linked to Lake Pavin during the last 2000 years. In AD 600, a sudden lake outburst triggered a slump deposit along with a 9 m lake-level drop that drove shifts in sedimentary organic matter composition. Outside the lake, outburst flood deposits have been described downstream and provide sedimentary evidence for this event. The lake-level drop also favored the generation of gravity reworking processes, as shown by (1) a regional earthquake-triggered large slope failure on the plateau connected to a mass-wasting deposit in the basin dated to AD 1300, and (2) a succession of turbidites in AD 1825 and AD 1860 contemporaneous to two historic earthquakes, suggesting that this lake is sensitive to earthquakes with a minimum epicentral intensity of V. Finally, past observations of lake water color changes in AD 1783 and AD 1936, similar to reports in other meromictic lakes, match iron-rich deposits identified in maar lake sediments and suggest that Lake Pavin could have undergone limnic eruptions.

  12. Past and future warming of a deep European lake (Lake Lugano): What are the climatic drivers?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lepori, Fabio; Roberts, James J.

    2015-01-01

    We used four decades (1972–2013) of temperature data from Lake Lugano, Switzerland and Italy, to address the hypotheses that: [i] the lake has been warming; [ii] part of the warming reflects global trends and is independent from climatic oscillations and [iii] the lake will continue to warm until the end of the 21st century. During the time spanned by our data, the surface waters of the lake (0–5 m) warmed at rates of 0.2–0.9 °C per decade, depending on season. The temperature of the deep waters (50-m bottom) displayed a rising trend in a meromictic basin of the lake and a sawtooth pattern in the other basin, which is holomictic. Long-term variation in surfacewater temperature correlated to global warming and multidecadal variation in two climatic oscillations, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the East Atlantic Pattern (EA).However, we did not detect an influence of the EA on the lake's temperature (as separate from the effect of global warming). Moreover, the effect of the AMO, estimated to a maximum of +1 °C, was not sufficient to explain the observed temperature increase (+2–3 °C in summer). Based on regional climate projections, we predicted that the lake will continue to warm at least until the end of the 21st century. Our results strongly suggest that the warming of Lake Lugano is tied to globalclimate change. To sustain current ecosystem conditions in Lake Lugano, we suggest that manage- ment plans that curtail eutrophication and (or) mitigation of global warming be pursued.

  13. Going from microbial ecology to genome data and back: studies on a haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from Soap Lake, Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-01-01

    Soap Lake is a meromictic, alkaline (∼pH 9.8) and saline (∼14–140 g liter-1) lake located in the semiarid area of eastern Washington State. Of note is the length of time it has been meromictic (at least 2000 years) and the extremely high sulfide level (∼140 mM) in its monimolimnion. As expected, the microbial ecology of this lake is greatly influenced by these conditions. A bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, was isolated from the mixolimnion region of this lake. Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans is a haloalkaliphilic bacterium capable of forming hydrogen from 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose. Due to its ability to produce hydrogen under saline and alkaline conditions, in amounts that rival genetically modified organisms, its genome was sequenced. This sequence data provides an opportunity to explore the unique metabolic capabilities of this organism, including the mechanisms for tolerating the extreme conditions of both high salinity and alkalinity of its environment. PMID:25477871

  14. Going from microbial ecology to genome data and back: studies on a haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from Soap Lake, Washington State.

    PubMed

    Mormile, Melanie R

    2014-01-01

    Soap Lake is a meromictic, alkaline (∼pH 9.8) and saline (∼14-140 g liter(-1)) lake located in the semiarid area of eastern Washington State. Of note is the length of time it has been meromictic (at least 2000 years) and the extremely high sulfide level (∼140 mM) in its monimolimnion. As expected, the microbial ecology of this lake is greatly influenced by these conditions. A bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, was isolated from the mixolimnion region of this lake. Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans is a haloalkaliphilic bacterium capable of forming hydrogen from 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose. Due to its ability to produce hydrogen under saline and alkaline conditions, in amounts that rival genetically modified organisms, its genome was sequenced. This sequence data provides an opportunity to explore the unique metabolic capabilities of this organism, including the mechanisms for tolerating the extreme conditions of both high salinity and alkalinity of its environment. PMID:25477871

  15. Geochemical insight into differences in the physical structures and dynamics of two adjacent maar lakes at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nicolosi, M.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Paternoster, M.; Rosciglione, A.

    2013-05-01

    report on the first geochemical investigation of the Monticchio maar lakes (Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy) covering an annual cycle that aimed at understanding the characteristic features of the physical structures and dynamics of the two lakes. We provide the first detailed description of the lakes based on high-resolution conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, chemical and isotopic (H and O) compositions of the water, and the amounts of dissolved gases (e.g., He, Ar, CH4, and CO2). The combined data set reveals that the two lakes, which are separated by less than 200 m, exhibit different dynamics: one is a meromictic lake, where the waters are rich in biogenic and mantle-derived gases, while the other is a monomictic lake, which exhibits complete turnover of the water in winter and the release of dissolved gases. Our data strongly suggest that the differences in the dynamics of the two lakes are due to different density profiles affected by dissolved solutes, mainly Fe, which is strongly enriched in the deep water of the meromictic lake. A conceptual model of water balance was constructed based on the correlation between the chemical composition of the water and the hydrogen isotopic signature. Gas-rich groundwaters that feed both of the lakes and evaporation processes subsequently modify the water chemistry of the lakes. Our data highlight that no further potential hazardous accumulation of lethal gases is expected at the Monticchio lakes. Nevertheless, geochemical monitoring is needed to prevent the possibility of vigorous gas releases that have previously occurred in historical time.

  16. Molecular and isotopic insights into methane oxidation in Lake Kivu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigah, P. K.; Wehrli, B.; Schubert, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Kivu is a meromictic lake in the East African Rift Valley, located between the Republic of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The hypolimnion is permanently stratified and contain an unusually high amount of dissolved methane (CH4; ~ 60 km3) and carbon dioxide (CO2; ~300 km3) at standard temperature and pressure. While microbial-mediated methane oxidation is an important sink of methane in the lake, little is known about the distribution of microbes involved in the methane oxidation. To provide insights into methanotrophy in the lake, we analyzed depth profile of CH4, δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-DIC, δ13C-POC and the biomarkers of methanotrophic archaea and bacteria and their stable carbon isotopic composition from suspended particulate matter isolated from the lake water column. Our preliminary data show enhanced methane oxidation in oxic-anoxic transition zone in the water column. Depth distribution of diagnostic methanotrophic archaeal biomarkers such as archaeol and hydroxyarchaeol suggest archaea might be involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. Phospholipid fatty acids and diplopterol distribution and carbon isotopic signatures indicate bacteria-mediated anaerobic (and aerobic) methane oxidation in the lake.

  17. Multidisciplinary characterisation of sedimentary processes in a recent maar lake (Lake Pavin, French Massif Central) and implication for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapron, E.; Albéric, P.; Jézéquel, D.; Versteeg, W.; Bourdier, J.-L.; Sitbon, J.

    2010-09-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in the most recent maar lake of the French Massif Central (Lake Pavin) are documented for the first time based on high resolution seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetric surveys and by piston coring and radiocarbon dating on a sediment depocentre developed on a narrow sub aquatic plateau. This new data set confirms the mid Holocene age of maar lake Pavin formation at 6970±60 yrs cal BP and highlights a wide range of gravity reworking phenomena affecting the basin. In particular, a slump deposit dated between AD 580-640 remoulded both mid-Holocene lacustrine sediments, terrestrial plant debris and some volcanic material from the northern crater inner walls. Between AD 1200 and AD 1300, a large slide scar mapped at 50 m depth also affected the southern edge of the sub aquatic plateau, suggesting that these gas-rich biogenic sediments (laminated diatomite) are poorly stable. Although several triggering mechanisms can be proposed for these prehistoric sub-aquatic mass wasting deposits in Lake Pavin, we argue that such large remobilisation of gas-rich sediments may affect the gas stability in deep waters of meromictic maar lakes. This study highlights the need to further document mass wasting processes in maar lakes and their impacts on the generation of waves, favouring the development of dangerous (and potentially deadly) limnic eruptions.

  18. Development of a real-time PCR method for the detection of fossil 16S rDNA fragments of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the sediments of Lake Cadagno.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, D F; Peduzzi, S; Guidi, V; Peduzzi, R; Wirth, S B; Gilli, A; Tonolla, M

    2012-05-01

    Lake Cadagno is a crenogenic meromictic lake situated in the southern range of the Swiss Alps characterized by a compact chemocline that has been the object of many ecological studies. The population dynamics of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the chemocline has been monitored since 1994 with molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To reconstruct paleo-microbial community dynamics, we developed a quantitative real-time PCR methodology for specific detection of 16S rRNA gene sequences of purple and green sulfur bacteria populations from sediment samples. We detected fossil 16S rDNA of nine populations of phototrophic sulfur bacteria down to 9-m sediment depth, corresponding to about 9500 years of the lake's biogeological history. These results provide the first evidence for the presence of 16S rDNA of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in Holocene sediments of an alpine meromictic lake and indicate that the water column stratification and the bacterial plume were already present in Lake Cadagno thousands of years ago. The finding of Chlorobium clathratiforme remains in all the samples analyzed shows that this population, identified in the water column only in 2001, was already a part of the lake's biota in the past. PMID:22433067

  19. Depth evolution of the Meirama pit lake, A Coruña, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Jordi; Juncosa-Rivera, Ricardo; Cereijo-Arango, José Luis; García-Morrondo, David; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    The Meirama pit lake is a water mass in the process of controlled flooding that, by the end of December 2015, can be described as a steadily stratified meromictic system. The deepest portion of the lake (monimolimnion) is isolated regarding the annual mixing dynamics (December/January) of the upper water body (mixolimnion), for which the depth of mixing is restricted to a water column of 35-40 m thick. Due to the contrasting flooding history (access of groundwater at the beginning and mixed access of stream/groundwater (being dominant the stream water) the deepest portion of the lake is separated from the upper, non-mixed layer by a marked chemocline. Strictly speaking, the monimolimnion of a meromictic lake extends to the waters located beneath the mixed lake layer. In the case of the Meirama Lake the monimolimnion is internally stratified and made of two major water bodies. From hereafter the deep and upper monimolimnion will be identified as bottom and middle sections of the lake while the mixolimnion is referred to as the surface layer. The general characteristics and evolution of the Meirama Lake have been reported elsewhere. In this work we focus on a summary description of the chemical evolution of the monimolimnion of the lake based on data gathered between 2009 and 2015 from the still on-going monitoring survey. The chemical evolution of the monimolimnion of the lake differs significantly from that of the mixolimnion. In general, surface water is sensible to seasonal fluctuations due to weather conditions, rainfall and biogeochemical processes. The middle and bottom sections are not sensible, in general, to this effects and their evolution obeys to a number of internal processes. In the case of temperature we observe a nearly constant gradient increase (0.001 °C/day) in the middle and deep lake waters up to the beginning of 2012, where it remains constant. The rise in temperature is likely due to the heat provided by groundwater seepage whose temperature

  20. STOCHASTIC INTEGRATION FOR TEMPERED FRACTIONAL BROWNIAN MOTION

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD

    2014-01-01

    Tempered fractional Brownian motion is obtained when the power law kernel in the moving average representation of a fractional Brownian motion is multiplied by an exponential tempering factor. This paper develops the theory of stochastic integrals for tempered fractional Brownian motion. Along the way, we develop some basic results on tempered fractional calculus. PMID:24872598

  1. Saturn's North Temperate Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    In this Voyager 2 false-color photograph, obtained Aug. 20 from a distance of 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles), north is to the upper left. This view of the northern edge of Saturn's North Temperate Belt, the brownish region in the lower right of the image, was made from frames taken through violet, blue and green filters. The bright disturbance in the lower left has been coiled into a figure '6' by the wind shear in the planet's atmosphere; this same feature was seen in an earlier release (P-23912, S-2-9). To the south of it, winds blow westward at 20 meters-per-second (45 mph). Within the white zone to the north, wind speeds are in excess of 130 meters-per-second (290 mph) to the east. Wavelike structures can be seen along the ribbon feature that roughly follows the core of this strong eastward-flowing jet. The smallest observable features in this image are about 120 km. (75 mi.) across. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  2. LakeMIP Kivu: Evaluating the representation of a large, deep tropical lake by a set of 1-dimensional lake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Wim; Stepanenko, Viktor; Darchambeau, François; Joehnk, Klaus; Martynov, Andrey; Mironov, Dmitrii; Perroud, Marjorie; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    The African great lakes are of utmost importance for the local economy (fishing), as well as being essential to the survival of the local people. During the last decades, these lakes experienced fast changes in ecosystem structure and functioning and their future evolution is a major concern. In this study, for the first time a set of one-dimensional lake models are evaluated over East-Africa, in particular over Lake Kivu (2.28 °S; 28.98 °E). The unique limnology of meromictic Lake Kivu, with the importance of salinity and geothermal springs in a tropical high-altitude climate, presents a worthy challenge to the 1D-lake models currently involved in the Lake Model Intercomparison Project (LakeMIP). Furthermore, this experiment will serve as the basis for a future, more complex intercomparison, coupling lake models with atmospheric circulation models to analyse climate change effects on the lake. Meteorological observations from two automatic weather stations, one at Kamembe airport (Rwanda, 2003-2008), the other at ISP Bukavu (DRC, 2003-2011), are used to drive each of these models. For the evaluation, a unique dataset is used which contains over 150 temperature profiles recorded since 2002. The standard LakeMIP protocol is adapted to mirror the limnological conditions in Lake Kivu and to unify model parameters as far as possible. Since some lake models do not account for salinity and its effect upon lake stratification, two sets of simulations are performed with each model: one for the freshwater layer only (60 m) and one for the average lake depth (240 m) including salinity. Therewith, on the one hand it is investigated whether each model is able to reproduce the correct mixing regime in Lake Kivu and captures the controlling of this seasonality by the relative humidity, which constrains evaporation except during summer (JJA). On the other hand, the ability of different models to simulate salinity- and geothermal-induced effects upon deep water stratification is

  3. Past, present and future of volcanic lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco; Mora-Amador, Raúl; Sandri, Laura; Chiarini, Veronica

    2014-02-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after lethal gas burst occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) in 1986, a limnic rather than a volcanic event. This led to the foundation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990s. We here introduce the first data base of volcanic lakes VOLADA, containing 474 lakes, a number that, in our opinion, is surprisingly high. VOLADA could become an interactive, open-access working tool where our community can rely on in the future. Many of the compiled lakes were almost unknown, or at least unstudied to date, whereas there are acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems that are continuously or discontinuously monitored, providing useful information for volcanic surveillance (e.g., Ruapehu, Yugama, Poás). Nyos-type lakes, i.e. those hosted in quiescent volcanoes and characterized by significant gas accumulation in bottom waters, are potentially hazardous. These lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term build-up of gas, which can be released after a trigger. Some of the unstudied lakes are possibly in the latter situation. Acidic crater lakes are easily recognized as active, whereas Nyos-type lakes can only be recognized as potentially hazardous if bottom waters are investigated, a less obvious operation. In this review, research strategies are lined out, especially for the “active crater lakes”. We make suggestions for monitoring frequency based on the principle of the “residence time dependent monitoring time window”. A complementary, multi-disciplinary (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, statistics) approach is considered to provide new ideas, which can be the bases for future volcanic lake monitoring. More profound deterministic knowledge (e.g., precursory signals for phreatic eruptions, or lake roll-over events) should not only serve to enhance conceptual models of

  4. Human Impact on Biogeochemical Cycles and Deposition Dynamics in Karstic Lakes: El Tobar Lake Record (Central Iberian Range, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro-Lostres, F.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Giralt, S.; Hillman, A. L.; Brown, E. T.; Abbott, M. B.; Valero-Garces, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Karstic lakes in the Iberian Range (Central Spain) provide a unique opportunity to test the human impact in the watersheds and the aquatic environments during historical times. We reconstruct the depositional evolution and the changes in biogeochemical cycles of El Tobar karstic lake, evaluating the response and the resilience of this Mediterranean ecosystem to both anthropogenic impacts and climate forcing during the last 1000 years. Lake El Tobar (40°32'N, 3°56'W; 1200 m a.s.l.; see Figure), 16 ha surface area, 20 m max. depth and permanent meromictic conditions, has a relatively large watershed (1080 ha). Five 8 m long sediment cores and short gravity cores where recovered, imaged, logged with a Geotek, described and sampled for geochemical analyses (elemental TOC, TIC, TN, TS), XRF scanner and ICP-MS, and dated (137Cs and 10 14C assays). The record is a combination of: i) laminated dark silts with terrestrial remains and diatoms and ii) massive to banded light silts (mm to cm -thick layers) interpreted as flood deposits. Sediments, TOC, and Br/Ti and Sr/Ca ratios identify four periods of increased sediment delivery occurred about 1500, 1800, 1850 and 1900 AD, coinciding with large land uses changes of regional relevance such as land clearing and increased population. Two main hydrological changes are clearly recorded in El Tobar sequence. The first one, marked by a sharp decrease in Mg, Ca and Si concentrations, took place about 1200 AD, and during a period of increasing lake level, which shifted from shallower to deeper facies and from carbonatic to clastic and organic-rich deposition. This change was likely related to increased water availability synchronous to the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age. The second one was a canal construction in 1967 AD when a nearby reservoir provided fresh water influx to the lake, and resulted in stronger meromictic conditions in the system after canal construction, which is marked by lower

  5. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  6. Recovery of temperate Desulfovibrio vulgaris bacteriophage on anovel host strain

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; Stolyar, S.S.; Pinel, N.; Yen, H.C.; He, Z.; Zhou,J.; Wall, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-04-02

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain DePue) closelyrelated to Desulfovibrio vulgaris ssp. vulgaris strain Hildenborough wasisolated from the sediment of a heavy-metal impacted lake usingestablished techniques. Although few physiological differences betweenstrains DePue and Hildenborough were observed, pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis (PFGE) revealed a significant genome reduction in strainDePue. Comparative whole-genome microarray and PCR analyses demonstratedthat the absence of genes annotated in the Hildenborough genome as phageor phage-related contributed to the significant genome reduction instrain DePue. Two morphotypically distinct temperate bacteriophage fromstrain Hildenborough were recovered using strain DePue as a host forplaque isolation.

  7. Temporal dynamics of active Archaea in oxygen-depleted zones of two deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Hugoni, Mylène; Domaizon, Isabelle; Taib, Najwa; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Agogué, Hélène; Galand, Pierre E; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Deep lakes are of specific interest in the study of archaeal assemblages as chemical stratification in the water column allows niche differentiation and distinct community structure. Active archaeal community and potential nitrifiers were investigated monthly over 1 year by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA transcripts and genes, and by quantification of archaeal amoA genes in two deep lakes. Our results showed that the active archaeal community patterns of spatial and temporal distribution were different between these lakes. The meromictic lake characterized by a stable redox gradient but variability in nutrient concentrations exhibited large temporal rearrangements of the dominant euryarchaeal phylotypes, suggesting a variety of ecological niches and dynamic archaeal communities in the hypolimnion of this lake. Conversely, Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I (MGI) largely dominated in the second lake where deeper water layers exhibited only short periods of complete anoxia and constant low ammonia concentrations. Investigations conducted on archaeal amoA transcripts abundance suggested that not all lacustrine Thaumarchaeota conduct the process of nitrification. A high number of 16S rRNA transcripts associated to crenarchaeal group C3 or the Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotic Group indicates the potential for these uncharacterized groups to contribute to nutrient cycling in lakes. PMID:25472601

  8. Microbial and biogeochernical processes Soda Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Cloern, J.E.; Sofer, Z.; Smith, R.L.; Culbertson, C.W.; Zehr, J.; Miller, L.; Cole, B.; Harvey, R.; Iversen, N.; Klug, M.; Des Marais, D J; Rau, G.

    1988-01-01

    Meromictic, alkaline lakes represent modern-day analogues of lacustrine source rock depositional environments. In order to further our understanding of how these lakes function in terms of limnological and biogeochemical processes, we have conducted an interdisciplinary study of Big Soda Lake. Annual mixolimnion productivity (ca. 500 g m-2) is dominated by a winter diatom bloom (60% of annual) caused by upward transport of ammonia to the epilimnion. The remainder of productivity is attributable to chemoautotrophs (30%) and photosynthetic bacteria (10%) present at the oxic -anoxic interface from May to November. Studies of bacterial heterotrophy and particulate fluxes in the water column indicate that about 90% of annual productivity is remineralized in the mixolimnion, primarily by fermentative bacteria. However, high rates of sulphate reduction (9-29 mmol m-2 yr-1) occur in the monimolimnion waters, which could remineralize most (if not all) of the primary productivity. This discrepancy has not as yet been fully explained. Low rates of methanogenesis also occur in the monimolimnion waters and sediments. Most of the methane is consumed by anaerobic methane oxidation occurring in the monimolimnion water column. Other bacterial processes occurring in the lake are also discussed. Preliminary studies have been made on the organic geochemistry of the monimolimnion sediments. Carbon-14-dating indicates a lower depositional rate prior to meromixis and a downcore enrichment in 13C of organic carbon and chlorophyll derivatives. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments indicate that the sediment organic matter is almost entirely derived from the water column with little or no contribution from terrestrial sources. The significance of the organics released by hydrous pyrolysis is discussed.

  9. Cryopreservation of Temperate Berry Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preservation of clonal fruit crops requires vegetative propagation. Cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen is considered an ideal method for long-term germplasm storage. Most of the existing cryopreservation techniques are effective for temperate berry crops. The availability of many techniques provi...

  10. Discovering the Ancient Temperate Rainforest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Two activities for grades 3 through 8 explore species adaptation and forestry issues in the North American rainforests. In one activity, students create imaginary species of plants or animals that are adapted for life in an ancient temperate rainforest. In the second activity, students role play groups affected by plans to log an area of the…

  11. Gradient Tempering Of Bearing Races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, Richardson A.

    1991-01-01

    Gradient-tempering process increases fracture toughness and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking of ball-bearing races made of hard, strong steels and subject to high installation stresses and operation in corrosive media. Also used in other applications in which local toughening of high-strength/low-toughness materials required.

  12. Scientific Coring in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    Lake Tahoe ranks among the largest, oldest, and deepest lakes in North America. In addition, the lake is located at a major tectonic boundary. These factors make the Lake Tahoe basin an exciting natural laboratory for studying the interaction between tectonics and climate in a high-altitude temperate setting. A recent meeting to explore the potential benefits of a comprehensive program of scientific coring in the Lake Tahoe basin attracted 67 researchers from 28 institutions. The meeting was supported by a grant from the Drilling, Observations, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) consortium with additional funding provided by the John Muir Institute for the Environment and the Tahoe Environmental Research Center at the University of California, Davis, the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the University of California, San Diego, the Desert Research Institute in Reo, Nev., the Academy for the Environment of the University of Nevada, Reno, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

  13. Physical drivers of lake evaporation across a gradient of climate and lake types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenters, J. D.; Blanken, P.; Healey, N. C.; Hinkel, K. M.; Ong, J.; Peake, C.; Potter, B. L.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Spence, C.; Van Cleave, K.; Zlotnik, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Inland waters exchange sensible and latent heat with the overlying atmosphere in ways that are very different from the surrounding terrestrial landscape. Depending on the regional climate and lake characteristics, open-water evaporation from lakes can vary out of phase with terrestrial evapotranspiration within the watershed, and key atmospheric drivers are often different as well. Lake evaporation is a complex process that interacts with many aspects of a lake ecosystem, including water temperature, vertical mixing, lake chemistry, stratification, ice cover, and water levels. Although driven primarily by vapor pressure gradient and wind speed, evaporation is also an energy-consuming process. This leads not only to significant roles from net radiation, sensible heat flux, and other components of the surface energy budget, but it also results in important feedbacks on lake temperature, ice cover, and other evaporation-mediating processes. As such, defining the climatic variables that "drive" lake evaporation is far from straightforward and often depends on timescale, lake depth, and characteristics of the regional climate. In this study, we provide some insight into the problem by examining the energy budget of a variety of lakes across a range of climatic gradients and lake types. This includes shallow Arctic lakes, deep temperate lakes, and a hypersaline lake in a semi-arid climate. Our results reveal a wide range of evaporative response to climatic forcing, including some lakes that show counterintuitive effects or even opposite responses to those of other lakes. Although process-based, mechanistic models should be able to account for such complexities, these findings highlight the need for caution when interpreting climatic drivers of lake evaporation. It is not likely, for example, that models of a solely empirical or statistical nature would be sufficient to fully capture the physics and dynamics of evaporation, particularly in an ever-changing climate.

  14. A selective integrated tempering method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijiang; Qin Gao, Yi

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, based on the integrated tempering sampling we introduce a selective integrated tempering sampling (SITS) method for the efficient conformation sampling and thermodynamics calculations for a subsystem in a large one, such as biomolecules solvated in aqueous solutions. By introducing a potential surface scaled with temperature, the sampling over the configuration space of interest (e.g., the solvated biomolecule) is selectively enhanced but the rest of the system (e.g., the solvent) stays largely unperturbed. The applications of this method to biomolecular systems allow highly efficient sampling over both energy and configuration spaces of interest. Comparing to the popular and powerful replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), the method presented in this paper is significantly more efficient in yielding relevant thermodynamics quantities (such as the potential of mean force for biomolecular conformational changes in aqueous solutions). It is more important that SITS but not REMD yielded results that are consistent with the traditional umbrella sampling free energy calculations when explicit solvent model is used since SITS avoids the sampling of the irrelevant phase space (such as the boiling water at high temperatures). PMID:19968339

  15. Influence of copper recovery on the water quality of the acidic Berkeley Pit lake, Montana, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Nicholas J; Gammons, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    The Berkeley Pit lake in Butte, Montana, formed by flooding of an open-pit copper mine, is one of the world's largest accumulations of acidic, metal-rich water. Between 2003 and 2012, approximately 2 × 10(11) L of pit water, representing 1.3 lake volumes, were pumped from the bottom of the lake to a copper recovery plant, where dissolved Cu(2+) was precipitated on scrap iron, releasing Fe(2+) back to solution and thence back to the pit. Artificial mixing caused by this continuous pumping changed the lake from a meromictic to holomictic state, induced oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+), and caused subsequent precipitation of more than 2 × 10(8) kg of secondary ferric compounds, mainly schwertmannite and jarosite, which settled to the bottom of the lake. A large mass of As, P, and sulfate was also lost from solution. These unforeseen changes in chemistry resulted in a roughly 25-30% reduction in the lake's calculated and measured total acidity, which represents a significant potential savings in the cost of lime treatment, which is not expected to commence until 2023. Future monitoring is needed to verify that schwertmannite and jarosite in the pit sediment do not convert to goethite, a process which would release stored acidity back to the water column. PMID:25723275

  16. Geosphere-Biosphere Interactions in Bio-Activity Volcanic Lakes: Evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica)

    PubMed Central

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  17. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  18. Phytoplankton assemblages of two intermittently open and closed coastal lakes in SE Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongyan; Morrison, R. John; West, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Species composition and biomass of phytoplankton assemblages of a heavily impacted lake (Lake Illawarra) and a less impacted lake (Burrill Lake) in the South-Eastern region of Australia were compared based on bimonthly samples from three sites in each lake collected between April 2005 and April 2007. Lake Illawarra was generally characterized by higher nutrient concentrations and lower salinity than Burrill Lake. Phytoplankton assemblages displayed significant differences between the two lakes in terms of the dominant species composition and patterns of seasonal change rather than biomass. Diatoms were the dominant species in Lake Illawarra on most sampling occasions. In contrast, dinoflagellates (including toxic species) dominated in Burrill Lake during most seasons. Seasonal succession of phytoplankton in the two lakes did not follow the strict spring maximum that is generally observed in temperate waters. In Burrill Lake, maximum phytoplankton biomass often occurred in winter, while the maximum biomasses in Lake Illawarra occurred in autumn, winter and spring. The significant difference of nutrient structure between two lakes and warm temperate regime was regarded as important factors to affect these results. The results suggested care should be taken when relying on estuary health "indicators", such as chlorophyll a, rather than more detailed investigations of phytoplankton species compositions.

  19. [Microbial metabolism of the carbon and sulfur cycles in Shira Lake (Khakasia)].

    PubMed

    Pimenov, N V; Rusanov, I I; Karnachuk, O V; Rogozin, D Iu; Briantseva, I A; Lunina, O N; Iusupov, S K; Parnachev, V P; Ivanov, M V

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological and biogeochemical studies of the meromictic saline Lake Shira (Khakasia) were conducted. In the upper part of the hydrogen-sulfide zone, at a depth of 13.5-14 m, there was a pale pink layer of water due to the development of purple bacteria (6 x 10(5) cells/ml), which were assigned by their morphological and spectral characteristics to Lamprocystis purpureus (formerly Amoebobacter purpurea). In August, the production of organic matter (OM) in Lake Shira was estimated to be 943 mg C/(m2 day). The contribution of anoxygenic photosynthesis was insignificant (about 7% of the total OM production). The share of bacterial chemosynthesis was still less (no more than 2%). In the anaerobic zone, the community of sulfate-reducing bacteria played a decisive role in the terminal decomposition of OM. The maximal rates of sulfate reduction were observed in the near-bottom water (114 micrograms S/(1 day)) and in the surface layer of bottom sediments (901 micrograms S/(dm3 day)). The daily expenditure of Corg for sulfate reduction was 73% of Corg formed daily in the processes of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis and bacterial chemosynthesis. The profile of methane distribution in the water column and bottom sediments was typical of meromictic reservoirs. The methane content in the water column increased beginning with the thermocline (7-8 m), and reached maximum values in the near-bottom water (17 microliters/l). In bottom sediments, the greatest methane concentrations (57 microliters/l) were observed in the surface layer (0-3 cm). The integral rate of methane formation in the water column and bottom sediments was almost an order of magnitude higher than the rate of its oxidation by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic microorganisms. PMID:12751251

  20. SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN CHARACTERISTICS IN ICE-COVERED LAKES. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic, one-dimensional model is presented which simulates daily dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles and associated water temperatures, ice covers and snow covers for dimictic and polymictic lakes of the temperate zone. The lake parameters required as model input are surface ...

  1. Bacterial Diversity in the Soda Saline Crater Lake from Isabel Island, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Garrido, José Félix; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo César; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Isabel Lake is a moderate saline soda crater lake located in Isabel Island in the eastern tropical Pacific coast of Mexico. Lake is mainly formed by rainfall and is strongly affected by evaporation and high input of nutrients derived from excretions of a large bird community inhabiting the island. So far, only the island macrobiota has been studied. The knowledge of the prokaryotic biota inhabiting the upper layers of this meromictic lake can give clues for the maintenance of this ecosystem. We assessed the diversity and composition of prokaryotic community in sediments and water of the lake by DGGE profiling, 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, and cultivation techniques. The bacterial community is largely dominated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms. Alpha diversity estimations reveal higher value in sediments than in water (P > 0.005). The lake water is dominated by γ-Proteobacteria belonging to four main families where Halomonadaceae presents the highest abundance. Aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant prokaryotes such as Cyanobacteria GPIIa, Halomonas, Alcanivorax, Idiomarina, and Cyclobacterium genera are commonly found. However, in sediment samples, Formosa, Muricauda, and Salegentibacter genera corresponding to Flavobacteriaceae family accounted for 15-20 % of the diversity. Heterotrophs like those involved in sulfur cycle, Desulfotignum, Desulfuromonas, Desulfofustis, and Desulfopila, appear to play an important role in sediments. Finally, a collection of aerobic halophilic bacterial isolates was created from these samples; members of the genus Halomonas were predominantly isolated from lake water. This study contributes to state the bacterial diversity present in this particular soda saline crater lake. PMID:26391805

  2. Lake Powell

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Lake Powell     View Larger Image ... (14.42 mb)   This true-color image over Lake Powell was acquired by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late March 2000. Lake Powell was formed with the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, on the ...

  3. CONNECTICUT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named lakes in Connecticut. It is a polygon Shapefile that includes all lakes that are named on the U.S. Geologicial Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut, plus other officially named lakes i...

  4. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...   View Larger Image Lake Eyre is a large salt lake situated between two deserts in one of Australia's driest regions. ... the effect of sunglint at the nadir camera view angle. Dry, salt encrusted parts of the lake appear bright white or gray. Purple areas have ...

  5. Characterization of microbial populations across geochemical and lithological boundaries in urban lake sediments under environmental change in Minneapolis-St. Paul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, M.; Harrison, B. K.; Flood, B. E.; Myrbo, A.; Bailey, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of microbial communities within urban lake sediments may offer a promising method to observe changes in lake geochemistry due to human impact. By mapping the abundances and diversity of microorganisms through the uppermost meter of sediment in three distinctive Minneapolis-St. Paul lakes (Brownie Lake and Twin Lake, both meromictic, and oligomictic Lake McCarrons) using 16S rRNA characterization, our aim was to observe changes in microbial populations across steep geochemical and lithological gradients. Lake McCarrons underwent a process of eutrophication and a shift to bottom water anoxia beginning around 1910 due mostly to agricultural run-off. This shift greatly increased the preservation potential of seasonal sedimentation and finely laminated varve accumulation. The onset of meromixis in Brownie Lake in ~1915 is abrupt and has been attributed to a sudden drop in water level. Twin Lake is perennially meromictic due to the topography of the watershed. The three lakes were sampled by collecting freeze cores in July, 2012 (McCarrons, Brownie) and February, 2013 (Twin) at the deepest locations beneath anoxic to hypoxic bottom waters. The cores were then subsampled with high resolution techniques at places of interest: within individual lamina, across mass flow deposits, and near the onset of laminae preservation (beginning of oxygen-depleted bottom waters). Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) allows for comparison of the microbial assemblages throughout the sediment columns of each lake and from lake to lake, with a focus on the horizons mentioned previously. The microbial assemblages present in specific horizons are often introduced via sedimentation and are partially derived from community composition at the time of sedimentation. T-RFLP analyses are complemented by mineralogical and lithological descriptions. The lakes have each been subject to their own set of variables and inputs. Brownie Lake contains high levels of

  6. VERTICAL DIFFUSION IN SMALL STRATIFIED LAKES: DATA AND ERROR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water temperature profiles were measured at 2-min intervals in a stratified temperate lake with a surface area of 0.06 km2 and a aximum depth of 10 m from May 7 to August 9, 1989. he data were used to calculate the vertical eddy diffusion coefficient K2 in the hypolimnion. he dep...

  7. Speciation and isotopic composition of sulfur in sediments from Jellyfish Lake, Palau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Spiker, E. C.; Orem, W.H.; Burnett, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    Jellyfish Lake, Palau, is a meromictic marine lake with high organic productivity, low reactive Fe content, and anoxic bottom waters. Sediment samples from Jellyfish Lake were examined for the distribution of sulfur species and their isotopic signatures in order to gain a better understanding of sedimentary sulfur incorporation in Fe-poor environments. Surface samples were taken along a transect from a near-shore site to the center of the lake, and include a sample below oxic water, a sample below the chemocline layer, and samples below anoxic waters. Three additional samples were taken from a core, 2 m long, collected near the lake center. Sulfur to organic carbon weight ratios in all samples were lower than the expected value of 0.36 for normal marine sediment, probably because the lake water is deficient in reactive Fe to form iron sulfides. Total sulfur contents in the surface sediments indicated no changes with distance from shore; however, the sulfur content of the surface sample at the chemocline layer may be slightly higher. Total sulfur content increased with depth in the core and is inversely related to organic carbon content. Organic sulfur is the major sulfur species in the samples, followed in descending order by sulfate, disulfides and monosulfides. Sulfate sulfur isotope ??34S-values are positive (from +20.56 to +12.04???), reflecting the marine source of sulfate in Jellyfish Lake. Disulfide and monosulfide ??34S-values are negative (from -25.07 to -7.60???), because of fractionation during bacterial reduction of sulfate. Monosulfide ??34S-values are somewhat higher than those of disulfides, and they are close to the ??34S-values of organic sulfur. These results indicate that most of the organic sulfur is formed by reaction of bacteriogenic monosulfides, or possibly monosulfide-derived polysulfides, with organic matter in the sediment. ?? 1993.

  8. Habitat, not resource availability, limits consumer production in lake ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Nicola; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Food web productivity in lakes can be limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which reduces fish production by limiting the abundance of their zoobenthic prey. We demonstrate that in a set of 10 small, north temperate lakes spanning a wide DOC gradient, these negative effects of high DOC concentrations on zoobenthos production are driven primarily by availability of warm, well-oxygenated habitat, rather than by light limitation of benthic primary production as previously proposed. There was no significant effect of benthic primary production on zoobenthos production after controlling for oxygen, even though stable isotope analysis indicated that zoobenthos do use this resource. Mean whole-lake zoobenthos production was lower in high-DOC lakes with reduced availability of oxygenated habitat, as was fish biomass. These insights improve understanding of lake food webs and inform management in the face of spatial variability and ongoing temporal change in lake DOC concentrations.

  9. Temperature dependence of the relationship between pCO2 and dissolved organic carbon in lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, L.; Duarte, C. M.; Marotta, H.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in Brazilian lakes, encompassing 225 samples across a wide latitudinal range in the tropics, was tested. Unlike the positive relationship reported for lake waters, which was largely based on temperate lakes, we found no significant relationship for low-latitude lakes (< 33°), despite very broad ranges in both pCO2 and DOC levels. These results suggest substantial differences in the carbon cycling of low-latitude lakes, which must be considered when upscaling limnetic carbon cycling to global scales.

  10. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator–prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  11. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities.

    PubMed

    Knowles, B; Silveira, C B; Bailey, B A; Barott, K; Cantu, V A; Cobián-Güemes, A G; Coutinho, F H; Dinsdale, E A; Felts, B; Furby, K A; George, E E; Green, K T; Gregoracci, G B; Haas, A F; Haggerty, J M; Hester, E R; Hisakawa, N; Kelly, L W; Lim, Y W; Little, M; Luque, A; McDole-Somera, T; McNair, K; de Oliveira, L S; Quistad, S D; Robinett, N L; Sala, E; Salamon, P; Sanchez, S E; Sandin, S; Silva, G G Z; Smith, J; Sullivan, C; Thompson, C; Vermeij, M J A; Youle, M; Young, C; Zgliczynski, B; Brainard, R; Edwards, R A; Nulton, J; Thompson, F; Rohwer, F

    2016-03-24

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus 'more microbes, fewer viruses'. PMID:26982729

  12. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  13. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10-cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by X-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- whereas sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth, reaching saturation with epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiological communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect that creates temperatures in excess of 60 °C in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic in volume and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the metalimnion, more rapid heat exchange, and lower winter lake temperatures. Solubility calculations indicate seasonal biogenic and thermogenic aragonite

  14. Local versus regional coherence in meteorological variables and lake temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.J.; Kratz, T.K.; Dillon, P. |

    1995-06-01

    Lakes are affected by many driving variables, some acting locally, some regionally. Meteorological variables and lake temperature profiles from long-term data sets collected at four research sites across the Great Lakes Region (the North Temperate Lakes LTER sites in northern and southern Wisconsin, and the Experimental Lakes Area and Dorset Research Area in Canada) were analyzed to test whether inter-annual variation in meteorological variables (air temperature and solar radiation), lake temperature, and mixed layer depth was temporally coherent, i.e. exhibited synchronous variation. Coherence is an important property to evaluate because it influences how broadly we can extrapolate results from a lake or set of lakes and it clarifies what aspects of climate are linked to lake dynamics. Results to date show strong coherence, as measured by high correlation values, of air temperature among the four areas. Summer surface temperature was strongly coherent for lakes within a research site and moderately coherent among some of the sites whereas hypolimnion temperature was not as coherent. Thus lake thermal variables range from being tightly linked to climate to relatively disconnected from regional climatic variation.

  15. Englacial Hydrology of Temperate Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, A. G.; Creyts, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    The englacial region of temperate glaciers is generally treated as a passive conveyor of water from the surface to the bed. Consequently, few studies have examined this region and relatively little is known. This is an important issue because englacial processes probably exert a first order control on the distribution of water to the subglacial hydraulic system. Controlling the water distribution probably controls the type of subglacial hydraulic features present and therefore sliding behavior. Certainly, englacial conduits play a major, if not primary, role in conveying water in the ablation zone. In regions of over-deepenings, areas highly crevassed, or in the accumulation zone, the importance of englacial conduits is less clear. Field studies have shown that intersecting englacial passageways in these regions are relatively common, implying that large water fluxes can drain efficiently through a network of fractures. Hypothetically, efficient drainage systems composed of englacial conduits develop in response to point input of large surface water fluxes. Where input is small and distributed, common to highly crevassed areas or the accumulation zone, water is probably routed through a network of englacial fractures. Glacier geometry may also play a role. Conduits may not develop in the over-deepened (closed basins) regions of a glacier requiring another flow pathway. That englacial fractures exist and can convey water presents a promising alternative. Measured rates of flow in fractures strongly suggest laminar conditions and a sufficient fracture density exists to accommodate the estimated water flux generated upstream by surface melt. The slow flow rates do not generate sufficient viscous heat to compensate expected rates of closure by freezing, however field observations and seismic evidence point to spontaneous fracture formation at depth that must regenerate the fracture network. It is unfortunate that englacial investigations are ignored in favor of

  16. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  17. Using a combination of radiogenic and stable isotopes coupled with hydrogeochemistry, limnometrics and meteorological data in hydrological research of complex underground mine-pit lake systems: The case of Cueva de la Mora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-España, J.; Diez Ercilla, M.; Pérez Cerdán, F.; Yusta, I.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents a combination of radiogenic and stable isotopes (3H, 2H and 18O on pit lake water, and 34S on dissolved sulfate) coupled with bathymetric, meteorological and limnometric investigations, and detailed hydrogeochemical studies to decipher the flooding history and hydrological dynamics of a meromictic and deeply stratified pit lake in SW Spain. The application of these combined techniques has been specially succesful considering the complexity of the studied system, which includes a substantial number of horizontal galleries, shafts and large rooms physically connected to the pit lake. Specific conductance and temperature profiles have depicted a physical structure of the water body which includes four monimolimnetic layers of increasing density with depth. This internal configuration includes m-scale layers separated by sharp transional zones and is rarely observed in natural, fresh water bodies and most other pit lakes. The tritium abundance of the different layers indicate that the deepest water consists in strongly acidified and metal-laden meteoric water infiltrated in the mine system soon after the mine closure in 1971-72. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of the different layers reflect a sharp stratification with increasing evaporative influence towards the lake surface. The combination of tritium data with the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of the different layers suggests a model of pit lake formation with an initial stage of flooding (with entrance of highly metal- and sulfate-loaded mine drainage from the underlying mine galleries) that deeply determined the physical structure and meromictic nature of the lake. After reaching the present water level and morphology, the stagnant, anoxic part of pit lake seems to have remained chemically and isotopically unmodified during its 40 year-old history. Although the pit lake receives significant water input during autumn and winter (which in turn provoke significant volumetric increases

  18. Evidence for local ciliate endemism in an alpine anoxic lake.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, Thorsten; Bruemmer, Franz; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2007-10-01

    Despite its long history, biogeography has received relatively little attention within the field of microbial ecology. Consequently, a fierce debate rages whether protists inhabit restricted geographic areas (endemism hypothesis) or are globally dispersed (ubiquitous dispersal hypothesis). The data presented in this article support the endemism hypothesis. We succeeded in isolating an oligohymenophorean ciliate from a microbial mat in a meromictic anoxic alpine lake (Alatsee) in Germany. The ciliary pattern and the morphometry of this isolate are remarkably similar to Urocentrum turbo (Mueller, 1786) Nitzsch, 1827. However, the organism does not possess trichocysts, a conspicuous and characteristic feature of U. turbo. Instead, the U. turbo-like isolate from lake Alatsee displays merely trichocyst anlagen ("ghosts") in the cytoplasm that are only visible after protargol impregnation and which become never attached to the cell's cortex. Despite the distinctness of this difference, such a morphospecies has not been described from any other environment. Thus, we suggest that the U. turbo-like isolate from lake Alatsee is a local endemic ecotype, although the sequences of the 18S rRNA, ITS1, 5.8S rRNA, and ITS2 genes are nearly identical to those of U. turbo (Mueller, 1786) Nitzsch, 1827. This indicates that neither 18S rDNA nor ITS1, ITS2, and 5.8S rDNA sequences are reliable means to conclusively resolve different morphospecies or ecotypes of ciliates. As a consequence, we argue that protist species richness can only be reliably accounted for by considering both molecular and morphological data. PMID:17323118

  19. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 2. Pelagic sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    The epilimnion of hypersaline, alkaline, meromictic Big Soda Lake contains an average 58 mmol sulfate liter−1 and 0.4 µmol dissolved iron liter−1. The monimolimnion, which is permanently anoxic, has a sulfide concentration ranging seasonally from 4 to 7 mmol liter−1. Depth profiles of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, assayed with a 35S tracer technique and in situ incubations, demonstrated that sulfate reduction occurs within the water column of this extreme environment. The average rate of reduction in the monimolimnion was 3 µmol sulfate liter−1 d−1in May compared to 0.9 in October. These values are comparable to rates of sulfate reduction reported for anoxic waters of more moderate environments. Sulfate reduction also occurred in the anoxic zone of the mixolimnion, though at significantly lower rates (0.025–0.090 µmol liter−1 d−1 at 25 m). Additions of FeS (1.0 mmol liter−1) doubled the endogenous rate of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, while MnS and kaolinite had no effect. These results suggest that sulfate reduction in Big Soda Lake is iron limited and controlled by seasonal variables other than temperature. Estimates of the organic carbon mineralized by sulfate reduction exceed measured fluxes of particulate organic carbon sinking from the mixolimnion. Thus, additional sources of electron donors (other than those derived from the sinking of pelagic autotrophs) may also fuel monimolimnetic sulfate reduction in the lake.

  20. Sedimentology of the saline lakes of the Cariboo Plateau, Interior British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaut, Robin W.; Long, Peter R.

    1989-10-01

    There are several hundred saline lakes in Interior British Columbia, including muddy siliciclastic playas, saline playas, perennial lakes (including meromictic sulphate lakes), and ephemeral lakes, some with permanent salts. The lake waters have highly variable compositions, with Na-CO 3-Cl, Na-CO 3-(SO 4)-Cl, Mg-Na-SO 4 and Na-Mg-SO 4, the dominant types of brine. On the Cariboo Plateau, where they are most abundant, the saline lakes are small, shallow, and occupy depressions within glacial and glacio-fluvial deposits. Most are groundwater-fed. The region is characterized by extremely cold winters and short hot summers. Dense coniferous forest mantles much of the plateau and surrounds most of the lakes. Most basins comprise three main subenvironments—hillslope, mudflat (saline and dry) and lake (ephemeral or perennial). Fluvial sediments are of little significance. Mudflats are primarily a zone of extensive interstitial carbonate precipitation from shallow groundwaters, including abundant magnesite and hydromagnesite. The amount of carbonate formed varies with groundwater composition. Some mudflats are carbonate-dominated; others are predominantly siliciclastic with only highly soluble interstitial salts forming. Sedimentary structures are disrupted by carbonate precipitation and displacive salt crystallization. Springs and ephemeral seepages are locally present. Microbial mats form extensively along many littoral zones and around springs; laminates are preserved in some cores. Efflorescent salt crusts cover saline mudflats around most lakes and playas. Subaqueous salts (including natron, epsomite, bloedite, mirabilite) are precipitated during late summer, autumn and winter in several hypersaline lakes, some by evaporative concentration, others by brine cooling and freeze-out. Several hypersaline, ephemeral lakes have an unusual "spotted" morphology, with hundreds of individual brine pools within carbonate-siliciclastic muds. Most recent sedimentation in the

  1. Modern Limnology and Varve Formation Processes in Lake Montcortès (Southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapote forné, M.; López, P.; Puche, E.; Safont, E.; Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Gomà, J.; Buchaca, T.; Pérez-Zanón, N.; Sigró, J.; Rull, V.; Vegas-Vilarrúbia, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Montcortès is a karstic lake located in Catalonian Pyrenees (Spain). Its sediments consist of biogenic varves composed of a couplet of calcite and organic matter layers and occasional detrital layer. Previous studies of the lake's sediments spanning the last 1500 years proposed that the lake was meromictic and that calcite layers formed due to endogenic precipitation in the epilimnion during spring/summer, driven by diatom blooms. These processes would have been influenced by variations in calcium saturation, trophic state and water temperature of the lake. The presence of phosphorous and biological differences between planktonic diatoms Cyclotella comta and C.cyclopuncta, would have produced additional differences in calcite sublayering. In order to improve comprehension of limnological variables that influence varve formation processes, monthly field campaigns including sediment traps deployment have been carried out during two concurrent years (2013-2015). The lake mixed once during winter. Endogenic calcite precipitation related with high primary production and calcium saturation in metalimnetic water was confirmed. Trapped material composition revealed low but constant calcite precipitation through the year with higher intensities during summer and autumn, coinciding with high relative abundances of C. cyclopuncta and C.ocellata. Nutrient content was very low throughout both years, particularly phosphorous. It seems to be removed by coprecipitation of calcium phosphate with calcite during summer, probably inhibiting part of calcite precipitation reaction. In contrast to previous hypotheses, currently calcite precipitation occurs through the whole year, mainly during summer and autumn months, and may be triggered by nucleation with picoplankton. Our study shows that processes leading to varve formation are highly complex and that any extrapolation to different regions or time periods should be handled with caution

  2. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  3. LAKE FORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Fork of the Arkansas River Watershed has been adversely affected through mining, water diversion and storage projects, grazing, logging, and other human influences over the past 120 years. It is the goals of the LFWWG to improve the health of Lake fork by addressing th...

  4. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  5. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 1. Pelagic bacterial heterotrophy and biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, Jon P.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Cloern, James E.; George, Leah H.; Lane, Judith L.

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial activities and abundance were measured seasonally in the water column of meromictic Big Soda Lake which is divided into three chemically distinct zones: aerobic mixolimnion, anaerobic mixolimnion, and anaerobic monimolimnion. Bacterial abundance ranged between 5 and 52 x 106 cells ml−1, with highest biomass at the interfaces between these zones: 2–4 mg C liter−1 in the photosynthetic bacterial layer (oxycline) and 0.8–2.0 mg C liter−1 in the chemocline. Bacterial cell size and morphology also varied with depth: small coccoid cells were dominant in the aerobic mixolimnion, whereas the monimolimnion had a more diverse population that included cocci, rods, and large filaments. Heterotrophic activity was measured by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation and [14C]glutamate uptake. Highest uptake rates were at or just below the photosynthetic bacterial layer and were attributable to small (<1 µm) heterotrophs rather than the larger photosynthetic bacteria. These high rates of heterotrophic uptake were apparently linked with fermentation; rates of other mineralization processes (e.g. sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification) in the anoxic mixolimnion were insignificant. Heterotrophic activity in the highly reduced monimolimnion was generally much lower than elsewhere in the water column. Therefore, although the monimolimnion contained most of the bacterial abundance and biomass (∼60%), most of the cells there were inactive.

  6. Blooms of cyanobacteria in a temperate Australian lagoon system post and prior to European settlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, P. L. M.; Jennings, M.; Holland, D. P.; Beardall, J.; Briles, C.; Zawadzki, A.; Doan, P.; Mills, K.; Gell, P.

    2015-11-01

    Blooms of noxious N2 fixing cyanobacteria such as Nodularia spumigena are a recurring problem in some estuaries. Here we report the results of a palaeoecological study on a temperate Australian lagoon system (The Gippsland Lakes) where we used stable isotopes and pigment biomarkers in dated cores as proxies for eutrophication and blooms of cyanobacteria. Pigment proxies show a clear signal, with an increase in cyanobacterial pigments (echinenone, canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin) in the period coinciding with recent blooms. Another excursion in these proxies was observed prior to the opening of an artificial entrance to the lakes in 1889, which markedly increased the salinity of the Gippsland Lakes. A coincident increase in the sediment organic carbon content in the period prior to the opening of the artificial entrance suggests the bottom waters of the lakes were increasingly stratified and hypoxic, which would have led to an increase in the recycling of phosphorus. After the opening of the artificial entrance there was a ~ 60 year period with low values for the cyanobacterial proxies as well as a low sediment organic carbon content suggesting a period of low bloom activity associated with the increased salinity of the lakes. During the 1940s, the current period of re-eutrophication commenced as indicated by a steadily increasing sediment organic carbon content and cyanobacterial pigments. We suggest increasing nitrogen inputs from the catchment led to the return of hypoxia and increased phosphorus release from the sediment, which drove the re-emergence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  7. Seasonal habitat selection by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in a small Canadian shield lake: Constraints imposed by winter conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchfield, P.J.; Tate, L.S.; Plumb, J.M.; Acolas, M.-L.; Beaty, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for cold, well-oxygenated waters significantly reduces the habitat available for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) during stratification of small temperate lakes. We examined the spatial and pelagic distribution of lake trout over two consecutive summers and winters and tested whether winter increased habitat availability and access to littoral regions in a boreal shield lake in which pelagic prey fish are absent. In winter, lake trout had a narrowly defined pelagic distribution that was skewed to the upper 3 m of the water column and spatially situated in the central region of the lake. Individual core areas of use (50% Kernel utilization distributions) in winter were much reduced (75%) and spatially non-overlapping compared to summer areas, but activity levels were similar between seasons. Winter habitat selection is in contrast to observations from the stratified season, when lake trout were consistently located in much deeper waters (>6 m) and widely distributed throughout the lake. Winter distribution of lake trout appeared to be strongly influenced by ambient light levels; snow depth and day length accounted for up to 69% of the variation in daily median fish depth. More restricted habitat use during winter than summer was in contrast to our original prediction and illustrates that a different suite of factors influence lake trout distribution between these seasons. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  8. Tempered glass and thermal shock of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that shows students the different strengths and fracture toughnesses between tempered and untempered glass. This paper also describes how glass is tempered and the materials science aspects of the process.

  9. Biological activity at the limits of life: Microbial cycling of C, S and N in cold, permanently stratified, hypersaline Lake Vanda, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Schutte, C.; Samarkin, V.; Casciotti, K. L.; Madigan, M.; Saxton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MCM) are the only perennially ice covered lakes on Earth and are the primary refuge for life in this hyper-arid polar desert. As a result of the ice cover and an uncoupled day/night cycle, the physical and biogeochemical processes in the lakes are highly unusual, with biogeochemical gradients and concentrations of specific compounds often exceeding those found in other aquatic ecosystems on Earth. These lakes are ideal systems for the study of redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes, model systems for understanding the effects of global climate change on polar ecosystems, end-member systems that provide insight into biogeochemical and limnological dynamics in meromictic lakes, analogues for life on other planets, and perfect systems to study microbial life at its thermodynamic limits. Lake Vanda, in the Wright valley, is relatively deep (73 m), hypersaline and has anoxic bottom water. High concentrations of chacotrophic salts results in low water activities that exert further challenges on microbial life. We collected details geochemical profiles of nutrients, major ions, dissolved gases, and redox metabolites and measured rates of microbially-mediated processes that cycle carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the lakes waters and sediments. Despite the harsh and extreme nature of Lake Vanda and the thermodynamic barriers to microbially-mediated geochemical reactions, microorganisms are not only present in the lake but they mediate a diverse suite of geochemical processes. Statistical correlations between geochemical parameters, microbial activity and microbial community composition shed light on the factors that regulate and limit microbial activity in this unique extreme environment.

  10. Charcoal Morphology, a Useful Indicator of Fire Signature in Prosser Lake, British Columbia, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enache, M. D.; Cumming, B. F.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of charcoal particle size and morphology were used along with quantitative analysis to extract indications on fire events over the last century from Prosser Lake (49\\deg45.05 N, 120\\deg37.30 W), a mesotrophic and slightly meromictic lake from British Columbia, Canada. Charcoal particles >150μ m were visually identified at a 0.5-3 years resolution in a laminated sedimentary sequence. According to their shape and structural features, charcoal particles were classified in seven morphologically distinct types and their abundances were assessed using Image Analysis techniques. Distributions of charcoal types were assessed as a proxy to fire events recorded between 1919-2000 and subsequent mechanisms of transportation-sedimentation to lake sediments. Frequent fires taking place before 1944, produced high amounts of charred particles, but strong fires that took place in 1939, 1940, 1958 and 1960 were poorly recorded by most of the charcoal types, whereas post-1944 periods of high precipitation levels without fire events increased their abundance. However, fragile-type fragments displaying high porosity walls showed a strong and significant correlation (R2 = 0.7; p = 0.02) with historically recorded forest fire in the proximity of Prosser Lake. Those fragments, according to their shape and structure might originate from high fragmentation of wood burning at high temperatures or by burning of small branches and leaves. Being very fragile, particles of this type would be destroyed by eventual secondary transportation processes and would not occur in levels not related to fire events. The remaining types of charcoal from Prosser Lake sediments displayed distributions biased by secondary transportation-sedimentation processes. We propose that charcoal morphology can be a useful indicator of fire occurrence, proximity of source-area and transportation-sedimentation mechanisms.

  11. Breeding sugarcane for temperate and cold environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana represents one of the world’s more temperate environments where sugarcane is commercially grown. Since its inception in the 1920s, The USDA-ARS breeding program at the Sugarcane Research Laboratory in Houma, Louisiana, U.S.A. has focused on breeding varieties adapted to this unique envir...

  12. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  13. The effects of tempering reactions on temper embrittlement of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; McMahon, C. J.

    1983-06-01

    The effects of tempering reactions which produce molybdenum-rich carbides on the temper embrittlement of NiCrMo, NiCrMoV, CrMo, and CrMoV steels, particularly embrittlement due to phosphorus segregation, are reviewed. Molybdenum can act as an effective scavenger for phosphorus and other embrittling impurities, but the scavenging is lost when the molybdenum is precipitated in carbides as a result of continued tempering during service at elevated temperatures. This leads to very slow embrittlement, controlled by the rates of alloy carbide formation, rather than by the diffusion of phosphorus, for example. The presence of vanadium apparently retards the embrittlement process even more by interfering with the formation of the molybdenum-rich carbides. Observations of the temper embrittlement behavior, and of the effects of service exposure, in three CrMoV steam turbine rotors are also reported and are shown to be consistent with the previous results.

  14. Effect of Tempering Condition on Milling Performance and Flour Functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tempering conditions of wheat grain change the quality of the flour; yet most experimental milling systems use a standard tempering without optimization. The effect of tempering condition on milling performance and flour functionality for three SRW cultivars ('Roane', 'Cyrus', and 'Severn') was tes...

  15. Sediment delivery and lake dynamics in a Mediterranean mountain watershed: Human-climate interactions during the last millennium (El Tobar Lake record, Iberian Range, Spain).

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Lostres, Fernando; Brown, Erik; Moreno, Ana; Morellón, Mario; Abbott, Mark; Hillman, Aubrey; Giralt, Santiago; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2015-11-15

    Land degradation and soil erosion are key environmental problems in Mediterranean mountains characterized by a long history of human occupation and a strong variability of hydrological regimes. To assess recent trends and evaluate climatic and anthropogenic impacts in these highly human modified watersheds we apply an historical approach combining lake sediment core multi-proxy analyses and reconstructions of past land uses to El Tobar Lake watershed, located in the Iberian Range (Central Spain). Four main periods of increased sediment delivery have been identified in the 8m long sediment sequence by their depositional and geochemical signatures. They took place around 16th, late 18th, mid 19th and early 20th centuries as a result of large land uses changes such as forest clearing, farming and grazing during periods of increasing population. In this highly human-modified watershed, positive synergies between human impact and humid periods led to increased sediment delivery periods. During the last millennium, the lake depositional and geochemical cycles recovered quickly after each sediment delivery event, showing strong resilience of the lacustrine system to watershed disturbance. Recent changes are characterized by large hydrological affections since 1967 with the construction of a canal from a nearby reservoir and a decreased in anthropic pressure in the watershed as rural areas were abandoned. The increased fresh water influx to the lake has caused large biological changes, leading to stronger meromictic conditions and higher organic matter accumulation while terrigenous inputs have decreased. Degradation processes in Iberian Range watersheds are strongly controlled by anthropic activities (land use changes, soil erosion) but modulated by climate-related hydrological changes (water availability, flood and runoff frequency). PMID:26186465

  16. Salinization forced anoxia in the Sea of Aral, the Dead Sea and the Urmia Lake: a temporal feature of the salt lakes development under the Global Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, Evgeniy; Ghaffari, Peygham; Zavialov, Petr; Kurbaniyazov, Abilgazi

    2016-04-01

    The Sea of Aral is undergone a process of its volume decrease and salinization started about 30 years ago. In the remained now lake in the former deepest part of the Sea the salinity increased from about 8 PSU in 1990 to 120 PSU in the surface layer, and 240 PSU in the bottom layer in 2015. On top of an increase of salinity, there was formed a sulfidic zone in the bottom layer, that was separated from the upper layer by an extremely strong halocline (more than 50 PSU in 100 cm). The reason of this halocline might be an influx of the heavy high salinity water formed in summer in the shallower part of the Aral Sea to the bottom layer of the deeper part of the Sea through a strait between them. The similar processes could take place in the Urmia Lake, where salinity increased from 120 PSU in 2000 to about 350-400 PSU in 2015. This lake also consists from a shallow and deep parts connected by a channel in the dam, and where there was also reported anoxia. And finally, the Dead Sea demonstrates a further development happened after the shallower Southern part of the Sea was totally evaporated. After 1993 the vertical mixing started to occur down to the bottom layer, and the lake regime changed from meromictic to monomictic, that resulted in aeration of the bottom layer. In this work we compare interannual changes of the main salinity components in the 3 water bodies and analyze results of the vertical chemical structure of the Sea of Aral studied in 2015.

  17. Viral and grazer regulation of prokaryotic growth efficiency in temperate freshwater pelagic environments.

    PubMed

    Pradeep Ram, A S; Colombet, Jonathan; Perriere, Fanny; Thouvenot, Antoine; Sime-Ngando, Telesphore

    2015-02-01

    In aquatic systems, limited data exists on the impact of mortality forces such as viral lysis and flagellate grazing when seeking to explain factors regulating prokaryotic metabolism. We explored the relative influence of top-down factors (viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing) on prokaryotic mortality and their subsequent impact on their community metabolism in the euphotic zone of 21 temperate freshwater lakes located in the French Massif Central. Prokaryotic growth efficiency (PGE, index of prokaryotic community metabolism) determined from prokaryotic production and respiration measurements varied from 5 to 74% across the lakes. Viral and potential grazer-induced mortality of prokaryotes had contrasting impact on PGE. Potential flagellate grazing was found to enhance PGE whereas viral lysis had antagonistic impacts on PGE. The average PGE value in the grazing and viral lysis dominated lake water samples was 35.4% (±15.2%) and 17.2% (±8.1%), respectively. Selective viral lysis or flagellate grazing on prokaryotes together with the nature of contrasted substrates released through mortality processes can perhaps explain for the observed variation and differences in PGE among the studied lakes. The influences of such specific top-down processes on PGE can have strong implications on the carbon and nutrient fluxes in freshwater pelagic environments. PMID:25764557

  18. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Monitoring Rehabilitation in Temperate North American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Casimir A.; Hood, W Gregory; Tear, Lucinda M.; Simenstad, Charles; Williams, Gregory D.; Johnson, L. L.; Feist, B. E.; Roni, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this chapter, we propose that monitoring rehabilitation in estuarine ecosystems by necessity requires quantifying relationships between dynamic estuarine processes and sensitive indicators of ecosystem function. While we do discuss temperate systems in general, emphasis is placed on anadromous salmon habitats in the Pacific Northwest because anadromous fishes are such a major focus of rehabilitation efforts, and present some of the greater challenges in linking function of one segment of their life history to conditions in a specific habitat. We begin with a basic overview of the ecological and socioeconomic significance of, as well as anthropogenic effects on, estuaries. Next, we briefly summarize the various kinds of estuarine rehabilitation historically practiced in temperate regions, and review estuarine rehabilitation monitoring design and methods, highlighting the unique challenges involved in monitoring estuarine systems. We then close with a summary and conclusions.

  20. The Epsomitic Phototrophic Microbial Mat of Hot Lake, Washington. Community Structural Responses to Seasonal Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Moran, James J.; Stegen, James C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Cole, Jessica K.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Malfatti, Stephanie; Chen, Feng; Tringe, Susannah; Beyenal, Haluk; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-11-13

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO2-4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function.

  1. The epsomitic phototrophic microbial mat of Hot Lake, Washington: community structural responses to seasonal cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Moran, James J.; Stegen, James C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Cole, Jessica K.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Tremblay, Julien; Singh, Kanwar; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Chen, Feng; Tringe, Susannah G.; Beyenal, Haluk; Fredrickson, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are compact ecosystems composed of highly interactive organisms in which energy and element cycling take place over millimeter-to-centimeter-scale distances. Although microbial mats are common in hypersaline environments, they have not been extensively characterized in systems dominated by divalent ions. Hot Lake is a meromictic, epsomitic lake that occupies a small, endorheic basin in north-central Washington. The lake harbors a benthic, phototrophic mat that assembles each spring, disassembles each fall, and is subject to greater than tenfold variation in salinity (primarily Mg2+ and SO2−4) and irradiation over the annual cycle. We examined spatiotemporal variation in the mat community at five time points throughout the annual cycle with respect to prevailing physicochemical parameters by amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene coupled to near-full-length 16S RNA clone sequences. The composition of these microbial communities was relatively stable over the seasonal cycle and included dominant populations of Cyanobacteria, primarily a group IV cyanobacterium (Leptolyngbya), and Alphaproteobacteria (specifically, members of Rhodobacteraceae and Geminicoccus). Members of Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Thioalkalivibrio and Halochromatium) and Deltaproteobacteria (e.g., Desulfofustis) that are likely to be involved in sulfur cycling peaked in summer and declined significantly by mid-fall, mirroring larger trends in mat community richness and evenness. Phylogenetic turnover analysis of abundant phylotypes employing environmental metadata suggests that seasonal shifts in light variability exert a dominant influence on the composition of Hot Lake microbial mat communities. The seasonal development and organization of these structured microbial mats provide opportunities for analysis of the temporal and physical dynamics that feed back to community function. PMID:24312082

  2. Sediment oxygen profiles in a super-oxygenated antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Meyer, M. A.; McKay, C. P.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Simmons, G. M. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Perennially ice-covered lakes are found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. In contrast to temperate lakes that have diurnal photic periods, antarctic (and arctic) lakes have a yearly photic period. An unusual feature of the antarctic lakes is the occurrence of O2 at supersaturated levels in certain portions of the water column. Here we report the first sediment O2 profiles obtained using a microelectrode from a perennially ice-covered antarctic lake. Sediment cores collected in January and October 1987 from Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley show oxygenation down to 15, and in some cases, 25 cm. The oxygenation of sediments several centimeters below the sediment-water interface is atypical for lake sediments and may be characteristic of perennially ice-covered lakes. There is a significant difference between the observed January and October sediment O2 profiles. Several explanations may account for the difference, including seasonality. A time-dependent model is presented which tests the feasibility of a seasonal cycle resulting from the long photoperiod and benthic primary production in sediments overlain by a highly oxygenated water column.

  3. Blooms of cyanobacteria in a temperate Australian lagoon system post and prior to European settlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Perran L. M.; Jennings, Miles; Holland, Daryl P.; Beardall, John; Briles, Christy; Zawadzki, Atun; Doan, Phuong; Mills, Keely; Gell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Blooms of noxious N2 fixing cyanobacteria such as Nodularia spumigena are a recurring problem in some estuaries; however, the historic occurrence of such blooms in unclear in many cases. Here we report the results of a palaeoecological study on a temperate Australian lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes) where we used stable isotopes and pigment biomarkers in dated cores as proxies for eutrophication and blooms of cyanobacteria. Pigment proxies show a clear signal, with an increase in cyanobacterial pigments (echinenone, canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin) in the period coinciding with recent blooms. Another excursion in these proxies was observed prior to the opening of an artificial entrance to the lakes in 1889, which markedly increased the salinity of the Gippsland Lakes. A coincident increase in the sediment organic-carbon content in the period prior to the opening of the artificial entrance suggests that the bottom waters of the lakes were more stratified and hypoxic, which would have led to an increase in the recycling of phosphorus. After the opening of the artificial entrance, there was a ˜ 60-year period with low values for the cyanobacterial proxies as well as a low sediment organic-carbon content suggesting a period of low bloom activity associated with the increased salinity of the lakes. During the 1940s, the current period of re-eutrophication commenced, as indicated by a steadily increasing sediment organic-carbon content and cyanobacterial pigments. We suggest that increasing nitrogen inputs from the catchment led to the return of hypoxia and increased phosphorus release from the sediment, which drove the re-emergence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  4. Land Cover Analysis of Temperate Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Satellite data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) instrument were used to produce a general land cover distribution of temperate Asia (referred to hence as Central Asia) from 1982, starting with the NOAA-7 satellite, and continuing through 1991, ending with the NOAA-11 satellite. Emphasis was placed upon delineating the and and semi-arid zones of Central Asia (largely Mongolia and adjacent areas), mapping broad categories of aggregated land cover, and upon studying photosynthetic capacity increases in Central Asia from 1982 to 1991.

  5. Fate of Allochthonous Dissolved Organic Carbon in Lakes: A Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Paul C.; Hamilton, David P.; Stanley, Emily H.; Preston, Nicholas; Langman, Owen C.; Kara, Emily L.

    2011-01-01

    Inputs of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to lakes derived from the surrounding landscape can be stored, mineralized or passed to downstream ecosystems. The balance among these OC fates depends on a suite of physical, chemical, and biological processes within the lake, as well as the degree of recalcintrance of the allochthonous DOC load. The relative importance of these processes has not been well quantified due to the complex nature of lakes, as well as challenges in scaling DOC degradation experiments under controlled conditions to the whole lake scale. We used a coupled hydrodynamic-water quality model to simulate broad ranges in lake area and DOC, two characteristics important to processing allochthonous carbon through their influences on lake temperature, mixing depth and hydrology. We calibrated the model to four lakes from the North Temperate Lakes Long Term Ecological Research site, and simulated an additional 12 ‘hypothetical’ lakes to fill the gradients in lake size and DOC concentration. For each lake, we tested several mineralization rates (range: 0.001 d−1 to 0.010 d−1) representative of the range found in the literature. We found that mineralization rates at the ecosystem scale were roughly half the values from laboratory experiments, due to relatively cool water temperatures and other lake-specific factors that influence water temperature and hydrologic residence time. Results from simulations indicated that the fate of allochthonous DOC was controlled primarily by the mineralization rate and the hydrologic residence time. Lakes with residence times <1 year exported approximately 60% of the DOC, whereas lakes with residence times >6 years mineralized approximately 60% of the DOC. DOC fate in lakes can be determined with a few relatively easily measured factors, such as lake morphometry, residence time, and temperature, assuming we know the recalcitrance of the DOC. PMID:21779347

  6. Using a coupled groundwater/surface-water model to predict climate-change impacts to lakes in the Trout Lake Watershed, northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall; Walker, John F.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.; Doherty, John

    2009-01-01

    The Trout Lake watershed in northern Wisconsin is underlain by a highly conductive outwash sand aquifer. In this area, streamflow is dominated by groudwater contributions, however, surface runoff occurs during intense rainfall periods and spring snowmelt. Surface runoff also occurs locally near stream/lake areas where the unsaturated zone is thin. A diverse data set, collected from 1992 to 2007 for the Trout Lake WEBB project and the co-located and NSF-funded North Temperate Lake LTER project, includes snowpack, solar radiation, potential evapotranspiration, lake levels, groundwater levels, and streamflow. The time-series processing software TSPROC (Doherty 2001)was used to distill the large time series data set to a smaller set of observations and summary statistics that captured the salient hydrologic information. The time-series processing reduced hundreds of thousands of observations to less than 5,000. Model calibration included specific predictions for several lakes in the study area using the PEST parameter estimation suit of software (Doherty 2007). The calibrated model was used to simulate the hydrologic response in the study lakes to a variety of climate change scenarios culled from the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (Solomon et al. 2007). Results from the simulations indicate climate change could result in substantial changes to the lake levels and components of the hydrologic budget of a seepage lake in the flow system. For a drainage lake lower in the flow system, the impacts of climate change are diminished.

  7. Effects of initial temperature and tempering medium on thermal tempering of dental porcelains.

    PubMed

    Hojjatie, B; Anusavice, K J

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that quenching of porcelain in silicone oil rather than in compressed air will significantly increase the flexure strength by reducing the potential for crack formation during transient cooling. A secondary hypothesis to be tested is that the initial tempering temperature can be reduced significantly below the porcelain maturing temperature of 982 degrees C but well above Tg without a decrease in strength. Opaque-body porcelain disks, 16 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness, with a thermal contraction mismatch (delta alpha) of -1.5, 0, and +3.2 ppm/degrees C were tempered from initial temperatures of 650, 750, 850, and 982 degrees C in silicone oil with kinematic viscosities of 50, 1000, and 5000 centistokes. Porcelain disks were also subjected to three cooling procedures in air: slow cooling in a furnace (SC), free convective cooling in a laboratory bench (FC), and tempering (T) by blasting the surface of body porcelain with air. The crack size induced by a Vickers microhardness indenter was measured within one minute after crack development. For determination of the influence of initial cooling temperature on biaxial flexure strength, six body porcelain disks (delta alpha = 0) were tempered in air from initial temperatures of 650, 750, 850, and 982 degrees C. The mean crack size of specimens tempered in oil was significantly smaller (p < or = 0.001) than that of specimens that were slowly-cooled or fast-cooled in air for all thermal contraction mismatch cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8450115

  8. Rare earth elements in the water column of Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Eric Heinen; Green, William J.

    2002-04-01

    We present data on the composition of water from Lake Vanda, Antarctica. Vanda and other lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are characterized by closed basins, permanent ice covers, and deep saline waters. The meromictic lakes provide model systems for the study of trace metal cycling owing to their pristine nature and the relative simplicity of their biogeochemical systems. Lake Vanda, in the Wright Valley, is supplied by a single input, the Onyx River, and has no output. Water input to the lake is balanced by sublimation of the nearly permanent ice cap that is broken only near the shoreline during the austral summer. The water column is characterized by an inverse thermal stratification of anoxic warm hypersaline water underlying cold oxic freshwater. Water collected under trace-element clean conditions was analyzed for its dissolved and total rare earth element (REE) concentrations by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Depth profiles are characterized by low dissolved REE concentrations (La, Ce, <15 pM) in surface waters that increase slightly (La, 70 pM; Ce, 20 pM) with increasing depth to ˜55 m, the limit of the fresh oxic waters. Below this depth, a sharp increase in the concentrations of strictly trivalent REE (e.g., La, 5 nM) is observed, and a submaximum in redox sensitive Ce (2.6 nM) is found at 60- to 62-m depth. At a slightly deeper depth, a sharper Ce maximum is observed with concentrations exceeding 11 nM at a 67-m depth, immediately above the anoxic zone. The aquatic concentrations of REE reported here are ˜50-fold higher than previously reported for marine oxic/anoxic boundaries and are, to our knowledge, the highest ever observed at natural oxic/anoxic interfaces. REE maxima occur within stable and warm saline waters. All REE concentrations decrease sharply in the sulfidic bottom waters. The redox-cline in Lake Vanda is dominated by diffusional processes and vertical transport of dissolved species driven by concentration

  9. Seasonal to sub-seasonal palaeoenvironmental changes in Lake Sihetun (Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation, NE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hethke, Manja; Fürsich, Franz T.; Jiang, Baoyu; Pan, Yanhong

    2013-01-01

    Sedimentary properties of the fossil-bearing deposits of Lake Sihetun (Yixian Formation, Lower Cretaceous) were investigated on a high-resolution, sub-millimetric scale. Data were obtained from three excavations and 50 thin-sections. Lake evolution is subdivided into four phases, of which Phases 2 and 3 provided suitable conditions for excellent fossil preservation. Six microfacies are recognized within these two phases: (1) allochthonous, siliciclastic laminae (26.1 μm thick on average), (2) chrysophycean cyst accumulations, (3) tuffaceous silt, (4) lacustrine chemical precipitates, (5) tuff and (6) normal-graded, sandy to silty siliciclastics. Phase 2 is characterized by Microfacies 1-5 and Phase 3 by Microfacies 6. Biofilms are common, and mass occurrences of framboids (pyrite pseudomorphs) are occurring in sediments of Phase 2. Varves can be verified for Microfacies 2 and 4 (179 μm thick). Thicknesses of Microfacies 2 highly fluctuate depending on the occurrence of seasonal heavier rains, which led to deposition of tuffaceous silt layers (Microfacies 3). Meromictic conditions dominated Phase 2, but recurrent mixing is demonstrated by short-lived colonization events by a benthic invertebrate fauna. The transition of Phase 2 to holomictic Phase 3 is marked by a dramatic increase in sediment yield associated with a change from dry to humid climates. Fossil preservation differs according to the diverse physical and chemical conditions during lake evolution. Phase 2 yields framboid replacement of organic tissue and excellent preservation of growth increments of clam-shrimp carapaces, which are poorly preserved in Phase 3. Conversely, though exhibiting a different mode of preservation, insect fossils are superbly preserved as dark stains sealed by silica coatings during Phase 3.

  10. Stable isotope analysis of dissolved carbon species of Hot Lake, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, S.; Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake in north-central Washington. The lake is epsomitic, with seasonably-variable salinity (.2 to 2 M magnesium sulfate) and produces carbonates and salt precipitates. The maximum depth of the lake is around 2.5 m, and below a thermocline there is intense solar heat retention in the monolimnion, often exceeding 50°C. Despite these extreme and variable conditions, a microbial mat of up to 1.5 cm thick thrives annually in Hot Lake. The mat is widespread throughout the lake at water depths (during our experiments) ranging from 60cm-140cm. It is comprised of a variety of cyanobacteria along with other autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. These populations are visibly stratified with four consistent laminae displaying differences in bacterial pigmentation. Many of the layers contain carbonate species, but the full relationship between the mat and the carbonate crystallization is not known. We are studying the microbial interactions and carbon cycling of the mat communities, using stable isotope analysis of the mat and the lake water, both in situ and ex situ. We are exploring the incorporation and movement of carbon in the mat, spatially and temporally, to understand the fixation mechanisms and metabolic processes at play in this environment. This was done primarily using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The focus of this work is on the study and measurement of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon using a GasBench and IRMS setup, following methods adapted from Lang et al. (2012). To account for the unique chemistry of Hot Lake, trials on the effects of oxidation conditions and salinity were done on lab-synthesized samples to compare to Hot Lake results. The majority of lake water analyses were done in conjunction with a stable isotope probing (SIP) experiment, completed during two 24-hour periods at Hot Lake in June and July of 2013. The SIP experiments included ex situ incubations (in separate glass containers on the

  11. Simulated Tempering and Swapping on Mean-Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Nayantara; Randall, Dana

    2016-08-01

    Simulated and parallel tempering are families of Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms where a temperature parameter is varied during the simulation to overcome bottlenecks to convergence due to multimodality. In this work we introduce and analyze the convergence for a set of new tempering distributions which we call entropy dampening. For asymmetric exponential distributions and the mean field Ising model with an external field simulated tempering is known to converge slowly. We show that tempering with entropy dampening distributions mixes in polynomial time for these models. Examining slow mixing times of tempering more closely, we show that for the mean-field 3-state ferromagnetic Potts model, tempering converges slowly regardless of the temperature schedule chosen. On the other hand, tempering with entropy dampening distributions converges in polynomial time to stationarity. Finally we show that the slow mixing can be very expensive practically. In particular, the mixing time of simulated tempering is an exponential factor longer than the mixing time at the fixed temperature.

  12. Temperance: With a Consideration of Evil, Violence, and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felderhof, Marius C.

    2009-01-01

    The article investigates the meaning of temperance by noting some cultural assumptions, raising the question as to why this classical virtue has largely disappeared from modern ethical discourse. By means of some historical notes temperance is identified as the unifying virtue in the person and in society. In its Christian form it is related to…

  13. Tempering characteristics of a vanadium containing dual phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. S.; Rao, B. V. N.

    1982-10-01

    Dual phase steels are characterized by a microstructure consisting of ferrite, martensite, retained austenite, and/or lower bainite. This microstructure can be altered by tempering with accompanying changes in mechanical properties. This paper examines such changes produced in a vanadium bearing dual phase steel upon tempering below 500 °C. The steel mechanical properties were minimally affected on tempering below 200 °C; however, a simultaneous reduction in uniform elongation and tensile strength occurred upon tempering above 400 °C. The large amount of retained austenite (≅10 vol pct) observed in the as-received steel was found to be essentially stable to tempering below 300 °C. On tempering above 400 °C, most of the retained austenite decomposed to either upper bainite (at 400 °C) or a mixture of upper bainite and ferrite-carbide aggregate formed by an interphase precipitation mechanism (at 500 °C). In addition, tempering at 400 °C led to fine precipitation in the retained ferrite. The observed mechanical properties were correlated with these microstructural changes. It was concluded that the observed decrease in uniform elongation upon tempering above 400 °C is primarily the consequence of the decomposition of retained austenite and the resulting loss of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) as a contributing mechanism to the strain hardening of the steel.

  14. VIEW NORTHFOREGROUNDBUILDING 121 TEMPERING SHOP NO. 2 (1944) LEFT (LARGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTH-FOREGROUND-BUILDING 121 TEMPERING SHOP NO. 2 (1944) LEFT (LARGE WINDOW-BUILDING 54 FLAT SHOP 3A (1954) CENTER TOP-BUILDING 58-TEMPERING SHOP NO. 1 (c.1910) RIGHT-BUILDING 119-WIRE STORAGE (c.1945) - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  15. Bacterial Chitin Hydrolysis in Two Lakes with Contrasting Trophic Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Dörte; Keller, Esther; Vazquez, Francisco; Schubert, Carsten J.; Zeyer, Josef; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Chitin, which is a biopolymer of the amino sugar glucosamine (GlcN), is highly abundant in aquatic ecosystems, and its degradation is assigned a key role in the recycling of carbon and nitrogen. In order to study the significance of chitin decomposition in two temperate freshwater lakes with contrasting trophic and redox conditions, we measured the turnover rate of the chitin analog methylumbelliferyl-N,N′-diacetylchitobioside (MUF-DC) and the presence of chitinase (chiA) genes in zooplankton, water, and sediment samples. In contrast to the eutrophic and partially anoxic lake, chiA gene fragments were detectable throughout the oligotrophic water column and chiA copy numbers per ml of water were up to 15 times higher than in the eutrophic waters. For both lakes, the highest chiA abundance was found in the euphotic zone—the main habitat of zooplankton, but also the site of production of easily degradable algal chitin. The bulk of chitinase activity was measured in zooplankton samples and the sediments, where recalcitrant chitin is deposited. Both, chiA abundance and chitinase activity correlated well with organic carbon, nitrogen, and concentrations of particulate GlcN. Our findings show that chitin, although its overall contribution to the total organic carbon is small (∼0.01 to 0.1%), constitutes an important microbial growth substrate in these temperate freshwater lakes, particularly where other easily degradable carbon sources are scarce. PMID:22101058

  16. Projected shifts in fish species dominance in Wisconsin lakes under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Gretchen JA; Read, Jordan S.; Hansen, Jonathan F.; Winslow, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Temperate lakes may contain both coolwater fish species such as walleye (Sander vitreus) and warmwater fish species such as largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Recent declining walleye and increasing largemouth bass populations have raised questions regarding the future trajectories and management actions for these species. We developed a thermodynamic model of water temperatures driven by downscaled climate data and lake-specific characteristics to estimate daily water temperature profiles for 2148 lakes in Wisconsin, US, under contemporary (1989–2014) and future (2040–2064 and 2065–2089) conditions. We correlated contemporary walleye recruitment and largemouth bass relative abundance to modeled water temperature, lake morphometry, and lake productivity, and projected lake-specific changes in each species under future climate conditions. Walleye recruitment success was negatively related and largemouth bass abundance was positively related to water temperature degree days. Both species exhibited a threshold response at the same degree day value, albeit in opposite directions. Degree days were predicted to increase in the future, although the magnitude of increase varied among lakes, time periods, and global circulation models (GCMs). Under future conditions, we predicted a loss of walleye recruitment in 33–75% of lakes where recruitment is currently supported and a 27–60% increase in the number of lakes suitable for high largemouth bass abundance. The percentage of lakes capable of supporting abundant largemouth bass but failed walleye recruitment was predicted to increase from 58% in contemporary conditions to 86% by mid-century and to 91% of lakes by late century, based on median projections across GCMs. Conversely, the percentage of lakes with successful walleye recruitment and low largemouth bass abundance was predicted to decline from 9% of lakes in contemporary conditions to only 1% of lakes in both future periods. Importantly, we identify up

  17. Methane metabolism in a temperate swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.A.; Knowles, R.

    1994-11-01

    Methane production has received much attention due not only to its importance as a terminal step in anaerobic organic matter degradation but also to its potentially significant role in climatic change and atmospheric chemistry. Wetlands are an important source and potential reservoir of methane, but the factors controlling its production and emission are not fully understood. This study examined in situ availability of substrates and the distribution of electron acceptors in a temperate peat swamp to determine how the chemistry and microbiology of the site affects methane production. Measurements were obtained in summer, fall and spring at two sites. Laboratory incubations with slurried peat soil were carried out. From the results, the authors speculate that along with differences in hydrology and chemical characteristics, heterogeneity in microbial activity may also contribute to the spatial variability of methane production and emission in wetlands. 45 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Why Be Temperate: Lessons from Bacteriophage λ.

    PubMed

    Gandon, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Many pathogens have evolved the ability to induce latent infections of their hosts. The bacteriophage λ is a classical model for exploring the regulation and the evolution of latency. Here, I review recent experimental studies on phage λ that identify specific conditions promoting the evolution of lysogenic life cycles. In addition, I present specific adaptations of phage λ that allow this virus to react plastically to variations in the environment and to reactivate its lytic life cycle. All of these different examples are discussed in the light of evolutionary epidemiology theory to disentangle the different evolutionary forces acting on temperate phages. Understanding phage λ adaptations yield important insights into the evolution of latency in other microbes, including several life-threatening human pathogens. PMID:26946976

  19. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals

  20. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  1. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  2. Stable isotopic biogeochemistry of carbon and nitrogen in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Lyons, W. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Lake Hoare (77 degrees 38' S, 162 degrees 53' E) is an amictic, oligotrophic, 34-m-deep, closed-basin lake in Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Its perennial ice cover minimizes wind-generated currents and reduces light penetration, as well as restricts sediment deposition into the lake and the exchange of atmospheric gases between the water column and the atmosphere. The biological community of Lake Hoare consists solely of microorganisms -- both planktonic populations and benthic microbial mats. Lake Hoare is one of several perennially ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys that represent the end-member conditions of cold desert and saline lakes. The dry valley lakes provide a unique opportunity to examine lacustrine processes that operate at all latitudes, but under an extreme set of environmental conditions. The dry valley lakes may also offer a valuable record of catchment and global changes in the past and present. Furthermore, these lakes are modern-day equivalents of periglacial lakes that are likely to have been common during periods of glacial maxima at temperate latitudes. We have analyzed the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of Lake Hoare for delta 13C and the organic matter of the sediments and sediment-trap material for delta 13C and delta 15N. The delta 13C of the DIC indicates that 12C is differentially removed in the shallow, oxic portions of the lake via photosynthesis. In the anoxic portions of the lake (27-34 m) a net addition of 12C to the DIC pool occurs via organic matter decomposition. The dissolution of CaCO3 at depth also contributes to the DIC pool. Except near the Canada Glacier where a substantial amount of allochthonous organic matter enters the lake, the organic carbon being deposited on the lake bottom at different sites is isotopically similar, suggesting an autochthonous source for the organic carbon. Preliminary inorganic carbon flux calculations suggest that a high percentage of the organic carbon fixed in the water column is

  3. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V.; Panneerselvam, G.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2015-02-15

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe{sub 2}C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, instead of Fe{sub 2}C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of

  4. Widespread green algae Chlorella and Stichococcus exhibit polar-temperate and tropical-temperate biogeography.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Hallmann, Christine; Spitzer, Karolin; Elster, Josef; Faßhauer, Fabian; Brinkmann, Nicole; Lepka, Daniela; Diwan, Vaibhav; Friedl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chlorella and Stichococcus are morphologically simple airborne microalgae, omnipresent in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The minute cell size and resistance against environmental stress facilitate their long-distance dispersal. However, the actual distribution of Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species has so far been inferred only from ambiguous morphology-based evidence. Here we contribute a phylogenetic analysis of an expanded SSU and ITS2 rDNA sequence dataset representing Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species from terrestrial habitats of polar, temperate and tropical regions. We aim to uncover biogeographical patterns at low taxonomic levels. We found that psychrotolerant strains of Chlorella and Stichococcus are closely related with strains originating from the temperate zone. Species closely related to Chlorella vulgaris and Muriella terrestris, and recovered from extreme terrestrial environments of polar regions and hot deserts, are particularly widespread. Stichococcus strains from the temperate zone, with their closest relatives in the tropics, differ from strains with the closest relatives being from the polar regions. Our data suggest that terrestrial Chlorella and Stichococcus might be capable of intercontinental dispersal; however, their actual distributions exhibit biogeographical patterns. PMID:27279416

  5. Longevity of Lake Superior lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schram, Stephen T.; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    The age structure of mature lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior increased following a population recovery that has taken place since the 1960s. As the population aged, it became apparent that scales were unreliable aging structures. Beginning in 1986, we examined both scale and sagittal otolith ages from tagged fish with a known period at liberty. We found large discrepancies in scale and sagittal otolith ages of mature fish, such that scale ages were biased low. We estimated lake trout living up to 42 years, which is greater than previously reported from Lake Superior. Investigators studying lake trout population dynamics in the Great Lakes should be aware that lake trout can live longer than previously thought.

  6. The effect of lake browning and respiration mode on the burial and fate of carbon and mercury in the sediment of two boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorova, Anastasija; Bravo, Andrea G.; Riise, Gunnhild; Bouchet, Sylvain; Björn, Erik; Sobek, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In many northern temperate regions, the water color of lakes has increased over the past decades ("lake browning"), probably caused by an increased export of dissolved organic matter from soils. We investigated if the increase in water color in two lakes in Norway has resulted in increased burial of organic carbon (OC) and mercury (Hg) in the sediments and if the Hg was prone to methylation. Lake Solbergvann experienced a threefold water color increase, and OC burial increased approximately twofold concomitant to the water color increase. This lake had prolonged periods of anoxic bottom water, and anoxic OC mineralization rates were only about half of the oxic OC mineralization rates (7.7 and 17.5 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively), contributing to an efficient OC burial. In Lake Elvåga, where water color increase was only approximately twofold and bottom water was oxygenated, no recent increase in OC burial could be observed. Hg burial increased strongly in both lakes (threefold and 1.6-fold in Lake Solbergvann and Lake Elvåga, respectively), again concomitant to the recent water color increase. The proportion of methylated Hg (MeHg) in surficial sediment was 1 order of magnitude higher in Lake Elvåga (up to 6% MeHg) than in Lake Solbergvann (0.2-0.6% MeHg), probably related to the different oxygenation regimes. We conclude that lake browning can result in increased OC and Hg burial in lake sediments, but the extent of browning and the dominating mode of sediment respiration (aerobic or anaerobic) strongly affect burial and fate of OC and Hg in sediments.

  7. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Integrating Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Lakes into the Glacially Influenced Landscape of the Northern Cascade Mountains, Washington State, USA.

    PubMed

    Larson; Lomnicky; Hoffman; Liss; Deimling

    1999-09-01

    / A basic knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of lakes is needed by management to make informed decisions to protect water resources. In this study we investigated some of the physical and chemical characteristics of 58 lakes in alpine, subalpine, and forest vegetation zones in a natural area (North Cascades National Park Service Complex) between 1989 and 1993. The objectives of the study were to: (1) document the time of ice-out relative to lake elevation; (2) determine how a sharp climate gradient west and east of the hydrologic divide affected the time of ice-out for subalpine lakes; and (3) assess how lake water quality was associated with lake elevation, lake depth, and basin geology. As expected, lake ice-out times occurred earlier with decreasing elevation. East-slope subalpine lakes iced-out earlier than did west-slope subalpine lakes because the east slope of the study area was drier and warmer than the west slope. On average, the lakes were relatively cold, neutral in pH, and low in dissolved substances and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus. Although some shallow lakes (depth <10 m) exhibited the highest alkalinities, conductivities, and concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen, most shallow lakes exhibited low values for these variables that were comparable to values observed in deep lakes. Geology did not play a major role in segregating the lakes based on water quality. Overall, lake temperature, pH, alkalinity, conductivity, and concentrations of total phosphorus and total Kjeldahl N increased with decreasing elevation. These changes in water quality with decreasing elevation in this temperate mountainous region corresponded with warmer air temperatures and increased vegetation biomass, soil depth and maturity, and dissolved substances and nutrients.KEY WORDS: Limnology; Mountain lakes; Water quality; North Cascades National Park Service Complex; National Park Servicehttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267

  9. Climate change forces new ecological states in tropical Andean lakes.

    PubMed

    Michelutti, Neal; Wolfe, Alexander P; Cooke, Colin A; Hobbs, William O; Vuille, Mathias; Smol, John P

    2015-01-01

    Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage of glaciers regionally. Using dated sediment cores from three lakes in the southern Sierra of Ecuador, we record abrupt increases in the planktonic thalassiosiroid diatom Discostella stelligera from trace abundances to dominance within the phytoplankton. This unprecedented shift occurs against the backdrop of rising temperatures, changing atmospheric pressure fields, and declining wind speeds. Ecological restructuring in these lakes is linked to warming and/or enhanced water column stratification. In contrast to seasonally ice-covered Arctic and temperate alpine counterparts, aquatic production has not increased universally with warming, and has even declined in some lakes, possibly because enhanced thermal stability impedes the re-circulation of hypolimnetic nutrients to surface waters. Our results demonstrate that these lakes have already passed important ecological thresholds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for Andean water resources. PMID:25647018

  10. Climate Change Forces New Ecological States in Tropical Andean Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Michelutti, Neal; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Cooke, Colin A.; Hobbs, William O.; Vuille, Mathias; Smol, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Air temperatures in the tropical Andes have risen at an accelerated rate relative to the global average over recent decades. However, the effects of climate change on Andean lakes, which are vital to sustaining regional biodiversity and serve as an important water resource to local populations, remain largely unknown. Here, we show that recent climate changes have forced alpine lakes of the equatorial Andes towards new ecological and physical states, in close synchrony to the rapid shrinkage of glaciers regionally. Using dated sediment cores from three lakes in the southern Sierra of Ecuador, we record abrupt increases in the planktonic thalassiosiroid diatom Discostella stelligera from trace abundances to dominance within the phytoplankton. This unprecedented shift occurs against the backdrop of rising temperatures, changing atmospheric pressure fields, and declining wind speeds. Ecological restructuring in these lakes is linked to warming and/or enhanced water column stratification. In contrast to seasonally ice-covered Arctic and temperate alpine counterparts, aquatic production has not increased universally with warming, and has even declined in some lakes, possibly because enhanced thermal stability impedes the re-circulation of hypolimnetic nutrients to surface waters. Our results demonstrate that these lakes have already passed important ecological thresholds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for Andean water resources. PMID:25647018

  11. Physical constraints and the comparative ecology of coastal ecosystems across the US Great Lakes, with a coda, presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of my favorite papers by Scott Nixon (1988) was the story he build around the observation that marine fisheries yields were higher per unit area or per unit primary production than temperate lakes. The story, and the putative agent for the freshwater/marine difference, involv...

  12. Physical constraints and the comparative ecology of coastal ecosystems across the US Great Lakes, with a coda

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of my favorite papers by Scott Nixon (1988) was the story he build around the observation that marine fisheries yields were higher than temperate lakes. The putative agent for the freshwater/marine difference, involved a higher energy of mixing due to tides in marine environm...

  13. Exploring the links between transient water inputs and glacier velocity in a small temperate glacier in southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavner, M.; Habermann, M.; Hood, E. W.; Fatland, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    Glaciers along the Gulf of Alaska are thinning and retreating rapidly. An important control on the rate at which ice is being lost is basal motion because higher glacier velocities increase the rate at which ice is delivered to ablation zones. Recent research has focused on understanding the effects of sub-glacial water storage on glacier basal motion. In this study, we examined two seasons of the effect of hydrologic controls (from large rainfall events as well as a glacier lake outburst floods) on the velocity of the Lemon Creek Glacier in southeastern Alaska. Lemon Creek Glacier is a moderately sized (~16~km2) temperate glacier at the margin of the Juneau Icefield. An ice-marginal lake forms at the head of the glacier and catastrophically drains once or twice every melt season. We have instrumented the glacier with two meteorological stations: one at the head of the glacier near the ice-marginal lake and another several kilometers below the terminus. These stations measure temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, incoming solar radiation and wind speed and direction. Lake stage in the ice-marginal lake was monitored with a pressure transducer. In addition, Lemon Creek was instrumented with a water quality sonde at the location of a US Geological Survey gaging station approximately 3 km downstream from the glacier terminus. The sonde provides continuous measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and conductivity. Finally, multiple Trimble NetRS dual frequency, differential GPS units were deployed on the glacier along the centerline of the glacier. All of the instruments were run continuously from May-September 2008 and May-September 2009 and captured threee outburst floods associated with the ice-marginal lake drainage as well as several large (>3~cm) rainfall events associated with frontal storms off of the Gulf of Alaska in late summer. Taken together, these data allow us to test the hypothesis that water inputs which overwhelm

  14. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Caballero, Francisca G; Miller, Michael K; Garcia - Mateo, C

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  15. Geology and environments of subglacial Lake Vostok.

    PubMed

    Leitchenkov, German L; Antonov, Anton V; Luneov, Pavel I; Lipenkov, Vladimir Ya

    2016-01-28

    The reconstruction of the geological (tectonic) structure and environments of subglacial Lake Vostok is based on geophysical surveys and the study of mineral particles found in cores of accreted ice and frozen lake water (sampled after the lake was unsealed). Seismic reflection and refraction investigations conducted in the southern part of Lake Vostok show very thin (200-300 m) sedimentary cover overlying a crystalline basement. Most of this thin veneer is thought to have been deposited during temperate-glacial conditions in Oligocene to Middle Miocene time (ca 34-14 Ma). The composition of the lake-bottom sediments can be deduced from mineral inclusions found in cores of accreted ice. Inclusions are represented by soft aggregates consisting mainly of clay-mica minerals and micrometre-sized quartz grains. Some of these inclusions contain subangular to semi-rounded rock clasts (siltstones and sandstones) ranging from 0.3 to 8 mm in size. In total, 31 zircon grains have been identified in two rock clasts and dated using SHRIMP-II. The ages of the studied zircons range from 0.6 to 2.0 Ga with two distinct clusters between 0.8 and 1.15 Ga and between 1.6 and 1.8 Ga. Rock clasts obviously came from the western lake shore, which is thus composed of terrigenous strata with an age of not older than 600 Ma. The sedimentary nature of the western lake shore is also confirmed by seismic refraction data showing seismic velocities there of 5.4-5.5 km s(-1) at the bedrock surface. After Lake Vostok was unsealed, its water (frozen and sampled next season) was also studied with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis. This study showed the existence of calcium carbonate and silica microparticles (10-20 μm across) in frozen water. PMID:26667916

  16. Effects of Temperature, Salinity and Fish in Structuring the Macroinvertebrate Community in Shallow Lakes: Implications for Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Brucet, Sandra; Boix, Dani; Nathansen, Louise W.; Quintana, Xavier D.; Jensen, Elisabeth; Balayla, David; Meerhoff, Mariana; Jeppesen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming may lead to changes in the trophic structure and diversity of shallow lakes as a combined effect of increased temperature and salinity and likely increased strength of trophic interactions. We investigated the potential effects of temperature, salinity and fish on the plant-associated macroinvertebrate community by introducing artificial plants in eight comparable shallow brackish lakes located in two climatic regions of contrasting temperature: cold-temperate and Mediterranean. In both regions, lakes covered a salinity gradient from freshwater to oligohaline waters. We undertook day and night-time sampling of macroinvertebrates associated with the artificial plants and fish and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators within artificial plants and in pelagic areas. Our results showed marked differences in the trophic structure between cold and warm shallow lakes. Plant-associated macroinvertebrates and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators were more abundant and the communities richer in species in the cold compared to the warm climate, most probably as a result of differences in fish predation pressure. Submerged plants in warm brackish lakes did not seem to counteract the effect of fish predation on macroinvertebrates to the same extent as in temperate freshwater lakes, since small fish were abundant and tended to aggregate within the macrophytes. The richness and abundance of most plant-associated macroinvertebrate taxa decreased with salinity. Despite the lower densities of plant-associated macroinvertebrates in the Mediterranean lakes, periphyton biomass was lower than in cold temperate systems, a fact that was mainly attributed to grazing and disturbance by fish. Our results suggest that, if the current process of warming entails higher chances of shallow lakes becoming warmer and more saline, climatic change may result in a decrease in macroinvertebrate species richness and abundance in shallow lakes. PMID:22393354

  17. Enhanced Sampling in the Well-Tempered Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2010-05-01

    We introduce the well-tempered ensemble (WTE) which is the biased ensemble sampled by well-tempered metadynamics when the energy is used as collective variable. WTE can be designed so as to have approximately the same average energy as the canonical ensemble but much larger fluctuations. These two properties lead to an extremely fast exploration of phase space. An even greater efficiency is obtained when WTE is combined with parallel tempering. Unbiased Boltzmann averages are computed on the fly by a recently developed reweighting method [M. Bonomi , J. Comput. Chem. 30, 1615 (2009)JCCHDD0192-865110.1002/jcc.21305]. We apply WTE and its parallel tempering variant to the 2d Ising model and to a Gō model of HIV protease, demonstrating in these two representative cases that convergence is accelerated by orders of magnitude.

  18. Enhanced sampling in the well-tempered ensemble.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, M; Parrinello, M

    2010-05-14

    We introduce the well-tempered ensemble (WTE) which is the biased ensemble sampled by well-tempered metadynamics when the energy is used as collective variable. WTE can be designed so as to have approximately the same average energy as the canonical ensemble but much larger fluctuations. These two properties lead to an extremely fast exploration of phase space. An even greater efficiency is obtained when WTE is combined with parallel tempering. Unbiased Boltzmann averages are computed on the fly by a recently developed reweighting method [M. Bonomi, J. Comput. Chem. 30, 1615 (2009)]. We apply WTE and its parallel tempering variant to the 2d Ising model and to a Gō model of HIV protease, demonstrating in these two representative cases that convergence is accelerated by orders of magnitude. PMID:20866953

  19. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  20. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  1. Integrating physical and chemical characteristics of lakes into the glacially influenced landscape of the Northern Cascade Mountains, Washington State, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Lomnicky, G.A.; Liss, W.J.; Deimling, E.

    1999-01-01

    A basic knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of lakes is needed by management to make informed decisions to protect water resources. In this study we investigated some of the physical and chemical characteristics of 58 lakes in alpine, subalpine, and forest vegetation zones in a natural area (North Cascades National Park Service Complex) between 1989 and 1993. The objectives of the study were to: (1) document the time of ice-out relative to lake elevation; (2) determine how a sharp climate gradient west and east of the hydrologic divide affected the time of ice-out for subalpine lakes; and (3) assess how lake water quality was associated with lake elevation, lake depth, and basin geology. As expected, lake ice-out times occurred earlier with decreasing elevation. East-slope subalpine lakes iced-out earlier than did west-slope subalpine lakes because the east slope of the study area was drier and warmer than the west slope. On average, the lakes were relatively cold, neutral in pH, and low in dissolved substances and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus. Although some shallow lakes (depth ,10 m) exhibited the highest alkalinities, conductivities, and concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen, most shallow lakes exhibited low values for these variables that were comparable to values observed in deep lakes. Geology did not play a major role in segregating the lakes based on water quality. Overall, lake temperature, pH, alkalinity, conductivity, and concentrations of total phosphorus and total Kjeldahl N increased with decreasing elevation. These changes in water quality with decreasing elevation in this temperate mountainous region corresponded with warmer air temperatures and increased vegetation biomass, soil depth and maturity, and dissolved substances and nutrients.

  2. Methanotrophy and chemoautotrophy within the redox gradient of a large and deep tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, Cedric; Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Roland, Fleur; Montante, Laetitia; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Bouillon, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lake Kivu (East Africa) is a large (2370 km2) and deep (maximum depth of 485 m) meromictic lake. Its vertical structure consists of an oxic and nutrient-poor mixed layer down to 70 m maximum, and a permanently anoxic monimolimnion rich in dissolved gases (methane and carbon dioxide) and inorganic nutrients. Seasonal variation of the vertical position of the oxic-anoxic interface is driven by contrasting precipitation and wind speed regimes between rainy (October-May) and dry (June-September) season, the latter being characterized by a deepening of the oxic zone, and an increased input of dissolved gases and inorganic nutrients. Our work aimed at quantifying methanotrophic and chemoautotrophic production within the redox gradient of Lake Kivu and identifying the micro-organisms involved in these processes using phospholipid-derived fatty acid markers and their carbon stable isotope composition. Our approach combined both natural stable isotope abundance analysis and 13C-labelling (13C-DIC ; 13C-CH4) experiments. Sampling was carried out at two stations in Lake Kivu during rainy (February 2012) and dry (September 2012) season conditions. Methanotrophic bacterial production rates were highly variable (from 0.1 to 7.0 μmol C L-1 d-1), but maximum values were always observed at the oxic-anoxic interface when the CH4:O2 ratio varied between 0.1 and 10, suggesting that the majority of methane was oxidized aerobically. Furthermore, strong stable isotope labelling of monounsaturated C16 fatty acids indicate that active methane oxidizers were related to the group of type I aerobic methanotrophs (gammaproteobacteria). Despite the dominance of aerobic methane oxidation, significant methanotrophic bacterial production rates were found below the oxic-anoxic interface during the rainy season, indicating that at least a fraction of the upcoming methane may be oxidized anaerobically. This observation was further confirmed by the strong labelling at these depths of the 10Me16

  3. Error and efficiency of simulated tempering simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of simulated tempering (ST) simulations. The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. An extension to the multistate case is described. We show that the relative gain in efficiency of ST simulations over regular molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is given by the ratio of their reactive fluxes, i.e., the number of transitions between the two states summed over all ST temperatures divided by the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD or MC simulation. This relation for the efficiency is derived for the limit in which changes in the ST temperature are fast compared to the two-state transitions. In this limit, ST is most efficient. Our expression for the maximum efficiency gain of ST simulations is essentially identical to the corresponding expression derived by us for replica exchange MD and MC simulations [E. Rosta and G. Hummer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 165102 (2009)] on a different route. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed efficiency gains in a test against ST and replica exchange MC simulations of a two-dimensional Ising model. Based on the efficiency formula, we provide recommendations for the optimal choice of ST simulation parameters, in particular, the range and number of temperatures, and the frequency of attempted temperature changes. PMID:20095723

  4. Error and efficiency of simulated tempering simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2010-01-21

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of simulated tempering (ST) simulations. The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. An extension to the multistate case is described. We show that the relative gain in efficiency of ST simulations over regular molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is given by the ratio of their reactive fluxes, i.e., the number of transitions between the two states summed over all ST temperatures divided by the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD or MC simulation. This relation for the efficiency is derived for the limit in which changes in the ST temperature are fast compared to the two-state transitions. In this limit, ST is most efficient. Our expression for the maximum efficiency gain of ST simulations is essentially identical to the corresponding expression derived by us for replica exchange MD and MC simulations [E. Rosta and G. Hummer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 165102 (2009)] on a different route. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed efficiency gains in a test against ST and replica exchange MC simulations of a two-dimensional Ising model. Based on the efficiency formula, we provide recommendations for the optimal choice of ST simulation parameters, in particular, the range and number of temperatures, and the frequency of attempted temperature changes. PMID:20095723

  5. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker; Sitzman, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

  6. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

    1998-10-27

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

  7. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Electrochemical and colorimetric measurements show the dominant role of FeS in a permanently anoxic lake.

    PubMed

    Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Viollier, Eric; Ciglenečki, Irena

    2013-01-15

    Recent publications have shown that the anodic reaction between FeS and Hg can be used for electrochemical detection of colloidal and particulate FeS in natural waters. Anodic waves that were recorded around -0.45 V (vs Ag/AgCl) in model solutions correspond to the electrochemical transformation of nanoparticulate FeS to HgS. Here, as a further step, the proposed approach is tested on anoxic, sulfidic, and iron-rich samples of a meromictic freshwater lake (Lake Pavin, France). Based on new and more comprehensive work on FeS electrochemistry in model and anoxic Lake Pavin samples, a new interpretation is given for previously recorded voltammetric signals in sulfide and iron rich environment, usually designated FeS(aq), and its role in controlling solubility of different FeS phases. A comparison of the depth profiles of S(-II) measured by voltammetry and the methylene blue method showed that the majority of S(-II) is in the form of FeS. In the monimolimnion layer, thermodynamic calculations based on total Fe(II) and S(-II) concentration, measured by ferrozine and the methylene blue method, predict precipitation of FeS with log K(s) values between -3.6 and -3.8, very close to mackinawite's K(s) value. In the upper part of the same layer, precipitation of greigite is predicted. It is shown that modification of a Hg electrode by surface-formed FeS has a significant influence on voltammetric Fe(II) determination, since reduction of Fe(II) under such conditions occurs both on bare (-1.4 V) and on FeS modified Hg surfaces (-1.1 V); Fe(II) may be underdetermined when only the -1.4 V peak is measured. PMID:23240551

  9. Groundwater - the underestimated component in lake nutrient balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Joerg; Nuetzmann, Gunnar

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication is one of the most important threats to lakes in temperate climatic zones. It is necessary to determine the relevance of different nutrient sources to conduct effective management measures, to understand in-lake processes and to model future scenarios. A prerequisite for nutrient balances are water balances. Surface inflows from streams, rivers and ditches can be precisely quantified and based on local weather data precipitation and evaporation can be calculated. Quantifications of groundwater infiltration and exfiltration are more difficult. Often they are determined as residual in the water balance equation or estimated based on groundwater flow models. For nutrient balances some additional input paths have to be taken into account, for example, dry deposition, waterfowl, swimmer and anglers. Furthermore, concentration fluctuations of the different inflows have to be considered. The determination of nutrient imports via the groundwater paths is quite complex and often disregarded in nutrient balances or based on dubious assumptions. Nevertheless, groundwater might be an important nutrient source in several lakes. There are three major reasons for neglecting the groundwater path: (1) The groundwater-lake interface is difficult to access, especially in deeper lakes. (2) The size of the interface gives much space for spatial heterogeneity and requires an enormous amount of measurements for reliable determinations. (3) The lake sediment is a reactive interface, i. e., there might be some processing of the nutrients at the immediate groundwater-lake interface. In the present study we suggest a combined approach of localization of major water infiltration zones with distributed temperature sensing, quantification of water infiltration at some locations based on temperature gradients at the groundwater-lake interface and determination of nutrient concentrations with seepage meters at the same locations.

  10. Diversity, evolution, and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in soda lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkart, Holly C.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2007-09-01

    Soap Lake is a hypersaline, alkaline lake in Central Washington State (USA). For the past five years the lake has been the site of an NSF Microbial Observatory project devoted to identifying critical geochemical and microbial characteristics of the monimolimnion sediment and water column, and has demonstrated rich multispecies communities occupy all areas of the lake. Soap Lake and similar soda lakes are subject to repeated transient periods of extreme evaporation characterized by significant repetitive alterations in salinity, pH, and total water volume, yet maintain high genetic and metabolic diversity. It has been argued that this repetitive cycle for salinity, alkalinity, and sulfur concentration has been a major driver for prokaryote evolution and diversity. The rapidity of wet-dry cycling places special demands on genome evolution, requirements that are beyond the relatively conservative eukaryotic evolutionary strategy of serial alteration of existing gene sequences in a relatively stable genome. Although HGT is most likely responsible for adding a significant amount of noise to the genetic record, analysis of HGT activity can also provide us with a much-needed probe for exploration of prokaryotic genome evolution and the origin of diversity. Packaging of genetic information within the protective protein capsid of a bacteriophage would seem preferable to exposing naked DNA to the highly alkaline conditions in the lake. In this study, we present preliminary data demonstrating the presence of a diverse group of phage integrases in Soap Lake. Integrase is the viral enzyme responsible for the insertion of phage DNA into the bacterial host's chromosome. The presence of the integrase sequence in bacterial chromosomes is evidence of lysogeny, and the diversity of integrase sequences reported here suggests a wide variety of temperate phage exist in this system, and are especially active in transition zones.

  11. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  12. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  13. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  14. Evolution and origin of sympatric shallow-water morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, in Canada's Great Bear Lake

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L N; Chavarie, L; Bajno, R; Howland, K L; Wiley, S H; Tonn, W M; Taylor, E B

    2015-01-01

    Range expansion in north-temperate fishes subsequent to the retreat of the Wisconsinan glaciers has resulted in the rapid colonization of previously unexploited, heterogeneous habitats and, in many situations, secondary contact among conspecific lineages that were once previously isolated. Such ecological opportunity coupled with reduced competition likely promoted morphological and genetic differentiation within and among post-glacial fish populations. Discrete morphological forms existing in sympatry, for example, have now been described in many species, yet few studies have directly assessed the association between morphological and genetic variation. Morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, are found in several large-lake systems including Great Bear Lake (GBL), Northwest Territories, Canada, where several shallow-water forms are known. Here, we assess microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation among four morphotypes of Lake Trout from the five distinct arms of GBL, and also from locations outside of this system to evaluate several hypotheses concerning the evolution of morphological variation in this species. Our data indicate that morphotypes of Lake Trout from GBL are genetically differentiated from one another, yet the morphotypes are still genetically more similar to one another compared with populations from outside of this system. Furthermore, our data suggest that Lake Trout colonized GBL following dispersal from a single glacial refugium (the Mississippian) and support an intra-lake model of divergence. Overall, our study provides insights into the origins of morphological and genetic variation in post-glacial populations of fishes and provides benchmarks important for monitoring Lake Trout biodiversity in a region thought to be disproportionately susceptible to impacts from climate change. PMID:25204304

  15. Evolution and origin of sympatric shallow-water morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, in Canada's Great Bear Lake.

    PubMed

    Harris, L N; Chavarie, L; Bajno, R; Howland, K L; Wiley, S H; Tonn, W M; Taylor, E B

    2015-01-01

    Range expansion in north-temperate fishes subsequent to the retreat of the Wisconsinan glaciers has resulted in the rapid colonization of previously unexploited, heterogeneous habitats and, in many situations, secondary contact among conspecific lineages that were once previously isolated. Such ecological opportunity coupled with reduced competition likely promoted morphological and genetic differentiation within and among post-glacial fish populations. Discrete morphological forms existing in sympatry, for example, have now been described in many species, yet few studies have directly assessed the association between morphological and genetic variation. Morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, are found in several large-lake systems including Great Bear Lake (GBL), Northwest Territories, Canada, where several shallow-water forms are known. Here, we assess microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation among four morphotypes of Lake Trout from the five distinct arms of GBL, and also from locations outside of this system to evaluate several hypotheses concerning the evolution of morphological variation in this species. Our data indicate that morphotypes of Lake Trout from GBL are genetically differentiated from one another, yet the morphotypes are still genetically more similar to one another compared with populations from outside of this system. Furthermore, our data suggest that Lake Trout colonized GBL following dispersal from a single glacial refugium (the Mississippian) and support an intra-lake model of divergence. Overall, our study provides insights into the origins of morphological and genetic variation in post-glacial populations of fishes and provides benchmarks important for monitoring Lake Trout biodiversity in a region thought to be disproportionately susceptible to impacts from climate change. PMID:25204304

  16. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  17. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  18. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  19. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  20. Nitrogen Gas Fluxes in Northeastern Temperate Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafave, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Venterea, R. T.; Lovett, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    Nitrogen gas fluxes are a poorly quantified component of the nitrogen (N) cycle of forest ecosystems and are important to water quality, atmospheric chemistry and forest health. We measured fluxes of nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) in oak and maple stands in the Catskill mountains of New York State. Fluxes of NO and N2O were measured using in situ chambers and N2 flux was measured in intact cores incubated in a helium-oxygen atmosphere closed recirculation system in the laboratory. Fluxes of NO and N2O were higher in maple than in oak stands, which is consistent with previous work showing higher rates of N cycling under maple than oak. NO fluxes averaged 1.7 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.2 in oak. N2O fluxes averaged 0.10 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.004 in oak. However, N2 fluxes were higher in oak (2.3 mg N m-2 d-1) than maple (0.15), a surprising result that was supported by independent measurements of denitrification potential. There was marked variability in fluxes between replicate plots that was linked to the presence of understory vegetation and physical characteristics of the forest floor. Results suggest that N gas fluxes in northeastern temperate forests may be more important than previously thought and may be an important regulator of export of N to coastal waters, N-related atmospheric chemistry and forest N saturation.

  1. Summer Dormancy in Perennial Temperate Grasses

    PubMed Central

    VOLAIRE, FLORENCE; NORTON, MARK

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Dormancy has been extensively studied in plants which experience severe winter conditions but much less so in perennial herbaceous plants that must survive summer drought. This paper reviews the current knowledge on summer dormancy in both native and cultivated perennial temperate grasses originating from the Mediterranean Basin, and presents a unified terminology to describe this trait. • Scope Under severe drought, it is difficult to separate the responses by which plants avoid and tolerate dehydration from those associated with the expression of summer dormancy. Consequently, this type of endogenous (endo-) dormancy can be tested only in plants that are not subjected to moisture deficit. Summer dormancy can be defined by four criteria, one of which is considered optional: (1) reduction or cessation of leaf production and expansion; (2) senescence of mature foliage; (3) dehydration of surviving organs; and (4, optional) formation of resting organs. The proposed terminology recognizes two levels of summer dormancy: (a) complete dormancy, when cessation of growth is associated with full senescence of foliage and induced dehydration of leaf bases; and (b) incomplete dormancy, when leaf growth is partially inhibited and is associated with moderate levels of foliage senescence. Summer dormancy is expressed under increasing photoperiod and temperature. It is under hormonal control and usually associated with flowering and a reduction in metabolic activity in meristematic tissues. Dehydration tolerance and dormancy are independent phenomena and differ from the adaptations of resurrection plants. • Conclusions Summer dormancy has been correlated with superior survival after severe and repeated summer drought in a large range of perennial grasses. In the face of increasing aridity, this trait could be used in the development of cultivars that are able to meet agronomic and environmental goals. It is therefore important to have a better

  2. Monitoring Change in Temperate Coniferous Forest Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Darrel (Technical Monitor); Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of this research was to improve monitoring of temperate forest change using remote sensing. In this context, change includes both clearing of forest due to effects such as fire, logging, or land conversion and forest growth and succession. The Landsat 7 ETM+ proved an extremely valuable research tool in this domain. The Landsat 7 program has generated an extremely valuable transformation in the land remote sensing community by making high quality images available for relatively low cost. In addition, the tremendous improvements in the acquisition strategy greatly improved the overall availability of remote sensing images. I believe that from an historical prespective, the Landsat 7 mission will be considered extremely important as the improved image availability will stimulate the use of multitemporal imagery at resolutions useful for local to regional mapping. Also, Landsat 7 has opened the way to global applications of remote sensing at spatial scales where important surface processes and change can be directly monitored. It has been a wonderful experience to have participated on the Landsat 7 Science Team. The research conducted under this project led to contributions in four general domains: I. Improved understanding of the information content of images as a function of spatial resolution; II. Monitoring Forest Change and Succession; III. Development and Integration of Advanced Analysis Methods; and IV. General support of the remote sensing of forests and environmental change. This report is organized according to these topics. This report does not attempt to provide the complete details of the research conducted with support from this grant. That level of detail is provided in the 16 peer reviewed journal articles, 7 book chapters and 5 conference proceedings papers published as part of this grant. This report attempts to explain how the various publications fit together to improve our understanding of how forests are changing and how to

  3. Modern process study on Chen Co and Ranwu Lake of Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, J.

    2013-12-01

    proxies in lake sediments. (3) The nutritional status of lake water was controlled by temperature, salinity by lake level. Carbonate deposition was influenced by biological factor clearly, but also influenced by under-water terrain and depth. (4) Paleo-lacustrine sediments have certain impact to modern sediment, reflecting the finer grain size and more chemical constituents of clay minerals in the ricver mouth of the southern river. (5) For Ranwu Lake, next to the oceanic glaciers, glacier melt influenced the lake more directly, which can be illustrated by the Quchi River dominating a lot of aspects of Ranwu Lake, including the water level, seasonal and spatial water temperate, conductivity, pH value, and even the chlorophyll content. Depositional flux analysis detected by sediment traps found that the fluxes decreasing from upper lake to the lower lake and greater flux in summer than other seasons, reflecting the dominant influence of Quchi River on the lake. (6) Analysis for the dust flux detected by a dust collector found that the greatest flux happened in winter and spring, with the flux 3~4 more than other seasons.

  4. Using a coupled groundwater/surfacewater model to predict climate-change impacts to lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, Northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, John F.; Hunt, Randall J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.; Doherty, John

    2009-01-01

    A major focus of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Trout Lake Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) project is the development of a watershed model to allow predictions of hydrologic response to future conditions including land-use and climate change. The coupled groundwater/surface-water model GSFLOW was chosen for this purpose because it could easily incorporate an existing groundwater flow model and it provides for simulation of surface-water processes. The Trout Lake watershed in northern Wisconsin is underlain by a highly conductive outwash sand aquifer. In this area, streamflow is dominated by groundwater contributions; however, surface runoff occurs during intense rainfall periods and spring snowmelt. Surface runoff also occurs locally near stream/lake areas where the unsaturated zone is thin. A diverse data set, collected from 1992 to 2007 for the Trout Lake WEBB project and the co-located and NSF-funded North Temperate Lakes LTER project, includes snowpack, solar radiation, potential evapotranspiration, lake levels, groundwater levels, and streamflow. The timeseries processing software TSPROC (Doherty 2003) was used to distill the large time series data set to a smaller set of observations and summary statistics that captured the salient hydrologic information. The timeseries processing reduced hundreds of thousands of observations to less than 5,000. Model calibration included specific predictions for several lakes in the study area using the PEST parameter estimation suite of software (Doherty 2007). The calibrated model was used to simulate the hydrologic response in the study lakes to a variety of climate change scenarios culled from the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Solomon et al. 2007). Results from the simulations indicate climate change could result in substantial changes to the lake levels and components of the hydrologic budget of a seepage lake in the flow system. For a drainage lake

  5. Carbon accumulation and sequestration of lakes in China during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Chen, Huai; Yu, Zicheng; Wu, Jianghua; Zhu, Qiu'an; Peng, Changhui; Wang, Yanfen; Qin, Boqiang

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the responses of lake systems to past climate change and human activity is critical for assessing and predicting the fate of lake carbon (C) in the future. In this study, we synthesized records of the sediment accumulation from 82 lakes and of C sequestration from 58 lakes with direct organic C measurements throughout China. We also identified the controlling factors of the long-term sediment and C accumulation dynamics in these lakes during the past 12 ka (1 ka = 1000 cal yr BP). Our results indicated an overall increasing trend of sediment and C accumulation since 12 ka, with an accumulation peak in the last couple of millennia for lakes in China, corresponding to terrestrial organic matter input due to land-use change. The Holocene lake sediment accumulation rate (SAR) and C accumulation rate (CAR) averaged (mean ± SE) 0.47 ± 0.05 mm yr(-1) and 7.7 ± 1.4 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) in China, respectively, comparable to the previous estimates for boreal and temperate regions. The SAR for lakes in the East Plain of subtropical China (1.05 ± 0.28 mm yr(-1) ) was higher than those in other regions (P < 0.05). However, CAR did not vary significantly among regions. Overall, the variability and history of climate and anthropogenic interference regulated the temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment and C sequestration for lakes in China. We estimated the total amount of C burial in lakes of China as 8.0 ± 1.0 Pg C. This first estimation of total C storage and dynamics in lakes of China confirms the importance of lakes in land C budget in monsoon-influenced regions. PMID:26220607

  6. Food of lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Erkkila, Leo F.; Tetzloff, Clifford L.

    1965-01-01

    Stomachs were examined from 1,492 lake trout and 83 siscowets collected from Lake Superior. Data are given on the food of lake trout of legal size (17 inches or longer) by year, season, and depth of water, and on the relation between food and size among smaller lake trout. Fish contributed 96.7 to 99.9 per cent of the total volume of food in the annual samples. Ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) were most common (52.2 to 87.5 per cent of the volume) in 1950 to 1953 and American smelt ranked first (65.6 per cent of the volume) in 1963. Cottids were in 8.9 to 12.3 per cent of the stomachs in 1950 to 1953 but in only 4.3 per cent in 1963. Insects ranked second to fish in occurrence (9.6 per cent for the combined samples) and crustaceans followed at 3.9 per cent. The greatest seasonal changes in the food of lake trout were among fish caught at 35 fathoms and shallower. The occurrence of Coregonus increased from 34.6 per cent in February-March to 71.1 per cent in October-December. Smelt were in 76.9 per cent of the stomachs in February-March but in only 2.2 per cent in October-December. Cottids, Mysis relicta, and insects were most common in the July-September collections. Lake trout taken at depths greater than 35 fathoms had eaten a higher percentage of Cottidae and Coregonus than had those captured in shallower water. Smelt, ninespine sticklebacks, Mysis, and insects were more frequent in stomachs of lake trout from less than 35 fathoms. Crustaceans comprised more than 70 per cent of the total volume of food for 4.0- to 7.9-inch lake trout but their importance decreased as the lake trout grew larger. Pontoporeia affinis was the most common in the stomachs of 4.0- to 6.9-inch lake trout and Mysis held first rank at 7.0 to 12.9 inches. Ostracods were important only to 4.0- to 4.9-inch lake trout. As the lake trout became larger, the importance of fish grew from 4.4-per cent occurrence at 5.0 to 5.9 inches to 93.9 per cent at 16.0 to 16.9 inches. Smelt were most commonly eaten by

  7. Distinct bacterial communities dominate tropical and temperate zone leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mincheol; Kim, Woo-Sung; Tripathi, Binu M; Adams, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Little is known of the bacterial community of tropical rainforest leaf litter and how it might differ from temperate forest leaf litter and from the soils underneath. We sampled leaf litter in a similarly advanced stage of decay, and for comparison, we also sampled the surface layer of soil, at three tropical forest sites in Malaysia and four temperate forest sites in South Korea. Illumina sequencing targeting partial bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene revealed that the bacterial community composition of both temperate and tropical litter is quite distinct from the soils underneath. Litter in both temperate and tropical forest was dominated by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while soil is dominated by Acidobacteria and, to a lesser extent, Proteobacteria. However, bacterial communities of temperate and tropical litter clustered separately from one another on an ordination. The soil bacterial community structures were also distinctive to each climatic zone, suggesting that there must be a climate-specific biogeographical pattern in bacterial community composition. The differences were also found in the level of diversity. The temperate litter has a higher operational taxonomic unit (OTU) diversity than the tropical litter, paralleling the trend in soil diversity. Overall, it is striking that the difference in community composition between the leaf litter and the soil a few centimeters underneath is about the same as that between leaf litter in tropical and temperate climates, thousands of kilometers apart. However, one substantial difference was that the leaf litter of two tropical forest sites, Meranti and Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), was overwhelmingly dominated by the single genus Burkholderia, at 37 and 23 % of reads, respectively. The 454 sequencing result showed that most Burkholderia species in tropical leaf litter belong to nonpathogenic "plant beneficial" lineages. The differences from the temperate zone in the bacterial

  8. The breath of the rocks: Lake carbon dioxide emissions from weathering processes at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcé, R.; Obrador, B.

    2014-12-01

    Most lakes and reservoirs are known to have surface carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations that are supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere, and hence nearly all of them are net emitters of CO2. Global carbon emissions from lakes account for 0.06 to 0.84 Pg C year-1, a substantial amount relative to other fluxes of the continental C balance. Therefore, a proper understanding of the land carbon cycle and its sensitivity to external perturbations requires detailed knowledge of drivers of global CO2 supersaturation in lakes. CO2 supersaturation has generally been attributed to a widespread imbalance of lake net ecosystem production towards net heterotrophy, but recent findings challenge this interpretation. Here we show that an integrated perspective including lake net ecosystem production together with precipitation and dissolution of carbonate minerals and inputs of dissolved inorganic carbon from the watershed, substantially improves our understanding of the processes leading to CO2 supersaturation in lakes with alkalinity above 1 meq L-1. Our results indicate that CO2 supersaturation is independent of net ecosystem production in many lakes, and that a significant amount of the CO2 evaded through their surface is directly related to weathering processes in the watershed that supply alkalinity to surface waters. After evaluation of the worldwide distribution of alkalinity across lakes we show that CO2 emissions related to weathering processes are relevant in tropical and temperate latitudes, but negligible in boreal regions.

  9. Consequences of thermal pollution from a nuclear plant on lake temperature and mixing regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Georgiy; Shatwell, Tom; Kasprzak, Peter

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the combined effects of thermal pollution from a nuclear power plant (NPP) and regional climate warming on the thermal regime of a lake. For this purpose, we used the lake model FLake and analyzed 50 years of temperature data from Lake Stechlin, Germany, which served as the cooling water reservoir for the Rheinsberg NPP from 1966 until 1990. Both modeling and statistical data analysis revealed a strong influence of the NPP cooling water discharge on the lake water temperatures and the vertical stability of the water column. A remarkable effect of thermal pollution consisted of strong vertical mixing in winter produced by the discharge of warm water into the lake when ambient water temperatures were below 4 °C. This effect caused a significant increase in the deep hypolimnion temperatures and a corresponding decrease of the vertical stability in the summer. In turn, climate warming had the opposite effect on the summer stability by increasing lake surface temperatures. Both the thermal pollution and climate change increased the duration of the summer stratification period. Our results suggest that industrial thermal pollution in temperate lakes during winter is stored in the deep water column until the next winter, whereas heat added in the summer dissipates relatively rapidly into the atmosphere. Accordingly, the winter thermal pollution could have a long-lasting effect on the lake ecology by affecting benthic biogeochemical processes.

  10. Ciliated protozoa of two antarctic lakes: analysis by quantitative protargol staining and examination of artificial substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Coats, D. W.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Planktonic and artificial substrate-associated ciliates have been identified in two perennially ice-covered antarctic lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Abundances estimated by quantitative protargol staining ranged from < 5 to 31690 cells l-1, levels that are comparable to those previously obtained using other methods. Nineteen ciliate taxa were identified from these lakes, with the most frequently encountered genera being Plagiocampa, Askenasia, Monodinium, Sphaerophrya and Vorticella. The taxonomic findings compare favorably with those of previous investigators; however four previously unreported genera were observed in both Lakes Fryxell and Hoare. The variability in the depth distributions of ciliates in Lake Fryxell is explained in terms of lake physicochemical properties and ciliate prey distributions, while factors related to temporal succession in the Lake Hoare assemblage remain unexplained. Local marine or temperate zone freshwater habitats are a more likely source than the surrounding dry valleys soils for present ciliate colonists in these lakes. Although the taxonomic uncertainties require further examination, our results suggest that ciliate populations in these antarctic lakes undergo significant fluctuations and are more diverse than was previously recognized.

  11. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  12. Biotic and abiotic response to palaeoenvironmental changes at Lake Pannons' western margin (Central Europe, Late Miocene)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.; Scholger, Robert; Gitter, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study was performed on a c. 30 m thick, limnic–deltaic sequence in the Styrian Basin (Austria). Geophysical (gamma ray activity, rock magnetism), geochemical (organic carbon, sulphur) and sedimentological observations were combined with palaeontological information (mainly ostracods). On this base, several ecological factors were deduced (terrigenous influx, salinity, water depth and oxygenation). Based on integrated stratigraphy as well as on palaeomagnetic results the whole section is set to Chron C5r.2r−1n (11.308–11.263 Ma) and covers a period of less than 45 kyr. In addition to the long-term record, we analysed short-term changes by high-resolution sampling (5 mm sample interval; ostracods, magnetic susceptibility). This ~ 2.3 m-thick interval spans in total < 3500 yr with an individual sample resolution of a few years only. The combination of these data permit the description of the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the section in detail: at the base of the section, the development of a conifer swamp on the lakeside of Lake Pannon is documented. This almost freshwater swamp existed for some centuries before it became extinct within a few decades due to a rise of the water-table. The drowning is related to a transgression of Lake Pannon, which triggered the establishment of a brackish-water fauna as well as greigite formation in the lake sediments. In general, the ongoing transgression favoured benthic life due to increased salinity (up to mesohaline conditions). The high-resolution ostracod and magnetic susceptibility record reflect short-term fluctuations in bottom-water ventilation. These oscillations probably range in the order of centuries and decades and are possibly related to climatic shifts. Later, the successive deepening of the lake resulted in a significant faunal turnover. A meromictic system with a well-established, oxygen-depleted hypolimnion developed. Finally, the limnic phase was replaced by a prograding

  13. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles, II; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  14. SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON YEAR-ROUND WATER TEMPERATURES IN TEMPERATE ZONE LAKES. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. 9800 years of meromixis and euxinia in Lake Cadagno (Swiss Alps): Sedimentary and biogeochemical evidence for the formation of a permanently stable chemocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, S. B.; Gilli, A.; Dahl, T. W.; Niemann, H.; Ravasi, D.; Lehmann, M. F.; Peduzzi, R.; Peduzzi, S.; Tonolla, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.

    2012-04-01

    Lake Cadagno is a meromictic high-alpine lake situated in the Piora valley in the southern Alps of Switzerland (1921 m asl, 0.26 km2, max. water depth 21 m). The inflow of sulfate-rich waters from subaquatic springs situated in dolomitic bedrock results in a permanent chemocline at 10 to 13 m water depth with sulfidic conditions in the hypolimnion. As yet, it is unknown how far back in time euxinia has prevailed in the Lake Cadagno water column, maintaining a diverse anaerobic community of bacteria at and below the redox-transition zone. Long sediment cores (10.5 m) covering the past ~12,000 years were, for the first time, retrieved from the centre of Lake Cadagno using an UWITEC piston coring system. Here, we present results documenting the lake's redox-state evolution through the Holocene based on sedimentological, geochemical and molecular analyses. Sediment stratigraphy reveals an autochthonous lacustrine background sedimentation frequently intercalated by flood (accounting for 30% of the sediment succession) and mass-movement deposits (49%) that are the result of lake-slope failures. Trace metal analysis by XRF core scanning and ICP-MS measurements document the transition from oxic conditions after the lake formation (~12,000 cal yr BP) to the onset of sulfidic conditions at ~9800 cal yr BP. Enhanced accumulation/preservation of Mn (up to 5.9 wt% of Mn) in the sediments indicates an intermediate (i.e. manganous) oxygenation state with fluctuating redox conditions during a millennial transition period. We propose that the high Mn concentrations are the result of Mn2+ leaching from the sediments during reducing conditions and subsequent rapid precipitation of Mn-oxide minerals during episodic and short-term mixing events. Sulfidic conditions, which are indicated in the sediment record by high Mo burial rates (Mo concentrations of up to 470 ppm), prevailed thereafter until modern times without any lasting hypolimnetic oxygenation. We speculate that the onset of

  16. Temperate Ice Under Jakobshavn Isbrae and Other Greenland Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinar, K. E.; Joughin, I. R.

    2010-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbrae, western Greenland's largest outlet glacier, drains 6.5% of the ice sheet's area and therefore may be poised to make rapid contributions to global sea level rise. Indeed, in the late 1990s the glacier doubled in speed as its floating ice tongue disintegrated. Driving stresses up to 300 kPa suggest that a considerable amount of ice deformation combines with basal sliding to produce Jakobshavn's fast speed. Boreholes and overturned icebergs have indicated the existence of a soft, temperate layer at the bottom of the ice, where shear deformation would be concentrated. The thickness and water content of the temperate ice layer determine how much of the motion it can provide. While we focus on Jakobshavn, we also apply our analysis to other Greenland outlet glaciers. This project uses an implicit finite-difference model to compute the temperate ice thickness and water content along multiple flowlines feeding Jakobshavn Isbrae and other Greenland glaciers, in an effort to identify the mechanisms for their rapid movement. In contrast to previous modeling studies, which chose ice velocities in order to match partial temperature profiles measured in boreholes, our model is constrained by satellite-observed surface velocities. The model calculates the temperature field and determines the sliding and internal deformation velocities, constrained by the velocity measurements, to make a self-consistent balance. Feedbacks between temperature, water content, and viscosity allow the temperate shear layer to evolve. Our model results for temperate ice thickness under Jakobshavn (150-300 meters) agree with previous estimates (100-700 meters) and recent observations (30 and 200-250 meters). This model is well suited for glaciers with deeply eroded bedrock troughs. Forthcoming observational campaigns such as NASA's IceBridge program will produce detailed basal topography data for other Greenland outlet glaciers. As these data come online, we will model the temperate

  17. Cretaceous gastropods: contrasts between tethys and the temperate provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohl, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the Cretaceous Period, gastropod faunas show considerable differences in their evolution between the Tethyan Realm (tropical) and the Temperate Realms to the north and south. Like Holocene faunas, prosobranch, gastropods constitute the dominant part of Cretaceous marine snail faunas. Entomotaeneata and opisthobranchs usually form all of the remainder. In Tethyan faunas the Archaeogastropoda form a consistent high proportion of total taxa but less than the Mesogastropoda throughout the period. In contrast, the Temperate faunas beginning in Albian times show a decline in percentages of archaeogastropod taxa and a significant increase in the Neogastropoda, until they constitute over 50 percent of the taxa in some faunas. The neogastropods never attain high diversity in the Cretaceous of the Tethyan Realm and are judged to be of Temperate Realm origin. Cretaceous Tethyan gastropod faunas are closely allied to those of the 'corallien facies' of the Jurassic and begin the period evolutionarily mature and well diversified. Three categories of Tethyan gastropods are analyzed. The first group consists of those of Jurassic ancestry. The second group orginates mainly during the Barremian and Aptian, reaches a climax in diversification during middle Cretaceous time, and usually declines during the latest Cretaceous. The third group originates late in the Cretaceous and consists of taxa that manage to either survive the Cretaceous-Tertiary crisis or give rise to forms of prominence among Tertiary warm water faunas. Temperate Realm gastropod faunas are less diverse than those of Tethys during the Early Cretaceous. They show a steady increase in diversity, primarily among the Mesogastropoda and Neogastropoda. This trend culminates in latest Cretaceous times when the gastropod assemblages of the clastic provinces of the inner shelf contain an abundance of taxa outstripping that of any other part of the Cretaceous of either realm. Extinction at the Cretaceous

  18. Climate-driven regime shift of a temperate marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wernberg, Thomas; Bennett, Scott; Babcock, Russell C; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Cure, Katherine; Depczynski, Martial; Dufois, Francois; Fromont, Jane; Fulton, Christopher J; Hovey, Renae K; Harvey, Euan S; Holmes, Thomas H; Kendrick, Gary A; Radford, Ben; Santana-Garcon, Julia; Saunders, Benjamin J; Smale, Dan A; Thomsen, Mads S; Tuckett, Chenae A; Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A; Wilson, Shaun

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem reconfigurations arising from climate-driven changes in species distributions are expected to have profound ecological, social, and economic implications. Here we reveal a rapid climate-driven regime shift of Australian temperate reef communities, which lost their defining kelp forests and became dominated by persistent seaweed turfs. After decades of ocean warming, extreme marine heat waves forced a 100-kilometer range contraction of extensive kelp forests and saw temperate species replaced by seaweeds, invertebrates, corals, and fishes characteristic of subtropical and tropical waters. This community-wide tropicalization fundamentally altered key ecological processes, suppressing the recovery of kelp forests. PMID:27387951

  19. Transformations of Carbides During Tempering of D3 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykiel, Tadeusz; Hryniewicz, Tadeusz

    2014-06-01

    The studies were performed on D3 tool steel hardened after austenitizing at 1050 °C during 30 min and tempering at 200-700 °C. Based on the diffraction studies performed from the extraction replicas, using electron microscopy, it was found that after 120-min tempering in the consecutive temperatures, the following types of carbides occur: Apart from higher mentioned carbides, there are also big primary carbides and fine secondary M7C3 carbides occurring, which did not dissolve during austenitizing.

  20. Temperate forest health in an era of emerging megadisturbance.

    PubMed

    Millar, Constance I; Stephenson, Nathan L

    2015-08-21

    Although disturbances such as fire and native insects can contribute to natural dynamics of forest health, exceptional droughts, directly and in combination with other disturbance factors, are pushing some temperate forests beyond thresholds of sustainability. Interactions from increasing temperatures, drought, native insects and pathogens, and uncharacteristically severe wildfire are resulting in forest mortality beyond the levels of 20th-century experience. Additional anthropogenic stressors, such as atmospheric pollution and invasive species, further weaken trees in some regions. Although continuing climate change will likely drive many areas of temperate forest toward large-scale transformations, management actions can help ease transitions and minimize losses of socially valued ecosystem services. PMID:26293954

  1. Investigation of the parallel tempering method for protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schug, Alexander; Herges, Thomas; Verma, Abhinav; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the suitability and efficiency of an adapted version of the parallel tempering method for all-atom protein folding. We have recently developed an all-atom free energy force field (PFF01) for protein structure prediction with stochastic optimization methods. Here we report reproducible folding of the 20-amino-acid trp-cage protein and the conserved 40-amino-acid three-helix HIV accessory protein with an adapted parallel tempering method. We find that the native state, for both proteins, is correctly predicted to 2 Å backbone root mean square deviation and analyse the efficiency of the simulation approach.

  2. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  3. Methyl chloride emission from a fern growing in sub-tropical, temperate and cool-temperate climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Takenaka, Akio; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Hiura, Tsutomu

    2015-04-01

    Methyl chloride(CH3Cl) is the most abundant halocarbon in the troposphere, and is known as a natural stratospheric ozone depletion compound. Amongst its various sources, tropical forests are likely the largest contributor, followed by biomass burning, oceans and salt marshes. There have been unsolved questions why CH3Cl-emitting plants are dominated by tropical plants. Recently we found that a fern, Osmunda japonica, collected from temperate zone emits as high as several μg-g(dw)-1-h-1 of CH3Cl. This fern has a wide natural distribution, covering sub-tropical, temperate and cool-temperate climate, making it possible to study the CH3Cl emission rate from one species under different climate conditions. In this presentation, we report seasonal and spatial variation of the CH3Cl emission rate from O. japonica, and discuss its controlling factors.

  4. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  5. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounder: A proved concept for temperate ice sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Leuschen, C.; Ayyangar, H.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of glaciers and snow cover are important to the understanding and prediction of both ablation ratio and the overall impact reductions in ice formation will have on the cryosphere. The extent of the coverage of these observations still remains limited in some regions due to natural geographic accidents that make it problematic for human in-situ exploration. Instruments with the capability to estimate the composition and thickness of ice formations are a suitable compliment to enhance the quality and extent of the data currently available. Radar instruments can be used to provide information on the internal and basal conditions of ice masses. For temperate ice, the high water content produces volume scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves. The volume scattering appears as clutter masking weak bedrock echoes. At the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) we have developed an HF dual-frequency Temperate-Ice Depth Sounder radar (TIDSoR) for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice. This radar has successfully sounded 1-km thick ice near Jakobshavn, Greenlad glacier and 2-km thick cold ice near Byrd camp, Antarctica. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.5 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum peak output power of 20 W. It also can be programmed to operate at other frequencies in the HF spectrum. The transmitted waveform is a digitally generated pulse with a programmable repetition frequency of up to 20 kHz. The frequencies of operation were selected based on three main criteria: (a) the ability to overcome volume scattering produced by the ice inclusions, such as water pockets, with at least 10 dB power of a backscattered signal and up to 3 km depth; (b) compatibility with high frequency aviation radio systems, which are mostly used for voice communications; and (c) portability, lower power consumption, and interface with a portable computer. The radar consists of three functional

  6. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  7. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead.

  8. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  9. The population structure of Escherichia coli isolated from subtropical and temperate soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Yan, Tao; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Ishii, Satoshi; Fujioka, Roger S.; Whitman, Richard L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    While genotypically-distinct naturalized Escherichia coli strains have been shown to occur in riparian soils of Lake Michigan and Lake Superior watersheds, comparative analyses of E. coli populations in diverse soils across a range of geographic and climatic conditions have not been investigated. The main objectives of this study were to: (a) examine the population structure and genetic relatedness of E. coli isolates collected from different soil types on a tropical island (Hawaii), and (b) determine if E. coli populations from Hawaii and temperate soils (Indiana, Minnesota) shared similar genotypes that may be reflective of biome-related soil conditions. DNA fingerprint and multivariate statistical analyses were used to examine the population structure and genotypic characteristics of the E. coli isolates. About 33% (98 of 293) of the E. coli from different soil types and locations on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, had unique DNA fingerprints, indicating that these bacteria were relatively diverse; the Shannon diversity index for the population was 4.03. Nearly 60% (171 of 293) of the E. coli isolates from Hawaii clustered into two major groups and the rest, with two or more isolates, fell into one of 22 smaller groups, or individual lineages. Multivariate analysis of variance of 89, 21, and 106 unique E. coli DNA fingerprints for Hawaii, Indiana, and Minnesota soils, respectively, showed that isolates formed tight cohesive groups, clustering mainly by location. However, there were several instances of clonal isolates being shared between geographically different locations. Thus, while nearly identical E. coli strains were shared between disparate climatologically- and geographically-distinct locations, a vast majority of the soil E. coli strains were genotypically diverse and were likely derived from separate lineages. This supports the hypothesis that these bacteria are not unique and multiple genotypes can readily adapt to become part of the soil autochthonous

  10. Scientific Temper among Academically High and Low Achieving Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kour, Sunmeet

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the scientific temper of high and low achieving adolescent girl students. Random sampling technique was used to draw the sample from various high schools of District Srinagar. The sample for the present study consisted of 120 school going adolescent girls (60 high and 60 low achievers). Data was…

  11. Temperate zone fens of the glaciated Midwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amon, J.P.; Thompson, C.A.; Carpenter, Q.J.; Miner, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study of more than 70 fens in the Midwestern United States and a review of the literature indicates that these temperate zone wetlands may differ from fens of the boreal zone and are not adequately differentiated from them by present classification systems. Fens of the Midwestern temperate zone 1) are wetlands with high botanical diversity, 2) are supported in part by ground water with conductivity > 100mS/ cm and circumneutral pH, 3) contain water in the root zone during most of the growing season yet are not usually inundated, and 4) accumulate organic and/or carbonate substrates. Individually, none of these descriptors is adequate to distinguish fens from other wetland communities of the Midwest such as marshes, sedge meadows, and wet prairies; yet, when they are taken together, such discrimination is possible. While fens of this zone share many species, our study does not support using indicator species because too few are both faithfully represented and geographically widespread. Midwestern temperate fens are sustained by forces of climate, landscape, and geology, which permit ground water to seep continuously into the root zone in a focused location. Since water availability in the temperate Midwest is less than in the boreal zone, continuous discharge is needed to maintain the saturation conducive to peat formation. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  13. Comparative genomics provides insight into maize adaptation in temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Hufford, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    A new study provides insights into the evolution of maize during its global spread into temperate regions from its origin in coastal Mexico.Please see related Research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-1009-x. PMID:27411931

  14. Tempered Water Lower Port Connector Structural Analysis Verification

    SciTech Connect

    CREA, B.A.

    2000-05-05

    Structural analysis of the lower port connection of the Tempered Water System of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility was performed. Subsequent detailed design changes to enhance operability resulted in the need to re-evaluate the bases of the original analysis to verify its continued validity. This evaluation is contained in Appendix A of this report. The original evaluation is contained in Appendix B.

  15. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  16. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  17. Presence of the Cyanotoxin Microcystin in Arctic Lakes of Southwestern Greenland.

    PubMed

    Trout-Haney, Jessica V; Wood, Zachary T; Cottingham, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins have received significant attention in eutrophic temperate and tropical systems where conspicuous blooms of certain planktonic taxa release toxins into fresh water, threatening its potability and safe use for recreation. Although toxigenic cyanobacteria are not confined to high nutrient environments, bloom-forming species, or planktonic taxa, these other situations are studied les often studied. For example, toxin production in picoplankton and benthic cyanobacteria-the predominant photoautotrophs found in polar lakes-is poorly understood. We quantified the occurrence of microcystin (MC, a hepatotoxic cyanotoxin) across 18 Arctic lakes in southwestern Greenland. All of the focal lakes contained detectable levels of MC, with concentrations ranging from 5 ng·L(-1) to >400 ng·L(-1) during summer, 2013-2015. These concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than many eutrophic systems, yet the median lake MC concentration in Greenland (57 ng·L(-1)) was still 6.5 times higher than the median summer MC toxicity observed across 50 New Hampshire lakes between 1998 and 2008 (8.7 ng·L(-1)). The presence of cyanotoxins in these Greenlandic lakes demonstrates that high latitude lakes can support toxigenic cyanobacteria, and suggests that we may be underestimating the potential for these systems to develop high levels of cyanotoxins in the future. PMID:27589801

  18. Distribution and fluctuations of backswimmers (Notonectidae) in a tropical shallow lake and predation on microcrustaceans.

    PubMed

    Domingos, A R; Arcifa, M S

    2016-07-11

    Notonectids are widely distributed in freshwaters and can prey on zooplankton in temperate lakes. However, its role in structuring the zooplankton community is unknown in tropical lakes. Thus, our objective was to study the notonectid Martarega uruguayensis in a Brazilian tropical shallow lake to evaluate its potential as a zooplankton predator. Its horizontal distribution was analized in the lake throughout one year in fortnightly samplings. Backswimmers were more abundant (mean density 162.9 ± 25.8 ind.m-2) in the cool-dry season, with a strong preference by the littoral zone (mean density 139.9 ± 17.5 ind.m-2). Laboratory experiments were undertaken with young and adult notonectid and the two most abundant cladocerans, Daphnia gessneri and Ceriodaphnia richardi, as prey. Predation by backswimmers in the laboratory showed that only juveniles fed on microcrustaceans (mean ingestion rate of 1.2 ± 0.2 Daphnia and 1.0 ± 0.2 Ceriodaphnia per predator per hour), without size selectivity. Adult insects probably have difficulties in detecting and manipulating small planktonic organisms. On the other hand, young instars might influence zooplankton community, especially in the littoral zone of the lake. This study does contribute to a better understanding of trophic interactions in tropical shallow lakes and is the first to investigate the predation of a notonectid on microcrustaceans from Lake Monte Alegre. PMID:27409228

  19. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  20. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  1. Origin and transport of CH4 in two maar lakes fed by mantle-derived volatiles (Mt. Vulture volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Cosenza, Paolo; Favara, Rocco; Foresta Martin, Luigi; Galli, Nunzio; Grassa, Fausto; Nuccio, Pasquale Mario; Paternoster, Michele; Riccobono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    It has been assessed that lakes contribute 6 to 16% to global CH4 emission in atmosphere. Accumulation of CH4 in the water is strongly dependent on the input of gas and the dynamic of the lake's water. Lakes located on tectonically and volcanically active areas (e.g., Kivu, Nyos) generally contain relevant amount of mantle-derived volatiles. This generated an open debate on the origin of CO2 and CH4 in volcanic lakes because the complex bio-geological cycling of these two gases. This study is a part of larger investigation carried out on two maar lakes (LPM and LGM) formed about 140.000 years ago during the last eruption of Mt. Vulture (Italy). In spite of it generally is considered to be extinct, both lakes are characterized by an active inflow of mantle-derived fluids (Caracausi et al., 2013). Although the two lakes are only 150 m apart, their respective dynamics are different being LPM a meromictic lake, while LGM a monomictic one (Caracausi et al., 2013). The stagnant waters of LPM are enriched in CO2 and CH4 but the total gas pressure is below the hydrostatic pressure, so that the transfer of gas towards the surface doesn't occur via bubbles. Vertical profiles at LPM reveal a marked decrease of the dissolved CH4 content in the shallower layers due to aerated water. The amount of CH4 dissolved in LGM water column shows seasonal variations: in autumn it is comparable to that of LPM at the same depth; in winter CH4 is fully released into atmosphere through overturn of waters. C and H isotopes of CH4 clearly indicate in both lakes an active production both by acetoclastic methanogenesis and by CO2 reduction although with different proportions. Historical reports describe intense episodic releases of gases from both lakes occurred up to about 200 years ago. Caracausi et al. (2013) highlight that these events could be caused by a release of mantle-derived CO2 accumulated in the crust or directly linked to magma degassing. In the present study the knowledge gained

  2. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  3. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6) "Watering"; (7) "Soil Erosion by Water"; (8) "Soil…

  4. Venezuela: Lake Maracaibo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Oil Slicks on Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela     View Larger Image Several oil slicks occurred on Lake Maracaibo in northwestern Venezuela between ... wave facets divert reflected rays into many directions. An oil film dampens the presence of small wind-driven "capillary" waves, resulting ...

  5. Lake Effect Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The lake effect is particularly clear in this Sea-viewing Wide field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) true-color image of the North American Great Lakes region, acquired December 5, 2000. Lakes Nipigon, Superior, and Michigan show striking contrasts between clear and cloudy air as the wind blows from the northwest across the lakes. As it flows across the relatively warm lakes, the cold dry air gathers heat and moisture from the surface. The warm moist air rises into the atmosphere and mixes vigorously with the cold dry air above. The layer of warm moist air deepens as it travels across the lake. Some of the evaporated water from the lake condenses into streamers of fog rising from the surface, while much of the moisture condenses to form a stratocumulus cloud in the upper half of the mixed layer. The cloud-forming water droplets may freeze into ice crystals and, due to accumulated water deposition over time, grow into snowflakes. This process can generate snowstorms that produce significant amounts of snowfall downwind. It is not uncommon for lake effect snowstorms to produce as much as two feet of snow within a 24-hour period in northwestern parts of New York and Pennsylvania. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  6. GREAT LAKES LIMNOLOGY MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has primary responsibility within the U.S. for conducting surveillance monitoring of the offshore waters of the Great Lakes. This monitoring is intended to fulfill provis...

  7. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  8. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  10. Lake trophic applications: Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts to classify the water quality characteristics of lakes using LANDSAT imagery are reported. Image processing and registration techniques are described. A lake classification scheme which involves the assignment of a trophic class number was used in the data analysis. The resulting values were compared to the corresponding rank assignment derived from field measurements.

  11. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  12. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  13. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  14. Spatial patterns in PCB concentrations of Lake Michigan lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Brown, Edward H., Jr.; Eck, Gary W.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the PCB body burden in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of the Great Lakes is from their food. PCB concentrations were determined in lake trout from three different locations in Lake Michigan during 1994–1995, and lake trout diets were analyzed at all three locations. The PCB concentrations were also determined in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), five species of prey fish eaten by lake trout in Lake Michigan, at three nearshore sites in the lake. Despite the lack of significant differences in the PCB concentrations of alewife, rainbow smelt, bloater, slimy sculpin, and deepwater sculpin from the southeastern nearshore site near Saugatuck (Michigan) compared with the corresponding PCB concentrations from the northwestern nearshore site near Sturgeon Bay (Wisconsin), PCB concentrations in lake trout at Saugatuck were significantly higher than those at Sturgeon Bay. The difference in the lake trout PCB concentrations between Saugatuck and Sturgeon Bay could be explained by diet differences. The diet of lake trout at Saugatuck was more concentrated in PCBs than the diet of Sturgeon Bay lake trout, and therefore lake trout at Saugatuck were more contaminated in PCBs than Sturgeon Bay lake trout. These findings were useful in interpreting the long-term monitoring series for contaminants in lake trout at both Saugatuck and the Wisconsin side of the lake.

  15. Exploring the links between transient water inputs and glacier velocity in a small temperate glacier in southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, M.; Hood, E.; Heavner, M.; Motyka, R.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers along the Gulf of Alaska are thinning and retreating rapidly and over the last century this loss of ice has contributed measurably to global sea level rise. An important control on the rate at which ice is being lost is basal motion because higher glacier velocities increase the rate at which ice is delivered to ablation zones. Recent research has focused on understanding the effects of sub-glacial water storage on glacier basal motion. In this study, we examined how water inputs from large rainfall events as well as a glacier lake outburst flood affected the velocity of the Lemon Creek Glacier in southeastern Alaska. Lemon Creek Glacier is a moderately sized (~16~km2) temperate glacier at the margin of the Juneau Icefield. An ice- marginal lake forms at the head of the glacier and catastrophically drains once or twice every melt season. We have instrumented the glacier with two meteorological stations: one at the head of the glacier near the ice-marginal lake and another several kilometers below the terminus. These stations measure temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, incoming solar radiation and wind speed and direction. Lake stage in the ice- marginal lake was monitored with a pressure transducer. In addition, Lemon Creek was instrumented with a water quality sonde at the location of a US Geological Survey gaging station approximately 3 km downstream from the glacier terminus. The sonde provides continuous measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and conductivity. Finally, two Trimble NetRS dual frequency, differential GPS units were deployed on the glacier at approximately 1/3 and 2/3 down the centerline of the glacier. All of the instruments were run continuously from May-September 2008 and captured the outburst flood associated with the ice-marginal lake drainage as well as several large (>3~cm) rainfall events associated with frontal storms off of the Gulf of Alaska in late summer. Taken together, these data allow us

  16. Evidence of offshore lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2003-01-01

    Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef, an offshore reef complex, was an historically important spawning area believed to represent some of the best habitat for the rehabilitation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron. Since 1986, lake trout have been stocked on these offshore reefs to reestablish self-sustaining populations. We sampled with beam trawls to determine the abundance of naturally reproduced age-0 lake trout on these offshore reefs during May-July in 1994-1998 and 2000-2002. In total, 123 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at Six Fathom Bank, and 2 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at nearby Yankee Reef. Our findings suggest that this region of Lake Huron contains suitable habitat for lake trout spawning and offers hope that lake trout rehabilitation can be achieved in the main basin of Lake Huron.

  17. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  18. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E., Jr.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  19. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  20. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E.; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations. PMID:24062731

  1. A Temperate Alpine Glacier as a Reservoir of Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Model Results of Incorporation, Transport, and Release.

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Christine; Bogdal, Christian; Lüthi, Martin P; Pavlova, Pavlina A; Schwikowski, Margit; Zennegg, Markus; Schmid, Peter; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    In previous studies, the incorporation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been quantified in the accumulation areas of Alpine glaciers. Here, we introduce a model framework that quantifies mass fluxes of PCBs in glaciers and apply it to the Silvretta glacier (Switzerland). The models include PCB incorporation into the entire surface of the glacier, downhill transport with the flow of the glacier ice, and chemical fate in the glacial lake. The models are run for the years 1900-2100 and validated by comparing modeled and measured PCB concentrations in an ice core, a lake sediment core, and the glacial streamwater. The incorporation and release fluxes, as well as the storage of PCBs in the glacier increase until the 1980s and decrease thereafter. After a temporary increase in the 2000s, the future PCB release and the PCB concentrations in the glacial stream are estimated to be small but persistent throughout the 21st century. This study quantifies all relevant PCB fluxes in and from a temperate Alpine glacier over two centuries, and concludes that Alpine glaciers are a small secondary source of PCBs, but that the aftermath of environmental pollution by persistent and toxic chemicals can endure for decades. PMID:27164482

  2. LAKE RESTORATION BY DILUTION: MOSES LAKE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dilution water, low in macronutrients, was added to Moses Lake on three occasions in 1977 and once in 1978 during the spring-summer period. The addition resulted in reducing the annual average inflow concentration of phosphorus from about 130-140 micrograms/l to 100 micrograms/l....

  3. Bifurcation dynamics of the tempered fractional Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Caibin; Yang, Qigui; Chen, YangQuan

    2016-08-01

    Tempered fractional processes offer a useful extension for turbulence to include low frequencies. In this paper, we investigate the stochastic phenomenological bifurcation, or stochastic P-bifurcation, of the Langevin equation perturbed by tempered fractional Brownian motion. However, most standard tools from the well-studied framework of random dynamical systems cannot be applied to systems driven by non-Markovian noise, so it is desirable to construct possible approaches in a non-Markovian framework. We first derive the spectral density function of the considered system based on the generalized Parseval's formula and the Wiener-Khinchin theorem. Then we show that it enjoys interesting and diverse bifurcation phenomena exchanging between or among explosive-like, unimodal, and bimodal kurtosis. Therefore, our procedures in this paper are not merely comparable in scope to the existing theory of Markovian systems but also provide a possible approach to discern P-bifurcation dynamics in the non-Markovian settings. PMID:27586627

  4. Geometric Brownian Motion with Tempered Stable Waiting Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Janusz; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka

    2012-08-01

    One of the earliest system that was used to asset prices description is Black-Scholes model. It is based on geometric Brownian motion and was used as a tool for pricing various financial instruments. However, when it comes to data description, geometric Brownian motion is not capable to capture many properties of present financial markets. One can name here for instance periods of constant values. Therefore we propose an alternative approach based on subordinated tempered stable geometric Brownian motion which is a combination of the popular geometric Brownian motion and inverse tempered stable subordinator. In this paper we introduce the mentioned process and present its main properties. We propose also the estimation procedure and calibrate the analyzed system to real data.

  5. Bifurcation dynamics of the tempered fractional Langevin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Caibin; Yang, Qigui; Chen, YangQuan

    2016-08-01

    Tempered fractional processes offer a useful extension for turbulence to include low frequencies. In this paper, we investigate the stochastic phenomenological bifurcation, or stochastic P-bifurcation, of the Langevin equation perturbed by tempered fractional Brownian motion. However, most standard tools from the well-studied framework of random dynamical systems cannot be applied to systems driven by non-Markovian noise, so it is desirable to construct possible approaches in a non-Markovian framework. We first derive the spectral density function of the considered system based on the generalized Parseval's formula and the Wiener-Khinchin theorem. Then we show that it enjoys interesting and diverse bifurcation phenomena exchanging between or among explosive-like, unimodal, and bimodal kurtosis. Therefore, our procedures in this paper are not merely comparable in scope to the existing theory of Markovian systems but also provide a possible approach to discern P-bifurcation dynamics in the non-Markovian settings.

  6. Phosphorus and iron cycles during early diagenesis of Lake Kai-ike sediments, Kami-koshiki Island, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, H.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Oguri, K.

    2014-12-01

    A meromictic Lake Kai-ike is located on the northeastern margin of Kami-koshiki island, Japan. Permanent density stratification develops due to seawater infiltration through a gravel bar separating the lake from the ocean. The oxygenated surface water overlays a stagnant, saline, and anoxic deep water containing hydrogen sulfide. Purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatium sp.) inhabit the chemocline at 4.5m depth. At the lake bottom, green sulfur bacteria form microbial mat-like structures (Nakajima et al., 2003; Environ. Microbiol.). Such environment can be treated as a model for the past anoxic ocean, such as during Cretaceous OAEs (Oguri et al., 2003; Frontier Res. on Earth Evol.). A 25 cm-long KAI4 sediment core (Yamaguchi et al., 2010; Palaeo3) was used for two sequential extraction methods. SEDEX method (Ruttenberg, 1992; Limnol. Oceanogr.) was used for partitioning phosphorus-bearing species into Pabs (absorbed), PFe (Fe-bound), Pauth (authigenic), Pdet (detrital), and Porg (organic). Iron-bearing species were also divided into FeHCl (HCl-soluble), Fecarb (carbonate), Feox (oxide), Femag (magnetite), and Feresi (residue), following the method of Poulton et al. (2005; Chem. Geol.). At the uppermost part of KAI4 core, Porg was the most abundant P-bearing species (~90% of total P). The Porg content sharply decreased with increasing depth to 5cm. The second most abundant species was PFe; however, PFe and Feox contents remained constant throughout the whole depth. At sediment surface in present-day oxygenated ocean, Fe3+-(oxy)hydroxides trap phosphate diffusing from deeper-anoxic sediment, and the phosphate concentration in pore water becomes high enough to precipitate authigenic apatite (Slomp et al., 1996; J. Mar. Res.). In case of Lake Kai-ike, however, the amount of Fe3+-(oxy)hydroxides was small relative to that of Porg (PFe/Porg = ~0.1). We suggest that the excess phosphate not adsorbed on Fe3+-(oxy)hydroxides was diffused out to the overlying water mass, and the

  7. Naphthalene biodegradation in temperate and arctic marine microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bagi, Andrea; Pampanin, Daniela M; Lanzén, Anders; Bilstad, Torleiv; Kommedal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Naphthalene, the smallest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is found in abundance in crude oil, its major source in marine environments. PAH removal occurs via biodegradation, a key process determining their fate in the sea. Adequate estimation of PAH biodegradation rates is essential for environmental risk assessment and response planning using numerical models such as the oil spill contingency and response (OSCAR) model. Using naphthalene as a model compound, biodegradation rate, temperature response and bacterial community composition of seawaters from two climatically different areas (North Sea and Arctic Ocean) were studied and compared. Naphthalene degradation was followed by measuring oxygen consumption in closed bottles using the OxiTop(®) system. Microbial communities of untreated and naphthalene exposed samples were analysed by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and pyrosequencing. Three times higher naphthalene degradation rate coefficients were observed in arctic seawater samples compared to temperate, at all incubation temperatures. Rate coefficients at in situ temperatures were however, similar (0.048 day(-1) for temperate and 0.068 day(-1) for arctic). Naphthalene biodegradation rates decreased with similar Q10 ratios (3.3 and 3.5) in both seawaters. Using the temperature compensation method implemented in the OSCAR model, Q10 = 2, biodegradation in arctic seawater was underestimated when calculated from the measured temperate k1 value, showing that temperature difference alone could not predict biodegradation rates adequately. Temperate and arctic untreated seawater communities were different as revealed by pyrosequencing. Geographic origin of seawater affected the community composition of exposed samples. PMID:23624724

  8. Efficient parallel tempering for first-order phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, T; Magiera, M P; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that facilitates efficient parallel tempering simulations of the density of states g(E) . We show that the algorithm eliminates the supercritical slowing down in the case of the Q=20 and Q=256 Potts models in two dimensions, typical examples for systems with extreme first-order phase transitions. As recently predicted, and shown here, the microcanonical heat capacity along the calorimetric curve has negative values for finite systems. PMID:17995052

  9. First description of underwater acoustic diversity in three temperate ponds

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Fanny; Depraetere, Marion; Gasc, Amandine; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pavoine, Sandrine; Sueur, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has produced an increased ecological interest in sonic environments, or soundscapes. However, despite this rise in interest and technological improvements that allow for long-term acoustic surveys in various environments, some habitats’ soundscapes remain to be explored. Ponds, and more generally freshwater habitats, are one of these acoustically unexplored environments. Here we undertook the first long term acoustic monitoring of three temperate ponds in France. By aural and visual inspection of a selection of recordings, we identified 48 different sound types, and according to the rarefaction curves we calculated, more sound types are likely present in one of the three ponds. The richness of sound types varied significantly across ponds. Surprisingly, there was no pond-to-pond daily consistency of sound type richness variation; each pond had its own daily patterns of activity. We also explored the possibility of using six acoustic diversity indices to conduct rapid biodiversity assessments in temperate ponds. We found that all indices were sensitive to the background noise as estimated through correlations with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, we determined that the AR index could be a good candidate to measure acoustic diversities using partial correlations with the SNR as a control variable. Yet, research is still required to automatically compute the SNR in order to apply this index on a large data set of recordings. The results showed that these three temperate ponds host a high level of acoustic diversity in which the soundscapes were variable not only between but also within the ponds. The sources producing this diversity of sounds and the drivers of difference in daily song type richness variation both require further investigation. Such research would yield insights into the biodiversity and ecology of temperate ponds. PMID:26587351

  10. First description of underwater acoustic diversity in three temperate ponds.

    PubMed

    Desjonquères, Camille; Rybak, Fanny; Depraetere, Marion; Gasc, Amandine; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pavoine, Sandrine; Sueur, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has produced an increased ecological interest in sonic environments, or soundscapes. However, despite this rise in interest and technological improvements that allow for long-term acoustic surveys in various environments, some habitats' soundscapes remain to be explored. Ponds, and more generally freshwater habitats, are one of these acoustically unexplored environments. Here we undertook the first long term acoustic monitoring of three temperate ponds in France. By aural and visual inspection of a selection of recordings, we identified 48 different sound types, and according to the rarefaction curves we calculated, more sound types are likely present in one of the three ponds. The richness of sound types varied significantly across ponds. Surprisingly, there was no pond-to-pond daily consistency of sound type richness variation; each pond had its own daily patterns of activity. We also explored the possibility of using six acoustic diversity indices to conduct rapid biodiversity assessments in temperate ponds. We found that all indices were sensitive to the background noise as estimated through correlations with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, we determined that the AR index could be a good candidate to measure acoustic diversities using partial correlations with the SNR as a control variable. Yet, research is still required to automatically compute the SNR in order to apply this index on a large data set of recordings. The results showed that these three temperate ponds host a high level of acoustic diversity in which the soundscapes were variable not only between but also within the ponds. The sources producing this diversity of sounds and the drivers of difference in daily song type richness variation both require further investigation. Such research would yield insights into the biodiversity and ecology of temperate ponds. PMID:26587351

  11. Tropical fishes dominate temperate reef fish communities within western Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yohei; Feary, David A; Kanda, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kosaku

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is resulting in rapid poleward shifts in the geographical distribution of tropical and subtropical fish species. We can expect that such range shifts are likely to be limited by species-specific resource requirements, with temperate rocky reefs potentially lacking a range of settlement substrates or specific dietary components important in structuring the settlement and success of tropical and subtropical fish species. We examined the importance of resource use in structuring the distribution patterns of range shifting tropical and subtropical fishes, comparing this with resident temperate fish species within western Japan (Tosa Bay); the abundance, diversity, size class, functional structure and latitudinal range of reef fishes utilizing both coral reef and adjacent rocky reef habitat were quantified over a 2 year period (2008-2010). This region has undergone rapid poleward expansion of reef-building corals in response to increasing coastal water temperatures, and forms one of the global hotspots for rapid coastal changes. Despite the temperate latitude surveyed (33°N, 133°E) the fish assemblage was both numerically, and in terms of richness, dominated by tropical fishes. Such tropical faunal dominance was apparent within both coral, and rocky reef habitats. The size structure of the assemblage suggested that a relatively large number of tropical species are overwintering within both coral and rocky habitats, with a subset of these species being potentially reproductively active. The relatively high abundance and richness of tropical species with obligate associations with live coral resources (i.e., obligate corallivores) shows that this region holds the most well developed temperate-located tropical fish fauna globally. We argue that future tropicalisation of the fish fauna in western Japan, associated with increasing coral habitat development and reported increasing shifts in coastal water temperatures, may have considerable positive economic

  12. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead. In this harsh desert environment, color infrared photography readily penetrates haze, detects and portrays vegetation as shades of red.

  13. Miocene drowning of temperate (Foramol) carbonate platform: upper Miami Terrace

    SciTech Connect

    Carannante, G.; Simone, L.; Neumann, C.

    1986-05-01

    Oligocene neritic rocks dredged from 350 m on the upper Miami Terrace exhibit repeated phosphatization as well as a filled void system containing post-Burdigalian foraminifera. During drowning, a neritic hardground was subjected to both pelagic deposition (infills) and repeated marine exposure (borings, P-coatings, etc). The neritic grainstone-packstone contains large benthic foraminifera, red algae, bryozoans, pelecypods, ahermatypic corals, echinoids, and some planktonic foraminifera. This composition association is the Foramol type characteristic of temperate to subtropical neritic environments such as the present Mediterranean, Brazilian, and New Zealand shelves. These temperate sediments derive from the local biocoenose, and accumulate slowly in deep sheets of loose skeletal debris. They become relict seaward where they are often bored, corroded, stained, glauconitized, and cemented into hardgrounds. Locally, hemipelagic cover might produce a palimpsest sequence. Recent Foramol-type platforms are undergoing drowning. The Miami Terrace is compared to very similar Miocene Foramol-type platforms now exposed in the southern Apennines. Both are characterized by neritic sequences passing upward into hemipelagics, via a palimpsest interval marked by glauconitic, phosphatic, iron-stained grains often mineralized into hardgrounds. The drowning of the Miami Terrace hence coincided with and, the authors suppose, was a result of the shift from a rapid, oligotrophic, tropical accumulation to a slow, temperate, eutrophic carbonate accumulation caused in turn by a temporary paleo-oceanographic shift to cooler, richer, neritic conditions within the history of this now subtropical setting.

  14. Carbon sequestration in managed temperate coniferous forests under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Caren C.; Beukema, Sarah; Nitschke, Craig R.; Coates, K. David; Scheller, Robert M.

    2016-03-01

    Management of temperate forests has the potential to increase carbon sinks and mitigate climate change. However, those opportunities may be confounded by negative climate change impacts. We therefore need a better understanding of climate change alterations to temperate forest carbon dynamics before developing mitigation strategies. The purpose of this project was to investigate the interactions of species composition, fire, management, and climate change in the Copper-Pine Creek valley, a temperate coniferous forest with a wide range of growing conditions. To do so, we used the LANDIS-II modelling framework including the new Forest Carbon Succession extension to simulate forest ecosystems under four different productivity scenarios, with and without climate change effects, until 2050. Significantly, the new extension allowed us to calculate the net sector productivity, a carbon accounting metric that integrates aboveground and belowground carbon dynamics, disturbances, and the eventual fate of forest products. The model output was validated against literature values. The results implied that the species optimum growing conditions relative to current and future conditions strongly influenced future carbon dynamics. Warmer growing conditions led to increased carbon sinks and storage in the colder and wetter ecoregions but not necessarily in the others. Climate change impacts varied among species and site conditions, and this indicates that both of these components need to be taken into account when considering climate change mitigation activities and adaptive management. The introduction of a new carbon indicator, net sector productivity, promises to be useful in assessing management effectiveness and mitigation activities.

  15. Temperate Assumptions: How Where We Work Influences How We Think.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Marlene

    2016-09-01

    Scientists have been observing the natural world for centuries and have long been intrigued by the high biodiversity and complexity of the tropics. They also usually had North American or European-in other words, outsider-perspectives and frequently concluded that the tropics were qualitatively different from the temperate regions in their ecology, evolution, and behavior. In particular, the tropics were seen as having a more benign abiotic environment, which in turn fostered more complex biotic relationships, with increased competition and other interactions. This may or may not be the case. Regardless, these ideas establish the temperate regions of the world as a kind of model system, a norm to which the tropics are compared and seen as different or unusual. The tropics are warmer or more diverse, rather than the temperate zone being cooler or less diverse. Such an attitude makes it difficult both to appreciate the scope of variation in nature and to develop accurate and general models for ecological and evolutionary processes. PMID:27513908

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Temperate Forage Legumes: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cornara, Laura; Xiao, Jianbo; Burlando, Bruno

    2016-07-29

    The discovery of bioactive molecules from botanical sources is an expanding field, preferentially oriented to plants having a tradition of use in medicine and providing high yields and availability. Temperate forage legumes are Fabaceae species that include worldwide-important crops. These plants possess therapeutic virtues that have not only been used in veterinary and folk medicine, but have also attracted the interest of official medicine. We have examined here Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium pratense and T. repens (clovers), Melilotus albus and M. officinalis (sweet clovers), Lotus corniculatus (birdsfoot trefoil), Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin), Lespedeza capitata (roundhead lespedeza), and Galega officinalis (goat's rue). The phytochemical complexes of these species contain secondary metabolites whose pharmacological potentials deserve investigation. Major classes of compounds include alkaloids and amines, cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids, coumarins, condensed tannins, and saponins. Some of these phytochemicals have been related to antihypercholesterolemia, antidiabetic, antimenopause, anti-inflammatory, antiedema, anthelmintic, and kidney protective effects. Two widely prescribed drugs have been developed starting from temperate forage legumes, namely, the antithrombotic warfarin, inspired from sweet clover's coumarin, and the antidiabetic metformin, a derivative of sainfoin's guanidine. Available evidence suggests that temperate forage legumes are a potentially important resource for the extraction of active principles to be used as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26507574

  17. Comparative visual ecophysiology of mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    Horodysky, Andrij Z.; Brill, Richard W.; Crawford, Kendyl C.; Seagroves, Elizabeth S.; Johnson, Andrea K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The absolute light sensitivities, temporal properties, and spectral sensitivities of the visual systems of three mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes (Atlantic spadefish [Ephippidae: Chaetodipterus faber], tautog [Labridae: Tautoga onitis], and black sea bass [Serranidae: Centropristis striata]) were studied via electroretinography (ERG). Pelagic Atlantic spadefish exhibited higher temporal resolution but a narrower dynamic range than the two more demersal foragers. The higher luminous sensitivities of tautog and black sea bass were similar to other benthic and demersal coastal mid-Atlantic fishes. Flicker fusion frequency experiments revealed significant interspecific differences at maximum intensities that correlated with lifestyle and habitat. Spectral responses of the three species spanned 400–610 nm, with high likelihood of cone dichromacy providing the basis for color and contrast discrimination. Significant day-night differences in spectral responses were evident in spadefish and black sea bass but not tautog, a labrid with characteristic structure-associated nocturnal torpor. Atlantic spadefish responded to a wider range of wavelengths than did deeper-dwelling tautog or black sea bass. Collectively, these results suggest that temperate reef-associated fishes are well-adapted to their gradient of brighter to dimmer photoclimates, representative of their unique ecologies and life histories. Continuing anthropogenic degradation of water quality in coastal environments, at a pace faster than the evolution of visual systems, may however impede visual foraging and reproductive signaling in temperate reef fishes. PMID:24285711

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of ten Streptococcus pneumoniae temperate bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Romero, Patricia; Croucher, Nicholas J; Hiller, N Luisa; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Bentley, Stephen D; García, Ernesto; Mitchell, Tim J

    2009-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that often carries temperate bacteriophages. As part of a program to characterize the genetic makeup of prophages associated with clinical strains and to assess the potential roles that they play in the biology and pathogenesis in their host, we performed comparative genomic analysis of 10 temperate pneumococcal phages. All of the genomes are organized into five major gene clusters: lysogeny, replication, packaging, morphogenesis, and lysis clusters. All of the phage particles observed showed a Siphoviridae morphology. The only genes that are well conserved in all the genomes studied are those involved in the integration and the lysis of the host in addition to two genes, of unknown function, within the replication module. We observed that a high percentage of the open reading frames contained no similarities to any sequences catalogued in public databases; however, genes that were homologous to known phage virulence genes, including the pblB gene of Streptococcus mitis and the vapE gene of Dichelobacter nodosus, were also identified. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools showed the presence of a toxin-antitoxin system in the phage phiSpn_6, and this represents the first time that an addition system in a pneumophage has been identified. Collectively, the temperate pneumophages contain a diverse set of genes with various levels of similarity among them. PMID:19502408

  19. Sliding mode controllers for a tempered glass furnace.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Naif B; Zribi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the design of two sliding mode controllers (SMCs) applied to a tempered glass furnace system. The main objective of the proposed controllers is to regulate the glass plate temperature, the upper-wall temperature and the lower-wall temperature in the furnace to a common desired temperature. The first controller is a conventional sliding mode controller. The key step in the design of this controller is the introduction of a nonlinear transformation that maps the dynamic model of the tempered glass furnace into the generalized controller canonical form; this step facilitates the design of the sliding mode controller. The second controller is based on a state-dependent coefficient (SDC) factorization of the tempered glass furnace dynamic model. Using an SDC factorization, a simplified sliding mode controller is designed. The simulation results indicate that the two proposed control schemes work very well. Moreover, the robustness of the control schemes to changes in the system's parameters as well as to disturbances is investigated. In addition, a comparison of the proposed control schemes with a fuzzy PID controller is performed; the results show that the proposed SDC-based sliding mode controller gave better results. PMID:26614678

  20. Carbon sequestration in managed temperate coniferous forests under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, C. C.; Beukema, S.; Nitschke, C. R.; Coates, K. D.; Scheller, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Management of temperate forests has the potential to increase carbon sinks and mitigate climate change. However, those opportunities may be confounded by negative climate change impacts. We therefore need a better understanding of climate change alterations to temperate forest carbon dynamics before developing mitigation strategies. The purpose of this project was to investigate the interactions of species composition, fire, management and climate change on the Copper-Pine creek valley, a temperate coniferous forest with a wide range of growing conditions. To do so, we used the LANDIS-II modelling framework including the new Forest Carbon Succession extension to simulate forest ecosystems under four different productivity scenarios, with and without climate change effects, until 2050. Significantly, the new extension allowed us to calculate the Net Sector Productivity, a carbon accounting metric that integrates above and below-ground carbon dynamics, disturbances, and the eventual fate of forest products. The model output was validated against literature values. The results implied that the species optimum growing conditions relative to current and future conditions strongly influenced future carbon dynamics. Warmer growing conditions led to increased carbon sinks and storage in the colder and wetter ecoregions but not necessarily in the others. Climate change impacts varied among species and site conditions and this indicates that both of these components need to be taken into account in when considering climate change mitigation activities and adaptive management. The introduction of a new carbon indicator - Net Sector Productivity, promises to be useful in assessing management effectiveness and mitigation activities.

  1. Effects of Land Use on Lake Nutrients: The Importance of Scale, Hydrologic Connectivity, and Region.

    PubMed

    Soranno, Patricia A; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales. PMID:26267813

  2. Effects of land use on lake nutrients: The importance of scale, hydrologic connectivity, and region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E.; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales.

  3. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Kohler, Jack; Andreassen, Karin

    2016-04-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a draw down of isochrones and cold ice. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in ice viscosity and releases deformation energy that can raise the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. Questions that arise are what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice and whether such past drainage events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on ice dynamics as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a full Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy-gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that a rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, can release considerable amounts of deformational energy, with the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in the horizontal extent of subglacial lakes and slippery patches, compared to the average ice column velocity, can create a traveling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past drainage events with ice penetrating radar.

  4. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, E.; Humbert, A.; Kleiner, T.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, K.

    2015-07-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a subsequent draw-down of isochrones and cold ice from the surface. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in temperature and ice viscosity, releasing deformation energy which raises the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. A question is what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice, and whether such past events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on the dynamics of a model ice stream as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a Full-Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that the rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, releases large amounts of deformational energy, which has the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature, commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in lake geometry or basal friction create a travelling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past events with ice penetrating radar.

  5. Effects of Land Use on Lake Nutrients: The Importance of Scale, Hydrologic Connectivity, and Region

    PubMed Central

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E.; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales. PMID:26267813

  6. Phytoplankton variability in Lake Fraijanes, Costa Rica, in response to local weather variation.

    PubMed

    Umaña-Villalobos, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    Phytoplankton species show a variety in morphology which is the result of adaptations to pelagic life including responses to fluctuations in water column dynamics driven by weather conditions. This has been reported in the oceans and in Northern temperate lakes. In order to observe whether tropical freshwater phytoplankton responds to seasonal variation in weather, the weekly variation in temperature of the water column and phytoplankton composition was studied in Lake Fraijanes, Costa Rica, a shallow (6.2m) lake at 1 640m above sea level. A chain of data loggers for temperature was placed in the deepest point in the lake to register temperature every hour at four different depths, and phytoplankton samples were retrieved every week for a year. Additional monthly samples for nutrients were taken at two depths. Notwithstanding its shallowness, the lake developed a thermal gradient which kept the water column stratified for several months during dry season. Whole lake overturns occurred during cold spells with intense precipitation. Phytoplankton changed throughout the year mainly through a shift in dominant taxa. From September to February the lake was frequently mixed by rain storms and windy weather. At this time, phytoplankton was dominated by Chlorococcal green algae. From March to June, the lake was stratified and warmer. Phytoplankton became dominated by Cyanobateria, mainly colonial Chroococcales. The rainy season started again in May 2009. During June and July the lake started to mix intermittently during rain events and phytoplankton showed a brief increase in the contribution of Chlorococcales. These changes fitted well to a general model of phytoplankton succession based on functional groups identified according to their morphology and adaptations. PMID:25102633

  7. Can lake sensitivity to desiccation be predicted from lake geometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Aminnezhad, Mousa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-08-01

    Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and man-made reservoirs. Using the LGI index, lakes can be classified into five groups: groups 1-4 when LGI is 0.5-2.5, 2.5-4.5, 4.5-6.5 and 6.5-8.5, respectively, and group 5 when LGI is >8.5. Naturally shallow and vast lakes and wetlands fall into the first group and deep man-made reservoirs in narrow valleys are in group 5. The response of three different lake systems (LGI 0.75, 2.75 and 6.5) to different water flow scenarios was then simulated using the water balance equation. From this, the index 'potential lake area' (Apot) was developed to show lake responses to changed hydro-climatological conditions. Apot and LGI can be used to classify lakes into open or closed systems. Simulations showed that lakes with low LGI have a shorter response time to flow and climate changes. As a result, the impact of water balance restoration is faster for lakes with low LGI than for lakes with high LGI. The latter are also more vulnerable to climate variation and change.

  8. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  9. GREAT LAKES PLANKTON PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton, which have short carbon turnover rates, are sensitive to water quality conditions and grazing by zooplankton, and thus respond rapidly to perturbations of the lake ecosystem. The determination of phytoplankton abundance and species composition is one method to tra...

  10. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  11. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  12. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  13. WHISKER LAKE WILDERNESS, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Whisker Lake Wilderness in northeastern Wisconsin was evaluated. Only a strip along the southwest corner of the wilderness is assessed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the massive sulfide type. The geologic terrain precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources. Sand and gravel and peat in swampy lowlands are the only resources of the Whisker lake Wilderness.

  14. Dragon Lake, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nicknamed 'Dragon Lake,' this body of water is formed by the Bratskove Reservoir, built along the Angara river in southern Siberia, near the city of Bratsk. This image was acquired in winter, when the lake is frozen. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on December 19, 1999. This is a natural color composite image made using blue, green, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  15. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  16. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  17. Availability of lake trout reproductive habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A decades-long program to reestablish self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the four lower Great Lakes produced excellent fisheries supported by stocked fish. These fish spawned widely and small numbers of their offspring were collected intermittently from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario, but no self-sustaining stocks were established. Irt this paper we address habitat sufficiency as a factor in the failure of stocked lake trout to established self-sustaining populations in the four lower Great Lakes. We present the previously unpublished results of lake trout spawning habitat surveys conducted at seven sites in the Great Lakes since 1987 and we compare them with the published results of similar surveys conducted at 24 other sites in the four lower lakes since 1981. Our evaluation indicates all but two of these sites can support the production of viable fry from spawnings by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are stocked in the Great Lakes. However, some of the best spawning, egg, and fry habitat in the lower Great Lakes seems to be at deeper offshore sites that may be unattractive to these shallow-water strains. Thus, we suggest also stocking the lower four lakes with strains from Lake Superior that might more fully exploit the best spawning habitat at these deeper, offshore sites.

  18. Lithostratigraphy and microfacies analyses of the Lateglacial and early Holocene sediment record from Lake Haemelsee (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haliuc, Aritina; Brauer, Achim; Dulski, Peter; Engels, Stefan; Lane, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Annually laminated sediments are unique continental archives holding essential paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic information providing the opportunity (i) to evaluate the climate variability at inter-annual to decadal scale and (ii) to construct independent and reliable chronologies. Lake Haemelsee in northern Germany (19.5 m a.s.l) is a key site for tracing high-resolution climatic and environmental evolution in W Europe because of its partly varved sediments. Here, we apply lithostratigraphical, geochemical and micro-facies analyses for the bottom sediments (~1700 to 1300 cm sediment depth) in order to investigate the driving mechanisms, timing and amplitude of Lateglacial abrupt climate changes to the onset of the Holocene warming. Detailed investigation includes micro-facies analyses on petrographic thin sections combined with high-resolution µ-XRF element scanning on both fresh sediment core halves (200 µm resolution) and impregnated sediment blocks (50µm resolution). Based on these analyses, the sediment composite profile (378 cm) has been divided in ten lithozones, each exhibiting different sedimentation modes in response to regional and local climatic and environmental changes. Micro-facies analyses revealed that sediments consist of organic matter, siderite, calcite, clay/silt and sand. The basal sediments consist of glacio-fluvial material. Fine laminations are best preserved in lithozone 5 (1522-1573 cm), where minima in element proxies for detrital sediments (Ti, K, Si) and maxima in Fe and Mn indicate the prevalence of anoxic meromictic conditions. Three different varve facies types were distinguished: i) the clastic-organic varves are specific for the intervals 1571-1573 cm and 1536-1541 cm; ii) calcite/siderite-organic varves appear between 1568-1571 and 1541-1545 cm; iii) the siderite-organic varves are characteristic for the middle of the lithozone 5 spanning from 1545-1568 cm. These changes in varve facies reflect the complex answer of

  19. μ-tempered metadynamics: Artifact independent convergence times for wide hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Bradley M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent analysis of well-tempered metadynamics (WTmetaD) showed that it converges without mollification artifacts in the bias potential. Here, we explore how metadynamics heals mollification artifacts, how healing impacts convergence time, and whether alternative temperings may be used to improve efficiency. We introduce "μ-tempered" metadynamics as a simple tempering scheme, inspired by a related mollified adaptive biasing potential, that results in artifact independent convergence of the free energy estimate. We use a toy model to examine the role of artifacts in WTmetaD and solvated alanine dipeptide to compare the well-tempered and μ-tempered frameworks demonstrating fast convergence for hill widths as large as 60∘ for μTmetaD.

  20. Tempered stable Lévy motion and transient super-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeumer, Boris; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2010-03-01

    The space-fractional diffusion equation models anomalous super-diffusion. Its solutions are transition densities of a stable Lévy motion, representing the accumulation of power-law jumps. The tempered stable Lévy motion uses exponential tempering to cool these jumps. A tempered fractional diffusion equation governs the transition densities, which progress from super-diffusive early-time to diffusive late-time behavior. This article provides finite difference and particle tracking methods for solving the tempered fractional diffusion equation with drift. A temporal and spatial second-order Crank-Nicolson method is developed, based on a finite difference formula for tempered fractional derivatives. A new exponential rejection method for simulating tempered Lévy stables is presented to facilitate particle tracking codes.

  1. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D; Hay, Mark E; Poore, Alistair G B; Campbell, Alexandra H; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L; Booth, David J; Coleman, Melinda A; Feary, David A; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K

    2014-08-22

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to 'barrens' when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  2. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts

    PubMed Central

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D.; Hay, Mark E.; Poore, Alistair G. B.; Campbell, Alexandra H.; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L.; Booth, David J.; Coleman, Melinda A.; Feary, David A.; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J.; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A.; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2014-01-01

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to ‘barrens’ when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  3. Contaminants in American alligator eggs from Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Lake Okeechobee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Percival, H.F.; Jennings, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 elements were measured in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) eggs collected in 1984 from Lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Okeechobee in central and south Florida. Organochlorine pesticides were highest in eggs from Lake Apopka. None of the elements appeared to be present at harmful concentrations in eggs from any of the lakes. A larger sample of eggs was collected in 1985, but only from Lakes Griffin, a lake where eggs were relatively clean, and Apopka, where eggs were most contaminated. In 1985, hatching success of artificially incubated eggs was lower for Lake Apopka, and several organochlorine pesticides were higher than in eggs from Lake Griffin. However, within Lake Apopka, higher levels of pesticides in chemically analyzed eggs were not associated with reduced hatching success of the remaining eggs in the clutch. Therefore, it did not appear that any of the pesticides we measured were responsible for the reduced hatching of Lake Apopka eggs.

  4. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  5. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  6. Lithology and late postglacial stratigraphy of bottom sediments in isolated basins of the White Sea coast exemplified by a small lake in the Chupa settlement area (Northern Karelia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakova, O. P.; Kolka, V. V.; Tolstobrova, A. N.; Lavrova, N. B.; Tolstobrov, D. S.; Shelekhova, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The complex lithological, geochemical, geochronological, and micropaleontological (diatoms, spores, pollen) investigations of stratified bottom sediments that constitute facies-variable sedimentary sequences in a small isolated lake located near the upper limit of the sea on the White Sea coast made it possible to define lithostratigraphic units (LSU) forming the complete sedimentary succession in deep parts of isolated basins. It is shown that stratigraphy of heterogeneous sequences is determined by two regional transgressive-regressive cycles in relative sea level fluctuations: alternating late Glacial and Holocene transgressions and regressions. The lower part of a clastogenic clayey-sandy-silty sequence successively composed of freshwater (LSU 1) and brackish-water (LSU 2) sediments of the ice-marginal basins and marine postglacial facies (LSU 3) was formed during the late Glacial glacioeustatic marine transgression. Its upper part formed in different isolated basins at different stages of the Holocene is represented depending on its altimetric position on the coastal slope by costal marine sediments (LSU 4) and facies of the partly isolated inlet (LSU 5). The organogenic sapropelic sequence, which overlies sediments of the marine basin and partly isolated bay, corresponds to lithostratigraphic units represented by Holocene sediments accumulated in the meromictic lake (LSU 6), onshore freshwater basin (LSU 7), and freshwater basin with elevated water mineralization (LSU 8) deposited during maximum development of Holocene transgression and lacustrine sediments (LSU 9) formed in coastal environments during terminal phases of the Holocene. The defined lithostratigraphic units differ from each other in lithological, micropaleontological, and geochemical features reflected in structural and textural properties of their sediments, their composition, inclusions, and composition of paleophytocoenoses and diatom assemblages.

  7. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  8. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  9. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  10. Lake Sarez, Tajikistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Sarez (top), deep in the Pamir mountains of Tajikistan, was created 90 years ago when a strong earthquake triggered a massive landslide that, in turn, became a huge dam along the Murghob River, now called the Usoi Dam. The resulting lake is perched above surrounding drainages at an elevation greater than 3000m, and is part of the watershed that drains the towering Akademi Nauk Range (see the regional image, lower). The lake is 61 km long and as deep as 500 m, and holds an estimated 17 cubic km of water. The area experiences considerable seismic activity, and scientists fear that part of the right bank may slump into the lake, creating a huge wave that will top over and possibly breach the natural dam. Such a wave would create a catastrophic flood downstream along the Bartang, Panj and Amu Darya Rivers, perhaps reaching all the way to the Aral Sea. Currently, central Asian governments, as well as the World Bank and the UN are monitoring the dam closely, and have proposed gradually lowering the lake level as a preventive measure. More information about the lake is available at the following web sites: Lake Sarez Study group, UN Report, Reliefweb Digital photograph numbers ISS002-E-7771 and ISS002-E-7479 were taken in the spring of 2001 from Space Station Alpha and are provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  11. Composition and structure of varves in Lake Żabińskie, northeastern Poland: a potential for high-resolution reconstruction of meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylmann, Wojciech; Bonk, Alicja; Amann, Benjamin; Butz, Christoph; Enters, Dirk; Kinder, Małgorzata; Grosjean, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental data from sediment records require a detailed knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological factors which influence sediment-formation processes and signal preservation in lake sediments. This can be achieved by process studies and high-resolution analysis of sediments that provide an opportunity to calibrate varves and paleolimnological proxies against instrumental hydrological and meteorological data. Here we present results from Lake Żabińskie located in northeastern Poland with the aim to understand the relationship between meteorological conditions, sedimentation processes and climate signal preservation in varve structure and chemical composition. This eutrophic and hardwater lake exhibits well preserved biogenic varves with high sedimentation rates (5-8 mm/yr). We conducted a three-year long observation of limnological conditions within the water column and recent sediment fluxes as well as analyzed a 70-cm long sediment core from the deepest part of the lake basin covering the last 125 years. Thin sections were prepared and analyzed microscopically for individual laminae composition. We also measured chemical variability within varves using high-resolution XRF scanning of impregnated sediment slabs. We demonstrate that different mixing patterns may occur in Lake Żabińskie, from dimictic to meromictic depending on the meteorological conditions. Sediment fluxes varied substantially during the observation period with characteristic spring maxima and, optionally, a second late fall maxima. Considerable variability was also observed for the fluxes of total organic carbon, biogenic silica and calcite. Microscopic investigation of the topmost sediments revealed a complex varve structure showing a distinct spring calcite lamina followed by one or more fine calcite laminae interbedded with diatom-rich laminae and, finally, by an organic-rich lamina with minerogenic admixtures deposited during winter

  12. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  13. Comparison of produced water toxicity to Arctic and temperate species.

    PubMed

    Camus, L; Brooks, S; Geraudie, P; Hjorth, M; Nahrgang, J; Olsen, G H; Smit, M G D

    2015-03-01

    Produced water is the main discharge stream from oil and gas production. For offshore activities this water is usually discharged to the marine environment. Produced water contains traces of hydrocarbons such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as alkylphenols, which are relatively resistant to biodegradation and have been reported to cause adverse effects to marine organisms in laboratory studies. For management of produced water, risk-based tools have been developed using toxicity data for mainly non-Arctic species. Reliable risk assessment approaches for Arctic environments are requested to manage potential impacts of produced water associated with increased oil and gas activities in Arctic regions. In order to assess the applicability of existing risk tools for Arctic areas, basic knowledge on the sensitivity of Arctic species has to be developed. In the present study, acute and chronic toxicity of artificial produced water for 6 Arctic and 6 temperate species was experimentally tested and evaluated. The hazardous concentrations affecting 5% and 50% of the species were calculated from species sensitivity distribution curves. Hazardous concentrations were compared to elucidate whether temperate toxicity data used in risk assessment are sufficiently representative for Arctic species. From the study it can be concluded that hazardous concentration derived from individual species' toxicity data of temperate and Arctic species are comparable. However, the manner in which Arctic and non-Arctic populations and communities respond to exposure levels above established thresholds remains to be investigated. Hence, responses at higher levels of biological organization should be studied to reveal potential differences in sensitivities to produced water between Arctic and non-Arctic ecosystems. PMID:25521339

  14. Diverse Temperate Bacteriophage Carriage in Clostridium difficile 027 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nale, Janet Y.; Shan, Jinyu; Hickenbotham, Peter T.; Fawley, Warren N.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 can be classified into subtypes, but it unknown if these differ in terms of severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). Genomic studies of C. difficile 027 strains have established that they are rich in mobile genetic elements including prophages. This study combined physiological studies, electron microscopy analysis and molecular biology to determine the potential role of temperate bacteriophages in disease and diversity of C. difficile 027. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced prophages from 91 clinical C. difficile 027 isolates and used transmission electron microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to characterise the bacteriophages present. We established a correlation between phage morphology and subtype. Morphologically distinct tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae were identified in 63 and three isolates, respectively. Dual phage carriage was observed in four isolates. In addition, there were inducible phage tail-like particles (PT-LPs) in all isolates. The capacity of two antibiotics mitomycin C and norfloxacin to induce prophages was compared and it was shown that they induced specific prophages from C. difficile isolates. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses was designed to examine molecular diversity of C. difficile myoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the capsid gene sequences from eight ribotypes showed that all sequences found in the ribotype 027 isolates were identical and distinct from other C. difficile ribotypes and other bacteria species. Conclusion/Significance A diverse set of temperate bacteriophages are associated with C. difficile 027. The observed correlation between phage carriage and the subtypes suggests that temperate bacteriophages contribute to the diversity of C. difficile 027 and may play a role in severity of disease associated with this ribotype. The capsid gene can be used as a tool to identify C. difficile

  15. Mobilization of Genomic Islands of Staphylococcus aureus by Temperate Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Bo Youn; Park, Joo Youn; Robinson, D. Ashley; Thomas, Jonathan C.; Park, Yong Ho; Thornton, Justin A.; Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    The virulence of Staphylococcus aureus, in both human and animal hosts, is largely influenced by the acquisition of mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Most S. aureus strains carry a variety of MGEs, including three genomic islands (νSaα, νSaβ, νSaγ) that are diverse in virulence gene content but conserved within strain lineages. Although the mobilization of pathogenicity islands, phages and plasmids has been well studied, the mobilization of genomic islands is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated the mobilization of νSaβ by the adjacent temperate bacteriophage ϕSaBov from strain RF122. In this study, we demonstrate that ϕSaBov mediates the mobilization of νSaα and νSaγ, which are located remotely from ϕSaBov, mostly to recipient strains belonging to ST151. Phage DNA sequence analysis revealed that chromosomal DNA excision events from RF122 were highly specific to MGEs, suggesting sequence-specific DNA excision and packaging events rather than generalized transduction by a temperate phage. Disruption of the int gene in ϕSaBov did not affect phage DNA excision, packaging, and integration events. However, disruption of the terL gene completely abolished phage DNA packing events, suggesting that the primary function of temperate phage in the transfer of genomic islands is to allow for phage DNA packaging by TerL and that transducing phage particles are the actual vehicle for transfer. These results extend our understanding of the important role of bacteriophage in the horizontal transfer and evolution of genomic islands in S. aureus. PMID:26953931

  16. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  17. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin with the upstream side of the outlet structure visible at photo center, view to north-northwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  18. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  20. Mono Lake Excursion Reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    The Mono Lake Excursion as recorded in the Mono Basin, CA, has an older part that is about negative 30 degrees inclination and about 300 degrees declination during low relative field intensity. Those paleomagnetic directions are closely followed by greater than 80 degrees positive inclination and east declination of about 100 degrees during higher relative field intensity. A path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) for the older part followed from old to young forms a large clockwise loop that reaches 35 degrees N latitude and is centered at about 35 degrees E longitude. That loop is followed by a smaller one that is counterclockwise and centered at about 70 degrees N latitude and 270 degrees E longitude (Denham & Cox, 1971; Denham, 1974; Liddicoat & Coe, 1979). The Mono Lake Excursion outside the Mono Basin in western North America is recorded as nearly the full excursion at Summer Lake, OR (Negrini et al., 1984), and as the younger portion of steep positive inclination/east declination in the Lahontan Basin, NV. The overall relative field intensity during the Mono Lake Excursion in the Lahontan Basin mirrors very closely the relative field intensity in the Mono Basin (Liddicoat, 1992, 1996; Coe & Liddicoat, 1994). Using 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dates (Kent et al., 2002) and paleoclimate and relative paleointensity records (Zimmerman et al., 2006) for the Mono Lake Excursion in the Mono Basin, it has been proposed that the Mono Lake Excursion might be older than originally believed and instead be the Laschamp Excursion at about 40,000 yrs B.P. (Guillou et al., 2004). On the contrary, we favor a younger age for the Mono Lake Excursion, about 32,000 yrs B.P., using the relative paleointensity in the Mono Basin and Lahontan Basin and 14C dates from the Lahontan Basin (Benson et al., 2002). The age of about 32,000 yrs B.P. is also in accord with the age (32,000- 34,000 yrs B.P.) reported by Channell (2006) for the Mono Lake Excursion at ODP Site 919 in the Irminger Basin

  1. Transport in the spatially tempered, fractional Fokker-Planck equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, A.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-06-01

    A study of truncated Lévy flights in super-diffusive transport in the presence of an external potential is presented. The study is based on the spatially tempered, fractional Fokker-Planck (TFFP) equation in which the fractional diffusion operator is replaced by a tempered fractional diffusion (TFD) operator. We focus on harmonic (quadratic) potentials and periodic potentials with broken spatial symmetry. The main objective is to study the dependence of the steady-state probability density function (PDF), and the current (in the case of periodic potentials) on the level of tempering, λ, and on the order of the fractional derivative in space, α. An expansion of the TFD operator for large λ is presented, and the corresponding equation for the coarse grained PDF is obtained. The steady-state PDF solution of the TFFP equation for a harmonic potential is computed numerically. In the limit λ → ∞, the PDF approaches the expected Boltzmann distribution. However, nontrivial departures from this distribution are observed for finite (λ > 0) truncations, and α ≠ 2. In the study of periodic potentials, we use two complementary numerical methods: a finite-difference scheme based on the Grunwald-Letnikov discretization of the truncated fractional derivatives and a Fourier-based spectral method. In the limit λ → ∞, the PDFs converges to the Boltzmann distribution and the current vanishes. However, for α ≠ 2, the PDF deviates from the Boltzmann distribution and a finite non-equilibrium ratchet current appears for any λ > 0. The current is observed to converge exponentially in time to the steady-state value. The steady-state current exhibits algebraical decay with λ, as J ˜ λ-ζ, for α ⩾ 1.75. However, for α ⩽ 1.5, the steady-state current decays exponentially with λ, as J ˜ e-ξλ. In the presence of an asymmetry in the TFD operator, the tempering can lead to a current reversal. A detailed numerical study is presented on the dependence of the

  2. Transport in the spatially tempered, fractional Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kullberg, A.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B

    2012-01-01

    A study of truncated Levy flights in super-diffusive transport in the presence of an external potential is presented. The study is based on the spatially tempered, fractional Fokker-Planck (TFFP) equation in which the fractional diffusion operator is replaced by a tempered fractional diffusion (TFD) operator. We focus on harmonic (quadratic) potentials and periodic potentials with broken spatial symmetry. The main objective is to study the dependence of the steady-state probability density function (PDF), and the current (in the case of periodic potentials) on the level of tempering, lambda, and on the order of the fractional derivative in space, alpha. An expansion of the TFD operator for large lambda is presented, and the corresponding equation for the coarse grained PDF is obtained. The steady-state PDF solution of the TFFP equation for a harmonic potential is computed numerically. In the limit lambda -> infinity, the PDF approaches the expected Boltzmann distribution. However, nontrivial departures from this distribution are observed for finite (lambda > 0) truncations, and alpha not equal 2. In the study of periodic potentials, we use two complementary numerical methods: a finite-difference scheme based on the Grunwald-Letnikov discretization of the truncated fractional derivatives and a Fourier-based spectral method. In the limit lambda -> infinity, the PDFs converges to the Boltzmann distribution and the current vanishes. However, for alpha not equal 2, the PDF deviates from the Boltzmann distribution and a finite non-equilibrium ratchet current appears for any lambda > 0. The current is observed to converge exponentially in time to the steady-state value. The steady-state current exhibits algebraical decay with lambda, as J similar to lambda(-zeta), for alpha >= 1.75. However, for alpha <= 1.5, the steady-state current decays exponentially with lambda, as J similar to e(-xi lambda). In the presence of an asymmetry in the TFD operator, the tempering can lead

  3. Investigation of thermal tempering in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydiner, Cahit Can

    Bulk metallic glasses are recent advanced materials which generate residual stresses due to rapid cooling from their surfaces during processing. These stresses arise from the thermal gradients that form within the sample at and above the glass transition region. A typical processing of BMGs involves feeding the alloy melt into a mold followed by severe quenching. The formation and nature of these stresses are analogous to the residual stresses due to the thermal tempering of silicate glasses. This analytical-experimental study investigates the thermal tempering phenomenon in BMGs for the first time. One of the best glass forming metallic alloys, Zr 41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5 Ni10Be22.5 (Vitreloy 1(TM)), is employed in this study. First, the best technique for the high-resolution measurement of residual stresses in BMGs is determined to be the crack compliance method. Second, the formation of the stresses is modeled with three different levels of viscoelastic phenomenology, namely, an instant freezing model, a viscoelastic model and a structural model. The constitutive laws for the viscoelastic and structural models are incorporated into the finite element method (ABAQUS(TM) software package) allowing the application of these models to complex geometries. To increase the accuracy of the analysis, the 'correct' temperature evolution in the sample during processing has to be input to these 'mechanical' models. Therefore, the heat transfer problem during the casting process of the BMG is analyzed in detail. Accuracy also requires a detailed knowledge of the thermal parameters of the material as a function of temperature; thus, some attention is also devoted to their measurement. At the end, calculated and measured stresses are compared and good agreement is achieved. BMGs are demonstrated to be capable of generating very high (around 400 MPa) compression on their surfaces. The study also yielded valuable physical insight into the thermal tempering process itself. It is seen that

  4. Factors affecting biotic mercury concentrations and biomagnification through lake food webs in the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Lescord, Gretchen L; Kidd, Karen A; Kirk, Jane L; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Wang, Xiaowa; Muir, Derek C G

    2015-03-15

    In temperate regions of Canada, mercury (Hg) concentrations in biota and the magnitude of Hg biomagnification through food webs vary between neighboring lakes and are related to water chemistry variables and physical lake features. However, few studies have examined factors affecting the variable Hg concentrations in landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) or the biomagnification of Hg through their food webs. We estimated the food web structure of six high Arctic lakes near Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada, using stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopes and measured Hg (total Hg (THg) in char, the only fish species, and methylmercury (MeHg) in chironomids and zooplankton) concentrations in biota collected in 2010 and 2011. Across lakes, δ(13)C showed that benthic carbon (chironomids) was the dominant food source for char. Regression models of log Hg versus δ(15)N (of char and benthic invertebrates) showed positive and significant slopes, indicting Hg biomagnification in all lakes, and higher slopes in some lakes than others. However, no principal components (PC) generated using all water chemistry data and physical characteristics of the lakes predicted the different slopes. The PC dominated by aqueous ions was a negative predictor of MeHg concentrations in chironomids, suggesting that water chemistry affects Hg bioavailability and MeHg concentrations in these lower-trophic-level organisms. Furthermore, regression intercepts were predicted by the PCs dominated by catchment area, aqueous ions, and MeHg. Weaker relationships were also found between THg in small char or MeHg in pelagic invertebrates and the PCs dominated by catchment area, and aqueous nitrate and MeHg. Results from these high Arctic lakes suggest that Hg biomagnification differs between systems and that their physical and chemical characteristics affect Hg concentrations in lower-trophic-level biota. PMID:24909711

  5. Pulsed resources at tundra breeding sites affect winter irruptions at temperate latitudes of a top predator, the snowy owl.

    PubMed

    Robillard, A; Therrien, J F; Gauthier, G; Clark, K M; Bêty, J

    2016-06-01

    Irruptive migration is mostly observed in species specialized on pulsed resources and is thought to be a response to unpredictable changes in food supply. We assessed two alternative hypotheses to explain the periodic winter irruptions of snowy owls Bubo scandiacus every 3-5 years in temperate North America: (a) the lack-of-food hypothesis, which states that a crash in small mammal abundance on the Arctic breeding grounds forces owls to move out of the tundra massively to search for food in winter; (b) the breeding-success hypothesis, which states that high abundance of tundra small mammals during the summer allows for high production of young, thus increasing the pool of migrants moving south the following winter. We modeled winter irruptions of snowy owls in relation to summer food resources and geographic location. Winter abundance of owls was obtained from citizen-based surveys from 1994 to 2011 and summer abundance of small mammals was collected in summer at two distant sites in Canada: Bylot Island, NU (eastern High Arctic) and Daring Lake, NWT (central Low Arctic). Winter owl abundance was positively related to prey abundance during the previous summer at both sites and tended to decrease from western to eastern temperate North America. Irruptive migration of snowy owls was therefore best explained by the breeding success hypothesis and was apparently caused by large-scale summer variations in food. Our results, combined with previous findings, suggest that the main determinants of irruptive migration may be species specific even in a guild of apparently similar species. PMID:26920901

  6. Pulverizing aeration as a method of lakes restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczorowska, E.; Podsiadłowski, S.

    2012-04-01

    The principal threat to lakes of the temperate zone is posed by factors accelerating their eutrophication and causing marked deoxygenation of the deeper layers of water, mainly the hypo- and metalimnion. Among their effects are frequent phytoplankton blooms, including those of blue-green algae, and general deterioration of water quality also affecting the abundance and health status of fish. The chief concern is a disturbed proportion between the amount of complex chemical compounds, especially organic, and the oxygen content of lake waters. Natural processes of water oxygenation are not too intensive, because they are practically limited to the epilimnion layer, connected as they are with the activity of aquatic plants of the littoral and sublittoral zone (which tends to disappear in contaminated lakes) and wind energy (the effect of waving). In summer conditions, with a relatively great chemical activity of bottom deposits, the intensity of those processes is usually inadequate. Hence, in 1995 a research was launched in the Institute of Agricultural Engineering of the Agricultural University in Poznań on an integrated lake restoration technology whose core was a self-powered aerator capable of oxygenating also the bottom layers of water (the hypolimnion) of deep lakes. The aerator uses energy obtained from a Savonius rotor mainly to diffuse gases: to release hydrogen sulphide, which usually saturates the hypolimnion water completely, and then to saturate this water with oxygen. Even early studies showed the constructed device to be highly efficient in improving oxygen conditions in the bottom zone. They also made it clear that it should be equipped with an autonomous system designed to inactivate phosphorus, one of the principal factors determining the rate of lake degradation. In 2003 the first wind-driven pulverising aerator equipped with such a system was installed in Town Lake in Chodzież. The aim of this work is to present the principles of operation of a

  7. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. PMID:27104923

  8. Groundwater and surface water interaction in flow-through gravel pit lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form when the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. In certain areas there are more than 60 of these lakes close together and their presence changes the drainage patterns and water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. In flow-through gravel pit lakes, groundwater mixes with surface water and interacts with the atmosphere; outflow occurs only via groundwater. The lifespan of gravel pit lakes may be up to thousands of years as their depth to surface ratio is typically large and sedimentation rates are low. We have studied two gravel pit lake systems, a fluvial freshwater system in the Netherlands and a coastal brackish lake system in Italy. One Dutch gravel pit lake studied in detail is in part artificially replenished with Meuse River water for drinking water production that occurs downstream of the lake by water pumps. The Italian gravel pit lakes are fed by brackish groundwater that is a mix of freshwater from precipitation, Apennine Rivers and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. Here, the drainage system of the low lying land enhances groundwater flow into the lake. Surface water evaporation is larger in temperate and Mediterranean climates than the actual evapotranspiration of pre-existing grassland and forests. The lakes, therefore, cause a loss of freshwater. The creation of water surfaces allows algae and other flora and fauna to develop. In general, water becomes gradually enriched in certain chemical constituents on its way through the hydrological cycle, especially as groundwater due to water-rock interactions. When groundwater ex-filtrates into gravel pit lakes, the natural flow of solutes towards the sea is interrupted. Hydrochemical analysis of ground- and surface waters, as well as chemical analysis of lake bottom sediments and stable H and O isotope data, show that gravel pit lake water is characterized (among

  9. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes, 36,000 miles of streams, and…

  10. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  11. Winter severity determines functional trait composition of phytoplankton in seasonally ice-covered lakes.

    PubMed

    Özkundakci, Deniz; Gsell, Alena S; Hintze, Thomas; Täuscher, Helgard; Adrian, Rita

    2016-01-01

    How climate change will affect the community dynamics and functionality of lake ecosystems during winter is still little understood. This is also true for phytoplankton in seasonally ice-covered temperate lakes which are particularly vulnerable to the presence or absence of ice. We examined changes in pelagic phytoplankton winter community structure in a north temperate lake (Müggelsee, Germany), covering 18 winters between 1995 and 2013. We tested how phytoplankton taxa composition varied along a winter-severity gradient and to what extent winter severity shaped the functional trait composition of overwintering phytoplankton communities using multivariate statistical analyses and a functional trait-based approach. We hypothesized that overwintering phytoplankton communities are dominated by taxa with trait combinations corresponding to the prevailing winter water column conditions, using ice thickness measurements as a winter-severity indicator. Winter severity had little effect on univariate diversity indicators (taxon richness and evenness), but a strong relationship was found between the phytoplankton community structure and winter severity when taxon trait identity was taken into account. Species responses to winter severity were mediated by the key functional traits: motility, nutritional mode, and the ability to form resting stages. Accordingly, one or the other of two functional groups dominated the phytoplankton biomass during mild winters (i.e., thin or no ice cover; phototrophic taxa) or severe winters (i.e., thick ice cover; exclusively motile taxa). Based on predicted milder winters for temperate regions and a reduction in ice-cover durations, phytoplankton communities during winter can be expected to comprise taxa that have a relative advantage when the water column is well mixed (i.e., need not be motile) and light is less limiting (i.e., need not be mixotrophic). A potential implication of this result is that winter severity promotes different

  12. Responses of temperate forest productivity to insect and pathogen disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, C. E.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate forcing factors have been documented to directly (e.g. CO2 fertilization) or indirectly (e.g. temperature and vapor pressure deficit) affect net primary productivity (NPP) of forests. Climate variations can also affect the vulnerability of forests to pests and pathogens, causing diffuse or widespread mortality. The introduction of novel pests is causing rapid mortality of targeted species with undetermined effects on forest productivity: NPP could decrease or increase depending on the severity (proportion of basal area impacted) and species diversity. We attempted to document the impact of diffuse mortality caused by insect outbreaks on North American temperate forests through synthesis of literature. Despite the large number of studies (>500) only a few (12) documented NPP in a systematic manner. The magnitude of insect and pathogen disturbance was larger in western than eastern forests due to the redundancy and functional diversity of temperate deciduous and mixed deciduous forests. Recovery from disturbance was more rapid from diffuse short duration defoliation events relative to the long lasting impacts of wood boring insects. Forest resilience may decrease as insect disturbance increases, particularly with generalist invasive pests that target a variety of species. We conclude that these biotic interactions, particularly when caused by invasive pests, impose biological forcing to forest NPP at similar magnitude and time scales than climate forcing.

  13. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Olaf; Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a (13)CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified (13)C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly (13)C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more (13)C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic (13)CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies. PMID:26740559

  14. Spearfishing to depletion: evidence from temperate reef fishes in Chile.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Natalio; Gelcich, L Stefan; Vásquez, Julio A; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Unreliable and data-poor marine fishery landings can lead to a lack of regulatory action in fisheries management. Here we use official Chilean landing reports and non-conventional indicators, such as fishers' perceptions and spearfishing competition results, to provide evidence of reef fishes depletions caused by unregulated spearfishing. Results show that the three largest and most emblematic reef fishes targeted mainly by spearfishers (> 98% of landings) [Graus nigra (vieja negra), Semicossyphus darwini (sheephead or pejeperro), and Medialuna ancietae (acha)] show signs of depletion in terms of abundance and size and that overall the catches of reef fishes have shifted from large carnivore species toward smaller-sized omnivore and herbivore species. Information from two snorkeling speargun world championships (1971 and 2004, Iquique, Chile) and from fishers' perceptions shows the mean size of reef fish to be declining. Although the ecological consequences of reef fish depletion are not fully understood in Chile, evidence of spearfishing depleting temperate reef fishes must be explicitly included in policy debates. This would involve bans or strong restrictions on the use of SCUBA and hookah diving gear for spearfishing, and minimum size limits. It may also involve academic and policy discussions regarding conservation and fisheries management synergies within networks of no-take and territorial user-rights fisheries areas, as a strategy for the sustainable management of temperate and tropical reef fisheries. PMID:20945755

  15. Nitrous oxide emission reduction in temperate biochar-amended soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Hüppi, R.; Leifeld, J.; Neftel, A.

    2012-01-01

    Biochar, a pyrolysis product of organic residues, is an amendment for agricultural soils to improve soil fertility, sequester CO2 and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In highly weathered tropical soils laboratory incubations of soil-biochar mixtures revealed substantial reductions for nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In contrast, evidence is scarce for temperate soils. In a three-factorial laboratory incubation experiment two different temperate agricultural soils were amended with green waste and coffee grounds biochar. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured at the beginning and end of a three month incubation. The experiments were conducted under three different conditions (no additional nutrients, glucose addition, and nitrate and glucose addition) representing different field conditions. We found mean N2O emission reductions of 60 % compared to soils without addition of biochar. The reduction depended on biochar type and soil type as well as on the age of the samples. CO2 emissions were slightly reduced, too. NO3- but not NH4+ concentrations were significantly reduced shortly after biochar incorporation. Despite the highly significant suppression of N2O emissions biochar effects should not be transferred one-to-one to field conditions but need to be tested accordingly.

  16. Connectivity within and among a network of temperate marine reserves.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Melinda A; Chambers, Justine; Knott, Nathan A; Malcolm, Hamish A; Harasti, David; Jordan, Alan; Kelaher, Brendan P

    2011-01-01

    Networks of marine reserves are increasingly being promoted as a means of conserving marine biodiversity. One consideration in designing systems of marine reserves is the maintenance of connectivity to ensure the long-term persistence and resilience of populations. Knowledge of connectivity, however, is frequently lacking during marine reserve design and establishment. We characterise patterns of genetic connectivity of 3 key species of habitat-forming macroalgae across an established network of temperate marine reserves on the east coast of Australia and the implications for adaptive management and marine reserve design. Connectivity varied greatly among species. Connectivity was high for the subtidal macroalgae Ecklonia radiata and Phyllospora comosa and neither species showed any clear patterns of genetic structuring with geographic distance within or among marine parks. In contrast, connectivity was low for the intertidal, Hormosira banksii, and there was a strong pattern of isolation by distance. Coastal topography and latitude influenced small scale patterns of genetic structure. These results suggest that some species are well served by the current system of marine reserves in place along this temperate coast but it may be warranted to revisit protection of intertidal habitats to ensure the long-term persistence of important habitat-forming macroalgae. Adaptively managing marine reserve design to maintain connectivity may ensure the long-term persistence and resilience of marine habitats and the biodiversity they support. PMID:21625388

  17. Connectivity within and among a Network of Temperate Marine Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Melinda A.; Chambers, Justine; Knott, Nathan A.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; Harasti, David; Jordan, Alan; Kelaher, Brendan P.

    2011-01-01

    Networks of marine reserves are increasingly being promoted as a means of conserving marine biodiversity. One consideration in designing systems of marine reserves is the maintenance of connectivity to ensure the long-term persistence and resilience of populations. Knowledge of connectivity, however, is frequently lacking during marine reserve design and establishment. We characterise patterns of genetic connectivity of 3 key species of habitat-forming macroalgae across an established network of temperate marine reserves on the east coast of Australia and the implications for adaptive management and marine reserve design. Connectivity varied greatly among species. Connectivity was high for the subtidal macroalgae Ecklonia radiata and Phyllospora comosa and neither species showed any clear patterns of genetic structuring with geographic distance within or among marine parks. In contrast, connectivity was low for the intertidal, Hormosira banksii, and there was a strong pattern of isolation by distance. Coastal topography and latitude influenced small scale patterns of genetic structure. These results suggest that some species are well served by the current system of marine reserves in place along this temperate coast but it may be warranted to revisit protection of intertidal habitats to ensure the long-term persistence of important habitat-forming macroalgae. Adaptively managing marine reserve design to maintain connectivity may ensure the long-term persistence and resilience of marine habitats and the biodiversity they support. PMID:21625388

  18. Environmental drivers of ectomycorrhizal communities in Europe's temperate oak forests.

    PubMed

    Suz, Laura M; Barsoum, Nadia; Benham, Sue; Dietrich, Hans-Peter; Fetzer, Karl Dieter; Fischer, Richard; García, Paloma; Gehrman, Joachim; Kristöfel, Ferdinand; Manninger, Miklós; Neagu, Stefan; Nicolas, Manuel; Oldenburger, Jan; Raspe, Stephan; Sánchez, Gerardo; Schröck, Hans Werner; Schubert, Alfred; Verheyen, Kris; Verstraeten, Arne; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2014-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are major ecological players in temperate forests, but they are rarely used in measures of forest condition because large-scale, high-resolution, standardized and replicated belowground data are scarce. We carried out an analysis of ectomycorrhizas at 22 intensively monitored long-term oak plots, across nine European countries, covering complex natural and anthropogenic environmental gradients. We found that at large scales, mycorrhizal richness and evenness declined with decreasing soil pH and root density, and with increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Shifts in mycorrhizas with different functional traits were detected; mycorrhizas with structures specialized for long-distance transport related differently to most environmental variables than those without. The dominant oak-specialist Lactarius quietus, with limited soil exploration abilities, responds positively to increasing nitrogen inputs and decreasing pH. In contrast, Tricholoma, Cortinarius and Piloderma species, with medium-distance soil exploration abilities, show a consistently negative response. We also determined nitrogen critical loads for moderate (9.5-13.5 kg N/ha/year) and drastic (17 kg N/ha/year) changes in belowground mycorrhizal root communities in temperate oak forests. Overall, we generated the first baseline data for ectomycorrhizal fungi in the oak forests sampled, identified nitrogen pollution as one of their major drivers at large scales and revealed fungi that individually and/or in combination with others can be used as belowground indicators of environmental characteristics. PMID:25277863

  19. Algal biomass and primary production within a temperate zone sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.A.; Sommerfeld, M.R. )

    1987-02-01

    The use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to extract chlorophyll a and {sup 14}C-labelled photosynthate from endolithic algae of sparsely vegetated, cold temperate grasslands on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona has yielded the first estimates of biomass and photosynthesis for this unusual community. These subsurface microorganisms are found widespread in exposed Coconino Sandstone, a predominant formation in this cold temperate region. The endolithic community in Coconino Sandstone, composed primarily of coccoid blue-green and coccoid/sarcinoid green algae, yielded a biomass value (as chlorophyll a content) of 87 mg m{sup {minus}2} rock surface area and a photosynthetic rate of 0.37 mg CO{sub 2} dm{sup {minus}2} hr{sup {minus}1} or 0.48 mg CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl a hr{sup {minus}1}. The endolithic algal community contributes moderate biomass (5-10%) and substantial photosynthesis (20-80%) to the sparse grassland ecosystem.

  20. Chilling and heat requirements for flowering in temperate fruit trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Dai, Junhu; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Yu, Haiying; Xu, Jianchu; Luedeling, Eike

    2014-08-01

    Climate change has affected the rates of chilling and heat accumulation, which are vital for flowering and production, in temperate fruit trees, but few studies have been conducted in the cold-winter climates of East Asia. To evaluate tree responses to variation in chill and heat accumulation rates, partial least squares regression was used to correlate first flowering dates of chestnut ( Castanea mollissima Blume) and jujube ( Zizyphus jujube Mill.) in Beijing, China, with daily chill and heat accumulation between 1963 and 2008. The Dynamic Model and the Growing Degree Hour Model were used to convert daily records of minimum and maximum temperature into horticulturally meaningful metrics. Regression analyses identified the chilling and forcing periods for chestnut and jujube. The forcing periods started when half the chilling requirements were fulfilled. Over the past 50 years, heat accumulation during tree dormancy increased significantly, while chill accumulation remained relatively stable for both species. Heat accumulation was the main driver of bloom timing, with effects of variation in chill accumulation negligible in Beijing's cold-winter climate. It does not seem likely that reductions in chill will have a major effect on the studied species in Beijing in the near future. Such problems are much more likely for trees grown in locations that are substantially warmer than their native habitats, such as temperate species in the subtropics and tropics.

  1. Mitochondrial ageing of a polar and a temperate mud clam.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Eva; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Abele, Doris

    2005-05-01

    We investigated mitochondrial ageing in a temperate (Mya arenaria) and an Antarctic (Laternula elliptica) mud clam, with similar lifestyle (benthic filter feeders) but different maximum life spans (MLSP), 13 and 36 years, respectively. The short-lived temperate M. arenaria showed a more pronounced decrease in mitochondrial function (respiration, respiratory control ratio, proton leak, membrane potential) with age than the long-lived Antarctic L. elliptica. H2O2 generation rates at habitat temperature were far higher in the short-lived M. arenaria compared to L. elliptica. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as proportion of the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (%H2O2/O2) increased significantly with age in M. arenaria, whereas in L. elliptica the proportion remained unchanged. Lower rates of mitochondrial H2O2 generation were presumably due to mild uncoupling as L. elliptica mitochondria showed higher proton leak compared to M. arenaria mitochondria. The results are discussed in to the light of the "Free Radical-Rate of Living theory", (Pearl, R., 1928. The Rate of Living. Alfred Knopf, New York; Harman, D., 1956. Aging: a theory based on free radical and radiation biology. J. Gerontol. 11, 298-300) and the "Uncoupling to Survive" hypothesis (Brand, M.D., 2000. Uncoupling to survive? The role of mitochondrial inefficiency in ageing. Exp. Gerontol. 35, 811-820). PMID:15811430

  2. Obtaining strong zirconia ceramic by hardening and tempering

    SciTech Connect

    Pliner, S.Y.; Dabizha, A.A.; Komolikov, Y.I.; Rutman, D.S.; Toropov, Y.S.

    1985-07-01

    To determine whether it is possible to strengthen ceramics by means of hardening and tempering, the authors selected a solid solution pf 3.4% of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (molar fraction) in ZrO/sub 2/. The solution was synthesized by combined precipitation of the compounds from an aqueous solution of chlorides. The filtered residue of hydroxides was dried and calcined at about 900/sup 0/C. The calcined material was milled for 80 h in an iron ball mill by the wet method with a ratio of materials: balls: water of 1:2:1. The material was then purified to remove tramp iron by treatment with HC1 with an addition of hydrogen peroxide, followed by decantation with distilled water. The specimens were heated to 2250-2300/sup 0/C in a furnace with a straight-through vertical channel of diameter 20 mm, a heating element made of stabilized zirconia, and high-temperature heat insulation made of porous ceramic-concrete based on ZrO/sub 2/. The hardening of the specimens at this temperature was done at a rate ensuring practically complete preservation of the cubic phase of ZrO/sub 2/. The tempering of the hardened specimens was done by the furnace with a silit heaters at 1400/sup 0/C over different times (0-85 h).

  3. Harmful filamentous cyanobacteria favoured by reduced water turnover with lake warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas; Köster, Oliver; Salcher, Michaela M.; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2012-11-01

    Anthropogenic-induced changes in nutrient ratios have increased the susceptibility of large temperate lakes to several effects of rising air temperatures and the resulting heating of water bodies. First, warming leads to stronger thermal stratification, thus impeding natural complete water turnover (holomixis), which compensates for oxygen deficits in the deep zones. Second, increased water temperatures and nutrient concentrations can directly favour the growth of harmful algae. Thus, lake-restoration programmes have focused on reducing nutrients to limit toxic algal blooms. Here we present evidence that the ubiquitous harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens has become the dominant species in a large lake during the past four decades, although the phosphorus content of the ecosystem decreased fivefold. However, the nitrogen input was not diminished concomitantly, favouring this non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium owing to increased N:P ratios. P. rubescens contains gas vesicles that allow for buoyancy to accumulate within the depth of optimal irradiance. As the toxic cyanobacterium has low consumption by predators, water turnover represents the main mechanism of seasonal population control. Thus, unidirectional lake-restoration measures in parallel with recurrent absence of holomixis owing to lake warming may lead to similar undesired effects that have formerly emerged from fertilization.

  4. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  5. Characterizing Phosphorus Release from a Northern Temperate Wetland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality of lakes, reservoirs, rivers and streams can be degraded by runoff from a variety of land uses, including runoff or drainage from agricultural cropland, pastures, feedlots, golf courses and suburban/urban lawns. Excess nutrients become a concern when they are readily available for tran...

  6. Reevaluation of lake trout and lake whitefish bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Kao, Yu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Using a corrected algorithm for balancing the energy budget, we reevaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the laboratory and for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in the laboratory and in the field. For lake trout, results showed that the bioenergetics model slightly overestimated food consumption by the lake trout when they were fed low and intermediate rations, whereas the model predicted food consumption by lake trout fed ad libitum without any detectable bias. The slight bias in model predictions for lake trout on restricted rations may have been an artifact of the feeding schedule for these fish, and we would therefore recommend application of the Wisconsin lake trout bioenergetics model to lake trout populations in the field without any revisions to the model. Use of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for coregonids resulted in overestimation of food consumption by lake whitefish both in the laboratory and in the field by between 20 and 30%, on average. This overestimation of food consumption was most likely due to overestimation of respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit to the observed consumption in our laboratory tanks. The adjusted model predicted the consumption in the laboratory and the field without any detectable bias. Until a detailed lake whitefish respiration study can be conducted, we recommend application of our adjusted version of the Wisconsin generalized coregonid bioenergetics model to lake whitefish populations in the field.

  7. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  8. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  9. Temperate Ice Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, V.; Player, K.; Gogineni, S.; Rodriguez, F.; Thompson, L.

    2007-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last few years. A key variable in the study of glacier dynamics is ice thickness. A few attempts have been made to develop airborne sounding radars for temperate-ice thickness measurements [Arcone et al., 2000]. There is an urgent need for compact radar for routine ice thickness measurements from ground-based and airborne platforms. Radars (Radio Detection and Ranging) have been widely used to measure ice thickness in Greenland and Antarctica. However, the radars used in these areas operate in the VHF and UHF part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Due to the composition of temperate ice, the attenuation and back-scatter from large pockets of water makes UHF and VHF ineffective in sounding of its thickness. Radars operating in lower part of the HF spectrum are required for sounding temperate ice. We are designing and developing a Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through the water pockets and provide a more accurate measurement of the ice thickness. TIDSoR is a light-weight system for ground-based operations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys in which weight is an important factor, such as in an UAV. TIDSoR operates on two channels in the HF spectrum using two-linear, frequency-modulated chirp waveforms. The two chirp frequency ranges are 7 to 8 MHz and 13.5 to 14.5 MHz. The radar will operate from a 12-V battery and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the battery. The radar consists of three main sections: Digital, RF and antenna. The digital-section generates the transmitter waveforms, timing and control signals, and digitizes processes and stores the received signal. The RF-section consists of a transmitter with a 20-W peak-power amplifier, band-pass filters, and a switching system for a shared antenna. The receiver consists of a blanking switch, a limiter, a low-noise amplifier, a band-pass filter and a data acquisition

  10. Regional variability among nonlinear chlorophyll-phosphorus relationships in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filstrup, Christopher T.; Wagner, Tyler; Soranno, Patricia A.; Stanley, Emily H.; Stow, Craig A.; Webster, Katherine E.; Downing, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl a) and total phosphorus (TP) is a fundamental relationship in lakes that reflects multiple aspects of ecosystem function and is also used in the regulation and management of inland waters. The exact form of this relationship has substantial implications on its meaning and its use. We assembled a spatially extensive data set to examine whether nonlinear models are a better fit for Chl a—TP relationships than traditional log-linear models, whether there were regional differences in the form of the relationships, and, if so, which regional factors were related to these differences. We analyzed a data set from 2105 temperate lakes across 35 ecoregions by fitting and comparing two different nonlinear models and one log-linear model. The two nonlinear models fit the data better than the log-linear model. In addition, the parameters for the best-fitting model varied among regions: the maximum and lower Chl aasymptotes were positively and negatively related to percent regional pasture land use, respectively, and the rate at which chlorophyll increased with TP was negatively related to percent regional wetland cover. Lakes in regions with more pasture fields had higher maximum chlorophyll concentrations at high TP concentrations but lower minimum chlorophyll concentrations at low TP concentrations. Lakes in regions with less wetland cover showed a steeper Chl a—TP relationship than wetland-rich regions. Interpretation of Chl a—TP relationships depends on regional differences, and theory and management based on a monolithic relationship may be inaccurate.

  11. 40 CFR 426.60 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass tempering subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... automotive glass tempering subcategory. 426.60 Section 426.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.60 Applicability; description of the automotive glass...

  12. 40 CFR 426.60 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass tempering subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... automotive glass tempering subcategory. 426.60 Section 426.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.60 Applicability; description of the automotive...

  13. 40 CFR 426.60 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass tempering subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... automotive glass tempering subcategory. 426.60 Section 426.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.60 Applicability; description of the automotive glass...

  14. 40 CFR 426.60 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass tempering subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... automotive glass tempering subcategory. 426.60 Section 426.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.60 Applicability; description of the automotive...

  15. 40 CFR 426.60 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass tempering subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... automotive glass tempering subcategory. 426.60 Section 426.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Tempering Subcategory § 426.60 Applicability; description of the automotive...

  16. The case for water activity as a specification for wheat tempering and flour production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture plays an important role in processing wheat grain into flour, from proper grain tempering to the stability of the flour. Moisture properties of dry grain, tempered grain, and finished flour are currently tracked using moisture content. However, stability factors such as microbial growth and...

  17. Genetic and Morphological Diversity of Temperate and Tropical Isolates of Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici is a diverse species causing disease on a broad range of both temperate and tropical plants. It was proposed that temperate and tropical isolates represent different species based on morphological observations. In this study we used cultural characteristics, amplified fragment l...

  18. Defining the Developmental Parameters of Temper Loss in Early Childhood: Implications for Developmental Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Choi, Seung W.; Carter, Alice S.; Hullsiek, Heide; Burns, James; McCarthy, Kimberly; Leibenluft, Ellen; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Temper modulation problems are both a hallmark of early childhood and a common mental health concern. Thus, characterizing specific behavioral manifestations of temper loss along a dimension from normative misbehaviors to clinically significant problems is an important step toward identifying clinical thresholds. Methods:…

  19. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  20. Emission of methyl chloride from a fern growing in subtropical, temperate, and cool-temperate climate zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Takenaka, Akio; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Hiura, Tsutom

    2015-06-01

    Tropical and subtropical forests are believed to be the largest source of methyl chloride (CH3Cl), which is a natural stratospheric ozone destroyer. However, very little is known about what controls the rate of emission from these forests or why biogenic CH3Cl emission is concentrated in the tropics and subtropics. In this study, we investigated the seasonal and spatial variations of the rate of CH3Cl emission from the fern Osmunda japonica, which has a broad distribution covering the subtropical, temperate, and subboreal climate zones. The average rates of CH3Cl emission from the fern were similar (~1-4 µg g(dw)-1 h-1) among three areas, and there was no significant seasonal change in the temperate zone, although the rate was highly variable among individual plants. These findings suggest that meteorological climate such as temperature and solar radiation is not a major environmental factor controlling biogenic CH3Cl emission of individual plants, but species with high CH3Cl emission activity are more abundant in tropical and subtropical zones. We also found that developmental stage might be an important factor controlling biogenic CH3Cl emission rates. These results have implications for predicting future global CH3Cl emission budgets and for understanding of the plant-atmosphere interaction.

  1. Institutional aspects of lake management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Stephen M.; Rumery, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The major barriers to successful lake management are institutional. However, in contrast to the technical and limnological dimensions of lake management, the institutional aspects of managing lakes have received little attention. The institutional factors that are important for successful lake management outcomes are: overlapping areal jurisdiction among governmental units, fragmented functional program responsibilities, ineffective coordination, limited authority, financial constraints, private sector roles, and inadequate public awareness and consensus. The range of typical institutional problems confronting lake management are well illustrated through experiences from the state of Wisconsin, USA. Because lake management programs with institutional shortcomings rarely realize their goals, it is critical to assimilate, evaluate, and apply our experience to date with the institutional arrangements necessary to effectively manage lake resources.

  2. CONTOURITES IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contour currents influence sedimentation in an area 15 km wide and 65 km long at the base of the slope off the Keweenaw Peninsula in Lake Superior, northwestern Michigan. Seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz) from this area show distinct wavy reflectors in a scoured trough at a d...

  3. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the ... should be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. The canyons and peaks of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains are ...

  4. Quebec: Lake Manicouagan

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... and other erosional processes have reduced the extent of the crater, with the original diameter estimated at about 100 kilometers. This ... metamorphic effects are abundant in the target rocks of the crater floor. Today Lake Manicouagan serves as a reservoir and is one of ...

  5. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  6. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  7. Echoes of Bark Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duenkel, Nicky; Hemstreet, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Two former staff members reflect on their feelings about the August 1995 closing of Bark Lake Leadership Centre (Ontario, Canada), which for 49 years had offered outdoor adventure and environmental education courses to youth and adults. They discuss their experiences as both students and teachers at the center, which helped shape their careers in…

  8. Upwellings in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaraev, M. N.; Troitskaya, E. S.; Blinov, V. V.; Ivanov, V. G.; Gnatovskii, R. Yu.

    2012-02-01

    Based on shipboard and satellite observations, the characteristics of upwelling in Lake Baikal in the period of direct temperature stratification have been determined for the first time. Coastal upwellings appear annually under the effect of run-down and alongshore winds and are traced along the coast to a distance of up to 60-100 km and up to 250 km in North Baikal. Analogous to the way it occurs in seas, water rises from the depths of 100-200 m (350 m as a maximum) at the velocity of 0.1 × 10-2-6.5 × 10-2 cm/s. Divergence in the field of intràbasin cyclonic macrovortices produces upwelling in the Baikal pelagic zone and downwelling in the vicinity of shores; this lasts from 7 to 88 days and covers the depth interval of 80-300 m in August and up to 400-800 m in early-mid November. The area of upwellings occupies up to 20-60% of the separate basins of the lake. Vertical circulation of water in the field of pelagic upwellings leads to intensification of coastal currents and to formation of the thermobar with a heat inert zone in the central part of the lake in November, and this thermobar is not observed in other lakes, at that.

  9. LAKE TAHOE VISIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Visibility monitoring and airborne particulate sampling in the Lake Tahoe Basin were used to document visual air quality levels and to assess the relative impacts of major contributing emission source categories. Visibility data were obtained by long path contrast and particle sc...

  10. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  11. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  12. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Precipitation during Tempering of a Nanostructured Bainitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Francesca G.; Miller, Michael K; Garcia-Mateo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon distribution during tempering of a nanostructured bainitic steel was analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT). Three different types of particles are detected on samples tempered at 673 K (400 C) for 30 minutes: lower bainite cementite with a carbon content of {approx}25 at. pct, {var_epsilon}-carbides with a carbon content close to 30 at. pct, and carbon clusters, small features with a carbon content of {approx}14 at. pct indicative of a stage of tempering prior to precipitation of {var_epsilon}-carbide. After tempering at 773 K (500 C) for 30 minutes, the {var_epsilon}-carbide-to-cementite transition was observed. Solute concentration profiles across carbide/ferrite interfaces showed the distribution of substitutional elements in {var_epsilon}-carbide and cementite for all the tempering conditions.

  13. Lake level variability in Silver Lake, Michigan: a response to fluctuations in lake levels of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    Sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan, can be used to constrain the timing and elevation of Lake Michigan during the Nipissing transgression. Silver Lake is separated from Lake Michigan by a barrier/dune complex and the Nipissing, Calumet, and Glenwood shorelines of Lake Michigan are expressed landward of this barrier. Two Vibracores were taken from the lake in February 2000 and contain pebbly sand, sand, buried soils, marl, peat, and sandy muck. It is suggested here that fluctuations in the level of Lake Michigan are reflected in Silver Lake since the Chippewa low phase, and possibly at the end of the Algonquin phase. An age of 12,490 B.P. (10,460±50 14C yrs B.P.) on wood from a buried Entisol may record the falling Algonquin phase as the North Bay outlet opened. A local perched water table is indicated by marl deposited before 7,800 B.P. and peat between 7,760-7,000 B.P. when Lake Michigan was at the low elevation Chippewa phase. Continued deepening of the lake is recorded by the transition from peat to sandy muck at 7,000 B.P. in the deeper core, and with the drowning of an Inceptisol nearly 3 m higher at 6,410 B.P. in the shallower core. A rising groundwater table responding to a rising Lake Michigan base level during the Nipissing transgression, rather than a response to mid-Holocene climate change, explains deepening of Silver Lake. Sandy muck was deposited continually in Silver Lake between Nipissing and modern time. Sand lenses within the muck are presumed to be eolian in origin, derived from sand dunes advancing into the lake on the western side of the basin.

  14. Climate change effects on groundwater dependent temperate forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Brolsma, R. J.; van Beek, R. L.; van Vliet, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Models developed to predict the influence of changing climate on ecosystems often concentrate on vegetation in connection with soil moisture, but usually omit groundwater. However in temperate climate zones, groundwater can have a profound effect on the reaction of vegetation to climate change, because it strongly influences the spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture and therefore water and oxygen stress of vegetation. Here we focus on the qualitative and quantitative effects of climate change on the zonation of vegetation and groundwater dynamics along a hill slope. To study this we developed a fully coupled hydrological-vegetation model, for a groundwater influenced temperate forest ecosystem. The vegetation model is based on the carbon assimilation model of Farquhar et al. (1980) and the extension of Daly et al. (2004), which includes transpiration of vegetation and accounts for the response to low soil moisture content. We modified this model to account for vegetation response to high soil moisture contents due to high groundwater levels, and we extended the model to include light competition, phenology and vegetation growth. To simulate the hydrological system the saturated-unsaturated flow model by van Beek (2002) is used. The coupled model was first compared to measured semi-hourly flux tower data of H2O and CO2, showing good results. Than simulation runs of 1000 years were performed to study the effect of climate change on soil water, groundwater and vegetation. We performed simulation runs with competition between wet and dry adapted species under current conditions and after climate change. Meteorological time series for the 2100 climate (SRESA2) were obtained from downscaling 6 different regional climate model runs from the ENSEMBLES project with a stochastic weather generator (Kilby et al., 2007). Results show that in the zones were the groundwater system is close to the surface, climate change causes large shifts in vegetation zonation of the

  15. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes

    PubMed Central

    Paul Antony, Chakkiath; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  16. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  17. Antarctic Dry Valley Streams and Lakes: Analogs for Noachian Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James; Marchant, David

    2013-04-01

    Recent climate models suggest that Noachian Mars may have been characterized by a "cold and icy", rather than a "warm and wet" climate. Noachian valley networks and open basin lakes have been cited as key evidence for a "warm and wet" early Mars. We investigate fluvial and lacustrine processes in the Mars-like Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) to assess whether such processes, which take place in the absence of pluvial activity and with mean annual temperatues (MAT) well below zero, can serve as informative proxies for Noachian Mars. In contrast to temperate climates, fluvial processes in the MDV (and thus a host of weathering, erosion and transport processes there) are severely limited by the lack of rainfall. The limited sources of meltwater provide very local streams and hyporheic zones, serving to concentrate chemical weathering processes and biological ecosystems. The horizontally stratified hydrologic system means that localized meltwater is constrained to flow in a very shallow and narrow aquifer perched on top of the ice table aquiclude. Lakes and ponds in temperate areas are largely of pluvial origin and characterized by abundant vegetation, large drainage basins and higher order streams delivering rainwater. In contrast, the hyperarid, hypothermal conditions in the MDV mean that there is no rainfall, water sources are limited primarily to meltwater from the surface of cold-based glaciers, and drainage into lakes is seasonal and highly variable, being related to changing and sluggish response to surface ice hypsometry, itself a function of changing climate. Lake surface fluctuations are caused by imbalances between meltwater input and sublimation from the lake surface ice and this sensitive balance tends to magnify even minor climate signals. Where does the lakewater come from and under what conditions is excess meltwater produced to cause modifications in their levels? The dominant means of supply (meltwater) and loss (ablation) are clearly seasonally

  18. High level of intergenera gene exchange shapes the evolution of haloarchaea in an isolated Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    DeMaere, Matthew Z; Williams, Timothy J; Allen, Michelle A; Brown, Mark V; Gibson, John A E; Rich, John; Lauro, Federico M; Dyall-Smith, Michael; Davenport, Karen W; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Tringe, Susannah G; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-10-15

    Deep Lake in Antarctica is a globally isolated, hypersaline system that remains liquid at temperatures down to -20 °C. By analyzing metagenome data and genomes of four isolates we assessed genome variation and patterns of gene exchange to learn how the lake community evolved. The lake is completely and uniformly dominated by haloarchaea, comprising a hierarchically structured, low-complexity community that differs greatly to temperate and tropical hypersaline environments. The four Deep Lake isolates represent distinct genera (∼85% 16S rRNA gene similarity and ∼73% genome average nucleotide identity) with genomic characteristics indicative of niche adaptation, and collectively account for ∼72% of the cellular community. Network analysis revealed a remarkable level of intergenera gene exchange, including the sharing of long contiguous regions (up to 35 kb) of high identity (∼100%). Although the genomes of closely related Halobacterium, Haloquadratum, and Haloarcula (>90% average nucleotide identity) shared regions of high identity between species or strains, the four Deep Lake isolates were the only distantly related haloarchaea to share long high-identity regions. Moreover, the Deep Lake high-identity regions did not match to any other hypersaline environment metagenome data. The most abundant species, tADL, appears to play a central role in the exchange of insertion sequences, but not the exchange of high-identity regions. The genomic characteristics of the four haloarchaea are consistent with a lake ecosystem that sustains a high level of intergenera gene exchange while selecting for ecotypes that maintain sympatric speciation. The peculiarities of this polar system restrict which species can grow and provide a tempo and mode for accentuating gene exchange. PMID:24082106

  19. Outburst floods of glacial lakes in Patagonia: is there an increasing trend?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassa, Gino; Wendt, Jens; Wendt, Anja; López, Paulina; Schuler, Thomas; Maas, Hans-Gerd; Carrasco, Jorge; Rivera, Andrés.

    2010-05-01

    Glaciers in Patagonia are temperate and many of them are receding at an accelerated rate, with a consequent enlargement of glacial lakes. We will review the occurrence of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs) recorded during the last century in Patagonia (Northern and Southern Patagonia icefields), and analyse them in view of the general warming of 0.5°C affecting the region during the last 40 years. Special attention will be devoted to Lake Cachet 2 (47°12' S, 73°15' W, 422 m a.s.l.) which has experienced 6 GLOF events during the last 2 years: April 6-7 2008, October 7-8 2008, 21-22 December 2008, 5 March 2009, 16 September 2009 and 5-6 January 2010. Lake Cachet 2 has an area of 4 km2, located on the eastern margin of the Northern Patagonia Icefield, being dammed on its southern margin by Colonia Glacier. Prior to the April 2008 event there had been no historical record of catastrophic flooding of this lake. Each event resulted in a flood wave of which travelled down Colonia River to the confluence with Baker River in a period of less than 48 hours, where it reached peak flows of approximately 2,000 m3/s. Here we present airborne and ground explorations carried out in the period 2008-2009 which confirm that the Lake Cachet 2 floods drain through an englacial tunnel under Colonia Glacier for a distance of 8 km, emerging at the front of the glacier. We propose that the lake started draining in 2008 as a result of the weakening of the ice dam produced by long-term thinning of Colonia Glacier. Measurements of the empty lake bed were performed with the CECS airborne laser scanner onboard a helicopter, which show that the maximum water volume of the lake is 200 x 106 m3. Modelling of the flood events has been carried out based on the subglacial flood model of Clarke (2003), showing that a semi-circular subglacial tunnel attaining a maximum dimension of 15 m can evacuate Lake Cachet 2 in approximately 48 hours, with peak flows on the order of 4000 m3/s. Preliminary

  20. Response in the trophic state of stratified lakes to changes in hydrology and water level: potential effects of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.

    2011-01-01

    To determine how climate-induced changes in hydrology and water level may affect the trophic state (productivity) of stratified lakes, two relatively pristine dimictic temperate lakes in Wisconsin, USA, were examined. Both are closed-basin lakes that experience changes in water level and degradation in water quality during periods of high water. One, a seepage lake with no inlets or outlets, has a small drainage basin and hydrology dominated by precipitation and groundwater exchange causing small changes in water and phosphorus (P) loading, which resulted in small changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. The other, a terminal lake with inlets but no outlets, has a large drainage basin and hydrology dominated by runoff causing large changes in water and P loading, which resulted in large changes in water level, P concentrations, and productivity. Eutrophication models accurately predicted the effects of changes in hydrology, P loading, and water level on their trophic state. If climate changes, larger changes in hydrology and water levels than previously observed could occur. If this causes increased water and P loading, stratified (dimictic and monomictic) lakes are expected to experience higher water levels and become more eutrophic, especially those with large developed drainage basins.

  1. Effects of increasing temperatures on methane concentrations and methanogenesis during experimental incubation of sediments from oligotrophic and mesotrophic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Andrea; Lyautey, Emilie; Montuelle, Bernard; Casper, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Global warming is expected to raise temperatures in freshwater lakes, which have been acknowledged to contribute up to 10% of the atmospheric methane concentrations. Increasing temperature enhances methane production and oxidation rates, but few studies have considered the balance between both processes at experimentally higher temperatures within lake sediments. The temperature dependence of methane concentrations, methane production rates, and methanogenic (mcrA) and methanotrophic (pmoA) community size was investigated in intact sediment cores incubated with aerobic hypolimnion water at 4, 8, and 12°C over 3 weeks. Sediment cores of 25 cm length were collected at two temperate lakes—Lake Stechlin (Germany; mesotrophic-oligotrophic, maximum depth 69.5 m) and Lake Geneva (France/Switzerland; mesotrophic, maximum depth 310 m). While methane production rates in Lake Stechlin sediments did not change with increasing temperatures, methane concentrations decreased significantly. In contrast, methane production rates increased in 20-25 cm in Lake Geneva sediments with increasing temperatures, but methane concentrations did not differ. Real-time PCR demonstrated the methanogenic and methanotrophic community size remained stable independently of the incubation temperature. Methane concentrations as well as community sizes were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in Lake Stechlin than in Lake Geneva, while potential methane production rates after 24 h were similar in both lakes, with on average 2.5 and 1.9 nmol g-1 DW h-1, respectively. Our results suggest that at higher temperatures methane oxidation could balance, and even exceed, methane production. This suggests that anaerobic methane oxidation could be involved in the methane balance at a more important rate than previously anticipated.

  2. Temper Outbursts in Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Their Association with Depressed Mood and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Georgina; Bolhuis, Koen; Heyman, Isobel; Mataix-Cols, David; Turner, Cynthia; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Temper outbursts in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are a common source of concern, but remain poorly understood. This study examined a set of hypotheses related to: (a) the prevalence of temper outbursts in paediatric OCD, (b) the associations of temper outbursts with OCD severity and depressive symptoms; and (c) the…

  3. Microevolution of European temperate oaks in response to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This review reconstructs microevolutionary processes that allowed long-lived species as temperate oaks (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) to cope with climate change since the last glacial maximum, by assembling insights from complementary synchronic and allochronic approaches. Paleobotanical and genetic investigations show that oaks migrated at larger velocities than expected, thanks to long-distance rare events and most likely human interferences. Hybridization was a key mechanism accelerating migration and enhancing species succession. Common garden experiments and genome wide association studies demonstrated that diversifying selection across large environmental gradients contributed to rapid local adaptation. Finally the review explores how lessons taken from past evolutionary scenarios may help to predict future responses of oaks to ongoing climate change. PMID:27263361

  4. Vertical heterogeneity in predation pressure in a temperate forest canopy

    PubMed Central

    Aikens, Kathleen R.; Buddle, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The forest canopy offers a vertical gradient across which variation in predation pressure implies variation in refuge quality for arthropods. Direct and indirect experimental approaches were combined to assess whether canopy strata differ in ability to offer refuge to various arthropod groups. Vertical heterogeneity in impact of avian predators was quantified using exclosure cages in the understory, lower, mid, and upper canopy of a north-temperate deciduous forest near Montreal, Quebec. Bait trials were completed in the same strata to investigate the effects of invertebrate predators. Exclusion of birds yielded higher arthropod densities across all strata, although treatment effects were small for some taxa. Observed gradients in predation pressure were similar for both birds and invertebrate predators; the highest predation pressure was observed in the understory and decreased with height. Our findings support a view of the forest canopy that is heterogeneous with respect to arthropod refuge from natural enemies. PMID:24010017

  5. Temperance, alcohol, and the American evangelical: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jessica

    2009-07-01

    Abstinence from alcohol is a way of life for many American evangelicals, with rates of abstention running at over 70% among some Pentecostal denominations. This paper examines the religious beliefs that, historically, have supported teetotalism. The most notable of these is Christian perfection, a doctrine that originated in 18th-century England, that was then radicalized in America in the early 19th century. Abstinence from alcohol is highest among denominations that make Christian perfection the cornerstone of their teachings, and lowest among those that discount human agency. The paper also argues that 19th-century American evangelicals were by no means committed uniformly to temperance as a way of life, and that this was especially true of the various Methodist churches. PMID:19563558

  6. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection. PMID:26825679

  7. Potential strategies for recovery of lake whitefish and lake herring stocks in eastern Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldenburg, K.; Stapanian, M.A.; Ryan, P.A.; Holm, E.

    2007-01-01

    Lake Erie sustained large populations of ciscoes (Salmonidae: Coregoninae) 120 years ago. By the end of the 19th century, abundance of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) had declined drastically. By 1925, the lake herring (a cisco) population (Coregonus artedii) had collapsed, although a limited lake herring fishery persisted in the eastern basin until the 1950s. In the latter part of the 20th century, the composition of the fish community changed as oligotrophication proceeded. Since 1984, a limited recovery of lake whitefish has occurred, however no recovery was evident for lake herring. Current ecological conditions in Lake Erie probably will not inhibit recovery of the coregonine species. Recovery of walleye (Sander vitreus) and efforts to rehabilitate the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Erie will probably assist recovery because these piscivores reduce populations of alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which inhibit reproductive success of coregonines. Although there are considerable spawning substrates available to coregonine species in eastern Lake Erie, eggs and fry would probably be displaced by storm surge from most shoals. Site selection for stocking or seeding of eggs should consider the reproductive life cycle of the stocked fish and suitable protection from storm events. Two potential sites in the eastern basin have been identified. Recommended management procedures, including commercial fisheries, are suggested to assist in recovery. Stocking in the eastern basin of Lake Erie is recommended for both species, as conditions are adequate and the native spawning population in the eastern basin is low. For lake herring, consideration should be given to match ecophenotypes as much as possible. Egg seeding is recommended. Egg seeding of lake whitefish should be considered initially, with fingerling or yearling stocking suggested if unsuccessful. Spawning stocks of whitefish in the western basin of Lake

  8. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake volume aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate lake volume (i.e. bathymetry) are usually only collected on a lake by lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. ...

  9. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  10. Lake Erie...Take a Bow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Maureen; Dunlevy, Margie

    This elementary school teaching unit was developed as a part of a series of teaching units that deal with Lake Erie. This unit was developed to enable children to: (1) identify the Great Lakes and pick out Lake Erie on a map; (2) demonstrate knowledge of Lake Erie's origin and geography; (3) list some uses of Lake Erie; and (4) give examples of…

  11. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest–atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics mani