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Sample records for mesaverde group uinta

  1. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  2. Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

    1989-07-01

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Western Gas Sands Project: production histories of the Piceance and Uinta basins of Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Kohout, J.

    1980-11-20

    Current United States geological tight sand designations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins' Western Gas Sands Project include the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations. Others, such as the Dakota, Cedar Mountain, Morrison and Mancos may eventually be included. Future production from these formations will probably be closely associated with existing trends. Cumulative gas production through December 1979, of the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins is less than 275 billion cubic feet. This contrasts dramatically with potential gas in place estimates of 360 trillion cubic feet. If the geology can be fully understood and engineering problems surmounted, significant potential reserves can be exploited.

  4. Results of field verification tests in the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Kukal, G.C.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Monson, E.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Piceance Basin of western Colorado contains a major potential natural gas resource in Mesaverde blanket and lenticular low permeability gas sands. The basin has been a pilot study area for government sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This work culminated in the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory consisting of three closely spaced wells, designed by the Department of Energy to study the reservoir and production characteristics of the low permeability sands of the Mesaverde Group in the Rulison Field near Rifle, Colorado. The purpose of this study is to compare geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of the existing Mesaverde producing areas in the Piceance Basin with those same characteristics at the Multiwell site. This study has been performed in two sequential parts, Phase I and Phase II. In Phase I the geologic, production and reservoir engineering parameters were developed for the existing Mesaverde gas producing areas through analysis of log suites, well completion information and production histories. The southern part of the basin was partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Phase II consisted of field verification tests with cooperative industry partners in which new subsurface geologic and production information was collected in the partitioned areas to be compared with that at MWX. This report presents the results of Phase II investigations.

  5. Results of field verification tests in the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kukal, G.C.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Monson, E.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Piceance Basin of western Colorado contains a major potential natural gas resource in Mesaverde blanket and lenticular low permeability gas sands. The basin has been a pilot study area for government sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This work culminated in the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory consisting of three closely spaced wells, designed by the Department of Energy to study the reservoir and production characteristics of the low permeability sands of the Mesaverde Group in the Rulison Field near Rifle, Colorado. The purpose of this study is to compare geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of the existing Mesaverde producing areas in the Piceance Basin with those same characteristics at the Multiwell site. This study has been performed in two sequential parts, Phase I and Phase II. In Phase I the geologic, production and reservoir engineering parameters were developed for the existing Mesaverde gas producing areas through analysis of log suites, well completion information and production histories. The southern part of the basin was partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Phase II consisted of field verification tests with cooperative industry partners in which new subsurface geologic and production information was collected in the partitioned areas to be compared with that at MWX. This report presents the results of Phase II investigations.

  6. Approximation of continuity of lenticular Mesaverde Group sandstone lenses utilizing close-well correlations, Piceance Basin, NW Colorado. SPE 11610

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.E.; Kohout, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Mesaverde Group sandstone units in 13 closely-spaced wells in the central and southern Piceance Basin of Colorado were correlated utilizing wireline log response quantitatively and qualitatively. Based on these correlations, the environmental subdivisions of the Mesaverde Group were characterized as follows: (1) paralic (upper mixed-marine) zone, occurring in the uppermost Mesaverde Group, includes thick sandstone units which are interpreted to be regionally continuous, (2) fluvial zone, containing point-bars 20 to 30+ ft thick, is interpreted to be correlatable to a maximum of 6800 ft, and (3) paludal zone has insufficient data to adequately characterize the sand units. However, 63 percent of the units are correlatable across at least 139 ft. An approximation of the dimensional characteristics of Mesaverde sandstone units has potential applications in designing hydraulic fracturing treatments and estimating gas reserves more accurately. 15 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Preliminary paleomagnetic poles and correlation of the Proterozoic Uinta Mountain Group, Utah and Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressler, Stephen L.

    1981-09-01

    Stable paleomagnetic directions have been obtained from seven sites spanning much of the 7-km-thick middle Proterozoic Uinta Mountain Group. The characteristic magnetization is carried partly by detrital(?) and secondary specularite and partly by hematite pigment. Preliminary paleomagnetic poles for six of the seven sites are closely grouped and their mean pole is 0.6°N, 157.2°E ( N = 6, α 95 = 5.4°). The pole for the seventh and stratigraphically highest site lies to the west, 4.6°N, 140.1°E, and ( n = 8, α 95= 15.9°). On the basis of the poles, revisions to correlations of the Uinta Mountain Group with other sequences are proposed. The Uinta Mountain Group appears to correlate with the Chuar Group and perhaps the upper member of the underlying Nankoweap Formation, and post-dates the Unkar Group of the Grand Canyon Supergroup. In addition, the upper part of the Uinta Mountain Group appears to correlate with the Little Dal Group of the Northwest Territories, Canada. The Uinta Mountain Group appears to entirely post-date the Belt Supergroup of Montana and Idaho. Correlation of the Uinta Mountain Group with the Chuar and Little Dal Groups is supported by the presence of the fossil Chuaria and by apparently overlapping isotopic ages. A maximum age range for the Uinta Mountain Group, extrapolated from the Grand Canyon Supergroup and the Little Dal Group, extends from <1100 to > 770 m.y.

  8. Depositional environments of a coal-bearing section in the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Routt County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaffke, Thresa M.

    1979-01-01

    A 107-m (350 ft) section of coal-bearing rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group that is exposed along an access road to the Edna Mine in Routt County, Colorado, records deposition of sediment during a regressive phase of the epicontinental sea. Each of the coal beds in the section occurs at the top of a bayfill sequence that records infilling of a bay sufficient to provide swamp conditions and allow formation of peat.

  9. Outcrop Gamma-ray Analysis of the Cretaceous mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robyn Wright

    2001-04-25

    This report presents the results of an outcrop gamma-ray survey of six selected measured sections included in the original report. The primary objective of this second study is to provide a baseline to correlate from the outcrop and reservoir model into Mesaverde strata in the San Juan Basin subsurface. Outcrop logs were generated using a GAD-6 gamma-ray spectrometer that simultaneously recorded total counts, potassium, uranium, and thorium data.

  10. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  11. Assessment of gas resources in low-permeability sandstones of Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.; Crovelli, R.A.; Spencer, C.W.; Mast, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    A modified volumetric approach is used to estimate gas resources in the low-permeability sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance basin of western Colorado. The Mesaverde Group was divided into three plays based on stratigraphy - the Williams Fork Formation, the Iles Formation, and the Rollins Sandstone Member (Mesaverde Formation) or Trout Creek Sandstone Member (Iles Formation). Each of these plays was subdivided into a deep-gas play and a shallower gas-water transition play. Variations in thermal maturity were used to define the boundaries of the plays. The aggregated mean in-place gas for all six plays is 419.55 tcf. The mean in-place resource numbers were run through probability programs, which assign estimates of the gas potential at the 95%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 5% probability levels both for individual plays and for the aggregate of all six plays. Assuming a 75% degree of dependency between the plays, there is a 95% chance of at least 274.45 tcf of total inplace gas, a 50% chance of 407.60 tcf, and a 5% chance of 605.33 tcf. Next, six different recovery factors were used. The first three assume current technology and a gas price of $5/mcf, and the second three assume future advanced technology without a gas price specified. The most likely estimated recoverable gas figures for the six plays at the 95%, 50%, and 5% probability levels using current technology are 8.75, 13.03, and 19.41 tcf, and using future advanced technology are 44.23, 65.97, and 98.39 tcf.

  12. Structural implications of underground coal mining in the Mesaverde Group in the Somerset Coal Field, Delta and Gunnison Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Carroll; Eric Robeck; Greg Hunt; Wendell Koontz

    2004-07-01

    Paleogene and Neogene faults and fractures on the eastern edge of the Colorado Plateau are present in Mesaverde Group coal and sandstone beds. Recent observations of coal cleat orientation in relation to faults in coal mines have significant impacts for mine planning in the area. Faults, coal cleats, and natural fractures are interpreted to show a structural evolution of the Mesaverde Group through time. This field trip included a visit to two active underground coal mines, the Bowie Resources' Bowie No. 2 Mine, and Mountain Coal's West Elk Mine. Mine geologists discussed structural styles including fault orientations and timing, cleat development, and rotation. Geologic encounters ranging from fault flooding, subsidence, mine fires, methane gas problems, and land use restrictions were also discussed. Coal cleat development and open-mode fractures in adjacent sandstones were observed on outcrops and compared to underground measurements in coal mines in the Somerset Coal Field, Colorado's most productive. Coal cleat orientations along a reverse fault in one mine showed rotation in relation to possible Neogene age displacement.

  13. Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation, an interpreted alluvial fan deposit in the basal Uinta Mountain Group (Middle Proterozoic), Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, I.D.; Wiley, M.T.

    1986-07-01

    The Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation, a member of the Middle Proterozic Uinta Mountain Group, is here proposed as a formal lithostratigraphic unit. It consists of interbedded dark reddish-brown to dark gray conglomerate with predominant white, pale green, gray, or pink metaquartzite clasts, light to dark brown or reddish-brown quartz arenite, and reddish-brown, red, or maroon shale. This represents the first proposal of a formation in the Uinta Mountain Group in the eastern part of the range and follows by only a few years beginning efforts to establish formations in the group in the western part. The Jesse Ewing Canyon Formation locally constitutes the basal member of the Uinta Mountain Group and is here reaffirmed as an alluvial fan deposit, based on a detailed comparison of observed features to those of modern alluvial fans. This interpretation supports the hypothesis that the Uinta Trough is an aulacogen.

  14. Description and origin of the lower part of the Mesaverde Group in Rifle Gap, Garfield County, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madden, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Rifle Gap cuts through the central part of the Grand Hogback and the gap exposes the entire Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. The best outcrops are on the roadcuts through the coal-rich lower part of the group. These roadcuts border the Rifle Gap dam and reservoir on the southwest, where the coal-rich section can be examined with little climbing away from the road. This coal-rich section consists of 1700 ft (518 m) of uppermost Mancos Shale, overlain by the Iles Formation and the lower part of the Williams Fork Formation of the Mesaverde Group. These formations are composed of members and informal units formed in a late Campanian coastal setting of deltas and intervening strandplains which supported vast peat swamps. The age and the coastal subenvironments of deposition of these units are indicated by fossils and sedimentary structures which can be studied on the roadcuts. The highest, most prominent roadcut exposes a thick, white sandstone called the Trout Creek Sandstone Member, Iles Formation, the correlations of which have been reassessed recently. This sandstone previously was correlated to a sandstone exposed at New Castle: the Rollins Sandstone Member, Mesaverde Formation, of the southern Piceance Creek basin. However, later field mapping showed that the two sandstones cannot be traced to each other but are separated by 310-450 ft (93.9-136.4 m) of strata along the central Grand Hogback. The recorrelations of the Trout Creek and adjacent sandstone members have influenced reconstruction of the local, late Campanian paleogeography of the oscillating shoreline. The sketches of paleogeographic reconstruction show an oscillating shoreline that trended northeast-southwest. This shoreline migrated inland to the area of Wolf Creek on the northern border of the Piceance Creek basin, and seaward only as far as the area of New Castle, until deposition of the Haas sandstone unit of the lower Williams Fork Formation. During the deposition of the Haas, the shoreline

  15. Outcrop Analysis of the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robin Wright

    2001-04-24

    Field work for this project was conducted during July and April 1998, at which time fourteen measured sections were described and correlated on or adjacent to Jicarilla Apache Reservation lands. A fifteenth section, described east of the main field area, is included in this report, although its distant location precluded use in the correlations and cross sections presented herein. Ground-based photo mosaics were shot for much of the exposed Mesaverde outcrop belt and were used to assist in correlation. Outcrop gamma-ray surveys at six of the fifteen measured sections using a GAD-6 scintillometer was conducted. The raw gamma-ray data are included in this report, however, analysis of those data is part of the ongoing Phase Two of this project.

  16. NMR determination of carbon aromatization during hydrous pyrolysis of coals from the Mesaverde group, Greater Green river basin

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Netzel, D.A.; Surdam, R.C.

    1995-12-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements have been made on the residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments conducted on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Green River Basin. Only a small percentage of the total carbon (13%) was converted to volatile products for both coals during hydrous pyrolysis. An accounting of the aliphatic carbon was obtained by comparing the aliphatic carbon in the gas, oil and residue products with that of the starting coals. The amount of aliphatic carbon in the volatile products and residue was not sufficient to account for the total amount of aliphatic carbon that disappeared. From this it was inferred that a substantial portion of the aliphatic carbon aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis, (48 and 56% for the Almond and Lance coal, respectively). These and additional results on coal maturation in the natural environment will be discussed.

  17. Detrital mineral chronology of the Uinta Mountain Group: Implications for the Grenville flood in southwestern Laurentia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, P.A.; Foster, D.A.; Mogk, D.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Kamenov, George D.; Vogl, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that large quantities of Grenville-age detritus dominate Neo-proterozoic to Cambrian arenites in southwest Laurentia (southwestern United States). U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons and 40Ar/39Ar ages of white mica from clastic sedimentary rocks of the Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group also indicate significant Mesoproterozoic detritus mixed with a variably abundant Archean component. Zircons with ages representative of the Paleoproterozoic basement in the eastern Uinta Mountains or the younger Paleoproterozoic rocks of the adjacent Yavapai-Mazatzal terranes were not observed. A limited range of initial ??Hf (???90% between -3 and +3) for Mesoproterozoic zircons suggests derivation from a source region (or regions) characterized by mixing between juvenile and reworked older crust during Grenville orogenesis. The enriched Grenville-age basement proposed to underlie much of southeastern North America may be this source based on similarities of Hf isotopic data from Mesoproterozoic zircons in Mississippi River sand and available paleocurrent data. If so, then disruption of this supply in the Cambrian may be related to Iapetan rifting and, perhaps, the separation of the Precordillera terrane from Laurentia. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  18. Solid-state NMR analysis of coals and shales from the Mesaverde Group, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; MacGowan, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    Samples of coals and shales from the Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming were analyzed using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). The samples were taken from a present-day depth of burial ranging from {approximately}3,000 to {approximately}15,000 ft. In addition, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on residues from the hydrous pyrolysis of Almond coal. The hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted isothermally for 72 hr in the temperature range of 290 to 360{degree}C (554 to 680{degree}F). In general, the maturation trends observed by NMR for the naturally and artificially matured samples were in agreement with results obtained from other geochemical analyses. The NMR spectra of the naturally matured shale samples showed only a small aliphatic component at depths greater than about 12,000 ft, indicating little capacity for hydrocarbon generation at depths greater than this. Vitrinite reflectance measurements placed the oil window at between 4,500 and 14,500 ft. NMR measurements of the hydrous pyrolysis residues showed a clear loss of aliphatic carbon, relative to the aromatic carbon, with temperature. For the residue obtained from the highest study temperature (360{degree}C/680{degree}F), there was a 60% depletion of the hydrocarbon-producing aliphatic components. The trends in loss of aliphatic carbon with temperature suggested a means of defining a geochemical transformation ratio in terms of the loss of the aliphatic carbon fraction. A good correlation was found between the NMR transformation ratio and the production index determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis measurements.

  19. A review of the multiwell experiment in tight gas sandstones of the Mesaverde Group, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Cretaceous Iles and Williams Fork Formations of the Mesaverde Group contain important reservoir and source rocks for basin-centered gas accumulations in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado. The sandstones in these formations have very low permeability, so low that successful production of gas requires the presence of fractures. To increase gas production, the natural fracture system of these "tight gas sandstones" must be augmented by inducing artificial fractures, while minimizing the amount of formation damage due to introduced fluids. The Multiwell Experiment was undertaken to provide geological characterization, obtain physical property data, and perform stimulation experiments in the Iles and Williams Fork Formations. Three vertical wells and one follow-up slant well were drilled, logged, partially cored, tested for gas production, stimulated in various manners, and tested again. Drawing from published reports and papers, this review paper presents well log, core, and test data from the Multiwell Experiment while emphasizing the geological controls on gas production at the site. Gas production is controlled primarily by a set of regional fractures trending west-northwest. The fractures are vertical, terminating at lithologic boundaries within and at the upper and lower boundaries of sandstone beds. Fractures formed preferentially in sandstones where in situ stress and fracture gradients are lower than in shales and mudstones. The fractures cannot be identified adequately in vertical wellbores; horizontal wells are required. Because present-day maximum horizontal stress is aligned with the regional fractures, artificial fractures induced by pressuring the wellbore form parallel to the regional fractures rather than linking them, with consequent limitations upon enhancement of gas production.

  20. Possible Pre-Cryogenian Eutrophication Event Recorded In ~770-742 Ma Strata Of The Uinta Mountain Group, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehler, C. M.; Hayes, D. S.; Nagy, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Previous mid-Neoproterozoic microfossil diversity studies yield evidence for a relatively sudden biotic change prior to the Cryogenian (Sturtian) glaciations. In an event interpreted as a mass extinction of eukaryotic phytoplankton followed by bacterial dominance, diverse assemblages of complex acritarchs are replaced by more uniform assemblages consisting of simple leiosphaerid acritarchs and bacteria. Recent data from the Chuar Group of the Grand Canyon (770-742 Ma) suggest this biotic change was caused by eutrophication rather than the previous idea that this change was due to the direct effects of Sturtian glaciation. Evidence includes total organic carbon increases indicative of increasing primary productivity followed by iron speciation values that suggest sustained water column anoxia. A new data set (this study) suggests that this same eutrophication event may be recorded in shale units of the formation of Hades Pass and the Red Pine Shale of Utah's Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group (770-742 Ma). Preliminary results of this study include a significant shift in microfossil assemblage from a higher-diversity (H'= 0.60) fauna that includes some ornamented acritarchs to a lower-diversity (H' = 0.11) fauna dominated by smooth leiosphaerids and microfossils of a bacterial origin (Ba|lla/ Sphaerocongregus sp.). This biotic change co-occurs with a significant increase in total organic carbon values that directly follows a positive carbon-isotopic excursion, suggesting increased primary productivity that may have been the result of elevated sediment influx and nutrient availability. Both the biotic change and period of increased total organic carbon values correspond with the onset of an interval of anoxia (indicated by total iron to aluminum ratios above 0.60) and a spike in sulfur concentration. Thus far, these findings support 1) correlations between the Uinta Mountain and Chuar groups, 2) the idea that the biotic turnover preserved in both strata was at least

  1. Basement in the Uintas: an enigma

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzma, H.R.

    1987-08-01

    The eastern Uinta Mountains, Utah-Colorado, contain the only exposures of the Precambrian Red Creek Quartzite (or Complex) and its contact with the Uinta Mountain Group (also Precambrian). Because of the higher metamorphic grade of the Red Creek and the relatively unmetamorphosed nature of the Uinta, the former has come to be regarded as the older unit, with the Uinta metasediments described as resting unconformably upon the Red Creek metamorphics, or faulted against them. The Uinta Mountain Group is more than 24,000 ft thick and comprises more than 99% of the outcropping Precambrian core of the Uinta Mountain arch (or anticline). Regional and local field relationships disprove existence of the unconformity. The so-called oldest rocks are exposed in a 15-mi/sup 2/ area on the north flank, instead of along the axis of the Uinta Mountain arch, in violation of the law of superposition. Xenoliths of younger rock occur within older rock, and the so-called basal conglomerate and as much as 3500 ft of Uinta Mountain Group bedding are transected by the Red Creek-Uinta contact. The Red Creek Complex rocks resulted from advance of a metamorphic front, with brecciation, melting, and reconstitution of the pre-existing sediments. The metamorphic contact ranges from sharp to gradational and diffuse. Faulting of post-Eocene(.) age has juxtaposed the two units in some places. The Red Creek has been dated at 1.55-1.65 b.y. (K-Ar). The Uinta metasediments must, therefore, be older, and are the oldest rocks in the range. No crystalline basement is exposed. Admittedly, this interpretation disagrees almost totally with more than a century of published geologic work on the Precambrian of the Uintas and has broad repercussions on long-standing concepts of regional Precambrian geology.

  2. Coal as a source rock of petroleum: A comparison between the petrology of the Mesaverde Group coals, in burial and hydrous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gonzalez, M.; Surdam, R.C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Almond Formation coal samples from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, were studied to investigate the textural characteristics and maceral composition at different levels of maturation as observed through burial and hydrous pyrolysis experiments. The textural changes observed in these scenarios (burial and hydrous pyrolysis) are very similar and show a textural evolution that starts with the loss of the original laminated texture on desmocollinite, followed by the formation of a porous texture that evolves to a vesicular texture due to the generation of increasing quantities of exsudatinite, which can be considered as the precursor of petroleum. The maceral transformation starts with the formation of micrinite from liptinite, and at the same time desmocollinite becomes homogenized and the content of semifusinite and fusinite increases with increasing temperature in both burial and hydrous pyrolysis. The sources of exsudatinite in the Almond coal are the liptinite macerals and desmocollinite, which both contribute to the formation of vesicles filled by exsudatinite. When these vesicles are broken, the expulsion of oil from coal takes place. The recovery of liquid petroleum (as much as 27 mg oil/g coal) demonstrates that the Almond coal may be a significant source for oil in the Greater Green River Basin.

  3. Natural gas resource characterization study of the Mesaverde group in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming: A strategic plan for the exploitation of tight gas sands. Final report, September 1993-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, R.C.

    1996-05-01

    This final report summarizes work completed during the contract on developing an innovative exploration and production strategy for the Mesaverde Group tight gas sands in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Thorough investigation of the processes affecting the sources and reservoirs of this gas resource has been undertaken in order to establish the critical parameters that determine how gas accumulates in gas-saturated, anomalously pressured rocks and that affect the successful and efficient exploitation of tight gas sands. During the contract, IER researchers have (1) developed a natural gas exploration paradigm that can be be used to create improved exploitation strategies for the Mesaverde Group tight gas sands, thereby lowing exploration risk; (2) detected and delineated sweet spots using 2-D and 3-D models of well log responses, petrographic and petrophysical studies, water chemistry analyses, and natural frature studies; (3) investigated the relationship of natural fractures and lineaments to hydrocarbon production in the GGRB; (4) created an expanded database for the GGRB; (5) prioritized volunteered experimental drill sites in the GGRB for potential cooperative research and development; and (6) participated in joint studies on a horizontal well completion in the Almond Formation, Echo Springs field, Washakie Basin.

  4. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  5. Assessment of the Mesaverde Total Petroleum System in Southwestern Wyoming Province: a petroleum system approach to assessing undiscovered oil and gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in a recent assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Southwestern Wyoming Province using a Total Petroleum System (TPS) approach, estimated a mean of 84.6 trillion cubic feet of gas (TCFG), 131 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 2.6 billion barrels of natural gas liquids (BBNGL) that have the potential to be added to reserves over the next 30 years. Only a fraction of this, however, may be economically recoverable . Of the total estimate of 84.6 TCFG, a mean of 25.78 TCFG is in continuous-type reservoirs in the Mesaverde TPS. The Mesaverde TPS is defined as all reservoirs predominantly containing gas derived from the Mesaverde Group east of the pinchout of the Lewis Shale, which acts as a top seal separating the Mesaverde TPS from the overlying Lewis TPS. Continuous-type reservoirs in the Mesaverde TPS were subdivided into the Almond Continuous Gas Assessment Unit (AU) (mean of 13.35 TCFG), Rock Springs-Ericson Continuous Gas AU (mean of 12.18 TCFG), and the Mesaverde Coalbed Gas AU (mean of 0.25 TCFG). Geologic analysis was used to determine the favorable ?sweet spots? for potential gas resources. The Almond AU has been heavily explored at depths less than 11,000 ft, thus additions to reserves will most likely be the result of infill drilling in existing fields and the discovery of sweet spots at depths greater than 11,000 ft. There is much uncertainty in the size of undiscovered resource in the Rock Springs-Ericson AU because potential reservoirs are only sparsely explored. Only a small fraction of in-place coal-bed gas is considered to be recoverable because of low permeability and problems posed by produced water.

  6. Mesozoic and early Tertiary paleostructure and sedimentology of central Wasatch Mountains, Uinta Mountains, and Uinta basin

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, M.D.; Bruhn, R.L.; Beck, S.L.

    1983-08-01

    During latest Cretaceous-Eocene time, 5,000 m (16,000 ft) of beds were deposited in central and northeast Utah. In the Late Cretaceous, sediment derived from the Sevier-Laramide thrust belt was transported to the east and southeast. Southerly paleocurrent directions in the base of the Currant Creek Formation (Maestrichtian) raise the possibility that uplift of the Uintas may have begun by then. The thrust belt continued as a major highland during the early Paleocene, and major uplift of the Uintas occurred. By the middle Paleocene there was an extensive lake which regressed during the late Paleocene as uplift of the Uintas continued. Lake Uinta reached its maximum size during the middle Eocene. Lower (early Duchesnean) and upper (Late Duchesnean) conglomeratic intervals record major episodes of uplift in the Uintas during latest Eocene. Structurally, the Wasatch Mountains are part of a marginal foreland fold and thrust belt. In the northern Wasatch Mountains, pre-Late Cretaceous thrust fault plates were folded in part of a large, ramp-anticline that is cored by allochthonous, crystalline basement . Foreland thrust belt structures in the central Wasatch Mountains were folded about the east-trending Uinta axis as the Uinta Mountains formed. Eastward movement on the Hogsback thrust during the Paleocene was transferred onto the adjacent Uinta axis and Uinta Mountains structure, causing about 20 km (12 mi) of sinistral slip in the western Uinta Mountains. A south-dipping fault ramp was located beneath the Uinta Mountains and extended to depths of 15 to 20 km (9 to 12 mi). Oblique-slip on this ramp probably resulted in about 20 km (12 mi) of crustal shortening perpendicular to the trend of the mountains.

  7. A NEW LOG EVALUATION METHOD TO APPRAISE MESAVERDE RE-COMPLETION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Greer

    2003-09-11

    Artificial intelligence tools, fuzzy logic and neural networks were used to evaluate the potential of the behind pipe Mesaverde formation in BMG's Mancos formation wells. A fractal geostatistical mapping algorithm was also used to predict Mesaverde production. Additionally, a conventional geological study was conducted. To date one Mesaverde completion has been performed. The Janet No.3 Mesaverde completion was non-economic. Both the AI method and the geostatistical methods predicted the failure of the Janet No.3. The Gavilan No.1 in the Mesaverde was completed during the course of the study and was an extremely good well. This well was not included in the statistical dataset. The AI method predicted very good production while the fractal map predicted a poor producer.

  8. The Geologic Story of the Uinta Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1969-01-01

    The opening of the West after the Civil War greatly stimulated early geologic exploration west of the 100th Meridian. One of the areas first studied, the Uinta Mountains region, gained wide attention as a result of the explorations of three Territorial Surveys, one headed by John Wesley Powell, one by Clarence King, and one by Ferdinand V. Hayden. Completion of the Union Pacific Railroad across southern Wyoming 100 years ago, in 1869, materially assisted geologic exploration, and the railheads at Green River and Rock Springs greatly simplified the outfitting of expeditions into the mountains. The overlap of the Powell, King, and Hayden surveys in the Uinta Mountains led to efforts that were less concerted than competitive and not without acrimony. Many parts of the area were seen by all three parties at almost the same time. Duplication was inevitable, of course, but all three surveys contributed vast quantities of new knowledge to the storehouse of geology, and many now-basic concepts arose from their observations. Powell's area of interest extended mainly southward from the Uinta Mountains to the Grand Canyon, including the boundless plateaus and canyons of southern Utah and northern Arizona. King's survey extended eastward from the High Sierra in California to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and encompassed a swath of country more than 100 miles wide. Hayden's explorations covered an immense region of mountains and basins from Yellowstone Park in Wyoming southeast throughout most of Colorado. Powell first entered the Uinta Mountains in the fall of 1868, having traveled north around the east end of the range from the White River country to Green River, Wyoming, then south over a circuitous route to Flaming Gorge and Browns Park, and finally back to the White River, where he spent the winter. In 1869, after reexamining much of the area visited the previous season, Powell embarked on his famous 'first boat trip' down the Green and Colorado Rivers. This trip was more exploratory

  9. Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde (Campanian) bedload fluvial meanderbelt sandstones, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.R. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    Reservoir characterization of Mesaverde meanderbelt sandstones is used to determined directional continuity of permeable zones. A 500-m (1600 ft) wide fluvial meanderbelt in the Mesaverde Group is exposed as laterally continuous 3-10-m (10-33-ft) high sandstone cliffs north of Rangely, Colorado. Forty-eight detailed measured sections through 3 point bar complexes oriented at right angles to the long axis of deposition and 1 complex oriented parallel to deposition were prepared. Sections were tied together by detailed sketches delineating and tracing major bounding surfaces such as scours and clay drapes. These complexes contain 3 to 8 multilateral sandstone packages separated by 5-20 cm (2-8 in.) interbedded siltstone and shale beds. Component facies are point bars, crevasse splays, chute bars, and floodplain/overbank deposits. Two types of lateral accretion surfaces are recognized in the point bar facies. Gently dipping lateral accretions containing fining-upward sandstone packages. Large scale trough cross-bedding at the base grades upward into ripples and plane beds. Steeply dipping lateral accretion surfaces enclose beds characterized by climbing ripple cross laminations. Bounding surfaces draped by shale lags can seal vertically stacked point bars from reservoir communication. Scoured boundaries allow communication in some stacked point bars. Crevasse splays showing climbing ripples form tongues of very fine-grained sandstone which flank point bars. Chute channels commonly cut upper point bar surfaces at their downstream end. Chute facies are upward-fining with small scale troughs and common dewatering structures. Siltstones and shales underlie the point bar complexes and completely encase the meanderbelt system. Bounding surfaces at the base of the complexes are erosional and contain large shale rip-up clasts.

  10. Montane wetland water chemistry, Uinta Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, K. S.; Matyjasik, M.; Ford, R. L.; Hernandez, M. W.; Welsh, S. B.; Summers, S.; Bartholomew, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    This study attempts to determine the relationship between surface and groundwater chemistry and wetland characteristics within the Reader Lakes watershed, Uinta Mountains. The dominant rock type in the study area is quartz sandstone of the Hades Pass formation, Unita Mountain Group (Middle Proterozoic). Minor amounts of interbedded arkose and illite-bearing shale are also present. Water chemistry data have been collected from more than one hundred locations during the 2008 and 2009 summer seasons. The Reader Creek watershed is approximately 9.8 km long and about 3.5 km wide in the central portion of the basin. Direct precipitation is the primary source of groundwater recharge and the area is typically covered by snow from November until May. Four distinct wetland complexes, designated as the upper, middle, lower and the sloping fen, constitute the major wetland environments in the study area. The chemistry of the melt water from the high-elevation snowfield is affected by weathering of incorporated atmospheric dust and surface rocks. Total dissolved solids in both years were between 7 and 9 mg/L. Major anions include HCO3 (averaging 4.0 mg/L), SO4 (1.3 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), Cl (0.8 mg/L), F (0.07 mg/L), PO4 (0.03 mg/L), and Br(0.015 mg/L). Major cations include Na (1.1 mg/L), Ca (1.0 mg/L), K (0.28 mg/L), and Mg (0.15 mg/L). Groundwater concentrations in the lower meadow, as measured in piezomters, are distinctly different, with the following maximum concentrations of anions: HCO3 (36.7 mg/L), SO4 (5.0 mg/L), Cl (3.4 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), PO4 (0.28 mg/L), F (0.23 mg/L), Br (0.12 mg/L), and cations: Ca (22 mg/L), Na (4.6 mg/L), Mg (3.4 mg/L), and K (1.8 mg/L)- with a maximum value of 83 mg/L for total dissolved solids. Waters in Reader Creek, the main trunk channel, are typically sodium-potassium and sodium -potassium bicarbonate, with some calcium-bicarbonate, mostly in the middle part of the watershed. Groundwater from springs is sodium-potassium in the upper

  11. Variations in vitrinite reflectance values for the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation, southeastern Piceance basin, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, V.F.; Johnson, R.C.; Johnson, S.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how most of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation in the southeastern Piceance basin is thermally mature enough to have produced hydrocarbons by thermal generation, but only part of the Mesaverde is thermally mature enough to have expelled significant amounts of natural gas. The Early Permian( ) Fryingpan Member of the Maroon Formation consists of quartz-rich, very fine to fine-grained sandstone deposited in eolian dune and interdune environments. The Fryingpan Member (formerly called the sandstone of the Fryingpan River) is removed from the State Bridge Formation and assigned to the Maroon Formation.

  12. Hadrosaur locomotion and herding behavior: evidence from footprints in the mesaverde Formation, Grand Mesa Coal Field, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lockley, M.G.; Young, B.H.; Carpenter, K.

    1983-01-01

    Dinosaur footprint casts from a Mesavede (Campanian) coal mine near Gunnison, Colorado resemble those of the notorious mystery dinosaur, Xosauros which was probably a giant hadrosaur. Existing footprint descriptions, although obscure and hard to verify, are too important to overlook, particularly since debate over hadrosaur speeds currently focuses only on a single, apparently ambiguous trackway. Hindlimb/foot ratios and stride-length estimates based on comparisons with other animals should be modified using actual measurements of hadrosaurs. Mesaverde trackway data indicates that hadrosaurs were usually slow moving, although this does not imply that they were incapable of running. The frequency and preferred orientation of their prints suggests high relative abundance and gregarious group activity (herding), which was probably an effective defense strategy. Footprints of a carnosaur are also associated with those of the hadrosaurs.

  13. Assessment of continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources in the Late Cretaceous Mancos Shale of the Piceance Basin, Uinta-Piceance Province, Colorado and Utah, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkins, Sarah J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Finn, Tom M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Le, Phoung A.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geology-based assessment of the continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources in the Late Cretaceous Mancos Shale within the Piceance Basin of the Uinta-Piceance Province (fig. 1). The previous USGS assessment of the Mancos Shale in the Piceance Basin was completed in 2003 as part of a comprehensive assessment of the greater UintaPiceance Province (U.S. Geological Survey Uinta-Piceance Assessment Team, 2003). Since the last assessment, more than 2,000 wells have been drilled and completed in one or more intervals within the Mancos Shale of the Piceance Basin (IHS Energy Group, 2015). In addition, the USGS Energy Resources Program drilled a research core in the southern Piceance Basin that provided significant new geologic and geochemical data that were used to refine the 2003 assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas in the Mancos Shale.

  14. Multiwell Experiment: I, The marine interval of the Mesaverde Formation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment is a field laboratory in the Piceance Basin of Colorado which has two overall objectives: to characterize the low permeability gas reservoirs in the Mesaverde Formation and to develop technology for their production. Different depositional environments have created distinctly different reservoirs in the Mesaverde, and MWX has addressed each of these in turn. This report presents a comprehensive summary of results from the lowermost interval: the marine interval which lies between 7450 and 8250 ft at the MWX site. Separate sections of this report are background and summary; site description and operations; geology; log analysis; core analysis; in situ stress; well testing, analysis and reservoir evaluation; and a bibliography. Additional detailed data, results, and data file references are given on microfiche in several appendices.

  15. Elevated Wintertime Ozone in Utah's Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Moore, K. D.; Hill, S.; Harper, K.

    2011-12-01

    Seemingly anomalous elevated wintertime ozone (O3) levels were first observed in Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) in 2005 and have been recorded most in subsequent winters. While research continues, it has been hypothesized that the unacceptable levels are a unique combination of stagnant meteorology, enhanced insolation due to relatively high elevations and snow increased albedo, and abundant precursor sources owing to the region's recent rapid expansion of oil and gas exploration and production. The UGRB area has over 4,700 recorded gas/oil wells and sits mostly in rural Sublette County which has an estimated population of 7,925, an area of 12,644 km2, and a basin floor elevation around 2200 m asl, surrounded on three sides with mountains up to 4,200 km asl. Similarly, the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah is a rural area prone to frequent low-level wintertime inversion episodes and persistent snow cover, with an expanding economy significantly based on gas and oil development and production (approximately 11,500 wells, with an estimated 17,000 more planned in the future years). The Basin lies primarily in Duchesne and Uintah Counties which have a combined population of approximately 51,200 and an area of about 19,982 km2. The floor of the Basin has a typical elevation around 1,560 m asl and is surrounded by mountains up to 4,120 m asl. Ambient measurements at four sites in the winter of 2009-2010 found many instances of ozone concentrations well above the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS; 75 ppb, 8-hr average, 4th highest value). To more fully characterize the behavior and geographical extent of the Uinta Basin's wintertime O3 issue, the Uintah Impact Mitigation Special Service District (UIMSSD) funded a study which included deploying 10 portable O3 monitors (2B Technologies, Inc., Model 205, Dual Beam) throughout the Basin. Furthermore, cooperative partners including the USEPA, BLM, UDAQ, NPS, and Golder Associates provided

  16. Uinta Basin Pneumatic Controller Research Project: Industry meeting slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Upstream oil and natural gas (ONG) production has increased significantly within Utah’s Uinta & Ouray (U&O) Basin and across the United States over the last decade. ONG extraction and production activities can co-emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a subset of which consists...

  17. Uinta Basin Pneumatic Controller Research Project: Industry meeting slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Upstream oil and natural gas (ONG) production has increased significantly within Utah’s Uinta & Ouray (U&O) Basin and across the United States over the last decade. ONG extraction and production activities can co-emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a subset of ...

  18. Exploration for coalbed methane gains momentum in Uinta basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gloyn, Robert W.; Sommer, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    A development program is planned, and at least three other companies are exploring for coalbed methane in the surrounding area. Estimates have been revised by the Utah Geological Survey for the coalbed methane potential of the southern Uinta basin. They are 8 tcf to more than the earlier estimates of 0.8-4.6 tcf.

  19. Single-phase and two-phase flow properties of mesaverde tight sandstone formation; random-network modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtani, Farzad; Maini, Brij; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2016-08-01

    3D random networks are constructed in order to represent the tight Mesaverde formation which is located in north Wyoming, USA. The porous-space is represented by pore bodies of different shapes and sizes which are connected to each other by pore throats of varying length and diameter. Pore bodies are randomly distributed in space and their connectivity varies based on the connectivity number distribution which is used in order to generate the network. Network representations are then validated using publicly available mercury porosimetry experiments. The network modeling software solves the fundamental equations of two-phase immiscible flow incorporating wettability and contact angle variability. Quasi-static displacement is assumed. Single phase macroscopic properties (porosity, permeability) are calculated and whenever possible are compared to experimental data. Using this information drainage and imbibition capillary pressure, and relative permeability curves are predicted and (whenever possible) compared to experimental data. The calculated information is grouped and compared to available literature information on typical behavior of tight formations. Capillary pressure curve for primary drainage process is predicted and compared to experimental mercury porosimetry in order to validate the virtual porous media by history matching. Relative permeability curves are also calculated and presented.

  20. 77 FR 53169 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Supervisor's office, 857 West South Jordan Parkway (106th South), South Jordan, Utah Written comments may be submitted as described under Supplementary Information. All... sent to Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Attn: Ms. Loyal Clark, 857 West South Jordan...

  1. 75 FR 38768 - Ashley National Forest, UT, High Uintas Wilderness-Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Habitat...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Forest Service Ashley National Forest, UT, High Uintas Wilderness--Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Habitat...) populations to suitable habitats within the High Uintas Wilderness. Implementation of this proposal would... nonnative fish is necessary to enhance habitat and restore genetically pure CRCT populations to...

  2. 75 FR 34973 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory... personnel; (2) Selection of a chairperson by the committee members; (3) Receive materials explaining...

  3. Depositional setting and diagenetic evolution of some Tertiary unconventional reservoir rocks, Uinta Basin, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, J.K.; Fouch, T.D.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The Douglas Creek Member of the Tertiary Green River Formation underlies much of the Uinta basin, Utah, and contains large volumes of oil and gas trapped in a complex of fractured low-permeability sandstone reservoirs. In the SE part of the basin at Pariette Bench, the Eocene Douglas Creek Member is a thick sequence of fine- grained alluvial sandstone complexly intercalated with lacustrine claystone and carbonate rock. Sediments were deposited in a subsiding intermontane basin along the shallow fluctuating margin of ancient Lake Uinta. Although the Uinta basin has undergone postdepositional uplift and erosion, the deepest cored rocks at Pariette Bench have never been buried more than 3000m.-from Authors

  4. Petroleum occurrences associated with Uinta mountains, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    The Uinta Mountains in northeastern Utah and northwestern Colorado are among the rare major structures in the western United States with east-west trends. The east-west trend may have an ancestry in a Precambrian aulacogen and a lower Paleozoic arch. The area was quiescent until the Paleocene or Eocene when the mountain block began to rise and the basins on the trending arches formed during the Cretaceous, and it uplifted the belt of Sevier-Laramide overthrusts. The eastern part of the mountain block collapsed during the mid-Tertiary. The range is an anticline with a core of Precambrian metasediments and steeply dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks on the flanks. Tertiary debris from the mountains overlaps onto older rocks. Anticlines along the flanks of the mountains produce oil and gas from Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. Stratigraphic traps on the structures cut by the mountain block are enhanced by the intersection, and they produce from Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks. Uplift of the mountains was important in creating unconformity and stratigraphic traps in several oil and gas fields and in bituminous sand deposits. Geophysical work and drilling have shown the flanks of the mountains to be thrust over or to overhand the adjacent basins. The numerous structural intersections, overhanging flanks, and the facies changes caused by the Uinta Mountains provide good opportunities for continued exploration and success.

  5. Origin of gilsonite fractures in Uinta basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Tetting, T.N.

    1984-07-01

    The concept of gilsonite fracture and vein evolution is still, by nature, a theoretical argument. A historical review presented with recent observations and conclusions divides this period of origin into five stages of formation. The Uncompahgre uplift established an initial ancestral pattern of northwest-trending anticlinal structures. These propagated northeastward throughout the Uinta and Piceance basins as a result of compression during the Pennsylvanian Period. Planes of weakness were imprinted vertically along the axes of these folds and subsequently affected the overlying Mesozoic sediments. Next, the Uinta uplift reenforced these northwest-trending folds and planes of weakness during the early Laramide orogeny. The third stage of formation involves contemporaneous deposition of Eocene sediments, including the kerogen of the Green River Formation. Differential compaction during diagenesis, over the northwest-trending residual highs formulated subperpendicular, localized tensile stresses. Vertical fractures propagated rapidly in an en echelon fashion along the imprinted axial planes of weakness. In the fourth stage of formation, fractures penetrated overlying reservoir intervals, which contained various combinations of liquid hydrocarbons and connate water. Released fluids entered the low-pressure voids and spread laterally and vertically throughout the Eocene sediments. A final period of inspisation and/or metamorphosis quickly altered the various liquid hydrocarbon deposits to form gilsonite and other bitumens. The variation of these bitumens is dependent on the original chemical composition of the individual reservoir zones during deposition.

  6. An integrated geological and geophysical study of the Uinta Mountains, Utah, Colorado and a geophysical study on Tamarix in the Rio Grande River basin, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Salma

    2008-07-01

    comprehensive picture of the structures in the study area. These models show that the Uinta uplift is a single sedimentary block with numerous thrust faults on the northern and southern flanks of the uplift. These models also reveal the fact that the thickness of the crust is quite variable in the study area. This is also supported by the crustal thickness map constructed for this study from seismic and receiver function information. Magnetic maps show that the Proterozoic sedimentary package known as Uinta Mountain Group extends into the Basin and Range and indicates its link with the ancient rift margin in the Western United States. Findings of this research are correlated to earlier studies and placed in a broader context. Finally an analogy is made between the Uinta aulacogen, the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen and the Dniepr-Donets aulacogen in Ukraine. This discussion focuses light on the mechanism that led to the Uinta's development from a failed rift to an uplift. Part two of this research examined the effect of saltcedar (Tamarix sp) on water and soil properties in the Rio Grande River valley in West Texas. Tamarix is a woody phreatophyte (water-loving plant) common in riparian habitats. The presence of Tamarix in a river system raises concerns about its effect on water quality because it can increase the salinity of water and surrounding soil and it reduces stream flow. Geophysical electrical techniques were used to track soil salinity and moisture changes caused by Tamarix, as well as to determine how soil salinity and moisture properties are altered when Tamarix is eradicated from the region. These techniques allowed more rapid in-situ assessment of the soil properties than the conventional method of removing soil and water samples for analysis. This study was focused on the influence of Tamarix on soil properties and hydrology at the subsurface at four sites in the Rio Bosque Wetlands Park, El Paso, Texas Two sites had flourishing Tamarix and two others were areas

  7. An integrated geological and geophysical study of the Uinta Mountains, Utah, Colorado and a geophysical study on Tamarix in the Rio Grande River basin, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Salma

    2008-07-01

    comprehensive picture of the structures in the study area. These models show that the Uinta uplift is a single sedimentary block with numerous thrust faults on the northern and southern flanks of the uplift. These models also reveal the fact that the thickness of the crust is quite variable in the study area. This is also supported by the crustal thickness map constructed for this study from seismic and receiver function information. Magnetic maps show that the Proterozoic sedimentary package known as Uinta Mountain Group extends into the Basin and Range and indicates its link with the ancient rift margin in the Western United States. Findings of this research are correlated to earlier studies and placed in a broader context. Finally an analogy is made between the Uinta aulacogen, the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen and the Dniepr-Donets aulacogen in Ukraine. This discussion focuses light on the mechanism that led to the Uinta's development from a failed rift to an uplift. Part two of this research examined the effect of saltcedar (Tamarix sp) on water and soil properties in the Rio Grande River valley in West Texas. Tamarix is a woody phreatophyte (water-loving plant) common in riparian habitats. The presence of Tamarix in a river system raises concerns about its effect on water quality because it can increase the salinity of water and surrounding soil and it reduces stream flow. Geophysical electrical techniques were used to track soil salinity and moisture changes caused by Tamarix, as well as to determine how soil salinity and moisture properties are altered when Tamarix is eradicated from the region. These techniques allowed more rapid in-situ assessment of the soil properties than the conventional method of removing soil and water samples for analysis. This study was focused on the influence of Tamarix on soil properties and hydrology at the subsurface at four sites in the Rio Bosque Wetlands Park, El Paso, Texas Two sites had flourishing Tamarix and two others were areas

  8. Lacustrine Basal Ages Constrain the Last Deglaciation in the Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Jeffrey; Laabs, Benjamin

    2013-04-01

    Basal radiocarbon ages from 21 high-elevation lakes limit the timing of final Pleistocene deglaciation in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah, USA. The lakes are located in glacial valleys and cirques 5 to 20 km upstream from LGM terminal moraines at elevations from 2830 to 3475 m. Many are impounded behind recessional moraines. Cores were retrieved from a floating platform with a percussion corer driven to the point of refusal. All penetrated inorganic silty clay beneath gyttja. AMS radiocarbon analyses were made on terrestrial macrofossils, daphnia ephippia, pollen concentrates, and bulk sediment retrieved from the base of each core. No radiocarbon reservoir effect was observed when bulk dates were checked against terrestrial material. Radiocarbon results were converted to calendar years using the IntCal09 calibration curve in OxCal 4.1. Given the stratigraphy observed in the cores, these calibrated basal ages are considered close limits on the timing of the local deglaciation and lake formation. The oldest three lakes have basal radiocarbon ages that calibrate to a few centuries after the Bölling/Alleröd warming, indicating that the landscape was becoming ice free at this time. These are followed by an overlapping group of five lakes with basal ages between 13.5 and 13.0 ka BP. Five more cores, from four separate lakes, have basal ages tightly clustered between 13.0 and 12.5 ka BP. Three of these lakes are dammed by moraines, suggesting glacial activity during the early part of the Younger Dryas interval. The lone kettle lake in the study yielded a basal age of 12.3 ka BP, considerably younger than the basal age of 13.9 ka BP from a nearby lake filling a bedrock basin, indicating that buried ice may have been locally stable for more than a millennium after deglaciation. The remaining seven lakes have basal ages between 12.0 and 11.0 ka BP. Four of these lakes are also dammed by moraines. These two non-overlapping clusters of basal ages for moraine

  9. Depositional systems and petroleum potential, Mesaverde Formation southeastern Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hippe, D.J.; Needham, D.W.; Ethridge, F.G.

    1986-08-01

    Depositional environments and systems of the Wind River basin Mesaverde Formation were interpreted from an analysis of outcrops along the Casper arch and Rattlesnake Hills anticline and cores and wireline logs from the adjacent subsurface. The Fales Sandstone and Parkman Sandstone/unnamed middle member are deposits of eastward progradational, wave-dominated strand-plain and deltaic complexes. Basal portions of the Fales Sandstone and the Parkman Sandstone are composed of a thickening- and coarsening-upward sandstone sequence whose facies represent storm-dominated inner-shelf and wave-dominated shore-zone environments. Facies sequences in the upper Fales Sandstone interval and the unnamed middle member are interpreted as deposits of lower coastal plain (marshes, bay fills, distributary channels, and crevasse splays) and upper coastal plain (alluvial channels, crevasse splays and fine-grained flood basin) sequences. The Teapot Sandstone is interpreted as an alluvial deposit. Analysis of facies sequences in the Teapot suggests a change in fluvial style, from braided-belt deposits along the southwest flank to meander-belt deposits along the northeast flank of the basin. These fluvial systems fed the Teapot deltas to the east. Stratigraphic plays for oil and gas include alluvial valley fills and point-bar deposits in the Teapot Sandstone, storm-dominated shelf sands in the upper Cody Shale and the Fales and Parkman Sandstones, and a transgressive barrier-bar sequence in the upper Fales Sandstone. Laterally continuous shore-zone sandstones may form combination traps where pinch-outs occur on structure.

  10. Shallow oil shale resources of the southern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dana, G.F.; Smith, J.W.; Trudell, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    The shallow Green River Formation oil shales in the southern part of Utah's Uinta Basin are potentially developable by strip mining or by subsurface techniques which take advantage of limited overburden. The resource of potential shale oil represented by the shallow deposits is evaluated in detail from corehole oil-yield data. Cross-sections are constructed to readily correlatable stratigraphic units selected to represent resources in the shallow shale. To define each unit, the thickness, average oil yield, and oil resource of each unit in each core are calculated. Contour maps constructed from these data define the resource variation across the shallow resource. By measuring areas enclosed in each resource unit within the defined limit of 200 feet (61 meters) of overburden, the resource represented by the shallow oil shale is evaluated. The total resource is measured as 4.9 billion barrels (779.1 billion liters) of potential shale oil at depths less than 200 feet (61 meters). The rich zone incorporates the Mahogany bed, the best shallow oil-shale unit. This section, currently being exploited by Geokinetics, Inc., for in situ production of shale oil by horizontal combustion, represents 2.2 billion barrels (349.8 billion liters) of potential shale oil in place.

  11. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  12. 76 FR 20310 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...The Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will conduct a meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose is to continue the review of project...

  13. 76 FR 28211 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ...The Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will conduct a meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose is to continue the review of project...

  14. 78 FR 2655 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Utah; Ogden Travel Plan Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Utah; Ogden Travel Plan Project... announces its intent to prepare a supplement to the Ogden Travel Plan Revision Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (FSEIS). The Ogden Travel Plan Revision FSEIS evaluated six alternatives...

  15. Tectonic implications of flexural modeling of the Uinta Mountains and surrounding basins since early Eocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratigan, D.; Heller, P.; Trampush, S. M.; Chen, P.; Dueker, K.

    2012-12-01

    Basin subsidence patterns provide a record of the evolution of regional loading during orogenesis. As such, flexural analysis provides insight on the impact of topographic growth in adjacent ranges, as well as documenting lithospheric behavior and timing of deformation. Flexural analysis of a north-south transect across the Uinta Mountains and associated basins shows much of the topographic load of the Uinta Mts developed long after initiation of Uinta deformation in latest Cretaceous time, and that sharply contrasting rigidities are necessary to explain regional subsidence patterns. Two paleohorizontal datums, c. 48 Ma, exist in the Green River Formation. The Mahogany bed is found in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah, and the Laney Member is in the Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. Deflections of these beds result from regional loading since early middle Eocene time due to shortening and topographic development of the Uinta Mts. Downward deflection of the Mahogany bed is at least 2800 m over a distance of 90 km with respect to an inflection point at 2250 m above sea level, while the Laney Member is deflected only 600 m over a horizontal distance of 140 km with an inflection point at 1850 m above sea level. Two-dimensional flexural modeling along a transect at 110.66° W using the present topography of the Uinta Mts and densities for the mountain load, basin fill and mantle lid of 2800, 2400 and 3300 kg/m3, respectively, indicates strongly varying rigidity between the two basins. Best-fit rigidities are 1022 N●m to the south, and 1024 N●m to the north. The contrast in rigidities is coincident with the projected position of the Archean-Proterozoic suture of the Cheyenne Belt — the older crust to the north being more rigid than younger crust to the south. To achieve the best fit, all of the present topography of the Uinta Mts, as much as 1.7 km above the basin floor, must have developed after deposition of the 48 Ma datum. The estimated rigidity

  16. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  17. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  18. Sedimentology of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado and implications for gas-bearing intervals in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    The exposures of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado, are of a regressive series of marine to fluvial deposits about 1650 m (5000 ft) thick. Grading up out of the marine Mancos Shale, the blanket shoreline sandstones of the Corcoran, Cozzette, and Rollins Sandstones record substages of the regression as delta lobes were activated and abandoned in northwestern Colorado during Late Cretaceous time. The overlying coals, sandstones, and carbonaceous mudstones were deposited on the paludal lower delta plain behind the shoreline. Meandering fluvial systems prograded over the paludal deposits. These systems deposited point-bar sandstones and overbank mudstones and siltstones in composite meander-belt trends, some of which are now gas-bearing, low-permeability reservoirs. Reorientation of the paleogeography during the Laramide orogeny (contemporaneous with fluvial deposition) probably changed the orientation of the meander belt trends. The uppermost sandstones at Rifle Gap, including the Ohio Creek conglomerate, are interpreted as shoreline deposits of a transgression that has been previously unrecognized in the area. Most of the record of this transgression has been destroyed by pre-Eocene erosion. The outcrops at Rifle Gap provide a basis for interpreting subsurface deposis in the Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project Multi-Well Experiment, 12 miles away.

  19. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The presence of discrete minerals associated with coal—whether (1) detrital or authigenic constituents of the coals or in thin mudstone or siltstone units interbedded with coals, or (2) authigenic phases that formed along cleats—might influence its utilization as an energy resource. The build-up of sintered ash deposits on the surfaces of heat exchangers in coal-fired power plants, due to the alteration of minerals during combustion of the coal, can seriously affect the functioning of the boiler and enhance corrosion of combustion equipment. In particular, the presence of sodium in coals has been considered a key factor in the fouling of boilers; however, other elements (such as calcium or magnesium) and the amount of discrete minerals burned with coal can also play a significant role in the inefficiency of and damage to boilers. Previous studies of the quality of coals in the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation of the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, revealed that the sodium content of the coals varied across the region. To better understand the origin and distribution of sodium in these coals, petrologic studies were undertaken within a sedimentological framework to evaluate the timing and geochemical constraints on the emplacement of sodium-bearing minerals, particularly analcime, which previously had been identified in coals in the Blackhawk Formation. Further, the study was broadened to include not just coals in the Blackhawk Formation from various localities across the Wasatch Plateau, but also sandstones interbedded with the coals as well as sandstones in the underlying Star Point Sandstone. The alteration history of the sandstones in both formations was considered a key component of this study because it records the nature and timing of fluids passing through them and the associated precipitation of sodium-bearing minerals; thus, the alteration history could place constraints on the distribution and timing of sodium mineralization in the interbedded or overlying Blackhawk coals. Although some preliminary results were previously presented at scientific meetings, the petrologic and geochemical data have not been fully compiled and reported. The purpose of this report is to present the methods of data acquisition and the results of petrologic and isotopic analyses on coal and sandstone samples from the Blackhawk Formation as well as sandstones of the underlying Star Point Sandstone.

  20. Subsurface fluid pressures from drill-stem tests, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    High fluid pressures are known to be associated with oil and gas fields in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Shut-in pressure measurements from drill-stem tests show how pressure varies with depth and by area within the basin. The data base used in this report incorporates over 2,000 pressure measurements from drill-stem tests in wells completed prior to 1985. However, the number of useful pressure measurements is considerably less, because many drill-stem tests fail to stabilize at the actual formation pressure if the permeability is low. By extracting the maximum pressure measurements recorded in a collection of wells within an area, the trend of formation pressure within that area can be approximated. Areal compilations of pressures from drill-stem tests show that overpressured rock formations occur throughout much of the northern and eastern areas of the Uinta Basin. In particular, significant overpressuring (0.5 < pressure gradient < 0.8 psi/ft) is found throughout much of the Altamont-Bluebell field at depths ranging from 10,000 to 13,000 ft, equivalent to 5,000 to 8,000 ft below sea level. Limited data indicate that the pressure gradient declines at depths greater than 13,000 ft. An underpressured zone appears to exist in the Altamont-Bluebell field at depths shallower than 5,000 ft. Throughout the eastern Uinta Basin, moderately overpressured zones (0.46 < pressure gradient < 0.5 psi/ft) are common, with local evidence of significantly overpressured zones, but pressure gradients greater than 0.6 psi/ft are rare.

  1. A Lacustrine Record of Postglacial Dust Deposition from the Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Samplers deployed in 2011 reveal a modern dust flux to the alpine zone (>3000 m asl) of the Uinta Mountains (Utah, USA) of ~4 gm/m2/yr. A notably uniform layer of silt, ~20 cm thick, in soil profiles from throughout the alpine zone, along with the presence in soils and modern dust of minerals not found in the bedrock, indicates that dust deposition has been an important long-term process in this environment. To evaluate how dust flux and properties have changed over the postglacial period a 190 cm-long lacustrine sediment core was analyzed. The core was collected with a percussion corer from a small lake (8 ha) at an elevation of 3043 m asl in 10.6 m of water. Six AMS 14C analyses on conifer needles, wood fragments, and bulk sediment support a depth-age model extending back to 12.7 ka BP. Loose near-surface sediment was not recovered, so the top of the core is truncated at 1.36 ka BP. Geochemical composition was evaluated at 2-cm intervals using ICP-AES after fluxing of ignited samples with LiBO2. The abundance of rare earth elements was determined for a subset of 16 samples using ICP-MS. Mineralogy was investigated at 2-cm intervals using XRD. Grain size distribution, organic matter content, and C:N ratio were determined at 1-cm intervals using laser scattering, loss-on-ignition, and an elemental analyzer, respectively. Results indicate that the flux and properties of dust arriving in the Uinta Mountains have varied over time, with the most significant variations occurring between 6.5 and 4.5 ka BP. During that time ratios of Zr/Al, Ti/Al and (Ca+Mg)/Fe rise to record-high values, and the abundance of Illite+Chlorite increases relative to feldspar. Prominent shifts occur in the abundances of some trace elements, such as Sc, along with changes in median grain size. The ratio La/Lu, as well as the magnitude of the Eu anomaly, also change. Collectively these fluctuations are consistent with a greater flux of dust to the Uinta Mountains, as well as a possible change

  2. Assessment of In-Place Oil Shale Resources of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Self, Jesse G.

    2010-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.32 trillion barrels of oil in place in 18 oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado.

  3. 77 FR 34337 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Evanston-Mountain View Ranger District; Utah; Smiths Fork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Evanston-Mountain View Ranger District; Utah; Smiths... submitting a correction to the notice of intent for the Smiths Fork Vegetation Restoration Project published... period for the Smiths Fork Vegetation Restoration Project has been extended. Comments concerning...

  4. Nahcolite and halite deposition through time during the saline mineral phase of Eocene Lake Uinta, Piceance Basin, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Halite and the sodium bicarbonate mineral nahcolite were deposited during the saline phase of Eocene Lake Uinta in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado. Variations in the area of saline mineral deposition through time were interpreted from studies of core and outcrop. Saline minerals were extensively leached by groundwater, so the original extent of saline deposition was estimated from the distribution of empty vugs and collapse breccias. Vugs and breccias strongly influence groundwater movement, so determining where leaching has occurred is an important consideration for in-situ oil shale extraction methods currently being developed. Lake Uinta formed when two smaller fresh water lakes, one in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah and the other in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado, expanded and coalesced across the Douglas Creek arch, an area of comparatively low subsidence rates. Salinity increased shortly after this expansion, but saline mineral deposition did not begin until later, after a period of prolonged infilling created broad lake-margin shelves and a comparatively small deep central lake area. These shelves probably played a critical role in brine evolution. A progression from disseminated nahcolite and nahcolite aggregates to bedded nahcolite and ultimately to bedded nahcolite and halite was deposited in this deep lake area during the early stages of saline deposition along with rich oil shale that commonly shows signs of slumping and lateral transport. The area of saline mineral and rich oil shale deposition subsequently expanded, in part due to infilling of the compact deep area, and in part because of an increase in water flow into Lake Uinta, possibly due to outflow from Lake Gosiute to the north. Finally, as Lake Uinta in the Piceance Basin was progressively filled from north to south by volcano-clastic sediment, the saline depocenter was pushed progressively southward, eventually covering much of the areas that had previously been marginal shelves

  5. Structural development and oil occurrence on northeast flank of Uinta Mountains near Irish Canyon, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    The study area is located along Vermillion Creek, 1-3 mi (1.6-5 km) east of Irish Canyon, in northwestern Colorado. The exposed stratigraphic section consists of steeply dipping to vertical Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation, Ericson, Sandstone, and Mancos Shale along the toe of the Sparks Ranch thrust fault, and of lesser dipping older Mesozoic and Paleozoic formations in distant parts of the thrust plate. In most places, the Almond Formation is in contact across the thrust fault with the Eocene Wasatch and Green River Formations, and all of these formations are unconformably overlain by the Oligocene Bishop Conglomerate and the Miocene Browns Park Formation. The structural development of the area has involved three major events: (1) Late Cretaceous uplift of the Uinta Mountains; (2) Paleocene and Eocene thrust movements of the sparks Ranch fault; and (3) late Tertiary normal faulting associated with a collapse of the eastern Uinta Mountains. Oil-saturated sandstones are present in outcrops of 10 Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary formations adjacent to several of the late Tertiary normal faults. Oil is escaping to the surface along these faults, probably from a large, deep-seated reservoir located below the Sparks Ranch thrust fault.

  6. Geologic evolution of Uinta-Piceance basin province, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.Y.; Tuttle, M.L.; Bryant, B.H.; Dubiel, R.F.; Fouch, T.D.; Franczyk, K.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Grout, M.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Molenaar, C.M.; Nichols, D.J.; Nichols, K.M.; Nuccio, V.F.; Peterson, F.; Pitman, J.K.; Perry, W.J. Jr.; Potter, C.J.; Sawatzky, D.L.; Scott, R.W. Jr.; Verbeek, E.R.; Wanty, R.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The Uinta-Piceance basin province (UPBP) has a complex Phanerozoic history characterized by five distinct phases of basin development (1) The UPBP formed part of a continental platform shelf on the northwestern flank of North America during the early and middle Paleozoic. Cambrian through Mississippian strata consist mainly of carbonate rocks, shale, and quartzite; contain major unconformities; and thicken westward. (2) Pennsylvanian-Permian uplifts of the ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny segmented this continental platform shelf into the Eagle, Paradox, and Oquirrh basins. Basin-margin tectonics and cyclic eustatic-climatic fluctuations strongly controlled deposition of the clastic, carbonate, and evaporitic fill of these basins. (3) During the early Mesozoic, the UPBP formed part of a slowly subsiding continental platform. Triassic-Jurassic rocks include eolian, alluvial, and lacustrine deposits that thicken and grade westward into marine facies. (4) Paleozoic and early Mesozoic strata in the westernmost part of the UPBP were thrust eastward during the late Mesozoic Sevier orogeny, causing subsidence in the adjacent foreland basin. The history of the UPBP part of this foreland basin is recorded by thick nonmarine deposits within and adjacent to the thrust belt that grade eastward into thinner accumulations of marine rocks. (5) The geometry and style of regional compressional deformation changed markedly with onset of the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene Laramide orogeny. Laramide uplifts segmented the UPBP foreland basin into the Uinta and Piceance intermontane lacustrine basins. The geometry of these lacustrine basins is notably different from that of the late Paleozoic segment basins.

  7. Neogene tectonics and geomorphology of the eastern Uinta Mountains in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.R

    1986-01-01

    A recent reevaluation of the Bishop Conglomerate in the eastern part of the Uinta Mountains of Utah and Colorado helps clarify how the conglomerate relates to the Browns Park Formation and, in turn, how both formations relate to Tertiary tectonic activity and late Tertiary and Quaternary drainage adjustments. Field relations indicate divergent geomorphic histories for the two formations, yet over broad areas they are nearly coextensive and, as will be shown, the Browns Park locally rests directly on the Bishop. Some of the conglomerate beneath the Browns Park Formation surely is Bishop, but a hiatus is indicated between the two formations. Sears, moreover, showed that the Bishop is stratigraphically below the Browns Park and, hence, is older. The Browns Park is now well dated as largely Miocene; the Bishop is Oligocene. In their type areas the Bishop and the Browns Park are separated by great topographic discontinuity, the Bishop capping high mesas and the Browns Park filling deep adjacent valleys. Because of its wide geographic extent and relatively uniform character, the Bishop is an excellent datum for use in reconstruction tectonic and geomorphic event in the Uinta region.

  8. Climate during the last glacial maximum in the Wasatch and southern Uinta Mountains inferred from glacier modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Mickelson, David M.

    2006-05-01

    Recent improvements in understanding glacial extents and chronologies in the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains and other mountain ranges in the western U.S. call for a more detailed approach to using glacier reconstructions to infer paleoclimates than commonly applied AAR-ELA-ÄT methods. A coupled 2-D mass balance and ice-flow numerical modeling approach developed by [Plummer, M.A., Phillips, F.M., 2003. A 2-D numerical model of snow/ice energy balance and ice flow for paleoclimatic interpretation of glacial geomorphic features. Quaternary Science Reviews 22, 1389-1406] allows exploration of the combined effects of temperature, precipitation, shortwave radiation and many secondary parameters on past ice extents in alpine settings. We apply this approach to the Little Cottonwood Canyon in the Wasatch Mountains and the Lake Fork and Yellowstone Canyons in the south-central Uinta Mountains. Results of modeling experiments indicate that the Little Cottonwood glacier required more precipitation during the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) than glaciers in the Uinta Mountains, assuming lapse rates were similar to modern. Model results suggest that if temperatures in the Wasatch Mountains and Uinta Mountains were ˜ 6 °C to 7 °C colder than modern, corresponding precipitation changes were ˜ 3 to 2× modern in Little Cottonwood Canyon and ˜ 2 to 1× modern in Lake Fork and Yellowstone Canyons. Greater amounts of precipitation in the Little Cottonwood Canyon likely reflect moisture derived from the surface of Lake Bonneville, and the lake may have also affected the mass balance of glaciers in the Uinta Mountains.

  9. Geophysical variables and behavior: XXIII. Relations between UFO reports within the Uinta Basin and local seismicity.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; Derr, J S

    1985-02-01

    A strong temporal correlation was found between the numbers of reports of UFOs (unidentified flying objects) and nearby seismic activity within the Uinta Basin for the year 1967. The numbers of UFO reports per month during this classic UFO flap were correlated 0.80 with the sum of the earthquake magnitudes per month for events within 150 km of the report area. Numbers of UFO reports were not correlated significantly with earthquake activity at distances greater than 150 km but less than 250 km away. The strongest correlation occurred between UFO reports and nearby seismic activity within the same month but not for previous or consequent months. Close scrutiny of daily shifts in epicenters and reports of UFOs indicate that they occurred when the locus of successive epicenters shifted across the area. These analyses were interpreted as support for the existence of strain fields whose movements generate natural phenomena that are reported as UFOs. PMID:3982923

  10. [Investigation of high pore fluid pressure in the Uinta Basin, Utah]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    High pore fluid pressures, approaching lithostatic, are observed in the deepest sections of the Uinta basin, Utah. The authors analyzed the cause of the anomalous overpressures with a 3-dimensional, numerical model of the evolution of the basin, including compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation as possible mechanisms. The numerical model builds the basin through time, coupling the structural, thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, and includes in situ hydrocarbon generation and migration. They used the evolution model to evaluate overpressure mechanisms and oil migration patterns for different possible conceptual models of the geologic history. Model results suggest that observed overpressures in the Uinta basin are probably caused by ongoing oil generation in strata with specific conditions of permeability, relative permeability, TOC content, and oil viscosity. They conducted a sensitivity analysis that suggests for oil generation to cause overpressures, the necessary conditions are: oil viscosity is {approximately}0.05 cP or higher, intrinsic permeability is {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} or lower, and source rock TOC values are {approximately}0.5% or higher. The authors also analyzed hydrocarbon migration patterns in the basin and how they are affected by the basin`s structural history. Oil migration patterns produced by the model are consistent with published oil production maps: oil moves from the deep Altamont source rocks toward Redwash, the eastern Douglas Creek Arch area, and southward towards the Sunnyside tar-sands and Book Cliffs. Peak oil generation occurs from the time of maximum burial in the mid-Tertiary ({approximately}35 to {approximately}30 Ma). Most differential uplift of the basin`s flanks probably occurs well after this time, and most oil migration to the basin`s southern and eastern flanks occurs prior to uplift of these flanks. Model results show that if the basin`s flanks are uplifted too soon, reduced

  11. Surface thermal maturity map of Uinta, Piceance, and Eagle basins area, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, V.F.; Johnson, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal maturity is essential for basin analysis studies because heat and heat flow play major roles in mineral formation, hydrocarbon generation and destruction, ground-water flow, and petroleum reservoir quality. The authors studied the thermal maturity of several hundred outcrop samples of coal and carbonaceous shale from Pennsylvanian through Quaternary rocks in the area encompassing the Uinta, Piceance, and Eagle basins of Utah and Colorado. All samples were analyzed for mean random vitrinite reflectance (R/sub m/); thus, thermal maturity is defined by R/sub m/ for this study. The authors' data show that R/sub m/ generally increase with age of the rock, reflecting increase burial depth and residence time at maximum temperature. Some coals show local anomalously high maturities because of proximity to Tertiary intrusives. Rocks of the same age show a general decrease in maturity from south to north in all three basins, which probably results from a decrease in geothermal gradients from south to north. In the Uinta basin, R/sub m/ values range from about 0.40 to 0.70% around the margins of the basin to 0.45% in the Altamont-Bluebell oil field near the basin center. In the Piceance basin, R/sub m/ values range from about 0.50 to 0.70% around the margins to about 0.25 to 0.35% in the center. The Eagle basin shows the widest range of R/sub m/ values, from 0.30 to 0.50% around the margins to values in the 4.0% range near the center.

  12. Surface thermal maturity map of Uinta, Piceance, and Eagle basins area, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, V.F.; Johnson, R.C.

    1988-02-01

    Knowledge of thermal maturity is essential for basin analysis studies because heat and heat flow play major roles in mineral formation, hydrocarbon generation and destruction, ground-water flow, and petroleum reservoir quality. The authors studied the thermal maturity of several hundred outcrop samples of coal and carbonaceous shale from Pennsylvanian through Quaternary rocks in the area encompassing the Uinta, Piceance, and Eagle basins of Utah and Colorado. All samples were analyzed for mean random vitrinite reflectance (R/sub m/); thus, thermal maturity is defined by R/sub m/ for this study. Their data show that R/sub m/ generally increases with age of the rock, reflecting increasing burial depth and residence time at maximum temperature. Some coals show local anomalously high maturities because of proximity to Tertiary intrusives. Rocks of the same age show a general decrease in maturity from south to north in all three basins, which probably results from a decrease in geothermal gradients from south to north. In the Uinta basin, R/sub m/ values range from about 0.40 to 0.70% around the margins of the basin to 0.45% in the Altamont-Bluebell oil field near the basin center. In the Piceance basin, R/sub m/ values range from about 0.50 to 0.70% around the margins to about 0.25 to 0.35% in the center. The Eagle basin shows the widest range of R/sub m/ values, from 0.30 to 0.50% around the margins to values in the 4.0% range near the center. Some vitrinite anomalies in the study area are best explained by sampling and analytical problems, such as choosing recycled vitrinite grains from organically lean shales or collecting weathered, oxidized samples.

  13. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  14. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  15. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  16. Latest Pleistocene glacial chronology of the Uinta Mountains: support for moisture-driven asynchrony of the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Refsnider, Kurt A.; Munroe, Jeffrey S.; Mickelson, David M.; Applegate, Patrick J.; Singer, Brad S.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2009-06-01

    Recent estimates of the timing of the last glaciation in the southern and western Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah suggest that the start of ice retreat and the climate-driven regression of pluvial Lake Bonneville both occurred at approximately 16 cal. ka. To further explore the possible climatic relationship of Uinta Mountain glaciers and the lake, and to add to the glacial chronology of the Rocky Mountains, we assembled a range-wide chronology of latest Pleistocene terminal moraines based on seventy-four cosmogenic 10Be surface-exposure ages from seven glacial valleys. New cosmogenic-exposure ages from moraines in three northern and eastern valleys of the Uinta Mountains indicate that glaciers in these parts of the range began retreating at 22-20 ka, whereas previously reported cosmogenic-exposure ages from four southern and western valleys indicate that ice retreat began there between 18 and 16.5 ka. This spatial asynchrony in the start of the last deglaciation was accompanied by a 400-m east-to-west decline in glacier equilibrium-line altitudes across the Uinta Mountains. When considered together, these two lines of evidence support the hypothesis that Lake Bonneville influenced the mass balance of glaciers in southern and western valleys of the range, but had a lesser impact on glaciers located farther east. Regional-scale variability in the timing of latest Pleistocene deglaciation in the Rocky Mountains may also reflect changing precipitation patterns, thereby highlighting the importance of precipitation controls on the mass balance of Pleistocene mountain glaciers.

  17. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in Mesaverde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    LORENZ, JOHN C.; COOPER, SCOTT P.

    2001-01-01

    A set of vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW but with local variations, is present in both the outcrop and subsurface in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones. Additional sets of conjugate shear fractures have been recognized in outcrops of Dakota strata and may be present in the subsurface. However, the deformation bands prevalent locally in outcrops in parts of the basin as yet have no documented subsurface equivalent. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain short, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures, and locally conjugate shear planes as well. Outcrops typically display secondary cross fractures which are rare in the subsurface, although oblique fractures associated with local structures such as the Hogback monocline may be present in similar subsurface structures. Spacings of the bed-normal extension fractures are approximately equal to or less than the thicknesses of the beds in which they formed, in both outcrop and subsurface. Fracture intensities increase in association with faults, where there is a gradation from intense fracturing into fault breccia. Bioturbation and minimal cementation locally inhibited fracture development in both formations, and the vertical limits of fracture growth are typically at bedding/lithology contrasts. Fracture mineralizations have been largely dissolved or replaced in outcrops, but local examples of preserved mineralization show that the quartz and calcite common to subsurface fractures were originally present in outcrop fractures. North-south trending compressive stresses created by southward indentation of the San Juan dome area (where Precambrian rocks are exposed at an elevation of 14,000 ft) and northward indentation of the Zuni uplift, controlled Laramide-age fracturing. Contemporaneous right-lateral transpressive wrench motion due to northeastward translation of the basin was both

  18. Increased Oil Production and Reserves From Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Deo, M.D.

    1998-04-01

    The Bluebell field is productive from the Tertiary lower Green River and Colton (Wasatch) Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in the ancestral Lake Uinta. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1000 to 3000 vertical ft (300-900 m), then stimulating the entire interval with hydrochloric acid. This technique is often referred to as the shot gun completion. Completion techniques used in the Bluebell field were discussed in detail in the Second Annual Report (Curtice, 1996). The shot-gun technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The study was intended to improve the geologic characterization of the producing formations and thereby develop completion techniques specific to the producing beds or facies instead of a shot gun approach to stimulating all the beds. The characterization did not identify predictable-facies or predictable-fracture trends within the vertical stratigraphic column as originally hoped. Advanced logging techniques can identify productive beds in individual wells. A field-demonstration program was developed to use cased-hole advanced logging techniques in two wells and recompletion the wells at two different scales based on the logging. The first well was going to be completed at the interval scale using a multiple stage completion technique (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage). The second well will be recompleted at the bed-scale using bridge plug and packer to isolate three or more

  19. Aeromagnetic maps of the Uinta and Piceance Basins and vicinity, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Plesha, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to understand the evolution of sedimentary basins, it is important to understand their tectonic setting. In a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study of the Uinta and Piceance basins in Utah and Colorado, this understanding is approached through characterization of subsurface structure and lithology of a large region encompassing the basins. An important tool for interpreting these subsurface features is aeromagnetic data. Aeromagnetic anomalies represent variations in the strength and direction of the Earth's magnetic field that are produced by rocks containing a significant number of magnetic minerals (commonly magnetite). The shape and magnitude of an anomaly produced by one body of rock are complexly related to the amount of magnetic minerals present, the magnetic properties of those minerals (determined by a number of factors, including the history of the rock), and the shape of the rock body. In the study area, only crystalline basement rocks and volcanic rocks are likely to contain enough magnetic minerals to produce anomalies; sedimentary rocks and metasediments are generally so poor in magnetic minerals that their magnetic effects cannot be detected by the types of surveys presented in this report. Patterns of anomalies on aeromagnetic maps can reveal not only lithologic differences related to magnetite content, but structural features as well, such as faults that have juxtaposed crystalline rocks against sedimentary rocks, and upwarps of crystalline basement underlying sedimentary sequences. Tectonic features of regional extent may not become apparent until a number of aeromagnetic surveys have been compiled and plotted at the same scale. Commonly the compilation involves piecing together data from surveys that were flown at different times and have widely disparate flight specifications and data reduction procedures. The data may be compiled into a composite map, where all the pieces are plotted onto one map without regard to the differences in

  20. Lacustrine hummocky cross-stratification in Green River Formation, southern Uinta basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, R.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) is a common sedimentary structure in marine strata but has only been reported in a few lake deposits. However, recent field investigations in the southern Uinta basin show that HCS occurs within several different depositional environments and lithologies in the lacustrine Green River Formation (Eocene). HCS is well developed within the open-lacustrine informal S2 marker unit of the Parachute Creek Member, where it exhibits many of the characteristics common in marine HCS: numerous low-angle, second-order truncations; antiforms (hummocks); association with planar laminations and ripples; gently curved parallel to nearly parallel laminations; fanning of laminations into swales; and scattered dip directions of truncation surfaces and laminae. Hummock spacing ranges from 20 cm to approximately 2.75 m. Hummocks produced by laminae that thicken toward the hummock crest indicate that at least some of the HCS was produced by bed forms molded by the flow, and not by a random scour-and-drape mechanism. Common laminae downlap at set boundaries, and asymmetric hummocks indicate that at least some of the hummocks were subject to minor migration during growth.

  1. Pyrolysis of Uinta Basin Oil Sands in fluidized bed and rotary kiln reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal, S.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was used to pyrolyze the mined and crushed ore from the PR Spring oil sands deposit which is located in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Liquid yields of approximately 80 wt% of the bitumen fed to the reactor were obtained. This compares to 55-70 wt% obtained from smaller laboratory scale fluidized bed reactors and a pilot-scale rotary kiln. The product yields and distributions exhibited no discernable trends with reactor temperature or solids retention time. The liquid products obtained from the pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor were upgraded compared to the bitumen in terms of volatility, viscosity, molecular weight, and metals (Ni and V) content. The nitrogen and sulphur contents of the total liquid products were also reduced relative to the bitumen. A comparison of oil sands pyrolysis yields from a pilot scale FBR and a rotary kiln of the same diameter (15.2 cm) was made. Under similar pyrolysis conditions, the rotary kiln produced a slightly more upgraded product but at lower total liquid yields. Kinetic modeling of the various reactors indicates that the pilot-scale FBR product distributions may be explained using a simplified two-reaction scheme. It is proposed that secondary cracking is suppressed in the large diameter FBR due to elimination of slugging and the superior quality of fluidization in the reactor. More experimental studies with the rotary kiln and an economic evaluation will be required before concluding which reactor is preferred for the thermal recovery process.

  2. Fire and ice: genetic structure of the Uinta ground squirrel (Spermophilus armatus) across the Yellowstone hotspot.

    PubMed

    Van Tuinen, Marcel; O'Keefe, Kim; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2008-04-01

    The range of the Uinta ground squirrel, Spermophilus armatus, is centred over one of the most tectonically active regions today, the Yellowstone hotspot. We document the role of Quaternary tectonic and climatic history on the genetic structure of this species by screening museum and extant individuals throughout its range. Phylogeographic, divergence time, and demographic analyses of partial mitochondrial cytochrome b and control region DNA sequences yield insight into the cadence of evolution across three spatiotemporal scales: (i) a relatively deep intraspecific divergence of S. armatus into three lineages coincident with the last major volcanic eruption in the region and maintained by the Snake River Plain; (ii) demographic expansion in two lineages corresponding to the time of last deglaciation of the region; and (iii) a recent (< 50 years) local extinction of the third lineage coincident with climatic change and conversion of habitat for agricultural purposes in eastern Idaho. Beyond these inferences, our study highlights the unique value of museum material to phylogeography, and shows that small mammal recolonization of previously glaciated montane 'islands' differs from northward postglacial expansion observed in areas previously covered by continental ice sheets. Montane 'islands' may harbour high genetic diversity because of admixture and recurrent expansion/extinction. PMID:18284571

  3. Estimation of Snow Depth in the Uinta Mountains using ICESat/GLAS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, J.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Snow depth and water equivalent (SWE) are critical drivers of regional scale water processes, particularly in areas of complex mountainous terrain and deep snowpack. Because sparse in situ gages can not characterize all the spatial heterogeneity of these regions, high resolution remotely sensed observations offer a potential opportunity for future watershed-scale estimates of snow depth. In the current study, the capability of a satellite lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth was tested using surface elevations retrieved by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) flown on board the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite from 2003-2009. By utilizing the instrument's database of seasonally repeated observations during snow on and snow off conditions, it is possible to evaluate the feasibility of estimating snow depth in mountainous terrain using space-based laser altimetry. The evaluation includes the analysis of GLAS waveforms, applying atmospheric and geophysical filtering criteria, and the testing and development of various methods of snow surface elevation estimation. This type of ICESat analysis was recently completed in the Uinta Mountains of NE Utah using several repeated GLAS tracks from 2005-2007 and compared to available regional SNOTEL data.

  4. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.; Morgan, C.D.

    1999-04-28

    The objective of the project is to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Uinta Basin, Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that stage-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance. In the first demonstration well (Michelle Ute well discussed in the previous technical report), dipole shear anisotropy (anisotropy) and dual-burst thermal decay time (TDT) logs were run before and isotope tracer log was run after the treatment. The logs were very helpful in characterizing the remaining hydrocarbon potential in the well. But, mechanical failure resulted in a poor recompletion and did not result in a significant improvement in the oil production from the well.

  5. Gas, Water, and Oil Production from the Wasatch Formation, Greater Natural Buttes Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Hoffman, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from 38 wells with production commencing during the 1980s from the Wasatch Formation in the Greater Natural Buttes field, Uinta Basin, Utah. This study is one of a series of reports examining fluid production from tight gas reservoirs, which are characterized by low permeability, low porosity, and the presence of clay minerals in pore space. The general ranges of production rates after 2 years are 100-1,000 mscf/day for gas, 0.35-3.4 barrel per day for oil, and less than 1 barrel per day for water. The water:gas ratio ranges from 0.1 to10 barrel per million standard cubic feet, indicating that free water is produced along with water dissolved in gas in the reservoir. The oil:gas ratios are typical of a wet gas system. Neither gas nor water rates show dependence upon the number of perforations, although for low gas-flow rates there is some dependence upon the number of sandstone intervals that were perforated. Over a 5-year time span, gas and water may either increase or decrease in a given well, but the changes in production rate do not exhibit any dependence upon well proximity or well location.

  6. Intertonguing of the Lower Part of the Uinta Formation with the Upper Part of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin During the Late Stages of Lake Uinta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnell, John R.

    2009-01-01

    During most of middle Eocene time, a 1,500-mi2 area between the Colorado and White Rivers in northwestern Colorado was occupied by the Piceance lobe of Lake Uinta. This initially freshwater lake became increasingly saline throughout its history. Sediments accumulating in the lake produced mostly clay shale, limestone, and dolomite containing varying concentrations of organic matter. At the time of the maximum extent of the lake, the organic-rich Mahogany bed of the Green River Formation was deposited throughout the area. Shortly after its deposition, stream deposits began infilling the lake from the north through a series of contractions interspersed with minor expansions. This fluctuation of the shoreline resulted in the intertonguing of the stream sediments of the lower part of the overlying Uinta Formation with the lacustrine sediments of the upper part of the Green River over a distance of about 40 mi; construction of regional stratigraphic cross sections show the pattern of intertonguing in considerable detail. The data utilized in this study, which covered parts of Rio Blanco, Garfield, and Mesa counties, was derived from (1) geologic mapping of thirty-four 7 1/2-minute quadrangles and stratigraphic studies by geologists of the U.S. Geological Survey, and (2) shale-oil assay information from numerous cores. As a result of this previous work and the additional effort involved in the compilation here presented, more than a dozen Green River Formation tongues have been named, some formally, others informally. Middle Eocene strata above the Mahogany bed in the northern part of the study area are dominantly coarse clastics of the Uinta Formation. The sedimentary sequence becomes more calcareous and organic-rich to the south where, in a 400-mi2 area, a 250 ft-thick sequence of oil shale above the Mahogany bed contains an average of 16 gallons of oil per ton of shale and is estimated to contain 73 billion barrels of oil.

  7. Architecture and Channel-Belt Clustering in the Fluvial lower Wasatch Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisel, J. R.; Pyles, D. R.; Bracken, B.; Rosenbaum, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene lower Wasatch Formation of the Uinta Basin contains exceptional outcrops of low net-sand content (27% sand) fluvial strata. This study quantitatively documents the stratigraphy of a 7 km wide by 300 meter thick strike-oriented outcrop in order to develop a quantitative data base that can be used to improve our knowledge of how some fluvial systems evolve over geologic time scales. Data used to document the outcrop are: (1) 550 meters of decimeter to half meter scale resolution stratigraphic columns that document grain size and physical sedimentary structures; (2) detailed photopanels used to document architectural style and lithofacies types in the outcrop; (3) thickness, width, and spatial position for all channel belts in the outcrop, and (4) directional measurements of paleocurrent indicators. Two channel-belt styles are recognized: lateral and downstream accreting channel belts; both of which occur as either single or multi-story. Floodplain strata are well exposed and consist of overbank fines and sand-rich crevasse splay deposits. Key upward and lateral characteristics of the outcrop documented herein are the following. First, the shapes of 243 channels are documented. The average width, thickness and aspect ratios of the channel belts are 110 m, 7 m, and 16:1, respectively. Importantly, the size and shape of channel belts does not change upward through the 300 meter transect. Second, channels are documented to spatially cluster. 9 clusters are documented using a spatial statistic. Key upward patterns in channel belt clustering are a marked change from non-amalgamated isolated channel-belt clusters to amalgamated channel-belt clusters. Critically, stratal surfaces can be correlated from mudstone units within the clusters to time-equivalent floodplain strata adjacent to the cluster demonstrating that clusters are not confined within fluvial valleys. Finally, proportions of floodplain and channel belt elements underlying clusters and channel belts

  8. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Uteland Butte Member of the Eocene Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered resources of 214 million barrels of oil, 329 billion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 14 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah.

  9. Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits.

  10. The Paleogene California River: Evidence of Mojave-Uinta paleodrainage from U-Pb ages of detrital zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, S.J.; Dickinson, W.R.; Gehrels, G.E.; Spencer, J.E.; Lawton, T.F.; Carroll, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    U-Pb age spectra of detrital zircons in samples from the Paleogene Colton Formation in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah and the Late Cretaceous McCoy Mountains Formation of southwestern Arizona (United States) are statistically indistinguishable. This finding refutes previous inferences that arkosic detritus of the Colton was derived from cratonic basement exposed by Laramide tectonism, and instead establishes the Cordilleran magmatic arc (which also provided sediment to the McCoy Mountains Formation) as the primary source. Given the existence of a north-south-trending drainage divide in eastern Nevada and the north-northeast direction of Laramide paleoflow throughout Arizona and southern Utah, we infer that a large river system headed in the arc of the Mojave region flowed northeast ~700 km to the Uinta Basin. Named after its source area, this Paleogene California River would have been equal in scale but opposite in direction to the modern Green River-Colorado River system, and the timing and causes of the subsequent drainage reversal are important constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Cordillera and the Colorado Plateau. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  11. Airborne radioactivity survey of the West Lonetree area, Uinta county, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meuschke, J.L.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey in an area of 154 square miles in Uinta county, Wyoming. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey, October 23, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area

  12. Demographic monitoring and population viability analysis of two rare beardtongues from the Uinta Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCaffery, Rebecca M.; Reisor, Rita; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Brunson, Jessi

    2014-01-01

    Energy development, in combination with other environmental stressors, poses a persistent threat to rare species endemic to the energy-producing regions of the Western United States. Demographic analyses of monitored populations can provide key information on the natural dynamics of threatened plant and animal populations, and how they might be affected by ongoing and future development. In the Uinta Basin in Utah and Colorado, Graham’s beardtongue (Penstemon grahamii) and White River beardtongue (Penstemon scariosus var. albifluvis) are two rare endemic wildflowers that persist on oil shale habitats heavily impacted by current energy exploration and development, and slated for expanded traditional drilling and oil shale development. We described demographic characteristics and population viability for two populations of each species that have been monitored since 2004. First, we measured population size, survival rates, transitions between life stages, and recruitment using individually marked plants at the four study areas. Then, we used matrix population models to determine stochastic population growth rates (λ) and the probability that each population would persist 50 years into the future, given current conditions. The two P. grahamii study plots had small populations averaging 70 adult plants, and relatively constant and high survival in both vegetative and flowering plants. The two P. scariosus var. albifluvis study plots had populations that averaged 120 adult plants, with high and stable survival in flowering plants and variable survival in vegetative plants. Recruitment of new seedlings into all populations was low and variable, with most recruitment occurring in one or two years. Both P. grahamii populations had λ near 1.0 (stable). One P. scariosus var. albifluvis population appeared to be declining (λ=0.97), while the other was increasing (λ=1.16). Our analyses reveal populations that appear relatively stable, but that are

  13. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Michael Vanden; Anderson, Paul; Wallace, Janae; Morgan, Craig; Carney, Stephanie

    2012-04-30

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary

  14. An Investigation of the Impacts of Climate and Environmental Change on Alpine Lakes in the Uinta Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, K. A.; Hundey, E. J.; Porinchu, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Aquatic systems in alpine and sub-alpine areas of the western United States are potentially impacted by atmospheric pollution and climate change. Because these mountainous regions are an important water resource for the western United States, it is critical to monitor and protect these systems. The Uinta Mountains are an east- west trending mountain range located on the border between Utah, Wyoming and Colorado and downwind of the Wasatch Front, Utah, which is characterized by a rapidly expanding population, as well as mining and industry. This alpine area provides water to many areas in Utah, and contributes approximately nine percent of the water supply to the Upper Colorado River. Our research is focused on determining the impacts of climate change and pollution on alpine lakes in the Uinta Mountains. The results presented here are based on limnological measurements made at 64 Uinta Mountain lakes spanning a longitude gradient of one degree and an elevation gradient of 3000 feet. At each lake maximum depth, conductivity, salinity, pH, Secchi depth, temperature, alkalinity, and concentrations of major anions, cations and trace metals were measured. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was performed to determine relationships between these variables and to examine the variability of the values of these variables. Our results indicate that steep climate gradients related to elevation and longitude result in clear differences in limnological properties of the study sites, with high elevation lakes characterized by greater amounts of nitrate and nitrite compared to low elevation sites. As well, diatoms in these lakes indicate that many high elevation sites are mesotrophic to eutrophic, which is unexpected for such remote aquatic ecosystems. We hypothesize that elevated nitrate and nitrite levels at high elevation sites are related to atmospherically derived nitrogen, but are being exacerbated relative to lower elevation sites by greater snow cover and reduced plant

  15. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project, Uinta Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    The project is designed to increase recoverable petroleum reserves in the United States. The Green River Formation in Utah`s Uinta Basin contains abundant hydrocarbons that are not easily recovered by primary means. The successful Lomax Montument Butte Unit water flood will be evaluated under this contract, and based on this information, water floods will be initiated in nearby Travis and Boundary units. In 1987, Lomax Exploration Company started a water flood in the Monument Butte Unit of a Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation. This was a low-enerey, geologically heterogeneous reservoir producing a waxy crude oil. Primary production yielded 5% of the OOIP. Due to the water flood project, total production will yield an estimated recovery of 20% OOIP.

  16. Indentifying environmental features for land management decisions. [Uinta Basin, Davis County foothills, and Farmington Bay in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The wetlands and water-related land use in the Uinta Basin were classified and mapped using photointerpretation of U-2 infrared photography and digital LANDSAT data. The digital maps were used to augment photointerpretations. A highly effective diagnostic tool emerged when the LANDSAT digital print was photoreduced to a film positive at the same scale as the U-2 film and overlain on the U-2 color film. As a result of this merging technique, cover types can be identified more accurately and probablistic statements can be made about the relative amounts of water being consumed in one pasture vs. another. The hazards to urban development on sensitive and unstable land in the foothills of Davis County were studied using NASA U-2 photography. Shoreline fluctuations were mapped in the Farmington Bay using LANDSAT digital data.

  17. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  18. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress for this quarter are discussed for subsurface and engineering studies.

  19. Constructing a Baseline Model of Alpine Wetlands of the Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyjasik, M.; Ford, R. L.; Bartholomew, L. M.; Welsh, S. B.; Hernandez, M.; Koerner, D.; Muir, M.

    2008-12-01

    Alpine wetlands of the Uinta Mountains, northeastern Utah, contain a variety of groundwater-dependent ecosystems. Unlike their counterparts in other areas of the Rocky Mountains, these systems have been relatively unstudied. The Reader Lakes area on the southern slope of the range was selected for detailed study because of its variety of wetland plant communities, homogenous bedrock geology, and minimal human impact. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study is to establish the functional links between the geomorphology and hydrogeology of these high mountain wetlands and their constituent plant communities. In addition to traditional field studies and water chemistry, geospatial technologies are being used to organize and analyze both field data (water chemistry and wetland vegetation) and archived multispectral imagery (2006 NAIP images). The hydrology of these wetlands is dominated by groundwater discharge and their surface is dominated by string-and-flark morphology of various spatial scales, making these montane wetlands classic patterned fens. The drainage basin is organized into a series of large-scale stair-stepping wetlands, bounded by glacial moraines at their lower end. Wetlands are compartmentalized by a series of large strings (roughly perpendicular to the axial stream) and flarks. This pattern may be related to small ridges on the underlying ground moraine and possibly modified by beaver activity along the axial stream. Small-scale patterning occurs along the margins of the wetlands and in sloping-fen settings. The smaller-scale strings and flarks form a complex; self-regulating system in which water retention is enhanced and surface flow is minimized. Major plant communities have been identified within the wetlands for example: a Salix planifolia community associated with the peaty strings; Carex aquatilis, Carex limosa, and Eriophorum angustifolium communities associated with flarks; as well as a Sphagnum sp.- rich hummocky transition zone

  20. Tectonic and climate changes expressed as sedimentary cycles and stratigraphic sequences of the Paleogene Lake Uinta System, central Rocky Mountains, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Pitman, J.K.

    1991-03-01

    Lake Uinta strata record both long- and short-term changes in climate and tectonic regime. Late Paleocene to late Eocene deposits are characterized by evaporite units (including halite and bicarbonate salts) and organically derived carbonate with extreme positive {delta}{sup 13}C and slightly negative {delta}{sup 18}O values that serve as evidence the lake was the center of a closed hydrologic system. Large reconfigurations of the lake system were tectonically induced and gave rise to relatively thick, lithologically distinct stratigraphic sequences. Simultaneous climate changes initiated very rapid lake level expansions and contractions as well as shifts in lake-water alkalinity and salinity (or chemistry) which resulted in the development of small- to large-scale sedimentary and stratigraphic cycles. Maastrichtian to earliest Eocene phases formed in local depressions (piggy back basins) on the thrust sheets, and in the incipient Uinta basin. Lake system reached its greatest aerial and volumetric extent in the middle and late Eocene and was centered in the foreland formed in front of high-angle reverse faults that bounded the rising Laramide structural blocks. At this time chemical precipitates, including basin centered carbonate and evaporite facies, formed during episodes of tectonically induced subsidence at the center of the clastic sediment-starved basin. Some fault-bounded margins of the Uinta basin are marked by synorogenic coarse debris that extends from the mountain front to the clastic sediment-starved lake. Tectonically induced stratigraphic sequences of the Lake Uinta system express environments for several million years whereas climatic cycles reflect much shorter episodes and very rapidly changing conditions.

  1. Detailed north-south cross section showing environments of deposition, organic richness, and thermal maturities of lower Tertiary rocks in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    The Uinta Basin of northeast Utah has produced large amounts of hydrocarbons from lower Tertiary strata since the 1960s. Recent advances in drilling technologies, in particular the development of efficient methods to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells, has spurred renewed interest in producing hydrocarbons from unconventional low-permeability dolomite and shale reservoirs in the lacustrine, Eocene Green River Formation. The Eocene Green River Formation was deposited in Lake Uinta, a long-lived saline lake that occupied the Uinta Basin, the Piceance Basin to the east, and the intervening Douglas Creek arch. The focus of recent drilling activity has been the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation and to a much lesser extent the overlying R-0 oil shale zone of the Green River Formation. Initial production rates ranging from 500 to 1,500 barrels of oil equivalent per day have been reported from the Uteland Butte member from horizontal well logs that are as long as 4,000 feet (ft);. The cross section presented here extends northward from outcrop on the southern margin of the basin into the basin’s deep trough, located just south of the Uinta Mountains, and transects the area where this unconventional oil play is developing. The Monument Butte field, which is one of the fields located along this line of section, has produced hydrocarbons from conventional sandstone reservoirs in the lower part of the Green River Formation and underlying Wasatch Formation since 1981. A major fluvial-deltaic system entered Lake Uinta from the south, and this new line of section is ideal for studying the effect of the sediments delivered by this drainage on hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Green River Formation. The cross section also transects the Greater Altamont-Bluebell field in the deepest part of the basin, where hydrocarbons have been produced from fractured, highly overpressured marginal lacustrine and fluvial reservoirs in the Green River, Wasatch

  2. Properties of Modern Dust Accumulating in the Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA, and Soil Evidence of Long-Term Dust Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Modern eolian sediment was collected at four locations in the alpine zone of the Uinta Mountains (Utah, USA) between July 2011 and July 2012. Collectors were a passive design based on the classic marble dust trap, but modified for use in this high-precipitation environment. On average the collectors accumulated 1.5 gm of dust, corresponding to an annual flux of 4.4 g/m2. This result is similar to values measured from snowpack samples in the Wind River (Wyoming) and San Juan (Colorado) Mountains. Dust flux was 3 to 5x higher during the winter compared with summer at the two sites featuring continuous vegetation, but was consistent between the seasons at the two collectors surrounded by a greater area of exposed soil. XRD analysis reveals that dust samples are dominated by quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, and illite. Some samples contain amphibole and chlorite. In contrast, samples of fine sediment collected from the surface of modern snowbanks are dominated by clay with no feldspar or quartz, suggesting that these minerals are derived from the surrounding soil surface, which is snow-covered in the winter. ICP-MS analysis reveals that the geochemistry of the coarse (>63-μm) fraction of the dust resembles that of the underlying bedrock, confirming a local origin for this sediment. In contrast, the fine (<63-μm) fraction of the dust closely matches the fine fraction of the soil A horizon, supporting an eolian origin for the ubiquitous layer of fines that mantles soil profiles throughout the Uinta Mountains. Grain size analysis with laser scattering reveals that modern dust is very well-sorted, with a median size of 8 μm (7.0 Φ). Using the annual dust flux and mean grain size, and taking into account the measured bulk density (0.95 gm/cm3), organic matter content (20%), and silt content (32%) of this loess cap, the extrapolated loess accretion rate is ~18 cm per 10,000 years. Given that prior studies (Bockheim et al., 2000 Catena; Munroe, 2007, Arctic

  3. Land and federal mineral ownership coverage for the Uinta Basin, Wasatch Plateau and surrounding areas, northeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, L.H.; Green, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Arc/Info coverage contains land status and Federal and State mineral ownership for approximately 25,900 square miles in northeastern Utah. The polygon coverage (which is also provided here as a shapefile) contains three attributes of ownership information for each polygon. One attribute indicates whether the surface is State owned, privately owned, consists of Tribal and Indian lands, or, if Federally owned, which Federal agency manages the land surface. Another attribute indicates where the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) maintains full or partial subsurface mineral rights. The third attribute indicates which energy minerals, if any, are owned by the Federal govenment. This coverage is based on land management status and Federal and State mineral ownership data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), and the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration at a scale of 1:100,000. This coverage was compiled primarily to serve the USGS National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Project in the Uinta-Piceance Basin Province and the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment Project in the Colorado Plateau.

  4. Advanced fracture modeling in the Uinta Basin (Utah) for optimized primary and secondary recovery. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The completed study focused on an area fracture-controlled highly unpredictable, fracture-controlled production near the Duchesne Fault Zone, Uinta Basin, in northeastern Utah. Production is seriously influenced by numerous high-angle faults and associated fractures--represented at the surface by a set of parallel, N80{degree}W-trending lineaments, and intricate fracture patterns in outcrop. Specific production is erratic and secondary recovery design is difficult because well-specific structural characterization and local fracture patterns are poorly understood. Furthermore, numerical models to simulate fluid flow in fractured reservoirs were either overly simplistic (did not adequately account for mechanical contrasts between matrix and fractures) or were extremely complex, requiring volumes of data typically not available to the operator. The contractors proposed implementing advanced geological, geomechanical and reservoir engineering methods to recognize and model the complex fracture networks exhibited at the surface and suggested in the shallow subsurface in the Duchesne Fault Zone. The intended methodology was to be developed in a data-limited environment, recognizing that operators in the basin will not have the financial resources or motivation to perform sophisticated and expensive reservoir engineering programs. User-friendly models for permeability, stress, and production using key geological and geophysical data, developed in this study can then be used to determine: economic placement of future operations, assessment of recoverable hydrocarbons, and forecasting of primary and secondary recovery.

  5. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project, Uinta Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1993-09-01

    The project is designed to increase recoverable petroleum reserves in the United States. The Green River Formation in Utah`s Uinta Basin contains abundant hydrocarbons that are not easily recovered by primary means. The successful Lomax Monument Butte Unit water flood will be evaluated under this contract, and based on this information, water floods will be initiated in nearby Travis and Boundary units. In 1987, Lomax Exploration Company started a water flood in the Monument Butte Unit of a Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation. This was a low-energy, geologically heterogeneous reservoir producing a waxy crude oil. Primary production yielded about 5% of the OOIP. Due to the water flood project, total production will yield an estimated recovery of 20% OOIP. The Monument Butte Unit {number_sign}10-34 and the Travis Unit {number_sign}14A-28 were put on production the last quarter of 1992. Formation Microimaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs were used to evaluate these wells as commercially productive. Through June 30, 1993, the Monument Butte {number_sign} 10-34 (11/27/92 first production) has produced 6,277 barrels of oil and 6.5 MMcf of gas and the Travis {number_sign}14A-28 (1/1/93 first production) has produced 7,717 barrels of oil and 19.9 MMcf of gas.

  6. Concentration and mineralogical residence of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah - A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, G.A.; Pitman, J.K.; Huffman, C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Ten samples from drillcore of two rich oil-shale beds from the Parachute Creek Member of the Eocene Green River Formation, Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, and Uinta Basin, Utah, were analyzed for 37 major, minor, and trace elements. For 23 of these elements, principal mineralogical residence is established or suggested and such studies may provide data which are useful for predicting the kinds and amounts of elements and compounds that might be released into the environment by oil-shale mining operations. ?? 1976.

  7. Characterizing the Response of Fluvial Systems to Extreme Global Warming During the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum: An Analysis of the Wasatch and Green River Formations, Uinta Basin, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E. R.; Plink-Bjorklund, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Wasatch and Green River Formations in the Uinta Basin, UT contain fluvial sandstones that record changes in terrestrial sedimentation coincident with Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and at least six post-PETM hyperthermal climate change events. While proxies for chemical weathering rates during the PETM have been developed using the marine osmium isotope record, to date there has been little research on chemical weathering rates in proximal terrestrial depocenters. This work is one part of a multi-proxy research effort combining quantitative petrographic analysis, the stable carbon isotope record, and a high-resolution stratigraphic and sedimentologic framework across the southern margin of the Uinta Basin. Relative tectonic quiescence in the Uinta Basin during the Early Eocene suggests that climate is the forcing mechanism controlling fluvial architecture and composition, and gradual basin subsidence has preserved at least six pulses of greenhouse climate change during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Terrestrial records of PETM climate do not support a humid climate with increased precipitation as previously suggested from marine proxies of climate change. Instead, terrestrial records of the PETM climate show evidence of prolonged drought punctuated by intense terrestrial flooding events in mid-latitude continental interiors. Increases in chemical weathering rates during the PETM due to increased temperature and average precipitation is cited as a key carbon sink to initiate a recovery phase where atmospheric CO2 returned to normal concentrations. If terrestrial records of chemical weathering rates differ substantially from marine proxies the carbon-cycle dynamics active during the EECO must be reconsidered. Initial results of this study show that these peak hyperthermal climate change conditions in the Uinta Basin preserve more compositionally and texturally immature sediments due to extremely high erosion and deposition rates, and subdued

  8. Geology of tight oil and potential tight oil reservoirs in the lower part of the Green River Formation, Uinta, Piceance, and Greater Green River Basins, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    The recent successful development of a tight oil play in the Eocene-age informal Uteland Butte member of the lacustrine Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, using modern horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques has spurred a renewed interest in the tight oil potential of lacustrine rocks. The Green River Formation was deposited by two large lakes, Lake Uinta in the Uinta and Piceance Basins and Lake Gosiute in the Greater Green River Basin. These three basins contain the world’s largest in-place oil shale resources with recent estimates of 1.53 trillion, 1.33 trillion, and 1.44 trillion barrels of oil in place in the Piceance, Uinta, and Greater Green River Basins, respectively. The Uteland Butte member was deposited during an early freshwater stage of the lake in the Uinta Basin prior to deposition of the assessed oil shale intervals. This report only presents information on the early freshwater interval and overlying brackish-water interval in all three basins because these intervals are most likely to have tight oil potential. Burial histories of the three basins were reconstructed to study (1) variations in subsidence and lake development, and (2) post deposition burial that led to the development of a petroleum system in only the Uinta Basin. The Uteland Butte member is a successful tight oil play because it is thermally mature for hydrocarbon generation and contains organic-rich shale, brittle carbonate, and porous dolomite. Abnormally high pressure in parts of the Uteland Butte is also important to production. Variations in organic richness of the Uteland Butte were studied using Fischer assay analysis from oil shale assessments, and pressures were studied using drill-stem tests. Freshwater lacustrine intervals in the Piceance and Greater Green River Basins are immature for hydrocarbon generation and contain much less carbonate than the Uteland Butte member. The brackish-water interval in the Uinta Basin is thermally mature for

  9. High-resolution regional paleoclimate simulations of Lake Bonneville and its influence on geomorphic processes in the Uinta Mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) for alpine glaciers in the Uinta Mountains at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) increase with distance from the shoreline of pluvial Lake Bonneville, an effect that has been linked at least in part to enhanced precipitation derived from Lake Bonneville. While this result is broadly consistent with relatively large-scale climate modeling studies, the precise meteorological mechanisms by which Lake Bonneville may have influenced the glacial geomorphology of the Uinta Mountains remain poorly understood. New, high resolution (4km grid spacing) quasi-idealized regional paeoclimate simulations of the LGM computed with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model provide new insights into these processes. Preliminary results indicate that moisture derived from Lake Bonneville likely would not have exerted a significant impact on regional precipitation unless the lake temperature exceeded about 4 degrees C. However, an ice-free Lake Bonneville would have likely exerted a modest (at least 1-2C) local warming, with associated impacts on precipitation and snowpack development. While the overall snowfall amounts do not appear to be greatly affected by the presence of a cold, ice-free lake, the presence of such a lake does appear to influence precipitation extremes throughout the region. These results suggest that the local temperature influence of pluvial lakes on regional glaciation may be of similar magnitude to the effects of enhanced evaporation from those lakes.

  10. In-place oil shale resources of the Mahogany zone sorted by grade, overburden thickness and stripping ratio, Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado and Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    A range of geological parameters relevant to mining oil shale have been examined for the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, and Uinta Basin, Utah, using information available in the U.S. Geological Survey Oil Shale Assessment database. Basinwide discrete and cumulative distributions of resource in-place as a function of (1) oil shale grade, (2) Mahogany zone thickness, (3) overburden thickness, and (4) stripping ratio (overburden divided by zone thickness) were determined for both basins on a per-acre basis, and a resource map showing the areal distribution of these properties was generated. Estimates of how much of the Mahogany zone resource meets various combinations of these parameters were also determined. Of the 191.7 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place in the Piceance Basin, 32.3 percent (61.8 billion barrels) is associated with oil shale yielding at least 25 gallons of oil per ton (GPT) of rock processed, is covered by overburden 1,000 feet thick or less, and has a stripping ratio of less than 10. In the Uinta Basin, 14.0 percent (29.9 billion barrels) of the 214.5 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place meets the same overburden and stripping ratio criteria but only for the lower grade cutoff of 15 GPT.

  11. Assessment of groundwater/surface-water interaction and simulation of potential streamflow depletion induced by groundwater withdrawal, Uinta River near Roosevelt, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, P.M.; Marston, T.; Kimball, B.A.; Stolp, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Roosevelt City, Utah, asserts a need for an additional supply of water to meet municipal demands and has identified a potential location for additional groundwater development at the Sprouse well field near the West Channel of the Uinta River. Groundwater is commonly hydraulically linked to surface water and, under some conditions, the pumpage of groundwater can deplete water in streams and other water bodies. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Roosevelt City, the Utah Department of Natural Resources, and the Ute Indian Tribe, began a study to improve understanding of the local interconnection between groundwater and surface water and to assess the potential for streamflow depletion from future groundwater withdrawals at a potential Roosevelt City development location-the Sprouse well field near the West Channel of the Uinta River. In the study, streamflow gains and losses at the river/aquifer boundary near the well field and changes in those conditions over time were assessed through (1) synoptic measurement of discharge in the stream at multiple sites using tracer-dilution methods, (2) periodic measurement of the vertical hydraulic gradient across the streambed, and (3) continuous measurement of stream and streambed water temperature using heat as a tracer of flow across the streambed. Although some contradictions among the results of the three assessment methods were observed, results of the approaches generally indicated (1) losing streamflow conditions on the West Channel of the Uinta River north of and upstream from the Sprouse well field within the study area, (2) gaining streamflow conditions south of and downstream from the well field, and (3) some seasonal changes in those conditions that correspond with seasonal changes in stream stage and local water-table altitudes. A numerical groundwater flow model was developed on the basis of previously reported observations and observations made during this study, and was used to estimate

  12. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.; Morgan, C.D.

    1996-05-01

    The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then applying an acid-fracture stimulation treatment to the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. The study identified reservoir characteristics of beds that have the greatest long-term production potential.

  13. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. First quarterly technical progress report, September 30, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.

    1994-01-10

    The objective of this project is to increase the oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin, Utah, by demonstration of improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field. Low productivity is attributed to gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Tertiary Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This phase will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project. Technical progress is described for: outcrop studies of the Green River Formation; subsurface studies of the Bluebell field; and engineering studies of the reservoirs in the Green River Formation and the Wasatch Formation.

  14. O3, VOC, NOx, PM2.5 and Meteorological Measurements during an Inversion Episode in Utah's Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. D.; Martin, R. S.; Hill, S.; Shorthill, H.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements found high winter ozone (O3) at several locations in northeastern Utah's Uinta Basin. Similar to Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin, the area has seen recent growth in the gas/oil sector. As a part of a more comprehensive project, a study was conducted examining the relationships between O3, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and meteorology during an inversion episode. The study took place February 21-25, 2011 at the area's population center (Vernal) and at an area within the gas/oil fields (Red Wash). At both sites, O3 and NOx, displayed expected diurnal behaviors. The 1-hr O3 concentrations ranged from 10-90 ppb at Vernal and 34-107 ppb at Red Wash. Average diurnal O3 maximums (±95% CI) were 70.4±12.1 ppb and 76.8±12.6 ppb at Vernal and Red Wash, respectively. The Red Wash average O3 diurnal curve was broader than that at Vernal and did not titrate out as rapidly in the evening and morning hours. In contrast, higher NOx was observed at Vernal, with hourly averaged values ranging from 4.5-80.2 ppb, compared to 1.5-29.7 ppb at Red Wash. The NOx tended to follow traffic patterns at both sites, with morning maximum 1-hr averages of 40.8±12.1 ppb and 20.2±8.7 ppb, respectively. A portable O3 monitor attached to a tethered balloon found high ground level O3 (70-80 ppb) and a decrease to relatively constant levels (50-60 ppb) by 150 m agl. Methane and non-methane hydrocarbons (NHMC) were collected at least twice per day using whole vial and sorbent cartridges, followed by GC-FID and GC-MS analysis. The gas/oil field samples (Red Wash) found significantly higher CH4 levels (2.71±0.32 ppm) compared to the Vernal samples (1.82±0.14 ppm). The NMHC were likewise higher at the Red Wash location. Calculation of the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) estimated that methane, ethane, propane, acetylene, remaining alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics accounted for 7.9%, 18.5%, 4.7%, 1.0%, 20.6%, 46

  15. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.

    1995-07-01

    The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment, sandstones deposited in fluvial-dominated deltas; and carbonates and some interbedded sandstones of the lower Wasatch transition deposited in mud flats. Bluebell project personnel are studying ways to improve completion techniques used in the field to increase primary production in both new wells and recompletions. The study includes detailed petrographic examination of the different lithologic reservoir types in both the outcrop and core. Outcrop, core, and geophysical logs are being used to identify and map important depositional cycles. Petrographic detail will be used to improve log calculation methods which are currently highly questionable due to varying water chemistry and clay content in the Green River and Wasatch Formations. Field mapping of fractures and their relationship to basin tectonics helps predict the orientation of open fractures in the subsurface. The project includes acquiring bore-hole imaging logs from new wells in the Bluebell field thereby obtaining detailed subsurface fracture data previously not available. Reservoir simulation models are being constructed to improve the understanding of pressure and fluid flow within the reservoir. A detailed database of well completion histories has been compiled and will be studied to determine which were the most and the least effective methods used in the past.

  16. Landscape patterns as habitat predictors: Building and testing models for cavity-nesting birds in the Uinta Mountains of Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawler, J.J.; Edwards, T.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to predict species occurrences quickly is often crucial for managers and conservation biologists with limited time and funds. We used measured associations with landscape patterns to build accurate predictive habitat models that were quickly and easily applied (i.e., required no additional data collection in the field to make predictions). We used classification trees (a nonparametric alternative to discriminant function analysis, logistic regression, and other generalized linear models) to model nesting habitat of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis), northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), and mountain chickadees (Parus gambeli) in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah, USA. We then tested the predictive capability of the models with independent data collected in the field the following year. The models built for the northern flicker, red-naped sapsucker, and tree swallow were relatively accurate (84%, 80%, and 75% nests correctly classified, respectively) compared to the models for the mountain chickadee (50% nests correctly classified). All four models were more selective than a null model that predicted habitat based solely on a gross association with aspen forests. We conclude that associations with landscape patterns can be used to build relatively accurate, easy to use, predictive models for some species. Our results stress, however, that both selecting the proper scale at which to assess landscape associations and empirically testing the models derived from those associations are crucial for building useful predictive models.

  17. A thermal resistance method for computing surface heat flow and subsurface temperatures with application to the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, David S.; Keho, Tim

    1982-09-01

    The thermal resistance method has been modified to test the utility of oil and gas well bottom-hole temperature data in determining heat flow and subsurface temperature patterns. Thermal resistance, defined as the quotient of a depth parameter '{Delta}{sub z}' and thermal conductivity 'k'', governs subsurface temperatures as follows: T{sub B} = T{sub 0} + q{sub 0} B {summation} z=0 ({Delta}z/k){sub i} where T{sub B} is the temperature at depth z = B, T{sub 0} is the surface temperature, q{sub 0} is surface heat flow and the thermal resistance ({Delta}z/k) is summed for all lithological units between the surface and depth B. In practice, bottom-hole temperatures are combined with a measured or estimated thermal conductivity profile to determine the surface heat flow q{sub 0}, which in turn is used for all consequent subsurface temperature computations. The method has been tested in the Tertiary Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah, a region of intermediate geologic complexity (structurally simple yet lithologically complex) where numerous oil and gas well data are available. Thermal conductivity values, determined for 852 samples from five representative wells varying in depth from 670 to 5180 meters, were used to assign average conductivities to geologic formations and to investigate the effect of facies changes on intra-formation conductivities. In situ conductivities were corrected for porosity and temperature effects. Formation thicknesses needed for the thermal resistance summation were obtained by utilizing approximately 2000 wells in the WEXPRO Petroleum Information file, the computations being expedited by describing all formation contacts as fourth order polynomial surfaces. Bottom-hole temperatures were used from 97 selected wells where multiple well logs permitted correcting temperatures for drilling effects.

  18. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Allison, M.L.

    1997-08-01

    The Bluebell field is productive from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then stimulating the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The characterization study resulted in recommendations for improved completion techniques and a field-demonstration program to test those techniques. The results of the characterization study and the proposed demonstration program are discussed in the second annual technical progress report. The operator of the wells was unable to begin the field demonstration this project year (October 1, 1995 to September 20, 1996). Correlation and thickness mapping of individual beds in the Wasatch Formation was completed and resulted in a. series of maps of each of the individual beds. These data were used in constructing the reservoir models. Non-fractured and fractured geostatistical models and reservoir simulations were generated for a 20-square-mile (51.8-km{sup 2}) portion of the Bluebell field. The modeling provides insights into the effects of fracture porosity and permeability in the Green River and Wasatch reservoirs.

  19. Quantifying Ozone Production throughout the Boundary Layer from High Frequency Tethered Profile Measurements during a High Ozone Episode in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, C. W.; Johnson, B.; Schnell, R. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Cullis, P.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Windell, J.; McClure-Begley, A.; Helmig, D.; Petron, G.

    2015-12-01

    During the Uinta Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) in Jan - Feb 2013, 735 tethered ozonesonde profiles were obtained at 3 sites including during high wintertime photochemical ozone production events that regularly exceeded 125 ppb. High resolution profiles of ozone and temperature with altitude, measured during daylight hours, showed the development of approximately week long high ozone episodes building from background levels of ~40 ppb to >150 ppb. The topography of the basin combined with a strong temperature inversion trapped oil and gas production effluents in the basin and the snow covered surface amplified the sun's radiation driving the photochemical ozone production at rates up to 13 ppb/hour in a cold layer capped at 1600-1700 meters above sea level. Beginning in mid-morning, ozone mixing ratios throughout the cold layer increased until late afternoon. Ozone mixing ratios were generally constant with height indicating that ozone production was nearly uniform throughout the depth of the cold pool. Although there was strong diurnal variation, ozone mixing ratios increased during the day more than decreased during the night, resulting in elevated levels the next morning; an indication that nighttime loss processes did not compensate for daytime production. Even though the 3 tethersonde sites were at elevations differing by as much as 140 m, the top of the high ozone layer was nearly uniform in altitude at the 3 locations. Mobile van surface ozone measurements across the basin confirmed this capped structure of the ozone layer; the vehicle drove out of high ozone mixing ratios at an elevation of ~1900 meters above sea level, above which free tropospheric ozone mixing ratios of ~50 ppb were measured. Exhaust plumes from a coal-fired power plant in the eastern portion of the basin were intercepted by the tethersondes. The structure of the profiles clearly showed that effluents in the plumes were not mixed downward and thus did not contribute precursor nitrogen

  20. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uinta Basin, Utah: point sources compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas wells using dry-gas collection, which means dehydration happens at the well, were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. Another large source was the flowback pond near a recently hydraulically re-fractured gas well. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas wells showed that wet gas collection wells compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool and that oil wells compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil wells on average emit heavier compounds than gas wells. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  1. Characteristics and description of cores from the USGS core hole CRU-1, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation, east-central Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighin, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Oil-yield, lithologic, and mineral distribution data were determined for cores taken from a 497.7-foot drill hole in the upper part of the Parachute Creek Member of the Eocene Green River Formation. The drill hole, 1050 feet FEL, 700 feet FNL, sec. 3, T. 12 S., R. 24 E., Uintah County, Utah, started slightly below the contact between the Uinta Formation, also of Eocene age, and the underlying Green River Formation. It ended 32 feet below the base of the Mahogany bed (the richest oil-shale bed between A groove and B groove--which define the upper and lower boundaries, respectively, of the Mahogany zone). Most of the interval studied is kerogen- or carbonate-rich, commonly tuffaceous, and is very fine grained. Several thin (<3 feet) oil-shale beds which yield as much as 25 gallons of oil per ton occur above the Mahogany zone, but are probably not of economic interest. The cored sequence contains several tuff beds. The thickest of these beds is approximately 2 feet thick; the average thickness is rarely greater than 0.5 feet. Two oil-saturated tuff beds occur approximately 65 feet above the Mahogany oil-shale bed. Although these two tuffs are exposed on nearby surface outcrops, no evidence of oil is seen on outcrop. The Mahogany zone is approximately 69 feet thick at the drill site; the lowermost few feet were not penetrated. At the site cored, the Mahogany zone is overlain by 435 feet of overburden. Fischer assays indicate that 42.3 feet of oil shale within the Mahogany zone could yield at least 25 gallons of oil per ton from beds at least 10 feet thick.

  2. Lands with Wilderness Characteristics, Resource Management Plan Constraints, and Land Exchanges: Cross-Jurisdictional Management and Impacts on Unconventional Fuel Development in Utah's Uinta Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

    2012-10-01

    Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those

  3. Models, data available, and data requirements for estimating the effects of injecting saltwater into disposal wells in the greater Altamont- Bluebell oil and gas field, northern Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freethey, Geoffrey W.

    1988-01-01

    Permits for disposing of salty oil-production water have been issued for 19 wells in the Greater Altamont-Bluebell field, Utah. During 1986 more than 500 million gal of production water were injected into the Duchesne River, the Uinta, and the Green River Formations through 18 of these wells. The physical and chemical effects of injecting this water on aquifers containing potable water are poorly understood. Interfingering and the structural configuration of these formations add complexity to the description of the geometry and hydrogeology of the groundwater system. A preliminary assessment of the problem indicates that numerical modeling may offer a method of estimating the hydrologic and hydrochemical effects of injection. Modeling possibilities include variable-density, three-dimensional flow, sectional transport, and areal transport modeling. Data needed to develop these models can be derived from a synthesis of geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical data already available in the files of State and Federal agencies, oil companies, and private data-base companies. Results from each modeling phase would contribute information for implementing the following phase. The result would be a better understanding of how water moves naturally through the groundwater system, the extent of alterations of both vertical and horizontal flow near the disposal wells, and an overall concept of the effects of deep injection on near-surface aquifers. (USGS)

  4. Re-Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of petroleum sourced from a Type I lacustrine kerogen: insights from the natural Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin and hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cumming, Vivien M.; Selby, David; Lillis, Paul G.; Lewan, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhenium–osmium (Re–Os) geochronology of marine petroleum systems has allowed the determination of the depositional age of source rocks as well as the timing of petroleum generation. In addition, Os isotopes have been applied as a fingerprinting tool to correlate oil to its source unit. To date, only classic marine petroleum systems have been studied. Here we present Re–Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of different petroleum phases (oils, tar sands and gilsonite) derived from the lacustrine Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin, USA. In addition we use an experimental approach, hydrous pyrolysis experiments, to compare to the Re–Os data of naturally generated petroleum in order to further understand the mechanisms of Re and Os transfer to petroleum. The Re–Os geochronology of petroleum from the lacustrine Green River petroleum system (19 ± 14 Ma – all petroleum phases) broadly agrees with previous petroleum generation basin models (∼25 Ma) suggesting that Re–Os geochronology of variable petroleum phases derived from lacustrine Type I kerogen has similar systematics to Type II kerogen (e.g., Selby and Creaser, 2005a, Selby and Creaser, 2005b and Finlay et al., 2010). However, the large uncertainties (over 100% in some cases) produced for the petroleum Re–Os geochronology are a result of multiple generation events occurring through a ∼3000-m thick source unit that creates a mixture of initial Os isotope compositions in the produced petroleum phases. The 187Os/188Os values for the petroleum and source rocks at the time of oil generation vary from 1.4 to 1.9, with the mode at ∼1.6. Oil-to-source correlation using Os isotopes is consistent with previous correlation studies in the Green River petroleum system, and illustrates the potential utility of Os isotopes to characterize the spatial variations within a petroleum system. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments on the Green River Formation source rocks show that Re and Os transfer

  5. Re-Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of petroleum sourced from a Type I lacustrine kerogen: Insights from the natural Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin and hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Vivien M.; Selby, David; Lillis, Paul G.; Lewan, Michael D.

    2014-08-01

    Rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) geochronology of marine petroleum systems has allowed the determination of the depositional age of source rocks as well as the timing of petroleum generation. In addition, Os isotopes have been applied as a fingerprinting tool to correlate oil to its source unit. To date, only classic marine petroleum systems have been studied. Here we present Re-Os geochronology and Os isotope fingerprinting of different petroleum phases (oils, tar sands and gilsonite) derived from the lacustrine Green River petroleum system in the Uinta Basin, USA. In addition we use an experimental approach, hydrous pyrolysis experiments, to compare to the Re-Os data of naturally generated petroleum in order to further understand the mechanisms of Re and Os transfer to petroleum. The Re-Os geochronology of petroleum from the lacustrine Green River petroleum system (19 ± 14 Ma - all petroleum phases) broadly agrees with previous petroleum generation basin models (∼25 Ma) suggesting that Re-Os geochronology of variable petroleum phases derived from lacustrine Type I kerogen has similar systematics to Type II kerogen (e.g., Selby and Creaser, 2005a,b; Finlay et al., 2010). However, the large uncertainties (over 100% in some cases) produced for the petroleum Re-Os geochronology are a result of multiple generation events occurring through a ∼3000-m thick source unit that creates a mixture of initial Os isotope compositions in the produced petroleum phases. The 187Os/188Os values for the petroleum and source rocks at the time of oil generation vary from 1.4 to 1.9, with the mode at ∼1.6. Oil-to-source correlation using Os isotopes is consistent with previous correlation studies in the Green River petroleum system, and illustrates the potential utility of Os isotopes to characterize the spatial variations within a petroleum system. Hydrous pyrolysis experiments on the Green River Formation source rocks show that Re and Os transfer are mimicking the natural system. This

  6. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  7. Detection and mapping of mineralized areas in the Cortez-Uinta Belt, Utah-Nevada, using computer-enhanced ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary analysis indicates that mineralogical differences between altered rocks and most unaltered rocks in south-central Nevada cause visible and near infrared spectral reflectance differences, which can be used to discriminate these broad categories of rocks in multispectral images. The most important mineralogical differences are the increased abundance of goethite, hematite, and jarosite, and the presence of alunite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite in the altered rock. The technique to enhance subtle spectral differences combines ratioing of the MSS bands and contrast stretching. The stretched ratio values are used to produce black and white images that depict materials according to spectral reflectance; rationing minimizes the influence of topography and overall albedo on the grouping of spectrally similar materials. Field evaluation of color-ratio composite shows that, excluding alluvial areas, approximately 80 percent of the green and brown color patterns are related to hydrothermal alternation. The remaining 20 percent consists mainly of pink hematitic crystallized tuff, a result of vapor phase crystallization, and of tan and red ferruginous shale and siltstone.

  8. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  9. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  10. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  11. Separation Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes eight-week short-term group designed to help separated or divorced men and women move through related adjustment phase in focused group setting. Discusses constructs that form the foundations of this short-term psychoeducational and support group and presents brief overview of psychological difficulties that occur as result of marital…

  12. Mammalian faunal response to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (~53.5-48.5 mya) and a new terrestrial record of the associated carbon isotope excursion from Raven Ridge in the Uinta Basin, Colorado-Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutchak, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Raven Ridge straddles the Colorado-Utah border on the northeastern edge of the Uinta Basin and consists of intertonguing units of the fluvial Colton and lacustrine Green River Formations. Fossil vertebrate localities along the ridge have produced a diverse mammalian fauna comprising 64 genera in 34 families. Included are the index taxa Smilodectes, Omomys, Heptodon, and Lambdotherium which suggest an age range of mid-Wasatchian (Wa5, ~53.5mya) through mid Bridgerian (Br2, ~48.5mya) for the Raven Ridge fauna. Others have shown that this time interval coincides with the onset, peak, and decline of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), an extended interval of globally warm temperatures following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) that is coincident with a large negative carbon excursion. The Raven Ridge fauna provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the effects of a lengthy interval of global warmth on mammalian diversity and ecosystem structure. To study changes in the mammalian fauna that occurred during the EECO, it was necessary to constrain the onset, peak, and decline of the EECO at Raven Ridge through chemostratigraphic correlation with established marine isotope curves. This was accomplished by analysis of approximately 300 sediment samples for Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content. TOC has been used successfully in the Bighorn Basin to identify the stratigraphic occurrence of the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) associated with the PETM, which has roughly the same amplitude as the negative excursion associated with the EECO. The Raven Ridge TOC data show a large negative carbon excursion that starts during the Wa6 biochron, peaks during the Wa7 biochron, and is followed by a positive excursion near the Wa-Br boundary. This terrestrial δ13C pattern is consistent with results seen in established marine isotope curves across the EECO interval. The minimum δ13C value of the negative excursion is -29.67‰, which is comparable to the Bighorn CIE

  13. Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  14. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  15. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  16. Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

  17. Geology of the lower Yellow Creek area, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, W.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The geology and resources of the lower Yellow Creek area, an area at the northwestern margin of the Piceance Creek basin comprising of four 7.5-minute quadrangles, are described. Subsurface face rocks penetrated by drill holes range in age from Pennsylvania to Cretaceous. Measured sections show the Mancos Shale and the Castlegate Sandstone, Iles Formation, and Williams Fork Formation of the Mesaverde Group of Late Cretaceous age and the Fort Union, Wasatch, Green River, and Uinta formations of Tertiary age. Surficial deposits of Quaternary age include terrace gravels, alluvium, and landslides. Fold axes and faults in the area trend northwesterly. The southern part of the area contains major oil-shale resources. Coal-bearing zones in the Williams Fork and Iles formations contain considerable coal. The coal-resources potential is limited, however, by nonpersistence of the thicker coal beds. Small amounts of gas have been produced from shallow, lenticular Tertiary sandstones. Large, but very lowgrade uranium resources are present in the Fort Union Formation.

  18. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  19. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  20. Cantor Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Ben; Dow, Chris; Livshits, Leo

    2011-01-01

    The Cantor subset of the unit interval [0, 1) is "large" in cardinality and also "large" algebraically, that is, the smallest subgroup of [0, 1) generated by the Cantor set (using addition mod 1 as the group operation) is the whole of [0, 1). In this paper, we show how to construct Cantor-like sets which are "large" in cardinality but "small"…

  1. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  2. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  3. Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane: Sand wash basin, Colorado and Wyoming. Topical report, August 1, 1991-April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; McMurry, R.G.

    1993-08-01

    Contents: tectonic evolution, stratigraphic setting, and coal fracture patterns of the sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the upper cretaceous mesaverde group, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, mesaverde group, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the upper mesaverde group, sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the paleocene fort union formation, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, fort union formation, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the fort union formation, sand wash basin; and resources and producibility of coalbed methane in the sand wash basin.

  4. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  5. Group Work Publication-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  6. Group Composition, Group Interaction and Achievement in Cooperative Small Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.

    This study investigated interaction and achievement in cooperative small groups in four junior high school mathematics classrooms. Ninety-six students learned a one-week unit on consumer mathematics in mixed-ability or uniform-ability groups. Students in mixed-ability groups scored higher on a problem-solving test than students in uniform-ability…

  7. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  8. Class Numbers and Groups of Algebraic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, V. P.; Bondarenko, A. A.; Rapinčuk, A. S.

    1980-06-01

    The class number of an algebraic group G defined over a global field is the number of double cosets of the adele group GA with respect to the subgroups of integral and principal adeles. In most cases the set of double cosets has the natural structure of an abelian group, called the class group of G. In this article the class number of a semisimple group G is computed, and it is proved that any finite abelian group can be realized as a class group.Bibliography: 24 titles.

  9. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended. PMID:24441299

  10. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Return to Web version Group B Strep Infection Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a certain kind of bacteria (germ) that lives in the intestine, rectum, and ...

  11. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  12. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  13. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boya, Luis J.

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  14. Preliminary thermal-maturity map of the Cameo and Fairfield or equivalent coal zone in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuccio, Vito F.; Johnson, Ronald C.

    1983-01-01

    This map was prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project and was constructed to show the thermal maturity of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation (or Group) in the Piceance Creek Basin. The ability of a source rock to generate oil and gas is directly related to its kerogen content and thermal maturity; hence, thermal maturity is commonly used as an exploration tool. This publication consists of two parts: a coal rank map for the basinwide Cameo and Fairfield or equivalent coal zone and three cross sections showing the variation in a coal rank for the entire Mesaverde. Structure contours on the map show the top of the Rollins Sandstone Member of the Mesaverde Formation and its equivalent the Trout Creek Sandstone Member of the Iles Formation of the Mesaverde Group, which immediately underlie the Cameo and Fairfield zone. The structure contours show the fairly strong correlation between structure and coal rank in the basin, suggesting that maximum overburden was the key factor in determining the coal ranks. Even in the southern part of the basin where extensive plutonism occurred during the Oligocene, coal ranks still generally follow structure; indicating that the plutons had little affect on the coals. On the cross sections both the top of the Rollins and Trout Creek, and the top of the Mesaverde Formation/Group are shown. A complete analysis of the entire Mesaverde in the basin would require more information than is presently available.

  15. Small Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  16. Redefining Cohesiveness in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyton, Joann; Springston, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate and extend research on work of Kelly and Duran in assessing relationship of group member perceptions of group interaction to group effectiveness. Concludes perceived similarity may not always align with perceptions of cohesiveness. (Author/ABL)

  17. Assertive Training in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  18. Interdependence and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the differential effects of task design and reward system design on group functioning in a large U.S. corporation; the effectiveness of "hybrid" groups (having tasks and rewards with both individual and group elements); and how individuals' autonomy preferences moderate their responses to interdependence. Groups performed best when…

  19. Characterization of Petroleum Residue in the Entrada Sandstone, Colorado National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.; King, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Introduction As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) petroleum resource assessment of the Uinta-Piceance Province, Colorado and Utah, in 2000 (USGS Uinta-Piceance Assessment Team, 2003), some 170 oils, oil stains, and oil seeps were geochemically characterized and divided into genetic types (Lillis and others, 2003). Recognized oil types include Minturn, Phosphoria, Grassy Trail Creek, Mancos, Mesaverde, and Green River. Subsequent to that study, the existence and general locality of petroleum residue in the Middle Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in Colorado National Monument (CNM) was brought to the attention of the authors (Scott and others, 2001). Because the analysis of such non-commercial petroleum deposits commonly yields valuable regional resource-trend information, we collected and characterized the reported CNM petroleum residue and compared the results with identified oil types in the Uinta-Piceance Province. Three samples of Entrada Sandstone with petroleum residue were collected near Little Park Road along the south edge of the CNM in sec.20, T.12S., R.101W. The approximate extent of the petroleum staining was determined by field testing with solvent, and the stains appear to be restricted to the upper part of the 'board beds' unit (informal name, Scott and others, 2001) of the Entrada Sandstone between the two fault traces of the Glade Park fault.

  20. Mystic Reflection Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlov, Yuri; Berenstein, Arkady

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to systematically study mystic reflection groups that emerged independently in the paper [Selecta Math. (N.S.) 14 (2009), 325-372] by the authors and in the paper [Algebr. Represent. Theory 13 (2010), 127-158] by Kirkman, Kuzmanovich and Zhang. A detailed analysis of this class of groups reveals that they are in a nontrivial correspondence with the complex reflection groups G(m,p,n). We also prove that the group algebras of corresponding groups are isomorphic and classify all such groups up to isomorphism.

  1. What Makes Groups Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allcorn, Seth

    1985-01-01

    By reviewing this analysis of the behavior of both groups and individuals in groups, human resources managers can learn to tell whether committees, task forces, and departments may be encouraging or inhibiting the work they set out to do. (Author)

  2. GROUP ASPIRATIONS AND GROUP COPING BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MEDOW, HERMAN; ZANDER, ALVIN

    THIS RESEARCH PROJECT WAS CONCERNED WITH THE EFFECTS OF CERTAIN INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL CONDITIONS UPON THE SELECTION OF A GROUP'S LEVEL OF ASPIRATION AND THE EFFECTS OF THESE CONDITIONS ON MEMBERS' COPING BEHAVIOR. SEVEN EXPERIMENTS WERE DESIGNED WHICH UTILIZED MALE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OF SUBURBAN SCHOOLS AS SUBJECTS. RESULTS OBTAINED FROM THE…

  3. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  4. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  5. Internet Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses newsgroups, listservs, and Web-based discussion groups. Highlights include major categories of international USENET discussion groups; newsgroups versus mailing lists; newsreaders; news servers; newsgroup subscriptions; newsgroups versus Web discussion groups; linking newsgroups, mailing lists, and the Web; and setting up a news host. A…

  6. Change through Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  7. Infant Group Care Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.

    Children under 3 years of age who are in group care face special health risks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control indicate the existence of a causal relationship between infant group day care and certain diseases that are spread through contact at day care centers. Children in group care who are still in diapers are especially vulnerable to…

  8. The Wisdom of Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2009-01-01

    What is it about small groups that make them so powerful? The answer is straightforward: Groups tend to solve problems better than even the brightest individuals because "many hands make light work," and "two heads are better than one." This is especially true when the groups are diverse and individuals act somewhat independently. In this month's…

  9. Working Group 7 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  10. Internet minimal group paradigm.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2005-04-01

    Over many years, social psychologists have sought to understand what causes individuals to form themselves into groups. Initially, it was believed that groups were formed when people bonded around a common goal. Later, it was found that, when individuals were divided into groups on a random basis, this in itself was sufficient for them to feel part of a group and show a preference for their own group over others. Since the environment in cyberspace is different from that of the offline world, for example, there is no physical proximity between participants; it may be assumed that it would be difficult to achieve feelings of affiliation among potential or actual group members. This pioneer study seeks to discover which components are requisite to the creation of a group identity among individuals surfing the Internet. For this experiment, 24 people were divided into two Internet chat groups according to their intuitive preference in a decision-making task. It was found that group members perceived their own group performance as superior on a cognitive task as compared with that of the other group. These results demonstrate that for surfers, the Internet experience is very real and even a trivial allocation of people to a group is likely to create a situation of ingroup favoritism. PMID:15938653

  11. Practice and Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  12. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  13. A NEW LOG EVALUATION METHOD TO APPRAISE MESAVERDE RE-COMPLETION OPPORTUNITES

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Greer

    2002-09-11

    This report covers the information presented at the technical progress review. The following topics were discussed: (1) Structure of the study area dataset. (2) A visual illustration of the typical logs. (3) Crossplots developed and evaluated for patterns that might bear a relationship to initial producing rate. (4) Development of fuzzy curves to rank the goodness of the statistical properties of the logs used to construct the crossplots. (5) Neural network correlations developed with statistical properties of the logs.

  14. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  15. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  16. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  17. Rebellion in group.

    PubMed

    Billow, Richard M

    2003-07-01

    Rebellion is a strategy of social action: to overthrow the group's status quo or to adamantly oppose its revision. Rebellion occurs when other avenues of influence seem futile or unattractive-a judgment that depends on the group's genuine receptivity to discussion and change, and equally, on the state of mind of the rebel. There are different pathways of rebellion: defiance, secession/exile, anarchy, or revolution. Although rebellion represents an individual's mental attitude toward a group, it is useful to think of group process and rebellion as an attempt to move the group in a different direction. Similar to other group members, the therapist has rebellious feelings and thoughts, and may take on the multiple roles of defiant instigator, exiled outcast, anarchist, and revolutionary. PMID:12841098

  18. Blood groups systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  19. Blood groups systems.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  20. Group Work. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  1. The Thursday Night Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    History and Social Science Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A Los Angeles based grassroots organization, the Thursday Night Group, promotes the vision that the world can be different and that we all--adults and children--can do something to find solutions to the nuclear threat. How the group serves as a resource to elementary and secondary schools is described. (RM)

  2. Beam dynamics group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  3. Grouping for Inequity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macqueen, Suzanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The inequity of streaming as a method of organising classes was established by research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s. While the practice produces small advantages for limited groups of students, it hinders the academic and social advancement of the majority. Although streaming has declined, new forms of achievement grouping have emerged, with…

  4. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Lymphoid leukosis has been the most common form of L/S group of diseases seen in field flocks, although myeloid leuk...

  5. Equivalence of superspace groups

    PubMed Central

    van Smaalen, Sander; Campbell, Branton J.; Stokes, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which determines the equivalence of two settings of a (3 + d)-dimensional superspace group (d = 1, 2, 3). The algorithm has been implemented as a web tool on , providing the transformation of any user-given superspace group to the standard setting of this superspace group in . It is shown how the standard setting of a superspace group can be directly obtained by an appropriate transformation of the external-space lattice vectors (the basic structure unit cell) and a transformation of the internal-space lattice vectors (new modulation wavevectors are linear combinations of old modulation wavevectors plus a three-dimensional reciprocal-lattice vector). The need for non-standard settings in some cases and the desirability of employing standard settings of superspace groups in other cases are illustrated by an analysis of the symmetries of a series of compounds, comparing published and standard settings and the transformations between them. A compilation is provided of standard settings of compounds with two- and three-dimensional modulations. The problem of settings of superspace groups is discussed for incommensurate composite crystals and for chiral superspace groups. PMID:23250064

  6. Groups and Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, Ravi; Miodownik, Dan; Riolo, Rick

    Violence can take place along a multitude of cleavages, e.g., (1) between political groups like the Kach Movement, pitting West Bank settlers against Israeli governments supporting the land-for-peace agenda; (2) between religious groups, such as Christians and Muslims in the Nigerian cities of Jos and Kaduna; (3) along class lines, as in India between Dalits and members of the Brahminical upper castes, upwardly mobile intermediate castes, and even other backward castes such as the Thevars; and (4) between ethnic groups such as the Hutu and Tutsi, both within and across state boundaries in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi.

  7. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  8. Composite Group Technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoff, Kevin

    A comprehensive classification methodology for graphite composite assemblies was developed at Boeing Helicopters. This classification scheme was used to create a Group Technology (GT) database containing part features and attributes which capture both product and process definition. GT data is available to both Engineering and Operations personnel for retrieval and analysis. This paper will address the applications of group technology at Boeing Helicopters. In particular, the role of GT in Aircraft Design Build (concurrent engineering) processes will be highlighted. Examples of design standardization efforts for composite airframe structural parts will be discussed. In addition, the group technology foundation for cellular manufacturing and a methodology for planning future composite manufacturing facilities will be presented.

  9. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... CJ. Group B streptococcal infections. In: Cherry J, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. ... PhD, Associate Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review ...

  10. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  11. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  12. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative uses multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. The resources of the Frederick National Lab allocated to the RAS Hub are organized into seven laboratory groups, each contributing to the collaborative effort.

  13. MSUD Family Support Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.1M to develop first drug for Maple Syrup Urine Disease Baby screening: Life-saving scheme expanded ... does not replace medical consultation. The MSUD (Maple Syrup Urine Disease) Family Support Group is not liable ...

  14. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  15. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    ScienceCinema

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-05-25

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy?s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  16. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  17. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  18. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    PubMed

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. PMID:26851342

  19. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  20. Coordinating Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  1. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  2. Group Psychotherapy in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Göran

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the national developments of group psychotherapy (GPS) in Sweden during the period from World War II until the present time. Methods and concepts, imported primarily from England and the United States, inspired trainings and widespread psychodynamic and group analytic applications in schools, health treatment, and social care. Education in psychotherapy and GPS at universities opened new therapeutic and vocational areas during the period 1970-2005. Increasing criticism of psychodynamics, as in other Western societies, but more radical in Sweden, has in the last decades made group analytic GPS diminish in favor of cognitive behavioral therapy models. Prospects for GPS further development may presently look bleak but, in a longer perspective, are promising. PMID:26401795

  3. Instructions to working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  4. A Quantum Groups Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn

    2002-05-01

    Here is a self-contained introduction to quantum groups as algebraic objects. Based on the author's lecture notes for the Part III pure mathematics course at Cambridge University, the book is suitable as a primary text for graduate courses in quantum groups or supplementary reading for modern courses in advanced algebra. The material assumes knowledge of basic and linear algebra. Some familiarity with semisimple Lie algebras would also be helpful. The volume is a primer for mathematicians but it will also be useful for mathematical physicists.

  5. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  6. Deliberative Discussion Focus Groups.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses a new approach for the conduct of focus groups in health research. Identifying ways to educate and inform participants about the topic of interest prior to the focus group discussion can promote more quality data from informed opinions. Data on this deliberative discussion approach are provided from research within three federally funded studies. As healthcare continues to improve from scientific and technological advancements, educating the research participants prior to data collection about these complexities is essential to gather quality data. PMID:26078330

  7. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  8. Internet Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, http://Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method. PMID:15681976

  9. Group Counseling: Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Johnnie

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes and sickle cell anemia (SCA) are two health-related characteristics that distinguish young people from their peers. This article outlines the problems of children with diabetes and SCA and presents the goals and format for group counseling of these populations and their parents. (Author/BEF)

  10. National Melon Research Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Melon Research Group met with the Cucurbitaceae 2010 conference in Charleston, South Carolina at 7:00 P.M. on November 17. The discussion was focused solely on cucurbit powdery mildew (CPM). Several reported increased problem with CPM or apparent changes in race. Ales Lebeda (Palacký Un...

  11. Project Echo Task Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A technician assigned to the Project Echo Task Group separates the two hemispheres of the Echo 1 container for inspection. The charge that freed the balloon was placed inside of a ring encircling the canister at its equator.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 181.

  12. PLATINUM-GROUP METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document assembles, organizes, and evaluates all pertinent information (up to April 1976) about the effects on man and his environment that result either directly or indirectly from pollution by platinum-group metals: iridium (Ir), osmium (Os), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), ...

  13. Valuing Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziosi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    For people living with or caring for someone with a disability, being able to talk to someone who can relate to their feelings of frustration during difficult times, offer practical advice on an issue, or even understand the importance of a small success, can make a difference. Support groups are a mainstay for individuals coping with daily…

  14. LCDs Revolutionize Group Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Mel

    1987-01-01

    Describes a screen projector based on liquid crystal display (LCD) that duplicates the monitor of a microcomputer and may be used in group training sessions for demonstration purposes. Suggestions of what features to look for and a buyer's guide are provided. (CLB)

  15. Special Interest Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degi, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers a reflection on the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, on April 20, 1999. Notes how every special-interest group has used the tragedy to support its own point of view, and concludes that teachers have become bystanders in the education of America's children. (SR)

  16. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of…

  17. The Pressure Group Cooker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Administrators across the nation have encountered vigorous challenges against textbooks, practices, and procedures that critics find laden with occult and New Age values. Attacks are becoming more aggressive, better organized, and well financed. This article and accompanying sidebars discuss pressure group tactics and ways to counter them. The…

  18. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  19. Dimensions of Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawidowicz, Paula

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between positive and negative group interactions and one or another of individuals' attitudes or characteristics--moral development, critical thinking, resilience, and self efficacy--has been examined previously. However, no systemic examination of individuals' development of patterns of these characteristics and those patterns'…

  20. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  1. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  2. Test Group Rethinks Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    A group that is developing tests for half the states in the nation has dramatically reduced the length of its assessment in a bid to balance the desire for a more meaningful and useful exam with concerns about the amount of time spent on testing. The decision by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium reflects months of conversation among its…

  3. [Transference and group psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Luiz Paulo de C; Santos, Manoel Antônio Dos

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the concept of transference, focusing on its peculiarities in the group context. The nature of the therapeutic situation and the broad freedom given to patients in order to access the unconscious material at their own pace, within a safe environment and with as little censorship as can be managed, transference gradually takes place. Through displacement, the psychotherapist and group members are perceived not as they are, with their real attributes, but as one or more objects that arouse emotions coming from the infant world, more precisely from the collection of deep affective influences. One peculiarity of the group situation when compared to individual psychotherapy is that, in the former, multiple transferences coexist, which group members establish among themselves, enabling a wide range of possible feelings. Both treatment modes share the assumption that unresolved conflicts which stimulated patients to seek for help can be reduced or even abolished through the interpretation and working through of transference, which functions as a process of change throughout the psychotherapy. PMID:16532247

  4. Learning from Nurture Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with Nurture Groups, which are a specialist form of provision for pupils with social, emotional and learning difficulties. The paper outlines the theoretical underpinnings of the NG approach and describes the practical arrangements and operations features of this form of provision. Evidence from research studies exploring the…

  5. COHOMOLOGY OF KLEINIAN GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Kra, Irwin

    1969-01-01

    Let [unk] be a (nonelementary) Kleinian group and q ≥ 2 an integer. The group [unk] acts in a natural way on the vector space II2q—2 of complex polynomials in one variable of degree ≤ 2q — 2. One can thus form H1([unk],II2q—2), the first cohomology group of [unk] with coefficients in II2q—2. There are essentially two ways of constructing cohomology classes. One construction originated with Eichler and has recently been extended by Ahlfors. Another construction is due to Bers. We show that for finitely generated [unk], every cohomology class pε H1([unk],II2q—2) can be written uniquely (if one chooses an invariant union of components of [unk]) as a sum of a Bers cohomology class and an Eichler cohomology class. Similar decompositions are obtained for the subgroups of parabolic cohomology classes introduced by Ahlfors. Some information on the structure of H1([unk],II2q—2) for infinitely generated groups [unk] is also obtained. PMID:16591774

  6. Cohomology of kleinian groups.

    PubMed

    Kra, I

    1969-07-01

    Let [unk] be a (nonelementary) Kleinian group and q >/= 2 an integer. The group [unk] acts in a natural way on the vector space II(2q-2) of complex polynomials in one variable of degree group of [unk] with coefficients in II(2q-2). There are essentially two ways of constructing cohomology classes. One construction originated with Eichler and has recently been extended by Ahlfors. Another construction is due to Bers. We show that for finitely generated [unk], every cohomology class pepsilon H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) can be written uniquely (if one chooses an invariant union of components of [unk]) as a sum of a Bers cohomology class and an Eichler cohomology class. Similar decompositions are obtained for the subgroups of parabolic cohomology classes introduced by Ahlfors. Some information on the structure of H(1)([unk],II(2q-2)) for infinitely generated groups [unk] is also obtained. PMID:16591774

  7. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  8. Group-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garth, Russell Y.

    1999-01-01

    An author of the 14th issue of this journal, which was devoted to group-based pedagogical approaches to college instruction, traces the continuing development of collaborative or cooperative learning. Notes influence of the original volume on guidelines of the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education and the Collaboration in…

  9. Working Group C Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuhn, H.-D.

    2003-12-01

    Working group C, "Application to FELs," of the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy addressed a total of nine topics. This summary will discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, "Optics Free" FEL Oscillators, and VISA II.

  10. Working With Citizens' Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, James B.

    1974-01-01

    The growing demand for expert technical advice in the areas of environmental impact statements, testimony at public hearings, and testimony in consumer or environmental litigation is examined. Brief descriptions of thirteen of the most active public-interest science groups are included. (DT)

  11. International Study Tour Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John J.; McCaw, William P.; Kero, Patty; Stewart, Courtney; Haddouch, Reda

    2014-01-01

    Using the context of international study tour groups, this study examined the personal and professional transformation that occurred among host faculty and staff at The University of Montana-Missoula as a result of their interactions with traveling academics from other countries. Data were collected from participant responses (n = 27) using a…

  12. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  13. Group A Streptococcal (GAS) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Core surveillance (ABCs) Group A Strep Calculator CDC Streptococcus Laboratory Sepsis About Group A Strep Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Group A Streptococcus (group A strep) are bacteria that can live ...

  14. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  15. Summaries of group discussions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    Group discussions following the presentations of reports on the remote sensing of Chesapeake Bay resources are presented. The parameters to be investigated by the remote sensors and the specifications of the sensors are described. Specific sensors for obtaining data on various aspects of the ecology are identified. Recommendations for establishing a data bank and additional efforts to obtain increased understanding of the ecology are submitted.

  16. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  17. Group process and group phenomena on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, H

    2001-07-01

    This article identifies group processes and group phenomena in discussion lists on the Internet and examines the differences and similarities with the processes in small and large groups. Group dynamics and phenomena, such as boundaries, cohesion, transference, scapegoating, and the leader's role are addressed. Large group features, such as alienation, vulnerability, and the vast amount of issues discussed in parallel are described. There are similarities between the discussion list and small groups on issues of cohesion and group norms, and in the psychological mechanisms of transference and scapegoating. There are differences regarding the contract, boundaries, leaving the group, and extra-group socialization. Although many of the phenomena described resemble a large group, a discussion list on the Internet maintains the illusion of being a small group and frequently acts like one. While a virtual therapy group would be somewhat different from a real group, it could nonetheless be useful. PMID:11447785

  18. Quality of Group Member Agendas and Group Session Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Jauquet, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Examined relationship between group members' (N=36) approach to group sessions and group session climate and relationship between length of time in group and agenda quality. Found average ratings of interpersonal and here-and-now dimensions of agendas were significantly related to average perception of group climate as more engaged and less…

  19. Simulated Group Counseling: An Experiential Training Model for Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, John L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experiential group training model designed for prepracticum-level counseling graduate students. Simulated Group Counseling (SCG) offers students an opportunity to experience being group members; facilitating a group; and processing the group with peers, an advanced graduate student observer, and the instructor. SGC reduces…

  20. Group Processes in Experiential Training Groups in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitza, Amy

    2011-01-01

    While group counseling has the potential to be an effective form of intervention in sub-Saharan Africa, research on group processes that would help guide group interventions in the region is scarce. This study investigated therapeutic factors and group climate in experiential training groups in Botswana. The Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ;…

  1. Group Progress of Community Elderly as Measured by Tape Recordings, Group Tempo and Group Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Marcella Bakur; Weinstock, Comilda S.

    1979-01-01

    Geriatric outpatients were involved in a group resocialization program. Comparison is made between experimental groups whose leader used group intervention techniques, and groups where leader played a nonintervention role. Experimental group members showed changes toward more active problem-solving approaches, while group members remained fixed at…

  2. Joint Effects of Group Composition, Group Norm, Type of Problem and Group vs. Individual Responding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerbladh, Thor; Sjodin, Sture

    1986-01-01

    Potential interactions between four factors of educational interest within small group research were studied: (1) type of problem; (2) group composition; (3) group norm; and (4) group productivity. Reliable interactions were obtained for: (1) sex x group norm; (2) sex x group norm x productivity; and (3) type of problem x productivity. (Author/LMO)

  3. Renormalization group functional equations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2011-03-15

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  4. Local Group Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David

    2013-11-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. The formation of the Milky Way in the CDM paradigm Ken Freeman; 2. Dark matter content and tidal effects in Local Group dwarf galaxies Steven R. Majewski; 3. Notes on the missing satellites problem James Bullock; 4. The Milky Way satellite galaxies Pavel Kroupa; 5. Stellar tidal streams Rodrigo Ibata; 6. Tutorial: the analysis of colour-magnitude diagrams David Valls-Gabaud; 7. Tutorial: modeling tidal streams using N-body simulations Jorge Peñarrubia.

  5. Theory and modeling group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  6. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  7. Theory and modeling group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  8. Systems special investigation group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An interim report concerning the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is presented by a Boeing Systems special investigation group (SIG). The SIG activities were divided into five engineering disciplines: electrical, mechanical, optics, thermal, and batteries/solar cells. The responsibilities of the SIG included the following areas: support de-integration at Kennedy Space Center (KSC); testing of hardware at Boeing; review of principal investigator (PI) test plans and test results; support of test activities at PI labs; and collation of all test results into the SIG database.

  9. Water resource systems group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedinger, Jery R.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    The 11th meeting of the Water Resource Systems Group was held at the University of Washington (Seattle), August 7-8, 1987. These systems group meetings, which are informal gatherings of professionals who have an interest in the educational and research aspects of water resources systems analysis, have usually been held on university campuses. The 30 attendees of the 1987 meeting represented a cross section of university faculty and graduate students, government managers and researchers, and engineering consultants.The meeting opened with short discussions by Steve Burges (University of Washington), Chuck Howard (CDD Howard and Associates, Victoria, Canada), David Dawdy (consultant, San Francisco, Calif.), and Jon Liebman (University of Illinois, Urbana) outlining their views of current issues in the water resources area. Burges emphasized the limitations and inadequacies of many of the models currently used in hydrology: rainfall runoff models may not adequately capture the physical characteristics of the movement of water into channels, vadose and saturated zone pollutant transport models are incapable of reproducing many of the features observed in the field, and many streamflow forecasting models used for reservoir operations have been constructed to reproduce average conditions but break down under the extreme conditions (floods and droughts) where they are most needed.

  10. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.