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Sample records for mesenteric ischemia non-okklusive

  1. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  2. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  3. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lock, G; Schölmerich, J

    1995-07-01

    Non-occlusive disease of the mesentery is still a rather underdiagnosed and underestimated condition. It is associated with circumstances that may compromise circulation or the intake of drugs that may lower mesenteric blood flow. Pathophysiologically, a "low flow syndrome" of mesenteric circulation is followed by vasoconstriction; a reperfusion injury may contribute to the ischemic injury. Histopathological changes vary between superficial localized lesions and transmural gangrene. Diagnosis within the initial 24 hours of the development of symptoms is crucial for prognosis but remains a difficult task. Clinical presentation, laboratory tests and ultrasound lack specificity; the role of duplex ultrasound, tonometry and reflectance spectophotometry is still under evaluation. Mesenteric angiography remains the only reliable diagnostic tool and should be applied early in all patients in whom acute mesenteric ischemia is a real possibility. Therapy is aimed at the rapid correction of predisposing and precipitating factors and an effective treatment of mesenteric vasoconstriction. Treatment of choice is a papaverine infusion into the superior mesenteric artery via an angiography catheter. Patients with peritoneal signs have to be treated surgically. PMID:7590571

  4. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Report of Five Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Ivancev, Krasnodar; Lindh, Mats; Uher, Petr

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement in stenotic and occluded mesenteric arteries in five consecutive patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Methods: Five patients with 70%-100% obliterations of all mesenteric vessels resulting in chronic mesenteric ischemia (n= 4) and as a prophylactic measure prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (n= 1) underwent PTA of celiac and/or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenoses (n= 2), primary stenting of ostial celiac occlusions (n= 2), and secondary stenting of a SMA occlusion (n= 1; recoil after initial PTA). All patients underwent duplex ultrasonography (US) (n= 3) and/or angiography (n= 5) during a median follow-up of 21 months (range 8-42 months). Results: Clinical success was obtained in all five patients. Asymptomatic significant late restenoses (n3) were successfully treated with repeat PTA (n= 2) and stenting of an SMA occlusion (n= 1; celiac stent restenosis). Recurrent pain in one patient was interpreted as secondary to postsurgical abdominal adhesions. Two puncture-site complications occurred requiring local surgical treatment. Conclusions: Endovascular techniques may be attempted prior to surgery in cases of stenotic or short occlusive lesions in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Surgery may still be preferred in patients with long occlusions and a low operative risk.

  6. [Intra-arterial fibrinolytic therapy for acute mesenteric ischemia].

    PubMed

    Michel, C; Laffy, P; Leblanc, G; Riou, J Y; Chaloum, S; Maklouf, M; Le Guen, O; Pitre, J

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of mesenteric ischemia secondary to embolic occlusion treated by percutaneous intra-arterial thrombolysis. Early initial radiographic evaluation included abdominal plain film, ultrasonography, abdominal CT, and arteriography. Only selective superior mesenteric artery angiography provided definite diagnosis. The duration of ischemic symptoms before thrombolysis was 6 hours. Post procedure angiogram at 12 hours showed complete resolution of the mesenteric arterial thrombus with clinical improvement. The most important criteria for patient survival is early diagnosis and immediate treatment. Direct infusion of urokinase into the superior mesentric artery may be an alternative to surgery in selected patients and particularly in patients without evidence of frank bowel necrosis. PMID:11223630

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Results in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chahid, Tamam; Alfidja, Agaicha T.; Biard, Marie; Ravel, Anne; Garcier, Jean Marc; Boyer, L.

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated immediate and long-term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement to treat stenotic and occluded arteries in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Fourteen patients were treated by 3 exclusive celiac artery (CA) PTAs (2 stentings), 3 cases with both Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and CA angioplasties, and 8 exclusive SMA angioplasties (3 stentings). Eleven patients had atheromatous stenoses with one case of an early onset atheroma in an HIV patient with antiphospholipid syndrome. The other etiologies of mesenteric arterial lesions were Takayashu arteritis (2 cases) and a postradiation stenoses (1 case). Technical success was achieved in all cases. Two major complications were observed: one hematoma and one false aneurysm occurring at the brachial puncture site (14.3%). An immediate clinical success was obtained in all patients. During a follow-up of 1-83 months (mean: 29 months), 11 patients were symptom free; 3 patients had recurrent pain; in one patient with inflammatory syndrome, pain relief was obtained with medical treatment; in 2 patients abdominal pain was due to restenosis 36 and 6 months after PTA, respectively. Restenosis was treated by PTA (postirradiation stenosis), and by surgical bypass (atheromatous stenosis). Percutaneous endovascular techniques are safe and accurate. They are an alternative to surgery in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia due to short and proximal occlusive lesions of SMA and CA.

  8. Mesenteric ischemia masquerading as refractory peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, K; Anandh, U

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of mesenteric ischemia in patients on long term peritoneal dialysis both of which were associated with poor outcomes. Both were diabetic and on peritoneal dialysis for a long time. On evaluation of refractory peritonitis we found evidence of non occlusive mesenteric ischemia. Despite adequate treatment both succumbed to their illness. Abdominal pathology, especially mesenteric ischemia leading to gut infarction, should be considered in patients with refractory peritonitis. PMID:26664217

  9. Inferior Mesenteric Artery Stenting as a Novel Treatment for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia in Patients with an Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery and Celiac Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, M.; Kobeiter, H.; Desgranges, P.; Becquemin, J.P.; Cochennec, F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging problem, with revascularization the mainstay of treatment. Management of CMI is especially challenging in the patient with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusions. Report We report a case series of four patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia who were not candidates for CA or SMA revascularization who were successfully treated with inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) angioplasty and stent placement to improve collateral circulation and palliate symptoms. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the largest case series to date reporting the use of an IMA stent to improve collateral circulation in patients with CMI. PMID:24920877

  10. Mesenteric ischemia: Pathogenesis and challenging diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Tziava, Evgenia; Touloumi, Stavroula; Krinos, Nikolaos; Danias, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-02-15

    Mesenteric ischemia (MI) is an uncommon medical condition with high mortality rates. ΜΙ includes inadequate blood supply, inflammatory injury and eventually necrosis of the bowel wall. The disease can be divided into acute and chronic MI (CMI), with the first being subdivided into four categories. Therefore, acute MI (AMI) can occur as a result of arterial embolism, arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis and non-occlusive causes. Bowel damage is in proportion to the mesenteric blood flow decrease and may vary from minimum lesions, due to reversible ischemia, to transmural injury, with subsequent necrosis and perforation. CMI is associated to diffuse atherosclerotic disease in more than 95% of cases, with all major mesenteric arteries presenting stenosis or occlusion. Because of a lack of specific signs or due to its sometime quiet presentation, this condition is frequently diagnosed only at an advanced stage. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT angiography contribute to differential diagnosis and management of AMI. Angiography is also the criterion standard for CMI, with mesenteric duplex ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography also being of great importance. Therapeutic approach of MI includes both medical and surgical treatment. Surgical procedures include restoration of the blood flow with arteriotomy, endarterectomy or anterograde bypass, while resection of necrotic bowel is always implemented. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for MI and to present the recent literature in order to provide an update on the current concepts of surgical management of the disease. Mesh words selected include MI, diagnostic approach and therapeutic management. PMID:26909235

  11. Mesenteric ischemia: Pathogenesis and challenging diagnostic and therapeutic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Tziava, Evgenia; Touloumi, Stavroula; Krinos, Nikolaos; Danias, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia (MI) is an uncommon medical condition with high mortality rates. ΜΙ includes inadequate blood supply, inflammatory injury and eventually necrosis of the bowel wall. The disease can be divided into acute and chronic MI (CMI), with the first being subdivided into four categories. Therefore, acute MI (AMI) can occur as a result of arterial embolism, arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis and non-occlusive causes. Bowel damage is in proportion to the mesenteric blood flow decrease and may vary from minimum lesions, due to reversible ischemia, to transmural injury, with subsequent necrosis and perforation. CMI is associated to diffuse atherosclerotic disease in more than 95% of cases, with all major mesenteric arteries presenting stenosis or occlusion. Because of a lack of specific signs or due to its sometime quiet presentation, this condition is frequently diagnosed only at an advanced stage. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT angiography contribute to differential diagnosis and management of AMI. Angiography is also the criterion standard for CMI, with mesenteric duplex ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography also being of great importance. Therapeutic approach of MI includes both medical and surgical treatment. Surgical procedures include restoration of the blood flow with arteriotomy, endarterectomy or anterograde bypass, while resection of necrotic bowel is always implemented. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for MI and to present the recent literature in order to provide an update on the current concepts of surgical management of the disease. Mesh words selected include MI, diagnostic approach and therapeutic management. PMID:26909235

  12. Relief of Mesenteric Ischemia by Z-Stent Placement into the Superior Mesenteric Artery Compressed by the False Lumen of an Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takeda, Kan; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Hiroshi; Yada, Isao

    1998-01-15

    In a 58-year-old man acute aortic dissection compromised the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), resulting in mesenteric ischemia. After failed balloon angioplasty a Gianturco Z-stent was placed. The stenosis improved immediately, followed by resolution of the clinical signs of mesenteric ischemia. SMA flow was well preserved 1 year after stenting.

  13. Percutaneous Retrograde Recanalization of the Celiac Artery by Way of the Superior Mesenteric Artery for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, George Chacko, Sujith Thomas

    2013-02-15

    A 52-year-old man presented with recurrent postprandial abdominal pain, sitophobia, and progressive weight loss. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) due to subtotal occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and flush occlusion of the celiac artery (CA) was diagnosed. Retrograde recanalization of the CA by way of a collateral channel from the SMA was performed using contemporary recanalization equipment. The CA and SMA were then stented, resulting in sustained resolution of CMI-related symptoms.

  14. Fulminant Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia Just after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Alkmin-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Feres, Omar; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2010-01-01

    Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is not a rare clinical entity in intensive medicine, and it can be a consequence of several clinical or surgical situations. This pathology results from reduced intestinal microvascular blood supply associated with an acute inflammatory process, culminating with bowel necrosis. This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since diagnosis of this potentially fatal condition remains a dilemma, NOMI should always be considered an eventual postoperative complication in high-risk surgical patients such as elderly individuals with previous history of nicotine abuse, congestive heart failure, and essential hypertension. The present paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt adequate treatment of NOMI in subjects with diminished cardiac output and severe abdominal pain. PMID:20300426

  15. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  16. Percutaneous retrograde revascularization of the occluded celiac artery for chronic mesenteric ischemia using intravascular ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Jain, Gagan; Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Goyal, Mayank; Trehan, Vijaya Kumar

    2013-07-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with a triad of postprandial abdominal pain, food fear and significant weight loss since 1 year suggestive of chronic mesenteric ischemia. CT angiogram revealed chronic total occlusion of the celiac artery (CA), inferior mesenteric artery and 80-90 % stenosis of the proximal superior mesenteric artery (SMA). After SMA stenting, successful retrograde recanalisation of chronically occluded CA through pancreatico-duodenal arcade using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance was done when standard tools failed. The role of IVUS in such challenging lesions is described in the following case report. PMID:23526494

  17. Platelet-activating factor: an endogenous mediator of mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion-induced shock.

    PubMed

    Mózes, T; Braquet, P; Filep, J

    1989-10-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in circulatory shock of intestinal origin was investigated in anesthetized dogs by measuring PAF levels in the superior mesenteric vein during reperfusion after 2-h occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery; by monitoring the effects of BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist; and by studying the circulatory effects of exogenous PAF injected into the superior mesenteric vein. PAF was measured by a platelet-aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like bioactivity was ascertained by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and alkaline treatment. Removal of the superior mesenteric artery occlusion caused an immediate dramatic decrease in mean arterial blood pressure with concomitant increase in mean portal venous pressure and hematocrit values. PAF concentration in the superior mesenteric vein increased from 0.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml (n = 4, P less than 0.05) within the first 5 min of reperfusion. Administration of exogenous PAF (0.1 microgram/kg) injected into the superior mesenteric vein produced similar hemodynamical effects. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021 (4 mg/kg), a specific PAF receptor antagonist, prevented the circulatory collapse. The present results suggest that PAF release during intestinal ischemia may play an important role in the development of circulatory collapse caused by mesenteric artery occlusion. PMID:2802004

  18. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Muszynski, N. D.; Cheng, L. K.; Bradshaw, L. A.; Naslund, T. C.; Richards, W. O.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging clinical problem that is difficult to diagnose noninvasively. Diagnosis early in the disease process would enable life-saving early surgical intervention. Previous studies established that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers detect the slow wave changes in the magnetoenterogram (MENG) noninvasively following induction of mesenteric ischemia in animal models. The purpose of this study was to assess functional physiological changes in the intestinal slow wave MENG of patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pre- and postoperative studies were conducted on CMI patients using MENG and intraoperative recordings using invasive serosal electromyograms (EMG). Our preoperative MENG recordings showed that patients with CMI exhibited a significant decrease in intestinal slow wave frequency from 8.9 ± 0.3 cpm preprandial to 7.4 ± 0.1 cpm postprandial (P < 0.01) that was not observed in postoperative recordings (9.3 ± 0.2 cpm preprandial and 9.4 ± 0.4 cpm postprandial, P = 0.86). Intraoperative recording detected multiple frequencies from the ischemic portion of jejunum before revascularization, whereas normal serosal intestinal slow wave frequencies were observed after revascularization. The preoperative MENG data also showed signals with multiple frequencies suggestive of uncoupling and intestinal ischemia similar to intraoperative serosal EMG. Our results showed that multichannel MENG can identify intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in CMI patients. PMID:25930082

  19. [Acute ischemia and arterial mesenteric infarction in patients aged over 75. Apropos of a comparative series of 38 cases].

    PubMed

    Bronner, J F; Boissel, P

    1997-08-01

    We report our experience in a series of 20 patients over 75 years of age with acute mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric infarction. This series was compared with 18 patients under 75 used a control group for scores of specific aspects to acute mesenteric ischemia. Overall mortality (80% versus 55%) (p = 0.1) and desertion rate after exploratory laparotomy (60% versus 35%) were high in the elderly patients with advanced stage disease. There was also a female predominance (80% versus 44%, p < 0.05). PMID:9378793

  20. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  1. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  2. Noninvasive monitoring of small intestinal oxygen in a rat model of chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Khan, Mahmood; Salisbury, Ronald; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-01-01

    We noninvasively monitored the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in rat small intestine using a model of chronic mesenteric ischemia by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry (EPR) over a 7-day period. The particulate probe lithium octa-n-butoxynaphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) was embedded into the oxygen permeable material polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) by cast-molding and polymerization (Oxy-Chip). A one-time surgical procedure was performed to place the Oxy-Chip on the outer wall of the small intestine (SI). The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was banded to approximately 30% blood flow for experimental rats. Noninvasive measurement of pO2 was performed at baseline for control rats or immediate post-banding and on days 1, 3, and 7. The SI pO2 for control rats remained stable over the 7-day period. The pO2 on day 7 was 54.5 ± 0.9 mmHg (mean ± SE). SMA banded rats were significantly different from controls with a noted reduction in pO2 post banding with a progressive decline to a final pO2 of 20.9 ± 4.5 mmHg (mean ± SE; p = 0.02). All SMA-banded rats developed adhesions around the Oxy-Chip yet remained asymptomatic. The hypoxia marker Hypoxyprobe™ was used to validate low tissue pO2. Brown cytoplasmic staining was consistent with hypoxia. Mild brown staining was noted predominantly on the villus tips in control animals. SMA-banded rats had an extended region of hypoxic involvement in the villus with a higher intensity of cytoplasmic staining. Deep brown staining of the enteric nervous system neurons and connective tissue both within layers and in the mesentery were noted. SMA banded rats with lower pO2 values had a higher intensity of staining. Thus, monitoring SI pO2 using the probe Oxy-Chip provides a valid measure of tissue oxygenation. Tracking pO2 in conditions that produce chronic mesenteric ischemia will contribute to our understanding of intestinal tissue oxygenation and how changes impact symptom evolution and the trajectory of chronic disease. PMID

  3. CT and MRI of experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.M.; Seggewib, C.; Weghaus, P.; Kamp, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of CT and MRI for the detection of bowel wall changes in experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia. In 18 female pigs. a percutaneous embolization of the superior mesenteric artery was performed with buthyl-2-cyanoacrylate and Lipoidal (1:1) (experimental group). In six animals, only diagnostic imaging and histologic evaluation were performed (control group). CT was carried out 3, 6, and 12 h after occlusion. Incremental CT (1 s scan time, 5 mm slice thickness, 7 mm increment, 120 kV/290 mAs) and spiral CT (slice thickness 5 mm, pitch 1.5, 120 kV/165 mA) were performed pre and post contrast injection (Somatom Plus/ Siemens). Serial CT was carried out after intravenous contrast injection (I ml/kg, 2 ml/s). MRI (Magnetom 1.5 T: Siemens) was performed with T1 (pre and post 0.01 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; Magnevist; Schering. Germany), T2, and proton density images in axial orientation. Slice thickness was 3 mm and slice gap 1 mm. Additionally, a T1-weighted GE sequence was obtained in dynamic technique (before and 30, 60, and 90 s after contrast agent injection) with a slice thickness of 5 mm. Biometrical monitoring included blood pressure, heart frequency, blood cell count, electrolyte status, blood gas analysis, and determination of serum lactate. Image evaluation included morphological analysis and determination of the enhancement pattern. Histological specimens were obtained and analyzed according to the Chiu classification. The histologic workup of the specimen 3, 6, and 12 h after vascular occlusion revealed an average Chiu state 3, 4, and 5. On CT, the bowel wall had a thickness of 4.7 mm on average in the ischemic segments. There was a significant difference from the control group. Free intraperitoneal fluid and intramural gas were seen after 12 h of ischemia in 80%. In ischemic bowel segments, no mural enhancement was seen. Normal segments and the bowel of the control animals showed an enhancement of 34 HU on average.

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal ischemia is a serious complication of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Some or all of the intestine dies because of ... Brandt LJ, Feuerstadt P. Instestinal ischemia. In: Feldman M, ... Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 9th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. [Ascaris lumbricoides in the nasogastric tube after operation on a patient with the diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Ayşegül Çopur; Gündoğdu, Deniz; Direkel, Sahin; Öztürk, Çinar

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a comman intestinal helminths in humans. It is a parasite which commonly affects society with a low socioeconomic status, especially in tropical and rural areas. Ascaris lumbricoides infestation can lead to serious complications because of the mobility of the worms. The parasite can cause a variety of complications like intestinal obstruction, perforation, biliary obstruction, pancreatitis, peritonitis, liver abscess, cholangiohepatitis, volvulus, and gangrene, etc. A 59-year-old female patient hospitalized with the diagnosis of mesenteric ischemia was operated on for jejunal resection. On the 6th postoperative day, a worm was noticed emerging through the nasogastric tube. Ascaris lumbricoides was determined as a result of the examination microbiology laboratory. The patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazole 200 mg 1x2. Our case describes a clinical situation of ascariasis observed after jejunal resection and emphasizes the importance of remaining aware of this rare complication of ascariasis. PMID:24192626

  6. A New Approach Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI to Diagnose Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Rabbit Model: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Kuang, Lian-qin; Zhang, Yu-long; Cheng, Hai-yun; Min, Jia-yan; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been applied to a wide range of biological and disease research. The purpose of the study was to use MEMRI to diagnose the acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI). Methods. The institutional experimental animal ethics committee approved this study. To optimize the dose of Mn2+ infusion, a dose-dependent curve was obtained using Mn2+-enhanced T1 map MRI by an intravenous infusion 2.5–20 nmol/g body weight (BW) of 50 nmol/L MnCl2. The eighteen animals were divided into control, sham-operated, and AMI groups. AMI models were performed by ligating the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). T1 values were measured on T1 maps in regions of the small intestinal wall and relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Results. A nonlinear relationship between infused MnCl2 solution dose and increase in small intestinal wall ΔR1 was observed. Control animal exhibited significant Mn2+ clearance over time at the dose of 15 nmol/g BW. In the AMI model, ΔR1 values (0.95 ± 0.13) in the small intestinal wall were significantly lower than in control group (2.05 ± 0.19) after Mn2+ infusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion. The data suggest that MEMRI shows potential as a diagnostic technique that is directly sensitive to the poor or absent perfusion in AMI. PMID:26693487

  7. R-spondin3 prevents mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue damage by tightening endothelium and preventing vascular leakage.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Lakshmi; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Thai, To-Ha; Sehrawat, Seema; Mayadas, Tanya N; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Tsokos, George C

    2013-08-27

    Inflammation and vascular injury triggered by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in a number of clinical settings. Wnt and its homolog partners R-spondins, in addition to regulating embryonic development have recently been demonstrated to serve as wound-healing agents in inflammation-associated conditions. Here we ask whether R-spondins could prevent inflammation-associated tissue damage in ischemic disorders and thus investigate the role of R-spondin3 (R-spo3) in a mouse model of mesenteric I/R. We demonstrate that R-spo3 ameliorates mesenteric I/R-induced local intestinal as well as remote lung damage by suppressing local and systemic cytokine response and deposition of IgM and complement in intestinal tissues. We also show that decreased inflammatory response is accompanied by tightening of endothelial cell junctions and reduction in vascular leakage. We conclude that R-spo3 stabilizes endothelial junctions and inhibits vascular leakage during I/R and thereby mitigates the inflammatory events and associated tissue damage. Our findings uniquely demonstrate a protective effect of R-spo3 in I/R-related tissue injury and suggest a mechanism by which it may have these effects. PMID:23942120

  8. An unusual case of mesenteric ischemia in a patient with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Baztarrica, Gabriel; Bornancini, Norberto; Salvaggio, Flavio; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms related to peripheral embolism are experienced in 2%-15% of cases of cardiac myxoma. We present a rare case of a 54-year-old man admitted due to sudden abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). As the patient's response to support treatment was favorable, a non-invasive approach was adopted, with prescription of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a tumor in the left atrium. The cardiac mass was completely removed and diagnosed as myxoma by histopathological analysis. As periodic CT scans showed progressive improvement of blood flow through the SMA, OAC was continued. OAC may have been beneficial due to the nature of emboli originating from a cardiac myxoma: thrombi covering the surface of the tumor. At present, there is no explanation in the literature for the benefits of OAC in patients with embolism associated with cardiac myxoma. PMID:23890757

  9. Fatal non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia and the use of propranolol in paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rogers, A; Numanoglu, A; Rode, H

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal complications without abdominal injury are infrequently seen in children with major burns. They are divided into those that occur early during the emergency phase of treatment and those that occur late in the course of treatment. One of the most serious late onset complications is non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia associated with the use of vasoactive drugs. We report on 2 children who late in the course of their burn injury developed ischaemic necrosis of their entire intestine. Both were on propranolol, the administration of which was continued with even during the periods of septic shock which preceded their demise. We are of the opinion that endogenous catecholamine release during hypotensive and septic episodes in conjunction with β-adrenergic blockage from propranolol could lead to severe splanchnic vasoconstriction from unopposed α-adrenergic activity and hence critical circulation impairment to the bowel in the 2 children. PMID:26899618

  10. [Imaging of intestinal ischemia].

    PubMed

    Van Beers, B E; Danse, E; Hammer, F; Goffette, P

    2004-04-01

    Ischemic bowel disease includes acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia, and colon ischemia. Cross-sectional imaging, and more particularly computed tomography, has an increasing role in the detection of acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia. Vascular obstructions or stenoses and changes in the bowel wall can be observed. Functional information can be added with MRI by using sequences that are sensitive to oxygen saturation in the superior mesenteric vein. Arteriography remains the reference examination in patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. PMID:15184799

  11. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the tissues surrounding the veins, and include: Appendicitis Cancer Diverticulitis Liver disease with cirrhosis Pancreatitis Patients ... Mesenteric venous thrombosis. Mayo Clin Proc Read More Appendicitis Blood clots Cirrhosis Diverticulitis Small intestinal ischemia and ...

  12. Non-occlusive Mesenteric Ischemia with Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Lactic Acidosis Following the Administration of a Sodium Glucose Co-transporter 2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gocho, Naoki; Aoki, Ema; Okada, Chiho; Omura, Kazuki; Hirashima, Takeshi; Suzuki, Natsuko; Tanaka, Hideki; Omori, Yasue

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a patient with non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) potentially associated with the administration of a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. A 60-year-old man with type 1 diabetes was transferred to our hospital due to vomiting and respiratory distress. He was treated with insulin, metformin and a SGLT2 inhibitor, which had recently been added. He was diagnosed with intestinal ischemia complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis. Urgent exploratory surgery was performed, and the gangrenous bowel was resected. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of NOMI. The administration of SGLT2 inhibitors therefore requires certain exceptions for type 1 diabetes and cautious monitoring for the occurrence of these possible adverse effects. PMID:27374678

  13. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures Images Audio Pronunciations The ...

  14. Management of Loose, Frequent Stools and Fecal Incontinence in a Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia Patient with Oral Serum-derived Bovine Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Good, Larry; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    AIM Chronic diarrhea with fecal incontinence (FI) is a severe, underreported, and intractable problem in many patients for which limited pharmaceutical options exist. METHODS A retrospective case history was collected after the administration of a prescription medical food composed of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) at 5 g once daily in a patient with chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) for chronic loose, frequent, and urgent stools. The patient was an 84-year-old white male with a 20-year history of progressively worsening chronic diarrhea with six to eight watery stools per day (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Type 7), urgency, nocturnal diarrhea, FI, and postprandial abdominal discomfort before administration of SBI. RESULTS After four weeks of SBI administration, the patient had two to three soft, semi-formed stools (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Types 4 and 5) per day with no nocturnal diarrhea, urgency, or FI, as well as full resolution of abdominal discomfort. In addition, the patient expressed an enhanced quality of life (QoL): able to travel, attend social events, and perform tasks not possible before therapy. CONCLUSION This case underscores how a safe, nutritional therapy may offer a new modality for physicians to address chronic loose, frequent stools with FI in patients with CMI in this difficult to manage gastrointestinal population. PMID:25674029

  15. [Mesenteric panniculitis].

    PubMed

    Ayala Gutiérrez, María Del Mar; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a condition characterized by chronic nonspecific inflammation of the mesentery. There is little and often confusing information about its characteristics and the approach to take once it has been demonstrated by an imaging test. We propose to describe the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological and pathological features of the patients with mesenteric panniculitis reported in the literature, as well as possible disorders causal or associated with mesenteric panniculitis, in the opinion of the authors of each study. Finally, we will review the different therapeutic options used and the response to them. To that end a literature search was performed from the main medical databases selecting ítems with information on these aspects. This information was collected on a database stored in SPSS software for further analysis and summary. PMID:26971978

  16. Endovascular Reconstruction of Complex Arterial Obstructions in the Mesenteric Arcade with 'Kissing Stents': Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Daliri, Armand; Krause, Ulrich C.; Kalinowski, Marc; Heverhagen, Johannes; Froelich, Jens J.

    2008-05-15

    This report describes a technique for advanced endoluminal reconstruction of complex bifurcational arterial obstructions located within the mesenteric arcade deploying applications from percutaneous transluminal coronary artery angioplasty. A patient was treated for persistent mesenteric ischemia during prolonged recovery after initial small bowel resection due to acute mesenteric ischemia. Following endovascular reconstruction of a complex arterial obstruction within the mesenteric arcade, ischemic symptoms subsided quickly and the patient recovered well. According to the literature, this seems to be the first case where such distal reconstruction of the mesenteric arcade has successfully been achieved percutaneously.

  17. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection. PMID:23946612

  18. Mesenteric arterial vasopressin in cats: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lote, K.; Folling, M.; Lekven, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1981-05-01

    The administration of intraaterial mesenteric vasopressin to induce small intestinal ischemia was evaluated in the cat. Small intestinal blood flow was measured by carbonized microsphere distribution and electromagnetic flowmetry. Injection of 99mTc labeled isotope into the superior mesenteric artery was monitored by gamma camera, and isotope kinetics were evaluated as indicators of small intestinal blood flow. Superior mesenteric arterial and small intestinal mucosal blood flow could maximally be reduced to 15%-20% of control by vasopressin administration. 99mTcO4 mesenteric-cardiac transit time was doubled in all animals when small intestinal mucosal blood flow was reduced to less than one-third of control. However, significant blood flow reductions were induced in other abdominal organs, most importantly in retroperitoneal lymph nodes and adipose tissue. Intraarterial mesenteric vasopressin administration does not induce sufficiently severe and specific intestinal ischemia to provide optimal conditions for selective small intestinal hypoxic radioprotection.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Human Mesenteric Lymph

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Peltz, Erik; Campsen, Jeffrey; Kelher, Marguerite; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive animal work has established mesenteric lymph as the mechanistic link between gut ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and distant organ injury. Our trauma and transplant services provide a unique opportunity to assess the relevance of our animal data to human mesenteric lymph under conditions that simulate those used in the laboratory. Mesenteric lymph was collected from eleven patients; with lymphatic injuries, during semi-elective spine reconstruction, or immediately before organ donation. The lymph was tested for its ability to activate human neutrophils in vitro, and was analyzed by label-free proteomic analysis. Human mesenteric lymph primed human PMNs in a pattern similar to that observed in previous rodent, swine, and primate studies. A total of 477 proteins were identified from the 11 subject’s lymph samples with greater than 99% confidence. In addition to classical serum proteins, markers of hemolysis, extracellular matrix components, and general tissue damage were identified. Both tissue injury and shock correlate strongly with production of bioactive lymph. Products of red blood cell hemolysis correlate strongly with human lymph bioactivity and immunoglobulins have a negative correlation with the pro-inflammatory lymph. These human data corroborate the current body of research implicating post shock mesenteric lymph in the development of systemic inflammation and multiple organ failure. Further studies will be required to determine if the proteins identified participate in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure and if they can be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:21192285

  1. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  2. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  3. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  4. A Case of Acute Ischemic Duodenal Ulcer Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection After Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon

    2009-03-15

    We report a case of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-related acute ischemic duodenal ulcer that developed in association with dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. We conclude that the acute duodenal ulcer was developed by ischemia related to superior mesenteric artery dissection during TACE. TACE should be conducted carefully with continuous observation of abdominal arteries.

  5. Silent Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vulnerable Plaque Silent Ischemia | Share Related terms: ischemia, restricted blood flow Ischemia is a condition where the flow of ... used to diagnose silent ischemia: An exercise stress test can show blood flow through your coronary arteries in response to exercise. ...

  6. Aneurysm of the cranial mesenteric artery in a cow.

    PubMed

    Angelos, J A; Anderson, B H; Waurzyniak, B J; Ames, T R; Turner, T A

    1995-09-01

    Exploratory laparotomy of an adult dairy cow, examined because of acute signs of persistent abdominal pain, revealed a firm pulsatile mass with associated fremitus just distal to the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. The cow died acutely 2.5 days after surgery. A dilated, thin-walled, sacculated aneurysm, which had ruptured, was located along the proximal portion of the cranial mesenteric artery. It was postulated that the aneurysm developed secondary to structural defects in the arterial wall, but caused no clinical signs until enlargement and local tissue stretching or circulatory disturbances caused intestinal ischemia, resulting in abdominal pain. Aneurysms of visceral arteries in cattle should be considered as another differential diagnosis for signs of abdominal pain after more common causes such as severe bloat, mesenteric root volvulus, intussusception, cecal dilatation/volvulus, and uterine torsion have been excluded. PMID:7649780

  7. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  8. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  9. The Mesenteric Approach in Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is an ideal surgery for pancreatic head cancer. In cancer surgery, 'isolated' means en bloc resection using a non-touch isolation technique. I have been developing isolated PD for pancreatic cancer since 1981. In this operation, the most important and first step is to use a mesenteric approach instead of Kocher's maneuver. The precise surgical techniques of the mesenteric approach are introduced in this paper. PMID:27215213

  10. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  11. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  12. Mesenteric castleman disease mimicking superior mesenteric artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-02-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is known as a lymphoproliferative disorder, which is most commonly located in the mediastinum. CD occurring in the mesentery is very rare. We report a case of CD in the mesentery, which is mimicking a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm on computed tomography image. PMID:25463333

  13. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, John C.; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Laine, Glen A.; Stewart, Randolph H.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min−1; Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min−1) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min−1; Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min−1) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  14. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quick, Christopher M; Criscione, John C; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H

    2014-06-15

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min(-1); Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min(-1)) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min(-1); Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min(-1)) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  15. Murine Model of Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Gubernatorova, Ekaterina O; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Koroleva, Ekaterina P; Jobin, Christian; Tumanov, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a life-threatening condition associated with a broad range of clinical conditions including atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hypotension, necrotizing enterocolitis, bowel transplantation, trauma and chronic inflammation. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a consequence of acute mesenteric ischemia, caused by inadequate blood flow through the mesenteric vessels, resulting in intestinal damage. Reperfusion following ischemia can further exacerbate damage of the intestine. The mechanisms of IR injury are complex and poorly understood. Therefore, experimental small animal models are critical for understanding the pathophysiology of IR injury and the development of novel therapies. Here we describe a mouse model of acute intestinal IR injury that provides reproducible injury of the small intestine without mortality. This is achieved by inducing ischemia in the region of the distal ileum by temporally occluding the peripheral and terminal collateral branches of the superior mesenteric artery for 60 min using microvascular clips. Reperfusion for 1 hr, or 2 hr after injury results in reproducible injury of the intestine examined by histological analysis. Proper position of the microvascular clips is critical for the procedure. Therefore the video clip provides a detailed visual step-by-step description of this technique. This model of intestinal IR injury can be utilized to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of injury and regeneration. PMID:27213580

  16. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  17. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan; Hong, Suk-Kyung

    2012-09-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  18. Effect of plant polyphenols on ischemia-reperfusion injury of the isolated rat heart and vessels.

    PubMed

    Brosková, Z; Drábiková, K; Sotníková, R; Fialová, S; Knezl, V

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effect of selected natural substances in a rat model of heart and mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Experiments were performed on isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, subjected to 30-min global ischemia, followed by 30-min reperfusion. Arbutin, curcumin, rosmarinic acid and extract of Mentha x villosa were applied in the concentration of 1 × 10⁻⁵ mol/l 10 min before the onset of ischemia and during reperfusion, through the perfusion medium. Mesenteric ischemia was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 60 min, subsequent reperfusion lasted 30 min. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by SMA ex vivo was determined by luminol-enhanced chemiluminiscence (CL). The effect of the substances was tested after their incubation with tissue. Curcumin and extract of Mentha x villosa were found to be the most effective in reducing reperfusion-induced dysrhythmias--ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. This effect was accompanied by bradycardic effect. The mesenteric I/R induced an increase in CL in vascular tissue which was dampened by substances tested. All substances tested were found to have antioxidant properties, as demonstrated by a reduction in ROS production in mesenteric vessels. This effect was confirmed in curcumin and extract of Mentha x villosa which reduced reperfusion dyshythmias. PMID:22933407

  19. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  20. Childhood giant omental and mesenteric lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Rasouly, Najibullah; Khpalwak, Hayatullah; Malikzai, Mohammad Omer; Faizi, Ahmad Reshad; Hoshang, Mer Mahmood Shah; Maroof, Sahar; Nasery, Mohammad Nawaz; Farzam, Farhad; Salehzai, Mohibullah; Sadiqi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Omental and mesenteric lipomas are very rare benign lesions of mature adipose tissue. They are well-defined, noninvasive, and encapsulated masses that can be discovered in asymptomatic patients or may cause variable nonspecific symptoms depending on their size and location. The omental and mesenteric lipoma has confusing features in ultrasound; however, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can well characterize and demarcate these lesions. Though few cases of mesenteric and omental lipomas have been reported in the literature, but because of its large size and childhood presentation, the case we present, can be one of the largest childhood omental and mesenteric lipomas ever reported. A 6-year-old girl presented with slowly progressing abdominal distension and repeated dull abdominal pain for last 4 years. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography examination revealed a huge mesenteric and omental lipoma that was resected surgically without any complications. PMID:26973731

  1. Incidental Finding and Management of Mesenteric Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Tohme, Maroon; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mesenteric fibromatosis, also known as mesenteric desmoids, is part of the clinical-pathologic spectrum of deep fibromatosis, which encompasses a group of benign fibro-proliferative processes that are locally aggressive and have the capacity to infiltrate or recur without metastasis. CASE REPORT Case of a 45-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and lung fibrosis, presenting for a left abdominal mass, which was found incidentally during his lung fibrosis imaging. He complained of constipation due to pressure upon his bowel leading to difficulty in defecation. CONCLUSIONS Although there are many overlapping criteria between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mesenteric fibromatosis, making it difficult to discriminate between the two, there are differences that are unique to mesenteric fibromatosis that should be noticed during the diagnosis. In this case, mesenteric fibromatosis was unusual as it is not associated with Gardner's syndrome, desmoid tumors, nor familial adenomatous polyposis, but was an incidental finding. PMID:27279600

  2. Childhood giant omental and mesenteric lipoma.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Rasouly, Najibullah; Khpalwak, Hayatullah; Malikzai, Mohammad Omer; Faizi, Ahmad Reshad; Hoshang, Mer Mahmood Shah; Maroof, Sahar; Nasery, Mohammad Nawaz; Farzam, Farhad; Salehzai, Mohibullah; Sadiqi, Jamshid

    2016-03-01

    Omental and mesenteric lipomas are very rare benign lesions of mature adipose tissue. They are well-defined, noninvasive, and encapsulated masses that can be discovered in asymptomatic patients or may cause variable nonspecific symptoms depending on their size and location. The omental and mesenteric lipoma has confusing features in ultrasound; however, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can well characterize and demarcate these lesions. Though few cases of mesenteric and omental lipomas have been reported in the literature, but because of its large size and childhood presentation, the case we present, can be one of the largest childhood omental and mesenteric lipomas ever reported. A 6-year-old girl presented with slowly progressing abdominal distension and repeated dull abdominal pain for last 4 years. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography examination revealed a huge mesenteric and omental lipoma that was resected surgically without any complications. PMID:26973731

  3. A "CLEAN CASE" OF SYSTEMIC INJURY: MESENTERIC LYMPH AFTER HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK ELICITS A STERILE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jeniann; Slaughter, Anne; Kotter, Cassandra V; Moore, Ernest E; Hauser, Carl J; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Wohlauer, Max; Frank, Daniel N; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Peltz, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Postinjury multiple organ failure results from an inappropriate overwhelming immune response to injury. During trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS), mesenteric ischemia causes gut mucosal breakdown with disruption of the intestinal barrier. It has been proposed that this releases the gut microbiota systemically via postshock mesenteric lymph (PSML), engendering infectious complications. Despite extensive investigation, no clear evidence has been presented for gut bacterial translocation after resuscitation from T/HS. However, such previous studies were limited by available technologies. More sensitive methods, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction, have since emerged for detection of bacterial presence and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to PSML derived from a rat model of T/HS. No bacterial presence was detected in a series of 12 samples, whereas multiple lymph samples showed the presence of DAMPs after T/HS. Thus, we confirmed that bacterial translocation does not exist in PSML after resuscitation from T/HS-associated mesenteric ischemia. However, T/HS does increase the presence of mitochondrial DAMPs in PSML. These results support our current position that PSML elaborates remote organ injury by multiple inflammatory mechanisms, including lipid-mediated proinflammatory stimuli, and by contribution from gut-derived DAMPs. PMID:26196840

  4. A Case of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Arising from the Superior Mesenteric Artery in a Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Jin; Ku, Min Jung; Cho, Sa Sun

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the inferior mesenteric artery are extremely uncommon, since the inferior mesenteric artery is regularly diverged at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. We found a rare case in which the inferior mesenteric artery arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The findings were made during a routine dissection of the cadaver of an 82-yr-old Korean woman. This is the tenth report on this anomaly, the second female and the first Korean. The superior mesenteric artery normally arising from abdominal aorta sent the inferior mesenteric artery as the second branch. The longitudinal anastomosis vessels between the superior mesenteric artery and inferior mesenteric artery survived to form the common mesenteric artery. This anatomical variation concerning the common mesenteric artery is of clinical importance, performing procedures containing the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:22022194

  5. Mesenteric Microcirculatory Dysfunctions and Translocation of Indigenous Bacteria in a Rat Model of Strangulated Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Fernando Luiz; Benabou, Simon; Greco, Karin Vicente; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos; Cruz, José Walber Miranda Costa; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaiba; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli; Silva, Maurício Rocha e; Sannomiya, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    PRUPOSE Bacterial translocation has been shown to occur in critically ill patients after extensive trauma, shock, sepsis, or thermal injury. The present study investigates mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunctions, the bacterial translocation phenomenon, and hemodynamic/metabolic disturbances in a rat model of intestinal obstruction and ischemia. METHODS Anesthetized (pentobarbital 50 mg/kg, i.p.) male Wistar rats (250–350 g) were submitted to intestinal obstruction or laparotomy without intestinal obstruction (Sham) and were evaluated 24 hours later. Bacterial translocation was assessed by bacterial culture of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen, and blood. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the mesenteric microcirculation were assessed by intravital microscopy, and P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expressions were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit, blood gases, lactate, glucose, white blood cells, serum urea, creatinine, bilirubin, and hepatic enzymes were measured. RESULTS About 86% of intestinal obstruction rats presented positive cultures for E. coli in samples of the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and 57% had positive hemocultures. In comparison to the Sham rats, intestinal obstruction induced neutrophilia and increased the number of rolling (~2-fold), adherent (~5-fold), and migrated leukocytes (~11-fold); this increase was accompanied by an increased expression of P-selectin (~2-fold) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (~2-fold) in the mesenteric microcirculation. Intestinal obstruction rats exhibited decreased PaCO2, alkalosis, hyperlactatemia, and hyperglycemia, and increased blood potassium, hepatic enzyme activity, serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin. A high mortality rate was observed after intestinal obstruction (83% at 72 h vs. 0% in Sham rats). CONCLUSION Intestinal obstruction and ischemia in rats is a relevant model for the in vivo study of mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunction

  6. Incidental Finding and Management of Mesenteric Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Tohme, Maroon; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 45 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric fibromatosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgical removal of the mesenteric fibromatosis Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Mesenteric fibromatosis, also known as mesenteric desmoids, is part of the clinical-pathologic spectrum of deep fibromatosis, which encompasses a group of benign fibro-proliferative processes that are locally aggressive and have the capacity to infiltrate or recur without metastasis. Case Report: Case of a 45-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and lung fibrosis, presenting for a left abdominal mass, which was found incidentally during his lung fibrosis imaging. He complained of constipation due to pressure upon his bowel leading to difficulty in defecation. Conclusions: Although there are many overlapping criteria between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mesenteric fibromatosis, making it difficult to discriminate between the two, there are differences that are unique to mesenteric fibromatosis that should be noticed during the diagnosis. In this case, mesenteric fibromatosis was unusual as it is not associated with Gardner’s syndrome, desmoid tumors, nor familial adenomatous polyposis, but was an incidental finding. PMID:27279600

  7. [Enteroscopy and imaging in sclerosing mesenteritis].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, U; Nitzsche, C; Felber, J; Dietrich, C F

    2012-09-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare, benign, and chronic fibrosing inflammatory disease of the mesenteric fatty tissue. Its aetiology is unknown. In the present report we describe a 56-year-old women who presented with postprandial abdominal pain, and weight loss. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mesenteric mass of 15 cm. The findings were typical for this disease. Additionally the patient underwent a single ballon enteroscopy in which the mucosa showed a considerable hyperergic reaction. The histological examination of the ileum was appropriate to support the suspicion. The patient's symptoms responded to a therapy with tamoxifen. PMID:22965632

  8. [Mesenteric trauma: management in austere environments].

    PubMed

    Peycru, T; Biance, N; Avaro, J P; Savoie, P H; Tardat, E; Balandraud, P

    2006-04-01

    Mesenteric trauma, i.e., injuries located in the bowel or organs supplied by the superior mesenteric artery, can be life-threatening. The incidence of these lesions is low. Most occur as result of blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma due mainly to gunshot wounds or road accidents. Management of these serious injuries can be challenging in the military field hospitals. The major problem in austere environment is the unavailabiity of computerized axial and other tools gene rally used for diagnosis. As an alternative to tomography diagnostic peritoneal lavage can be used with a high sensitivity for the detection of mesenteric trauma. The second difficulty is technical. General surgeons without vasular training or supplies must prepared to suspect and reonstuct lesions of the superior mesenteric available resources. PMID:16775948

  9. Increased levels of platelet-activating factor in blood following intestinal ischemia in the dog.

    PubMed

    Filep, J; Hermán, F; Braquet, P; Mózes, T

    1989-01-31

    The possible role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in superior mesenteric artery occlusion induced circulatory collapse was studied in anesthetized dogs. PAF was measured by platelet aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like product in blood was ascertained by thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography and alkaline treatment. Low amount of PAF was detected in the mesenteric blood under normal conditions, during reperfusion PAF levels were significantly higher. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist abolished the fall in mean arterial pressure and the rise in hematocrit due to ischemia/reperfusion. These findings suggest that PAF may play an important role in mesenteric ischemia-induced circulatory collapse. PMID:2916986

  10. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  11. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by becoming weaker pumps.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Nguyen, T L; Quick, C M; Heaps, C L; Hardy, J; Laine, G A; Wilson, E; Stewart, R H

    2015-03-01

    Lymphangions, the segments of lymphatic vessels between two adjacent lymphatic valves, actively pump lymph. Acute changes in transmural pressure and lymph flow have profound effects on lymphatic pump function in vitro. Chronic changes in pressure and flow in vivo have also been reported to lead to significant changes in lymphangion function. Because changes in pressure and flow are both cause and effect of adaptive processes, characterizing adaptation requires a more fundamental analysis of lymphatic muscle properties. Therefore, the purpose of the present work was to use an intact lymphangion isovolumetric preparation to evaluate changes in mesenteric lymphatic muscle mechanical properties and the intracellular Ca(2+) in response to sustained mesenteric venous hypertension. Bovine mesenteric veins were surgically occluded to create mesenteric venous hypertension. Postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 6) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) animals were isolated and evaluated 3 days after the surgery. Spontaneously contracting MVH vessels generated end-systolic active tension and end-diastolic active tension lower than the Sham vessels. Furthermore, steady-state active tension and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration levels in response to KCl stimulation were also significantly lower in MVH vessels compared with those of the Sham vessels. There was no significant difference in passive tension in lymphatic vessels from the two groups. Taken together, these results suggest that following 3 days of mesenteric venous hypertension, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to become weaker pumps with decreased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. PMID:25519727

  12. Use of T-stat to Predict Colonic Ischemia during and after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eugene S.; Pevec, William C.; Link, Daniel P.; Dawson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    As surgeons become more aggressive in treating aneurysms with endovascular techniques, traditional surgical principles of preserving internal iliac arteries and the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) have been challenged. A case is presented where the T-stat device, an FDA approved device for measuring colon ischemia, was used as an adjunctive measure to assist in the successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a patient at high risk for colon ischemia. PMID:18295116

  13. Inferior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula: Case report and world-literature review

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Antonios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Alexandrou, Andreas; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas between the inferior mesenteric artery and vein are rare, with only 26 primary and secondary cases described in the literature. Secondary fistulas occur following operations of the left hemicolon and manifest as abdominal pain, abdominal mass, gastrointestinal bleeding, colonic ischemia and portal hypertension. Symptom intensities are flow-dependent, and can range from minimal symptoms to severe heart failure due to left to right shunt. Diagnosis is usually established by radiological or intraoperative examination. Treatment options include embolization and/or surgical resection. Therapeutic decisions should be adapted to the unique characteristics of the fistula on an individual basis. A new case of a primary arteriovenous fistula is described and discussed along with a complete review of the literature. The patient in this report presented with signs and symptoms of colonic ischemia without portal hypertension. The optimal treatment for this patient required a combination of embolization and surgical operation. The characteristics of these rare inferior mesenteric arteriovenous fistulas are examined and some considerations concerning diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that should be followed are presented. PMID:25009407

  14. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  15. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  16. Laparoscopic resection of a jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: case report

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; TARTARINI, D.; FABBRI, N.; BIANCHINI, E.; ANANIA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and can occur at any age. They can manifest with abdominal pain or compressive mass effect. The exact etiology is unknown. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and laparoscopy are used in diagnosing mesenteric cysts. Laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst is possible and should be considered as the treatment of choice. We present a case of mesenteric pseudocyst of small bowel treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:25644729

  17. [Mesenteric infarct in primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kurz, R; Eder, A; Buck, J; Heinkelein, J

    1997-09-01

    The mesenteric infarction is a rare but life threatening cause of acute abdomen. A 55-year-old woman was referred to the hospital because of acute mesenteric infarction and in the history claudication. In the absence of risk factors (atrial fibrillation, atherosclerosis, nicotin abusus) a postoperative work up was started to identify the cause of the arterial occlusions. A primary antiphospholipid-antibody syndrome was found. The patient is now receiving low-dose aspirin and anticoagulation therapy. The follow-up over now 14 months shows no further events. PMID:9432819

  18. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome. PMID:23475546

  19. A Case of Laparoscopic Mesenteric Cyst Excision

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikalp; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Geller, Matthew; Selbs, Elena; Romero, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of a young, healthy patient with a symptomatic mesenteric cyst. He had a 5-month history of abdominal pain from this disorder, and the case is presented to illustrate the clinical picture and operative management of this rare disorder. PMID:22988537

  20. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, D. N.; Shaikh, F. M.; Kavanagh, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight. PMID:26421207

  1. Superior Mesenteric Artery Aneurysm Caused by Aortic Valve Endocarditis: The Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    de Troia, Alessandro; Mottini, Francesca; Biasi, Lukla; Azzarone, Matteo; Tecchio, Tiziano; Salcuni, PierFranco

    2016-02-01

    Infectious aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery are a rare but life-threatening condition due to the risk of visceral ischemia, sepsis, or hemorrhage. In this study, we report the case of a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) secondary to a bioprosthetic valve endocarditis, successfully managed with aneurysm resection and saphenous vein interposition graft. We performed an extensive PubMed-based rewiew of the literature of the last 10 years on SMAA, which include the detection of 38 articles quoting 41 SMAAs. The case histories were divided in 2 groups: 18 cases belonged to nonmycotic group A and 23 cases were included in mycotic group B. In group A, 44.4% of patients were treated surgically, whereas in group B, 90.5%. The 2 study groups significantly differed (P = .01) in terms of surgical treatment. The surgical approach still remains the first choice of treatment in mycotic aneurysm. PMID:26983666

  2. Chylous mesenteric cysts: a rare surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Perri, Giampaolo; Freschi, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is defined as a cyst that is located in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract and may extend from the base of the mesentery into the retroperitoneum. It is often asymptomatic and therefore it is usually found as an incidental finding. Preoperative diagnosis may be possible with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the correct diagnosis can only be made with histology. The first-choice therapy is the complete removal of the cyst, which must be accurately planned according to the anatomy of the lesion, its dimensions and its relationships with major abdominal structures. We present two clinical cases: the one of a 30-year-old man with a mesenteric cyst that was removed by laparoscopy and the other of a 61-year-old woman who underwent open excision of a huge retroperitoneal cyst. PMID:24876395

  3. Fetal and postnatal ovine mesenteric vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Nielsen, Lori C.; Caty, Michael G.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal circulation and mesenteric arterial (MA) reactivity may play a role in preparing the fetus for enteral nutrition. We hypothesized that MA vasoreactivity changes with gestation and vasodilator pathways predominate in the postnatal period. METHODS Small distal MA rings (0.5-mm diameter) were isolated from fetal (116-d, 128-d, 134-d, and 141-d gestation, term ~ 147 d) and postnatal lambs. Vasoreactivity was evaluated using vasoconstrictors (norepinephrine (NE) after pretreatment with propranolol and endothelin-1(ET-1)) and vasodilators (NO donors A23187 and s-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP)). Protein and mRNA assays for receptors and enzymes (endothelin receptor A, alpha-adrenergic receptor 1A (ADRA1A), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5)) were performed in mesenteric arteries. RESULTS MA constriction to NE and ET-1 peaked at 134 d. Relaxation to A23187 and SNAP was maximal after birth. Basal eNOS activity was low at 134 d. ADRA1A mRNA and protein increasedsignificantlyat134danddecreasedpostnatally.sGC and PDE5 protein increased from 134 to 141 d. CONCLUSION Mesenteric vasoconstriction predominates in late-preterm gestation (134 d; the postconceptional age with the highest incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)) followed by a conversion to vasodilatory influences near the time of full-term birth. Perturbations in this ontogenic mechanism, including preterm birth, may be a risk factor for NEC. PMID:26672733

  4. Right-Side Colon Ischemia: Clinical Features, Large Visceral Artery Occlusion, and Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Longstreth, George F; Hye, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Large visceral artery occlusion (LVAO) could underlie right-side colon ischemia (RSCI) but is little known. Objective: To assess patients with RSCI through long-term follow-up, including features and management of LVAO. Main Outcome Measures: Mesenteric ischemia and mortality. Design: Retrospective observational study in an integrated health care system. Results: Of 49 patients (30 women [61.2%]; mean [standard deviation] age, 69.4 [11.9] years), 19 (38.8%) underwent surgery—that is, 5 (83.3%) of 6 who developed RSCI in hospital following surgical procedures and 14 (32.6%) of 43 who had RSCI before hospitalization (p value = 0.03); overall, 5 (10.2%) died. Among 44 survivors with a median (range) follow-up of 5.19 (0.03–14.26) years, 5 (11.4%), including 3 (20.0%) of 15 operated cases, had symptomatic LVAO and underwent angioplasty and stent placement: 2 for abdominal angina that preceded RSCI, 1 for acute mesenteric ischemia 1 week after resection of RSCI, 1 for RSCI 6 weeks after resection of left-side ischemia, and 1 for abdominal angina that began 3 years after spontaneous recovery from RSCI. None had further mesenteric ischemia until death from nonintestinal disease or the end of follow-up (1.6 to 10.2 years later). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for all 44 survivors at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years were 88.6%, 72.3%, 57.6%, and 25.9%, respectively. Thirty-one patients (70.4%) died during follow-up, 19 (61.3%) of a known cause; the 39 patients not treated for LVAO lacked mesenteric ischemia. Conclusion: Patients with RSCI may have symptomatic LVAO; therefore, we advise they undergo careful query for symptoms of abdominal angina and routine visceral artery imaging. PMID:26263388

  5. Laparoscopic excision of mesenteric cyst of sigmoid mesocolon

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarwar, Ajay H; Tayade, Mukund B; Borisa, Ashok D; Kasat, Gaurav V

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumours. They are found in the mesentery of small bowel (66%) and mesentery of large intestine (33%), usually in the right colon. Very few cases have been reported of tumours found in mesentery of descending colon, sigmoid or rectum. Mesenteric cysts do not show classical clinical findings and are detected incidentally during imaging due to absent or non-specific clinical presentation or during management of one of their complications. Ultrasonography (USG)/computed tomography (CT)/ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in diagnosing mesenteric cyst but they cannot determine the origin of cyst. Laparoscopy not only helps in diagnosing the site and origin of the mesenteric cyst but also has a therapeutic role. Laparoscopic treatment of mesenteric cyst is a safe, preferred method of treatment and is a less-invasive surgical technique. Here, we present an unusual case of mesenteric cyst arising from the sigmoid mesocolon treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:23626420

  6. Anatomical variation of the inferior mesenteric vein's drainage pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilaie, Mina

    The purpose of this project is to report the variable drainage pattern of the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) as reported by medical students' observations recorded on anatomical variation data sheets (n = 192). A meta-analysis on the drainage pattern of the inferior mesenteric vein as described in various anatomy resources was conducted (n = 40). The inferior mesenteric vein was observed to drain into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein, and the junction between the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein. Anatomy resources do not commonly report all three drainage sites. It is imperative that all these common drainage sites of the inferior mesenteric vein are stated in anatomy resources, so that students are taught realistic human anatomy including its common variations.

  7. Ischemic Colitis Due to a Mesenteric Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poullos, Peter D.; Thompson, Atalie C.; Holz, Grant; Edelman, Lauren A.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a rare, life-threatening, consequence of mesenteric arteriovenous malformations. Ischemia ensues from a steal phenomenon through shunting, and may be compounded by the resulting portal hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography is the most common first-line test because it is quick, non-invasive, and allows for accurate anatomic characterization. Also, high-resolution three-dimensional images can be created for treatment planning. Magnetic resonance angiography is similarly sensitive for vascular mapping. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and also allows for therapeutic endovascular embolization. Our patient underwent testing using all three of these modalities. We present the first reported case of this entity in a patient with a vascular connective tissue disorder. PMID:25926912

  8. Increased intestinal permeability in endotoxic pigs. Mesenteric hypoperfusion as an etiologic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Antonsson, J.B.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Infusing pigs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreases superior mesenteric artery blood flow (Qsma), suggesting that mesenteric hypoperfusion may be responsible for LPS-induced alterations in gut mucosal permeability. To test this hypothesis, we studied four groups of anesthetized swine. Group 1 animals (N = 6) were infused with LPS (250 micrograms/kg over 1 hour beginning at 60 minutes) and continuously resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (48 mL/kg per hour). In group 2 (N = 5), Qsma was decreased by 50% by means of a mechanical occluder to mimic the LPS-induced alterations in Qsma observed in group I. Group 3 (N = 5) was included to document our ability to detect ischemia/reperfusion-induced alterations in mucosal permeability; in these pigs, Qsma was decreased in steps to zero flow (at 150 to 210 minutes) and then perfusion was restored (at 210 to 270 minutes). Pigs in group 4 (N = 6) served as normal controls; these animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate at the same rate as in group 1 but were not infused with LPS. To assess mucosal permeability, we measured plasma-to-lumen clearances for two markers, chromium 51-labeled edetic acid monohydrate (EDTA) and urea. Loading and maintenance infusions of the markers were given intravenously, and a 20-cm isolated segment of small intestine was continuously perfused at 2 mL/min with Ringer's lactate at 37 degrees C. Results were expressed as the ratio of the clearances for the two probes (CEDTA/CUREA). In group 3, CEDTA/CUREA was 999% +/- 355% of baseline at 270 minutes. In group 1, CEDTA/CUREA was 572% +/- 235% of baseline at 270 minutes. In groups 2 and 4, however, CEDTA/CUREA did not change significantly from the baseline value over the duration of the study. These data suggest that increased mucosal permeability after LPS is due to factors other than (or in addition to) mesenteric hypoperfusion.

  9. Superior mesenteric origin of the proper hepatic artery: embryological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Alakkam, Anas; Hill, Robert V; Saggio, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The hepatic arteries are subject to a great deal of anatomical variation, potentially complicating hepatobiliary surgical procedures as well as general gastrointestinal procedures that involve foregut and midgut structures. We report a case of a rare variant of the proper hepatic artery discovered during dissection of an 84-year-old male cadaver. In this individual, the common hepatic artery was absent and the proper hepatic artery was replaced directly to the superior mesenteric artery. The gastroduodenal artery and the right inferior phrenic artery took origin from the celiac trunk. In addition, there was no identifiable right gastric artery. The celiac trunk gave off three branches: the splenic, left gastric, and gastroduodenal arteries. The entire arterial blood supply to the liver, therefore, was derived from the superior mesenteric artery. Patterns of regression of the ventral branches and the partial disappearance of the ventral anastomotic arteries during embryonic development play a major role in the variations of the gut arteries. An intraoperative encounter with this particular variant carries a significant risk of iatrogenic injury with potentially devastating ischemia and necrotic results. Accurate depiction and definition of the hepatic arterial anatomy are crucial. Variations like the one described here underscore the importance of pre-operative imaging and knowledge of the embryological origins of variation. PMID:26650050

  10. Idiopathic myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins: Rare case of ischemic colitis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Kota; Yamada, Rin; Fujiwara, Takashi; Koizumi, Koichi; Horiguchi, Shin-ichiro; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins (IMHMV) is a rare and poorly understood ischemic colitis that occurs in the rectosigmoid colon of predominantly young, previously healthy, male patients. A 76-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a 1-year history of worsening diarrhea, lower abdominal pain, and weight loss (-6 kg). Laboratory evaluation revealed white blood cell count of 13,200/μL, C-reactive protein level of 2.0 mg/dL (normal range, 0.0-0.3), and negative results for stool culture (including Clostridium difficile). Colonoscopy showed circumferential and edematous narrowing of the sigmoid colon with deep longitude ulceration. Biopsy was done and examination of the specimen demonstrated no specific ischemia. The patient was treated with bowel rest, antibiotics, and i.v. fluids; however, his symptoms worsened. Finally, sigmoidectomy was carried out. Histological examination demonstrated significant myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins leading to thickening and stenosis of the venous lumen. Therefore, the final diagnosis was IMHMV. Three months following sigmoidectomy, he was asymptomatic. PMID:25777655

  11. A NON-INVASIVE DIAGNOSIS OF INTESTINAL ISCHEMIA BY EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AND MASS SPECTROMETRY-PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the potential of exhaled breath analysis by Column Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) as a non invasive and sensitive approach to evaluate mesenteric ischemia in pigs.

    Domestic pigs (n=3) were anesthetized with Guaifenesin/ Fentanyl/ Ketamine/ Xylazine...

  12. Computed tomography (CT) of bowel and mesenteric injury in blunt abdominal trauma: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, including the assessment of blunt bowel and mesenteric injuries. CT signs of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries are bowel wall defect, free air, oral contrast material extravasation, extravasation of contrast material from mesenteric vessels, mesenteric vascular beading, abrupt termination of mesenteric vessels, focal bowel wall thickening, mesenteric fat stranding, mesenteric haematoma and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal fluid. This pictorial essay illustrates CT features of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Pitfalls in interpretation of images are emphasized in proven cases. PMID:23082464

  13. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  14. Giant Aggressive Mesenteric Fibromatosis- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BN, Anandaravi; CD, Jagadish Kumar; M, Mayur; URS, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromatosis are rare, accounting for 0.03% of all tumours. Mesenteric fibromatosis is a very rare (8% of all desmoid neoplasm). Aggressive fibromatosis of mesentery is a rare surgical problem affecting 2-4 per million people. Females are more commonly affected than males (Estrogen acts as a growth factor). It is locally invasive and tends to recur but never metastasize. Here, we are discussing about 24-year-old male presented with progressive abdomen distension associated with pain since one month. Abdominal examination showed a firm non-tender intra-abdominal mass, measuring around 15x14 cm size, with intrinsic mobility, which was perpendicular to mesenteric line, all borders were well-made out. CECT abdomen showed features suggestive of GIST . Elective Laparotomy was done and a giant mass arising from mesentery without any infiltration to the surrounding structures was noted. The entire mass was excised and mesentery repaired. Histopathology showed uniform band of spindle shaped cells arranged in fascicles admixed with blood vessels in a collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemistry showed Beta Catenin +ve, CD 117-ve, CD 34 –ve and SMA-ve, which is confirmative of Fibromatosis. Postoperative period was uneventful. PMID:25859491

  15. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  16. Role of lipase-generated free fatty acids in converting mesenteric lymph from a noncytotoxic to a cytotoxic fluid.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Dong, Wei; Sharpe, Susan M; Sheth, Sharvil U; Palange, David C; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick; Deitch, Edwin A

    2012-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that mesenteric lymph plays a very important role in the development of multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome under critical conditions. Great efforts have been made to identify the biologically active molecules in the lymph. We used a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) model and the superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) model, representing a global and a localized intestinal ischemia-reperfusion insult, respectively, to investigate the role of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the cytotoxicity of mesenteric lymph in rats. Lymph was collected before, during, and after (post) shock or SMAO. The post-T/HS and SMAO lymph, but not the sham lymph, manifested cytotoxicity for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVEC cytotoxicity was associated with increased FFAs, especially the FFA-to-protein ratio. Addition of albumin, especially delipidated albumin, reduced this cytotoxicity. Lipase treatment of trauma-sham shock (T/SS) lymph converted it from a noncytotoxic to a cytotoxic fluid, and its toxicity correlated with the FFA-to-protein ratio in a fashion similar to that of the T/HS lymph, further suggesting that FFAs were the key components leading to HUVEC cytotoxicity. Analysis of lymph by gas chromatography revealed that the main FFAs in the post-T/HS or lipase-treated T/SS lymph were palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. When added to the cell culture at levels comparable to those in T/HS lymph, all these FFAs were cytotoxic, with linoleic acid being the most potent. In conclusion, this study suggests that lipase-generated FFAs are the key components resulting in the cytotoxicity of T/HS and SMAO mesenteric lymph. PMID:22899820

  17. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  18. Mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Wojskowicz, Piotr; Kiśluk, Joanna; Fil, Dawid; Kemona, Andrzej; Dadan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniosis is an acute or chronic, zoonotic disease caused by infection of Gram-negative rods Yersinia enterocolitica. It can be transmitted by the consumption of originally contaminated food products (pork, unpasteurized milk) or secondarily contaminated with animal or vegetable products. The clinical picture of infection may have a variable course is related to the age and physical condition of the patient, or pathogenic properties of microorganisms. Infection caused by Y. enterocolitica can occur in different clinical forms: food poisoning, colitis, mesentric lymphadenitis, erythema nodosum, arthritis, pharyngitis, pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis. The aim of this study was to present a rare case of infection with Y. enterocolitica mesenteric lymph nodes coexistent with appendicitis. PMID:26557944

  19. Mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Wojskowicz, Piotr; Kiśluk, Joanna; Fil, Dawid; Kemona, Andrzej; Dadan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniosis is an acute or chronic, zoonotic disease caused by infection of Gram-negative rods Yersinia enterocolitica. It can be transmitted by the consumption of originally contaminated food products (pork, unpasteurized milk) or secondarily contaminated with animal or vegetable products. The clinical picture of infection may have a variable course is related to the age and physical condition of the patient, or pathogenic properties of microorganisms. Infection caused by Y. enterocolitica can occur in different clinical forms: food poisoning, colitis, mesentric lymphadenitis, erythema nodosum, arthritis, pharyngitis, pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis. The aim of this study was to present a rare case of infection with Y. enterocolitica mesenteric lymph nodes coexistent with appendicitis. PMID:26557944

  20. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  1. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. PMID:25035742

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Choi, Lorraine; Lin, Peter H; Dardik, Alan; Eraso, Andrea; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric venous occlusion is a rare yet highly morbid condition that is traditionally treated with anticoagulation while surgery serves as the last resort. Percutaneous intervention provides an effective option with relatively low mortality and morbidity. We herein describe use of transhepatic percutaneous thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis in treating two cases of symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. These cases underscore the fact that transhepatic thrombectomy and thrombolysis are a highly effective strategy for treating acute symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. Several percutaneous techniques are also reviewed. PMID:17382054

  3. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Rebecca L.; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  4. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Burns, Rebecca L; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  5. Computed tomography of mesenteric involvement in fulminant pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, R.B.; Federle, M.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1983-04-01

    Although extension into the mesentery has been recognized as a frequent pathway of extrapancreatic spread in acute pancreatitis, it has received relatively little attention in the computed tomography (CT) literature. The medical records and CT scans of 55 patients with severe pancreatitis were reviewed in this study; of these patients, 19 (35%) had mesenteric abnormalities, which in 11 patients (20%) represented the most extensive extrapancreatic site of the most extensive extrapancreatic site of involvement. In fulminant pancreatitis, dissection along the mesentery is an important pathway for spread of pancreatic abscesses or phlegmons. Clinical correlation suggests that a combination of mesenteric with lesser sac and anterior pararenal space involvement is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 19 patients with mesenteric involvement, two died and 14 (74%) required surgery for abscesses, pseudocysts, or, in one case, a colonic fistula. The CT features of the normal mesentery and CT criteria for diagnosing mesenteric inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  6. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  7. Organ distribution of gut-derived bacteria caused by bowel manipulation or ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Redan, J.A.; Rush, B.F. Jr.; Lysz, T.W.; Smith, S.; Machiedo, G.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Translocation of carbon-14-labeled Escherichia coli from the gut was studied at the specified times in the following groups of rats: Group 1, 5 hours after ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; Group 2, 5 hours after laparotomy and exposure of the superior mesenteric artery with gentle removal and replacement of the intestines; and Group 3, 5 hours after handling but no surgical manipulation. Both living and dead bacteria were administered by means of gavage, and the effect of viability, intestinal ischemia without reperfusion, and bowel manipulation on the translocation of enteric bacteria was assessed. We demonstrated that (1) even gentle bowel manipulation causes bacteremia as great as that associated with ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; (2) dead E. coli are absorbed into the blood in the presence of bowel manipulation or ischemia but less effectively than are live E. coli; (3) live bacteria are found in highest concentration in the lung and in descending order in the liver, kidney, heart, and spleen; (4) dead bacteria absorbed from the gut are found in highest concentration in the kidney and the liver. Lesser amounts are found in the lung, spleen, and heart.

  8. Survival with Collateral Circulation after Gastrointestinal Ischemia Caused by Aortic Dissection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Eiji; Endo, Kazuya; Ota, Mitsuhiko; Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Hashimoto, Kenkichi; Egashira, Akinori; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kusumoto, Tetsuya; Ikejiri, Koji

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who presented with gradually intensifying abdominal pain of acute onset and was shown by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examination to have acute aortic dissection (Stanford type B). A diagnosis of gastrointestinal necrosis was made and he underwent emergency surgery. At laparoscopy, he was found to have no superior mesenteric arterial pulse and intestinal necrosis from the upper jejunum to the right transverse colon. Resection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) perfusion area was performed. Postoperatively, ischemia in the perfusion area of the celiac artery was also diagnosed, manifesting as gallbladder necrosis, portal vein gas accompanying gastric wall necrosis, perforation of the remaining upper jejunum, and hepatic and splenic infarction. However, development of a collateral circulation originating in the left colic branch of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) enabled retrograde provision of blood to the celiac artery through the SMA pancreaticoduodenal arcade. Thus, in this case, spontaneous development of a natural bypass created a new route for arterial perfusion, contributing to the patient's survival. When ischemia of the celiac artery and SMA perfusion areas occur, collateral circulation can develop from the IMA. PMID:26462314

  9. Successful Recanalization of Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion by a Combination of Intraarterial Thrombolysis and Mechanical Thrombectomy with a Carotid Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sinak, Igor; Janik, Jan; Mikolajcik, Anton; Mistuna, Dusan

    2013-06-15

    Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion is a life-threatening disease, and acute intestinal ischemia develops from the sudden decrease in perfusion to the intestines. The key to saving the patient's life is early diagnosis, and prompt revascularization of the SMA can prevent intestinal infarction and decrease the risk of bowel segment necrosis. Computed tomographic angiography may be useful for rapid diagnosis. We report recanalization of an SMA occlusion in an 80-year-old man with a combination of intraarterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy with a carotid filter.

  10. Identification of Mouse Mesenteric and Subcutaneous in vitro Adipogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yugo; Otsuki, Michio; Kita, Shunbun; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fat accumulation and the dysfunction of visceral white adipose tissue (WAT), but not subcutaneous WAT, cause abnormalities in whole body metabolic homeostasis. However, no current drugs specifically target visceral WAT. The primary reason for this is that a practical in vitro culture system for mesenteric adipocytes has not been established. To resolve this issue, we sought to identify in vitro adipogenic cells in mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs. First, we examined the expression pattern of surface antigens in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from mouse mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs, and found the expression of 30 stem cell-related surface antigens. Then, to evaluate the adipogenic ability of each fraction, we performed in vitro screening, and identified five candidate markers for mesenteric adipogenic cells and one candidate marker for subcutaneous adipogenic cells. To investigate whether in vitro adipogenic ability accurately reflects the conditions in vivo, we performed transplantation experiments, and identified CD9− CD201+ Sca-1− cells and CD90+ cells as mesenteric and subcutaneous in vitro adipogenic cells, respectively. Furthermore, mature adipocytes derived from mesenteric and subcutaneous adipogenic cells maintained each characteristic phenotype in vitro. Thus, our study should contribute to the development of a useful culture system for visceral adipocytes. PMID:26884347

  11. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    Dysplasia of the renal and cervical arteries are well known, but dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is less frequent and has specific presentation. There have been few reports on the different types of presentations. We report a series of 38 cases and present the characteristic features together with a comparison with data in the literature. These non-atheromatous non-inflammatory lesions of the arterial wall occurred either in a context of fibromuscular disease which cause is unknown (30/38 patients) or in patients with genetic disease such as neurofibromatosis (3/38) or Ehlers-Danlos disease (5/38). The fibromuscular disease presented three aspects with specific characteristics. a) stenosing lesions found predominantly in women with a different morphology than in the other localization (usually associated): irregular diffuse stenosis discovered in patients with hypertension, or ischemic digestive symptoms (6/14 patients). b) Aneurysms, also found predominantly in women, but less frequently associated with other dysplasias. These aneurysms were generally sacciform. Unlike data in the literature, our series only included rupture in 1/8 cases. The aneurysm was discovered during the exploration of abdominal pain or hypertension. c) The third type of fibromuscular disease concerned dissections which were observed in the male population, (except one case of segmental dysplasia), and presented with signs of digestive ischemia in the other seven patients, four in an emergency context requiring immediate treatment. Two genetic diseases were observed. a) Neurofibromatosis led to dysplasia analogous to fibromuscular disease, but with abnormal nerve formations in the wall. For the three cases observed, one involved only the visceral arteries and the two others thoraco-abdominal coarctation. b) We had five patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery. For three there was a fusiform dilatation and in one small aneurysms

  12. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  13. I. Effect of Trichinella spiralis infection on the migration of mesenteric lymphoblasts and mesenteric T lymphoblasts in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Parrott, D M; Bruce, R G

    1976-11-01

    The migration of [125I]UdR-labelled mesenteric lymph node cells in NIH strain mice at various times after inis produced an enhanced accumulation of mesenteric immunoblasts in the small intestine at 2 and 4 days after infection but not at later times. The enhanced migration occurred when using cells from both uninfected and infected donors, denoting an absence of antigenic specificity. This effect is not secondary to a reduced arrival of cells at sites away from the gut in infected mice, but to a primary increase of the arrival in the small intestine. Mesenteric T lymphoblasts (separated on a nylon-wool column) migrated to the small intestine of uninfected recipients and appear to be a major portion of the population which migrate to the gut of infected recipients. Our results were confirmed using 51Cr to label mesenteric cells. We conclude that the parasite causes the small intestine to become more attractive or retentive for mesenteric blast cells early during infection. PMID:62712

  14. Rare case of sclerosing mesenteritis and low grade follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema; Mahy, Gillian; Roche, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of long standing sclerosing mesenteritis; initially presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a mesenteric mass with surrounding fat oedema and stranding with a pseudocapsule and fat ring sign were clearly visualised on the initial computed tomography scan. Laparotomy showed diffuse thickening at the root of the mesentery and histology from this specimen revealed fat necrosis and reactive lymphoid tissue consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. Initial treatment with steroids and tamoxifen relieved the symptoms and the mass. He was maintained on tamoxifen. Three years later he developed a recurrence of his symptoms and abdominal mass that responded to a course of steroids. Two years following this, he developed a follicular Hodgkin’s lymphoma. PMID:27099861

  15. Rare case of sclerosing mesenteritis and low grade follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Seema; Mahy, Gillian; Roche, Enrico

    2016-04-16

    An unusual case of long standing sclerosing mesenteritis; initially presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a mesenteric mass with surrounding fat oedema and stranding with a pseudocapsule and fat ring sign were clearly visualised on the initial computed tomography scan. Laparotomy showed diffuse thickening at the root of the mesentery and histology from this specimen revealed fat necrosis and reactive lymphoid tissue consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. Initial treatment with steroids and tamoxifen relieved the symptoms and the mass. He was maintained on tamoxifen. Three years later he developed a recurrence of his symptoms and abdominal mass that responded to a course of steroids. Two years following this, he developed a follicular Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27099861

  16. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management. PMID:27097623

  17. Sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas: A mimicker of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scudiere, Jennifer R.; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Herman, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Thornton, Katherine; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Horton, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM), also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, rarely involves the parenchyma of the pancreas. When sclerosing mesenteritis does involve the pancreas, it can mimic pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically with pain, obstructive jaundice, a mass lesion and even the appearance of vascular invasion. We report 6 patients with sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas (mean age 43.2 years, 5 female), and review their clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathology, and outcome. Five of these 6 patients were originally thought to have a primary pancreatic neoplasm. Initial presenting clinical information was available for each patient: all 6 reported abdominal or epigastric pain, 3 reported weight loss, and 2 reported one or more of the following: back pain, fever, abdominal bloating/distention, nausea with/without vomiting, and anorexia. The lesions formed masses with an infiltrative pattern, and all had three key histologic features: fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and fat necrosis—without a known etiology. The inflammatory infiltrate was composed of a mixture of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered eosinophils. Of the five patients with post-treatment clinical information available, four had at least a partial response to treatment with steroids, tamoxifen, azathioprine, resection, or a combination of these, and 1 did not respond. A dramatic response to immunosuppressive therapy is illustrated by the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with the presumptive diagnosis of an unresectable pancreatic cancer. Distinguishing sclerosing mesenteritis from pancreatic carcinoma is crucial to appropriate management, as patients with sclerosing mesenteritis may benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20351487

  18. Catastrophic multiple organ ischemia due to an anti-Pr cold agglutinin developing in a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia after treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Joshua; McMahon, Brandon; Ramsey, Glenn; Kwaan, Hau C

    2009-02-01

    Cold agglutinin disease occurring with cryoglobulinemia is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia that was treated with rituximab and, after response, developed an anti-Pr cold agglutinin that manifested with hemolysis and microvascular occlusion causing mesenteric ischemia and cerebral infarction. Unlike previous reports of patients with cryoglobulinemia and cold agglutinin disease, our patient did not have a detectable cryoprecipitate when his cold agglutinin manifested. PMID:19097173

  19. The evolving concept of physiological ischemia training vs. ischemia preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Lu, Hongjian; Lu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghui; Peng, Qingyun; Ren, Caili; Xiang, Jie; Mei, Chengyao; Li, Jianan

    2015-11-01

    Ischemic heart diseases are the leading cause of death with increasing numbers of patients worldwide. Despite advances in revascularization techniques, angiogenic therapies remain highly attractive. Physiological ischemia training, which is first proposed in our laboratory, refers to reversible ischemia training of normal skeletal muscles by using a tourniquet or isometric contraction to cause physiologic ischemia for about 4 weeks for the sake of triggering molecular and cellular mechanisms to promote angiogenesis and formation of collateral vessels and protect remote ischemia areas. Physiological ischemia training therapy augments angiogenesis in the ischemic myocardium by inducing differential expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, cell migration, protein folding, and generation. It upregulates the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor, and induces angiogenesis, protects the myocardium when infarction occurs by increasing circulating endothelial progenitor cells and enhancing their migration, which is in accordance with physical training in heart disease rehabilitation. These findings may lead to a new approach of therapeutic angiogenesis for patients with ischemic heart diseases. On the basis of the promising results in animal studies, studies were also conducted in patients with coronary artery disease without any adverse effect in vivo, indicating that physiological ischemia training therapy is a safe, effective and non-invasive angiogenic approach for cardiovascular rehabilitation. Preconditioning is considered to be the most protective intervention against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury to date. Physiological ischemia training is different from preconditioning. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical data of physiological ischemia training and its difference from preconditioning. PMID:26664354

  20. Proteome changes in mesenteric lymph induced by sepsis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, PING; LI, YAN; ZHANG, LIAN-DONG; WANG, LIANG-HUA; WANG, XI; HE, CHAO; LIN, ZHAO-FEN

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the changes in mesenteric lymph during the development of sepsis and to identify the distinct proteins involved, as targets for further study. The sepsis animal model was constructed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mesenteric lymph was collected from 28 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into the following four groups (n=7 per group): CLP-6 h, CLP-24 h, sham-6 h and sham-24 h groups. Capillary high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed to analyze the proteome in mesenteric lymph. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis was then conducted to investigate the distinct proteins. Compared with the sham group, 158 distinct proteins were identified in the lymph samples from the CLP group. Five of these proteins associated with the same lipid metabolism pathway were selected, apolipoprotein E (ApoE), annexin A1 (Anxa1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), S100a8 and S100a9. The expression of ApoE, Anxa1, NGAL, S100a8 and S100a9 were all elevated in the progression of sepsis. The five proteins were reported to be closely associated with disease development and may be a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis. In conclusion, identifying proteome changes in mesenteric lymph provides a novel perspective to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying sepsis. PMID:25242054

  1. Ileocolic Arteriovenous Fistula with Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurism: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorio, Miguel Angel de; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Medrano, Joaquin; Schoenholz, Caudio; Rodriguez, Juan; D'Agostino, Horacio

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of a venous aneurysm secondary to an acquired ileocolic arteriovenous fistula in a 64-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain and history of appendectomy. The aneurysm was diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography. Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula between ileocolic branches of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. This vascular abnormality was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  2. Mesenteric artery contraction and relaxation studies using automated wire myography.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Lakeesha E; Williams, Cicely L; Pointer, Mildred A; Awumey, Emmanuel M

    2011-01-01

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. These small vessels of between 100-400 μm in diameter function primarily in directing blood flow to various organs according to the overall requirements of the body. The rat mesenteric artery has a diameter greater than 100 μm. The myography technique, first described by Mulvay and Halpern(1), was based on the method proposed by Bevan and Osher(2). The technique provides information about small vessels under isometric conditions, where substantial shortening of the muscle preparation is prevented. Since force production and sensitivity of vessels to different agonists is dependent on the extent of stretch, according to active tension-length relation, it is essential to conduct contraction studies under isometric conditions to prevent compliance of the mounting wires. Stainless steel wires are preferred to tungsten wires because of oxidation of the latter, which affects recorded responses(3).The technique allows for the comparison of agonist-induced contractions of mounted vessels to obtain evidence for normal function of vascular smooth muscle cell receptors. We have shown in several studies that isolated mesenteric arteries that are contracted with phenylyephrine relax upon addition of cumulative concentrations of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(e;)). The findings led us to conclude that perivascular sensory nerves, which express the G protein-coupled Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR), mediate this vasorelaxation response. Using an automated wire myography method, we show here that mesenteric arteries from Wistar, Dahl salt-sensitive(DS) and Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats respond differently to Ca(2+)(e;). Tissues from Wistar rats showed higher Ca(2+)-sensitivity compared to those from DR and DS. Reduced CaR expression in mesenteric arteries from DS rats correlates with reduced Ca(2+)(e;)-induced relaxation of isolated, pre-contracted arteries. The data

  3. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  4. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Murthy, G; Hargens, A R; Lehman, S; Rempel, D M

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue. PMID:11398857

  5. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  6. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  7. [Myocardial responses to ischemia].

    PubMed

    Borisenko, V G; Gubareva, E A; Kade, A Kh

    2010-01-01

    The paper details the types of a myocardial response to impaired blood flow, such as myocardial stunning, hibernation, ischemic preconditioning, warm-up phenomenon, ischemic postconditioning, remodeling, and infarction. According to the pathogenesis, the authors identify several types of myocardial dysfunction in transient ischemic attack--uptake, delivery; and a mixed one. It is concluded the myocardial response to damage depends on a combination of influencing factors, a number of pathophysiological processes starting in the acute phase of ischemia achieve its peak in the late period. PMID:20564927

  8. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  9. Mesenteric amyloid deposition as the initial presentation of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Mehrnaz

    2011-01-01

    Despite many recent progresses in diagnostic modalities, occasionally the initial manifestation of the diseases may be misleading. Therefore, to consider the uncommon presentations of prevalent diseases may be of help. Plasma-cell dyscrasia is one of the most well-known haematological malignancies. Clonal expansion of plasma cells results in diverse clinical findings, such as renal failure, lytic bone lesion, anaemia, hyperviscosity syndrome and so forth. However, this disease entity rarely presents with abdominal mass due to mesenteric amyloid deposition. Here we report a case of a 53-year-old Iranian woman who presented with a 4-month history of abdominal pain and fullness; she was finally found to suffer from small bowel mesenteric amyloidosis in the context of multiple myeloma. PMID:22714598

  10. Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula embolisation complicated by bowel ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Maher; Issa, Ghada; Muhsen, Shirin; Haydar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistulas are rare, especially when iatrogenic in origin. Management of these fistulas can be surgical or endovascular. Endovascular embolisation is the preferred modality with a low rate of complications. Among the reported complications, bowel ischaemia is considered an unlikely occurrence. We report a case of a complex iatrogenic arterioportal fistula that was managed by endovascular embolisation and controlled through both its inflow and outflow, and was later complicated by bowel ischaemia. PMID:23682091

  11. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  12. What else is hiding behind superior mesenteric artery syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Paola; Iacobelli, Barbara Daniela; Torroni, Filippo; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Bagolan, Pietro; Fusaro, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon condition in children. We describe a case of a 7-year-old boy with SMAS that occurred 3 years after a Deloyers' procedure for subtotal colonic Hirschsprung who was admitted for bilious vomit, abdominal pain and diarrhea due to unrecognized celiac disease. This case emphasize that SMAS in children needs a close medical and surgical follow-up to avoid an underestimation of early clinical signs unrelated to surgery. PMID:25972411

  13. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  14. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Leiomyosarcoma of the Mesenteric Root: A Strategic Location of a Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Offir

    2015-01-01

    High mesenteric root sarcomas are difficult to manage due to their proximity to the superior mesenteric vessels. Resection of these tumors along with the blood vessels may lead to a complicated and protracted convalescence for the patient. Resection remains the main treatment modality for these tumors. During operation on high mesenteric root sarcomas, sound clinical judgment is needed for the decision not to sacrifice vital blood vessels. PMID:26464571

  16. Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Holloway, Naomi; Thimmesch, Amanda; Wood, John G; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a leading cause of death in traumatic injury. Ischemia and hypoxia in HS and fluid resuscitation (FR) creates a condition that facilitates excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is a major factor causing increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and inflammation in the microcirculation resulting in reperfusion tissue injury. The aim of this study was to determine if ubiquinol (coenzyme Q10) decreases microvascular inflammation following HS and FR. Intravital microscopy was used to measure leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions in the rat mesentery following 1-h of HS and 2-h post FR with or without ubiquinol. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by removing ~ 40% of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats' blood volume to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure <50 mmHg for 1 h. Ubiquinol (1 mg/100 g body weight) was infused intravascularly in the ubiquinol group immediately after 1-h HS. The FR protocol included replacement of the shed blood and Lactate Ringer's in both the control and ubiquinol groups. We found that leukocyte adherence (2.3 ± 2.0), mast cell degranulation (1.02 ± 0.01), and ROS levels (159 ± 35%) in the ubiquinol group were significantly reduced compared to the control group (10.8 ± 2.3, 1.36 ± 0.03, and 343 ± 47%, respectively). In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04). In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation. These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties. PMID:25413319

  17. Segmental "misty mesentery" on FDG PET/CT: an uncommon manifestation of mesenteric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Ameya D; Purandare, Nilendu C; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric lymphomas are commonly seen as bulky hypermetabolic nodal masses on F-FDG PET/CT. Very rarely, these are seen as mesenteric haziness due to localized hyperattenuation of fat, known as "misty mesentery", which morphological imaging-wise has other differentials as well. We report a unique imaging finding of segmental misty mesentery with hypermetabolic mesenteric nodes on FDG PET/CT in a patient who was kept on observation due to inconclusive biopsy, which on follow-up imaging progressed to extensive lymphomatous involvement. Thus, in retrospect, this imaging feature on baseline PET/CT was diagnostic for mesenteric lymphoma. PMID:23797224

  18. Purinergic signalling in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pedata, Felicita; Dettori, Ilaria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Melani, Alessia; Fusco, Irene; Corradetti, Renato; Pugliese, Anna Maria

    2016-05-01

    Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia a primary damage due to the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, i.e microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. Extracellular concentrations of ATP and adenosine in the brain increase dramatically during ischemia in concentrations able to stimulate their respective specific P2 and P1 receptors. Both ATP P2 and adenosine P1 receptor subtypes exert important roles in ischemia. Although adenosine exerts a clear neuroprotective effect through A1 receptors during ischemia, the use of selective A1 agonists is hampered by undesirable peripheral effects. Evidence up to now in literature indicate that A2A receptor antagonists provide protection centrally by reducing excitotoxicity, while agonists at A2A (and possibly also A2B) and A3 receptors provide protection by controlling massive infiltration and neuroinflammation in the hours and days after brain ischemia. Among P2X receptors most evidence indicate that P2X7 receptor contribute to the damage induced by the ischemic insult due to intracellular Ca(2+) loading in central cells and facilitation of glutamate release. Antagonism of P2X7 receptors might represent a new treatment to attenuate brain damage and to promote proliferation and maturation of brain immature resident cells that can promote tissue repair following cerebral ischemia. Among P2Y receptors, antagonists of P2Y12 receptors are of value because of their antiplatelet activity and possibly because of additional anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover strategies that modify adenosine or ATP concentrations at injury sites might be of value to limit damage after ischemia. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and

  19. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  20. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  1. Ruptured and unruptured mycotic superior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Semel, Marcus E; McGillicuddy, Edward A; Ho, Karen J; Menard, Matthew T; Gates, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    Aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and branches thereof are uncommon but have a high rate of rupture and mortality relative to other visceral artery aneurysms. Historically, the predominant etiology has been infectious; with a renewed rise in intravenous drug abuse rates in the last decade, we hypothesize a resurgence in septic embolic complications may occur in the coming years. Here, we describe the presentation and management of 2 cases of intravenous drug users presenting with infectious endocarditis and SMA main trunk and branch aneurysms, one of which was ruptured. In addition, we review the literature on these rare clinical entities. PMID:25017769

  2. Mesenteric venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milne, P Y; Thomas, R J

    1976-05-01

    Small-bowel infarction resulting from mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication to which young women taking oral contraceptives are liable. The patient characteristically presents with an "acute abdomen" after a variable prodromal period of vague abdominal pain. The correct diagnosis can be made from the macroscopic appearance at laparotomy, provided the surgeon is alert to the condition. An accurate diagnosis is important, as anticoagulation measures must be instituted early to counter the commonly associated thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:1067070

  3. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  4. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI. PMID:26902261

  5. Tyrphostin AG 126 reduces intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marzocco, Stefania; Mazzon, Emanuela; Pinto, Aldo; Autore, Giuseppina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of tyrphostin AG126, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in the splanchnic artery occlusion (SAO) shock mediated injury. SAO shock was induced in rats by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk for 45 min. After 1 h of reperfusion, SAO shocked rats developed a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure. Ileum analysis revealed that SAO shock is characterized by a significant (P<0.01) induction in TNF-alpha and IL-1 ileum levels, while immunohistochemistry examination of necrotic ileum demonstrated a marked increase in the immunoreactivity in intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) and nitrotyrosine formation. A significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity (P<0.01) was also observed in rats subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Tyrphostin AG126, given intraperitoneally 30 min before ischemia at the dose of 5 mg/kg, significantly improved mean arterial blood pressure, markedly reduced TNF-alpha and IL-1beta levels and the positive staining of ICAM-1 into the reperfused ileum. Tyrphostin AG126 significantly improved the histological status of the reperfused tissue. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that tyrphostin AG126 exerts multiple protective effects in splanchnic artery occlusion/reperfusion shock and suggests that this tyrosine kinase inhibitor may be a candidate for consideration as a therapeutic intervention for ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:16485131

  6. TRPM8 Channel Activation Induced by Monoterpenoid Rotundifolone Underlies Mesenteric Artery Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Darizy Flavia; de Almeida, Monica Moura; Chaves, Cinthia Guedes; Braz, Ana Letícia; Gomes, Maria Aparecida; Pinho-da-Silva, Leidiane; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Andrade, Viviane Aguiar; Leite, Maria de Fátima; de Albuquerque, José George Ferreira; Araujo, Islania Giselia Albuquerque; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Correia, Nadja de Azevedo; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our aims were to investigate transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channels (TRPM8) involvement in rotundifolone induced relaxation in the mesenteric artery and to increase the understanding of the role of these thermosensitive TRP channels in vascular tissue. Thus, message and protein levels of TRPM8 were measured by semi-quantitative PCR and western blotting in superior mesenteric arteries from 12 week-old Spague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isometric tension recordings evaluated the relaxant response in mesenteric rings were also performed. Additionally, the intracellular Ca2+ changes in mesenteric artery myocytes were measured using confocal microscopy. Using PCR and western blotting, both TRPM8 channel mRNA and protein expression was measured in SD rat mesenteric artery. Rotundifolone and menthol induced relaxation in the isolated superior mesenteric artery from SD rats and improved the relaxant response induced by cool temperatures. Also, this monoterpene induced an increase in transient intracellular Ca2+. These responses were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with capsazepine or BCTC, both TRPM8 channels blockers. The response induced by rotundifolone was not significantly attenuated by ruthenium red, a non-selective TRP channels blocker, or following capsaicin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1. Our findings suggest that rotundifolone induces relaxation by activating TRPM8 channels in rat superior mesenteric artery, more selectively than menthol, the classic TRPM8 agonist, and TRPM8 channels participates in vasodilatory pathways in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. PMID:26599698

  7. [Mesenteric panniculitis of the colon: barium enema, US, CT, and MRI findings (case report)].

    PubMed

    Kebapçi, Mahmut; Adapinar, Baki; Kaya, Tamer; Kebapçi, Nur

    2004-12-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis as an uncommon disease of unknown etiology characterised by nonspecific inflammation of the fat tissue of the mesentery. In this report, we are presenting a case of mesenteric panniculitis of the rectosigmoid colon in which characteristic findings of barium enema, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were noted. We emphasized the diagnostic significance of these methods. PMID:15611917

  8. Relief of superior mesenteric artery syndrome with correction of multiplanar spinal deformity by posterior spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Marecek, Geoffrey S; Barsness, Katherine A; Sarwark, John F

    2010-07-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is obstruction of the third portion of the duodenum by compression between the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Pediatric orthopedists are familiar with this entity, as the association between superior mesenteric artery syndrome and spinal fusion or body casting has been well established. However, patients with spinal deformities usually experience superior mesenteric artery syndrome after orthopedic intervention, with rates after corrective spinal surgery reported between 0.5% and 2.4%. Symptoms of superior mesenteric artery syndrome typically include nausea, bilious emesis, abdominal pain, early satiety, and anorexia. Initial treatment focuses on gastric decompression and maintaining euvolemia and electrolyte balance. The patient should receive enteral nutrition via nasojejunal tube or parenteral nutrition to allow for weight gain and subsequent resolution of the obstruction. The superior mesenteric artery takes off from the duodenum at an angle of 45 degrees to 60 degrees in normal individuals. The third portion of the duodenum is suspended between these vessels by the ligament of Treitz. Any variation in this relationship that decreases the arteriomesenteric angle may induce obstruction. Specifically, lumbar hyperextension or hyperlordosis can traction the mesentery and vessels. Only 2 cases of superior mesenteric artery syndrome in patients with sagittal plane spinal deformity have been described in the literature. In patients with concomitant superior mesenteric artery syndrome and spinal deformity, correction of the deformity may help alleviate the obstruction and result in faster recovery. The contribution of spinal column deformity to the arteriomesenteric angle should not be overlooked. PMID:20608618

  9. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  10. Coexistence of rare arteries in the human celiaco-mesenteric system.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Mabuchi, M; Giuvarasteanu, I; Kikuta, A; Ohtsuka, A

    1998-10-01

    Some rare anomalies of the celiaco-mesenteric system were observed postmortem in a Japanese adult male: a) The left gastric, common hepatic, splenic and superior mesenteric arteries arose independently from the abdominal aorta. b) The anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery of the superior mesenteric artery issued a hepatic artery which ascended along the anterior surface of the pancreas and gave off the right gastroepiploic, right gastric and cystic arteries. c) The common hepatic artery gave off an anastomosing branch to the superior mesenteric artery. d) The left gastric artery gave off the left accessory hepatic artery. e) The splenic artery issued the accessory middle colic artery. f) The left inferior phrenic artery gave off the esophageal branch. These anomalies are discussed in light of a typological system which we proposed in a previous paper for the celiaco-mesenteric system. PMID:9810433

  11. Lymph transport in rat mesenteric lymphatics experiencing edemagenic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Akl, Tony; Coté, Gerard L.; Moore, James E.; Zawieja, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess lymphatic flow adaptations to edema, we evaluated lymph transport function in rat mesenteric lymphatics under normal and edemagenic conditions in situ. Methods Twelve rats were infused with saline (intravenous infusion, 0.2 ml/min/100g body weight) to induce edema. We intravitally measured mesenteric lymphatic diameter and contraction frequency, as well as immune cell velocity and density before, during and after infusion. Results A 10-fold increase in lymph velocity (0.1–1 mm/s) and a 6-fold increase in flow rate (0.1–0.6 μL/min), were observed post-infusion, respectively. There were also increases in contraction frequency and fractional pump flow 1-minute post-infusion. Time-averaged wall shear stress increased 10 fold post-infusion to nearly 1.5 dynes/cm2. Similarly, maximum shear stress rose from 5 dynes/cm2 to 40 dynes/cm2. Conclusions Lymphatic vessels adapted to edemagenic stress by increasing lymph transport. Specifically, the increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity, and shear stress were significant. Lymph pumping increased post-infusion, though changes in lymphatic diameter were not statistically significant. These results indicate that edemagenic conditions stimulate lymph transport via increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity and flow. These changes, consequently, resulted in large increases in wall shear stress, which could then activate NO pathways and modulate lymphatic transport function. PMID:24397756

  12. Phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Inoshita, Naoko; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An 80-year-old woman visited the hospital emergency department with the chief complaints of epigastric pain and vomiting. She was hospitalized urgently following the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome based on abdominal computed tomography findings. Conservative therapy was not effective, and phlegmonous gastritis was diagnosed based on the findings of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy performed on the 12th day of the disease. Undernutrition and reduced physical activity were observed on hospital admission, and proactive nutritional therapy with enteral nutrition was started. An upper gastrointestinal series, performed approximately 1 month later, confirmed the persistence of strictures and impaired gastric emptying. Because conservative therapy was unlikely to improve oral food intake, open total gastrectomy was performed on the 94th day of the disease. Examination of surgically resected specimens revealed marked inflammation and fibrosis, especially in the body of the stomach. Following a good postoperative recovery, the patient was able to commence oral intake and left our hospital on foot approximately 1 month after surgery. PMID:27489695

  13. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  14. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  15. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  16. Effect of perturbations and a meal on superior mesenteric artery flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, J.; Camilleri, M.; Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Our aims were to evaluate to role of superior mesenteric blood flow in the pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension in patients with generalized autonomic failure. METHODS: Twelve patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and 12 healthy controls underwent superior mesenteric artery flow measurements using Doppler ultrasonography during head-up tilt and tilt plus meal ingestion. Autonomic failure was assessed using standard tests of the function of the sympathetic adrenergic, cardiovagal and postganglionic sympathetic sudomotor function. RESULTS: Superior mesenteric flow volume and time-averaged velocity were similar in patients and controls at supine rest; however, responses to cold pressor test and upright tilt were attenuated (p < 0.05) in patients compared to controls. Head-up tilt after the meal evoked a profound fall of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the patients; the reduction of mesenteric blood flow correlated (r = 0.89) with the fall of blood pressure in these patients, providing another manifestation of failed baroreflexes. We make the novel finding that the severity of postprandial orthostatic hypotension regressed negatively with the postprandial increase in mesenteric flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension. CONCLUSION: Mesenteric flow is under baroreflex control, which when defective, results in, or worsens orthostatic hypotension. Its large size and baroreflexivity renders it quantitatively important in the maintenance of postural normotension. The effects of orthostatic stress can be significantly attenuated by reducing the splanchnic-mesenteric volume increase in response to food. Evaluation of mesenteric flow in response to eating and head-up tilt provide important information on intra-abdominal sympathetic adrenergic function, and the ability of the patient to cope with orthostatic stress.

  17. Cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Kalyan, Jiten P; Jonas, Attila; Hanif, Muhammad A; Prionidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms as a result of arterial degenerative disease are rare (0.1-2%), and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) accounts for 3.2% of all reported series. However, mycotic SMA aneurysms (SMAAs) are even rarer, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of SMA by Enterococcus faecalis (EF). We report a case of 77-year-old man with 6-week history of supra pubic/left iliac fossa pain, weight loss and fever. The computed tomography demonstrated an incidental finding of 4.4 × 3-cm SMAA with no primary foci. The subsequent serology and specimen confirmed EF. Aneurysmectomy without bypass grafting along with antimicrobial therapy resulted in full recovery of the patient. PMID:26276703

  18. Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance arterial function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Ground studies indicate that spaceflight may diminish vascular contraction. To examine that possibility, vascular function was measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats immediately after an 18-day shuttle flight. Isolated mesenteric resistance arterial responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were measured using wire myography within 17 h of landing. After flight, maximal contraction to norepinephrine was attenuated (P < 0.001) as was relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (P < 0.05). At high concentrations, acetylcholine caused vascular contraction in vessels from flight animals but not in vessels from vivarium control animals (P < 0.05). The results are consistent with data from ground studies and indicate that spaceflight causes both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent alterations in vascular function. The resulting decrement in vascular function may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

  19. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Associated with Hormonal Contraceptive Use.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Nobuatsu

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was admitted with a 7-day history of lower abdominal pain and nausea. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness in the lower abdomen without signs of peritonitis. There were no specific findings in the laboratory evaluation. She had a history of dysmenorrhea for 15 years and was taking a combined hormonal contraceptive containing 0.02 mg ethinyl estradiol and 3 mg drospirenone for 19 months. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT). Systemic anticoagulant infusion was immediately administered and the symptoms disappeared within 2 days. The thrombus disappeared after 3 months. This case report suggests that early diagnosis of SMVT and immediate systemic anticoagulant therapy may reduce the rate of intestinal infarction. PMID:27462195

  20. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Associated with Hormonal Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Nobuatsu

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was admitted with a 7-day history of lower abdominal pain and nausea. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness in the lower abdomen without signs of peritonitis. There were no specific findings in the laboratory evaluation. She had a history of dysmenorrhea for 15 years and was taking a combined hormonal contraceptive containing 0.02 mg ethinyl estradiol and 3 mg drospirenone for 19 months. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT). Systemic anticoagulant infusion was immediately administered and the symptoms disappeared within 2 days. The thrombus disappeared after 3 months. This case report suggests that early diagnosis of SMVT and immediate systemic anticoagulant therapy may reduce the rate of intestinal infarction. PMID:27462195

  1. Changes in mesenteric, renal, and aortic flows with +Gx acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. L.; Erickson, H. H.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in man and dogs have indicated that the splanchnic bed might contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration. Eight mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented with Doppler flow probes around the superior mesenteric (SMA) and renal arteries (RA) as well as the terminal aorta (TA). A solid-state pressure transducer was placed in the aorta distal to the flow probe. Using alpha-chloralose anesthesia following a 2-4 week recovery period, the animals were subjected to 120 sec at levels of 5, 10 and 15 +Gx acceleration on a 7.6-m radius centrifuge. The results indicate that both an active component and a mechanical component contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration.

  2. Endovascular Management of Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Barbery, Katuska; Lamus, Daniel; Nanavati, Kunal

    2008-11-15

    The uncommon presentation of an arterioportal fistula (APF) involving the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with a pseudoaneurysm represents a therapeutic challenge. We present the case of a 24-year-old female admitted to the hospital after multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen; the patient underwent multiple surgeries and, in the process, developed a SMA pseudoaneurysm and fistula. The vascular interventional radiology team was consulted for treatment of the pseudoaneurysm and fistula. A covered stent was inserted percutaneously to exclude the APF and the pseudoaneurysm in a single procedure. The patient returned to our service after 21 months for a follow-up CT scan, which demonstrated the stent and the distal vasculature to be patent.

  3. Wilkie's Syndrome or Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Fact or Fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Vera; Deeb, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome (known as Wilkie's syndrome) is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. It is an acquired disorder in which acute angulation of the SMA causes compression of the third part of the duodenum between the SMA and the aorta. This is commonly due to loss of fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions. We report a 17-year-old female who presented with intermittent abdominal pain and intractable vomiting following significant weight loss after hospitalization for pneumonia. Symptoms persisted for 2 years and the patient underwent extensive invasive and non-invasive tests, but to no avail. Thereafter she developed acute high intestinal obstruction, which unraveled her diagnosis. This case emphasizes the challenges in the diagnosis of SMA syndrome and the need for increased awareness of this entity. This will improve early recognition in order to reduce irrelevant tests and unnecessary treatments. PMID:26120301

  4. Visceral periadventitial adipose tissue regulates arterial tone of mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Verlohren, Stefan; Dubrovska, Galyna; Tsang, Suk-Ying; Essin, Kirill; Luft, Friedrich C; Huang, Yu; Gollasch, Maik

    2004-09-01

    Periadventitial adipose tissue produces vasoactive substances that influence vascular contraction. Earlier studies addressed this issue in aorta, a vessel that does not contribute to peripheral vascular resistance. We tested the hypothesis that periadventitial adipose tissue modulates contraction of smaller arteries more relevant to blood pressure regulation. We studied mesenteric artery rings surrounded by periadventitial adipose tissue from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The contractile response to serotonin, phenylephrine, and endothelin I was markedly reduced in intact vessels compared with vessels without periadventitial fat. The contractile response to U46619 or depolarizing high K+-containing solutions (60 mmol/L) was similar in vessels with and without periadventitial fat. The K+ channel opener cromakalim induced relaxation of vessels precontracted by serotonin but not by U46619 or high K+-containing solutions (60 mmol/L), suggesting that K+ channels are involved. The intracellular membrane potential of smooth muscle cells was more hyperpolarized in intact vessels than in vessels without periadventitial fat. Both the anticontractile effect and membrane hyperpolarization of periadventitial fat were abolished by inhibition of delayed-rectifier K+ (K(v)) channels with 4-aminopyridine (2 mmol/L) or 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mmol/L). Blocking other K+ channels with glibenclamide (3 micromol/L), apamin (1 micromol/L), iberiotoxin (100 nmol/L), tetraethylammonium ions (1 mmol/L), tetrapentylammonium ions (10 micromol/L), or Ba2+ (3 micromol/L) had no effect. Longitudinal removal of half the perivascular tissue reduced the anticontractile effect of fat by almost 50%, whereas removal of the endothelium had no effect. We suggest that visceral periadventitial adipose tissue controls mesenteric arterial tone by inducing vasorelaxation via K(v) channel activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:15302842

  5. [Transanal Doppler ultrasound for prevention of colonic ischemia following abdominal aortic reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Sakurazawa, K

    1991-10-01

    Colonic gangrene is a fatal complication following aorto-iliac reconstruction. Preservation of a sufficient blood flow through both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the internal iliac artery (IIA) is believed to be important in its prevention. The transanal Doppler ultrasound technique is a new method to explore intraoperative pelvic hemodynamic changes. After identifying the artery responsible for rectal perfusion and then estimating the collateral rectal blood supply which was derived from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after aortic clamping, the treatment for the IMA and the IIA was determined. Out of 49 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), 43 cases (88%) were considered to be SMA-dominant, with ligation of the IMA and the IIA being feasible. The IMA and bilateral IIAs could be ligated uneventfully in 14 AAA cases. And, in fact, the reconstruction of the IMA was performed in only 2 cases (4%). Among 21 cases of aorto-iliac occlusive disease (AIOD), 8 cases (38%) were found to be SMA-non-dominant, which suggests a greater importance in the preservation of intrapelvic circulation in AIOD than in AAA. Adequate intraoperative monitoring, by the transanal Doppler ultrasound technique, is essential for the successful prevention of postoperative colonic ischemia. PMID:1961189

  6. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia: results of a recent series.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Papaspiropoulos, V; Mancini, P; Ceccanei, G

    2004-04-01

    Due to the rarity of the condition, large and prospective series defining the optimal method of digestive arteries revascularization, for the treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia, are lacking. The aim of this consecutive sample clinical study was to test the hypothesis that flexible application of different revascularization methods, according to individual cases, will yield the best results in the management of chronic intestinal ischemia. Eleven patients, of a mean age of 56 years, underwent revascularization of 11 digestive arteries for symptomatic chronic mesenteric occlusive disease. Eleven superior mesenteric arteries and one celiac axis were revascularized. The revascularization techniques included retrograde bypass grafting in 7 cases, antegrade bypass grafting in 2, percutaneous arterial angioplasty in 1, and arterial reimplantation in one case. The donor axis for either reimplantation or bypass grafting was the infrarenal aorta in 4 cases, an infrarenal Dacron graft in 4, and the celiac aorta in one case. Grafting materials included 5 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and 3 Dacron grafts. Concomitant procedures included 3 aorto-ilio-femoral grafts and one renal artery revascularization. Mean follow-up duration was 31 months. There was no operative mortality. Cumulative survival rate was 88.9% at 36 months (SE 12.1%). Primary patency rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). The symptom free rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). Direct reimplantation, antegrade and retrograde bypass grafting, all allow good mid-term results: the choice of the optimal method depends on the anatomic and general patient's status. Associated infrarenal and renal arterial lesions can be safely treated in the same time of digestive revascularization. Angioplasty alone yields poor results and should be limited to patients at poor risk for surgery. PMID:15154575

  7. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, Yoshiki E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy.

  8. Mesenteric Panniculitis in a Thirteen-Year-Old Korean Boy Treated with Prednisolone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Ji Soo

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric mesenteric panniculitis is an extremely rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation, fat necrosis, and fibrosis in the mesenteric adipose tissue. A previously healthy 13-year-old boy was admitted because of right upper abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed increased attenuation and enhancement in the left upper abdominal omental fat and anterior peritoneal wall thickening. A laparoscopic biopsy showed mesenteric panniculitis with chronic inflammation, adiponecrosis, and septal fibrosis. Serological tests for autoimmune diseases, nested polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and special immunohistochemical stains for malignancy were all negative. Symptomatic improvement and improved abnormal findings were achieved after an 8-month treatment with prednisolone according to a follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan. Here, we report a case of pediatric mesenteric panniculitis treated with prednisolone. PMID:27437192

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Volvulus through Mesenteric Defect in Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Scott; Al-Qaraghouli, Mohammed; Hussain, Naveed; Finck, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal midgut volvulus is a rare surgical emergency in which bowel is severely compromised. Rarely the etiology is a mesenteric defect. Early diagnosis is essential and lifesaving in the immediate newborn period. Typically upper gastrointestinal or ultrasound imaging can be suggestive of the diagnosis of volvulus in the neonate. Sometimes, however, the diagnosis may be elusive. Herein, we report on the use of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose a midgut volvulus that occurred through a congenital mesenteric defect. PMID:27551577

  10. Rupture of an Aneurysm of a Small Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arer, Ilker Murat; Gedikoglu, Murat; Yabanoglu, Hakan; Noyan, Mustafa Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) is an uncommon vascular disorder. Complications such as rupture have been reported. Once complication has been encountered both surgical and endovascular treatment techniques can be considered. Case Report We present a case of 68-year old male patient with SMAA rupture treated by endovascular modality. Conclusions Endovascular therapy is an effective and less invasive option for rupture of superior mesenteric artery aneurysm. PMID:27536338

  11. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  12. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents Mesenteric Fat Deposition and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Chi H. L.; Szabo, Alexander; Yu, Yinghua; Camer, Danielle; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric fat belongs to visceral fat. An increased deposition of mesenteric fat contributes to obesity associated complications such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We have investigated the therapeutic effects of bardoxolone methyl (BARD) on mesenteric adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6J mice were administered oral BARD during HFD feeding (HFD/BARD), only fed a high-fat diet (HFD), or fed low-fat diet (LFD) for 21 weeks. Histology and immunohistochemistry were used to analyse mesenteric morphology and macrophages, while Western blot was used to assess the expression of inflammatory, oxidative stress, and energy expenditure proteins. Supplementation of drinking water with BARD prevented mesenteric fat deposition, as determined by a reduction in large adipocytes. BARD prevented inflammation as there were fewer inflammatory macrophages and reduced proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha). BARD reduced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, suggesting an antioxidative stress effect. BARD upregulates energy expenditure proteins, judged by the increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) proteins. Overall, BARD induces preventive effect in HFD mice through regulation of mesenteric adipose tissue. PMID:26618193

  13. Binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites in rat mesenteric lymph

    SciTech Connect

    Dueland, S.; Bouillon, R.; Van Baelen, H.; Pedersen, J.I.; Helgerud, P.; Drevon, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    A protein with high affinity for vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in rat mesenteric lymph has been studied. Mesenteric lymph was collected after duodenal instillation of radiolabeled vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. As previously described, approximately 10% of vitamin D3 and 95% of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 recovered in mesenteric lymph were associated with the alpha-globulin fractions. The radioactive vitamin D3 recovered in the lymph fraction with d greater than 1.006 (free of chylomicrons) coeluted with purified rat serum binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites (DBP) from an antirat DBP column. The results obtained by immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that this protein in mesenteric lymph had molecular weight and immunological properties identical with purified serum DBP. Purified serum DBP labeled with /sup 125/I was injected intravenously and mesenteric lymph was collected. results suggesting that DBP may be transferred from blood to mesenteric lymph and that plasma and lymph DBP may have a similar origin.

  14. Anatomical Description and Clinical Relevance of a Rare Variation in the Mesenteric Arterial Arcade Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hansdak, Ranjeeta; Thakur, Avinash; Mehta, Vandana; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    Solitary vascular variations of the mesenteric arteries are extremely rare and have been seldom reported in the past. The aim of this study is to emphasize the anatomical and clinical relevance of one such rare variation of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). The current case anomaly was incidentally observed while guiding the undergraduate medical students in the dissection of the mesenteric region of the abdomen in an Indian cadaver. An Accessory left colic artery was seen to be branching off from the Inferior Mesenteric artery and further dividing into two transverse branches which took part in the formation of arterial arc for the perfusion of the transverse and the descending colon. Awareness of such aberrant branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery helps in optimal selection of the mode of treatment or operative planning. Additionally, this knowledge minimizes possible iatrogenic injuries resulting from surgeries. Moreover, surgical anatomy of anomalous branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery is extremely essential for planning and successfully executing reconstructive procedures using these branches as pedicles for the transposed part of the colon. PMID:26435936

  15. Rho Kinase Enhances Contractions of Rat Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Moor, Andrea N.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1–10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5–50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1–10 μM H1152 or 25–50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose

  16. Rho kinase enhances contractions of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Kristine H; Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Moor, Andrea N; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1-10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5-50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1-10 μM H1152 or 25-50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose that

  17. Leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahbi, Abdullah M; Elmoukaied, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of male infertility. Many surgical approaches are used as each of them has advantages over the other and is preferred by surgeons. Vascular injury has never been reported as a complication of varicocelectomy apart from testicular artery injury. We present a 36-year-old male who developed leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy due to common femoral artery injury. He was successfully treated by using a vein graft. PMID:27022305

  18. Predictive Modeling of Cardiac Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Contextual Alarms Management System (CALMS) project is to develop sophisticated models to predict the onset of clinical cardiac ischemia before it occurs. The system will continuously monitor cardiac patients and set off an alarm when they appear about to suffer an ischemic episode. The models take as inputs information from patient history and combine it with continuously updated information extracted from blood pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG lines. Expert system, statistical, neural network and rough set methodologies are then used to forecast the onset of clinical ischemia before it transpires, thus allowing early intervention aimed at preventing morbid complications from occurring. The models will differ from previous attempts by including combinations of continuous and discrete inputs. A commercial medical instrumentation and software company has invested funds in the project with a goal of commercialization of the technology. The end product will be a system that analyzes physiologic parameters and produces an alarm when myocardial ischemia is present. If proven feasible, a CALMS-based system will be added to existing heart monitoring hardware.

  19. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  20. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed. PMID:23395151

  1. Mesenteric lymph flow in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Nagai, Takashi; Coté, Gerard L; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the aging-associated changes, contractile characteristics of mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV), and lymph flow in vivo in male 9- and 24-mo-old Fischer-344 rats. Lymphatic diameter, contraction amplitude, contraction frequency, and fractional pump flow, lymph flow velocity, wall shear stress, and minute active wall shear stress load were determined in MLV in vivo before and after N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) application at 100 μM. The active pumping of the aged rat MLV in vivo was found to be severely depleted, predominantly through the aging-associated decrease in lymphatic contractile frequency. Such changes correlate with enlargement of aged MLV, which experienced much lower minute active shear stress load than adult vessels. At the same time, pumping in aged MLV in vivo may be rapidly increased back to levels of adult vessels predominantly through the increase in contraction frequency induced by nitric oxide (NO) elimination. Findings support the idea that in aged tissues surrounding the aged MLV, the additional source of some yet unlinked lymphatic contraction-stimulatory metabolites is counterbalanced or blocked by NO release. The comparative analysis of the control data obtained from experiments with both adult and aged MLV in vivo and from isolated vessel-based studies clearly demonstrated that ex vivo isolated lymphatic vessels exhibit identical contractile characteristics to lymphatic vessels in vivo. PMID:21873496

  2. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Isolated Dissection of Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    PubMed

    Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Galzerano, G; Setacci, C

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery is extremely rare. In December 2012, a 45-year-old man, without significant comorbidities, presented at the emergency room of another hospital with abdominal pain. The patient was treated with medical therapy and discharged on resolution of the pain. Three months later he returned to the emergency room with a new onset of pain. CT-angiography (CTA) showed an isolated SMA dissection associated with aneurysmal dilatation. The patient was referred to our attention. We attempted endovascular exclusion of the dissecting aneurysm in May 2013. We deployed a self-expandable nitinol stent (BostonSC Adapt 4-9×32 mm) in order to simultaneously repair the dissection, preserve the branches and exclude the aneurysm. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. At 10-month follow-up CTA showed excellent positioning of the stent, patency of the visceral branches and shrinkage of the aneurysm. PMID:26324038

  4. Ethyl pyruvate protects colonic anastomosis from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Unal, B; Karabeyoglu, M; Huner, T; Canbay, E; Eroglu, A; Yildirim, O; Dolapci, M; Bilgihan, A; Cengiz, O

    2009-03-01

    Ethyl pyruvate is a simple derivative in Ca(+2)- and K(+)-containing balanced salt solution of pyruvate to avoid the problems associated with the instability of pyruvate in solution. It has been shown to ameliorate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in many organs. It has also been shown that I/R injury delays the healing of colonic anastomosis. In this study, the effect of ethyl pyruvate on the healing of colon anastomosis and anastomotic strength after I/R injury was investigated. Anastomosis of the colon was performed in 32 adult male Wistar albino rats divided into 4 groups of 8 individuals: (1) sham-operated control group (group 1); (2) 30 minutes of intestinal I/R by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (group 2); (3) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 3), ethyl pyruvate was administered as a 50-mg/kg/d single dose; and (4) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 4), ethyl pyruvate administration was repeatedly (every 6 hours) at the same dose (50 mg/kg). On the fifth postoperative day, animals were killed. Perianastomotic tissue hydroxyproline contents and anastomotic bursting pressures were measured in all groups. When the anastomotic bursting pressures and tissue hydroxyproline contents were compared, it was found that they were decreased in group 2 when compared with groups 1, 3, and 4 (P < .05). Both anastomotic bursting pressure (P = .005) and hydroxyproline content (P < .001) levels were found to be significantly increased with ethyl pyruvate administration when compared with group 2. When ethyl pyruvate administration doses were compared, a significant difference was not observed (P > .05). Ethyl pyruvate significantly prevents the delaying effect of I/R injury on anastomotic strength and healing independent from doses of administration. PMID:19064591

  5. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  6. Effects of Ukrain on intestinal apoptosis caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akcılar, Raziye; Akcılar, Aydın; Koçak, Cengiz; Koçak, Fatma Emel; Bayat, Zeynep; Şimşek, Hasan; Şahin, Server; Savran, Bircan

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the antiapoptotic effect of Ukrain on intestinal lesion induced by mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: laparotomy (L), I/R, and Ukrain and I/R (U + I/R). In the U + I/R group, Ukrain (7 mg/kg) was given by intraperitoneal at the beginning of the study. 1 h after ukrain application, ischemia was induced for 30 minutes, and reperfusion was subsequently allowed for 120 minutes in the I/R and U + I/R groups. Rats were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and intestinal tissues were collected for biochemical and molecular examination. Intestinal tissues caspase 3 protein were assayed. Serum Bcl-xL and iNOS were measured. The expression level of caspase-3, Bcl-xL and iNOS in intestinal tissue of rats were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Levels of serum iNOS and mRNA expression were increased in the I/R and decreased in the U + I/R group. In addition, levels of the proapoptotic gene caspase-3 protein and mRNA expression were increased in the I/R and decreased in the U + I/R group. Levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-xL serum and mRNA expression were increased in the U + I/R group. Conclusions: Ukrain can reduce the ischemia-reperfusion injury in the intestinal tissue by inhibiting the cell apoptosis. The mechanism may be correlated with increased Bcl-xL mRNA expressions and decreased mRNA expressions of Caspase-3 and iNOS. PMID:26885190

  7. Caudal mesenteric ganglion in the sheep - macroanatomical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, W; Chrószcz, A; Dudek, A; Janeczek, M; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) is a prevetrebral ganglion which provides innervation to a number of organs in the abdominal and pelvic cavity. The morphology of CaMG and the chemical coding of neurones in this ganglion have been described in humans and many animal species, but data on this topic in the sheep are entirely lacking. This prompted us to undertake a study to determine the localization and morphology of sheep CaMG as well as immunohistochemical properties of its neurons. The study was carried out on 8 adult sheep, weighing from 40 to 60 kg each. The sheep were deeply anaesthetised and transcardially perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. CaMG-s were exposed and their location was determined. Macroanatomical observations have revealed that the ovine CaMG is located at the level of last two lumbar (L5 or L6) and the first sacral (S1) vertebrae. The ganglion represents an unpaired structure composed of several, sequentially arranged aggregates of neurons. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed that nearly all (99.5%) the neurons were DβH-IR and were richly supplied by VACHT-IR nerve terminals forming "basket-like" structures around the perikarya. VACHT-IR neurones were not determined. Many neurons (55%) contained immunoreactivity to NPY, some of them (10%) stained for Met-ENK and solitary nerve cells were GAL-positive. CGRP-IR nerve fibres were numerous and a large number of them simultaneously expressed immunoreactivity to SP. Single, weakly stained neurones were SP-IR and only very few nerve cells weakly stained for VIP. PMID:26172189

  8. Endovascular Therapeutic Approaches for Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, S. Sonesson, B.; Resch, T.

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcome of attempted endovascular intervention in patients with acute embolic or thrombotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. The records of 21 patients during a 3-year period between 2005 and 2008 were retrieved from the in-hospital registry. The first group included 10 patients (6 women and 4 men; median age 78 years) with acute embolic occlusion of the SMA. The median duration of symptoms from symptom onset to angiography was 30 hours (range 6 to 120). Synchronous emboli (n = 12) occurred in 6 patients. Embolus aspiration was performed in 9 patients, and 7 of these had satisfactory results. Complementary local thrombolysis was successful in 2 of 3 patients. Residual emboli were present at completion angiography in all 7 patients who underwent successful aspiration embolectomy, and bowel resection was necessary in only 1 of these patients. One serious complication occurred because of a long SMA dissection. The in-hospital survival rate was 90% (9 of 10 patients). The second group included 11 patients (10 women and 1 man; median age 68 years) with atherosclerotic acute SMA occlusions. The median time of symptom duration before intervention was 97 hours (range 17 to 384). The brachial, femoral, and SMA routes were used in 6, 7, and 5 patients, respectively. SMA stenting was performed through an antegrade (n = 7) or retrograde (n = 3) approach. Bowel resection was necessary in 4 patients. No major complications occurred. The in-hospital survival rate was 82% (9 of 11 patients). Endovascular therapy of acute SMA occlusion provides a good alternative to open surgery.

  9. [Ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gennai, Stéphane; Pison, Christophe; Briot, Raphaël

    2014-09-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage arising from the first hours after transplantation. The first etiology of the primary graft dysfunction in lung is ischemia-reperfusion. It is burdened by an important morbi-mortality. Lung ischemia-reperfusion increases the oxidative stress, inactivates the sodium pump, increases the intracellular calcium, leads to cellular death and the liberation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Researches relative to the reduction of the lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries are numerous but few of them found a place in common clinical practice, because of an insufficient level of proofs. Ex vivolung evaluation is a suitable technique in order to evaluate therapeutics supposed to limit lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries. PMID:24935680

  10. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  11. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord.

    PubMed

    Balmaseda, M T; Gordon, C; Cunningham, M L; Clairmont, A C

    1987-09-01

    Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. This unusual type of intestinal obstruction known as superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity. It is diagnosed radiologically by an abrupt, vertical cutoff of barium flow in the third portion of the duodenum. The management is primarily medical but occasionally surgical correction is required. Herein, the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome was made in an incomplete quadriplegic woman who had recently undergone surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord. This case was managed successfully with gastrointestinal decompression, proper positioning in the side-lying position, and adequate nutrition. PMID:3631039

  12. Effects of exercise and excitement on mesenteric and renal dynamics in conscious, unrestrained baboons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to measure arterial pressure and mesenteric and renal blood flows from nine unrestrained, conscious baboons during periods of rest, moderate exercise, and extreme excitement. A description of the experiments hardware is presented, including artificial depressants phenylcyclidine hydrochloride, 0.5-1.0 mg/kg, and pentobarbital sodium, 15 mg/kg, and an ultrasonic telemetry flow meter. Results showed rising heart rate and arterial pressure coupled with a reduction of mesenteric and renal flows as the level of exercise was increased. These findings are compared with mesenteric and renal flows somewhat above control level, but relatively stable heart rate and arterial pressure, postprandially. Attention is given to a quantitative analysis of the experimental results.

  13. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  14. Measurement of Angiogenesis, Arteriolargenesis, and Lymphangiogenesis Phenotypes by Use of Two-Dimensional Mesenteric Angiogenesis Assay.

    PubMed

    Benest, Andrew V; Bates, David O

    2016-01-01

    Successful therapeutic angiogenesis requires an understanding of how the myriad interactions of growth factors released during angiogenesis combine to form a mature vascular bed. This requires a model in which multiple physiological and cell biological parameters can be identified. The adenoviral-mediated mesenteric angiogenesis assay as described here is ideal for that purpose. The clear, thin, and relatively avascular mesenteric panel can be used to measure increased vessel perfusion by intravital microscopy. In addition, high-powered microvessel analysis is carried out by immunostaining of features essential for the study of angiogenesis or lymphangiogenesis (including endothelium, pericyte, smooth muscle cell area, and proliferation), allowing functional data to be obtained in conjunction with high-power microvessel ultrastructural analysis. Therefore, the mesenteric angiogenesis model offers a robust system to analyze the morphological changes associated with angiogenesis, induced by different agents. PMID:27172966

  15. Relaxin deficiency attenuates pregnancy-induced adaptation of the mesenteric artery to angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sarah A; Leo, Chen Huei; Senadheera, Sevvandi N; Girling, Jane E; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy is associated with reduced peripheral vascular resistance, underpinned by changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function. Failure of the maternal vasculature to adapt correctly leads to serious pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. The peptide hormone relaxin regulates the maternal renal vasculature during pregnancy; however, little is known about its effects in other vascular beds. This study tested the hypothesis that functional adaptation of the mesenteric and uterine arteries during pregnancy will be compromised in relaxin-deficient (Rln(-/-)) mice. Smooth muscle and endothelial reactivity were examined in small mesenteric and uterine arteries of nonpregnant (estrus) and late-pregnant (day 17.5) wild-type (Rln(+/+)) and Rln(-/-) mice using wire myography. Pregnancy per se was associated with significant reductions in contraction to phenylephrine, endothelin-1, and ANG II in small mesenteric arteries, while sensitivity to endothelin-1 was reduced in uterine arteries of Rln(+/+) mice. The normal pregnancy-associated attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries did not occur in Rln(-/-) mice. This adaptive failure was endothelium-independent and did not result from altered expression of ANG II receptors or regulator of G protein signaling 5 (Rgs5) or increases in reactive oxygen species generation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with l-NAME enhanced ANG II-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries of both genotypes, whereas blockade of prostanoid production with indomethacin only increased ANG II-induced contraction in arteries of pregnant Rln(+/+) mice. In conclusion, relaxin deficiency prevents the normal pregnancy-induced attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in small mesenteric arteries. This is associated with reduced smooth muscle-derived vasodilator prostanoids. PMID:26936785

  16. Increased tumour necrosis factor α production in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic patients with ascites

    PubMed Central

    Genescà, J; Martí, R; Rojo, F; Campos, F; Peribáñez, V; Gónzalez, A; Castells, L; Ruiz-Marcellán, C; Margarit, C; Esteban, R; Guardia, J; Segura, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cytokines produced in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic rats with bacterial translocation may participate in circulatory alterations of cirrhosis. Aim: To investigate whether cirrhotic patients present an increased local generation of cytokines in mesenteric lymph nodes. Methods: Mesenteric lymph nodes from 26 cirrhotic and 10 control patients were assessed for tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) and interleukin 6 mRNA and protein expression by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and by enzyme immunoassay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Interleukin 6 levels were not different between cirrhotics and controls. Protein and mRNA TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes from cirrhotics were higher than in controls (p<0.05). Tissue expression of TNF by immunohistochemistry was more abundant in cirrhotics. Ascitic patients showed higher TNF levels (47 (34–54) pg/mg protein) than patients without ascites (18 (17–25) pg/mg protein) (p<0.001). Elevated TNF levels (>28 pg/mg protein) in cirrhotics were associated with a higher Child-Pugh score, the antecedent of ascites, a lower prothrombin rate, and higher bilirubin and blood TNF levels. The strongest association, confirmed by multivariate analysis, was with the presence of ascites (p<0.001). Bacterial infections after transplantation, mainly by enteric bacteria, were only detected in patients with high TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes (33% of patients; p=0.05). Conclusion: Patients with advanced liver cirrhosis, and especially with ascites, have increased local production of TNF in mesenteric lymph nodes that, in common with experimental cirrhosis, may also be induced by bacterial translocation. PMID:12801966

  17. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Celiac Axis Occlusion Treated Using Endovascular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Biswajit; Kuhan, Ganesh; Johnson, Brian; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2006-10-15

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery and associated celiac axis occlusion is presented. The patient was successfully treated with celiac artery recanalization and placement of a covered stent within the superior mesenteric artery. Follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months and 3 years demonstrated patency of the covered stent and continued exclusion of the aneurysm. Although the long-term success of this procedure is unknown this management option should be considered where facilities are available, to reduce the increased morbidity associated with open surgical procedure.

  18. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  19. Large mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moschos, John; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Paikos, Dimitrios; Tagarakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Zissis; Kadis, Savvas; Katsos, Ioannis; Tarpagos, Anestis

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with severe debilitation, anemia and diarrhea over two months. Colonoscopy revealed many (>100) polyps (familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome). Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass at the left upper abdomen in conjunction with the splenic flexure. Total colectomy with mesenteric mass and adjacent small bowel removal and ileoanal pouch was performed. Examination of the resected mesenteric mass showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with scarce mitosis and infiltration of the adjacent small bowel. We describe for the first time in medical literature the coexistence of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and GIST in a 30-year-old man. PMID:16855925

  20. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: MRI and CT imaging correlated to anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, Th; Danse, E; Sempoux, Ch; Annet, L; Dragean, Ch Anca; Trefois, P; Abbes Orabi, N; Kartheuser, A

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare tumor, classified by WHO of intermediate biological potential with tendency for local recurrence and small risk for distant metastasis. Histologically IMT is a mixture of inflamma- tory cells and myofibroblastic spindle cells proliferation. To our knowledge there is no MRI description of mesenteric IMT in the literature. We would like to emphasize the correlation between medical imaging and anatomical pathology based on our experience of a mesenteric IMT in a 28-year-old patient. PMID:25597213

  1. Percutaneous drainage and sclerosis of mesenteric cysts: literature overview and report of an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Giada; Ferrarese, Alessia; Busso, Marco; Borello, Alessandro; Catalano, Silvia; Surace, Alessandra; Marola, Silvia; Gentile, Valentina; Martino, Valter; Solej, Mario; Nano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 29-years-old male patient, affected by a voluminous post-traumatic mesenteric cyst, a rare abdominal disease; our patient represents a rarely affected age group. Treatment was based on interventional radiology with an US-guided drainage and sclerosis by ethyl alcohol of the lesion. The intervention performed on this patient represents the application of a standardized radiological technique to a new contest, mesenteric cysts, whose gold-standard treatment is represented in literature by surgery. In our case we obtained an optimal result, with complete regression of the treated cyst: it proved to be an effective, feasible, safe and minimally invasive procedure. PMID:25183644

  2. Seatbelt syndrome with superior mesenteric artery syndrome: leave nothing to chance!

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Singla, Apresh A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of seatbelts to legislation has dramatically reduced mortality and morbidity from motor vehicle accidents. However, overtime evidence has emerged of ‘seatbelt syndrome’ (SBS), particularly in the paediatric population. The report describes the diagnosis and management of this rare injury in a 12-year-old boy who sustained a chance lumbar fracture and mesenteric tear resulting in small bowel obstruction. His stay was subsequently complicated by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. This is the first documented case of SBS with SMA syndrome. High index of suspicion and continuity of care, particularly in the setting of a ‘seatbelt sign’, is paramount to timely diagnosis and management. PMID:26564612

  3. Mesenteric circulation: three-dimensional MR angiography with a gadolinium-enhanced multiecho gradient-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Shirkhoda, A; Konez, O; Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Ellwood, R A; Kirsch, M J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the mesenteric circulation with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, the authors examined 16 individuals (12 patients, four volunteers) with a gadolinium-enhanced, breath-hold, fat-saturated, multiecho, three-dimensional, gradient-echo sequence. Twenty examinations were performed. Grades of 3 or 4 (on a five-point scale [4 = best seen, 0 = not seen]) were applicable to 17 (85%) of 20 MR angiograms obtained in superior mesenteric artery trunks, 15 (75%) in celiac arteries, five (25%) in inferior mesenteric arteries; 15 (75%) of first-order branching, 12 (60%) of second-order branching, and 10 (50%) of third-order branching; 17 (85%) in superior mesenteric veins; and 17 (85%) in portal veins. MR angiography with this technique depicted the mesenteric arterial and venous circulation and the portal vein with excellent resolution in a short time. PMID:8988220

  4. Relationship Between the Levels of Oxidative Stress in Mesenteric and Peripheral Serum and Clinicopathological Variables in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Ahmet Fikret; Kemik, Özgür; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Purisa, Sevim; Tüzün, İshak Sefa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the differences existing between the levels of oxidative stress in peripheral and mesenteric serum in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and Methods One hundred fifty patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgery between May 2005 and March 2010 were prospectively analyzed. The differences between oxidative stress parameters in their peripheral and mesenteric blood were measured. The associations between peripheral and mesenteric levels and the staging and clinicopathological variables were investigated. Results: Oxidative stress parameters were higher in patients with advanced tumor staging (p<0.01), lymph node invasion (p<0.01), and venous invasion (p<0.01). Differences between oxidative stress parameters in peripheral and mesenteric blood samples were also observed. Conclusions: The mesenteric levels of the oxidative stress markers were higher than the peripheral levels in these colorectal cancer patients. Higher levels of these oxidative stress markers are associated with an advanced state of cancer. PMID:25206984

  5. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  6. Perioperative myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shernan, Stanton K

    2003-09-01

    Myocardial I-R injury contributes to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after cardiac surgery. The pathogenesis of I-R injury is complex and involves the activation, coordination, and amplification of several systemic and local proinflammatory pathways (Fig. 4). Treatment and prevention of perioperative morbidity associated with myocardial I-R will ultimately require a multifocal approach. Combining preoperative risk stratification (co-morbidity and surgical complexity), minimizing initiating factors predisposing to SIRS, limiting ischemia duration, and administering appropriate immunotherapy directed toward systemic and local proinflammatory mediators of I-R injury, should all be considered. In addition, the role of the genetic-environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is also being examined. Thus, in the near future, preoperative screening for polymorphisms of certain inflammatory and coagulation genes should inevitably help reduce morbidity by permitting the identification of high-risk cardiac surgical patients and introducing the opportunity for gene therapy or pharmacogenetic intervention [42,64]. PMID:14562561

  7. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eklof, B; Hoevels, J; Ihse, I

    1978-01-01

    The mortality in acute intestinal ischemia is high, and 50% of such patients have previous attacks of abdominal angina due to chronic intestinal ischemia. Vascular reconstruction is remarkably successful in relieving the symptoms of chronic intesintal ischemia and for this reason angiographic examination is recommended in all patients in whom chronic intestinal ischemia is suspected. If the diagnosis is established by arteriography with appropriate supporting evidence, vascular reconstruction should be performed. Images Fig. 1a and b. Fig. 2a and b. Fig. 3b and c. Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b. Fig. 5b. Fig. 6. Fig. 7a. Fig. 7b and c. Fig. 8a and b. Fig. 9a. Fig. 9b. Fig. 9c. PMID:637591

  8. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  9. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect vasoactivity of these compounds. Objectives were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in mesenteric artery and vein and determine if previous exposure to endophyte-infected tall fescue affec...

  10. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect the vasoactivity of these compounds. The objectives of this study were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in bovine mesenteric artery (MA) and vein (MV) and determine if previous exposure ...

  11. Superior Mesenteric Vein Occlusion Causing Severe Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Two Paediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anna L.; Jones, Matthew; Healey, Andrew; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports about superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in childhood are very rare and have not been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. We describe two cases of severe bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract in children who had undergone complex abdominal surgery at considerable time before. The first child had a tracheoesophageal fistula, corrected by division, gastrostomy insertion, and repair of duodenal rupture. The child presented with severe bleeding from the gastrostomy site and was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the proximal superior mesenteric vein. The second child had a gastroschisis and duodenal atresia, and required duodenoplasty, gastrostomy insertion, hemicolectomy, and adhesiolysis. The child presented with intermittent severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, resulting from collateral vessels at location of the surgical connections. He was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein. In both children, the extensive previous surgery and anastomosis were considered the cause of the mesenteric thrombosis. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis in both cases, in addition to characteristic findings on endoscopy. Paediatricians should suspect this condition in children with severe gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly in children with previous, complex abdominal surgery. PMID:23198238

  12. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mohammed H; Chan, Wilson W; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  13. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  14. Mesenteric desmoid-type fibromatosis causing secondary hypertension in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Seon; Jung, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yong-Bong

    2014-01-01

    This report describes an 18-year-old woman presenting with abdominal distension, left flank pain, and hypertension. She had a huge abdominal mass, diagnosed as a mesenteric desmoid-type fibromatosis, causing compression of the left external iliac vessels and ureter, as well as elevated renin concentration and hypertension. After surgical removal of the mass, all signs improved including hypertension. PMID:25264535

  15. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wilson W.; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  16. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  17. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Dominguez, James M; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Following exposure to microgravity, there is a reduced ability of astronauts to augment peripheral vascular resistance, often resulting in orthostatic hypotension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mesenteric arteries and veins will exhibit diminished vasoconstrictor responses after spaceflight. Mesenteric arteries and veins from female mice flown on the Space Transportation System (STS)-131 (n=11), STS-133 (n=6), and STS-135 (n=3) shuttle missions and respective ground-based control mice (n=30) were isolated for in vitro experimentation. Vasoconstrictor responses were evoked in arteries via norepinephrine (NE), potassium chloride (KCl), and caffeine, and in veins through NE across a range of intraluminal pressures (2-12 cmH(2)O). Vasoconstriction to NE was also determined in mesenteric arteries at 1, 5, and 7 d postlanding. In arteries, maximal constriction to NE, KCl, and caffeine were reduced immediately following spaceflight and 1 d postflight. Spaceflight also reduced arterial ryanodine receptor-3 mRNA levels. In mesenteric veins, there was diminished constriction to NE after flight. The results indicate that the impaired vasoconstriction following spaceflight occurs through the ryanodine receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release mechanism. Such vascular changes in astronauts could compromise the maintenance of arterial pressure during orthostatic stress. PMID:23099650

  18. Arteriovenous Fistula of a Colic Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard D. Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy; Bhat, Rajesh

    2010-08-15

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) of the superior mesenteric artery and its branches are exceedingly rare. We report an unusual case of a patient who was found to be symptomatic from such an AVF, with diarrhea and terminal ileal thickening. We describe the findings from magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and catheter angiography and discuss the endovascular management.

  19. Morphological Changes in Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and Lymphocyte Subpopulation Composition in Experimental Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Postovalova, E A; Khochansky, D N; Zolotova, N A; Gao, Yu; Makarova, O V; Dobrynina, M T

    2016-04-01

    Morphological changes in the mesenteric lymph nodes of male C57Bl/6 mice and subpopulation composition of lymphocytes in these nodes were studied in experimental acute and chronic ulcerative colitis induced by sodium dextran sulfate. Acute and chronic ulcerative colitis was associated with the development of reactive changes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. These changes were of mixed type and were characterized by follicular hyperplasia and sinus reaction. The content of CD19(+) B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes decreased in acute ulcerative colitis, while the content of CD3(+)CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells increased, which presumably reflected activation of Th1 reactions. The increase in the count of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and CD3(+)CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells was due to intensive migration of lymphocytes from the thymus and the colonic compartment of the local immune system. Chronic ulcerative colitis was associated with higher levels of CD19(+) B cells and CD3(+)CD4(+) T helper cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes, which was characteristic of adoptive immunity reactions and chronization of the inflammatory process. PMID:27165070

  20. [Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after surgical correction of severe dorso-lumbar deformities. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    Massaioli, N; Rastel-Bogin, P; Schieroni, R; Brayda-Bruno, M; Villata, E; Bonatti, L; Redivo, L; Galliano, R; Busch, R; Borello, G

    1995-12-01

    The authors report two cases of superior mesenteric artery syndrome observed in 22 operations for severe spinal deformities. Medical, dietary and postural treatment enabled the situation to be resolved in one case; whereas an intestinal derotation according to Strong-Valdoni was successfully performed in the other. The various surgical alternatives are discussed. PMID:8725066

  1. Ischemia modified albumin: does it change during pneumoperitoneum in robotic prostatectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Ozgen, Serpil Ustalar; Ozveren, Bora; Kilercik, Meltem; Aksu, Ugur; Ay, Binnaz; Tufek, Ilter; Kural, Ali Riza; N.Turkeri, Levent; Toraman, Fevzi

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusion We did not demonstrate any significant mesenteric-splanchnic ischemia which could be detected by serum IMA levels during robotic radical prostatectomies performed under steep Trendelenburg position and when IAP is maintained in between 11-14 mmHg PMID:27136469

  2. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  3. Diagnostic value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide levels in determination of the duration of mesenteric ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Sinan; Karahan, Oguz; Yazici, Suleyman; Guclu, Orkut; Caliskan, Ahmet; Tezcan, Orhan; Yavuz, Celal

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Mesenteric arteries release C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which hyperpolarises vascular smooth muscle. We measured the levels of this peptide after inducing mesenteric ischaemia over a series of time intervals, so as to determine its predictive value in demonstrating the severity of ischaemia in a rat model. Methods A total of 32 rats were allocated to four groups containing eight rats each. Basal CNP reference levels were measured in the control group, which was not exposed to any intervention. In groups I, II and III, mesenteric ischaemia was induced over three, six and nine hours, respectively, and plasma CNP levels were measured afterwards. Mesenteric ischaemia was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Results In comparison with the controls (2.38 ± 0.18 pg/ml), CNP levels were relatively lower in group I (2.54 ± 0.42 pg/ml). However, significant increases in plasma CNP levels were observed over longer periods of ischaemia in group II, at 5.23 ± 0.22 pg/ml, and in group III, at 6.19 ± 0.67 pg/ml (p < 0.05). A significant direct relationship was determined between plasma CNP levels and prolonged intervals of mesenteric ischaemia (R = 0.56, p < 0.001). Conclusion Measuring plasma CNP levels in patients with acute mesenteric ischaemia may be beneficial in estimating the time period over which the ischaemic injury has occurred. PMID:24967686

  4. A Vasoactive Role for Endogenous Relaxin in Mesenteric Arteries of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gooi, Jon H.; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin has striking effects on the vascular system. Specifically, endogenous relaxin treatment reduces myogenic reactivity through nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasorelaxation and increases arterial compliance in small resistance arteries. However, less is known about the vascular roles of endogenous relaxin, particularly in males. Therefore, we used male wild-type (Rln+/+) and relaxin knockout (Rln−/−) mice to test the hypothesis that passive wall properties and vascular reactivity in mesenteric arteries would be compromised in Rln−/− mice. Passive compliance was determined in arteries (n = 8–9) mounted on a pressure myograph and in Ca2+-free Krebs containing 2 mM EGTA. Passive volume compliance was significantly (P = 0.01) decreased in the mesenteric arteries of Rln−/− mice. Vascular reactivity was assessed using wire myography. In mesenteric arteries (n = 5) of Rln−/− mice, there was a significant (P<0.03) increase in sensitivity to the vasoconstrictors phenylephrine and thromboxane-mimetic U41669. This enhanced responsiveness to vasoconstrictors was abolished by endothelial denudation, and attributed to impaired NO and prostanoid pathways in Rln−/− mice. Sensitivity to the endothelial agonist acetylcholine was significantly (n = 7–9, P≤0.03) decreased, and this was abolished in the presence of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2 µM). This indicates that prostanoid vasoconstrictor pathways were upregulated in the mesenteric arteries of Rln−/− mice. In summary, we demonstrate endothelial dysfunction and impaired arterial wall remodeling in male mice deficient in relaxin. Thus, our results highlight a role for endogenous relaxin in the maintenance of normal mesenteric artery structure and function in males. PMID:25243460

  5. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role. PMID:25537798

  6. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Dominguez, James M.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Following exposure to microgravity, there is a reduced ability of astronauts to augment peripheral vascular resistance, often resulting in orthostatic hypotension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mesenteric arteries and veins will exhibit diminished vasoconstrictor responses after spaceflight. Mesenteric arteries and veins from female mice flown on the Space Transportation System (STS)-131 (n=11), STS-133 (n=6), and STS-135 (n=3) shuttle missions and respective ground-based control mice (n=30) were isolated for in vitro experimentation. Vasoconstrictor responses were evoked in arteries via norepinephrine (NE), potassium chloride (KCl), and caffeine, and in veins through NE across a range of intraluminal pressures (2–12 cmH2O). Vasoconstriction to NE was also determined in mesenteric arteries at 1, 5, and 7 d postlanding. In arteries, maximal constriction to NE, KCl, and caffeine were reduced immediately following spaceflight and 1 d postflight. Spaceflight also reduced arterial ryanodine receptor-3 mRNA levels. In mesenteric veins, there was diminished constriction to NE after flight. The results indicate that the impaired vasoconstriction following spaceflight occurs through the ryanodine receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ release mechanism. Such vascular changes in astronauts could compromise the maintenance of arterial pressure during orthostatic stress.—Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis, R. T., III, Dominguez, J. M., II, Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice. PMID:23099650

  7. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  8. Diagnosis of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pope, J Hector; Selker, Harry P

    2003-02-01

    A better understanding of coronary syndromes allow physicians to appreciate UAP and AMI as part of a continuum of ACI. ACI is a life-threatening condition whose identification can have major economic and therapeutic importance as far as threatening dysrhythmias and preventing or limiting myocardial infarction size. The identification of ACI continues to challenge the skill of even experienced clinicians, yet physicians continue (appropriately) to admit the overwhelming majority of patients with ACI; in the process, they admit many patients without acute ischemia [2], overestimating the likelihood of ischemia in low-risk patients because of magnified concern for this diagnosis for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Studies of admitting practices from a decade ago have yielded useful clinical information but have shown that neither clinical symptoms nor the ECG could reliably distinguish most patients with ACI from those with other conditions. Most studies have evaluated the accuracy of various technologies for diagnosing ACI, yet only a few have evaluated the clinical impact of routine use. The prehospital 12-lead ECG has moderate sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of ACI. It has demonstrated a reduction of the mean time to thrombolysis by 33 minutes and short-term overall mortality in randomized trials. In the general ED setting, only the ACI-TIPI has demonstrated, in a large-scale multicenter clinical trial, a reduction in unnecessary hospitalizations without decreasing the rate of appropriate admission for patients with ACI. The Goldman chest pain protocol has good sensitivity for AMI but was not shown to result in any differences in hospitalization rate, length of stay, or estimated costs in the single clinical impact study performed. The protocol's applicability to patients with UAP has not been evaluated. Single measurement of biomarkers at presentation to the ED has poor sensitivity for AMI, although most biomarkers have high specificity. Serial

  9. Intestinal Translocation of Clinical Isolates of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in a Rat Model of Bacterial Colonization and Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Karin M.; van der Heijden, Inneke M.; Galvao, Flavio H.; Lopes, Camila G.; Costa, Silvia F.; Abdala, Edson; D’Albuquerque, Luiz A.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a rat model of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli and to evaluate intestinal translocation to blood and tissues after total and partial hepatic ischemia. Methods - We developed a model of rat colonization with VRE and ESBL-E coli. Then we studied four groups of colonized rats: Group I (with hepatic pedicle occlusion causing complete liver ischemia and intestinal stasis); Group II (with partial liver ischemia without intestinal stasis); Group III (surgical manipulation without hepatic ischemia or intestinal stasis); Group IV (anesthetized without surgical manipulation). After sacrifice, portal and systemic blood, large intestine, small intestine, spleen, liver, lungs, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured. Endotoxin concentrations in portal and systemic blood were determined. Results – The best inocula were: VRE: 2.4×1010 cfu and ESBL-E. coli: 1.12×1010 cfu. The best results occurred 24 hours after inoculation and antibiotic doses of 750 µg/mL of water for vancomycin and 2.1 mg/mL for ceftriaxone. There was a significantly higher proportion of positive cultures for ESBL-E. coli in the lungs in Groups I, II and III when compared with Group IV (67%; 60%; 75% and 13%, respectively; p:0.04). VRE growth was more frequent in mesenteric lymph nodes for Groups I (67%) and III (38%) than for Groups II (13%) and IV (none) (p:0.002). LPS was significantly higher in systemic blood of Group I (9.761±13.804 EU/mL−p:0.01). No differences for endotoxin occurred in portal blood. Conclusion –We developed a model of rats colonized with resistant bacteria useful to study intestinal translocation. Translocation occurred in surgical procedures with and without hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and probably occurred via the bloodstream. Translocation was probably lymphatic in the ischemia-reperfusion groups

  10. The transcriptome of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    VanGilder, Reyna L.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Barr, Taura L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular causality and response to stroke is complex. Yet, much of the literature examining the molecular response to stroke has focused on targeted pathways that have been well-characterized. Consequently, our understanding of stroke pathophysiology has made little progress by way of clinical therapeutics since tissue plasminogen activator was approved for treatment nearly a decade ago. The lack of clinical translation is in part due to neuron-focused studies, preclinical models of cerebral ischemia and the paradoxical nature of neuro-inflammation. With the evolution of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable criteria streamlining research efforts and broad availability of genomic technologies, the ability to decipher the molecular fingerprint of ischemic stroke is on the horizon. This review highlights preclinical microarray findings of the ischemic brain, discusses the transcriptome of cerebral preconditioning and emphasizes the importance of further characterizing the role of the neurovascular unit and peripheral white blood cells in mediating stroke damage and repair within the penumbra. PMID:22381515

  11. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Leischik, Roman; Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  13. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  14. The GPR55 agonist lysophosphatidylinositol relaxes rat mesenteric resistance artery and induces Ca2+ release in rat mesenteric artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    AlSuleimani, Y M; Hiley, C R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), a lipid signalling molecule, activates GPR55 and elevates intracellular Ca2+. Here, we examine the actions of LPI in the rat resistance mesenteric artery and Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells isolated from the artery. Experimental Approach Vascular responses were studied using wire myographs. Single-cell fluorescence imaging was performed using a MetaFluor system. Hypotensive effects of LPI were assessed using a Biopac system. Key Results In isolated arteries, LPI-induced vasorelaxation was concentration- and endothelium-dependent and inhibited by CID 16020046, a GPR55 antagonist. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 had no effect, whereas rimonabant and O-1918 significantly potentiated LPI responses. Vasorelaxation was reduced by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, alone or combined. LPI decreased systemic arterial pressure. GPR55 is expressed in rat mesenteric artery. LPI caused biphasic elevations of endothelial cell intracellular Ca2+. Pretreatment with thapsigargin or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate abolished both phases. The PLC inhibitor U73122 attenuated the initial phase and enhanced the second phase, whereas the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 abolished the late phase but not the early phase. Conclusions and Implications LPI is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator in the rat small mesenteric artery and a hypotensive agent. The vascular response involves activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and is not mediated by CB1 receptors, but unexpectedly enhanced by antagonists of the ‘endothelial anandamide’ receptor. In endothelial cells, LPI utilizes PLC-IP3 and perhaps ROCK-RhoA pathways to elevate intracellular Ca2+. Overall, these findings support an endothelial site of action for LPI and suggest a possible role for GPR55 in vasculature. PMID:25652040

  15. Sclerosing Mesenteritis and Disturbance of Glucose Metabolism: A New Relationship? A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, João Pedro Tavares; Romão, Vera; Eulálio, Margarida; Jorge, Rita; Breda, Filipe; Calretas, Suzana; Leitão, Sara; Eugénio, Gisela; Santos, Rui; Carvalho, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 51 • Male, 70 • Male, 63 • Male, 67 • Female, 76 Final Diagnosis: Sclerosing mesenteritis Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colcicine Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Sclerosing mesenteritis is an idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic disease that affects the mesentery. It is a rare disease, with the total number of reported cases in the literature ranging from 122 to 300. It mainly affects men in the sixth decade of life, and its etiology remains unknown. Clinical presentation is variable, but it is frequently asymptomatic. Diagnosis is often made by computed tomography (CT) scan, although biopsy may be needed for confirmation. An association between other diseases (e.g., neoplasms) and sclerosing mesenteritis has been described, but the relationship between the latter and glucose changes is not disclosed in the currently available literature. Case Report: Five cases of sclerosing mesenteritis and glucose metabolism disorders (impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus) were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 65±9.3 years, 80% were male, and all patients were white. Three patients were asymptomatic and the other 2 (40%) had non-specific chronic abdominal pain. Blood tests revealed normal inflammatory parameters (mean HbA1c was 6.4% and fasting blood glucose was 140 mg/dL). The diagnosis was made by abdominal CT scan. The 2 symptomatic patients underwent therapy with colchicine 1 mg/day, with clinical improvement. During the mean 43-month follow-up period, there was no symptomatic progression, thereby maintaining the usual benign course of this condition. Conclusions: Sclerosing mesenteritis has only been described in small series and isolated cases, but its diagnosis is becoming more common due to greater access to diagnostic methods and higher awareness of the disease in the medical community

  16. Progressing Sclerosing Mesenteritis (Mesenteric Panniculitis) Mimics Progression of Malignancy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma on Serial 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William

    2016-04-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma in the proximal stomach. A staging 18F-FDG PET/CT showed an intensely FDG-avid gastric mass, as well as a mildly FDG-avid misty nodular mesentery. After 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a follow-up PET/CT showed partial response of the gastric primary, with increase in the size of nodules in the mesentery and increased FDG uptake, raising concern of secondary malignancy. Biopsy of the mesentery revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation, consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:26359565

  17. Tolerance of the Human Kidney to Isolated Controlled Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Joel M.; Ercole, Barbara; Torkko, Kathleen C.; Hilton, William; Bennett, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance of the human kidney to ischemia is controversial. Here, we prospectively studied the renal response to clamp ischemia and reperfusion in humans, including changes in putative biomarkers of AKI. We performed renal biopsies before, during, and after surgically induced renal clamp ischemia in 40 patients undergoing partial nephrectomy. Ischemia duration was >30 minutes in 82.5% of patients. There was a mild, transient increase in serum creatinine, but serum cystatin C remained stable. Renal functional changes did not correlate with ischemia duration. Renal structural changes were much less severe than observed in animal models that used similar durations of ischemia. Other biomarkers were only mildly elevated and did not correlate with renal function or ischemia duration. In summary, these data suggest that human kidneys can safely tolerate 30–60 minutes of controlled clamp ischemia with only mild structural changes and no acute functional loss. PMID:23411786

  18. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  19. Assessment of Renal Ischemia By Optical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J T; Demos, S; Michalopoulou, A; Pierce, J L; Troppmann, C

    2004-01-07

    Introduction: No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts prior to transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Methods: Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes; 8 animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contra-lateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross polarized light scattering images were taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Results: Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450 nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800 nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (p < 0.0001 for each method, one-way ANOVA). All adjacent and non-adjacent time points between 0 and 90 minutes were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's PLSD. Conclusions: Optical spectroscopic methods can accurately quantify warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  20. Changes of loading tensile force-stretch relationships of rabbit mesenteric vein after 21 days of head-down rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Jie; Sun, Hui-Pin; Yue, Yong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Wu, Xing-Yu

    Changes of venous compliance may contribute to postflight orthostatic intolerance; however, direct animal studies to address the changes of venous compliance to microgravity have been rare. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance changes of mesenteric veins of rabbits after 21 days of head-down rest (HDR). Twenty-four healthy male New Zealand Rabbits were randomly divided into 21 days of HDR group, horizontal immobilization group (HIG) and control group (Ctrl), with eight in each. Loading tensile force-stretch relationships of mesenteric vein segments were constructed after 21 d HDR. With the increase of loading tensile force, both longitudinal and circumferential stretches of vein samples increased significantly. Under the same loading tensile force, mesenteric vein of the HDR showed significant increase both in circumferential stretch and longitudinal stretches compared to those of Ctrl group and HIG group. These results indicate that, a 21-day simulated weightlessness leads to increase of mesenteric venous compliance.

  1. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haifeng; Li, Ruokun; Qiang, Jinwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Li; Sun, Rongxun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging (CTPI) for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia−reperfusion (IR) injury in a porcine model. Materials and Methods Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) the IR group (n = 24), where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively); (2) the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 20), where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively); (3) the ischemia group (n = 4), where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4) baseline group (n = 4), an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and for histopathological examination. Results The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia). The blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability surface (PS) among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion. Conclusion CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury. PMID:27458696

  2. Laparoscopic inferior mesenteric to gonadal vein end-to-side bypass: a new attempt for nutcracker syndrome treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Ning; Chen, Shuqiu; Liu, Jin; Sha, Guozhu; Zhu, Weidong; Xu, Bin

    2015-08-01

    The nutcracker syndrome (NCS) is because of the compression of the left renal vein when it passes between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. The treatment of NCS is controversial, and conservative, endovascular stent implantation, open surgical, and laparoscopic treatments have been previously described. In this study, we present a new method of conducting end-to-side anastomosis between the inferior mesenteric and left gonadal vein. The proposed method was proven feasible for treating NCS. PMID:26072721

  3. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  4. Systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiple metastases in a dog.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Tominaga, Makiko; Hirayama, Kazuko; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-02-01

    A 5-year-old female miniature dachshund presenting with persistent vomiting and diarrhea had two concurrent rare pathological conditions: systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiorgan metastases. Neoplastic mast cells formed mass in the mesentery of the cecal-colonic region and were also found in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, adrenal grands, ovaries, bone marrow and other tissues. The cells had intracytoplasmic granules with metachromasia and were immunohistochemically positive for c-kit and histamine. Granulomatous lesions with fungal organisms were present in the heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, subserosal and surrounding adipose tissue of the duodenum, thyroid glands and mesenteric mass, and phagocytosed organisms were detected in the liver and bone marrow. Bacteriologically and immunohistochemically, the fungi were consistent with Candida albicans. PMID:19262039

  5. Hepatopancreatic arterial ring: bilateral symmetric typology in human celiaco-mesenteric arterial system.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Motohiro; Horiuchi, Kanji; Nishida, Keiichiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Murakami, Takuro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2002-10-01

    The celiac and mesenteric arterial system including the left gastric, splenic, common hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries shows various types of origins, courses, ramifications and anastomoses. In order to explain the various expressions of this system, we have proposed a typological model, in which celiacomesenteric arteries develop as paired or bilaterally symmetrical primordial vessels originated from the anterior aspect of the aorta, and these vessels anastomose each other with longitudinal and horizontal pathways. Here, we report 3 unusual cases characterized by arterial rings, formed by the left gastric, left accessory hepatic, proper hepatic, anterior pancreaticoduodenal, and dorsal pancreatic arteries. The dorsal pancreatic and anterior pancreaticoduodenal arteries are located to the right and left of the embryonic pancreas developing in the dorsal mesentery, respectively. Such hepatopancreatic arterial rings simultaneously containing right and left elements can only be explained using our typological model, in which the concept of paired arteries or bilateral symmetry is introduced. PMID:12530508

  6. Primary adenocarcinoma of the small intestine presenting as superior mesenteric artery syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SUN, KE-KANG; WU, XIAOYANG; LIU, GANG; QIAN, HAIXIN; SHEN, XIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon cause of vomiting and weight loss due to compression of the third part of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery. Small bowel adenocarcinoma is an uncommon tumor, which is frequently delayed in diagnosis as its symptoms and signs are non-specific. The present study describes a case of SMAS occurring in a 51-year-old man, caused by intestinal obstruction secondary to a primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenal-jejunal junction. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of small bowel adenocarcinoma masquerading as SMAS. The present case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of SMAS in patients with upper bowel obstruction caused by intestinal carcinoma. PMID:26998097

  7. Complement regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses during intestinal ischemia reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Michael R.; Hoffman, Sara M.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2010-01-01

    Innate immune responses including TLR4 and complement activation are required for mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced tissue damage. We examined the regulation of TLR4 and complement activation in a mouse model of intestinal IR. Intestinal IR induced C3 deposition in a TLR4 dependent manner. In addition, in wild-type but not TLR4 deficient mice, IR significantly increased C3 and Factor B (FB) mRNA expression within the intestine. To further examine the role of TLR4 and complement, we administered the complement inhibitor, CR2-Crry, to target local complement activation in wild-type C57Bl/10, and TLR4 deficient B10/ScN mice. TLR4 deficient mice sustained less damage and inflammation after IR than wild-type mice, but administration of CR2-Crry did not further reduce tissue damage. In contrast, CR2-Crry treatment of wild-type mice was accompanied by a reduction in complement activation and in C3 and FB transcription in response to IR. CR2-Crry also significantly decreased intestinal IL-6 and IL-12p40 production in both the wild-type and TLR4 deficient mice. These data indicate that TLR4 regulates extrahepatic complement production while complement regulates TLR4-mediated cytokine production during intestinal IR. PMID:20800895

  8. Water Extract of Mentha x villosa: Phenolic Fingerprint and Effect on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Fialovaa, Silvia; Veizerova, Lucia; Nosalova, Viera; Drabikova, Katarina; Tekelova, Daniela; Grancai, Daniel; Sotnikova, Ruzena

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative analysis of the water extract of Mentha x villosa Huds. leaves was performed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and quantitative analysis was made by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection (LC-DAD). Sixteen phenolic compounds were identified and quantified consisting of 8 phenolic acids/derivatives and 8 flavonoid glycosides (quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, coumaroyl-hexoside, caffeic acid, coumaroylquinic acid, lithospermic acid, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid A, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-rutinoside, eriodictyol-7-O-rutinoside, apigenin-7-O-glucuronide, kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide, chrysoeriol-7-O-rutinoside, and hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside). Luteolin-7- O-rutinoside (25.6 ± 0.7 mg/g dry extract) and rosmarinic acid (17.9 ± 0.4 mg/g dry extract) were the most abundant. High antioxidant activity of this phenolic-rich water extract was confirmed in vitro by DPPH and ABTS tests and ex vivo in the ischemia-reperfusion injured rat superior mesenteric artery. Thus, the water extract of M. x villosa leaves seems to be a promising agent in prevention of tissue injury caused by oxidative stress. PMID:26197521

  9. Transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic mesenteric bleeding: a 15-year, single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong Soo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for mesenteric bleeding following trauma. METHODS From 2001 to 2015, 12 patients were referred to our interventional unit for mesenteric bleeding following trauma, based on clinical decisions and computed tomography (CT) images. After excluding one patient with no bleeding focus and one patient who underwent emergency surgery, a total of 10 patients (male:female ratio, 9:1; mean age, 52.1 years) who underwent super selective TAE of visceral arteries were included in this study. Technical and clinical success, complications, and 30-day mortality rate were analyzed. RESULTS In 10 patients who underwent TAE, the types of trauma were motor vehicle collision (n=6), fall (n=2), assault (n=1), and penetrating injury (n=1), and the bleeding arteries were in the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade (n=4), jejunal artery (n=3), colic artery (n=2), and sigmoid artery (n=1). N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (n=2), microcoils (n=2), and combinations of NBCA, microcoils, or gelatin sponge particles (n=6) were used as embolic agents. Technical success was achieved in all 10 patients, with immediate cessation of bleeding. Clinical success rate was 90% (9/10), and all patients were discharged with no further treatment required for mesenteric bleeding. However, one patient showed rebleeding 10 days later and underwent repeated TAE with successful result. There were no TAE-related ischemic complications such as bowel infarction. The 30-day mortality rate was 0%. CONCLUSION Our clinical experience suggests that TAE used to control mesenteric bleeding following trauma is safe and effective as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery. PMID:27306658

  10. Eugenol dilates mesenteric arteries and reduces systemic BP by activating endothelial cell TRPV4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Wang, Qian; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eugenol, a vanilloid molecule found in some dietary plants, relaxes vasculature in part via an endothelium-dependent process; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we investigated the endothelial cell-mediated mechanism by which eugenol modulates rat mesenteric artery contractility and systemic BP. Experimental Approach The isometric tension of rat mesenteric arteries (size 200–300 μm) was measured using wire myography; non-selective cation currents (ICat) were recorded in endothelial cells using patch clamp electrophysiology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were determined in anaesthetized rats. Key Results Eugenol relaxed endothelium-intact arteries in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was attenuated by endothelium denudation. L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, a combination of TRAM-34 and apamin, selective blockers of intermediate and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and HC-067047, a TRPV4 channel inhibitor, but not indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, reduced eugenol-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact arteries. Eugenol activated HC-067047-sensitive ICat in mesenteric artery endothelial cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TRPV4 knockdown abolished eugenol-induced ICat activation. An i.v. injection of eugenol caused an immediate, transient reduction in both MAP and HR, which was followed by prolonged, sustained hypotension in anaesthetized rats. This sustained hypotension was blocked by HC-067047. Conclusions and Implications Eugenol activates TRPV4 channels in mesenteric artery endothelial cells, leading to vasorelaxation, and reduces systemic BP in vivo. Eugenol may be therapeutically useful as an antihypertensive agent and is a viable molecular candidate from which to develop second-generation TRPV4 channel activators that reduce BP. PMID:25832173

  11. Inhibition of the active lymph pump by flow in rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Davis, Michael J.; Zawieja, David C.; Delp, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the influence of imposed flow on an active lymph pump under conditions of controlled intraluminal pressure. Thus, the mechanisms are not clearly defined. Rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic ducts were isolated, cannulated and pressurized. Input and output pressures were adjusted to impose various flows. Lymphatic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured and used to determine contraction frequency and pump flow indices. Imposed flow inhibited the active lymph pump in both mesenteric lymphatics and in the thoracic duct. The active pump of the thoracic duct appeared more sensitive to flow than did the active pump of the mesenteric lymphatics. Imposed flow reduced the frequency and amplitude of the contractions and accordingly the active pump flow. Flow-induced inhibition of the active lymph pump followed two temporal patterns. The first pattern was a rapidly developing inhibition of contraction frequency. Upon imposition of flow, the contraction frequency immediately fell and then partially recovered over time during continued flow. This effect was dependent on the magnitude of imposed flow, but did not depend on the direction of flow. The effect also depended upon the rate of change in the direction of flow. The second pattern was a slowly developing reduction of the amplitude of the lymphatic contractions, which increased over time during continued flow. The inhibition of contraction amplitude was dependent on the direction of the imposed flow, but independent of the magnitude of flow. Nitric oxide was partly but not completely responsible for the influence of flow on the mesenteric lymph pump. Exposure to NO mimicked the effects of flow, and inhibition of the NO synthase by N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine attenuated but did not completely abolish the effects of flow.

  12. Endosomal proteolysis regulates calcitonin gene-related peptide responses in mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    McNeish, AJ; Roux, BT; Aylett, S-B; Van Den Brink, AM; Cottrell, GS

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator, implicated in the pathogenesis of migraine. CGRP activates a receptor complex comprising, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). In vitro studies indicate recycling of CLR•RAMP1 is regulated by degradation of CGRP in early endosomes by endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1). However, it is not known if ECE-1 regulates the resensitization of CGRP-induced responses in functional arterial tissue. Experimental Approach CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1 expression in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (RMA-SMCs) and mesenteric arteries was analysed by RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. CGRP-induced signalling in cells was examined by measuring cAMP production and ERK activation. CGRP-induced relaxation of arteries was measured by isometric wire myography. ECE-1 was inhibited using the specific inhibitor, SM-19712. Key Results RMA-SMCs and arteries contained mRNA for CLR, ECE-1a-d and RAMP1. ECE-1 was present in early endosomes of RMA-SMCs and in the smooth muscle layer of arteries. CGRP induced endothelium-independent relaxation of arteries. ECE-1 inhibition had no effect on initial CGRP-induced responses but reduced cAMP generation in RMA-SMCs and vasodilation in mesenteric arteries responses to subsequent CGRP challenges. Conclusions And Implications ECE-1 regulated the resensitization of responses to CGRP in RMA-SMCs and mesenteric arteries. CGRP-induced relaxation did not involve endothelium-derived pathways. This is the first report of ECE-1 regulating CGRP responses in SMCs and arteries. ECE-1 inhibitors may attenuate an important vasodilatory pathway, implicated in primary headaches and may represent a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of migraine. PMID:22881710

  13. Small Intestinal and Mesenteric Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Causing Occult Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Erdogan, Ahmet; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Akgul, Ozgur; Coskun, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the meseancymal neoplasms which may involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. C-Kit and platelet derived factor receptor alpha polypeptide are believed to be responsible for the genetic basis. This case presentation aimed to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic modality of multiple small intestinal, omental, and mesenteric GISTs with different sizes which caused occult bleeding in a 43-year-old male patient. PMID:26989528

  14. A randomised controlled comparison of injection, thermal, and mechanical endoscopic methods of haemostasis on mesenteric vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, C; Kadirkamanathan, S; Gong, F; Swain, C

    1998-01-01

    Background and aims—A randomised controlled comparison of haemostatic efficacy of mechanical, injection, and thermal methods of haemostasis was undertaken using canine mesenteric vessels to test the hypothesis that mechanical methods of haemostasis are more effective in controlling haemorrhage than injection or thermal methods. The diameter of arteries in human bleeding ulcers measures up to 3.45 mm; mesenteric vessels up to 5 mm were therefore studied. 
Methods—Mesenteric vessels were randomised to treatment with injection sclerotherapy (adrenaline and ethanolamine), bipolar diathermy, or mechanical methods (band, clips, sewing machine, endoloops). The vessels were severed and haemostasis recorded. 
Results—Injection sclerotherapy and clips failed to stop bleeding from vessels of 1 mm (n=20) and 2 mm (n=20). Bipolar diathermy was effective on 8/10 vessels of 2 mm but failed on 3 mm vessels (n=5). Unstretched elastic bands succeeded on 13/15 vessels of 2 mm but on only 3/10 vessels of 3 mm. The sewing machine achieved haemostasis on 8/10 vessels of 4 mm but failed on 5 mm vessels (n=5); endoloops were effective on all 5 mm vessels (n=5). 
Conclusions—Only mechanical methods were effective on vessels greater than 2 mm in diameter. Some mechanical methods (banding and clips) were less effective than expected and need modification. Thermal and (effective) mechanical methods were significantly (p<0.01) more effective than injection sclerotherapy. The most effective mechanical methods were significantly more effective (p<0.01) than thermal or injection on vessels greater than 2mm. 

 Keywords: endoscopic haemostasis; mesenteric vessels PMID:9616305

  15. Effects of portal hypertension on responsiveness of rat mesenteric artery and aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T; Geraghty, J; Osborne, H; Docherty, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of pre-hepatic portal hypertension on the responsiveness of rat small mesenteric arteries and aorta. Rats were made portal hypertensive by creating a calibrated portal vein stenosis, or sham-operated. 2. In rat mesenteric arteries, there was no significant difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile potency of noradrenaline (NA), but the maximum contractile responses to NA, U46619 and KCl were significantly increased in vessels from portal hypertensive animals. This altered maximum contractile response was not due to alterations in smooth muscle mass. 3. In rat mesenteric arteries, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). The difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated rats in the maximum response to U46619 was maintained following a combination of methylene blue (1 microM) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (100 microM), suggesting that any differences in endothelial function do not explain differences in the response to vasoconstrictors. 4. In rat aorta, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile response to NA or KCl or in the endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh. 5. In pithed rats, there was no difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the pressor potency of NA. 6. It is concluded that portal hypertension produces an increase in the contractile response to the vasoconstrictors NA, U46619 and KCl in rat mesenteric arteries but not in the aorta. This suggests that the diminished responsiveness to vasoconstrictors reported in portal hypertensive rats in vivo is not due to a diminished responsiveness at the level of the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:7773539

  16. Superior mesenteric artery-duodenal fistula secondary to a gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Cory M; Frandah, Wesam; Krohmer, Steven; Flomenhoft, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Arterioenteric fistulas are a rare cause of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. We present a patient who developed a fistula between a middle colic artery pseudoaneurysm, a proximal branch of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and the third part of the duodenum 2 weeks after a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the abdomen. The patient's presentation, evaluation, treatment, and prognosis are discussed. All prior published cases of SMA-duodenal fistulas are reviewed. PMID:26722161

  17. Increasing TRPV4 expression restores flow-induced dilation impaired in mesenteric arteries with aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xia; Li, Jie; Guo, Jizheng; Liu, Limei; Yan, Dejun; Yang, Yunyun; Li, Zhongwen; Zhu, Jinhang; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The flow-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) rise in endothelial cells is an important early event leading to flow-induced blood vessel dilation. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4), a Ca2+-permeable cation channel, facilitates the flow-stimulated [Ca2+]i rise. To determine whether TRPV4 is involved in age-related flow-induced blood vessel dilation impairment, we measured blood vessel diameter and nitric oxide (NO) levels and performed Ca2+ imaging, immunoblotting, and immunostaining assays in rats. We found that the flow-induced and TRPV4 activator 4α-PDD-induced dilation of mesenteric arteries from aged rats were significantly decreased compared with those from young rats. The flow- or 4α-PDD-induced [Ca2+]i rise was also markedly reduced in primary cultured mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) from aged rats. Immunoblotting and immunostaining results showed an age-related decrease of TRPV4 expression levels in MAECs. Additionally, the 4α-PDD-induced NO production was significantly reduced in aged MAECs. Compared with lentiviral GFP-treated aged rats, lentiviral vector delivery of TRPV4 increased TRPV4 expression level in aged MAECs and restored the flow- and 4α-PDD-induced vessel dilation in aged mesenteric arteries. We concluded that impaired TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling causes endothelial dysfunction and that TRPV4 is a potential target for clinical treatment of age-related vascular system diseases. PMID:26947561

  18. Dynamic Changes in Rat Mesenteric Lymph Proteins Following Trauma Using Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Peltz, Erik D.; Moore, Ernest E.; Jordan, Janeen R.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2014-01-01

    Early events triggered by post-trauma/hemorrhagic shock currently represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The causative agents of these events have been associated with increased neutrophil priming secondary to shock-dependent alterations of mesenteric lymph. Previous studies have suggested that unknown soluble components of the post-shock mesenteric lymph are main drivers of these events. In the present study, we applied a label free proteomics approach to further delve into the early proteome changes of the mesenteric lymph in response to hemorrhagic shock. Time-course analyses were performed by sampling the lymph every thirty minutes post-shock up until 3h (the time window within which a climax in neutrophil priming was observed). There are novel, transient early post-hemorrhagic shock alterations to the proteome and previously undocumented post-shock protein alterations. These results underlie the triggering of coagulation and pro-inflammatory responses secondary to trauma/hemorrhagic shock, metabolic deregulation and apoptosis, and alterations to proteases/anti-proteases homeostasis, which are suggestive of the potential implication of extracellular matrix proteases in priming neutrophil activation. Finally, there is a likely correlation between early PSML post-shock neutrophil priming and proteomics changes, above all protease/anti-proteases impaired homeostasis (especially of serine proteases and metalloproteases). PMID:25243424

  19. Mesenteric Fat Lipolysis Mediates Obesity-Associated Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wueest, Stephan; Item, Flurin; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Challa, Tenagne D; Müller, Werner; Blüher, Matthias; Konrad, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance are among the most prevalent metabolic disorders and are tightly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms linking obesity to hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are incompletely understood. Glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the common signal transducer of all interleukin 6 (IL-6) cytokines. We provide evidence that gp130-mediated adipose tissue lipolysis promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. In obese mice, adipocyte-specific gp130 deletion reduced basal lipolysis and enhanced insulin's ability to suppress lipolysis from mesenteric but not epididymal adipocytes. Consistently, free fatty acid levels were reduced in portal but not in systemic circulation of obese knockout mice. Of note, adipocyte-specific gp130 knockout mice were protected from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis as well as from insulin resistance. In humans, omental but not subcutaneous IL-6 mRNA expression correlated positively with liver lipid accumulation (r = 0.31, P < 0.05) and negatively with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp glucose infusion rate (r = -0.28, P < 0.05). The results show that IL-6 cytokine-induced lipolysis may be restricted to mesenteric white adipose tissue and that it contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis. Therefore, blocking IL-6 cytokine signaling in (mesenteric) adipocytes may be a novel approach to blunting detrimental fat-liver crosstalk in obesity. PMID:26384383

  20. Multiple mesenteric well-differentiated liposarcoma complicated by purulent inflammation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GAO, WEI; WANG, HUAIZHOU; LIU, JINYU; WANG, FUJIANG; DONG, JIANJUN; GENG, JUNZU

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mesenteric well-differentiated (WD) liposarcoma is an extremely rare entity. The present study describes a case of multiple mesenteric WD liposarcoma, complicated by purulent inflammation, in a 59-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and pyrexia of unknown origin. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a large, non-encapsulated mass in the abdomino-pelvic cavity, which was characterized by two components, a main portion of fatty density and a non-adipose solid portion. A re-evaluated CT scan, performed eight days later, revealed an enlargement of the non-adipose mass. A laparotomy was performed, and numerous separated fatty nodules and masses of various sizes were identified within the mesentery of the small intestine. The histological findings were consistent with an adipocytic subtype of multiple mesenteric WD liposarcoma, with the largest of the tumors complicated by purulent inflammation. The multiplicity of these tumors and the concurrent purulent inflammation in the present case make it unique. PMID:25663908

  1. A unique combination of celiac disease, mesenteric lymph node cavitation, splenic atrophy and necrotizing hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, T; Hiele, M; Vermeire, S; Libbrecht, L; Verslype, C

    2008-01-01

    We report on a patient who was diagnosed six years before with celiac disease, with a current combined problem of asplenism, mesenteric cysts and elevated liver function tests. The implications of splenic atrophy mimic those of post-splenectomy patients. Mesenteric lymph node cavitation is a rare complication of celiac disease that is most often associated with splenic atrophy. The pathogenesis is unknown. The clinical implications of the cavitated mesenteric lymph nodes are unclear. The association of celiac disease with liver disease was reported many years ago, but only recently these associations have been more clearly defined. Liver involvement shows a clinical spectrum varying from nonspecific reactive hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, steatohepatitis to frank cirrhosis. Associations with autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been described. In our patient, we found no obvious cause for the necrotizing hepatitis and the negative auto-antibodies made it impossible to firmly establish the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. The causal relationship with celiac disease, if any, remains unproven. PMID:18720941

  2. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  3. The effect of taurine on mesenteric blood flow and organ injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Sevgili, A M; Akbiyik, F; Atilla, P; Cakar, N; Balkanci, Z D; Iskit, A B; Guc, M O

    2008-08-01

    Endotoxin decreases mesenteric blood flow and inflicts organ injury via free radicals. We investigated whether taurine, an endogenous antioxidant and vasodilator, could attenuate the deleterious effects of endotoxin in a mouse model of sepsis. Swiss albino mice were allocated into four groups and treated either with taurine (150 mg/kg, i.p. at 0(th), 8(th), 16(th) h) or its solvent sterile saline (NaCl 0.9%, w/v) while E. coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or its solvent saline were also given at 8(th) h. At 24(th) h the animals were anaesthetized and the mesenteric blood flow was measured by using perivascular ultrasonic Doppler-flowmeter. The animals were then exsanguinated, the spleen, liver, and kidneys were isolated for histopathological examination. Thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), glutathione, and myeloperoxidase activity were determined in the liver samples. Endotoxin significantly decreased the mesenteric blood flow and glutathione levels in liver while TBARS and myeloperoxidase activity were increased. However, taurine did not block the deleterious effects of endotoxin nor it did attenuate the histopathological injury. Therefore, we concluded that endotoxin-induced organ injury via free radicals is resistant to blockade by taurine. PMID:18163178

  4. The vasodilatory action of telmisartan on isolated mesenteric artery rings from rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-ping; Qian, Li-ren

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) represent one of the widely used antihypertensive agents. In addition to anti-hypertension effect, some ARBs also show other molecular effects such as activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and so on. Here we studied the effects of telmisartan on the rat isolated mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine (PE). Materials and Methods: Rat mesenteric artery rings were pre-contracted with 10 μM PE, and cumulative concentration-response curves to telmisartan were obtained. The endothelium-dependent mechanisms were investigated by mechanical removal of the endothelium. K+ channels were investigated by pretreatment of the artery rings with various K+ channel blockers. Results: Telmisartan produced concentration-dependent relaxation of the artery rings pre-contracted by 10 μM PE. Denudation of the endothelium did not affect the relaxant effect of telmisartan. Pretreatment with BaCl2 nearly inhibited the relaxation induced by the 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 μM telmisartan, but did not affect the relaxation induced by the 50 and 100 μM telmisartan. While the relaxation induced by telmisartan was not affected by pretreatment with TEA, 4-AP and glibenclamide. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated that telmisartan produces concentration dependent vasodilation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings with or without endothelium pre-contracted by PE. KIR channel may be involved in such a relaxant effect of telmisartan. PMID:26730331

  5. Cyclooxygenase metabolism mediates vasorelaxation to 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in human mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The vasorelaxant effect of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) has been well characterised in animals. 2-AG is present in human vascular cells and is up-regulated in cardiovascular pathophysiology. However, the acute vascular actions of 2-AG have not been explored in humans. Approach Mesenteric arteries were obtained from patients receiving colorectal surgery and mounted on a myograph. Arteries were contracted and 2-AG concentration–response curves were carried out. Mechanisms of action were characterised pharmacologically. Post hoc analysis was carried out to assess the effects of cardiovascular disease/risk factors on 2-AG responses. Results 2-AG caused vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries, independent of cannabinoid receptor or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activation, the endothelium, nitric oxide or metabolism via monoacyglycerol lipase or fatty acid amide hydrolase. 2-AG-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in the presence of indomethacin and flurbiprofen, suggesting a role for cyclooxygenase metabolism 2-AG. Responses to 2-AG were also reduced in the presence of Cay10441, L-161982 and potentiated in the presence of AH6809, suggesting that metabolism of 2-AG produces both vasorelaxant and vasoconstrictor prostanoids. Finally, 2-AG-induced vasorelaxation was dependent on potassium efflux and the presence of extracellular calcium. Conclusions We have shown for the first time that 2-AG causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries. Vasorelaxation is dependent on COX metabolism, activation of prostanoid receptors (EP4 & IP) and ion channel modulation. 2-AG responses are blunted in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24548820

  6. Structure-related blockage of calcium channels by vasodilator alkamides in mice mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniela C G; Pereira, Aline C; Gutierrez, Stanley J C; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lemos, Virgínia S; Côrtes, Steyner F

    2016-07-01

    The development of new calcium channel blockers is still relevant for the understanding of their physiological role and pharmacological and therapeutic purposes. For this task, natural products represent a relevant source of new drugs. The present work investigated the mechanism and the structural relationship of the vasodilator effect of riparins I, II and III in mouse small mesenteric artery. Riparins I, II and III induced an endothelium-independent and concentration-dependent vasodilator effect in mesenteric arteries. Riparins II and III were more potent than riparin I, suggesting a structural relationship of the effect of these drugs. All riparins inhibited the contractile effect of KCl, similarly to nifedipine. However, the inhibitory profile was different for the contractile responses to phenylephrine and caffeine, passing from similar to nifedipine with riparin I, for similar to SKF-96365 with riparin III. A comparable effect was observed for the increase in the intracellular calcium concentration induced by caffeine and phenylephrine. These results suggest that the higher hydroxylation provides the alkamides the ability to inhibit non-selective cation channels in addition to the inhibition of L-type calcium channels in mouse mesenteric arteries. These observations may give support to the development of new selective inhibitors of non-selective cation channels using alkamides as leading compounds. PMID:27173831

  7. Nicotine facilitates reinnervation of phenol-injured perivascular adrenergic nerves in the rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Shingo; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi; Hagimori, Kenta; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Yokomizo, Ayako; Takayama, Fusako; Tangsucharit, Panot; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicotine has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions in the central nervous system. To elucidate the peripheral neurotrophic effects of nicotine, we determined whether nicotine affected the reinnervation of mesenteric perivascular nerves following a topical phenol treatment. A topical phenol treatment was applied to the superior mesenteric artery proximal to the abdominal aorta in Wistar rats. We examined the immunohistochemistry of the distal small arteries 7 days after the treatment. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-LI and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI fibers in these arteries. The administration of nicotine at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day (1.5 mg/kg/injection, twice a day), but not once a day or its continuous infusion using a mini-pump significantly increased the density of TH-LI nerves without affecting CGRP-LI nerves. A pretreatment with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium, mecamylamine, and methyllycaconitine, but not dextrometorphan, canceled the TH-LI nerve reinnervation induced by nicotine. Nicotine significantly increased NGF levels in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) and mesenteric arteries, but not in the dorsal root ganglia, and also up-regulated the expression of NGF receptors (TrkA) in the SCG, which were canceled by hexamethonium. These results suggested that nicotine exhibited neurotrophic effects that facilitated the reinnervation of adrenergic TH-LI nerves by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and NGF in the SCG. PMID:25514605

  8. Influence of celecoxib on the vasodilating properties of human mesenteric arteries constricted with endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    GRZEŚK, GRZEGORZ; SZADUJKIS-SZADURSKA, KATARZYNA; MATUSIAK, GRZEGORZ; MALINOWSKI, BARTOSZ; GAJDUS, MARTA; WICIŃSKI, MICHAŁ; SZADUJKIS-SZADURSKI, LESZEK

    2014-01-01

    The mitogenic and vasoconstrictive properties of the vascular system are attributed to endothelin-1 (ET-1). ET-1 serum concentration increases in a number of pathological conditions, particularly in those associated with blood vessel constriction. ET-1 is also associated with the underlying pathomechanisms of primary pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension and eclampsia. The aim of this study was to compare the vasodilating properties of selected phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and celecoxib in human mesenteric arteries constricted with ET-1, and investigate the role of the endothelium in relaxation. Perfused human mesenteric arteries were collected and stored under the same conditions as organs for transplantation. The mesenteric arteries (with and without the endothelium) were constricted by the addition of ET-1 and treated with one of the following: sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor), zaprinast (PDE5 and 6 inhibitor), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and celecoxib [cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor]. Based on the observed changes of the perfusion pressure, concentration response curves (CRCs) were prepared for the respective inhibitors and the EC50 (concentration causing an effect equal to half of the maximum effect), pD2 (negative common logarithm of EC50) and relative potency (RP) were calculated. The results suggested that all the inhibitors triggered a concentration-dependent decrease in the perfusion pressure in isolated human superior mesenteric arteries with endothelium constricted by the addition of ET-1. In the arteries without endothelium, CRCs for celecoxib and rolipram were shifted to the right without a significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect. Moreover, CRCs for sildenafil and zaprinast were shifted to the right with a simultaneous significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect and with an increased inclination angle in reference to the concentration axis. In the presence of the endothelium, all of the evaluated PDE inhibitors, as well

  9. Influence of celecoxib on the vasodilating properties of human mesenteric arteries constricted with endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Grześk, Grzegorz; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Matusiak, Grzegorz; Malinowski, Bartosz; Gajdus, Marta; Wiciński, Michał; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    The mitogenic and vasoconstrictive properties of the vascular system are attributed to endothelin-1 (ET-1). ET-1 serum concentration increases in a number of pathological conditions, particularly in those associated with blood vessel constriction. ET-1 is also associated with the underlying pathomechanisms of primary pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension and eclampsia. The aim of this study was to compare the vasodilating properties of selected phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and celecoxib in human mesenteric arteries constricted with ET-1, and investigate the role of the endothelium in relaxation. Perfused human mesenteric arteries were collected and stored under the same conditions as organs for transplantation. The mesenteric arteries (with and without the endothelium) were constricted by the addition of ET-1 and treated with one of the following: sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor), zaprinast (PDE5 and 6 inhibitor), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and celecoxib [cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor]. Based on the observed changes of the perfusion pressure, concentration response curves (CRCs) were prepared for the respective inhibitors and the EC50 (concentration causing an effect equal to half of the maximum effect), pD2 (negative common logarithm of EC50) and relative potency (RP) were calculated. The results suggested that all the inhibitors triggered a concentration-dependent decrease in the perfusion pressure in isolated human superior mesenteric arteries with endothelium constricted by the addition of ET-1. In the arteries without endothelium, CRCs for celecoxib and rolipram were shifted to the right without a significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect. Moreover, CRCs for sildenafil and zaprinast were shifted to the right with a simultaneous significant decrease in the maximum dilating effect and with an increased inclination angle in reference to the concentration axis. In the presence of the endothelium, all of the evaluated PDE inhibitors, as well

  10. Pre- and Perinatal Ischemia-Hypoxia, the Ischemia-Hypoxia Response Pathway, and ADHD Risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Taylor F; Schmidt-Kastner, Rainald; McGeary, John E; Kaczorowski, Jessica A; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on how measured pre- and perinatal environmental and (epi)genetic risk factors are interrelated and potentially influence one, of many, common developmental pathway towards ADHD. Consistent with the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis, lower birth weight is associated with increased ADHD risk. Prenatal ischemia-hypoxia (insufficient blood and oxygen supply in utero) is a primary pathway to lower birth weight and produces neurodevelopmental risk for ADHD. To promote tissue survival in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) pathway gene expression is altered in the developing brain and peripheral tissues. Although altered IHR gene expression is adaptive in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, lasting IHR epigenetic modifications may lead to increased ADHD risk. Taken together, IHR genetic vulnerability to ischemia-hypoxia and IHR epigenetic alterations following prenatal ischemia-hypoxia may result in neurodevelopmental vulnerability for ADHD. Limitations of the extant literature and future directions for genetically-informed research are discussed. PMID:26920003

  11. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE MESENTERIAL ISCHEMIA].

    PubMed

    Shepehtko, E N; Garmash, D A; Kurbanov, A K; Marchenko, V O; Kozak, Yu S

    2016-04-01

    Experience of surgical treatment of 143 patients, suffering an acute mesenterial ischemia, was summarized. Isolated intestinal resection was performed in 41 patients (lethality 65.9%), intestinal resection with the mesenterial vessels thrombembolectomy--in 9 (lethality 33.3%). After performance of the combined intervention postoperative lethality was in two times lower, than after isolated intestinal resection. PMID:27434952

  12. [Platelets, atherothrombosis, antiplatelet drugs and cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2013-02-01

    Platelets play a much more important role in myocardial ischemia than in cerebral ischemia, because atherothrombosis - the underlying cause of the vast majority of myocardial infarcts - is responsible for only 25-30% of cerebral infarcts. Aspirin is the only effective antiplatelet drug for primary prevention of ischemic events, especially those affecting the heart. For secondary prevention of cerebral infarction, clopidogrel and the combination of aspirin with extended-release dipyridamole are both marginally better than aspirin alone, but aspirin remains the gold standard worldwide because of its remarkable cost/benefit/tolerability ratio. The clopidogrel-aspirin combination is to be avoided because of the risk of hemorrhage, particularly in the brain and gastrointestinal tract. Revascularization strategies and the choice of antiplatelet drugs for the acute phase of myocardial and cerebral ischemia are very different, consisting of endovascular treatment and aggressive platelet inhibition for coronary infarcts, versus intravenous thrombolysis and / or aspirin for cerebral infarcts. None of the new antiplatelet drugs used in acute coronary syndromes has so far been studied in acute cerebral ischemia. PMID:24919368

  13. [Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and melatonin].

    PubMed

    Sahna, Engin; Deniz, Esra; Aksulu, Hakki Engin

    2006-06-01

    It is believed that myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is related to increased free radical generated and intracellular calcium overload especially during the period of reperfusion. The pineal secretory product, melatonin, is known to be a potent free radical scavenger, antioxidant and can inhibit the intracellular calcium overload. In this review, we have summarized the fundamental of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and the effects of melatonin on myocardial damage that related to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. The total antioxidant capacity of human serum is related to melatonin levels. Incidence of sudden cardiac death is high in the morning hours. It has been shown that melatonin levels are significantly low at these times and patients with coronary heart disease have lower than normal individuals. These findings thought that melatonin would be valuable to test in clinical trials for prevention of possible ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury, especially life threatening arrhythmias and infarct size, effecting life quality, associated with thrombolysis, angioplasty, coronary artery spasm or coronary bypass surgery. PMID:16766282

  14. Effects of pulmonary ischemia on lung morphology.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michael J; Bishai, John M; Mitzner, Wayne; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia resulting from chronic pulmonary embolism leads to proliferation of the systemic circulation within and surrounding the lung. However, it is not clear how well alveolar tissue is sustained during the time of complete pulmonary ischemia. In the present study, we investigated how pulmonary ischemia after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL) would alter lung mechanical properties and morphology. In this established mouse model of lung angiogenesis after chronic LPAL (10), we evaluated lung function and structure before (3 days) and after (14 days) a functional systemic circulation to the left lung is established. Age-matched naïve and sham-operated C57Bl/6 mice and mice undergoing chronic LPAL were studied. Left and right lung pressure-volume relationships were determined. Next, lungs were inflated in situ with warmed agarose (25-30 cmH(2)O) and fixed, and mean chord lengths (MCL) of histological sections were quantified. MCL of naïve mice averaged 43.9 +/- 1.8 mum. No significant changes in MCL were observed at either time point after LPAL. Left lung volumes and specific compliances were significantly reduced 3 days after LPAL. However, by 14 days after LPAL, lung pressure-volume relationships were not different from controls. These results suggest that severe pulmonary ischemia causes changes in lung mechanics early after LPAL that are reversed by the time a new systemic vasculature is known to perfuse pulmonary capillaries. The LPAL model thus affords a unique opportunity to study lung functional responses to tissue ischemia and subsequent recovery. PMID:17449796

  15. Role of Endothelial Cells in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Arun K.; Symons, J. David; Boudina, Sihem; Jaishy, Bharat; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury has broad clinical implications and is a critical mediator of cardiac surgical outcomes. “Ischemic injury” results from a restriction in blood supply leading to a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand of a sufficient intensity and/or duration that leads to cell necrosis, whereas ischemia-reperfusion injury occurs when blood supply is restored after a period of ischemia and is usually associated with apoptosis (i.e. programmed cell death). Compared to vascular endothelial cells, cardiac myocytes are more sensitive to ischemic injury and have received the most attention in preventing myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Many comprehensive reviews exist on various aspects of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of vascular endothelial cells in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and to stimulate further research in this exciting and clinically relevant area. Two specific areas that are addressed include: 1) data suggesting that coronary endothelial cells are critical mediators of myocardial dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury; and 2) the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in endothelial cell death as a result of an ischemia-reperfusion insult. Elucidating the cellular signaling pathway(s) that leads to endothelial cell injury and/or death in response to ischemia-reperfusion is a key component to developing clinically applicable strategies that might minimize myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25558187

  16. Monitored extended secondary arterial ischemia in a free muscle transfer.

    PubMed

    Sværdborg, Mille; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2012-02-01

    In reconstructive microsurgery, flap failure can be catastrophic to the patient. Different monitoring methods have been implemented in an attempt to recognize secondary ischemia during its early stages. However, the exact onset of secondary ischemia can be difficult to determine because there are no well-documented and reliable monitoring techniques that offer true continuous monitoring in a clinical setting. Because of the uncertain time in terms of the onset of secondary ischemia, the exact length of ischemia before revascularization, the secondary ischemia time, cannot be obtained. This is probably part of the reason why not much has been published regarding the effect of secondary ischemia time in reference to flap survival. We present a case of a free gracilis muscle flap that was salvaged despite more than 11 hours of arterial ischemia. The flap was monitored using microdialysis and at no time was the ischemia clearly demonstrated by clinical inspection. We conclude that clinical monitoring in some cases can be an unreliable method for monitoring free muscle transfers suffering from arterial ischemia and that further studies are needed for more specific guidelines regarding the critical secondary ischemia time in muscle flaps. PMID:21959552

  17. A case report of an 80 year old man with mesenteric panniculitis, a raised lactate and hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chechi, Moaize; Alsallami, Zeyad; Armstrong, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare condition which presents as abdominal pain. It involves benign inflammatory or fibrotic changes affecting the mesentery of the bowel. Presentation of case An 80 year old man presented with severe abdominal pain of acute onset. He was found to have a high lactate and high blood glucose. He was not a known diabetic. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis, and the patient rapidly responded to steroid treatment. Discussion Mesenteric panniculitis has been known to present as an acute abdomen. However, an associated high lactate and hyperglycaemia is hitherto unreported in the literature. With no obvious precipitant for an increased lactate, we propose it is potentially caused by the subsequent fat necrosis and regional ischaemia associated with mesenteric panniculitis. Conclusion This case report underlines the importance of further research into the relationship between mesenteric panniculitis, a high lactate, and diabetes. In addition, short term steroid treatment (one month) seemed to confer the same benefit as long term steroid treatment. PMID:26629850

  18. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:27235767

  19. Acrolein induces vasodilatation of rodent mesenteric bed via an EDHF-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, S.O.; Adeagbo, A.S.O.; D'Souza, S.E.; Bhatnagar, A.; Conklin, D.J. . E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu

    2006-12-15

    Acrolein is generated endogenously during lipid peroxidation and inflammation and is an environmental pollutant. Protein adducts of acrolein are detected in atherosclerotic plaques and neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease. To understand vascular effects of acrolein exposure, we studied acrolein vasoreactivity in perfused rodent mesenteric bed. Acrolein induced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation that was more robust and more sensitive than dilation induced by 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, trans-2-hexenal, or propionaldehyde. Acrolein-induced vasodilatation was mediated by K{sup +}-sensitive components, e.g., it was abolished in 0 [K{sup +}]{sub o} buffer or in 3 mM tetrabutylammonium, inhibited 75% in 50 {mu}M ouabain, and inhibited 64% in 20 mM K{sup +} buffer. Moreover, combined treatment with the Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channel inhibitors 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34, 100 nM) and apamin (5 {mu}M) significantly reduced vasodilatation without altering sensitivity to acrolein. However, acrolein-induced % dilation was unaffected by L-NAME or indomethacin pretreatment indicating mechanistic independence of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, acrolein induced vasodilatation in cirazoline-precontracted mesenteric bed of eNOS-null mice confirming eNOS independence. Pretreatment with 6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl) hexanoic acid (PPOH 50 {mu}M), an epoxygenase inhibitor, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol (100 {mu}M) significantly attenuated acrolein-induced vasodilatation. Collectively, these data indicate that acrolein stimulates mesenteric bed vasodilatation due to endothelium-derived signal(s) that is K{sup +}-, ouabain-, PPOH-, and Tempol-sensitive, and thus, a likely endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These data indicate that low level acrolein exposure associated with vascular oxidative stress or inflammation stimulates vasodilatation via EDHF release in medium-sized arteries - a novel function.

  20. The adipokine chemerin amplifies electrical field-stimulated contraction in the isolated rat superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Winner, Brittany M; Charvat, Trevor; Krasinksi, Antoni; Punna, Sreenivas; Watts, Stephanie W

    2016-08-01

    The adipokine chemerin causes arterial contraction and is implicated in blood pressure regulation, especially in obese subjects with elevated levels of circulating chemerin. Because chemerin is expressed in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) that surrounds the sympathetic innervation of the blood vessel, we tested the hypothesis that chemerin (endogenous and exogenous) amplifies the sympathetic nervous system in mediating electrical field-stimulated (EFS) contraction. The superior mesenteric artery, with or without PVAT and with endothelium and sympathetic nerve intact, was mounted into isolated tissue baths and used for isometric contraction and stimulation. Immunohistochemistry validated a robust expression of chemerin in the PVAT surrounding the superior mesenteric artery. EFS (0.3-20 Hz) caused a frequency-dependent contraction in isolated arteries that was reduced by the chemerin receptor ChemR23 antagonist CCX832 alone (100 nM; with, but not without, PVAT), but not by the inactive congener CCX826 (100 nM). Exogenous chemerin-9 (1 μM)-amplified EFS-induced contraction in arteries (with and without PVAT) was blocked by CCX832 and the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin. CCX832 did not directly inhibit, nor did chemerin directly amplify, norepinephrine-induced contraction. Whole mount immunohistochemical experiments support colocalization of ChemR23 with the sympathetic nerve marker tyrosine hydroxylase in superior mesenteric PVAT and, to a lesser extent, in arteries and veins. These studies support the idea that exogenous chemerin modifies sympathetic nerve-mediated contraction through ChemR23 and that ChemR23 may be endogenously activated. This is significant because of the well-appreciated role of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure control. PMID:27371688

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 3 Channels Control the Vascular Contractility of Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Soo-In; Kim, Joo Young; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Muallem, Shmuel; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels are non-selective cation channels and regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We examined the role of TRPC3 channels in agonist-, membrane depolarization (high K+)-, and mechanical (pressure)-induced vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation in mouse mesenteric arteries. Vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of endothelial cells intact mesenteric arteries were measured in TRPC3 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) was measured in isolated arteries from TRPC3 WT and KO mice as well as in the mouse endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrate/nitrite concentrations were also measured in TRPC3 WT and KO mice. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was reduced in TRPC3 KO mice when compared to that of WT mice, but neither high K+- nor pressure-induced vasoconstriction was altered in TRPC3 KO mice. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited in TRPC3 KO mice and by the selective TRPC3 blocker pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine blocked the phenylephrine-induced increase in Ca2+ ratio and then relaxation in TRPC3 WT mice but had little effect on those outcomes in KO mice. Acetylcholine evoked a Ca2+ increase in endothelial cells, which was inhibited by pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine induced increased NO release in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. Acetylcholine also increased the nitrate/nitrite concentration in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. The present study directly demonstrated that the TRPC3 channel is involved in agonist-induced vasoconstriction and plays important role in NO-mediated vasorelaxation of intact mesenteric arteries. PMID:25310225

  2. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  3. Substance P promotes expansion of human mesenteric preadipocytes through proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Kara; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Thomou, Thomas; Koon, Hon Wai; Bowe, Collin; Kim, Ho; Giorgadze, Nino; Tchkonia, Tamara; Pirtskhalava, Tamara; Kirkland, James L.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2009-01-01

    White adipose tissue is intimately involved in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. We reported that human mesenteric preadipocytes express the substance P (SP)-mediated neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), which signals proinflammatory responses. Here we tested the hypothesis that SP promotes proliferation and survival of human mesenteric preadipocytes and investigated responsible mechanism(s). Preadipocytes were isolated from mesenteric fat biopsies during gastric bypass surgery. Proliferative and antiapoptotic responses were delineated in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), caspase-3, and TUNEL assays, as well as Western immunoanalysis. SP (10−7 M) increased MTS and proliferation (BrdU) and time dependently (15–30 min) induced Akt, EGF receptor, IGF receptor, integrin αVβ3, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and PKC-θ phosphorylation. Furthermore, pharmacological antagonism of Akt and PKC-θ activation significantly attenuated SP-induced preadipocyte proliferation. Exposure of preadipocytes to the proapoptotic Fas ligand (FasL, 100 μM) resulted in nuclear DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay), as well as increased cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, cleaved caspase-7, and caspase-3 expression. Cotreatment with SP almost completely abolished these responses in a NK-1R-dependent fashion. SP (10−7 M) also time dependently stimulated expression 4E binding protein 1 and phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase, which increased protein translation efficiency. SP increases preadipocyte viability, reduces apoptosis, and stimulates proliferation, possibly via cell cycle upregulation and increased protein translation efficiency. SP-induced proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways in fat depots may contribute to development of the creeping fat and inflammation characteristic of Crohn's disease. PMID:19282377

  4. Mesenteric lymph diversion abrogates 5-lipoxygenase activation in the kidney following trauma and hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Stringham, John R.; Moore, Ernest E.; Gamboni, Fabia; Harr, Jeffrey N.; Fragoso, Miguel; Chin, Theresa L.; Carr, Caitlin E.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early acute kidney injury (AKI) following trauma is associated with multiorgan failure and mortality. Leukotrienes have been implicated both in AKI and in acute lung injury. Activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) colocalizes with 5-LO–activating protein (FLAP) in the first step of leukotriene production following trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Diversion of postshock mesenteric lymph, which is rich in the 5-LO substrate of arachidonate, attenuates lung injury and decreases 5-LO/FLAP associations in the lung after T/HS. We hypothesized that mesenteric lymph diversion (MLD) will also attenuate postshock 5-LO–mediated AKI. METHODS Rats underwent T/HS (laparotomy, hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mm Hg for 45 minutes, and resuscitation), and MLD was accomplished via cannulation of the mesenteric duct. Extent of kidney injury was determined via histology score and verified by urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay. Kidney sections were immunostained for 5-LO and FLAP, and colocalization was determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal intensity. The end leukotriene products of 5-LO were determined in urine. RESULTS AKI was evident in the T/HS group by derangement in kidney tubule architecture and confirmed by neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay, whereas MLD during T/HS preserved renal tubule morphology at a sham level. MLD during T/HS decreased the associations between 5-LO and FLAP demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy and decreased leukotriene production in urine. CONCLUSION 5-LO and FLAP colocalize in the interstitium of the renal medulla following T/HS. MLD attenuates this phenomenon, which coincides with pathologic changes seen in tubules during kidney injury and biochemical evidence of AKI. These data suggest that gut-derived leukotriene substrate predisposes the kidney and the lung to subsequent injury. PMID:24747451

  5. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  6. Upper Limb Ischemia: Clinical Experiences of Acute and Chronic Upper Limb Ischemia in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon; Lee, Chung Won; Choi, Jinseok; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Sang-pil

    2015-01-01

    Background Upper limb ischemia is less common than lower limb ischemia, and relatively few cases have been reported. This paper reviews the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical characteristics of upper limb ischemia and analyzes the factors affecting functional sequelae after treatment. Methods The records of 35 patients with acute and chronic upper limb ischemia who underwent treatment from January 2007 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 55.03 years, and the number of male patients was 24 (68.6%). The most common etiology was embolism of cardiac origin, followed by thrombosis with secondary trauma, and the brachial artery was the most common location for a lesion causing obstruction. Computed tomography angiography was the first-line diagnostic tool in our center. Twenty-eight operations were performed, and conservative therapy was implemented in seven cases. Five deaths (14.3%) occurred during follow-up. Twenty patients (57.1%) complained of functional sequelae after treatment. Functional sequelae were found to be more likely in patients with a longer duration of symptoms (odds ratio, 1.251; p=0.046) and higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (odds ratio, 1.001; p=0.031). Conclusion An increased duration of symptoms and higher initial serum LDH levels were associated with the more frequent occurrence of functional sequelae. The prognosis of upper limb ischemia is associated with prompt and proper treatment and can also be predicted by initial serum LDH levels. PMID:26290835

  7. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bercu, Zachary L. Sheth, Sachin B.; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A. Fischman, Aaron M. Nowakowski, F. Scott Kim, Edward Patel, Rahul S.

    2015-10-15

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  8. High tie versus low tie of the inferior mesenteric artery: a protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In anterior resection of rectum, the section level of inferior mesenteric artery is still subject of controversy between the advocates of high and low tie. The low tie is the division and ligation to the branching of the left colic artery and the high tie is the division and ligation at its origin at the aorta. We intend to assess current scientific evidence in literature and to establish the differences comparing technique, anatomy and physiology. The aim of this protocol is to achieve a meta-analysis that tests safety and feasibility of the two procedures with several types of outcome measures. PMID:22071020

  9. Mesenteric Defect with Internal Herniation: A Rare Cause of Bowel Obstruction in Newborn.

    PubMed

    Adnen, Hakim; Aida, Borgi; Serra, Belhadj; Narjess, Ghali; Asma, Hamdi; Ammar, Khaldi; Khaled, Menif; Said, Jlidi; Nejla, Ben Jaballah

    2015-01-01

    Herniation through a congenital mesenteric defect is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment improves the prognosis. We present a case of a full-term infant who presented with respiratory distress at birth. Enteral feeding was not started because abdominal distension and delayed passage of meconium. Bowel obstruction was suspected. Radiological investigation did not provide a clear diagnosis. Surgical exploration revealed transmesenteric congenital hernia. After surgical repair, enteral feeding was tolerated and patient was discharged with an uneventful outcome. Diagnostic difficulties were discussed. PMID:25978102

  10. Congenital mesenteric abnormality causing death in an infant with a concurrent diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Jonathon; Langlois, Neil E I

    2010-03-01

    The principle causes of infant death are natural causes [including the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)]. Natural deaths in infants are principally due to infections, cardiovascular anomalies and other metabolic or genetic disorders. Gastrointestinal pathology including anomalies may also cause death in this age group. This case describes a 6 month old boy who had undergone repair of a diaphragmatic hernia when aged 2 days, but who subsequently died as a result of a mesenteric abnormality with torsion of the gut and a large fibrous walled bowel containing hernial sac in the left pleural cavity. PMID:20084555

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide modulates perivascular sensory neurotransmission in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed

    PubMed Central

    Ralevic, Vera

    2002-01-01

    A possible role of nitric oxide (NO) as a modulator of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurotransmission in blood vessels was investigated in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of methoxamine-preconstricted mesenteric beds elicited frequency-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 and 300 μM) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 100 μM), inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation. D-NAME (300 μM), 6-aminoindazole (100 μM) and Nω-propyl-L-arginine (50 nM), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS, were without effect. The effect of 10 μM L-NAME was reversed by L-arginine (1 mM), the substrate for NOS. L-NAME (300 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) had no significant effect on vasorelaxations to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the principal motor neurotransmitter of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in rat mesenteric arteries, or to capsaicin, indicating a prejunctional action. The inhibitors of NOS had no effect on vasorelaxation to forskolin, but augmented vasorelaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Removal of the endothelium augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation, but did not affect vasorelaxation to CGRP, indicating a prejunctional action of endothelial NO. In the absence of endothelium, L-NAME (300 μM) inhibited, and 7-NI (100 μM) caused no further augmentation of sensory neurotransmission. SNP (100 nM), a nitric oxide donor, attenuated sensory neurogenic relaxations to EFS. In rat isolated thoracic aortic rings, L-NAME (100 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) attenuated concentration-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine. These data show that NO modulates sensory neurotransmission evoked by EFS of the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed, and that when NO synthesis is blocked sensory neurogenic relaxation is augmented. The source of NO is the vascular endothelium. PMID:12183327

  12. Fatal extraintestinal toxoplasmosis in a young male cat with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Tamara M; Blois, Shauna; Vince, Andrew R

    2016-05-01

    A 22-month-old indoor/outdoor neutered male domestic short-haired cat had a history of progressive lethargy, vomiting, and decreased appetite. Abdominal ultrasound revealed an irregular hyperechoic mass in the mid-abdomen. He was unresponsive to symptomatic medical management and was euthanized after 3 days of hospitalization. A diagnosis of disseminated extraintestinal toxoplasmosis was made based on the finding of intracytoplasmic protozoan parasites on histopathological examination of mesenteric lymph nodes, hepatic and intestinal samples, and on immunohistochemistry. PMID:27152033

  13. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  14. Ischemia detection using Isoelectric Energy Function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    A novel method has been proposed for the detection of ischemia using an isoelectric energy function (IEEF) resulting from ST segment deviations in ECG signals. The method consists of five stages: pre-processing, delineation, measurement of isoelectric energy, a beat characterization algorithm and detection of ischemia. The isoelectric energy threshold is used to differentiate ischemic beats from normal beats for ischemic episode detection. Then, ischemic episodes are classified as transmural or subendocardial. The method is validated for recordings of the annotated European ST-T database (EDB). The results show 98.12% average sensitivity (SE) and 98.16% average specificity (SP). These results are significantly better than those of existing methods cited in the literature. The advantage of the proposed method includes simplicity, ruggedness and automatic discarding of noisy beats. PMID:26623944

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingchao; Li, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an intricate mechanism that mediates numerous responses during brain ischemia, thus being essential to determine the fate of neurons. In recent years, studies of the mechanisms of brain ischemic injury have centered on ER stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, dysfunction of mitochondria, inflammatory reactions, calcium overload and death receptor pathways. The role of ER stress is highly important. In addition to resulting in neuronal cell death through calcium toxicity and apoptotic pathways, ER stress also triggers a series of adaptive responses including unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, the expression of pro-survival proteins and the enhancement of ER self-repair ability, leading to less ischemic brain damage. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in understanding of the relations between ER stress and brain ischemia. PMID:26289799

  16. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Corstens, F.H.; Thien, T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-{sup 201}Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging.

  17. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  18. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, Joseph J.; Arbid, Elias J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic limb ischemia involves the restoration of pulsatile blood flow to the distal extremity. Some patients cannot be treated with endovascular means or with open surgery; some may have medical comorbidities that render them unfit for surgery, while others may have persistent ischemia or pain even in the face of previous attempts at reperfusion. In spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a device with electrodes is implanted in the epidural space to stimulate sensory fibers. This activates cell-signaling molecules that in turn cause the release of vasodilatory molecules, a decrease in vascular resistance, and relaxation of smooth muscle cells. SCS also suppresses sympathetic vasoconstriction and pain transmission. When patient selection is based on microcirculatory parameters, SCS therapy can significantly improve pain relief, halt the progression of ulcers, and potentially achieve limb salvage. PMID:23805343

  19. Is longer sevoflurane preconditioning neuroprotective in permanent focal cerebral ischemia?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Caiwei; Sheng, Bo; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Sevoflurane preconditioning has neuroprotective effects in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. However, its influence on permanent cerebral ischemia remains unclear. In the present study, the rats were exposed to sevoflurane for 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes, followed by induction of permanent cerebral ischemia. Results demonstrated that 30- and 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly reduced the infarct volume at 24 hours after cerebral ischemia, and 60-minute lurane preconditioning additionally reduced the number of TUNEL- and caspase-3-positive cells in the ischemic penumbra. However, 120-minute sevoflurane preconditioning did not show evident neuroprotective effects. Moreover, 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly attenuated neurological deficits and infarct volume in rats at 4 days after cerebral ischemia. These findings indicated that 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning can induce the best neuroprotective effects in rats with permanent cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25206521

  20. [Paradigm shift in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. From bowel reconstruction to transposition of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, D; Pourhassan, S; Sandmann, W

    2009-04-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome--also known as Wilkie's syndrome or as arteriomesenteric obstruction of the duodenum--is a rare condition of upper intestinal obstruction in which the third part of the duodenum is compressed by the overlying, narrow-angled superior mesenteric artery against the posterior structures. It is characterized by early satiety, recurrent vomiting, abdominal distention, weight loss and postprandial distress. When nonsurgical management is not possible or the problem is refractory, surgical intervention is necessary. Usually a reconstruction of the intestinal passage is performed. We report the first case of successful transposition of the superior mesenteric artery into the infrarenal aorta in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. PMID:19066831

  1. Renal acid-base metabolism after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Holloway, J C; Phifer, T; Henderson, R; Welbourne, T C

    1986-05-01

    The response of the kidney to ischemia-induced cellular acidosis was followed over the immediate one hr post-ischemia reflow period. Clearance and extraction experiments as well as measurement of cortical intracellular pH (pHi) were performed on Inactin-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Arteriovenous concentration differences and para-aminohippurate extraction were obtained by cannulating the left renal vein. Base production was monitored as bicarbonate released into the renal vein and urine; net base production was related to the renal handling of glutamine and ammonia as well as to renal oxygen consumption and pHi. After a 15 min control period, the left renal artery was snared for one-half hr followed by release and four consecutive 15 min reflow periods. During the control period, cortical cell pHi measured by [14C]-5,5-Dimethyl-2,4-Oxazolidinedione distribution was 7.07 +/- 0.08, and Q-O2 was 14.1 +/- 2.2 micromoles/min; neither net glutamine utilization nor net bicarbonate generation occurred. After 30 min of ischemia, renal tissue pH fell to 6.6 +/- 0.15. However, within 45 min of reflow, cortical cell pH returned and exceeded the control value, 7.33 +/- 0.06 vs. 7.15 +/- 0.08. This increase in pHi was associated with a significant rise in cellular metabolic rate, Q-O2 increased to 20.3 +/- 6.4 micromoles/min. Corresponding with cellular alkalosis was a net production of bicarbonate and a net ammonia uptake and glutamine release; urinary acidification was abolished. These results are consistent with a nonexcretory renal metabolic base generating mechanism governing cellular acid base homeostasis following ischemia. PMID:3723929

  2. Ischemia, reperfusion and oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Manso, C F

    1992-11-01

    Alterations which occur during ischemia are reviewed. They modify the metabolic status in such a way they prepare the cell to an anomalous response to reoxygenation. The consequence of this disturbance is the generation of oxygen free radicals through several mechanisms, including the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the arachidonic acid cascade, the activation of xanthine oxidase, activation of phagocytes, iron mobilization, etc. Reduced glutathione is exhausted, proteins are inactivated. Lipid peroxidation induces membrane breakdown and cellular death. PMID:1290647

  3. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  4. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  5. [Transition of myocardial ischemia to heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Fraccarollo, D; Gaudron, P; Hu, K; Laser, A; Neubauer, S; Schorb, W

    1998-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia results in myocardial dysfunction. Recovery may be delayed ("stunning"), or persistent if perfusion remains reduced ("hibernation") and ischemia may go on to necrosis, thus, contributing to chronic heart failure. In addition, myocardium not directly affected by ischemia may undergo adaptive processes like hypertrophy and dilatation, which may result in chronic left heart failure. This process is characterized by hemodynamic, neurohumoral, and progressive morphologic changes of the heart which are closely interrelated. Hemodynamic changes basically consist of an increase in left ventricular filling pressure and a decrease in global ejection fraction, and, in most cases years after myocardial infarction, in an increase in systemic vascular resistance and right atrial pressure. Neurohumoral changes consist of an increase in plasma catecholamines, atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin, and in an activation of the renin-angiotensin-system. Plasma endothelin-1 was recently reported to be increased in patients with heart failure, and prognosis was related to endothelin levels. Diminished response of vessels to endothelium (EDRF/NO) dependent vasodilatation suggests impairment of vascular endothelium in heart failure. Local changes of cardiac neurohumoral systems could contribute to structural changes of the heart, e.g., systemic activation to hemodynamic changes. Structural changes of the heart are characterized by an increase in volume and thickness of surviving myocardium and an expansion of ischemic and necrotic myocardium. Molecular control of these processes which include various cell types, such as cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, are currently an issue of intense research and could result in specific therapeutic importance. PMID:9816648

  6. Polyphenols and neuroprotection against ischemia and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, B

    2011-12-01

    Neuroprotection of polyphenols in medical plants is getting attention in the world. Scutellaria baicalensis, paeonia veitchii and paeonia suffruticosa have been extensively studied in the last 10 years and show multi-function. They are neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antithrombic agents as well as vasoconstriction inhibitors and amyloid-peptide (Aβ) cleaners by means of their polyphenols: baicalin, baicalein, wogonin (in scutellaria), and paeonol, paeonoside, paeoniflorin (PF) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6-Penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (PGG) (in paeonia veitchii and paeonia suffruticosa). Other 4 medical plants: astragali, ligusticum wallichii, angelica sinensis and carthamus tinctorius (saffron) have been the major medicines to treat ischemia for hundreds of years in China, Korea and Japan. Our recent experimental studies demonstrated the neuroprotective efficacy of the combination of these phyotmedicines on mitigating brain infarction and global ischemia as well as preventing the neurodegeneration following ischemia. Owing to their multi-function, including improving cerebral blood circulation, they therefore have the potential to alleviate the symptoms of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Pharmacology of the 7 herbs and their major relative polyphenols is depicted in the article. PMID:22070681

  7. Modulation of cardiac metabolism during myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Antonio C P; Dourado, Paulo M M; Galvão, Tatiana de Fátima Gonçalves

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic modulation during myocardial ischemia is possible by the use of specific drugs, which may induce a shift from free fatty acid towards predominantly glucose utilization by the myocardium to increase ATP generation per unit oxygen consumption. Three agents (trimetazidine, ranolazine, and perhexiline) have well-documented anti-ischaemic effects. However, perhexiline, the most potent agent currently available, requires plasma-level monitoring to avoid hepato-neuro-toxicity. Besides, the long-term safety of trimetazidine and ranolazine has yet to be established. In addition to their effect in ischemia, the potential use of these drugs in chronic heart failure is gaining recognition as clinical and experimental data are showing the improvement of myocardial function following treatment with several of them, even in the absence of ischemia. Future applications for this line of treatment is promising and deserves additional research. In particular, large, randomised, controlled trials investigating the effects of these agents on mortality and hospitalization rates due to coronary artery disease are needed. PMID:18991673

  8. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine and cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Fung

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide but effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention of brain injury in patients with cerebral ischemia is lacking. Although tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been used to treat stroke patients, this therapeutic strategy is confronted with ill side effects and is limited to patients within 3 hours of a stroke. Stroke-mediated cell death is a complex interplay of aberrant events involving excitotoxicity, acidosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, peri-infarct depolarization, and apoptosis. Due to the complexity of the events and the disappointing results from single agent trials, the combination of thrombolytic therapy and effective neural protection therapy may be an alternative strategy for patients with cerebral ischemia. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has been described in ancient medicine systems as a treatment for various ailments associated with stroke. Recently, there have been reports of its benefits in treating stroke. This review will focus on various traditional Chinese herbal medicines and their neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia. PMID:22201915

  9. Multiple molecular penumbras after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sharp, F R; Lu, A; Tang, Y; Millhorn, D E

    2000-07-01

    Though the ischemic penumbra has been classically described on the basis of blood flow and physiologic parameters, a variety of ischemic penumbras can be described in molecular terms. Apoptosis-related genes induced after focal ischemia may contribute to cell death in the core and the selective cell death adjacent to an infarct. The HSP70 heat shock protein is induced in glia at the edges of an infarct and in neurons often at some distance from the infarct. HSP70 proteins are induced in cells in response to denatured proteins that occur as a result of temporary energy failure. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is also induced after focal ischemia in regions that can extend beyond the HSP70 induction. The region of HIF induction is proposed to represent the areas of decreased cerebral blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery. Immediate early genes are induced in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain regions. These distant changes in gene expression occur because of ischemia-induced spreading depression or depolarization and could contribute to plastic changes in brain after stroke. PMID:10908035

  10. Alterations of voltage-dependent K(+) channels in the mesenteric artery during the early and chronic phases of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Da Hye; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Kim, Han Sol; Son, Youn Kyoung; Yang, Se-Ran; Park, Jeong-Ran; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Firth, Amy L; Na, Sung Hun; Park, Won Sun

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the alteration of voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells from control (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) and diabetic (Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty [OLETF]) rats during the early and chronic phases of diabetes. We demonstrated alterations in the mesenteric Kv channels during the early and chronic phase of diabetes using the patch-clamp technique, the arterial tone measurement system, and RT-PCR in Long-Evans Tokushima (LETO; for control) and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF; for diabetes) type 2 diabetic model rats. In the early phase of diabetes, the amplitude of mesenteric Kv currents induced by depolarizing pulses was greater in OLETF rats than in LETO rats. The contractile response of the mesenteric artery induced by the Kv inhibitor, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), was also greater in OLETF rats. The expression of most Kv subtypes- including Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kv2.1, Kv3.2, Kv4.1, Kv4.3, Kv5.1, Kv6.2, Kv8.1, Kv9.3, and Kv10.1-were increased in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle from OLETF rats compared with LETO rats. However, in the chronic phase of diabetes, the Kv current amplitude did not differ between LETO and OLETF rats. In addition, the 4-AP-induced contractile response of the mesenteric artery and the expression of Kv subtypes did not differ between the two groups. The increased Kv current amplitude and Kv channel-related contractile response were attributable to the increase in Kv channel expression during the early phase of diabetes. The increased Kv current amplitude and Kv channel-related contractile response were reversed during the chronic phase of diabetes. PMID:27218229

  11. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of coeliac artery stenosis in the treatment of mesenteric angina: a case report and review of therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, A; Teo, N B; Pickford, I R; Moss, J G

    2000-12-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old gentleman with mesenteric angina who was successfully treated with stenting of a coeliac artery stenosis using a Palmaz stent, and review the therapeutic options in the management of mesenteric angina. PMID:11153434

  12. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-05-16

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  13. Mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction and hyperhomocysteinemia due to homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype.

    PubMed

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Andercou, Octavian; Andercou, Aurel

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 30-year-old man with bowel infarction due to mesenteric venous thrombosis and multiple risk factors, including mild hyperhomocysteinemia due to methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and recent abdominal surgery, is reported. His clinical manifestation consisted of persistent abdominal pain; complementary examinations showed nonspecific findings such as leukocytosis and dilated loops of the bowel. The diagnosis of mesenteric venous thrombosis with bowel infarction was made during laparotomy and confirmed by anatomopathologic examination. He underwent segmental resection associated with lifelong anticoagulant therapy and vitamin B supplementation with a favorable course. PMID:19000982

  14. Retrograde Stenting Under Transmesenteric Angiographic Guidance of an Occluded Superior Mesenteric Vein to Treat Life-Threatening Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kelay, Arun; Morgan-Rowe, Luke; Constantinou, Jason; Malago, Massimo; Ivancev, Krassi

    2016-02-01

    Midgut carcinoid tumors (MCTs) are responsible for a range of mesenteric vascular complications and may rarely manifest with gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage. Endovascular approaches are particularly useful for this population, as surgery is often technically difficult. We report a case of life-threatening upper GI bleeding in a 50-year-old man previously diagnosed with an MCT in the small bowel mesentery. Computed tomography angiogram revealed an MCT obstructing the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) associated with multiple large collateral vessels. The patient underwent retrograde stenting of the obstructed SMV using a combined open and endovascular approach to successfully terminate the persistent GI bleeding. PMID:26657192

  15. De-misty-fying the mesentery: an algorithmic approach to neoplastic and non-neoplastic mesenteric abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Taffel, Myles T; Khati, Nadia J; Hai, Nabila; Yaghmai, Vahid; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Mesenteric abnormalities are often incidentally discovered on cross-sectional imaging performed during daily clinical practice. Findings can range from the vague "misty mesentery" to solid masses, and the possible etiologic causes encompass a wide spectrum of underlying pathologies including infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic processes. Unfortunately, the clinical and imaging findings are often non-specific and may overlap. This article discusses the various diseases that result in mesenteric abnormalities. It provides a framework to non-invasively differentiate these entities, when possible. PMID:24633598

  16. Combined transmesenteric and transhepatic recanalization of chronic portal and mesenteric vein occlusion to treat bleeding duodenal varices.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Saher S; Caldwell, Stephen H; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Maluf, Daniel G; Angle, John F; Saad, Wael E

    2014-08-01

    Two patients presented with bleeding duodenal varices secondary to mesenteric and portal vein chronic occlusion. After a failed transhepatic recanalization, a combined transmesenteric and transhepatic approach was used to recanalize the chronic portal and mesenteric venous obstruction. The occluded segment was treated with transmesenteric stent placement in one patient and stent placement and coil embolization of varices in the second patient. Follow-up imaging and endoscopy showed decompression of the duodenal varices in both patients and absence of further bleeding episodes. PMID:25085062

  17. TLR4-HMGB1-, MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling in mouse intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; He, Gui-Zhen; Wang, Yu-Kang; Zhu, Qian-Kun; Chen, Wei; Guo, Tai

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize high-mobility group protein 1-toll-like receptor 4 (HMGB1-TLR4) and downstream signaling pathways in intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. METHODS: Forty specific-pathogen-free male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 per group): sham, control, anti-HMGB1, anti-myeloid differentiation gene 88 (MyD88), and anti-translocating-chain-associating membrane protein (TRIF) antibody groups. Vehicle with the control IgG antibody, anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, or anti-TRIF antibodies (all 1 mg/kg, 0.025%) were injected via the caudal vein 30 min prior to ischemia. After anesthetization, the abdominal wall was opened and the superior mesenteric artery was exposed, followed by 60 min mesenteric ischemia and then 60 min reperfusion. For the sham group, the abdominal wall was opened for 120 min without I/R. Levels of serum nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured, along with myeloperoxidase activity in the lung and liver. In addition,morphologic changes that occurred in the lung and intestinal tissues were evaluated. Levels of mRNA transcripts encoding HMGB1 and NF-κB were measured by real-time quantitative PCR, and levels of HMGB1 and NF-κB protein were measured by Western blot. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Blocking HMGB1, MyD88, and TRIF expression by injecting anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, or anti-TRIF antibodies prior to ischemia reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in serum; NF-κB p65: 104.64 ± 11.89, 228.53 ± 24.85, 145.00 ± 33.63, 191.12 ± 13.22, and 183.73 ± 10.81 (P < 0.05); IL-6: 50.02 ± 6.33, 104.91 ± 31.18, 62.28 ± 6.73, 85.90 ± 17.37, and 78.14 ± 7.38 (P < 0.05); TNF-α, 43.79 ± 4.18, 70.81 ± 6.97, 52.76 ± 5.71, 63.19 ± 5.47, and 59.70 ± 4.63 (P < 0.05) for the sham, control, anti-HMGB1, anti-MyD88, and anti-TRIF groups, respectively (all in pg/mL).Antibodies also alleviated tissue injury in the lung and

  18. Pulmonary leukosequestration induced by hind limb ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Anner, H; Kaufman, R P; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1987-01-01

    Lower torso ischemia leads to acute respiratory failure, an event associated with the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lungs. This study tests whether ischemia-induced eicosanoid synthesis leads to polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation in the lungs. Anesthetized rats (N = 51) were randomized into five groups: nonischemic sham rats (N = 10); the remaining four groups were rats made ischemic for 4 hours with bilateral thigh tourniquets treated just before tourniquet release with saline vehicle (N = 17): the thromboxane (Tx) synthase inhibitor OKY-046 (Ono Pharmaceutica, Osaka, Japan) 2 mg/kg intravenously every 2 hours (N = 8); the lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine (DEC) (Sigma, St. Louis, MO) 0.2 mg/kg/min intravenously (N = 8); the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist SRI (Sandoz Inc., East Hanover, NJ) 63-072 3 mg/kg intravenously every 30 minutes (N = 8). Four hours after ischemia, plasma TxB2 levels in the ischemic placebo-treated group was 3570 +/- 695 pg/mL, compared with 495 +/- 73 pg/mL in sham rats (p less than 0.001). Lung microscopy showed foci of proteinaceous exudate in alveoli and 121 +/- 10 PMN/20 high power fields (HPF) compared with 59 +/- 9 PMN/20 HPF in the sham group (p less than 0.001). One day after ischemia PMN accumulations remained elevated at 119 PMN/20 HPF. Pretreatment with OKY-046 led to reduced TxB2 levels of 149 +/- 17 pg/mL, normal lung histology, and 83 +/- 13 PMN/20 HPF, a value similar to that of the sham group and lower than that of the placebo-treated group (p less than 0.05). Treatment with DEC yielded TxB2 levels of 1419 +/- 492 pg/mL, which was lower than that of the placebo group (p less than 0.05) but higher than that of the sham group (p less than 0.05). Microscopy showed normal lungs with 79 +/- 7 PMN/20 HPF lower than the placebo group (p less than 0.05). SRI 63-072 did not inhibit Tx synthesis or leukosequestration in the lungs. Platelet counts decreased in all groups relative to sham

  19. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI. PMID:26945375

  20. Characterization and mesenteric lymph node cells-mediated immunomodulatory activity of litchi pulp polysaccharide fractions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Zhang, Ruifen; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Juan; Su, Dongxiao; Yi, Yang; Wang, Guangjin; Wei, Zhencheng; Zhang, Mingwei

    2016-11-01

    Three water-soluble hetero-polysaccharides, designated LP1-3, were isolated from litchi pulp. Their structures, solution properties and immunomodulatory activities were evaluated. LP1 contained (1→4,6)-β-d-Glc and (1→4)-α-l-Gal, while LP2 contained (1→3)-α-l-Ara and (l→2)-β-d-Gal, and LP3 contained α-l-Ara and (l→4)-β-Rha. Their molecular weights ranged from 105,880 to 986,470g/mol. LP1 had a spherical conformation with hyper-branched structure and LP2 was semi-flexible chain, while the polysaccharide chains of LP3 were cross linked to form network-like conformation in solution. In addition, all fractions strongly stimulated mesenteric lymph node cell proliferation, IFN-γ and IL-6 secretion in the dose range of 25-100μg/mL compared with untreated control group (p<0.05). LP1 exhibited the strongest stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, which may be attributed to its unique chemical structure and chain conformation. This is the first report on the solution properties and intestinal immunity activities of polysaccharides from litchi pulp. PMID:27516297

  1. Adaptation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels to prolonged changes in transmural pressure.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Nguyen, T L; Quick, C M; Hardy, J; Laine, G A; Wilson, E; Stewart, R H

    2013-07-15

    In vitro studies have revealed that acute increases in transmural pressure increase lymphatic vessel contractile function. However, adaptive responses to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo have not been reported. Therefore, we developed a novel bovine mesenteric lymphatic partial constriction model to test the hypothesis that lymphatic vessels exposed to higher transmural pressures adapt functionally to become stronger pumps than vessels exposed to lower transmural pressures. Postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels were partially constricted for 3 days. On postoperative day 3, constricted vessels were isolated, and divided into upstream (UP) and downstream (DN) segment groups, and instrumented in an isolated bath. Although there were no differences between the passive diameters of the two groups, both diastolic diameter and systolic diameter were significantly larger in the UP group than in the DN group. The pump index of the UP group was also higher than that in the DN group. In conclusion, this is the first work to report how lymphatic vessels adapt to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo. Our results suggest that vessel segments upstream of the constriction adapt to become both better fluid conduits and lymphatic pumps than downstream segments. PMID:23666672

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for superior mesenteric artery syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yao, Si-Yuan; Mikami, Ryuichi; Mikami, Sakae

    2015-12-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is defined as a compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the abdominal aorta and the overlying SMA. SMA syndrome associated with anorexia nervosa has been recognized, mainly among young female patients. The excessive weight loss owing to the eating disorder sometimes results in a reduced aorto-mesenteric angle and causes duodenal obstruction. Conservative treatment, including psychiatric and nutritional management, is recommended as initial therapy. If conservative treatment fails, surgery is often required. Currently, traditional open bypass surgery has been replaced by laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy as a curative surgical approach. However, single incision laparoscopic approach is rarely performed. A 20-year-old female patient with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and SMA syndrome was prepared for surgery after failed conservative management. As the patient had body image concerns, a single incision laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy was performed to achieve minimal scarring. As a result, good perioperative outcomes and cosmetic results were achieved. We show the first case of a young patient with SMA syndrome who was successfully treated by single incision laparoscopic duodenojejunostomy. This minimal invasive surgery would be beneficial for other patients with SMA syndrome associated with anorexia nervosa, in terms of both surgical and cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26668518

  3. Spontaneous superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Watring, Nicole J; Smith, Corbett M; Stokes, Gordon K; Counselman, Francis L

    2010-11-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department with a 4-day history of severe, sharp left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting. She had been seen 3 days prior at another Emergency Department, and had a negative work-up including a normal non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis for possible kidney stone. Vital signs were: temperature 36.3°C (97.3°F), pulse 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure 141/80 mm Hg. Physical examination was remarkable for marked tenderness in the left upper and middle quadrants and voluntary guarding. Bowel sounds were normal. Although laboratory studies were normal, a CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast suggested a superior mesenteric artery dissection. This was confirmed with arteriography. The clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of superior mesenteric artery dissection are reviewed. PMID:18180132

  4. Transcript analysis of a goat mesenteric lymph node by deep next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides a practical and inexpensive alternative for exploring genomic data in non-model organisms. The functional annotation of non-model mammalian genomes, such as that of goats, is still poor compared to that of humans and mice. In the current study, we performed a whole transcriptome analysis of an intestinal mucous membrane lymph node to comprehensively characterize the transcript catalogue of this tissue in a goat. Using an Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing platform, 9.692 GB of raw reads were acquired. A total of 57,526 lymph transcripts were obtained, and the majority of these were mapped to known transcriptional units (42.67%). A comparison of the mRNA expression of the mesenteric lymph nodes during the juvenile and post-adolescent stages revealed 8949 transcripts that were differentially expressed, including 6174 known genes. In addition, we functionally classified these transcripts using Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms. A total of 6174 known genes were assigned to 64 GO terms, and 3782 genes were assigned to 303 KEGG pathways, including some related to immunity. Our results reveal the complex transcriptome profile of the lymph node and suggest that the immune system is immature in the mesenteric lymph nodes of juvenile goats. PMID:27173308

  5. The superior mesenteric artery. The critical factor in the pouch pull-through procedure.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Friend, W G; Medwell, S J

    1984-11-01

    The critical factor in ileal pouch pull-through operations is the length of the superior mesenteric artery. The pouch must reach the dentate line and have adequate blood supply. A series of cadaver and morgue studies were performed to evaluate the two most popular pouches of the "J" and "S" configurations. The "S" pouch generally reaches 2 to 4 cm more caudad than the "J" pouch. If necessary, however, the "J" pouch can be lengthened 2 to 4 cm by cutting the branch vessel under tension to the pouch, sparing vessels to either side and the marginal arcade. The "S" pouch procedure always sacrifices the ileocecal artery, but the "J" pouch procedure does not necessarily do so. The greatest caudad reach is available when the ileum is cut flush with the cecum. To verify a rule of thumb for reaching the dentate line with the pouch, the length of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) origin to the inferior margin of the symphysis pubis and the SMA to dentate line were compared. If the tip of the pouch or conduit reached 6 cm below the symphysis pubis, all pouches reached the dentate line. PMID:6499610

  6. Influence of oestrous cycle and pregnancy on the reactivity of the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Dalle Lucca, J J; Adeagbo, A S; Alsip, N L

    2000-04-01

    In isolated, perfused mesenteric vascular beds from female rats, it was assessed whether the constrictor response to cirazoline, an alpha(1)-adrenergic agonist, or acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation was altered by oestrous cycle or pregnancy and the ability of nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to modulate these responses. Mesenteries, removed from female rats on each oestrous cycle day and gestation day 16, were perfused with physiological salt solution. Tone was induced with cirazoline (1 micromol/l), and concentration-response curves to ACh generated. Responsiveness to ACh was tested in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), ibuprofen (IBU) and tetrabutylammonium (TBA), to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclo-oxygenase and K(+) channels respectively. Cirazoline-induced tone was smaller in pro-oestrous and pregnant groups, but the increase in tone to L-NA was larger in pregnant compared with oestrous and dioestrous groups. Control responses to ACh were not different, but L-NA attenuated the response in virgin groups only. IBU did not affect the ACh response, but TBA attenuated it in all groups. When TBA was introduced first, ACh-induced dilatation was significantly reduced and not altered by L-NA addition. These results suggest that in the mesenteric vascular bed from cycling and pregnant rats, EDHF is the major mediator of ACh-induced dilatation and NOS may be up-regulated in pregnant and pro-oestrous rats. PMID:10739850

  7. Superior mesenteric artery (Wilkie's) syndrome: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal system obstruction.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Abdullah; Uslukaya, Omer; Ülger, Burak Veli; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Bahadır, Mehmet Veysi; Bozdag, Zubeyir; Böyük, Abdullah; Göya, Cemil

    2016-04-01

    Background Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) results from the compression of the third part of the duodenum between the aorta and the proximal part of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Clinical presentation of SMAS is characterized by the dilatation of the proximal part of the third part of the duodenum. SMAS is a rare cause of the upper gastrointestinal system (UGS) obstruction. In this study, we aimed to present our clinical experience in the treatment of five patients with SMAS, which is a rare clinical condition requiring surgery. Patients and methods The retrospective study included five patients who were treated due to SMAS at our clinic between January 2010 and January 2014. Results All the patients were underweight, with a mean BMI of 15.73 (14-16). The clinical symptoms included epigastric pain after food intake, large volume bilious emesis, early satiety, failure to gain weight, indigestion, esophageal reflux, sense of fullness, and persistent weight loss. SMAS was diagnosed using barium meal studies, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, abdominal ultrasonography, and CT angiography. Four patients underwent duodenojejunostomy and one patient was managed with gastrojejunostomy. No complication was observed during the postoperative period, and all the patients achieved significant improvement in symptoms. Conclusion SMAS is a rare cause of UGS obstruction, and the diagnosis of SMAS is often delayed. SMAS should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of the patients with unsubstantiated symptoms of persistent nausea, emesis, and significant weight loss. PMID:27385294

  8. Involvement of histamine in endothelium-dependent relaxation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Maejima, Daisuke; Nagai, Takashi; Bridenbaugh, Eric; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The knowledge of the basic principles of lymphatic function, still remains, to a large degree, rudimentary and will require significant research efforts. Recent studies of the physiology of the mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) suggested the presence of an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) other than nitric oxide. In this study we tested the hypothesis that lymphatic endothelium-derived histamine relaxes MLVs. Methods We measured and analyzed parameters of lymphatic contractility in isolated and pressurized rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels under control conditions and after pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 100 μM) or/and histamine production by α-methyl-DL-histidine dihydrochloride (α-MHD, 10 μM). Effectiveness of α-MHD was confirmed immunohistochemically. We also used immunohistochemical labeling and western blot analysis of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Additionally we blocked HDC protein expression in MLVs by transient transfection with vivo-morpholino oligos. Results We found that only combined pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide and histamine production completely eliminates flow-dependent relaxation of lymphatic vessels, thus confirming a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. We also confirmed the presence of histidine decarboxylase and histamine inside lymphatic endothelial cells. Conclusions Our study supports a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. PMID:24750494

  9. The effects of hindlimb unweighting on the capacitance of rat small mesenteric veins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Brooks-Asplund, E. M.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. Mesenteric veins are critical in modulating cardiac filling through venoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simulated microgravity on the capacitance of rat mesenteric small veins. We constructed pressure-diameter relationships from vessels of 21-day hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rats and control rats by changing the internal pressure and measuring the external diameter. Pressure-diameter relationships were obtained both before and after stimulation with norepinephrine (NE). The pressure-diameter curves of HLU vessels were shifted to larger diameters than control vessels. NE (10(-4) M) constricted veins from control animals such that the pressure-diameter relationship was significantly shifted downward (i.e., to smaller diameters at equal pressure). NE had no effect on vessels from HLU animals. These results indicate that, after HLU, unstressed vascular volume may be increased and can no longer decrease in response to sympathetic stimulation. This may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in cardiac output and stroke volume seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  10. The nature of the natural killer (NK) cell of human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; Jewell, D P

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of the mononuclear cell (MNC) from human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node mediating anti-K-562 activity with that of peripheral blood has been assessed. Depletion of macrophages did not alter the measured cytotoxicity confirming that the effector cells were lymphocytes. Complement lysis of Leu 7 and Leu 11b coated cells reduced intestinal natural killer (NK) activity by a similar degree to that of peripheral blood but mesenteric lymph node NK activity was affected to a lesser extent. The response in NK activity of mucosal and nodal MNC to short incubation with lymphoblastoid interferon was similar to that for peripheral blood MNC. Twenty-four hours incubation of MNC with low concentrations of purified interleukin-2 (IL-2) consistently augmented intestinal and nodal NK activity but failed to augment that of peripheral blood MNC. No differences between the inhibitory effects of cAMP and prostaglandin E2 on NK activity from the three sites were seen. In addition, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase activity with indomethacin had no effect on NK activity of intestinal and peripheral blood MNC while the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, suppressed intestinal and peripheral blood NK activity similarly. In conclusion, anti-K-562 activity by intestinal MNC is mediated by NK cells with similar phenotypic and functional properties to those of peripheral blood. However, the increased sensitivity of mucosal NK cells to IL-2 suggests that higher proportions of NK cell precursors may be present in intestinal MNC populations. PMID:2412737

  11. Chemiluminescence response induced by mesenteric ischaemia/reperfusion: effect of antioxidative compounds ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nosál'ová, Viera; Sotníková, Ružena; Drábiková, Katarína; Fialová, Silvia; Košťálová, Daniela; Banášová, Silvia; Navarová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) play an important role in human pathophysiology as they occur in many clinical conditions and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Interruption of blood supply rapidly damages metabolically active tissues. Restoration of blood flow after a period of ischaemia may further worsen cell injury due to an increased formation of free radicals. The aim of our work was to assess macroscopically the extent of intestinal pathological changes caused by mesenteric I/R, and to study free radical production by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) of ileal samples. In further experiments, the antioxidative activity of the drugs tested was evaluated spectrophotometrically by the use of the DPPH radical. We studied the potential protective ex vivo effect of the plant origin compound arbutin as well as of the pyridoindole stobadine and its derivative SMe1EC2. I/R induced pronounced haemorrhagic intestinal injury accompanied by increase of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGA) activity. Compared to sham operated (control) rats, there was only a slight increase of CL response after I/R, probably in association with neutrophil increase, indicated by enhanced MPO activity. All compounds significantly reduced the peak values of CL responses of the ileal samples ex vivo, thus reducing the I/R induced increase of free radical production. The antioxidants studied showed a similar inhibitory effect on the CL response influenced by mesenteric I/R. If proved in vivo, these compounds would represent potentially useful therapeutic antioxidants. PMID:21217883

  12. Antioxidant Potential of the Methanol Extract of Parquetina nigrescens Mediates Protection Against Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinrinmade, Fadeyemi J; Akinrinde, Akinleye S; Soyemi, Olubisi O; Oyagbemi, Ademola A

    2016-01-01

    Parquetina nigrescens is a medicinal herb with recognized antioxidant properties and potential to alleviate conditions associated with oxidative stress, including gastric ulcers. We investigated the protective potential of methanol extract of Parquetina nigrescens (MEPN) against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the intestine of rats. Thirty (30) male Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned into five groups with Group I made up of control rats and Group II consisting of rats experimentally subjected to ischemia and reperfusion (IR) by clamping of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 30 minutes and 45 minutes, respectively. Groups III and IV rats also had IR, but were initially pre-treated with MEPN at 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg respectively, for seven days. Rats in Group V were also pre-treated with Vitamin C, for seven days, before induction of IR. The results showed marked reduction in intestinal epithelial lesions in groups treated with MEPN, compared to the IR group which had severe villi erosion, inflammatory cell infiltration and hemorrhages. There were significant increases in Malondialdehyde (MDA) and significant reductions in reduced glutathione (GSH) and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity with IR injury, while pre-treatment with either MEPN or Vitamin C prevented these effects. Increases in Glutathione peroxidase (GPX), Catalase (CAT) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) with IR provided evidence for adaptive responses to oxidative injury during IR and preservation of enzyme activity by MEPN and Vitamin C. Taken together, Parquetina nigrescens provided considerable alleviation of intestinal injury produced by IR, at values much as effective as that offered by Vitamin C. PMID:26634775

  13. Experimental Study on the Effect of Intravenous Stem Cell Therapy on Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Induced Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Azza; Metwally, Hala Gabr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The myocyte death that follows intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major factor contributing to high mortality and morbidity in ischemic heart disease. The purpose of stem cell (SC) therapy for myocardial infarction is to improve clinical outcomes. The present study aimed at investigating the possible therapeutic effect of intravenous human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (HCBMSCs) on intestinal ischemia reperfusion induced cardiac muscle injury in albino rat. Methods and Results: Thirty male albino rats were divided equally into control (Sham-operated) group, I/R group where rats were exposed to superior mesenteric artery ligation for 1 hour followed by 1 hour reperfusion. In SC therapy group, the rats were injected with HCBMSCs into the tail vein. The rats were sacrificed four weeks following therapy. Cardiac muscle sections were exposed to histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies. In I/R group, multiple fibers exhibited deeply acidophilic sarcoplasm with lost striations and multiple fibroblasts appeared among the muscle fibers. In SC therapy group, few fibers appeared with deeply acidophilic sarcoplasm and lost striations. Mean area of muscle fibers with deeply acidophilic sarcoplasm and mean area% of fibroblasts were significantly decreased compared to I/R group. Prussion blue and CD105 positive cells were found in SC therapy group among the muscle fibers, inside and near blood vessels. Conclusions: Intestinal I/R induced cardiac muscle degenerative changes. These changes were ameliorated following HCBMSC therapy. A reciprocal relation was recorded between the extent of regeneration and the existence of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:24386556

  14. Pretreatment of cromolyn sodium prior to reperfusion attenuates early reperfusion injury after the small intestine ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Zi-Qing; Gan, Xiao-Liang; Luo, Gang-Jian; Li, Shang-Rong; Cai, Jun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Cromolyn Sodium (CS) pretreated prior to reperfusion on the activity of intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) and mucous membrane of the small intestine in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of rats. METHODS: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham group (group S), model group (group M), high and low dosage of CS groups, (treated with CS 50 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg, group C1 and C2). Intestinal IR damage was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. CS was intravenouly administrated 15 min before reperfusion. Ultrastructure and counts of IMMC, intestinal structure, the expression of tryptase, levels of malondisldehyde (MDA), TNF-α, histamine and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the small intestine were detected at the end of experiment. RESULTS: The degranulation of IMMC was seen in group M and was attenuated by CS treatment. Chiu’s score of group M was higher than the other groups. CS could attenuate the up-regulation of the Chiu’s score, the levels of MDA, TNF-α, and expression of tryptase and the down-regulation of SOD activity and histamine concentration. The Chiu’s score and MDA content were negatively correlated, while SOD activity was positively correlated to the histamine concentration respectively in the IR groups. CONCLUSION: Pretreated of CS prior to reperfusion protects the small intestine mucous from ischemia-reperfusion damage, the mechanism is inhibited IMMC from degranulation. PMID:17876882

  15. Mesenteric angiography

    MedlinePlus

    The x-ray table is hard and cold. You may ask for a blanket or pillow. You may feel a brief sting when the numbing medicine (anesthetic) is given. You will feel a brief sharp pain and some pressure as ...

  16. Myocardial ischemia--association with perioperative cardiac morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The development of ambulatory electrocardiographic recorders and analysers and the application of transesophageal echocardiography in the mid-1980's enabled investigators to quantify and describe the occurrence of silent as well as symptomatic ischemia in the perioperative period. Several technical advances which have recently occurred in ECG monitoring include the use of miniaturized digital computing equipment to store and analyze data. In addition, real time ST-segment analysis has become widely available on multicomponent monitors in both the operating room and intensive care units. The incidence of perioperative myocardial ischemia depends on the patient population, the surgical procedure, and the monitoring technique used. Several studies in the early 1990's have shown that cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing major, noncardiac surgery is best predicted by postoperative myocardial ischemia, rather than tradition preoperative clinical predictors. Long duration postoperative ischemia may be the factor most significantly associated with adverse cardiac outcome. Postoperative pain, physiological and emotional stress may all combine to cause tachycardia, hypertension, increase in cardiac output, and fluid shifts which, in high risk patients, might result in subendocardial ischemia and eventual myocardial infarction. If postoperative myocardial ischemia is the cause of late postoperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, then treatment of postoperative myocardial ischemia should reduce morbidity. In addition, reducing pain and stress and avoiding postoperative hypoxemia might prevent postoperative myocardial ischemia and minimize the need for extensive preoperative cardiac evaluation. PMID:7825338

  17. Interaction of isoflavones and endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract on vasoactivity of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It was hypothesized that isoflavones may attenuate ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and possibly alleviate diminished contractility of vasculature after exposure to ergot alkaloids. The objective of this study was to determine if prior incubation of bovine mesenteric vasculature with the isof...

  18. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-11-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed.

  19. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not. PMID:26264109

  20. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Management by Endovascular Stent-Graft Placement and Transluminal Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michael J. Choi, Eugene; McRae, Stephen; Madoff, David C.; Ahrar, Kamran; Pisters, Peter

    2007-06-15

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare and potentially fatal postoperative complication. Herein we present a case of a large post-pancreaticoduodenectomy SMA pseudoaneurysm that required thrombin injection after initial stent-graft deployment to accomplish complete pseudoaneurysm occlusion.

  1. Influence of Ketotifen, Cromolyn Sodium, and Compound 48/80 on the survival rates after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zi-qing, Hei; Xiao-liang, Gan; Pin-jie, Huang; Jing, Wei; Ning, Shen; Wan-ling, Gao

    2008-01-01

    Background Mast cells were associated with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, the study was to observe the influence of Ketotifen, Cromolyn Sdium(CS), and Compound 48/80(CP) on the survival rates on the third day after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Methods 120 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, Sham-operated group (group S), model group (group M), group K, group C and group CP. Intestinal damage was triggered by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 75 minutes, group K, C, and CP were treated with kotifen 1 mg·kg-1, CS 50 mg·kg-1, and CP 0.75 mg·kg-1 i.v. at 5 min before reperfusion and once daily for three days following reperfusion respectively. Survival rate in each group was recorded during the three days after reperfusion. All the surviving rats were killed for determining the concentration of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase(AST), glutamic pyruvic transaminase(ALT), the ratio of AST compare ALT(S/L), total protein(TP), albumin(ALB), globulin(GLB), the ratio of ALB compare GLB(A/G), phosphocreatine kinase(CK), lactate dehydrogenase(LDH), urea nitrogen(BUN) and creatinine(CRE) at the 3rd day after reperfusion. And ultrastructure of IMMC, Chiu's score, lung histology, IMMC counts, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 of the small intestine were detected at the same time. Results Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury reduced the survival rate. The concentrations of TP, ALB and level of IL-10 in intestine in group M decreased significantly while the concentrations of S/L, LDH and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestine increased significantly compared with group S (P < 0.05). Treatment with Ketotifen and CS increased the survival rate compared with group M (P < 0.05), attenuated the down-regulation or up-regulation of the above index (P < 0.05). Treatment with CP decreased the survival rate on the 3rd day after reperfusion compared with group M(P < 0.05). Group K and C had better

  2. Glibenclamide in Cerebral Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Simard, J. Marc; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor; Stern, Barney J.; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Jacobson, Sven; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1)–transient receptor potential 4 (Trpm4) channel is an important molecular element in focal cerebral ischemia. The channel is upregulated in all cells of the neurovascular unit following ischemia, and is linked to microvascular dysfunction that manifests as edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, which cause brain swelling. Activation of the channel is a major molecular mechanism of cytotoxic edema and “accidental necrotic cell death.” Blockade of Sur1 using glibenclamide has been studied in different types of rat models of stroke: (i) in conventional non-lethal models (thromboembolic, 1–2 h temporary, or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion), glibenclamide reduces brain swelling and infarct volume and improves neurological function; (ii) in lethal models of malignant cerebral edema, glibenclamide reduces edema, brain swelling, and mortality; (iii) in models with rtPA, glibenclamide reduces swelling, hemorrhagic transformation, and death. Retrospective studies of diabetic patients who present with stroke have shown that those whose diabetes is managed with a sulfonylurea drug and who are maintained on the sulfonylurea drug during hospitalization for stroke have better outcomes at discharge and are less likely to suffer hemorrhagic transformation. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the basic science, preclinical experiments, and retrospective clinical studies on glibenclamide in focal cerebral ischemia and stroke. We also compare the preclinical work in stroke models to the updated recommendations of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR). The findings reviewed here provide a strong foundation for a translational research program to study glibenclamide in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:24132564

  3. Mesenteric lymph duct ligation prevents trauma/hemorrhage shock-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Justin T.; Lee, Marlon A.; Caputo, Francis J.; Kawai, Kentaro; Badami, Chirag; Kawai, Tomoko; Deitch, Edwin A.; Yatani, Atsuko

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that trauma combined with hemorrhage shock (T/HS) is associated with myocardial contractile dysfunction. However, the initial events triggering the cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated. Thus we tested the hypothesis that factors carried in intestinal (mesenteric) lymph contribute to negative inotropic effects in rats subjected to a laparotomy (T) plus hemorrhagic shock (HS; mean arterial blood pressure of 30–40 Torr for 90 min) using a Langendorff isolated heart preparation. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed 24 h after trauma plus sham shock (T/SS) or T/HS by recording the LV developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP rise and fall ( ± dP/dtmax) in five groups of rats: 1) naive noninstrumented rats, 2) rats subjected to T/SS, 3) rats subjected to T/HS, 4) rats subjected to T/SS with mesenteric lymph duct ligation (T/SS+LDL), or 5) rats subjected to T/HS+LDL. Cardiac function was comparable in hearts from naive, T/SS, and T/SS+LDL rats. Both LVDP and ± dP/dtmax were significantly depressed after T/HS. The T/HS hearts also manifested a blunted responsiveness to increases in coronary flow rates and Ca2+, and this was prevented by LDL preceding T/HS. Although electrocardiograms were normal under physiological conditions, when the T/HS hearts were perfused with low Ca2+ levels (∼0.5 mM), prolonged P-R intervals and second-degree plus Wenckebach-type atrioventricular blocks were observed. No such changes occurred in the control or T/HS+LDL hearts. The effects of T/HS were similar to those of the Ca2+ channel antagonist diltiazem, indicating that an impairment of cellular Ca2+ handling contributes to T/HS-induced cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, gut-derived factors carried in mesenteric lymph are responsible for acute T/HS-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:19008486

  4. Superior Mesenteric Arterial Flow Pattern is Associated with Major Adverse Events in Adults with Fontan Circulation.

    PubMed

    Mori, Makoto; Shioda, Kayoko; Elder, Robert W; Pernetz, Maria A; Rodriguez, Fred H; Rangosch, Alicia; Kogon, Brian E; Book, Wendy M

    2016-08-01

    Factors contributing to the failure of Fontan circulation in adults are poorly understood. Reduced superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) flow has been identified in pediatric Fontan patients with protein-losing enteropathy. SMA flow has not been profiled in an adult Fontan population and its association with adverse events is unknown. We aimed to examine associations between SMA flow patterns and adverse events in adult Fontan patients. We performed a retrospective review of adult Fontan patients who underwent echocardiograms between 2008 and 2014. SMA Doppler data included peak systolic and end-diastolic velocity and velocity time integral (VTI). Systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio and resistive index were calculated. The relationship between SMA flow parameters and major adverse events (death or transplantation) was examined using proportional hazard Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meyer analysis was conducted to construct survival curve of patients with and without adverse events. 91 post-Fontan adult patients (76 % systemic left ventricle, 20 % atriopulmonary Fontan, mean age 27.9 years) were analyzed. Adverse events occurred in nine patients (death = 4, transplant = 5). When compared with the non-event group, the event group had increased end-diastolic velocity [hazard ratio (HR) 1.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.8; p = 0.002], increased systolic VTI (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-2.2, p = 0.02), increased diastolic VTI (HR 1.7, 95 % CI 1.2-2.4, p = 0.004), decreased S/D velocity ratio (HR 0.32, 95 % CI 0.14-0.71, p = 0.006), decreased S/D VTI ratio (HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.61-0.97, p = 0.02), and decreased resistive index (HR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.14-0.60, p = 0.0007). Increased end-diastolic velocity and VTI in mesenteric arterial flow, with lower systolic/diastolic ratio and resistive index, were associated with death and need for heart transplant in adult Fontan patients. The mesenteric hyperemic flow was also associated with clinical signs of portal

  5. Digital ischemia as a manifestation of malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, L M; Hauty, M G; Edwards, J M; Porter, J M

    1987-01-01

    The association of malignancy with thrombotic disorders of the arterial and venous systems is well described. To date, however, there are only 23 published case reports of digital gangrene associated with malignancy. During a prospective evaluation of over 700 patients with finger ischemia, there were five patients with finger gangrene associated with malignancy. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluation, including detailed immunologic survey and hand angiography, allowed establishment of the precise mechanisms responsible for vascular occlusions in each patient. Three mechanisms were identified: arteritis, hyperviscosity, and hypercoagulability. Digital gangrene associated with malignancy is a rare condition, the mechanism for which can be deduced by careful diagnostic evaluation. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3606232

  6. Repeated early thrombolysis in cervical spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Etgen, Thorleif; Höcherl, Constanze

    2016-07-01

    Specific therapy of acute spinal ischemia is not established. We report the first case of an MRI-verified cervical spinal ischemia treated by thrombolysis and review the literature. A 72-year old woman with right-sided motor hemiparesis and trunk ataxia was treated by intravenous thrombolysis with full recovery. Three days later she developed again a severe right-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis and a second off-label intravenous thrombolysis was repeated. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right-sided posterior-lateral cervical spinal ischemia. Spinal ischemia may clinically present with a cerebral-stroke-like picture challenging diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Systemic thrombolysis might be a treatment option in acute spinal ischemia. In addition, early repeated systemic thrombolysis may be considered in selected strokes. PMID:26762860

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Are Involved in Regulating Hypocontractility of Mesenteric Artery to Norepinephrine in Cirrhotic Rats with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liu, De-Jun; Huo, Yan-Miao; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress is involved in the hypocontractility of visceral artery to vasoconstrictors and formation of hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhosis with portal hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the mesenteric artery contractility in CCl4-induced cirrhotic rats, and the roles of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) desensitization and RhoA /Rho associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) pathways. Methods: The mesenteric artery contraction to norepinephrine (NE) was determined by vessel perfusion system following treatments with apocynin, tempol or PEG-catalase. The protein expression of α1 adrenergic receptor, β-arrestin-2, ROCK-1, moesin and p-moesin was measured by western blot. The interaction between α1 adrenergic receptor and β-arrestin-2 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. Results: Pretreatment with apocynin or PEG-catalase in cirrhotic rats, the hydrogen peroxide level in the mesenteric arteriole was significantly decreased, and the dose-response curve of mesenteric arteriole to NE moved to the left with EC50 decreased. There was no significant change for the expression of α1 adrenergic receptor. However, the protein expression of β-arrestin-2 and its affinity with α1 adrenergic receptor were significantly decreased. The ROCK-1 activity and anti- Y-27632 inhibition in cirrhotic rats increased significantly with the protein expression unchanged. Such effects were not observed in tempol-treated group. Conclusion: The H2O2 decrease in mesenteric artery from rats with cirrhosis resulted in down regulation of the β-arrestin-2 expression and its binding ability with α1 adrenergic receptor, thereby affecting the agonist-induced ROCK activation and improving the contractile response in blood vessels. PMID:24719556

  8. Retrograde axonal transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-12-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor (/sup 125/I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The /sup 125/I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar /sup 125/I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 125/I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of /sup 125/I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported /sup 125/I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions.

  9. Mangafodipir Protects against Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Leconte, Mahaut; Kavian, Niloufar; Bedda, Sassia; Nicco, Carole; Chereau, Christiane; Goulvestre, Claire; Weill, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aim Mangafodipir is a contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging that concentrates in the liver and displays pleiotropic antioxidant properties. Since reactive oxygen species are involved in ischemia-reperfusion damages, we hypothesized that the use of mangafodipir could prevent liver lesions in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury. Mangafodipir (MnDPDP) was compared to ischemic preconditioning and intermittent inflow occlusion for the prevention of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in the mouse. Methods Mice were subjected to 70% hepatic ischemia (continuous ischemia) for 90 min. Thirty minutes before the ischemic period, either mangafodipir (10 mg/kg) or saline was injected intraperitoneally. Those experimental groups were compared with one group of mice preconditioned by 10 minutes' ischemia followed by 15 minutes' reperfusion, and one group with intermittent inflow occlusion. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury was evaluated by measurement of serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) activity, histologic analysis of the livers, and determination of hepatocyte apoptosis (cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activity). The effect of mangafodipir on the survival rate of mice was studied in a model of total hepatic ischemia. Results Mangafodipir prevented experimental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the mouse as indicated by a reduction in serum ASAT activity (P<0.01), in liver tissue damages, in markers of apoptosis (P<0.01), and by higher rates of survival in treated than in untreated animals (P<0.001). The level of protection by mangafodipir was similar to that observed following intermittent inflow occlusion and higher than after ischemic preconditioning. Conclusions Mangafodipir is a potential new preventive treatment for hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22073237

  10. Q Fever Endocarditis Presenting with Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism and Renal Infarction.

    PubMed

    Raizada, Amol; Apte, Nachiket; Pham, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in mammals, birds, and ticks. Acute cases in human beings can be asymptomatic, or they can present with a flu-like illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis. Approximately 5% of cases progress to chronic Q fever. Endocarditis, the most typical manifestation of chronic Q fever, is usually associated with small vegetations that occur in patients who have had prior valvular damage or who are immunocompromised. We present what we think is the first reported case of superior mesenteric artery embolism from Q fever endocarditis of the aortic valve, in a 39-year-old woman who needed surgical embolectomy and subsequent aortic valve replacement. PMID:27047296

  11. Computerised multiparametric analysis from images of blood flow through frog mesenteric arterial bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Umrani, J; Prakash, B; Singh, M

    1997-07-01

    A computerised multiparametric procedure is developed to analyse the images of blood flow through various locations of the mesenteric arterial bifurcation of frog. The data are recorded by a video microscopic system and, after digitisation and pre-processing, are analysed by an IBM PC/AT based image processing system to obtain erythrocyte and velocity distribution profiles by axial tomographic and image velocimetry techniques, respectively. The vessel radius, haematocrit, blood flow through main and branch arteries and flow separation zones are determined from the data by various analytical procedures. In contrast to the earlier techniques the data are obtained from the same location of the vessel and thus the variability in flow parameters is minimised. PMID:9327615

  12. Megabulbus in endoscopy; suspect for superior mesenteric artery syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Eğritaş, Ödül; Demiroğullari, Billur; Dalgıç, Buket

    2015-03-01

    Rarity of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome (SMAS) and necessity of invasive tests to verify the diagnosis leads to patients receiving symptom-oriented drugs for a long period without any definite diagnosis. Diagnostic tests such as barium series, abdominal CT scan, abdominal angiography or magnetic resonance arteriography are used in patients with suspected SMAS. In pediatric patients, a non-invasive SMAS diagnosis may be considered easily with abdominal ultrasound performed by experienced hands. Megabulbus is used as a radiological term; however, reviewing the literature an endoscopic definition for megabulbus was not found. We decided to mention severely dilated pyloric ring and bulb as megabulbus. Megabulbus might be an indicator for SMAS. This is the first case of SMAS in adult and pediatric age groups presenting with megabulbus. PMID:25835120

  13. Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Using a Nitinol Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Konda, Daniel Pendenza, Gianluca; Spinelli, Alessio; Stefanini, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2005-01-15

    A 68-year-old woman presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding (hematocrit 19.3%) and in a critical clinical condition (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade 4) from a giant superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm (196.0 x 131.4 mm) underwent emergency endovascular treatment. The arterial tear supplying the pseudoaneurysm was excluded using a 5.0 mm diameter and 31 mm long monorail expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered self-expanding nitinol stent. Within 6 days of the procedure, a gradual increase in hemoglobin levels and a prompt improvement in the clinical condition were observed. Multislice CT angiograms performed immediately, 5 days, 30 days and 3 months after the procedure confirmed the complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm.

  14. New Portal-Superior Mesenteric Vein Reconstructions Using First Jejunal Vein Flap in Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Nobuyuki; Miki, Kenji; Kosuge, Tomoo

    2016-06-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is the only potential treatment for pancreatic head adenocarcinomas, which are sometimes located close to or invade the portal-superior mesenteric vein (PSMV). Surgeons often attempt to obtain a negative resectional margin after resection of the PSMV. This attempt requires PSMV reconstruction through graft replacements or end-to-end anastomosis; however, possible complications should be concerned including anastomosis stenosis, damage to some of the PSMV branches, prosthetic graft infection, and that associated with autologous graft harvesting. The first jejunal artery and vein are often resected in PD with the intent of lymphadenectomy. In this study, jejunal vein flap was used for PSMV reconstruction without causing damage to any of the PSMV branches in two patients. Here, we describe the new methods of PSMV reconstruction using first jejunal vein flap in PD. PMID:26801505

  15. Mesenteric Fibromatosis in Crohn's Disease as a Potential Effect of Adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Fleisher, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman with no medical or surgical history was evaluated for weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed signs of Crohn's disease, which was later confirmed endoscopically. She was started on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor therapy. Nine months after treatment, she experienced additional weight loss and a 7 x 8 x 8-cm mass on repeat CT. Biopsy revealed retroperitoneal fibromatosis, so TNF-α was continued. Repeat CT showed an enlarged mass. TNF-α therapy had a suspected role in mass growth, therapy was discontinued, and the mass surgically resected. One year after resection, she has regained weight with no recurrence of the mesenteric fibromatosis. PMID:27144199

  16. A Delayed Diagnosis of Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia: The Role of Clinicians’ Cognitive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Sern Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhoeal illnesses with nausea and weight loss are a common indication for gastroenterology review. While many such cases have intra-luminal aetiologies, such as inflammatory bowel disease, coeliac disease or other malabsorptive conditions, with many other cases due to functional gut disorders or systemic malignancy, clinicians must also keep vascular disorders in mind. Here we report a patient with a delayed diagnosis of chronic mesenteric ischaemia after 6 months of gastrointestinal symptoms strongly mimicking an alternative diagnosis such as inflammatory bowel disease due an atypical predominance of nausea and diarrhoea rather than pain. We briefly review the literature on treatment of this condition but also discuss with particular attention the sequence of cognitive errors made by clinicians that led to a diagnostic delay, inviting readers to thus reflect on how such errors can be minimised in their practice. PMID:27403105

  17. Single Nisoldipine-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Smooth Muscle Cells Isolated from Rabbit Mesenteric Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Jennings F.; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1986-08-01

    Single smooth muscle cells were enzymatically isolated from the rabbit mesenteric artery. At physiological levels of external Ca, these cells were relaxed and contracted on exposure to norepinephrine, caffeine, or high levels of potassium. The patch-clamp technique was used to measure unitary currents through single channels in the isolated cells. Single channels were selective for divalent cations and exhibited two conductance levels, 8 pS and 15 pS. Both types of channels were voltage-dependent, and channel activity occurred at potentials positive to -40 mV. The activity of both channel types was almost completely inhibited by 50 nM nisoldipine. These channels appear to be the pathways for voltage-dependent Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle and may be the targets of the clinically used dihydropyridines.

  18. Severe gastric dilatation due to superior mesenteric artery syndrome in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mascolo, Margherita; Dee, Elizabeth; Townsend, Ronald; Brinton, John T; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-07-01

    Forty-seven year old female, with a history of anorexia nervosa, was admitted to a medical stabilization unit (ACUTE) complaining of abdominal pain exacerbated by oral intake, associated with nausea, and relieved by emesis. Admission body mass index was 10.6. Labs were notable for hepatitis and hypoglycemia. On her progressive oral refeeding plan, she suddenly developed severe abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed gastric dilatation and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. SMA syndrome is a rare complication of severe malnutrition resulting from compression of the duodenum between the aorta and the SMA. It is diagnosed by an upper gastrointestinal series or an abdominal CT. Gastric dilatation, in turn, is a rare complication of SMA syndrome to be included in the differential diagnoses of abdominal pain in severely malnourished patients as it is potentially life-threatening. The patient was switched to an oral liquid diet, began weight restoring, and had resolution of symptoms. PMID:25639251

  19. Pulmonary Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles Exposure Differentially Impairs Coronary and Mesenteric Arteriolar Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Minarchick, Valerie C; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Porter, Dale W; Wolfarth, Michael G; Çiftyürek, Engin; Barger, Mark; Sabolsky, Edward M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are an engineered nanomaterial that possesses unique catalytic, oxidative and reductive properties. Currently, CeO2 NPs are being used as a fuel catalyst but these properties are also utilized in the development of potential drug treatments for radiation and stroke protection. These uses of CeO2 NPs present a risk for human exposure; however, to date no studies have investigated the effects of CeO2 NPs on the microcirculation following pulmonary exposure. Previous studies in our laboratory with other nanomaterials have shown impairments in normal microvascular function after pulmonary exposures. Therefore, we predicted that CeO2 NP exposure would cause microvascular dysfunction that is dependent on the tissue bed and dose. Twenty-four hour post exposure to CeO2 NPs (0–400 μg), mesenteric and coronary arterioles were isolated and microvascular function was assessed. Our results provided evidence that pulmonary CeO2 NP exposure impairs endothelium-dependent and -independent arteriolar dilation in a dose-dependent manner. The CeO2 NP exposure dose which causes a 50% impairment in arteriolar function (EC50) was calculated and ranged from 15 – 100 μg depending on the chemical agonist and microvascular bed. Microvascular assessments with acetylcholine revealed a 33–75% reduction in function following exposure. Additionally, there was a greater sensitivity to CeO2 NP exposure in the mesenteric microvasculature due to the 40% decrease in the calculated EC50 compared to the coronary microvasculature EC50. CeO2 NP exposure increased mean arterial pressure in some groups. Taken together these observed microvascular changes may likely have detrimental effects on local blood flow regulation and contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction associated with particle exposure. PMID:23645470

  20. The production of vasoconstriction-induced residual NO modulates perfusion pressure in rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Seçilmiş, M A; Özü, Ö Y; Kıroğlu, O E; Şingirik, E; Büyükafşar, K

    2014-11-01

    In the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors, the contribution of residual NO to endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by chemical agonists acetylcholine and bradykinin has been documented in resistance vessels. However, the contribution of residual NO to the vasodilatation in response to pressure and fluid shear stress is not well understood. In this study, to demonstrate the activity of residual NO, we applied a NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (HCX), on the phenylephrine-induced increase in perfusion pressure in the presence of NOS inhibitors, Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in the rat perfused mesenteric bed. The perfusion pressure was increased by phenylephrine (1-2 µM), an α1-adrenoceptor agonist. This increase was augmented by the addition of L-NA or L-NAME. In the presence of any NOS inhibitors, the application of hydroxocobalamin (100 µM) further increased the perfusion pressure. The removal of endothelium by saponin (50 mg/L) and the use of a non-selective protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine (5 nM), and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erbstatin A (30 µM), but not a calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium (0.5 µM), inhibited the additional pressor responses induced by L-NA or L-NAME and a combination of either of them with hydroxocobalamine. These findings show that there could be a NOS inhibitor-resistant residual NO production in response to pressure in the rat mesenteric vascular bed. This residual NO production may be associated with the activation of tyrosine kinase and protein kinases, but not calmodulin. Finally, this pressure-induced residual NO exerts a modulatory role against vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine. PMID:24534887

  1. Protons modulate perivascular axo-axonal neurotransmission in the rat mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Shingo; Hirai, Kazuhiro; Ozaki, Shuichiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Fukushima-Miyashita, Satoko; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine releases protons from adrenergic nerves via stimulation of nicotinic ACh receptors and activates transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors located on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves, resulting in vasodilatation. The present study investigated whether perivascular nerves release protons, which modulate axon-axonal neurotransmission. Experiment Approach Perfusion pressure and pH levels of perfusate in rat-perfused mesenteric vascular beds without endothelium were measured with a pressure transducer and a pH meter respectively. Key Results Periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) initially induced vasoconstriction, which was followed by long-lasting vasodilatation and decreased pH levels in the perfusate. Cold-storage denervation of the preparation abolished the decreased pH and vascular responses to PNS. The adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine inhibited PNS-induced vasoconstriction and effects on pH, but not PNS-induced vasodilatation. Capsaicin (CGRP depletor), capsazepine and ruthenium red (TRPV1 inhibitors) attenuated the PNS-induced decrease in pH and vasodilatation. In denuded preparations, ACh caused long-lasting vasodilatation and lowered pH; these effects were inhibited by capsaicin pretreatment and atropine, but not by guanethidine or mecamylamine. Capsaicin injection induced vasodilatation and a reduction in pH, which were abolished by ruthenium red. The use of a fluorescent pH indicator demonstrated that application of nicotine, ACh and capsaicin outside small mesenteric arteries reduced perivascular pH levels and these effects were abolished in a Ca2+-free medium. Conclusion and Implication These results suggest that protons are released from perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves upon PNS and these protons modulate transmission in CGRPergic nerves. PMID:25117291

  2. Portal, superior mesenteric and splenic vein thrombosis secondary to hyperhomocysteinemia with pernicious anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute portomesenteric vein thrombosis is an uncommon but serious condition with potential sequelae, such as small-bowel gangrene and end-stage hepatic failure. It is known to be caused by various pro-thrombotic states, including hyperhomocysteinemia. We describe what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of concomitant thrombosis of portal, superior mesenteric and splenic veins due to hyperhomocysteinemia secondary to pernicious anemia and no other risk factors. Case presentation A 60-year-old Indian man presented with epigastric pain, diarrhea and vomiting. An abdominal imaging scan showed that he had concomitant pernicious anemia and concomitant portal, superior mesenteric and splenic vein thrombosis. A work-up for the patient’s hypercoagulable state revealed hyperhomocysteinemia, an undetectable vitamin B12 level and pernicious anemia with no other thrombophilic state. He developed infarction with perforation of the small bowel and subsequent septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, and he ultimately died due to progressive hepatic failure. Conclusion This report demonstrates that pernicious anemia, on its own, can lead to hyperhomocysteinemia significant enough to lead to lethal multiple splanchnic vein thrombosis. Our case also underscores the need to (1) consider portomesenteric thrombosis in the differential diagnosis of epigastric abdominal pain, (2) perform a complete thrombotic work-up to elucidate metabolic abnormalities that could be contributing to a pro-thrombotic state and (3) initiate aggressive measures, including early consideration of multi-visceral transplantation, in order to avoid decompensation and a significant adverse outcome. PMID:25155131

  3. The actions of some cannabinoid receptor ligands in the rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard; Robin Hiley, C

    1998-01-01

    The actions of a number of cannabinoid receptor ligands were investigated using the myograph-mounted rat isolated mesenteric artery. Anandamide, CP 55,940, HU-210, palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2 all caused concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine-precontracted vessels which were not affected by removal of the endothelium.Precontracting vessels with 60 mM KCl instead of methoxamine greatly reduced the vasorelaxant effects of anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide. High K+ solution caused a modest decrease in the relaxant potency of CP 55,940 and HU-210, and had no effect on relaxations induced by WIN 55,212-2.Relaxations of methoxamine-induced tone by anandamide, CP 55,940 and HU-210, but not palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2, were attenuated by the cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR 141716A. Relaxation of vessels contracted with 60 mM KCl by CP 55,940 was also sensitive to SR 141716A.Anandamide and CP 55,940 caused small but concentration-dependent contractions in resting vessels in the absence of extracellular calcium. These were not sensitive to SR 141716A. Palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2 produced smaller contractions only at higher concentrations.Anandamide and CP 55,940, but not palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2, caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the phasic contractions induced by methoxamine in calcium-free conditions, but only anandamide caused inhibition of contractions to caffeine under such conditions. These inhibitory effects were not antagonised by SR 141716A.The present study provides the first detailed investigation of the actions of cannabinoid agonists on vascular smooth muscle. Our results show that these compounds exert both receptor-dependent and -independent effects on agonist-induced calcium mobilization in the rat isolated mesenteric artery. PMID:9806337

  4. Unique gene program of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries as revealed by deep RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Reho, John J; Shetty, Amol; Dippold, Rachael P; Mahurkar, Anup; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of RNA samples from rat small mesenteric arteries (MA) and aorta (AO) identified common and unique features of their gene programs. ∼5% of mRNAs were quantitatively differentially expressed in MA versus AO. Unique transcriptional control in MA smooth muscle is suggested by the selective or enriched expression of transcription factors Nkx2-3, HAND2, and Tcf21 (Capsulin). Enrichment in AO of PPAR transcription factors and their target genes of mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation is consistent with slow (oxidative) tonic smooth muscle. In contrast MA was enriched in contractile and calcium channel mRNAs suggestive of components of fast (glycolytic) phasic smooth muscle. Myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit paralogs Mypt1 and p85 were expressed at similar levels, while smooth muscle MLCK was the only such kinase expressed, suggesting functional redundancy of the former but not the latter in accordance with mouse knockout studies. With regard to vaso-regulatory signals, purinergic receptors P2rx1 and P2rx5 were reciprocally expressed in MA versus AO, while the olfactory receptor Olr59 was enriched in MA. Alox15, which generates the EDHF HPETE, was enriched in MA while eNOS was equally expressed, consistent with the greater role of EDHF in the smaller arteries. mRNAs that were not expressed at a level consistent with impugned function include skeletal myogenic factors, IKK2, nonmuscle myosin, and Gnb3. This screening analysis of gene expression in the small mesenteric resistance arteries suggests testable hypotheses regarding unique aspects of small artery function in the regional control of blood flow. PMID:26156969

  5. Inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase in rabbit mesenteric artery and vas deferens by catechol oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Panek, D U; Azzaro, A J; Stitzel, R E; Head, R J

    1987-03-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effects of oestrogens, catechol oestrogens, and catecholamines on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity derived from rabbit mesenteric artery and vas deferens. Both catechol oestrogens, 2-hydroxyoestradiol (2OHE2) and 2-hydroxyoesterone (2OHE1), inhibited TH activity in mesenteric artery and vas deferens in a concentration-dependent manner with potencies that were higher than those for noradrenaline but lower than that for dopamine. When added to the reaction medium along with increasing concentrations of a pterin cofactor (200 to 1,500 mumol/l DMPH4), the catechol oestrogens (200 mumol/l) increased the apparent Km for DMPH4 without altering the maximum velocity (Vmax) of the reaction. Similar results were obtained with the addition of noradrenaline (200 mumol/l) and dopamine (120 mu/mol). Apparent Ki values obtained for the catecholamines and catechol oestrogens were within the same order of magnitude and varied from 30 mumol/l for dopamine and 2OHE2 to 183 mumol/l for 2OHE1. Oestradiol (E2) and 2-methoxyoestradiol (2MeOE2), i.e., oestrogens that do not possess a catechol moiety, exhibited only weak inhibitory effects on TH activity. At the highest concentration tested (1 mmol/l), they did not reduce enzyme activity below 58% of control values. Kinetic analysis revealed that these two oestrogens did not consistently affect either the Vmax of hydroxylation or the Km for DMPH4. It is concluded that catechol oestrogens inhibit TH activity with a potency comparable to noradrenaline and dopamine. This inhibition is by competition with the pterin cofactor. Oestrogens that to not possess a catechol moiety are not effective inhibitors of TH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2884573

  6. Lymphatic Muscle Cells in Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessels of Various Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5–15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. Methods and Results In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. Conclusions The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels. PMID:23531183

  7. Role of the heme oxygenases in abnormalities of the mesenteric circulation in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Sacerdoti, David; Abraham, Nader G; Oyekan, Adebayo O; Yang, Liming; Gatta, Angelo; McGiff, John C

    2004-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a product of heme metabolism by heme-oxygenase (HO), has biological actions similar to those of nitric oxide (NO). The role of CO in decreasing vascular responses to constrictor agents produced by experimental cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride was evaluated before and after inhibition of HO with tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) in the perfused superior mesenteric vasculature (SMV) of cirrhotic and normal rats and in normal rats transfected with the human HO-1 (HHO-1) gene. Perfusion pressure and vasoconstrictor responses of the SMV to KCl, phenylephrine (PE), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were decreased in cirrhotic rats. SnMP increased SMV perfusion pressure and restored the constrictor responses of the SMV to KCl, PE, and ET-1 in cirrhotic rats. The relative roles of NO and CO in producing hyporeactivity of the SMV to PE in cirrhotic rats were examined. Vasoconstrictor responses to PE were successively augmented by stepwise inhibition of CO and NO production, suggesting a complementary role for these gases in the regulation of reactivity of the SMV. Expression of constitutive but not of inducible HO (HO-1) was increased in the SMV of cirrhotic rats as was HO activity. Administration of adenovirus containing HHO-1 gene produced detection of HHO-1 RNA and increased HO activity in the SMV within 7 days. Rats transfected with HO-1 demonstrated reduction in both perfusion pressure and vasoconstrictor responses to PE in the SMV. We propose that HO is an essential component in mechanisms that modulate reactivity of the mesenteric circulation in experimental hepatic cirrhosis in rats. PMID:14600247

  8. Focal embolic cerebral ischemia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guangliang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are well accepted for investigating the pathogenesis and potential treatment strategies for human stroke. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an endovascular filament is a widely used model to induce focal cerebral ischemia. However, this model is not amenable to thrombolytic therapies. As thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is a standard of care within 4.5 hours of human stroke onset, suitable animal models that mimic cellular and molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and thrombolysis of stroke are required. By occluding the MCA with a fibrin-rich allogeneic clot, we have developed an embolic model of MCA occlusion in the rat, which recapitulates the key components of thrombotic development and of thrombolytic therapy of rtPA observed from human ischemic stroke. The surgical procedures of our model can be typically completed within approximately 30 min and are highly adaptable to other strains of rats as well as mice for both genders. Thus, this model provides a powerful tool for translational stroke research. PMID:25741989

  9. Effects of carbon monoxide on myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, E.N.; Pagano, M. ); Bleecker, E.R.; Walden, S.M. ); Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E. ); Hackney, J.D.; Selvester, R.H. ); Warren, J. ); Gottlieb, S.O.

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether low doses of carbon monoxide (CO) exacerbate myocardial ischemia during a progressive exercise test. The effect of CO exposure was evaluated using the objective measure of time to development of electrocardiographic changes indicative of ischemia and the subjective measure of time to onset of angina. Sixty-three male subjects (41-75 years) with well-documented coronary artery disease, who had exertional angina pectoris and ischemic ST-segment changes in their electrocardiograms, were studied. Results from three randomized, double-blind test visits (room air, low and high CO) were compared. The effect of CO exposure was determined from the percent difference in the end points obtained on exercise tests performed before and after a 1-hr exposure to room air or CO. A significant dose-response relationship was found for the individual differences in the time to ST end point and angina for the pre-versus postexposure exercise test at the three carboxyhemoglobin levels. These findings demonstrate that low doses of CO produce significant effects on cardiac function during exercise in subjects with coronary artery disease.

  10. Effects of cerebral ischemia on neuronal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Liu, Wenquan; Hu, Haitao; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present study examined whether or not neuronal hemoglobin (Hb) is present in rats. It then examined whether cerebral ischemia or ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects neuronal Hb levels in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 15 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 24 hours of reperfusion, an IPC stimulus, or 24 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), or IPC followed three days later by 24 hours of pMCAO. In vitro, primary cultured neurons were exposed to 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation with 22 hours of reoxygenation. Results showed that Hb is widely expressed in rat cerebral neurons but not astrocytes. Hb expression was significantly upregulated in the ipsilateral caudate and the cortical core of the middle cerebral artery territory after IPC. Hb levels also increased in more penumbral cortex and the contralateral hemisphere 24 hours after pMCAO, but expression in the ipsilateral caudate and cortical core area were decreased. Ischemic preconditioning modified pMCAO-induced brain Hb changes. Neuronal Hb levels in vitro were increased by 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation and 22 hours of reoxygenation. These results indicate that Hb is synthesized in neurons and can be upregulated by ischemia. PMID:19066615

  11. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  12. Understanding STAT3 signaling in cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, K E; Breen, E P; Gallagher, H C; Buggy, D J; Hurley, J P

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. It remains one of the greatest challenges to global health and will continue to dominate mortality trends in the future. Acute myocardial infarction results in 7.4 million deaths globally per annum. Current management strategies are centered on restoration of coronary blood flow via percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and administration of anti-platelet agents. Such myocardial reperfusion accounts for 40-50 % of the final infarct size in most cases. Signaling transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been shown to have cardioprotective effects via canonical and non-canonical activation and modulation of mitochondrial and transcriptional responses. A significant body of in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that activation of the STAT3 signal transduction pathway results in a cardio protective response to ischemia and attempts have been made to modulate this with therapeutic effect. Not only is STAT3 important for cardiomyocyte function, but it also modulates the cardiac microenvironment and communicates with cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, we here review the current evidence supporting the manipulation of STAT3 for therapeutic benefit in cardiac ischemia and identify areas for future research. PMID:27017613

  13. An anomalous case of the left gastric artery, the splenic artery and hepato-mesenteric trunk independently arising from the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Saga, Tsuyoshi; Hirao, Takeshi; Kitashima, Sadaharu; Watanabe, Koh-Ichi; Nohno, Mariko; Araki, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Seiji; Yamaki, Koh-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of an arterial anomaly in the celiaco-mesenteric region, encountered in a Japanese female cadaver for dissection at the gross anatomy laboratory of Kurume University School of Medicine in 2003. The usual celiac trunk was not identified, and the left gastric artery, the splenic artery and the hepato-mesenteric trunk independently arose from the abdominal aorta. Moreover, the hepatic artery arising from the hepato-mesenteric trunk ran behind the portal vein. The classification for this type of arterial anomaly is a Type II' of Morita's classification and Type II of Higashi and Hirai's classification, not belong to the Adachi's. PMID:16119612

  14. Blood clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tissues in that area. This is called ischemia. If ischemia is not treated promptly, it can lead to ... Heart (angina or a heart attack) Intestines ( mesenteric ischemia ) or mesenteric venous thrombosis Kidneys ( renal vein thrombosis ) ...

  15. An Evidence-Based Review of Related Metabolites and Metabolic Network Research on Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengting; Tang, Liying; Liu, Xin; Fang, Jing; Zhan, Hao; Wu, Hongwei; Yang, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, metabolomics analyses have been widely applied to cerebral ischemia research. This paper introduces the latest proceedings of metabolomics research on cerebral ischemia. The main techniques, models, animals, and biomarkers of cerebral ischemia will be discussed. With analysis help from the MBRole website and the KEGG database, the altered metabolites in rat cerebral ischemia were used for metabolic pathway enrichment analyses. Our results identify the main metabolic pathways that are related to cerebral ischemia and further construct a metabolic network. These results will provide useful information for elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia, as well as the discovery of cerebral ischemia biomarkers. PMID:27274780

  16. mRNA redistribution during permanent focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Monique K; Jamison, Jill T; Dunbar, Joseph C; DeGracia, Donald J

    2013-12-01

    Translation arrest occurs in neurons following focal cerebral ischemia and is irreversible in penumbral neurons destined to die. Following global cerebral ischemia, mRNA is sequestered away from 40S ribosomal subunits as mRNA granules, precluding translation. Here, we investigated mRNA granule formation using fluorescence in situ histochemistry out to 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia using middle cerebral artery occlusion in Long Evans rats with and without diabetes. Neuronal mRNA granules colocalized with PABP, HuR, and NeuN, but not 40S or 60S ribosomal subunits, or organelle markers. The volume of brain with mRNA granule-containing neurons decreased exponentially with ischemia duration, and was zero after 8 h permanent focal cerebral ischemia or any duration of ischemia in diabetic rats. These results show that neuronal mRNA granule response has a limited range of insult intensity over which it is expressed. Identifying the limits of effective neuronal stress response to ischemia will be important for developing effective stroke therapies. PMID:24323415

  17. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  18. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  19. Arterial surgery for arm ischemia. A survey of 136 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Holleman, J H; Hardy, J D; Williamson, J W; Raju, S; Neely, W A

    1980-01-01

    A series of 136 patients with upper extremity ischemia requiring operative correction is presented. Causes of the ischemia included trauma, atherosclerosis, embolism, iatrogenic causes, radiation injury, and cervical rib syndrome. Operations included primary repair, various bypass grafts and embolectomy. Illustrative case reports are used to emphasize important points. The subclavian, axillary and brachial arteries have been considered separately. In general, ischemia of the arm caused by a discrete lesion is amenable to surgical correction with an excellent change of success. Images Fig. 1. Figs. 5a and b. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7387235

  20. Delayed effects of sublethal ischemia on the acquisition of tolerance to ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, T; Hoshida, S; Yamashita, N; Fuji, H; Oe, H; Hori, M; Kamada, T; Tada, M

    1993-06-01

    The infarct-limiting effect of ischemic preconditioning is believed to be a transient phenomenon. We examined the delayed effects of repetitive brief ischemia on limiting infarct size in an open-chest dog model by an occlusion (90 minutes) of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) followed by reperfusion (5 hours). The dogs were preconditioned with four brief repeated ischemic episodes induced by 5-minute LAD occlusions with subsequent reperfusion. The size of infarcts initiated by a sustained occlusion immediately or 24 hours after preconditioning was significantly smaller when compared with infarcts in sham-operated dogs (for the immediate occlusion, 14.4 +/- 2.0% versus 39.0 +/- 3.7%, respectively [p < 0.01]; and for the delayed occlusion, 18.8 +/- 3.4% versus 35.1 +/- 4.6%, respectively [p < 0.05]); however, when the infarction was induced 3 hours (31.2 +/- 3.7% versus 37.5 +/- 4.2%, respectively) or 12 hours (25.4 +/- 4.8% versus 35.0 +/- 5.3%, respectively) after repetitive ischemia, the infarct size did not differ. No differences were seen in regional myocardial blood flow or rate-pressure products between the two groups. These results indicate that an infarct-limiting effect of brief repeated ischemia can be observed 24 hours after sublethal preconditioning. PMID:8495557

  1. Succinate Accumulation and Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: Of Mice but Not Men, a Study in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Wijermars, L G M; Schaapherder, A F; Kostidis, S; Wüst, R C I; Lindeman, J H

    2016-09-01

    A recent seminal paper implicated ischemia-related succinate accumulation followed by succinate-driven reactive oxygen species formation as a key driver of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the data show that the mechanism is universal for all organs tested (kidney, liver, heart, and brain), a remaining question is to what extent these observations in mice translate to humans. We showed in this study that succinate accumulation is not a universal event during ischemia and does not occur during renal graft procurement; in fact, tissue succinate content progressively decreased with increasing graft ischemia time (p < 0.007). Contrasting responses were also found with respect to mitochondrial susceptibility toward ischemia and reperfusion, with rodent mitochondria robustly resistant toward warm ischemia but human and pig mitochondria highly susceptible to warm ischemia (p < 0.05). These observations suggest that succinate-driven reactive oxygen formation does not occur in the context of kidney transplantation. Moreover, absent allantoin release from the reperfused grafts suggests minimal oxidative stress during clinical reperfusion. PMID:26999803

  2. Real-Time Visualization of Tissue Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Chrien, Thomas D. (Inventor); Eastwood, Michael L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A real-time display of tissue ischemia which comprises three CCD video cameras, each with a narrow bandwidth filter at the correct wavelength is discussed. The cameras simultaneously view an area of tissue suspected of having ischemic areas through beamsplitters. The output from each camera is adjusted to give the correct signal intensity for combining with, the others into an image for display. If necessary a digital signal processor (DSP) can implement algorithms for image enhancement prior to display. Current DSP engines are fast enough to give real-time display. Measurement at three, wavelengths, combined into a real-time Red-Green-Blue (RGB) video display with a digital signal processing (DSP) board to implement image algorithms, provides direct visualization of ischemic areas.

  3. Vitreal Ocygenation in Retinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallab, Walid; AmeriMD, Hossein; Barron, Ernesto; ChaderPhD, Gerald; Greenbaum, Elias; Hinton, David E; Humayun, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. To study the feasibility of anterior vitreal oxygenation for the treatment of acute retinal ischemia. METHODS. Twenty rabbits were randomized into an oxygenation group, a sham treatment group, and a no treatment group. Baseline electroretinography (ERG) and preretinal oxygen (PO2) measurements were obtained 3 to 5 days before surgery. Intraocular pressure was raised to 100 mm Hg for 90 minutes and then normalized. The oxygenation group underwent vitreal oxygenation for 30 minutes using intravitreal electrodes. The sham treatment group received inactive electrodes for 30 minutes while there was no intervention for the no treatment group. Preretinal PO2 in the posterior vitreous was measured 30 minutes after intervention or 30 minutes after reperfusion (no treatment group) and on postoperative days (d) 3, 6, 9, and 12. On d14, rabbits underwent ERG and were euthanatized.

  4. Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ouma, Geoffrey O.; Zafrir, Barak; Mohler, Emile R.; Flugelman, Moshe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a severe form of peripheral artery disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. The primary therapeutic goals in treating CLI are to reduce the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, relieve ischemic pain, heal ulcers, prevent major amputation, and improve quality of life (QoL) and survival. These goals may be achieved by medical therapy, endovascular intervention, open surgery, or amputation and require a multidisciplinary approach including pain management, wound care, risk factors reduction, and treatment of comorbidities. No-option patients are potential candidates for the novel angiogenic therapies. The application of genetic, molecular, and cellular-based modalities, the so-called therapeutic angiogenesis, in the treatment of arterial obstructive diseases has not shown consistent efficacy. This article summarizes the current status related to the management of patients with CLI and discusses the current findings of the emerging modalities for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:23129733

  5. Tibial intervention for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Bret N

    2009-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) is increasingly important as the average age of the world population and the incidence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome increases. Fortunately, most patients will not progress to this stage of peripheral arterial disease, yet if left untreated, there is a high risk of future cardiovascular events. At the point of ischemic rest pain or tissue loss, there are significant implications for morbidity and mortality. There is a high prevalence of multisegment occlusive disease in the CLI patient with the infrapopliteal vessels frequently involved. Revascularization of the affected limb is of utmost importance as the prospects of wound healing and relief of ischemic rest pain are poor without reestablishing continuous flow to the distal extremity. With the advent of endovascular devices designed to treat this vexing problem, the ability to successfully treat this difficult patient population with less procedural morbidity has been greatly enhanced. PMID:21326541

  6. Lymphocytes and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Linfert, Douglas; Chowdhry, Tayseer; Rabb, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common and important clinical problem in many different organ systems, including kidney, brain, heart, liver, lung, and intestine. IRI occurs during all deceased donor organ transplants. IRI is a highly complex cascade of events that includes interactions between vascular endothelium, interstitial compartments, circulating cells, and numerous biochemical entities. It is well established that the innate immune system, such as complement, neutrophils, cytokines, chemokines, and macrophages participate in IRI. Recent data demonstrates an important role for lymphocytes, particularly T cells but also B cells in IRI. Lymphocytes not only participate in augmenting injury responses after IRI, but could also be playing a protective role depending on the cell type and stage of injury. Furthermore, lymphocytes appear to be participating in the healing response from IRI. These new data open the possibility for lymphocyte targeted therapeutics to improve the short and long term outcomes from IRI. PMID:19027612

  7. Successful treatment of mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration by the delivery of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate via an abdominal wall vein.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Osamu; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Koichi; Inoue, Seijiro; Takamori, Hiroshi; Baba, Hideo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    Bleeding from mesenteric varices associated with portal hypertension is occasionally life-threatening. A 53-year-old man who had undergone esophageal transection for esophageal varices and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric varices presented with melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. He was treated by injecting N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate via an abdominal wall vein to obtain retrograde transvenous obliteration. PMID:23716126

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  9. Cell Biology of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeris, Theodore; Baines, Christopher P.; Krenz, Maike; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Disorders characterized by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, continue to be among the most frequent causes of debilitating disease and death. Tissue injury and/or death occur as a result of the initial ischemic insult, which is determined primarily by the magnitude and duration of the interruption in the blood supply, and then subsequent damage induced by reperfusion. During prolonged ischemia, ATP levels and intracellular pH decrease as a result of anaerobic metabolism and lactate accumulation. As a consequence, ATPase-dependent ion transport mechanisms become dysfunctional, contributing to increased intracellular and mitochondrial calcium levels (calcium overload), cell swelling and rupture, and cell death by necrotic, necroptotic, apoptotic, and autophagic mechanisms. Although oxygen levels are restored upon reperfusion, a surge in the generation of reactive oxygen species occurs and proinflammatory neutrophils infiltrate ischemic tissues to exacerbate ischemic injury. The pathologic events induced by I/R orchestrate the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, which appears to represent a common end-effector of the pathologic events initiated by I/R. The aim of this treatise is to provide a comprehensive review of the mechanisms underlying the development of I/R injury, from which it should be apparent that a combination of molecular and cellular approaches targeting multiple pathologic processes to limit the extent of I/R injury must be adopted to enhance resistance to cell death and increase regenerative capacity in order to effect long-lasting repair of ischemic tissues. PMID:22878108

  10. Observation of mesenteric microcirculatory disturbance in rat by laser oblique scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yichen; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Tong; Lu, Yiqing; Jin, Dayong; Ren, Qiushi; Liu, Yuying; Han, Jingyan; Xi, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model has been widely applied to the study of microcirculation disturbance. In this work, we used laser oblique scanning optical microscopy (LOSOM) to observe the microcirculation system in the mesentery of rat model. Utilizing a localized point-scanning detection scheme, high-contrast images of leukocytes were obtained. The extended detection capability facilitated both the automatic in vivo cell counting and the accurate measurement of the rolling velocity of leukocytes. Statistical analysis of the different treatment groups suggested that the distinction between I/R and sham groups with time lapse is significant.

  11. Observation of mesenteric microcirculatory disturbance in rat by laser oblique scanning optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yichen; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Tong; Lu, Yiqing; Jin, Dayong; Ren, Qiushi; Liu, Yuying; Han, Jingyan; Xi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model has been widely applied to the study of microcirculation disturbance. In this work, we used laser oblique scanning optical microscopy (LOSOM) to observe the microcirculation system in the mesentery of rat model. Utilizing a localized point-scanning detection scheme, high-contrast images of leukocytes were obtained. The extended detection capability facilitated both the automatic in vivo cell counting and the accurate measurement of the rolling velocity of leukocytes. Statistical analysis of the different treatment groups suggested that the distinction between I/R and sham groups with time lapse is significant. PMID:23640310

  12. Two anomalous cases of the hepato-mesenteric and the gastro-splenic trunks independently arising from the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Y; Yamaki, K; Saga, T; Hirata, T; Yoshida, M; Soejima, H; Kanazawa, T; Tanaka, K; Yoshizuka, M

    2000-01-01

    This report describes two arterial anomaly cases in the celiaco-mesenteric region, which were encountered in two Japanese male cadavers in the dissecting room at Kurume University School of Medicine in 1999. In these cases, the usual celiac trunks were not identified, and the hepato-mesenteric and the gastro-splenic trunks were independently arising from the abdominal aorta. Moreover, in the first case, the common hepatic artery passed ventral side of the portal vein and divided into the hepatic proper and the gastroduodenal arteries. This type of arterial anomaly belongs to the Type V of Adachi's classification and the Type IV' of Morita's classification. In the second case, the common hepatic artery passed dorsal side of the portal vein and divided into the hepatic proper and the gastroduodenal arteries. This type of arterial anomaly belongs to the Type VI of Adachi's classification and the Type IV' of Morita's classification. PMID:11059229

  13. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome caused by surgery and radiation therapy for a brain tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEI, QIUCHENG; WANG, XINYING; WU, CHAO; BI, JINGCHENG; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is defined as an obstruction of the third part of duodenum due to compression by the superior mesenteric artery. Although traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for SMAS, few cases of SMAS resulting from brain surgery have been reported. SMAS has been observed to occur following neurosurgical surgery in pediatric patients but, to the best of our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in adults. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old female patient who developed SMAS after persistent vomiting and prolonged weight loss following cerebellar tumor resection and cranial irradiation. The SMAS was confirmed by computed tomography and resolved following successful nutritional management. PMID:26622529

  14. Hemorrhagic ascites from spontaneous ectopic mesenteric varices rupture in NASH induced cirrhosis and successful outcome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Edula, Raja GR; Qureshi, Kamran; Khallafi, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices can often present as the first decompensating event in patients with cirrhosis. This can be a potentially life threatening event associated with a 15%-20% early mortality. We present a rare case of new onset ascites due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage from ruptured mesenteric varices; in a 37 years old male with newly diagnosed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced cirrhosis as the first decompensating event. The patient was successfully resuscitated with emergent evacuation of ascites for diagnosis, identification and control of bleeding mesenteric varices and eventually orthotopic liver transplantation with successful outcome. Various clinical presentations, available treatment options and outcomes of ectopic variceal bleeding are discussed in this report. PMID:25009406

  15. Terminology and nomenclature in colonic surgery: universal application of a rule-based approach derived from updates on mesenteric anatomy.

    PubMed

    Coffey, J C; Sehgal, R; Culligan, K; Dunne, C; McGrath, D; Lawes, N; Walsh, D

    2014-09-01

    Recent developments in colonic surgery generate exciting opportunities for surgeons and trainees. In the first instance, the anatomy of the entire mesenteric organ has been clarified and greatly simplified. No longer is it regarded as fragmented and complex. Rather it is continuous from duodenojejunal flexure to mesorectum, spanning the gastrointestinal tract between. Recent histologic findings have demonstrated that although apposed to the retroperitoneum, the mesenteric organ is separated from this via Toldt's fascia. These fundamentally important observations underpin the principles of complete mesocolic excision, where the mesocolic package is maintained intact, following extensive mesenterectomy. More importantly, they provide the first opportunity to apply a canonical approach to the development of nomenclature in resectional colonic surgery. In this review, we demonstrate how the resultant nomenclature is entirely anatomic based, and for illustrative purposes, we apply it to the procedure conventionally referred to as right hemicolectomy, or ileocolic resection. PMID:24968936

  16. Telmisartan attenuates the inflamed mesenteric adipose tissue in spontaneous colitis by mechanisms involving regulation of neurotensin/microRNA-155 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zuo, Lugen; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zhen; Gu, Lili; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    Mesenteric adipose tissue hypertrophy is unique to Crohn's disease while the molecular basis of the crosstalk between MAT and the intestinal inflammation is largely unknown. Telmisartan is an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker and a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-receptor-γ agonist which has beneficial effects on fat distribution and pro-inflammatory adipokine expression. We evaluated the effect of telmisartan upon mesenteric adipose tissue alterations and inflammatory features in IL-10(-)/(-) mice. We found that treatment with telmisartan significantly ameliorated the severity of colitis in IL-10(-)/(-) mice. Additionally, administration of telmisartan was associated with restoration of mesenteric adipose tissue adipocyte morphology and the expression of adipokines. Furthermore, telmisartan treatment suppressed the neurotensin/microRNA-155 pathway in mesenteric adipose tissue from spontaneous colitis which was confirmed by an in vitro study using cultured mesenteric adipose tissue from Crohn's disease patients. Administration of telmisartan showed promising results in spontaneous colitis which was associated with the attenuated mesenteric adipose tissue alteration which at least in part, was associated with its activity in the regulation of the neurotensin/microRNA-155 pathway. These results support the hypothesis that regulating the abnormal immune response in adipose tissue is an important target for the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:25576685

  17. Spinal cord ischemia is multifactorial: what is the best protocol?

    PubMed

    Melissano, Germano; Bertoglio, Luca; Mascia, Daniele; Rinaldi, Enrico; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Nardelli, Pasquale; Chiesa, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Despite the improved understanding of spinal cord anatomy and spinal cord ischemia pathophysiology, the rate of debilitating postoperative paraparesis or paraplegia is still not negligible after procedures for thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic disease. Single studies have demonstrated the role of different treatment modalities to prevent or treat spinal cord ischemia. A multimodal approach, however, is advocated by most authors. Even after the employment of endovascular techniques become routine, the rate of spinal cord ischemia after treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic pathology remained unchanged over time. Spinal cord ischemia is often treatable by different means that concur to improve indirect spinal perfusion through collateral circulation; it should, therefore, be managed promptly and aggressively due to its potential reversibility. Ongoing technical improvements of non-invasive diagnostic tools may allow a better preoperative assessment of the spinal vascular network and a better planning of both open and endovascular thoracic or thoracoabdominal repair. PMID:26731537

  18. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the new model of global cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisel, A. A.; Chernysheva, G. A.; Smol'yakova, V. I.; Savchenko, R. R.; Plotnikov, M. B.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the changes of hippocampal neurogenesis in a new model of global transient cerebral ischemia which was performed by the occlusion of the three main vessels (tr. brachiocephalicus, a. subclavia sinistra, and a. carotis communis sinistra) branching from the aortic arch and supplying the brain. Global transitory cerebral ischemia was modeled on male rats (weight = 250-300 g) under chloral hydrate with artificial lung ventilation. Animals after the same surgical operation without vessel occlusion served as sham-operated controls. The number of DCX-positive (doublecortin, the marker of immature neurons) cells in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1-CA3 fields of hippocampus was counted at the 31st day after ischemia modeling. It was revealed that global cerebral ischemia decreased neurogenesis in dentate gyrus in comparison with the sham-operated group (P<0.05) while neurogenesis in CA1-CA3 fields was increased as compared to the control (P<0.05).

  19. Multiple coronary arterial loops as a cause of myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashour, Tali T.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Lee, Damon

    1993-01-01

    A case of long-standing angina with ischemia documented by exercise testing and thallium scintigraphy in a patient who had multiple proximal loops in all three major coronary arteries in the absence of luminal stenosis, is reported.

  20. Use of a Hydrogel-Coated Self-Expandable Coil to Salvage a Failed Transcatheter Embolization of a Mesenteric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, James T.; West, Derek L.; Pai, Rajiv; Owens, Charles A.

    2006-12-15

    HydroCoil (MicroVention, Aliso Viejo, CA, USA) is a self-expanding detachable coil developed to improve the endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms. The hydrogel polymer covering the microcoil expands to several times its original diameter to enhance thrombosis of the intended vessel. We made use of this new technology to occlude a mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm that failed superselective embolization with standard microcoils.

  1. CT Angiographic Demonstration of a Mesenteric Vessel "Whirlpool" in Intestinal Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Coskun, Unsal

    2008-01-01

    Although the color Doppler ultrasonography diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus, based on the typical "whirlpool" appearance of the mesenteric vascular structures is well-defined in the peer-reviewed literature, the combination of both the angiographic illustration of these findings and the contemporary state-of-the-art imaging techniques is lacking. We report the digital subtraction angiography and multidetector computed tomography angiography findings of a 37-year-old male with intestinal malrotation. PMID:18838858

  2. Transarterial Thrombin Injection Secured with an Embolic Protection Device as a Treatment for a Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Krasinski, Zbigniew; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    A pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare and life-threatening condition of various etiology. Even unruptured it can cause severe health problems or death. We report a 71-year-old male with a SMA pseudoaneurysm who was successfully treated with a transarterial thrombin injection secured with an embolic protection device used in carotid angioplasty. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a SMA pseudoaneurysm treated by this method.

  3. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  4. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  5. Association between Kinin B1 Receptor Expression and Leukocyte Trafficking across Mouse Mesenteric Postcapillary Venules

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Peter G.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Perretti, Mauro

    2000-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy, we examined the role played by B1 receptors in leukocyte trafficking across mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. B1 receptor blockade attenuated interleukin (IL)-1β–induced (5 ng intraperitoneally, 2 h) leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and leukocyte emigration (∼50% reduction). The B1 receptor agonist des-Arg9bradykinin (DABK), although inactive in saline- or IL-8–treated mice, caused marked neutrophil rolling, adhesion, and emigration 24 h after challenge with IL-1β (when the cellular response to IL-1β had subsided). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot revealed a temporal association between the DABK-induced response and upregulation of mesenteric B1 receptor mRNA and de novo protein expression after IL-1β treatment. DABK-induced leukocyte trafficking was antagonized by the B1 receptor antagonist des-arg10HOE 140 but not by the B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140. Similarly, DABK effects were maintained in B2 receptor knockout mice. The DABK-induced responses involved the release of neuropeptides from C fibers, as capsaicin treatment inhibited the responses. Treatment with the neurokinin (NK)1 and NK3 receptor antagonists attenuated the responses, whereas NK2, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists had no effect. Substance P caused leukocyte recruitment that, similar to DABK, was inhibited by NK1 and NK3 receptor blockade. Mast cell depletion using compound 48/80 reduced DABK-induced leukocyte trafficking, and DABK treatment was shown histologically to induce mast cell degranulation. DABK-induced trafficking was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor blockade. Our findings provide clear evidence that B1 receptors play an important role in the mediation of leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions in postcapillary venules, leading to leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response. This involves activation of C fibers and mast cells

  6. Spreading dilatation to luminal perfusion of ATP and UTP in rat isolated small mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Polly; Dora, Kim A

    2007-01-01

    Levels of ATP achieved within the lumen of vessels suggest a key autacoid role. P2Y receptors on the endothelium may represent the target for ATP, leading to hyperpolarization and associated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle through the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathway. EDHF signals radially from the endothelium to cause dilatation, and appears mechanistically distinct from the axial spread of dilatation, which we showed occurs independently of a change in endothelial cell Ca2+ in rat mesenteric arteries. Here we have investigated the potential of P2Y receptor stimulation to evoke spreading dilatation in rat resistance small arteries under physiological pressure and flow. Triple cannulation of isolated arteries enables focal application of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides to the endothelium, avoiding potential complicating actions of these agents on the smooth muscle. Nucleotides were locally infused through one branch of a bifurcation, causing near maximal local dilatation attributable to EDHF. Dilatation then spread rapidly into the adjacent feed artery and upstream against the direction of luminal flow, sufficient to increase flow into the feed artery. The rate of decay of this spreading dilatation was identical between nucleotides, and matched that to ACh, which acts only on the endothelium. In contrast, focal abluminal application of either ATP or UTP at the downstream end of cannulated arteries evoked constriction, which only in the case of ATP was also associated with modest spread of dilatation. The non-hydrolysable ADP analogue, ADPβS, acting at P2Y1 receptors, caused robust local and spreading dilatation responses whether applied to the luminal or abluminal surface of pressurized arteries. Dilatation to nucleotides was sensitive to inhibition with apamin and TRAM-34, selective blockers of small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively. These data demonstrate that direct luminal stimulation of P

  7. A study of the inferior mesenteric and pelvic ganglia of guinea-pigs with intracellular electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Crowcroft, P. J.; Szurszewski, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    1. Ganglion cells in the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) and the pelvic plexus of the guinea-pig were studied using intracellular micro-electrodes. 2. Ganglion cells had resting membrane potentials of 55-65 mV. Threshold for initiation of an action potential ranged from 10 to 20 mV depolarization. Action potentials often exceeded 100 mV in amplitude and were followed by an after-hyperpolarization of up to 20 mV. 3. Synaptic responses were recorded from cells in the IMG in response to stimulation of the right and left hypogastric nerves, ascending mesenteric, inferior splanchnic and colonic nerves. It has been established that more than forty preganglionic fibres converge on any one cell. Preganglionic fibres to the IMG were also observed in the pelvic nerves. 4. In contrast to the IMG, ganglion cells in the pelvic plexus received up to ten preganglionic fibres. 5. Ganglion cells responded to supramaximal preganglionic stimulation with up to four action potentials. 6. In the IMG, action potentials in response to synaptic action were followed by a prolonged period of hyperpolarization (after-hyperpolarization) and a later phase of prolonged depolarization (after-depolarization). The time course of these after potentials depended on the pattern of firing of action potentials during the period of stimulation. In the presence of dihydro-β-erythroidine, or if synaptic action was insufficient to evoke action potentials, only the after-depolarization was observed. 7. Other cells were impaled whose properties differed from those described above. In one group of cells the resting membrane potentials were higher (up to 85 mV), input resistances lower and the threshold for initiation of an action potential was higher. The other group were inexcitable, had high resting membrane potentials (up to 85 mV), low input resistances and underwent a slow depolarization in response to repetitive stimulation of preganglionic fibres. 8. This study indicates that marked convergence of

  8. Role of female sex hormones in neuronal nitric oxide release and metabolism in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Minoves, Nuria; Balfagón, Gloria; Ferrer, Mercedes

    2002-09-01

    This study examines the effects of female sex hormones on the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS), as well as the modulation of this response by neuronal NO. For this purpose, segments of denuded superior mesenteric artery from ovariectomized (OvX) female Sprague-Dawley rats and from control rats (in oestrus phase) were used. EFS induced frequency-dependent contractions, which were greater in segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester strengthened EFS-elicited contractions to a greater extent in arteries from OvX rats than in those from control rats. Similar results were observed with the preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole. The sensorial neurotoxin capsaicin did not modify EFS-induced contractions in segments from either group. In noradrenaline-precontracted segments, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced concentration-dependent relaxation, which was greater in segments from control rats than in those from OvX rats. 8-Bromo-cGMP induced similar concentration-dependent relaxation in noradrenaline-precontracted segments from both OvX and control rats. Diethyldithiocarbamate, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor, reduced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from both groups of rats. SOD, a superoxide anion scavenger, enhanced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from OvX rats, but did not modify it in segments from control rats. EFS induced NO(-)(2) formation, which was greater in segments from OvX than in those from control rats, and pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, a blocker of nerve impulse propagation, abolished release in both cases. These results suggest that EFS induces greater neuronal NO release in mesenteric segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats and, although NO metabolism is also higher, the contribution of net neuronal NO in the vasomotor response to EFS is greater in segments from OvX rats than in those

  9. Vasodilator actions of abnormal-cannabidiol in rat isolated small mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa Ho, W-S; Hiley, C Robin

    2003-01-01

    The nonpsychoactive cannabinoid abnormal-cannabidiol (trans-4-[3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) (abn-cbd) produced concentration-dependent relaxation of methoxamine-precontracted rat small mesenteric artery. Endothelial removal reduced abn-cbd potency six-fold without affecting the maximum relaxation. In endothelium-intact vessels, abn-cbd was less potent under 60 mM KCl-induced tone and inhibited by combination of L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor; 300 μM), apamin (small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels inhibitor; 50 nM) and charybdotoxin (inhibitor of intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BKCa; 50 nM). L-NAME alone or in combination with either toxin alone had little effect. In intact vessels, relaxations to abn-cbd were inhibited by SR 141716A (cannabinoid receptor antagonist; 1 or 3 μM). Concomitant addition of L-NAME, apamin and charybdotoxin had no further effect. Other cannabinoid receptor antagonists either had little (SR 144528; 1 μM and AM 251; 1 μM) or no effect (AM 630; 10 μM and AM 281; 1 μM). Inhibition of gap junctions, Gi/o protein coupling and protein kinase A also had no effect. Endothelium-independent relaxation to abn-cbd was unaffected by L-NAME, apamin plus charybdotoxin or capsaicin (10 μM). Abn-cbd inhibited CaCl2-induced contractions in vessels with depleted intracellular Ca2+ stores and stimulated with methoxamine or KCl. This was insensitive to SR 141716A (3 μM) but greatly reduced in vessels stimulated with ionomycin (Ca2+ ionophore; 1 μM). We conclude that abn-cbd relaxes the rat small mesenteric artery by endothelium-dependent activation of K+ channels via SR 141716A-sensitive pathways, which do not involve CB1 and CB2 receptors. It also causes endothelium-independent, SR 141716A-insensitive, relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. PMID:12711633

  10. Vasorelaxant effects of oleamide in rat small mesenteric artery indicate action at a novel cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Pui Man; Hiley, C Robin

    2006-03-01

    Oleamide (cis-9-octadecenoamide) exhibits some cannabimimetic responses despite its low affinities at the currently known cannabinoid receptors. Here we have investigated whether or not it is a vasorelaxant in rat small mesenteric arteries. Oleamide elicited vasorelaxation (EC50=1.2+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=99.1+/-3.9%, n=8) which was reduced by endothelial removal. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduced the response (EC50=5.3+/-1.6 microM, Rmax=59.2+/-7.7%, n=7; P<0.01) as did blockade of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KCa) with apamin plus charybdotoxin (both 50 nM) (EC50=2.1+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=58.4+/-1.9%, n=5; P<0.05). Desensitisation of vanilloid receptors with capsaicin (10 microM for 30 min) shifted the oleamide concentration-response curve approximately 30-fold to the right (n=7; P<0.01). Pertussis toxin (400 ng ml-1 for 2 h) caused a two-fold shift in the response curve (EC50=2.2+/-0.4 microM, Rmax=66.8+/-4.5%, n=6; P<0.01). Rimonabant (CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; SR141716A; 3 microM) significantly inhibited relaxation induced by oleamide (EC50=3.5+/-0.3 microM, Rmax=75.1+/-1.9%; n=8; P<0.05). In contrast, neither the more selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (1 microM), nor the CB2 antagonist, SR144528 (1 microM), had significant effects. O-1918 (10 microM), a putative antagonist at a novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (abnormal-cannabidiol site), markedly reduced the relaxation to oleamide (n=7; P<0.01). It is concluded that oleamide responses in the rat isolated small mesenteric artery are partly dependent on the presence of the endothelium, activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KC)) and involve capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Oleamide may share a receptor (sensitive to rimonabant and O-1918, and coupled to KC) and Gi/o) with anandamide in this vessel. This might be distinct from both of the known cannabinoid receptors and the novel abnormal-cannabidiol site. PMID:16415907

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Pregabalin on Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aşcı, Sanem; Demirci, Serpil; Aşcı, Halil; Doğuç, Duygu Kumbul; Onaran, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of disability in adults. Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury causes cerebral edema, hemorrhage, and neuronal death. Aims: In post-ischemic reperfusion, free radical production causes brain tissue damage by oxidative stress. Pregabalin, an antiepileptic agent was shown to have antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of pregabalin on ischemia and reperfusion in rat brain injury. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Male Wistar rats weighing (250–300 g) were randomly divided into six groups, each consisting of 6 rats: control (C), pregabalin (P), ischemia (I), pregabalin + ischemia (PI), ischemia + reperfusion (IR) and ischemia + reperfusion + pregabalin (PIR). Rats were initially pre-treated with 50 mg/kg/d pregabalin orally for two days. Then, animals that applied ischemia in I, PI, IR and PIR groups were exposed to carotid clamping for 30 minutes and 20 minutes reperfusion was performed in the relevant reperfusion groups. Results: NR2B receptor levels were significantly lower in the PIR group in comparison to the IR group. In the PIR group, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level had statistically significant decrease compared with IR group. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels were also significantly increased in the PIR group compared with I, IR and control groups. In the PI and PIR groups, catalase (CAT) levels were also significantly increased compared with I and IR groups (p=0.03 and p=0.07, respectively). Conclusion: Pregabalin may protect the damage of oxidative stress after ischemia + reperfusion. This result would illuminate clinical studies in the future. PMID:27403394

  12. Retino-choroidal ischemia in central retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nazimul; Hussain, Anjli

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old gentleman with insulin dependent diabetes had decreased vision in the right eye due to non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion with macular edema. One month following intravitreal ranibizumab, he developed retino-choroidal ischemia with further loss of vision. Authors show the fluorescein angiographic transition from non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion to retino-choroidal ischemia. PMID:25473353

  13. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  14. EEG Monitoring in Cerebral Ischemia: Basic Concepts and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    van Putten, Michel J A M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette

    2016-06-01

    EEG is very sensitive to changes in neuronal function resulting from ischemia. The authors briefly review essentials of EEG generation and the effects of ischemia on the underlying neuronal processes. They discuss the differential sensitivity of various neuronal processes to energy limitations, including synaptic disturbances. The clinical applications reviewed include continuous EEG monitoring during carotid surgery and acute ischemic stroke, and EEG monitoring for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:27258443

  15. Historical development of mesenteric anatomy provides a universally applicable anatomic paradigm for complete/total mesocolic excision.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Rishabh; Coffey, J Calvin

    2014-11-01

    Although total mesorectal excision has now become the 'gold standard' for the surgical management of rectal cancer, this is not so for colon cancer. Recent data, provided by Hohenberger and West et al. and others, have demonstrated excellent oncological outcomes when mesenterectomy is extensive (as is implicit in the concept of a 'high tie') and the mesenteric package not violated. Such studies highlight the importance of understanding the basics of the mesenteric organ (including the small intestinal mesentery, mesocolon, mesosigmoid and mesorectum) and of abiding to principles of planar surgery. In this review, we first offer classic descriptions of the mesocolon and then detail contemporary thinking. In so doing, we provide an anatomical basis for safe and effective complete mesocolic excision (CME) in the management of colon cancer. Finally we list opportunities associated with the new anatomical paradigm, demonstrating benefits across multiple disciplines. Perhaps most importantly, we feel that a crystallized view of mesenteric anatomy will overcome factors that have hindered the general uptake of CME. PMID:25035348

  16. Vasorelaxant activities of Danhong injection and their differential effects on the rat abdominal aorta and mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianming; Zhi, Xiaowen; Cui, Ting; Zheng, Qiaowei; Wang, Shixiang; Cao, Yongxiao; Cui, Changcong; Feng, Weiyi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have found that Danhong injection (DHI), an extensively used herbal extract preparation in China, might be a powerful vasodilator. The aims of this study were to determine the vascular activity of DHI and its effects on arteries of different sizes. The results showed that DHI significantly inhibited rat-hindquarters and rabbit-ear vasoconstriction elicited by norepinephrine (NE) perfusion and markedly relaxed KCl-contracted and NE-contracted rat abdominal aortic and mesenteric artery rings. The endothelium made only a minor contribution to the vasorelaxant effect of DHI on artery segments. The vasorelaxant effect of DHI varied with the artery size, with larger arteries exhibiting a more sensitive and potent vasodilator response. DHI relaxed NE-induced vasoconstriction probably through inhibition of the intracellular Ca2+ release through the inositol triphosphate receptor system in the abdominal aorta and mesenteric artery, along with blockage of extracellular Ca2+ influx through the receptor-linked Ca2+ channels in the mesenteric artery. In addition, DHI completely relaxed KCl-induced contraction in both of the arteries, suggesting that inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is involved in the vasorelaxant effect of DHI. This elucidation of the vascular effects of DHI and the underlying mechanisms could lead to improved clinical applications. PMID:25264751

  17. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of leukocytes-endothelium interaction in rat mesenteric microcirculation after endotoxin injection: role of inhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Neviere, Remi; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Buys, Bruno; Dhelin, Guy; Lesage, Jean C.; Mathieu, D.; Guery, Benoit; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to microvascular endothelium has been recognized as an important factor in the development of multiple organ dysfunction after a septic insult. We tested the hypothesis whether inhaled NO would reduce leukocyte rolling and / or leukocyte adhesion in the mesenteric venule preparation in endotoxemic rats. This study was performed with fluorescence imaging microscopy using a closed chamber for in vivo mesentery visualization. Leukocytes were selectively stained with acridine red. Compared to saline, endotoxemia was associated with increases in the flux of rolling leukocytes and in adherent and emigrated leukocytes. Inhaled nitric oxide treatment had no effects on leukocyte behavior in saline treated rats, whereas it reduced adherent and emigrated leukocytes in endotoxin-treated rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endotoxemia-induced leukocyte infiltration was related to an increase in the number of rolling leukocytes and subsequent adhesion and emigration in the mesenteric venule. Our results clearly showed that inhaled NO reduces leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in mesenteric venule of endotoxemic rats presumably by interfering with specific cell adhesion molecules.

  18. Mouse Transient Global Ischemia Two-Vessel Occlusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Pontarelli, Fabrizio; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Transient global ischemia in rodents induces delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons, as well as in some hilar neurons of the dentate gyrus, medium aspiny neurons of the striatum, pyramidal neurons in neocortical layers II, V and VI, and Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In contrast to focal ischemia that mimics regional stroke in humans, this model of global ischemia mimics the brain injury that occurs after human cardiac arrest. Early events include caspase activation, cleavage of anti-death Bcl-2 family proteins and large mitochondrial channel activity. Genetically engineered mice provide opportunities for study such as the knock-in mouse expressing a caspase-resistant form of Bcl-xL found to exhibit markedly reduced mitochondrial channel activity and reduced vulnerability to ischemia-induced neuronal death1. It is therefore relevant to adapt and develop a simple protocol for producing transient global ischemia in mouse2. The two-vessel occlusion model has been specifically developed to provide optimal outcomes in mouse and offers several advantages over the four-vessel occlusion model traditionally used in rat including the relative ease of the procedure as well as only a single day of surgery. However it should be noted that this procedure has a higher morbidity rate compared to other ischemia models as well as a higher degree of variability. These two disadvantages necessitate the use of a larger cohort of animals, which for many healthy breeding transgenic animals is a non-deterring factor.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of rutaecarpine on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunlin; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Shu; Xue, Guiping; Hou, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Rutaecarpine, an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Tetradium ruticarpum, has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Because both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are forms of ischemic vascular disease, they are closely related. We hypothesized that rutaecarpine also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. A cerebral ischemia reperfusion model was established after 84, 252 and 504 μg/kg carpine were given to mice via intraperitoneal injection, daily for 7 days. Results of the step through test, 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride dyeing and oxidative stress indicators showed that rutaecarpine could improve learning and memory ability, neurological symptoms and reduce infarction volume and cerebral water content in mice with cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Rutaecarpine could significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content and increase the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in mouse brain. Therefore, rutaecarpine could improve neurological function following injury induced by cerebral ischemia reperfusion, and the mechanism of this improvement may be associated with oxidative stress. These results verify that rutaecarpine has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion in mice. PMID:25206511

  20. Vinpocetine modulates metabolic activity and function during retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; O'Brien, Brendan J; Truong, Mai; Guo, Cindy X; Kalloniatis, Michael; Acosta, Monica L

    2015-05-01

    Vinpocetine protects against a range of degenerative conditions and insults of the central nervous system via multiple modes of action. Little is known, however, of its effects on metabolism. This may be highly relevant, as vinpocetine is highly protective against ischemia, a process that inhibits normal metabolic function. This study uses the ischemic retina as a model to characterize vinpocetine's effects on metabolism. Vinpocetine reduced the metabolic demand of the retina following ex vivo hypoxia and ischemia to normal levels based on lactate dehydrogenase activity. Vinpocetine delivered similar effects in an in vivo model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion, possibly through increasing glucose availability. Vinpocetine's effects on glucose also appeared to improve glutamate homeostasis in ischemic Müller cells. Other actions of vinpocetine following ischemia-reperfusion, such as reduced cell death and improved retinal function, were possibly a combination of the drug's actions on metabolism and other retinal pathways. Vinpocetine's metabolic effects appeared independent of its other known actions in ischemia, as it recovered retinal function in a separate metabolic model where the glutamate-to-glutamine metabolic pathway was inhibited in Müller cells. The results of this study indicate that vinpocetine mediates ischemic damage partly through altered metabolism and has potential beneficial effects as a treatment for ischemia of neuronal tissues. PMID:25696811

  1. Methods for Acute and Subacute Murine Hindlimb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Michael E; McCord, Timothy J; McClung, Joseph M; Kontos, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and animal models that reliably reproduce the human disease are necessary to develop new therapies for this disease. The mouse hindlimb ischemia model has been widely used for this purpose, but the standard practice of inducing acute limb ischemia by ligation of the femoral artery can result in substantial tissue necrosis, compromising investigators' ability to study the vascular and skeletal muscle tissue responses to ischemia. An alternative approach to femoral artery ligation is the induction of gradual femoral artery occlusion through the use of ameroid constrictors. When placed around the femoral artery in the same or different locations as the sites of femoral artery ligation, these devices occlude the artery over 1 - 3 days, resulting in more gradual, subacute ischemia. This results in less substantial skeletal muscle tissue necrosis, which may more closely mimic the responses seen in human PAD. Because genetic background influences outcomes in both the acute and subacute ischemia models, consideration of the mouse strain being studied is important in choosing the best model. This paper describes the proper procedure and anatomical placement of ligatures or ameroid constrictors on the mouse femoral artery to induce subacute or acute hindlimb ischemia in the mouse. PMID:27403963

  2. Methods for Acute and Subacute Murine Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Michael E.; McCord, Timothy J.; McClung, Joseph M.; Kontos, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and animal models that reliably reproduce the human disease are necessary to develop new therapies for this disease. The mouse hindlimb ischemia model has been widely used for this purpose, but the standard practice of inducing acute limb ischemia by ligation of the femoral artery can result in substantial tissue necrosis, compromising investigators' ability to study the vascular and skeletal muscle tissue responses to ischemia. An alternative approach to femoral artery ligation is the induction of gradual femoral artery occlusion through the use of ameroid constrictors. When placed around the femoral artery in the same or different locations as the sites of femoral artery ligation, these devices occlude the artery over 1-3 days, resulting in more gradual, subacute ischemia. This results in less substantial skeletal muscle tissue necrosis, which may more closely mimic the responses seen in human PAD. Because genetic background influences outcomes in both the acute and subacute ischemia models, consideration of the mouse strain being studied is important in choosing the best model. This paper describes the proper procedure and anatomical placement of ligatures or ameroid constrictors on the mouse femoral artery to induce subacute or acute hindlimb ischemia in the mouse. PMID:27403963

  3. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  4. A Program for Solving the Brain Ischemia Problem

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Our recently described nonlinear dynamical model of cell injury is here applied to the problems of brain ischemia and neuroprotection. We discuss measurement of global brain ischemia injury dynamics by time course analysis. Solutions to proposed experiments are simulated using hypothetical values for the model parameters. The solutions solve the global brain ischemia problem in terms of “master bifurcation diagrams” that show all possible outcomes for arbitrary durations of all lethal cerebral blood flow (CBF) decrements. The global ischemia master bifurcation diagrams: (1) can map to a single focal ischemia insult, and (2) reveal all CBF decrements susceptible to neuroprotection. We simulate measuring a neuroprotectant by time course analysis, which revealed emergent nonlinear effects that set dynamical limits on neuroprotection. Using over-simplified stroke geometry, we calculate a theoretical maximum protection of approximately 50% recovery. We also calculate what is likely to be obtained in practice and obtain 38% recovery; a number close to that often reported in the literature. The hypothetical examples studied here illustrate the use of the nonlinear cell injury model as a fresh avenue of approach that has the potential, not only to solve the brain ischemia problem, but also to advance the technology of neuroprotection. PMID:24961411

  5. Differential inhibition of noradrenaline release mediated by inhibitory A₁-adenosine receptors in the mesenteric vein and artery from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, C; Sousa, J B; Vieira-Rocha, M S; Fresco, P; Gonçalves, J; Diniz, C

    2013-03-01

    Mesenteric arteries and veins are densely innervated by sympathetic nerves and are crucial in the regulation of peripheral resistance and capacitance, respectively, thus, in the control of blood pressure. Presynaptic adenosine receptors are involved in vascular tonus regulation, by modulating noradrenaline release from vascular postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. Some studies also suggest that adenosine receptors (AR) may have a role in hypertension. We aim at investigating the role of presynaptic adenosine receptors in mesenteric vessels and establish a relationship between their effects (in mesenteric vessels) and hypertension, using the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a model of hypertension. Adenosine receptor-mediated modulation of noradrenaline release was investigated through the effects of selective agonists and antagonists on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow. CPA (A1AR selective agonist: 1-100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow, but the inhibition was lower in SHR mesenteric vessels. IB-MECA (A3AR selective agonist: 1-100 nM) also inhibited tritium overflow but only in WKY mesenteric veins. CGS 21680 (A2AAR selective agonist: up to 100 nM) failed to facilitate noradrenaline release in mesenteric veins, from both strains, but induced a similar facilitation in the mesenteric arteries. NECA (non-selective AR agonist: 1, 3 and 10μM), in the presence of A1 (DPCPX, 20 nM) and A3 (MRS 1523, 1 μM) AR selective antagonists, failed to change tritium overflow. In summary, the modulatory effects mediated by presynaptic adenosine receptors were characterized, for the first time, in mesenteric vessels: a major inhibition exerted by the A1 subtype in both vessels; a slight inhibition mediated by A3 receptors in mesenteric vein; a facilitation mediated by A2A receptors only in mesenteric artery (from both strains). The less efficient prejunctional adenosine receptor mediated inhibitory effects can contribute to an increase of noradrenaline in

  6. Haemodynamic changes in the superior mesenteric artery induced by acupuncture stimulation on the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Takayama, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Nagase, Satoru; Seki, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is commonly performed on acupoints. A comparison of quantitative physiological alterations induced by stimulation on different acupoints has never been performed in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in humans. Therefore, we investigated changes in blood flow volume (BFV) in the SMA as an indicator of physiological effects induced by stimulation on 3 points. Thirty healthy participants aged 29 ± 10 years (mean ± SD) were enrolled. All participants underwent stimulations on 3 points located in the lower legs: ST36, LR3, and a non-acupoint. Control pertains to a condition with no-stimulation. Stimulation was performed bilaterally with manual rotation of the needles. BFV was measured by ultrasonography before insertion and 10, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after stimulation. Following acupuncture on ST36, BFV increased significantly 20 and 30 minutes after stimulation, compared to BFV before insertion (P < 0.05). Following stimulation on LR3 and the non-acupoint, no significant differences in BFV could be found. Relative to the no-stimulation group, stimulation on LR3, and the non-acupoint, stimulation on ST36 elicited a significant increase in BFV (P < 0.05). The results suggest that stimulation on the different points causes distinct physiological effects in BFV in the SMA. PMID:22675391

  7. Garcinielliptone FC, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from Platonia insignis Mart., promotes vasorelaxant effect on rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; da Costa-Júnior, Joaquim Soares; Moura, Lucas Henrique Porfírio; Ferraz, Alexandre Barros Falcão; Rossatto, Raíssa Rebés; David, Jorge Maurício; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Oliveira, Rita de Cássia Meneses; Citó, Antônia Maria das Graças Lopes; de Oliveira, Aldeídia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Polyisoprenylated benzophenones represent a group of chemical compounds commonly identified in Clusiaceae species and are responsible for a large amount of biological activities. In this work, the vasorelaxant effect induced by garcinielliptone FC (GFC) isolated from Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae), a monotype species from Platonia genus, was investigated. GFC promoted an endothelium-independent vasorelaxation on phenylephrine (PHE, 10(-5) mol L(-1))-induced vasoconstriction, but not on KCl (80 mmol L(-1))-induced vasoconstriction, on rat superior mesenteric artery rings. In addition, a concentration-dependent decrease of PHE- or serotonin-induced cumulative concentration-response curves was observed for GFC, and a slight decrease of pD₂ value on CaCl₂-induced vasoconstriction. In a Ca(2+)-free medium, GFC interfered in calcium mobilisation from PHE (10(-5) mol L(-1))-sensitive intracellular stores. GFC-induced vasorelaxant effect is probably mediated by a dual effect on mobilisation of calcium intracellular stores and attenuation of transmembrane calcium influx. PMID:24579922

  8. Image correlation method for measuring flow and diameter changes in contracting mesenteric microlymphatics in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Cote, Gerard; Gashev, Anatoly; Greiner, Steven; Moore, James; Zawieja, David

    2006-02-01

    Collecting microlymphatics play a vital role in promoting lymph flow from the initial lymphatics in the interstitial spaces to the large transport lymph ducts. In most tissues, the primary mechanism for producing this flow is the spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic wall. Individual units, known as lymphangion, are separated by valves that help prevent backflow when the vessel contracts, thus promoting flow through the lymphatic network. Lymphatic contractile activity is inhibited by flow in isolated lymphatics, however there are virtually no in situ measurements of lymph flow in these vessels. One of the difficulties associated with obtaining such measurements is the time consuming methods of manual particle tracking used previously by our group. Using an in situ preparation with mesenteric microlymphatics (~ 100 μm in diameter) and a high speed imaging system (500 fps), we have developed an image correlation method to measure lymphatic flow with a standard error of prediction of 0.3 mm/sec when compared with manual particle tracking.

  9. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  10. [Effect of trimebutine on cholinergic transmission in neurons of the inferior mesenteric ganglion of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Julé, Y

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of trimebutine on the synaptic activity of neurons of the rabbit inferior mesenteric ganglion, using intracellular recording techniques. The synaptic activity was produced by subthreshold stimuli (0.5 Hz) applied individually, on lumbar splanchnic and lumbar colonic nerves. These stimuli triggered cholinergic responses corresponding to fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. In 8 of 20 neurones tested trimebutine (10(-6) g/ml) produced an inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, without any change in the resting membrane potential. In 6 of 20 neurons tested, trimebutine produced, successively, an early facilitation followed by a late inhibition of excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Both effects occurred without change in the resting membrane potential. The inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine were accompanied, by an increase and a decrease in the number of failures of nerve stimulation respectively. These results indicate that inhibitory and facilitatory effects of trimebutine correspond respectively to a decrease and an increase in the amount of acetylcholine released from presynaptic nerve terminals originating from the spinal cord and the distal colon. PMID:3038656

  11. Sympathetic neuroeffector transmission to pulmonary vascular smooth muscle in porcine superior mesenteric arterial occlusion (SMAO) shock.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S; Glenn, T M; Eddy, L J; Rebert, R R

    1980-01-01

    Splanchnic arterial occlusion shock results in pulmonary endothelial damage and depression of porcine intralobar pulmonary artery and vein contractility. This study evaluates the functional integrity of the adrenergic nerves innervating intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins and the changes in neurotransmission following 1) superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) shock in swine; 2) sequential inhibition of prostacyclin, thromboxane, and prostaglandin synthesis; and 3) mechanical stripping of the endothelium. Rings of porcine intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins were obtained from sham and SMAO shocked swine. They were suspended in muscle baths and stimulated transmurally at 1-32 Hz, 2 msec duration, 2 msec delay at 7.5-10V. Some experiments were performed on rings of intralobular pulmonary arteries and veins in which the endothelium was stripped with a razor blade. Appropriate inverted-reverted controls were used to account for any deleterious effects of the preparatory techniques involved in stripping. Intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins from sham swine contracted in response to 1 Hz, with maximum responses at 32 Hz. The responses to nerve stimulation were enhanced by cocaine and inhibited by phentolamine, an alpha-receptor antagonist. Inhibition of endothelial prostacyclin synthesis, as well as endothelial stripping, diminished by 30-40% the responses to nerve stimulation. The responses to nerve stimulation were depressed in both intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins in SMAO shocked swine. The data demonstrate physiologic regulation of neural control in porcine pulmonary blood vessels. Furthermore, the data suggest that prostaglandin, the vascular endothelium, and shock, may modify this process. PMID:7315616

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSLATION AND JETTING OF ULTRASOUND-ACTIVATED MICROBUBBLES IN MESENTERIC MICROVESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    High-speed photomicrography was used to study the translational dynamics of single microbubbles in microvessels of ex vivo rat mesenteries. The microbubbles were insonated by a single 2 μs ultrasound pulse with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures spanning the range of 0.8–4 MPa. The microvessel diameters ranged from 10 – 80 μm. The high-speed image sequences show evidence of ultrasound-activated microbubble translation away from the nearest vessel wall; no microbubble showed a net translation toward the nearest vessel wall. Microbubble maximum translational displacements exceeded 20 μm. Microjets with the direction of the jets identifiable were also observed; all microjets appear to have been directed away from the nearest vessel wall. These observations appear to be characteristic of a strong coupling between ultrasound-driven microbubbles and compliant microvessels. Although limited to mesenteric tissues, these observations provide an important step in understanding the physical interactions between microbubbles and microvessels. PMID:22036639

  13. Inherent rhythm of smooth muscle cells in rat mesenteric arterioles: An eigensystem formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I. Lin; Moshkforoush, Arash; Hong, Kwangseok; Meininger, Gerald A.; Hill, Michael A.; Tsoukias, Nikolaos M.; Kuo, Watson

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of experimental data and mathematical equations in the literature, we remodel the ionic dynamics of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as an eigensystem formulation, which is valid for investigating finite variations of variables from the equilibrium such as in common experimental operations. This algorithm provides an alternate viewpoint from frequency-domain analysis and enables one to probe functionalities of SMCs' rhythm by means of a resonance-related mechanism. Numerical results show three types of calcium oscillations of SMCs in mesenteric arterioles: spontaneous calcium oscillation, agonist-dependent calcium oscillation, and agonist-dependent calcium spike. For simple single and double SMCs, we demonstrate properties of synchronization among complex signals related to calcium oscillations, and show different correlation relations between calcium and voltage signals for various synchronization and resonance conditions. For practical cell clusters, our analyses indicate that the rhythm of SMCs could (1) benefit enhancements of signal communications among remote cells, (2) respond to a significant calcium peaking against transient stimulations for triggering globally oscillating modes, and (3) characterize the globally oscillating modes via frog-leap (non-molecular-diffusion) calcium waves across inhomogeneous SMCs.

  14. Haemodynamic Changes in the Superior Mesenteric Artery Induced by Acupuncture Stimulation on the Lower Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masashi; Takayama, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Nagase, Satoru; Seki, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is commonly performed on acupoints. A comparison of quantitative physiological alterations induced by stimulation on different acupoints has never been performed in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in humans. Therefore, we investigated changes in blood flow volume (BFV) in the SMA as an indicator of physiological effects induced by stimulation on 3 points. Thirty healthy participants aged 29 ± 10 years (mean ± SD) were enrolled. All participants underwent stimulations on 3 points located in the lower legs: ST36, LR3, and a non-acupoint. Control pertains to a condition with no-stimulation. Stimulation was performed bilaterally with manual rotation of the needles. BFV was measured by ultrasonography before insertion and 10, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after stimulation. Following acupuncture on ST36, BFV increased significantly 20 and 30 minutes after stimulation, compared to BFV before insertion (P < 0.05). Following stimulation on LR3 and the non-acupoint, no significant differences in BFV could be found. Relative to the no-stimulation group, stimulation on LR3, and the non-acupoint, stimulation on ST36 elicited a significant increase in BFV (P < 0.05). The results suggest that stimulation on the different points causes distinct physiological effects in BFV in the SMA. PMID:22675391

  15. Advanced age decreases local calcium signaling in endothelium of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boerman, Erika M; Everhart, Jesse E; Segal, Steven S

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with vascular dysfunction that impairs tissue perfusion, physical activity, and the quality of life. Calcium signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is integral to vasomotor control, exemplified by localized Ca(2+) signals within EC projections through holes in the internal elastic lamina (IEL). Within these microdomains, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization is integral to smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation via coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. However, the effects of aging on local EC Ca(2+) signals (and thereby signaling between ECs and SMCs) remain unclear, and these events have not been investigated in vivo. Furthermore, it is unknown whether aging affects either the number or the size of IEL holes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that local EC Ca(2+) signaling is impaired with advanced age along with a reduction in IEL holes. In anesthetized mice expressing a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent protein (GCaMP2) selectively in ECs, our findings illustrate that for mesenteric arteries controlling splanchnic blood flow the frequency of spontaneous local Ca(2+) signals in ECs was reduced by ∼85% in old (24-26 mo) vs. young (3-6 mo) animals. At the same time, the number (and total area) of holes per square millimeter of IEL was reduced by ∼40%. We suggest that diminished signaling between ECs and SMCs contributes to dysfunction of resistance arteries with advanced age.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/aging-impairs-endothelial-ca2-signaling/. PMID:26945073

  16. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  17. Vascular responses to compound 48/80 in rat mesenteric vascular beds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Li, Zhen; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Jin, Xin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Sun, Pengyuan

    2016-06-01

    A further investigation was performed on the vascular effect of endogenous histamine using the histamine releaser, compound 48/80, in rat mesenteric vascular beds with active tone. In preparations with intact endothelium, low concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-5) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-5) mg/mL) perfusion for 1 min only induced a small vasodilation. High concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-4) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-2) mg/mL) induced a biphasic vascular responses, an initial vasoconstriction followed a subsequent long-lasting vasodilation. The vasodilation induced by low concentrations of compound 48/80 and the vasoconstriction induced by high concentration of compound 48/80 was inhibited by olopatadine. However, cimetidine did not affect the responses induced by compound 48/80. Endothelium removal enlarged the compound 48/80-induced phase-2 vasoconstriction, while it attenuated the phase-3 vasodilation. Additionally, indomethacin and seratrodast significantly inhibited vasoconstriction but it did not affect the long-lasting vasodilation induced by high concentrations of compound 48/80. Ruthenium red inhibited the vasodilation induced by low concentrations and high concentrations of compound 48/80. These results suggest that the vasoconstriction induce by high concentrations of compound 48/80 is mediated by endogenous histamine released from mast cells. It is also suggested that thromboxane A2 released from mast cells is related to the vasoconstriction. PMID:26991394

  18. Autologous Peritoneum Graft Repair of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Defect During Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Sumer, Fatih; Polat, Yilmaz; Kutlu, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancers frequently invade the portomesenteric veins. Venous resection during pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intent is more common now than it was in the past. Most venous resections can be repaired primarily, but some require vascular grafts. Here, we describe the use of an autologous parietal peritoneum graft instead of vascular grafts for repairing a superior mesenteric vein (SMV) defect. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with en bloc resection of the SMV lateral wall was performed in a 70-year-old woman with cancer of the pancreatic head. The SMV defect was 2 cm long and its width was half the SMV circumference. The defect was covered with a 3 × 2 cm parietal autologous peritoneum graft obtained from the left subcostal area and using running 6/0 polypropylene suture. Tension-free patching was performed, and we retained slight bulging of the graft. Her postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged on Day 11 after computed tomography confirmed the patency of the SMV, despite slight narrowing. She was well after 10 months of follow-up. Autologous parietal peritoneum grafts can be used for repairing partial venous defects during pancreaticoduodenectomy. They are effective and are easy, fast, and cheap to obtain. PMID:26594604

  19. Agonist-induced activation of rat mesenteric resistance vessels: comparison between noradrenaline and vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Cauvin, C.; Weir, S.W.; Wallnoefer, A.R.; Rueegg, U.P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of noradrenaline (NA, 10(-5) M) and (arginine8)vasopressin (AVP, 10(-7) M) on tension in Ca2+-free medium and on membrane potential, and the inhibition of NA- and AVP-induced contractions by isradipine, have been compared in mesenteric resistance vessels (MRVs) from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The release of intracellular Ca2+ by AVP contributed significantly less to its tension development than does that by NA. Nonetheless, the concentration-response curves for inhibition by isradipine of NA- and AVP-induced tonic tension were nearly identical. Similarly, these two agonists produced the same degree of membrane depolarization. In addition, both agonists were able to stimulate large contractions in vessels previously depolarized by 80 mM K+. AVP also stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into rat cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In contrast to the stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx by KCl depolarization, the agonist-stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx was insensitive to inhibition by organic Ca2+ antagonists. It is concluded that Ca2+ entry through receptor-operated Ca2+-permeable channels (ROCs) may contribute to agonist-induced activation of rat aortic and MRV smooth muscle.

  20. Pre-existing oral contrast from lanthanum carbonate: a confounding factor in CT mesenteric angiography

    PubMed Central

    Bull, M D; Shrimanker, R; Thomas, M R M; Mulgrew, C J

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old male was referred from the renal unit to radiology for investigation of bleeding per rectum. A CT mesenteric angiogram was performed. However, it was noted on the pre-contrast images that the large bowel contained positive oral contrast media. The procedure was abandoned as it would have been difficult to see extravasation of intravenous contrast from a bleeding point in the large bowel. The initial belief was that either the patient had been given oral contrast by ward staff on the assumption that it would be needed, or had had a recent radiological study requiring contrast, which was still present. Neither was the case; it emerged that the patient was taking Fosrenol (Shire Pharmaceuticals, Wayne, PA), a lanthanum carbonate medication used in the treatment of hyperphosphataemia. Lanthanum is densely radio-opaque and appears as positive bowel contrast on CT and plain radiography studies. When considering radiological studies specifically requiring the absence of oral contrast, it is important to be aware of the patient's drug history to avoid non-diagnostic scans with the associated radiation exposure. PMID:22457410

  1. Microbiota restricts trafficking of bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes by CX(3)CR1(hi) cells.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Gretchen E; Longman, Randy S; Zhang, Jing-Xin; Breart, Beatrice; Galan, Carolina; Cuesta, Adolfo; Schwab, Susan R; Littman, Dan R

    2013-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota has a critical role in immune system and metabolic homeostasis, but it must be tolerated by the host to avoid inflammatory responses that can damage the epithelial barrier separating the host from the luminal contents. Breakdown of this regulation and the resulting inappropriate immune response to commensals are thought to lead to the development of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We proposed that the intestinal immune system is instructed by the microbiota to limit responses to luminal antigens. Here we demonstrate in mice that, at steady state, the microbiota inhibits the transport of both commensal and pathogenic bacteria from the lumen to a key immune inductive site, the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). However, in the absence of Myd88 or under conditions of antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, non-invasive bacteria were trafficked to the MLNs in a CCR7-dependent manner, and induced both T-cell responses and IgA production. Trafficking was carried out by CX(3)CR1(hi) mononuclear phagocytes, an intestinal-cell population previously reported to be non-migratory. These findings define a central role for commensals in regulating the migration to the MLNs of CX(3)CR1(hi) mononuclear phagocytes endowed with the ability to capture luminal bacteria, thereby compartmentalizing the intestinal immune response to avoid inflammation. PMID:23334413

  2. Inherent rhythm of smooth muscle cells in rat mesenteric arterioles: An eigensystem formulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, I Lin; Moshkforoush, Arash; Hong, Kwangseok; Meininger, Gerald A; Hill, Michael A; Tsoukias, Nikolaos M; Kuo, Watson

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of experimental data and mathematical equations in the literature, we remodel the ionic dynamics of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as an eigensystem formulation, which is valid for investigating finite variations of variables from the equilibrium such as in common experimental operations. This algorithm provides an alternate viewpoint from frequency-domain analysis and enables one to probe functionalities of SMCs' rhythm by means of a resonance-related mechanism. Numerical results show three types of calcium oscillations of SMCs in mesenteric arterioles: spontaneous calcium oscillation, agonist-dependent calcium oscillation, and agonist-dependent calcium spike. For simple single and double SMCs, we demonstrate properties of synchronization among complex signals related to calcium oscillations, and show different correlation relations between calcium and voltage signals for various synchronization and resonance conditions. For practical cell clusters, our analyses indicate that the rhythm of SMCs could (1) benefit enhancements of signal communications among remote cells, (2) respond to a significant calcium peaking against transient stimulations for triggering globally oscillating modes, and (3) characterize the globally oscillating modes via frog-leap (non-molecular-diffusion) calcium waves across inhomogeneous SMCs. PMID:27176337

  3. Gut-derived mesenteric lymph but not portal blood increases endothelial cell permeability and promotes lung injury after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Magnotti, L J; Upperman, J S; Xu, D Z; Lu, Q; Deitch, E A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether gut-derived factors leading to organ injury and increased endothelial cell permeability would be present in the mesenteric lymph at higher levels than in the portal blood of rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock. This hypothesis was tested by examining the effect of portal blood plasma and mesenteric lymph on endothelial cell monolayers and the interruption of mesenteric lymph flow on shock-induced lung injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The absence of detectable bacteremia or endotoxemia in the portal blood of trauma victims casts doubt on the role of the gut in the generation of multiple organ failure. Nevertheless, previous experimental work has clearly documented the connection between shock and gut injury as well as the concept of gut-induced sepsis and distant organ failure. One explanation for this apparent paradox would be that gut-derived inflammatory factors are reaching the lung and systemic circulation via the gut lymphatics rather than the portal circulation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers, grown in two-compartment systems, were exposed to media, sham-shock, or postshock portal blood plasma or lymph, and permeability to rhodamine (10K) was measured. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 90 minutes of sham or actual shock and shock plus lymphatic division (before and after shock). Lung permeability, pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, alveolar apoptosis, and bronchoalveolar fluid protein content were used to quantitate lung injury. RESULTS: Postshock lymph increased endothelial cell monolayer permeability but not postshock plasma, sham-shock lymph/plasma, or medium. Lymphatic division before hemorrhagic shock prevented shock-induced increases in lung permeability to Evans blue dye and alveolar apoptosis and reduced pulmonary MPO levels. In contrast, division of the mesenteric lymphatics at the end of the shock period but before reperfusion ameliorated but failed to prevent increased lung permeability

  4. Chapter 7. Mouse models of ischemic angiogenesis and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Joshua I; Suliman, Ahmed; Barillas, Samuel; Angle, Niren

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) events are distinct but interrelated processes etiologic to the most prevalent human diseases. A delicate balance exists whereby ischemic injury can result in beneficial angiogenesis or in detrimental reperfusion injury overwhelming the organism. Here, we describe in vivo models of ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury with emphasis on murine hindlimb ischemia models. We also provide a brief introduction to murine myocardial ischemia experiments. Each model is described in the context of human disease. Emphasis is made on the strengths and weaknesses of the available techniques, particularly as it relates to data analysis, interpretation, and translational relevance. PMID:19007664

  5. Effects of carbon monoxide on myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Allred, E N; Bleecker, E R; Chaitman, B R; Dahms, T E; Gottlieb, S O; Hackney, J D; Pagano, M; Selvester, R H; Walden, S M; Warren, J

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether low doses of carbon monoxide (CO) exacerbate myocardial ischemia during a progressive exercise test. The effect of CO exposure was evaluated using the objective measure of time to development of electrocardiographic changes indicative of ischemia and the subjective measure of time to onset of angina. Sixty-three male subjects (41-75 years) with well-documented coronary artery disease, who had exertional angina pectoris and ischemic ST-segment changes in their electrocardiograms, were studied. Results from three randomized, double-blind test visits (room air, low and high CO) were compared. The effect of CO exposure was determined from the percent difference in the end points obtained on exercise tests performed before and after a 1-hr exposure to room air or CO. The exposures resulted in postexercise carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels of 0.6% +/- 0.3%, 2.0% +/- 0.1%, and 3.9% +/- 0.1%. The results obtained on the 2%-COHb day and 3.9%-COHb day were compared to those on the room air day. There were 5.1% (p = 0.01) and 12.1% (p less than or equal to 0.0001) decreases in the time to development of ischemic ST-segment changes after exposures producing 2.0 and 3.9% COHb, respectively, compared to the control day. In addition, there were 4.2% (p = 0.027) and 7.1% (p = 0.002) decreases in time to the onset of angina after exposures producing 2.0 and 3.9% COHb, respectively, compared to the control day. A significant dose-response relationship was found for the individual differences in the time to ST end point and angina for the pre- versus postexposure exercise tests at the three carboxyhemoglobin levels. These findings demonstrate that low doses of CO produce significant effects on cardiac function during exercise in subjects with coronary artery disease. PMID:2040254

  6. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  7. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  8. Novel Biomarkers of Arterial and Venous Ischemia in Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Gerard K.; Monahan, John F. W.; Davis, Gabrielle B.; Lee, Yong Suk; Ragina, Neli P.; Wang, Charles; Zhou, Zhao Y.; Hong, Young Kwon; Spivak, Ryan M.; Wong, Alex K.

    2013-01-01

    The field of reconstructive microsurgery is experiencing tremendous growth, as evidenced by recent advances in face and hand transplantation, lower limb salvage after trauma, and breast reconstruction. Common to all of these procedures is the creation of a nutrient vascular supply by microsurgical anastomosis between a single artery and vein. Complications related to occluded arterial inflow and obstructed venous outflow are not uncommon, and can result in irreversible tissue injury, necrosis, and flap loss. At times, these complications are challenging to clinically determine. Since early intervention with return to the operating room to re-establish arterial inflow or venous outflow is key to flap salvage, the accurate diagnosis of early stage complications is essential. To date, there are no biochemical markers or serum assays that can predict these complications. In this study, we utilized a rat model of flap ischemia in order to identify the transcriptional signatures of venous congestion and arterial ischemia. We found that the critical ischemia time for the superficial inferior epigastric fasciocutaneus flap was four hours and therefore performed detailed analyses at this time point. Histolgical analysis confirmed significant differences between arterial and venous ischemia. The transcriptome of ischemic, congested, and control flap tissues was deciphered by performing Affymetrix microarray analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Principal component analysis revealed that arterial ischemia and venous congestion were characterized by distinct transcriptomes. Arterial ischemia and venous congestion was characterized by 408 and 1536>2-fold differentially expressed genes, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to identify five candidate genes Prol1, Muc1, Fcnb, Il1b, and Vcsa1 to serve as biomarkers for flap failure in both arterial ischemia and venous congestion. Our data suggests that Prol1 and Vcsa1 may be specific indicators of venous congestion and allow clinicians to

  9. Intravascular heparin protects muscle flaps from ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Cooley, B C; Fowler, J D; Gould, J S

    1995-01-01

    Heparin has been found to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle and other tissue/organ systems. The timing of heparin administration to the muscle vasculature has not been explored. We investigated the use of heparinized blood as a washout solution during ischemia to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury. A rat cutaneous maximus muscle free flap was subjected to a 10-hr period of room temperature ischemia, then was heterotopically transplanted to the groin via microsurgical revascularization to the femoral vessels. In three experimental groups, flaps were subjected to brief ex vivo perfusion with autologous heparinized blood, at 2, 5, or 8 hr into the 10-hr ischemic interval. In the two other groups, the flaps were not perfused, and the animals were systemically heparinized either before ischemia or before transplantation, respectively. A control group underwent no flap perfusion or systemic heparinization. After transplantation, flaps were given a 48-hr period of in vivo reperfusion, then were harvested for evaluation. Flaps undergoing ex vivo perfusion or preischemic heparinization had no significant differences in weight gain (edema) compared with flaps receiving posttransplant heparinization or no heparinization (controls). The dehydrogenase staining of muscle biopsies was significantly faster (indicative of viable tissue) for perfused flaps and the flaps for which the animals received preischemic heparinization, when compared with flaps for which the animals received posttransplant heparinization or no heparinization. From these results, we conclude that heparin offers protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury when it can be introduced into the vascular network either prior to or during the ischemia period. These findings suggest the possibility of using heparinized washout solutions to enhance survival in amputated extremities. PMID:7783611

  10. Spin label oximetry to assess extracellular oxygen during myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, J E; Froncisz, W; Joseph, J; Kalyanaraman, B

    1997-01-01

    We describe real-time measurement of myocardial oxygen consumption during ischemia in the intact heart. Measurement of extracellular oxygen concentration during myocardial ischemia by spin label oximetry has been limited by ischemia-induced reduction of the neutral, water-soluble nitroxide TEMPONE. We have overcome this problem by encapsulating the nitroxides. Isolated immature (7-10 d old) rabbit hearts (n = 8) were perfused aerobically within the cavity of a loop gap resonator with bicarbonate buffer containing an oxygen-sensitive, lipid-soluble nitroxide (14N-TEMPO laurate in FC-43 perfluorocarbon micelles) and a much less oxygen-sensitive and positively charged nitroxide (15N-TEMPO choline in multilamellar vesicles) as an internal standard. The ratio of the ESR signal amplitudes of these nitroxides was used as a sensitive index of oxygen concentration. Sequestration of the nitroxides decreased their reduction rate by ascorbate in comparison with nonsequestered nitroxides. Hearts were subjected to 60 min of global no-flow ischemia at 20 degrees C. Extracellular oxygen content (mean +/- SD) during aerobic perfusion was 1195 +/- 55 mumol/liter. The electron spin resonance signal from TEMPO laurate increased with the onset and progression of ischemia, consistent with a decrease in extracellular oxygen, while the signal for TEMPO choline was relatively unchanged. Extracellular oxygen content after 40 and 60 min of ischemia was reduced to 393 +/- 27 mumol/liter (p < .05) and 61 +/- 5 mumol/liter (p < .05), respectively. We conclude that spin-label oximetry can directly and precisely measure myocardial oxygen consumption at constant temperature during ischemia in the intact heart. PMID:8958135

  11. Thrombolysis and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M; Díez Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Fuentes, B; Carceller, F; Roda, J M

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. The resulting burden on society grows with the increase in the incidence of stroke. The term brain attack was introduced to describe the acute presentation of stroke and emphasize the need for urgent action to remedy the situation. Though a large number of therapeutic agents, like thrombolytics, NMDA receptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers and antioxidants, have been used or are being evaluated, there is still a large gap between the benefits of these agents and the properties of an ideal drug for stroke. So far, only thrombolysis with rtPA within a 3-hour time window has been shown to improve the outcome of patients with ischemic stroke. Understanding the mechanisms of injury and neuroprotection in these diseases is important to target news sites for treating ischemia. Better evaluation of the drugs and increased similarity between the results of animal experimentation and in the clinical setting requires critical assessment of the selection of animal models and the parameters to be evaluated. Our laboratory has employed a rat embolic stroke model to investigate the combination of rtPA with citicoline as compared to monotherapy alone and investigated whether neuroprotection should be provided before or after thrombolysis in order to achieve a greater reduction of ischemic brain damage. PMID:16651822

  12. CERAMIDE AND MITOCHONDRIA IN ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Novgorodov, Sergei A.; Gudz, Tatyana I.

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark of tissue injury in various models of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is mitochondrial dysfunction and the release of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic proteins leading to cell death. Although IR-induced mitochondrial injury has been extensively studied and key mitochondrial functions affected by IR are chiefly characterized, the nature of the molecule that causes loss of mitochondrial integrity and function remains obscure. It has become increasingly clear that ceramide, a membrane sphingolipid and a key mediator of cell-stress responses could play a critical role in IR-induced mitochondrial damage. Emerging data point to excessive ceramide accumulation in tissue and, specifically, in mitochondria after IR. Exogenously added to isolated mitochondria, ceramide could mimic some of the mitochondrial dysfunctions occurring in IR. The recent identification and characterization of major enzymes in ceramide synthesis is expected to contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of ceramide involvement in mitochondrial damage in IR. This review will examine the experimental evidence supporting the important role of ceramide in mitochondrial dysfunction in IR in order to highlight potential targets for pharmacological manipulation of ceramide levels. PMID:19247196

  13. Therapeutic angiogenesis for critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sae Hee; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2014-03-01

    The application of gene- and cell-based therapies to promote angiogenesis is a novel concept to treat lower-limb critical limb ischemia (CLI) and may provide an unmet need for patients with no options for revascularization. Proof of concept was demonstrated in animal models resulting in clinical trials that have confirmed the feasibility and short-term efficacy of intramuscular injection of angiogenetic tissue growth factors or bone marrow stem cells. The safety of these biologic therapies has been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials with no "off-target" angiogenesis, growth of occult tumors, or progression of diabetic retinopathy. Current phase III randomized clinical trials using a DNA plasmid with the hepatocyte growth factor gene or bone marrow aspirate concentrate of mesenchymal cells are designed to address several crucial issues, including proper patient selection criteria, relevant clinical endpoints, and long-term efficacy. Because effectiveness of these novel therapies remains to be established, ongoing and future randomized clinical trials should be placebo-controlled, investigator-blinded, and have amputation-free survival as the primary endpoint. Further development of efficient gene transfer techniques and keeping transplanted stem cells healthy have the potential to make biologic therapies more robust in promoting angiogenesis, tissue regeneration, and resolution of CLI symptoms. If sustained efficacy can be demonstrated, new therapeutic strategies for patients with CLI will be available for clinicians, ie, limb revascularization using angiogenic gene or stem cell therapy alone, or in conjunction with endovascular intervention. PMID:25812756

  14. Protective effect of melatonin-supported adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Lo; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Chai, Han-Tan; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Tong, Meng-Shen; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that combined melatonin and autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) was superior to either alone against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion (SBIR) injury induced by superior mesenteric artery clamping for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 72 hr. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 50) were equally categorized into sham-operated controls SC, SBIR, SBIR-ADMSC (1.0 × 10(6) intravenous and 1.0 × 10(6) intrajejunal injection), SBIR-melatonin (intraperitoneal 20 mg/kg at 30 min after SI ischemia and 50 mg/kg at 6 and 18 hr after SI reperfusion), and SBIR-ADMSC-melatonin groups. The results demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-α, MPO, LyG6+ cells, CD68+ cells, WBC count, and gut permeability were highest in SBIR and lowest in SC, significantly higher in SBIR-ADMSC group and further increased in SBIR-melatonin group than in the combined therapy group (all P < 0.001). The ischemic mucosal damage score, the protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, MPO, and iNOS), oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2, and oxidized protein), apoptosis (APAF-1, mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP), mitochondrial damage (cytosolic cytochrome C) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX) markers, as well as cellular expressions of proliferation (PCNA), apoptosis (caspase-3, TUNEL assay), and DNA damage (γ-H2AX) showed an identical pattern, whereas mitochondrial cytochrome C exhibited an opposite pattern compared to that of inflammation among all groups (all P < 0.001). Besides, antioxidant expressions at protein (NQO-1, GR, and GPx) and cellular (HO-1) levels progressively increased from SC to the combined treatment group (all P < 0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin-ADMSC treatment offered additive beneficial effect against SBIR injury. PMID:26013733

  15. Potential of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl lactic acid for ameliorating ischemia-reperfusion-induced microvascular disturbance in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Yan; Horie, Yoshinori; Fan, Jing-Yu; Sun, Kai; Guo, Jun; Miura, Soichiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-01

    This study intended to examine the effect of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl lactic acid (DLA), a major ingredient of Salvia miltiorrhiza, on ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat mesenteric microcirculatory injury. DLA (5 mg.kg(-1).h(-1)), superoxide dismutase (SOD, 12,000 U.kg(-1).h(-1)), or catalase (CAT, 20 mg/kg) was continuously infused either starting from 10 min before the ischemia or 10 min after the initiation of reperfusion. The venule diameter, number of adherent leukocytes, FITC-albumin leakage, dihydrorhodamine 123 fluorescence, and mast cell degranulation were determined using an intravital microscope. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the expression of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 in neutrophils were evaluated by in vitro experiments. The results showed that pretreatment with DLA significantly reduced peroxide production in and leukocyte adhesion to venular wall, albumin leakage, and mast cell degranulation induced by I/R. The DLA posttreatment exerted an ameliorating effect on I/R-induced disorders as well, characterized by inhibiting further increase in peroxide production in venular wall and albumin leakage and diminishing the number of leukocytes that had adhered to the venular wall. In vitro experiments revealed that treatment with DLA significantly attenuated TNF-alpha plus fMLP-evoked production of H(2)O(2) and the H(2)O(2)-elicited expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils. SOD and CAT manifested similarly but with the exception that either SOD or CAT were unable to retrieve the adherent leukocytes if administrated after initiation of reperfusion and to depress the H(2)O(2)-induced expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils. It is concluded that DLA protects from and ameliorates the I/R-induced microcirculatory disturbance by interfering with both peroxide production and adhesion molecule expression. PMID:19008340

  16. Sevoflurane ameliorates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion-induced lung injury by inhibiting the synergistic action between mast cell activation and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    LUO, CHENFANG; YUAN, DONGDONG; ZHAO, WEICHENG; CHEN, HUIXIN; LUO, GANGJIAN; SU, GUANGJIE; HEI, ZIQING

    2015-01-01

    Preconditioning with sevoflurane (SEV) can protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in several organs, however, the benefits of SEV against acute lung injury (ALI), induced by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR), and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of SEV preconditioning on IIR-mediated ALI and the associated mechanisms in a rat model. Female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 2.3% SEV or apocynin (AP), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, were subjected to 75 min superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 2 h reperfusion in the presence or absence of the mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 (CP). SEV and AP were observed to downregulate the protein expression levels of p47phox and gp91phox in the lungs of normal rats. IIR resulted in severe lung injury, characterized by significant increases in pathological injury scores, lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein expression levels of p47phox, gp91phox and ICAM-1, the presence of hydrogen peroxide, malondydehyde and interleukin-6, and the activity of myeloperoxidase. In addition, significant reductions were observed in the expression of prosurfactant protein C, accompanied by an increase in MC degranulation, demonstrated by significant elevations in the number of mast cells, expression levels of tryptase and the concentration of β-hexosaminidase. These changes were further augmented in the presence of CP. In addition, SEV and AP preconditioning significantly alleviated the above alterations induced by IIR alone or in combination with CP. These findings suggested that SEV and AP attenuated IIR-induced ALI by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and the synergistic action between oxidative stress and mast cell activation. PMID:25815524

  17. Reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide during ischemia protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew; Bond, Richard; McLean, Peter; Uppal, Rakesh; Benjamin, Nigel; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2004-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to protect against the damaging effects of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, whereas xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) normally causes damage through the generation of reactive oxygen species. In the heart, inorganic nitrite has the potential to act as an endogenous store of NO, liberated specifically during ischemia. Using a detection method that we developed, we report that under ischemic conditions both rat and human homogenized myocardium and the isolated perfused rat heart (Langendorff preparation) generate NO from in a reaction that depends on XOR activity. Functional studies of rat hearts in the Langendorff apparatus showed that nitrite (10 and 100 µM) reduced infarct size from 47.3 ± 2.8% (mean percent of control ± SEM) to 17.9 ± 4.2% and 17.4 ± 1.0%, respectively (P < 0.001), and was associated with comparable improvements in recovery of left ventricular function. This protective effect was completely blocked by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazole-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). In summary, the generation of NO from •, rather than damaging.

  18. Normobaric Oxygen Therapy for Scleral Ischemia or Melt

    PubMed Central

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoodreza; Idani, Esmaeil; Malekahmadi, Mohammad; Feizi, Sepehr

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of normobaric oxygen (NBO) therapy for treatment of scleral ischemia or melt. Methods This prospective interventional case series includes 9 eyes of 8 patients with scleral ischemia or melt of diverse etiologies. Following the failure of conventional medical and/or surgical therapy to improve ischemia or upon clinical deterioration, NBO was initiated. All patients received 100% NBO at flow rate of 10 liters/minute by face mask for 1 hour, twice daily until complete vascularization of ischemic areas. Main outcome measures were improvement of scleral ischemia and healing of conjunctival epithelial defects. Results NBO therapy led to epithelialization and vascularization of the ischemic sclera in all eyes; the repair process began 3-4 days after NBO had been initiated and was completed in 18.1±4.7 (range, 10-25) days. All patients remained stable over a 9-month follow-up period. Conclusion NBO therapy seems effective for treatment of scleral ischemia or melt, and hence can be considered as a non-invasive alternative to surgical intervention in these conditions. PMID:23504548

  19. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  20. Fluorometry of ischemia reperfusion injury in rat lungs in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated the utility of optical fluorometry to evaluate lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rats lungs under various chemically-induced respiratory states. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute ischemia on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in vivo using optical fluorometry. Under ischemic conditions, insufficient oxygen supply to the mitochondrial chain should reduce the mitochondrial redox state calculated from the ratio of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide). The chest of anesthetized, and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rat was opened to induce acute ischemia by clamping the left hilum to block both blood flow and ventilation to one lung for approximately 10 minutes. NADH and FAD fluorescent signals were recorded continuously in a dark room via a fluorometer probe placed on the pleural surface of the left lung. Acute ischemia caused a decrease in FAD and an increase in NADH, which resulted in an increase in the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR=NADH/FAD). Restoration of blood flow and ventilation by unclamping the left hilum returned the RR back to its baseline. These results (increase in RR under ischemia) show promise for the fluorometer to be used in a clinical setting for evaluating the effect of pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in real time.

  1. Sphingolipid Therapy in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are known to play a significant physiological role in cell growth, cell differentiation, and critical signal transduction pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant role of sphingolipids and their metabolites in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our laboratory has investigated the cytoprotective effects of N,N,N-Trimethylsphingosine chloride (TMS), a stable N-methylated synthetic sphingolipid analogue on myocardial and hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury in clinically relevant in vivo murine models of ischemia-reperfusion injury. TMS administered intravenously at the onset of ischemia reduced myocardial infarct size in the wild-type and obese (ob/ob) mice. Following myocardial I/R, there was an improvement in cardiac function in the wild-type mice. Additionally, TMS also decreased serum liver enzymes following hepatic I/R in wild-type mice. The cytoprotective effects did not extend to the ob/ob mice following hepatic I/R or to the db/db mice following both myocardial and hepatic I/R. Our data suggests that although TMS is cytoprotective following I/R in normal animals, the cytoprotective actions of TMS are largely attenuated in obese and diabetic animals which may be due to altered signaling mechanisms in these animal models. Here we review the therapeutic role of TMS and other sphingolipids in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury and their possible mechanisms of cardioprotection. PMID:17928150

  2. Effect of curcumin on diabetic rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mingsan; Cheng, Bolin; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of curcumin on cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats the effects and features. intravenous injection alloxan diabetes model, to give alloxan first seven days the tail measured blood glucose value, the election successful model rats were fed with large, medium and small doses of curcumin suspension, Shenqijiangtang suspension and the same volume of saline, administered once daily. The first 10 days after administration 2h (fasting 12h) rat tail vein blood glucose values measured in the first 20 days after administration of 2h (fasting 12h), do cerebral ischemia surgery; rapid carotid artery blood after 30min rats were decapitated, blood serum, blood glucose and glycated serum protein levels; take part of the brain homogenates plus nine times the amount of normal saline, made 10 percent of brain homogenates. Another part of the brain tissue, in the light microscope observation of pathological tissue. Compared with model group, large, medium and small doses of curcumin can significantly lower blood sugar and glycated serum protein levels, significantly reduced brain homogenates lactic acid content and lactate dehydrogenase activity; large, medium-dose curcumin can significantly increase brain homogenates Na(+)-K(+)-ATP activity, dose curcumin can significantly improve brain homogenates Ca(+)-Mg(+)- ATP activity. Curcumin can reduce blood sugar in diabetic rat model of cerebral ischemia and improve brain energy metabolism, improve their brain tissue resistance to ischemia and hypoxia, cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats have a good drop the role of sugar and protect brain tissue. PMID:25631517

  3. Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia with Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Bobak; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of myocardial ischemia in symptomatic patients remains a common and challenging clinical situation faced by physicians. Risk stratification by presence of ischemia provides important utility for both prognostic assessment and management. Unfortunately, current noninvasive modalities possess numerous limitations and have limited prognostic capacity. More recently, ischemia assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to be a safe, available, and potentially cost-effective alternative with both high diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over other noninvasive methods, including high temporal and spatial resolution, relatively few contraindications, and absence of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, studies assessing the clinical utility and cost effectiveness of CMR in the short-term setting for patients without evidence of an acute myocardial infarction have also demonstrated favorable results. This review will cover techniques of ischemia assessment with CMR by both stress-induced wall motion abnormalities as well as myocardial perfusion imaging. The diagnostic and prognostic performance studies will also be reviewed, and the use of CMR for ischemia assessment will be compared with other commonly used noninvasive modalities. PMID:22014487

  4. Enhanced excitability of guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion neurons during and following recovery from chemical colitis.

    PubMed

    Linden, David R

    2012-11-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons in the prevertebral ganglia (PVG) provide ongoing inhibitory tone to the gastrointestinal tract and receive innervation from mechanosensory intestinofugal afferent neurons primarily located in the colon and rectum. This study tests the hypothesis that colitis alters the excitability of PVG neurons. Intracellular recording techniques were used to evaluate changes in the electrical properties of inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) neurons in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and acetic acid models of guinea pig colitis. Visceromotor IMG neurons were hyperexcitable 12 and 24 h, but not 6 h, post-TNBS during "acute" inflammation. Hyperexcitability persisted at 6 days post-TNBS during "chronic" inflammation, as well as at 56 days post-TNBS when colitis had resolved. In contrast, there was only a modest decrease in the current required to elicit an action potential at 24 h after acetic acid administration. Vasomotor neurons from inflamed preparations exhibited normal excitability. The excitatory effects of XE-991, a blocker of the channel that contributes to the M-type potassium current, and heteropodatoxin-2, a blocker of the channel that contributes to the A-type potassium current, were unchanged in TNBS-inflamed preparations, suggesting that these currents did not contribute to hyperexcitability. Riluzole, an inhibitor of persistent sodium currents, caused tonic visceromotor neurons to accommodate to sustained current pulses, regardless of the inflammatory state of the preparation, and restored a normal rheobase in neurons from TNBS-inflamed preparations but did not alter the rheobase of control preparations, suggesting that enhanced activity of voltage-gated sodium channels may contribute to colitis-induced hyperexcitability. Collectively, these data indicate that enhanced sympathetic drive as a result of hyperexcitable visceromotor neurons may contribute to small bowel dysfunction during colitis. PMID:22961805

  5. Reconstruction of portal vein and superior mesenteric vein after extensive resection for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suh Min; Park, Daedo; Min, Sang-Il; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tumor invasion to the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV) can be encountered during the surgery for pancreatic cancer. Venous reconstruction is required, but the optimal surgical methods and conduits remain in controversies. Methods From January 2007 to July 2012, 16 venous reconstructions were performed during surgery for pancreatic cancer in 14 patients. We analyzed the methods, conduits, graft patency, and patient survival. Results The involved veins were 14 SMVs and 2 PVs. The operative methods included resection and end-to-end anastomosis in 7 patients, wedge resection with venoplasty in 2 patients, bovine patch repair in 3 patients, and interposition graft with bovine patch in 1 patient. In one patient with a failed interposition graft with great saphenous vein (GSV), the SMV was reconstructed with a prosthetic interposition graft, which was revised with a spiral graft of GSV. Vascular morbidity occurred in 4 cases; occlusion of an interposition graft with GSV or polytetrafluoroethylene, segmental thrombosis and stenosis of the SMV after end-to-end anastomosis. Patency was maintained in patients with bovine patch angioplasty and spiral vein grafts. With mean follow-up of 9.8 months, the 6- and 12-month death-censored graft survival rates were both 81.3%. Conclusion Many of the involved vein segments were repaired primarily. When tension-free anastomosis is impossible, the spiral grafts with GSV or bovine patch grafts are good options to overcome the size mismatch between autologous vein graft and portomesenteric veins. Further follow-up of these patients is needed to demonstrate long-term patency. PMID:23741692

  6. Induced Hypothermia During Resuscitation From Hemorrhagic Shock Attenuates Microvascular Inflammation In The Rat Mesenteric Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Coyan, Garrett N.; Moncure, Michael; Thomas, James H.; Wood, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular inflammation occurs during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock, causing multiple organ dysfunction and mortality. Pre-clinical evidence suggests that hypothermia may have some benefit in selected patients by decreasing this inflammation, but this effect has not been extensively studied. Methods Intravital microscopy was used to visualize mesenteric venules of anesthetized rats in real time to evaluate leukocyte adherence and mast cell degranulation. Animals were randomly allocated to normotensive or hypotensive groups, and further subdivided into hypothermic and normothermic resuscitation (N=6 per group). Animals in the shock groups underwent mean arterial blood pressure reduction to 40-45 mmHg for 1 hour via blood withdrawal. During the first two hours following resuscitation by infusion of shed blood plus double that volume of normal saline, rectal temperature of the hypothermic groups were maintained at 32-34°C, while the normothermic groups were maintained between 36-38°C. The hypothermic group was then rewarmed for the final two hours of resuscitation. Results Leukocyte adherence was significantly lower after 2 hours of hypothermic resuscitation compared with normothermic resuscitation: (2.8±0.8 vs 8.3±1.3 adherent leukocytes, p=0.004). Following rewarming, leukocyte adherence remained significantly different between hypothermic and normothermic shock groups: (4.7±1.2 vs 9.5±1.6 adherent leukocytes, p=0.038). Mast cell degranulation index (MDI) was significantly decreased in the hypothermic (1.02±0.04 MDI) vs normothermic (1.22±0.07 MDI) shock groups (p=0.038) after the experiment. Conclusions Induced hypothermia during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock attenuates microvascular inflammation in rat mesentery. Furthermore, this decrease in inflammation is carried over after rewarming takes place. PMID:25046540

  7. Robotic Low Ligation of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery for Rectal Cancer Using the Firefly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose By integrating intraoperative near infrared fluorescence imaging into a robotic system, surgeons can identify the vascular anatomy in real-time with the technical advantages of robotics that is useful for meticulous lymphovascular dissection. Herein, we report our initial experience of robotic low ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique. Materials and Methods The study group included 11 patients who underwent a robotic total mesorectal excision with preservation of the left colic artery for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique between July 2013 and December 2013. Results The procedures included five low anterior resections and six ultra-low anterior resections with loop ileostomy. The median total operation time was 327 min (226-490). The low ligation time was 10 min (6-20), and the time interval between indocyanine green injection and division of the sigmoid artery was 5 min (2-8). The estimated blood loss was 200 mL (100-500). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (4-5), and the median length of stay was 7 days (5-9). Three patients developed postoperative complications; one patients developed anal stricture, one developed ileus, and one developed non-complicated intraabdominal fluid collection. The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 17 (9-29). Conclusion Robotic low ligation of the IMA with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique is safe and feasible. This technique can allow for precise lymph node dissection along the IMA and facilitate the identification of the left colic branch of the IMA. PMID:26069127

  8. Lipopolysaccharide induces catecholamine production in mesenteric adipose tissue of rats previously exposed to immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Vargovic, P; Laukova, M; Ukropec, J; Manz, G; Kvetnansky, R

    2016-07-01

    Catecholamines (CAs) are mainly produced by sympathoadrenal system but their de novo production has been also observed in adipose tissue cells. The aim of this work was to investigate whether immune challenge induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates biosynthesis of CAs in mesenteric adipose tissue (MWAT), as well as whether previous exposure to immobilization (IMO) stress could modulate this process. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single (2 h) or repeated (2 h/7 days) IMO and afterwards injected with LPS (i.p., 100 μg/kg body weight) and sacrificed 3 h later. LPS did not alter CA biosynthesis in MWAT in control rats. Single and repeated IMO elevated CAs and expression of CA biosynthetic enzymes in MWAT, including adipocyte and stromal/vascular fractions (SVF). Repeated IMO followed by LPS treatment led to the up-regulation of CA-biosynthetic enzymes expression, elevation of CAs in SVF but depletion of norepinephrine and epinephrine in adipocyte fraction. Prior IMO caused a marked LPS-induced macrophage infiltration in MWAT as evaluated by F4/80 expression. A positive correlation between expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and F4/80 suggests macrophages as the main source of LPS-induced CA production in MWAT. Furthermore, prior exposure to the single or repeated IMO differently affected immune responses following LPS treatment by modulation of inflammatory cytokine expression. These data suggest that stress might be a significant modulator of immune response in MWAT via stimulation of the macrophage infiltration associated with cytokine response and de novo production of CAs. PMID:27314578

  9. The Budd-Chiari syndrome. Treatment by mesenteric-systemic venous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J L; Herlong, H F; Sanfey, H; Boitnott, J; Kaufman, S L; Gott, V L; Maddrey, W C

    1983-01-01

    Twelve patients with the Budd-Chiari syndrome have been managed surgically. Ten of the patients were female, two were male, with a mean age of 40 years. Three of the patients had polycythemia vera, two had pre-existing cirrhosis, one had ingested estrogens, one had an occult tumor, and in four there were no associated factors. Ten patients presented with ascites and two with bleeding esophageal varices. The diagnosis was confirmed in all 12 patients by liver biopsy and hepatic vein catheterization. Inferior vena cavography revealed the abdominal vena cava to be thrombosed in six patients. The superior mesenteric vein was used to decompress the congested liver in all 12 patients. In five patients, a mesocaval shunt (MCS) was performed and in seven patients, a mesoatrial shunt (MAS) was carried out. There were four hospital deaths (two MCS, two MAS). One late death (MAS) occurred from liver failure following shunt thrombosis. Two additional patients (one MCS, one MAS) re-developed ascites immediately following surgery and angiography revealed a thrombosed shunt. Ascites has been controlled with a LeVeen shunt in these two patients, but liver biopsies showed progression to cirrhosis. The remaining five patients (three MAS, two MCS) did well, and angiography revealed patent shunts. Two of these patients, however, re-developed ascites at 4 and 10 months following MAS and required a second MAS. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 68 months. In three of the patients (two MCS, one MAS) with patent shunts, liver biopsy shows a remarkable return toward normal liver architecture and histology. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6615056

  10. Vascular smooth muscle desensitization in rabbit epigastric and mesenteric arteries during hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ratz, P H; Miner, A S; Huang, Y; Smith, C A; Barbee, R W

    2016-07-01

    The decompensatory phase of hemorrhage (shock) is caused by a poorly defined phenomenon termed vascular hyporeactivity (VHR). VHR may reflect an acute in vivo imbalance in levels of contractile and relaxant stimuli favoring net vascular smooth muscle (VSM) relaxation. Alternatively, VHR may be caused by intrinsic VSM desensitization of contraction resulting from prior exposure to high levels of stimuli that temporarily adjusts cell signaling systems. Net relaxation, but not desensitization, would be expected to resolve rapidly in an artery segment removed from the in vivo shock environment and examined in vitro in a fresh solution. Our aim was to 1) induce shock in rabbits and apply an in vitro mechanical analysis on muscular arteries isolated pre- and postshock to determine whether VHR involves intrinsic VSM desensitization, and 2) identify whether net VSM relaxation induced by nitric oxide and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase activation in vitro can be sustained for some time after relaxant stimulus washout. The potencies of phenylephrine- and histamine-induced contractions in in vitro epigastric artery removed from rabbits posthemorrhage were decreased by ∼0.3 log units compared with the control contralateral epigastric artery removed prehemorrhage. Moreover, a decrease in KCl-induced tonic, relative to phasic, tension of in vitro mesenteric artery correlated with the degree of shock severity as assessed by rates of lactate and K(+) accumulation. VSM desensitization was also caused by tyramine in vivo and PE in vitro, but not by relaxant agents in vitro. Together, these results support the hypothesis that VHR during hemorrhagic decompensation involves contractile stimulus-induced long-lasting, intrinsic VSM desensitization. PMID:27199133

  11. Involvement of Potassium Channels in Vasorelaxant Effect Induced by Valeriana prionophylla Standl. in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Filho, Abrahão Alves; Rodrigues, Lilia Simone Urzedo; Araújo, Jaíse Paiva; Maciel, Priscilla Maria Pereira; de Albuquerque, Jamile Morais; Cehinel Filho, Valdir; Cáceres, Armando; Fregoneze, Josmara Bartolomei; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida; Silva, Darizy Flávia

    2013-01-01

    Assays in vitro and in vivo were performed on extract from roots and leaves from the Valeriana prionophylla Standl. (VPR and VPF, resp.). In phenylephrine (1 μM) precontracted rings, VPR (0.01–300 μg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation (maximum response (MR) = 75.4 ± 4.0%, EC50 = 5.97 (3.8–9.3) μg/mL, n = 6]); this effect was significantly modified after removal of the endothelium (EC50 = 39.6 (27.2–57.6) μg/mL, P < 0.05). However, VPF-induced vasorelaxation was less effective compared to VPR. When rings were preincubated with L-NAME (100 μM) or indomethacin (10 μM), the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by VPR was significantly attenuated (MR = 20.9 ± 2.3%, 34.2 ± 2.9%, resp., P < 0.001). In rings denuded endothelium, precontracted with KCl (80 mM), or in preparations pretreated with KCl (20 mM) or tetraethylammonium (1 or 3 mM), the vasorelaxant activity of VPR was significantly attenuated (MR = 40.0 ± 8.2, n = 5; 50.5 ± 6.0%; 49.3 ± 6.4%; 46.8 ± 6.2%; resp., P < 0.01). In contrast, neither glibenclamide (10 μM), barium chloride (30 μM), nor 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) affected VPR-induced relaxation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypotension induced by VPR seems to involve, at least in part, a vascular component. Furthermore, endothelium-independent relaxation induced by VPR involves K+ channels activation, most likely due to BKCa channels, in the rat superior mesenteric artery. PMID:24023569

  12. Vascular resection in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with portal or superior mesenteric vein invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Gang; Xie, Kun-Lin; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate long-term survival after the Whipple operation with superior mesenteric vein/portal vein resection (SMV/PVR) in relation to resection length. METHODS: We evaluated 118 patients who underwent the Whipple operation for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at our Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic Surgery between 2005 and 2010. Fifty-eight of these patients were diagnosed with microscopic PV/SMV invasion by frozen-section examination and underwent SMV/PVR. In 28 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was ≤ 3 cm. In the other 30 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was > 3 cm. Clinical and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: SMV/PVR was performed successfully in 58 patients. There was a significant difference between the two groups (SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm and SMV/PVR > 3 cm) in terms of the mean survival time (18 mo vs 11 mo) and the overall 1- and 3-year survival rates (67.9% and 14.3% vs 41.3% and 5.7%, P < 0.02). However, there was no significant difference in age (64 years vs 58 years, P = 0.06), operative time (435 min vs 477 min, P = 0.063), blood loss (300 mL vs 383 mL, P = 0.071) and transfusion volume (85.7 mL vs 166.7 mL, P = 0.084) between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who underwent the Whipple operation with SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm had better long-term survival than those with > 3 cm resection. PMID:24379594

  13. Apamin-sensitive K+ channels mediate an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in rabbit mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M E; Brayden, J E

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial cells release a variety of substances which affect the membrane potential and tone of underlying vascular smooth muscle. In the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine to inhibit nitric oxide synthase and indomethacin to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, acetylcholine (ACh; EC50 approximately 1 microM) elicited the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in rabbit mesenteric arteries. 2. The hyperpolarization due to EDHF was blocked by apamin (IC50 approximately 0.3 nM), and by other inhibitors of the apamin-sensitive K+ channel (10 nM scyllatoxin, 100 microM d-tubocurarine, 300 microM gallamine) in the presence of indomethacin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine. The hyperpolarization was not blocked by glibenclamide (5 microM), iberiotoxin (10 nM), tetraethylammonium (1 mM), barium (500 microM), 4-aminopyridine (500 microM), ouabain (10 microM), bumetanide (10 microM), or nimodipine (100 nM). 3. In the presence of apamin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine, but the absence of indomethacin, ACh triggered a hyperpolarization that was blocked by glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. A similar glibenclamide-sensitive hyperpolarization was caused by Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin. 4. In experiments which distinguished the effects of EDHF, prostanoids and nitric oxide, hyperpolarizations and/or relaxations triggered by ACh were antagonized by muscarinic antagonists, the relative potencies (atropine approximately 4-DAMP > pirenzepine) of which indicated that the release of all three endothelium-derived factors was mediated by M3 receptors. 5. Our results suggest that ACh stimulates M3 receptors on endothelial cells, triggering the release of nitric oxide and prostanoids, which hyperpolarize underlying smooth muscle by activation of KATP channels, and the release of an EDHF, which hyperpolarizes smooth muscle through the activation of apamin-sensitive K+ (KAS) channels. Images Figure 4 PMID:8788937

  14. Effects of heparin on the vasodilator action of protamine in the rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Akata, T.; Kodama, K.; Takahashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of protamine on the rabbit isolated small mesenteric artery were investigated both in the presence and in the absence of heparin, by the isometric tension-recording method. 2. The dissociation constant for the binding of heparin to protamine has never been previously reported, so in order to minimize the effects of protamine, known to have a vasodilator action, and to examine only the effects of a heparin-protamine complex, the experiments with heparin were performed in the presence of high concentrations of heparin (21-700 u ml-1), concentrations at which heparin itself does not affect the vascular tone. 3. Protamine (15-500 micrograms ml-1), in the absence of heparin, was found to inhibit (P < 0.05) noradrenaline (1 microM)-induced contractions both in endothelium-intact and in endothelium-denuded tissues. 4. Such vasodilator action of protamine in either endothelium-intact or -denuded tissues continued, even in the presence of excess heparin at a heparin/protamine (H/P) ratio of 1.4 u micrograms -1, but was almost completely blocked in the presence of a much greater excess of heparin (H/P ratio > or = 4.7 u micrograms -1): heparin was present both before and during the application of protamine. 5. The vasodilator action of protamine in the absence of heparin was prolonged both in the endothelium-intact and -denuded tissues after protamine had been washed out from the bath with Krebs solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8401936

  15. Influence of the dopamine receptor agonists fenoldopam and quinpirole in the rat superior mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, A. G.; Lefebvre, R. A.; Vanderniepen, P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of local administration of the dopamine 2 (DA2)-receptor agonist quinpirole and of the DA1-receptor agonist fenoldopam was studied in the in situ, constant flow autoperfused, superior mesenteric vascular bed of the rat. Local infusion of quinpirole (30 micrograms kg-1 min-1 for 5 min) had no effect on baseline perfusion pressure; it reduced the pressor responses to electrical stimulation (4 Hz, 1 ms, supramaximal voltage) of the periarterial sympathetic nerves to 45.6 +/- 2.1% of its original value but did not modify similar pressor responses produced by locally administered noradrenaline. The inhibitory effect of quinpirole was antagonized by the selective DA2-receptor antagonist domperidone (10 micrograms kg-1) but not by the selective DA1-receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (50 micrograms kg-1). Local infusion of fenoldopam (30 micrograms kg-1 min-1 for 5 min) reduced baseline perfusion pressure to 89.9 +/- 1.9%, increased the pressor response to electrical stimulation (4 Hz, 1 ms, supramaximal voltage) of the periarterial nerves to 134.7 +/- 14.0%, but reduced the pressor response to locally administered noradrenaline to 37.2 +/- 8.2%. Similar pressor responses induced by the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine were also reduced by fenoldopam (to 38.4 +/- 6.4%), but responses to locally administered angiotensin II were not modified. Pretreatment with SCH 23390 (50 micrograms kg-1) antagonized the effect of fenoldopam on baseline perfusion pressure, but had no influence on the effect of fenoldopam on responses to electrical stimulation or to noradrenaline. Pretreatment with the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine (100 micrograms kg-1) had no effect on the reduction in baseline perfusion pressure induced by fenoldopam nor on its inhibitory effect on the response to noradrenaline, but it antagonized the stimulatory effect of fenoldopam on the response to electrical stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2886174

  16. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the contractility of rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, C; Jensen, P E; Prieto, D; Hughes, A; Mulvany, M J; Aalkjaer, C

    1995-01-01

    1. A pharmacological characterization of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) belonging to two distinct groups (competitors at the ATP-binding site and the substrate-binding site, respectively) was performed, based on their effects on the contractility of rat mesenteric arteries. 2. Both the ATP-site competitors (genistein and its inactive analogue, daidzein) and the substrate-site competitors (tyrphostins A-23, A-47 and the inactive analogue, A-1) reversibly inhibited noradrenaline (NA, (10 microM)) and KCl (125 mM) induced contractions, concentration-dependently. Genistein was slightly but significantly more potent than daidzein; the tyrphostins were all less potent than genistein, and there were no significant differences between the individual potencies. The tyrosine kinase substrate-site inhibitor bis-tyrphostin had no inhibitory effect. 3. Genistein, daidzein, A-23 and A-47 each suppressed the contraction induced by Ca2+ (1 microM) in alpha-toxin permeabilized arteries. A-1 and bis-tyrphostin had little or no effect on contraction of the permeabilized arteries. 4. Genistein was significantly more potent than daidzein with respect to inhibition of the contraction induced by 200 nM Ca2+ in the presence of NA (100 microM) and GTP (3 microM). The effect of A-23, A-47, A-1 and bis-tyrphostin was similar in permeabilized arteries activated with Ca2+ (200 nM) + NA (100 microM) + GTP (3 microM) and permeabilized arteries activated with 1 microM Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620718

  17. The vascular effects of different arginase inhibitors in rat isolated aorta and mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, NN; Harris, EE; Chin-Dusting, JFP; Andrews, KL

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase share the common substrate L-arginine, and arginase inhibition is proposed to increase NO production by increasing intracellular levels of L-arginine. Many different inhibitors are used, and here we have examined the effects of these inhibitors on vascular tissue. Experimental approach Each arginase inhibitor was assessed by its effects on isolated rings of aorta and mesenteric arteries from rats by: (i) their ability to preserve the tolerance to repeated applications of the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine (ACh); and (ii) their direct vasorelaxant effect. Key results In both vessel types, tolerance (defined as a reduced response upon second application) to ACh was reversed with addition of L-arginine, (S)-(2-boronethyl)-L-cysteine HCl (BEC) or NG-Hydroxy-L-arginine (L-NOHA). On the other hand, Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly augmented the response to ACh, an effect that was partially reversed with L-arginine. No effect on tolerance to ACh was observed with L-valine, nor-valine or D,L, α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). BEC, L-NOHA and nor-NOHA elicited endothelium-independent vasorelaxation in both endothelium intact and denuded aorta while L-valine, DFMO and nor-valine did not. Conclusions and implications BEC and L-NOHA, but not nor-NOHA, L-valine, DFMO or nor-valine, significantly reversed tolerance to ACh possibly conserving L-arginine levels and therefore increasing NO bioavailability. However, both BEC and L-NOHA caused endothelium-independent vasorelaxation in rat aorta, suggesting that these inhibitors have a role beyond arginase inhibition alone. Our data thus questions the interpretation of many studies using these antagonists as specific arginase inhibitors in the vasculature, without verification with other methods. PMID:19133993

  18. A case of small bowel mesenteric pneumatosis: A multidisciplinary approach to clinical interpretation and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Christopher; Salih, Tamir; Saha, Arin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumatosis of the small bowel mesentery is rare and the preserve of case reports. This case report describes the importance of a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) approach to rare pathologies. Case report A 78-year-old man presented to our unit with a two-day history of upper abdominal pain associated with nausea and intermittent vomiting. An urgent computed tomography (CT) scan was organised. The scan was grossly abnormal and difficult to interpret; it was reported as widespread intra-mural gas within the small bowel wall most likely secondary to extensive small bowel ischaemia. Although surgical intervention was very high risk (predicted P-possum mortality of over 60%) and there was a strong possibility that the patient would not recover from surgery, the disparity between clinical and radiological findings meant that a diagnostic laparoscopy was indicated. A diagnostic laparoscopy showed that the small bowel itself was normal but there was extensive gas within the mesentery, caused by a band adhesion which had eroded into the peritoneal layer of the small bowel mesentery. Discussion Pneumatosis of the small bowel mesentery is a pathological sign rather than a diagnosis and is characterised by gas within the mesenteric sleeves. It is likely associated with significant morbidity and therefore rarely observed as the majority with this sign would not be deemed suitable for surgical intervention. Conclusion The case highlights an unusual pathology, rare imaging findings, the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach and the value of clear communication and informed consent when considering major intervention or surgery. PMID:27082993

  19. [Efficacy of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Involving the Superior Mesenteric Artery].

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Satoh, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Araki, Hiroyuki; Idani, Hitoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Harano, Masao; Kanazawa, Takashi; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Choda, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Michihiro; Miyoshi, Hisanobu; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2015-11-01

    Multidisciplinary therapy is essential in the treatment of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer involving the superior mesenteric artery (BR-SMA). We analyzed the outcomes of multidisciplinary treatment for BR-SMA and evaluated the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy (NAT). We reviewed the clinical courses of 10 patients with BR-SMA. Seven patients were treated with preoperative neoadjuvant therapy (NAT group), and 3 patients underwent radical pancreaticoduodenectomy first (SF group). In the NAT group, the rate of R0 was 7/7 (100%), the induction rate of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) was 6/7 (86%), and the first recurrence sites were the lung in 4 patients, and the liver and peritoneum in one patient each, respectively. In the SF group, the rate of R0 was 2/3 (67%) because of a positive pathological dissecting peripancreatic margin in 1 case. The induction rate of AC was 3/3 (100%), and the first recurrence sites were the liver in 2 patients, the peritoneum in 1, and a local site in 1. The disease free survival of the NAT group (median survival time [MST] 19.3 months) was significantly better than that of the SF group (MST 5.7 months) (log rank test, p=0.002). The median overall survival of the NAT and SF groups was 51.6 months and 19.5 months, respectively (p=0.128). An R0 resection could be performed in all cases in the NAT group. The NAT extended disease-free survival. We conclude that NAT is recommended in the treatment of BR-SMA. PMID:26805071

  20. Initial and Middle-Term Outcome of Treatment for Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilun; Ding, Huanyu; Shan, Zhen; Du, Jianliang; Yao, Chen; Chang, Guangqi; Wang, Shenming

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SIDSMA) represents an extremely rare condition. Although various treatments including conservative treatment, endovascular stenting (ES), and surgical repair are currently available, consensus treatment guideline is absent due to scarce of SIDSMA cases. Thus, we present our experience in the treatment of SIDSMA at our single center.Fourteen cases of SIDSMA were treated with conservative treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), endovascular stenting (ES), or surgical repair at our center between January 2008 and January 2014. Demographics, clinical manifestations, coexisting medical conditions, imaging feature, treatments, and follow-up outcome of these patients were retrospectively collected and analyzed.For 13 patients without peritonitis, conservative treatment was given for 4 to 6 days initially. After the first observation cycle, symptoms and signs were alleviated in 8 patients, and conservative treatments were continued. The remaining 5 patients received technically and clinically successful ES (in 4) or CDT (in 1) due to worsening symptoms and signs during conservative treatment. One patient with peritonitis underwent emergency surgery, with the necrotic small intestine resected. However, the abdominal pain was not alleviated 17 days postoperatively, ES was thus performed and symptoms relieved immediately. Two weeks after ES, a new aneurysm and partial thrombosis in the distal part of the stent were found by computed tomography angiography in this patient. No intestinal infarction or mortality developed during hospitalization. Follow-up was accomplished in 11 cases, ranging from 4 to 74 months (23.5 ± 21.3). Except that one complained with mild abdominal pain, the other 10 achieved complete remission. All patients were free from new aneurysmal formation of SMA and all stents remained patent.For SIDSMA without peritonitis, conservative treatment can be provided with reasonable

  1. Diverse Cytokine Profile from Mesenteric Lymph Node Cells of Cull Cows Severely Affected with Johne's Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Dairu; Subharat, Supatsak; Wedlock, D. Neil; Luo, Dongwen; de Lisle, Geoffrey W.; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease, is able to dampen or distort immune responses at the mucosal sites and coexist with a massive infiltration of immune cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Knowledge of the mechanism by which M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis subverts the immune response at the mucosal level in cattle is important for the development of improved disease control strategies, including new vaccines and diagnostic tests. In this study, 38 cull cows from herds infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were divided into four groups, based on M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis culture from gut tissues and histopathological lesion scores. Cytokine gene expression and secretion from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sonicate-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cultures of the animals were compared. Antigen stimulation of MLN cells from the severely lesioned group resulted in significant upregulation of the mRNA expression of five cytokines, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-13, IL-17A, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which have a diverse range of functions, while there was no significant upregulation of these cytokines by the other groups. There were major differences between the responses of the PBMC and MLN cultures, with higher levels of secreted IFN-γ released from the MLN cultures and, conversely, higher levels of IL-10 released from the PBMC cultures. The upregulation of all five cytokines from cells at the site of infection in the severely lesioned animals suggested a dysregulated immune response, contributing to a failure to clear infection in this group of animals. PMID:21795461

  2. Mesenteric lymph node transcriptome profiles in BALB/c mice sensitized to three common food allergens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food allergy is a serious health concern among infants and young children. Although immunological mechanism of food allergy is well documented, the molecular mechanism(s) involved in food allergen sensitization have not been well characterized. Therefore, the present study analyzed the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) transcriptome profiles of BALB/c mice in response to three common food allergens. Results Microarray analysis identified a total of 1361, 533 and 488 differentially expressed genes in response to β-lactoglobulin (BLG) from cow's milk, ovalbumin (OVA) from hen's egg white and peanut agglutinin (PNA) sensitizations, respectively (p < 0.05). A total of 150 genes were commonly expressed in all antigen sensitized groups. The expression of seven representative genes from microarray experiment was validated by real-time RT-PCR. All allergens induced significant ear swelling and serum IgG1 concentrations, whereas IgE concentrations were increased in BLG- and PNA-treated mice (p < 0.05). Treatment with OVA and PNA significantly induced plasma histamine concentrations (p < 0.05). The PCA demonstrated the presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum of previously sensitized and challenged mice. Conclusions Immunological profiles indicate that the allergen dosages used are sufficient to sensitize the BALB/c mice and to conduct transcriptome profiling. Microarray studies identified several differentially expressed genes in the sensitization phase of the food allergy. These findings will help to better understand the underlying molecular mechanism(s) of food allergen sensitizations and may be useful in identifying the potential biomarkers of food allergy. PMID:21211037

  3. Colony social stress differentially alters blood pressure and resistance-sized mesenteric artery reactivity in SHR/y and WKY male rats.

    PubMed

    Toot, Jonathan D; Reho, John J; Novak, Jacqueline; Dunphy, Gail; Ely, Daniel L; Ramirez, Rolando J

    2011-01-01

    Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, testosterone, and spontaneously hypertensive rat Y chromosome (SHR Yc) play a role in a genetic model of hypertension. Male rats with the SHR Yc and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) autosomes (denoted SHR/y) exhibit these characteristics when compared to rats with the WKY Yc and WKY autosomes (denoted WKY). We hypothesized that chronic social stress will increase blood pressure and SNS activity more in SHR/y males compared to WKY males, resulting in increased myogenic reactivity along with decreased vasoconstriction of small mesenteric arteries. SHR/y and WKY males were housed in strain- specific colonies (10 males with 10 females) or as controls (10 males). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and blood samples were collected prior to termination. Second-order mesenteric arteries were studied using a pressure arteriograph in which myogenic reactivity and phenylephrine (PE) responsiveness were measured. SHR/y colony SBP, and circulating norepinephrine and testosterone concentrations were elevated compared to control and WKY colony males (p < 0.05). Mesenteric artery myogenic reactivity was increased in SHR/y colony males (p < 0.001). Mesenteric arteries from SHR/y colony males exhibited a significant decrease in PE-induced constriction. Colony social stress elevated both SNS activity and testosterone level which may be responsible for the increased mesenteric artery myogenic reactivity, and SBP as noted in SHR/y males. PMID:20666653

  4. Measurement of the Distance and Angle Between the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery on CT Scan: Values in Indian Population in Different BMI Categories.

    PubMed

    Bhagirath Desai, Aditi; Sandeep Shah, Dharita; Jagat Bhatt, Chhaya; Umesh Vaishnav, Kavita; Salvi, Bharat

    2015-12-01

    The primary intention of the study was to "prove" that the reduced angle and distance between the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and aorta significantly correlates with reduced body mass index (BMI). This in turn indicates the strong etiological role of this factor for causation of SMA syndrome. (Most literature till date still mentions sudden depletion of fat pad between the vessels as a "proposed predisposing factor"). The superior mesenteric artery syndrome is characterized by the compression of the third segment of the duodenum by the mesentery at superior mesenteric artery level and a resulting duodenal (±gastric) dilatation. The disease is closely related with the depletion of the fat pad between the vessels narrowing the angle and reducing the distance between the vessels. A prospective study of 100 patients (58 males and 42 females) in the age range 15-85 years (mean age 50 years) who had undergone CT scan for various other complaints. CT scan had been performed with routine protocol comprising plain phase followed by arterial and venous phase by measuring the angle between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery, and also BMI was calculated. Mean values for distance and angle were obtained with standard deviation and 95 % confidence intervals. Pearson coefficients were also calculated and results tabulated. A strong positive correlation exists between BMI and the angle between the aorta and SMA. With increment in BMI, the angle also increases so less chance of developing superior mesenteric artery syndrome. PMID:26730074

  5. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  6. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki; Kawata, Sumio

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  7. Interaction of Isoflavones and Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue Seed Extract on Vasoactivity of Bovine Mesenteric Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yang; Harmon, David L.; Flythe, Michael D.; Klotz, James L.

    2015-01-01

    It was hypothesized that isoflavones may attenuate ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and possibly alleviate diminished contractility of vasculature after exposure to ergot alkaloids. The objective of this study was to determine if prior incubation of bovine mesenteric vasculature with the isoflavones formononetin (F), biochanin A (B), or an ergovaline-containing tall fescue seed extract (EXT) and their combinations affect ergotamine (ERT)-induced contractility. Multiple segments of mesenteric artery and vein supporting the ileal flange of the small intestine were collected from Angus heifers at slaughter (n = 5, bodyweight = 639 ± 39 kg). Duplicates of each vessel type were incubated in tissue culture flasks at 37°C with a 50-mL volume of Krebs–Henseleit buffer containing: only buffer (control); or 1 × 10−6 M EXT; F; or B; and combinations of 1 × 10−6 M EXT + F; 1 × 10−6 M EXT + B; 1 × 10−6 M F + B; or 1 × 10−6 M EXT + F + B. After incubation for 2 h, sections were mounted in a multimyograph chamber. The ERT dose responses were normalized to 0.12 M KCl. Pretreatment with F, B, and F + B without EXT resulted in similar contractile responses to ERT in mesenteric artery and all incubations containing EXT resulted in a complete loss of vasoactivity to ERT. In mesenteric artery pretreated with EXT, treatments that contained B had higher contractile responses (P < 0.05) at ERT concentrations of 1 × 10−7 and 5 × 10−7 M. Also, treatments containing B tended (P < 0.1) to have greater responses than treatments without B at ERT concentrations of 1 × 10−6, 5 × 10−6, and 5 × 10−5 M. In mesenteric vein pretreated with EXT, treatments containing F had greater contractile responses to ERT at 1 × 10−5, 5 × 10−5, and 1 × 10−4 M (P < 0.05). These data indicated that F and B at 1 × 10−6 M and their

  8. Interaction of Isoflavones and Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue Seed Extract on Vasoactivity of Bovine Mesenteric Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yang; Harmon, David L; Flythe, Michael D; Klotz, James L

    2015-01-01

    It was hypothesized that isoflavones may attenuate ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and possibly alleviate diminished contractility of vasculature after exposure to ergot alkaloids. The objective of this study was to determine if prior incubation of bovine mesenteric vasculature with the isoflavones formononetin (F), biochanin A (B), or an ergovaline-containing tall fescue seed extract (EXT) and their combinations affect ergotamine (ERT)-induced contractility. Multiple segments of mesenteric artery and vein supporting the ileal flange of the small intestine were collected from Angus heifers at slaughter (n = 5, bodyweight = 639 ± 39 kg). Duplicates of each vessel type were incubated in tissue culture flasks at 37°C with a 50-mL volume of Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing: only buffer (control); or 1 × 10(-6) M EXT; F; or B; and combinations of 1 × 10(-6) M EXT + F; 1 × 10(-6) M EXT + B; 1 × 10(-6) M F + B; or 1 × 10(-6) M EXT + F + B. After incubation for 2 h, sections were mounted in a multimyograph chamber. The ERT dose responses were normalized to 0.12 M KCl. Pretreatment with F, B, and F + B without EXT resulted in similar contractile responses to ERT in mesenteric artery and all incubations containing EXT resulted in a complete loss of vasoactivity to ERT. In mesenteric artery pretreated with EXT, treatments that contained B had higher contractile responses (P < 0.05) at ERT concentrations of 1 × 10(-7) and 5 × 10(-7) M. Also, treatments containing B tended (P < 0.1) to have greater responses than treatments without B at ERT concentrations of 1 × 10(-6), 5 × 10(-6), and 5 × 10(-5) M. In mesenteric vein pretreated with EXT, treatments containing F had greater contractile responses to ERT at 1 × 10(-5), 5 × 10(-5), and 1 × 10(-4) M (P < 0.05). These data indicated that F and B at 1 × 10(-6) M and their combination

  9. Evaluation and treatment of chronic digital ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilgis, E F

    1981-01-01

    Forty-two patients were evaluated and treated during the past five years at the Union Memorial Hospital Hand Center with the diagnosis of chronic digital ischemia. These patients with this syndrome, manifested by pain, severe cold intolerance and occasional tip ulceration, all were failures of conventional conservative treatment of vasodilators, tobacco abstinence and beta blocking agents. The evaluation consisted of first ruling out large vessel disease by noninvasive techniques of angiography. The patients underwent a variety of noninvasive diagnostic tests including Doppler examination, pulse volume recordings with cold stress, radioisotope scanning of the digital circulation and peripheral sympathetic block of the digital nerves. Treatment included direct microvascular reconstruction of the distal ulnar or radial artery and palmar arch, in ten patients, thermal biofeedback, in 22 patients and a new surgical procedure-digital sympathectomy, in ten patients, involving 18 digits. Eight of ten patients with palmar arch reconstruction improved with seven of ten having patent vein grafts. Thermal biofeedback has been helpful in 20 patients. Testing shows that an increase in digital perfusion can be initiated by all patients. However, only 70% can achieve this improvement. Digital sympathectomy consists of isolating the terminal branches of the sympathetic nerves which travel with the peripheral nerves, dividing these branches and stripping the adventitia of the digital arteries. Eight of nine patients have the experienced improvement in digital circulation, as manifested by pulse volume recordings after operation and radioisotope studies. Pain is substantially alleviated and the ulcers healed. All of these patients responded before operation to the digital nerve block with measured increased in digital perfusion. PMID:7247519

  10. [Protective effect of lornoxicam on development of myocardial infarction in rats under conditions of ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, S A; Lipina, T V; Zagidullin, T R; Fominykh, E S; Golubeva, A V; Varenik, E N; Parnes, E Ia; Semenov, P A

    2008-01-01

    Activation of inflammation and enzyme cyclooxygenase with formation of proinflammatory prostaglandins is a key element of development of myocardial infarction in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Basing on literature data and own experience we suggested that single intravenous injection of 230 mg/kg of nonselective inhibitor of type 1 and 2 cyclooxygenase lornaxicam in the phase of initialization of inflammation 20 min after onset of ischemia would lead to reduction of myocardial infarction volume in rats in irreversible ischemia and ischemia with subsequent reperfusion. The conducted study allowed to reveal that administration of lornoxicam in recommended for human use dose lowered mortality of animals and increased number of capillaries per one cardiomyocyte in case of irreversible coronary artery occlusion. In ischemia-reperfusion as in irreversible myocardial ischemia lornoxicam reduced volume of necrosis and degree of thinning of left ventricular wall in the region of infarction, and lowered volume of connective tissue in periinfarction zone of the myocardium in remote period. PMID:19076093

  11. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  12. Effect of brain microdialysis on aminergic transmitter levels in repeated cerebral global transient ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Thaminy, S; Bellissant, E; Maginn, M; Decombe, R; Allain, H; Bentué-Ferrer, D

    1996-12-28

    The effect of repeated transient global ischemia and microdialysis on changes in aminergic neurotransmitter release was investigated using the rat four-vessel occlusion model of global ischemia. To examine the possible transient or permanent changes in neurotransmitter release, ischemia was induced at varying time points in 5 groups of rats. The first ischemia occurred either 24 h (groups I, II, IV, V) or 96 h (group III) following vertebral artery electro-coagulation and guide probe implantation(s), and the second ischemia was induced either 48 h (groups I, IV, V) or 72 h (group II) following the first ischemia. To assess the consequence of repeated microdialysis on the results, one group of rats (group IV) was not dialysed during the first ischemia and another group (group V) was bilaterally dialysed during the second ischemia. Finally, amphetamine-induced neurotransmitter release was also studied in rats submitted to ischemia and compared with that in normal rats. In each case, dopamine, serotonin and their main metabolites were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Monoamine release was inhibited during the second episode of transient ischemia; this non-release was linked to the repeated microdialysis and not to the repeated ischemia. Although the results of chronic studies using brain microdialysis have been widely recognized as valid, the findings presented here indicate that combined with ischemia, probe reinsertion modifies the level of neurotransmitter release. PMID:9007758

  13. Ischemia-induced mitochondrial apoptosis is significantly attenuated by ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Racay, Peter; Chomova, Maria; Tatarkova, Zuzana; Kaplan, Peter; Hatok, Jozef; Dobrota, Dusan

    2009-09-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) represents an important adaptation of CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which results in increased tolerance of CNS to the lethal ischemia. Ischemia-induced mitochondrial apoptosis is considered to be an important event leading to neuronal cell death after cerebral blood flow arrest. In presented study, we have determined the effect of IPC on ischemia/reperfusion-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Global brain ischemia was induced by permanent occlusion of vertebral arteries and temporal occlusion of carotid arteries for 15 min. Rats were preconditioned by 5 min of sub-lethal ischemia and 2 days later 15 min of lethal ischemia was induced. With respect to mitochondrial apoptosis initiation, translocation of p53 to mitochondria was observed in hippocampus but not in cerebral cortex. However, level of both apoptotic bax and anti-apoptotic bcl-xl in both hippocampal and cortical mitochondria was unchanged after global brain ischemia. Detection of genomic DNA fragmentation as well as Fluoro-Jade C staining showed that ischemia induces apoptosis in vulnerable CA1 layer of rat hippocampus. IPC abolished completely ischemia-induced translocation of p53 to mitochondria and had significant protective effect on ischemia-induced DNA fragmentation. In addition, significant decrease of Fluoro-Jade C positive cells was observed as well. Our results indicate that IPC abolished almost completely both initiation and execution of mitochondrial apoptosis induced by global brain ischemia. PMID:19283470

  14. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-17

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:26751429

  15. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  16. Neutrophils--a key component of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Zoe Victoria; Woodruff, Trent Martin; Halai, Reena; Wu, Mike Chia-Lun; Cooper, Matthew Allister

    2013-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common occurrence following myocardial infarction, transplantation, stroke, and trauma that can lead to multiple organ failure, which remains the foremost cause of death in critically ill patients. Current therapeutic strategies for IRI are mainly palliative, and there is an urgent requirement for a therapeutic that could prevent or reverse tissue damage caused by IRI. Neutrophils are the primary responders following ischemia and reperfusion and represent important components in the protracted inflammatory response and severity associated with IRI. Experimental studies demonstrate neutrophil infiltration at the site of ischemia and show that inducing neutropenia can protect organs from IRI. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms involved in neutrophil recruitment, activation, and adherence and how this contributes to disease severity in IRI. Inhibiting neutrophil mobilization, tissue recruitment, and ultimately neutrophil-associated activation of local and systemic inflammatory responses may have therapeutic potential in the amelioration of local and remote tissue damage following IRI. PMID:24088997

  17. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  18. Recovery of impaired K+ channels in mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats by prolonged treatment with cholecalciferol

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Antonio C R; Feres, Teresa; Vianna, Lucia M; Paiva, Therezinha B

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for blood pressure reduction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) after prolonged cholecalciferol treatment was studied. Two-week treatment of SHR with 0.125 mg cholecalciferol kg−1 body weight per day orally caused significant reductions of systolic blood pressure and of the resting perfusion pressure of the mesenteric vascular bed at constant flow. In addition, the treated animals presented a normalization of the maximum vasoconstriction response to noradrenaline and a reduction of the maximum effect of the adrenaline concentration-response curves. This latter effect probably was due to recovery of the impaired Ca2+-dependent K+ channels coupled to α2-adrenoceptors since it was prevented by apamin. The treatment with cholecalciferol also normalized the smooth muscle cell membrane potential of de-endothelialized mesenteric arteries of SHR and their hyperpolarizing responses to α2-adrenergic agonists, which were depressed in untreated SHR. In mesenteric rings with endothelium, α2-adrenergic agonists caused similar hyperpolarizing responses in the SHR and in normotensive Wistar (NWR) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY). In non cholecalciferol-treated SHR the hyperpolarizing mediator involved in this effect was NO, while in NWR it was the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). After cholecalciferol treatment, the hyperpolarization induced by α2-adrenergic agonists in SHR smooth muscle cells was mediated by EDHF, as in NWR. Our results indicate that the hypotensive effect of cholecalciferol in the SHR is probably due to the normalization of vascular reactivity, by restoring the functioning of apamin- and ATP-sensitive K+ channels located in the vascular smooth muscle cell membrane, which are impaired in the SHR. PMID:10401569

  19. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, D.K.; Grover, A.K.; Daniel, E.E.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with (3H) prazosin and (3H)yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the (3H)prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the (3H) yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the (3H)prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that (3H)prazosin and (3H)yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Flavonoid-Rich Fraction of Bergamot Juice (BJe) in a Mouse Model of Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Daniela; Cordaro, Marika; Campolo, Michela; Gugliandolo, Enrico; Esposito, Emanuela; Benedetto, Filippo; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The flavonoid-rich fraction of bergamot juice (BJe) has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The aim of work was to test the beneficial effects of BJe on the modulation of the ileum inflammation caused by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. To understand the cellular mechanisms by which BJe may decrease the development of intestinal I/R injury, we have evaluated the activation of signaling transduction pathways that can be induced by reactive oxygen species production. Superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk were occluded for 30 min and reperfused for 1 h. The animals were sacrificed after 1 h of reperfusion, for both histological and molecular examinations of the ileum tissue. The experimental results demonstrated that BJe was able to reduce histological damage, cytokines production, adhesion molecules expression, neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress by a mechanism involved both NF-κB and MAP kinases pathways. This study indicates that BJe could represent a new treatment against inflammatory events of intestinal I/R injury. PMID:27471464