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Sample records for mesenteric ischemia non-okklusive

  1. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  2. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  3. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lock, G; Schölmerich, J

    1995-07-01

    Non-occlusive disease of the mesentery is still a rather underdiagnosed and underestimated condition. It is associated with circumstances that may compromise circulation or the intake of drugs that may lower mesenteric blood flow. Pathophysiologically, a "low flow syndrome" of mesenteric circulation is followed by vasoconstriction; a reperfusion injury may contribute to the ischemic injury. Histopathological changes vary between superficial localized lesions and transmural gangrene. Diagnosis within the initial 24 hours of the development of symptoms is crucial for prognosis but remains a difficult task. Clinical presentation, laboratory tests and ultrasound lack specificity; the role of duplex ultrasound, tonometry and reflectance spectophotometry is still under evaluation. Mesenteric angiography remains the only reliable diagnostic tool and should be applied early in all patients in whom acute mesenteric ischemia is a real possibility. Therapy is aimed at the rapid correction of predisposing and precipitating factors and an effective treatment of mesenteric vasoconstriction. Treatment of choice is a papaverine infusion into the superior mesenteric artery via an angiography catheter. Patients with peritoneal signs have to be treated surgically. PMID:7590571

  4. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Report of Five Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Ivancev, Krasnodar; Lindh, Mats; Uher, Petr

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement in stenotic and occluded mesenteric arteries in five consecutive patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Methods: Five patients with 70%-100% obliterations of all mesenteric vessels resulting in chronic mesenteric ischemia (n= 4) and as a prophylactic measure prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (n= 1) underwent PTA of celiac and/or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenoses (n= 2), primary stenting of ostial celiac occlusions (n= 2), and secondary stenting of a SMA occlusion (n= 1; recoil after initial PTA). All patients underwent duplex ultrasonography (US) (n= 3) and/or angiography (n= 5) during a median follow-up of 21 months (range 8-42 months). Results: Clinical success was obtained in all five patients. Asymptomatic significant late restenoses (n3) were successfully treated with repeat PTA (n= 2) and stenting of an SMA occlusion (n= 1; celiac stent restenosis). Recurrent pain in one patient was interpreted as secondary to postsurgical abdominal adhesions. Two puncture-site complications occurred requiring local surgical treatment. Conclusions: Endovascular techniques may be attempted prior to surgery in cases of stenotic or short occlusive lesions in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Surgery may still be preferred in patients with long occlusions and a low operative risk.

  6. [Intra-arterial fibrinolytic therapy for acute mesenteric ischemia].

    PubMed

    Michel, C; Laffy, P; Leblanc, G; Riou, J Y; Chaloum, S; Maklouf, M; Le Guen, O; Pitre, J

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of mesenteric ischemia secondary to embolic occlusion treated by percutaneous intra-arterial thrombolysis. Early initial radiographic evaluation included abdominal plain film, ultrasonography, abdominal CT, and arteriography. Only selective superior mesenteric artery angiography provided definite diagnosis. The duration of ischemic symptoms before thrombolysis was 6 hours. Post procedure angiogram at 12 hours showed complete resolution of the mesenteric arterial thrombus with clinical improvement. The most important criteria for patient survival is early diagnosis and immediate treatment. Direct infusion of urokinase into the superior mesentric artery may be an alternative to surgery in selected patients and particularly in patients without evidence of frank bowel necrosis. PMID:11223630

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Results in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chahid, Tamam; Alfidja, Agaicha T.; Biard, Marie; Ravel, Anne; Garcier, Jean Marc; Boyer, L.

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated immediate and long-term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement to treat stenotic and occluded arteries in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Fourteen patients were treated by 3 exclusive celiac artery (CA) PTAs (2 stentings), 3 cases with both Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and CA angioplasties, and 8 exclusive SMA angioplasties (3 stentings). Eleven patients had atheromatous stenoses with one case of an early onset atheroma in an HIV patient with antiphospholipid syndrome. The other etiologies of mesenteric arterial lesions were Takayashu arteritis (2 cases) and a postradiation stenoses (1 case). Technical success was achieved in all cases. Two major complications were observed: one hematoma and one false aneurysm occurring at the brachial puncture site (14.3%). An immediate clinical success was obtained in all patients. During a follow-up of 1-83 months (mean: 29 months), 11 patients were symptom free; 3 patients had recurrent pain; in one patient with inflammatory syndrome, pain relief was obtained with medical treatment; in 2 patients abdominal pain was due to restenosis 36 and 6 months after PTA, respectively. Restenosis was treated by PTA (postirradiation stenosis), and by surgical bypass (atheromatous stenosis). Percutaneous endovascular techniques are safe and accurate. They are an alternative to surgery in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia due to short and proximal occlusive lesions of SMA and CA.

  8. Mesenteric ischemia masquerading as refractory peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, K; Anandh, U

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of mesenteric ischemia in patients on long term peritoneal dialysis both of which were associated with poor outcomes. Both were diabetic and on peritoneal dialysis for a long time. On evaluation of refractory peritonitis we found evidence of non occlusive mesenteric ischemia. Despite adequate treatment both succumbed to their illness. Abdominal pathology, especially mesenteric ischemia leading to gut infarction, should be considered in patients with refractory peritonitis. PMID:26664217

  9. Inferior Mesenteric Artery Stenting as a Novel Treatment for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia in Patients with an Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery and Celiac Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, M.; Kobeiter, H.; Desgranges, P.; Becquemin, J.P.; Cochennec, F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging problem, with revascularization the mainstay of treatment. Management of CMI is especially challenging in the patient with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusions. Report We report a case series of four patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia who were not candidates for CA or SMA revascularization who were successfully treated with inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) angioplasty and stent placement to improve collateral circulation and palliate symptoms. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the largest case series to date reporting the use of an IMA stent to improve collateral circulation in patients with CMI. PMID:24920877

  10. Mesenteric ischemia: Pathogenesis and challenging diagnostic and therapeutic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Tziava, Evgenia; Touloumi, Stavroula; Krinos, Nikolaos; Danias, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia (MI) is an uncommon medical condition with high mortality rates. ΜΙ includes inadequate blood supply, inflammatory injury and eventually necrosis of the bowel wall. The disease can be divided into acute and chronic MI (CMI), with the first being subdivided into four categories. Therefore, acute MI (AMI) can occur as a result of arterial embolism, arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis and non-occlusive causes. Bowel damage is in proportion to the mesenteric blood flow decrease and may vary from minimum lesions, due to reversible ischemia, to transmural injury, with subsequent necrosis and perforation. CMI is associated to diffuse atherosclerotic disease in more than 95% of cases, with all major mesenteric arteries presenting stenosis or occlusion. Because of a lack of specific signs or due to its sometime quiet presentation, this condition is frequently diagnosed only at an advanced stage. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT angiography contribute to differential diagnosis and management of AMI. Angiography is also the criterion standard for CMI, with mesenteric duplex ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography also being of great importance. Therapeutic approach of MI includes both medical and surgical treatment. Surgical procedures include restoration of the blood flow with arteriotomy, endarterectomy or anterograde bypass, while resection of necrotic bowel is always implemented. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for MI and to present the recent literature in order to provide an update on the current concepts of surgical management of the disease. Mesh words selected include MI, diagnostic approach and therapeutic management. PMID:26909235

  11. Mesenteric ischemia: Pathogenesis and challenging diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Mastoraki, Sotiria; Tziava, Evgenia; Touloumi, Stavroula; Krinos, Nikolaos; Danias, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-02-15

    Mesenteric ischemia (MI) is an uncommon medical condition with high mortality rates. ΜΙ includes inadequate blood supply, inflammatory injury and eventually necrosis of the bowel wall. The disease can be divided into acute and chronic MI (CMI), with the first being subdivided into four categories. Therefore, acute MI (AMI) can occur as a result of arterial embolism, arterial thrombosis, mesenteric venous thrombosis and non-occlusive causes. Bowel damage is in proportion to the mesenteric blood flow decrease and may vary from minimum lesions, due to reversible ischemia, to transmural injury, with subsequent necrosis and perforation. CMI is associated to diffuse atherosclerotic disease in more than 95% of cases, with all major mesenteric arteries presenting stenosis or occlusion. Because of a lack of specific signs or due to its sometime quiet presentation, this condition is frequently diagnosed only at an advanced stage. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT angiography contribute to differential diagnosis and management of AMI. Angiography is also the criterion standard for CMI, with mesenteric duplex ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography also being of great importance. Therapeutic approach of MI includes both medical and surgical treatment. Surgical procedures include restoration of the blood flow with arteriotomy, endarterectomy or anterograde bypass, while resection of necrotic bowel is always implemented. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment for MI and to present the recent literature in order to provide an update on the current concepts of surgical management of the disease. Mesh words selected include MI, diagnostic approach and therapeutic management. PMID:26909235

  12. Relief of Mesenteric Ischemia by Z-Stent Placement into the Superior Mesenteric Artery Compressed by the False Lumen of an Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takeda, Kan; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Hiroshi; Yada, Isao

    1998-01-15

    In a 58-year-old man acute aortic dissection compromised the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), resulting in mesenteric ischemia. After failed balloon angioplasty a Gianturco Z-stent was placed. The stenosis improved immediately, followed by resolution of the clinical signs of mesenteric ischemia. SMA flow was well preserved 1 year after stenting.

  13. Percutaneous Retrograde Recanalization of the Celiac Artery by Way of the Superior Mesenteric Artery for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, George Chacko, Sujith Thomas

    2013-02-15

    A 52-year-old man presented with recurrent postprandial abdominal pain, sitophobia, and progressive weight loss. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) due to subtotal occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and flush occlusion of the celiac artery (CA) was diagnosed. Retrograde recanalization of the CA by way of a collateral channel from the SMA was performed using contemporary recanalization equipment. The CA and SMA were then stented, resulting in sustained resolution of CMI-related symptoms.

  14. Fulminant Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia Just after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Alkmin-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Feres, Omar; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2010-01-01

    Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is not a rare clinical entity in intensive medicine, and it can be a consequence of several clinical or surgical situations. This pathology results from reduced intestinal microvascular blood supply associated with an acute inflammatory process, culminating with bowel necrosis. This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since diagnosis of this potentially fatal condition remains a dilemma, NOMI should always be considered an eventual postoperative complication in high-risk surgical patients such as elderly individuals with previous history of nicotine abuse, congestive heart failure, and essential hypertension. The present paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt adequate treatment of NOMI in subjects with diminished cardiac output and severe abdominal pain. PMID:20300426

  15. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  16. Percutaneous retrograde revascularization of the occluded celiac artery for chronic mesenteric ischemia using intravascular ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Jain, Gagan; Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Goyal, Mayank; Trehan, Vijaya Kumar

    2013-07-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with a triad of postprandial abdominal pain, food fear and significant weight loss since 1 year suggestive of chronic mesenteric ischemia. CT angiogram revealed chronic total occlusion of the celiac artery (CA), inferior mesenteric artery and 80-90 % stenosis of the proximal superior mesenteric artery (SMA). After SMA stenting, successful retrograde recanalisation of chronically occluded CA through pancreatico-duodenal arcade using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance was done when standard tools failed. The role of IVUS in such challenging lesions is described in the following case report. PMID:23526494

  17. Platelet-activating factor: an endogenous mediator of mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion-induced shock.

    PubMed

    Mózes, T; Braquet, P; Filep, J

    1989-10-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in circulatory shock of intestinal origin was investigated in anesthetized dogs by measuring PAF levels in the superior mesenteric vein during reperfusion after 2-h occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery; by monitoring the effects of BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist; and by studying the circulatory effects of exogenous PAF injected into the superior mesenteric vein. PAF was measured by a platelet-aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like bioactivity was ascertained by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and alkaline treatment. Removal of the superior mesenteric artery occlusion caused an immediate dramatic decrease in mean arterial blood pressure with concomitant increase in mean portal venous pressure and hematocrit values. PAF concentration in the superior mesenteric vein increased from 0.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml (n = 4, P less than 0.05) within the first 5 min of reperfusion. Administration of exogenous PAF (0.1 microgram/kg) injected into the superior mesenteric vein produced similar hemodynamical effects. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021 (4 mg/kg), a specific PAF receptor antagonist, prevented the circulatory collapse. The present results suggest that PAF release during intestinal ischemia may play an important role in the development of circulatory collapse caused by mesenteric artery occlusion. PMID:2802004

  18. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Muszynski, N. D.; Cheng, L. K.; Bradshaw, L. A.; Naslund, T. C.; Richards, W. O.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging clinical problem that is difficult to diagnose noninvasively. Diagnosis early in the disease process would enable life-saving early surgical intervention. Previous studies established that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers detect the slow wave changes in the magnetoenterogram (MENG) noninvasively following induction of mesenteric ischemia in animal models. The purpose of this study was to assess functional physiological changes in the intestinal slow wave MENG of patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pre- and postoperative studies were conducted on CMI patients using MENG and intraoperative recordings using invasive serosal electromyograms (EMG). Our preoperative MENG recordings showed that patients with CMI exhibited a significant decrease in intestinal slow wave frequency from 8.9 ± 0.3 cpm preprandial to 7.4 ± 0.1 cpm postprandial (P < 0.01) that was not observed in postoperative recordings (9.3 ± 0.2 cpm preprandial and 9.4 ± 0.4 cpm postprandial, P = 0.86). Intraoperative recording detected multiple frequencies from the ischemic portion of jejunum before revascularization, whereas normal serosal intestinal slow wave frequencies were observed after revascularization. The preoperative MENG data also showed signals with multiple frequencies suggestive of uncoupling and intestinal ischemia similar to intraoperative serosal EMG. Our results showed that multichannel MENG can identify intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in CMI patients. PMID:25930082

  19. [Acute ischemia and arterial mesenteric infarction in patients aged over 75. Apropos of a comparative series of 38 cases].

    PubMed

    Bronner, J F; Boissel, P

    1997-08-01

    We report our experience in a series of 20 patients over 75 years of age with acute mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric infarction. This series was compared with 18 patients under 75 used a control group for scores of specific aspects to acute mesenteric ischemia. Overall mortality (80% versus 55%) (p = 0.1) and desertion rate after exploratory laparotomy (60% versus 35%) were high in the elderly patients with advanced stage disease. There was also a female predominance (80% versus 44%, p < 0.05). PMID:9378793

  20. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  1. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  2. Noninvasive monitoring of small intestinal oxygen in a rat model of chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Khan, Mahmood; Salisbury, Ronald; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-01-01

    We noninvasively monitored the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in rat small intestine using a model of chronic mesenteric ischemia by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry (EPR) over a 7-day period. The particulate probe lithium octa-n-butoxynaphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) was embedded into the oxygen permeable material polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) by cast-molding and polymerization (Oxy-Chip). A one-time surgical procedure was performed to place the Oxy-Chip on the outer wall of the small intestine (SI). The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was banded to approximately 30% blood flow for experimental rats. Noninvasive measurement of pO2 was performed at baseline for control rats or immediate post-banding and on days 1, 3, and 7. The SI pO2 for control rats remained stable over the 7-day period. The pO2 on day 7 was 54.5 ± 0.9 mmHg (mean ± SE). SMA banded rats were significantly different from controls with a noted reduction in pO2 post banding with a progressive decline to a final pO2 of 20.9 ± 4.5 mmHg (mean ± SE; p = 0.02). All SMA-banded rats developed adhesions around the Oxy-Chip yet remained asymptomatic. The hypoxia marker Hypoxyprobe™ was used to validate low tissue pO2. Brown cytoplasmic staining was consistent with hypoxia. Mild brown staining was noted predominantly on the villus tips in control animals. SMA-banded rats had an extended region of hypoxic involvement in the villus with a higher intensity of cytoplasmic staining. Deep brown staining of the enteric nervous system neurons and connective tissue both within layers and in the mesentery were noted. SMA banded rats with lower pO2 values had a higher intensity of staining. Thus, monitoring SI pO2 using the probe Oxy-Chip provides a valid measure of tissue oxygenation. Tracking pO2 in conditions that produce chronic mesenteric ischemia will contribute to our understanding of intestinal tissue oxygenation and how changes impact symptom evolution and the trajectory of chronic disease. PMID

  3. CT and MRI of experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.M.; Seggewib, C.; Weghaus, P.; Kamp, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of CT and MRI for the detection of bowel wall changes in experimentally induced mesenteric ischemia. In 18 female pigs. a percutaneous embolization of the superior mesenteric artery was performed with buthyl-2-cyanoacrylate and Lipoidal (1:1) (experimental group). In six animals, only diagnostic imaging and histologic evaluation were performed (control group). CT was carried out 3, 6, and 12 h after occlusion. Incremental CT (1 s scan time, 5 mm slice thickness, 7 mm increment, 120 kV/290 mAs) and spiral CT (slice thickness 5 mm, pitch 1.5, 120 kV/165 mA) were performed pre and post contrast injection (Somatom Plus/ Siemens). Serial CT was carried out after intravenous contrast injection (I ml/kg, 2 ml/s). MRI (Magnetom 1.5 T: Siemens) was performed with T1 (pre and post 0.01 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; Magnevist; Schering. Germany), T2, and proton density images in axial orientation. Slice thickness was 3 mm and slice gap 1 mm. Additionally, a T1-weighted GE sequence was obtained in dynamic technique (before and 30, 60, and 90 s after contrast agent injection) with a slice thickness of 5 mm. Biometrical monitoring included blood pressure, heart frequency, blood cell count, electrolyte status, blood gas analysis, and determination of serum lactate. Image evaluation included morphological analysis and determination of the enhancement pattern. Histological specimens were obtained and analyzed according to the Chiu classification. The histologic workup of the specimen 3, 6, and 12 h after vascular occlusion revealed an average Chiu state 3, 4, and 5. On CT, the bowel wall had a thickness of 4.7 mm on average in the ischemic segments. There was a significant difference from the control group. Free intraperitoneal fluid and intramural gas were seen after 12 h of ischemia in 80%. In ischemic bowel segments, no mural enhancement was seen. Normal segments and the bowel of the control animals showed an enhancement of 34 HU on average.

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal ischemia is a serious complication of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Some or all of the intestine dies because of ... Brandt LJ, Feuerstadt P. Instestinal ischemia. In: Feldman M, ... Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 9th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. [Ascaris lumbricoides in the nasogastric tube after operation on a patient with the diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Çiçek, Ayşegül Çopur; Gündoğdu, Deniz; Direkel, Sahin; Öztürk, Çinar

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a comman intestinal helminths in humans. It is a parasite which commonly affects society with a low socioeconomic status, especially in tropical and rural areas. Ascaris lumbricoides infestation can lead to serious complications because of the mobility of the worms. The parasite can cause a variety of complications like intestinal obstruction, perforation, biliary obstruction, pancreatitis, peritonitis, liver abscess, cholangiohepatitis, volvulus, and gangrene, etc. A 59-year-old female patient hospitalized with the diagnosis of mesenteric ischemia was operated on for jejunal resection. On the 6th postoperative day, a worm was noticed emerging through the nasogastric tube. Ascaris lumbricoides was determined as a result of the examination microbiology laboratory. The patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazole 200 mg 1x2. Our case describes a clinical situation of ascariasis observed after jejunal resection and emphasizes the importance of remaining aware of this rare complication of ascariasis. PMID:24192626

  6. R-spondin3 prevents mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue damage by tightening endothelium and preventing vascular leakage.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Lakshmi; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Thai, To-Ha; Sehrawat, Seema; Mayadas, Tanya N; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Tsokos, George C

    2013-08-27

    Inflammation and vascular injury triggered by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in a number of clinical settings. Wnt and its homolog partners R-spondins, in addition to regulating embryonic development have recently been demonstrated to serve as wound-healing agents in inflammation-associated conditions. Here we ask whether R-spondins could prevent inflammation-associated tissue damage in ischemic disorders and thus investigate the role of R-spondin3 (R-spo3) in a mouse model of mesenteric I/R. We demonstrate that R-spo3 ameliorates mesenteric I/R-induced local intestinal as well as remote lung damage by suppressing local and systemic cytokine response and deposition of IgM and complement in intestinal tissues. We also show that decreased inflammatory response is accompanied by tightening of endothelial cell junctions and reduction in vascular leakage. We conclude that R-spo3 stabilizes endothelial junctions and inhibits vascular leakage during I/R and thereby mitigates the inflammatory events and associated tissue damage. Our findings uniquely demonstrate a protective effect of R-spo3 in I/R-related tissue injury and suggest a mechanism by which it may have these effects. PMID:23942120

  7. A New Approach Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI to Diagnose Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Rabbit Model: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Kuang, Lian-qin; Zhang, Yu-long; Cheng, Hai-yun; Min, Jia-yan; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been applied to a wide range of biological and disease research. The purpose of the study was to use MEMRI to diagnose the acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI). Methods. The institutional experimental animal ethics committee approved this study. To optimize the dose of Mn2+ infusion, a dose-dependent curve was obtained using Mn2+-enhanced T1 map MRI by an intravenous infusion 2.5–20 nmol/g body weight (BW) of 50 nmol/L MnCl2. The eighteen animals were divided into control, sham-operated, and AMI groups. AMI models were performed by ligating the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). T1 values were measured on T1 maps in regions of the small intestinal wall and relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Results. A nonlinear relationship between infused MnCl2 solution dose and increase in small intestinal wall ΔR1 was observed. Control animal exhibited significant Mn2+ clearance over time at the dose of 15 nmol/g BW. In the AMI model, ΔR1 values (0.95 ± 0.13) in the small intestinal wall were significantly lower than in control group (2.05 ± 0.19) after Mn2+ infusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion. The data suggest that MEMRI shows potential as a diagnostic technique that is directly sensitive to the poor or absent perfusion in AMI. PMID:26693487

  8. An unusual case of mesenteric ischemia in a patient with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Baztarrica, Gabriel; Bornancini, Norberto; Salvaggio, Flavio; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms related to peripheral embolism are experienced in 2%-15% of cases of cardiac myxoma. We present a rare case of a 54-year-old man admitted due to sudden abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). As the patient's response to support treatment was favorable, a non-invasive approach was adopted, with prescription of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a tumor in the left atrium. The cardiac mass was completely removed and diagnosed as myxoma by histopathological analysis. As periodic CT scans showed progressive improvement of blood flow through the SMA, OAC was continued. OAC may have been beneficial due to the nature of emboli originating from a cardiac myxoma: thrombi covering the surface of the tumor. At present, there is no explanation in the literature for the benefits of OAC in patients with embolism associated with cardiac myxoma. PMID:23890757

  9. Fatal non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia and the use of propranolol in paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rogers, A; Numanoglu, A; Rode, H

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal complications without abdominal injury are infrequently seen in children with major burns. They are divided into those that occur early during the emergency phase of treatment and those that occur late in the course of treatment. One of the most serious late onset complications is non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia associated with the use of vasoactive drugs. We report on 2 children who late in the course of their burn injury developed ischaemic necrosis of their entire intestine. Both were on propranolol, the administration of which was continued with even during the periods of septic shock which preceded their demise. We are of the opinion that endogenous catecholamine release during hypotensive and septic episodes in conjunction with β-adrenergic blockage from propranolol could lead to severe splanchnic vasoconstriction from unopposed α-adrenergic activity and hence critical circulation impairment to the bowel in the 2 children. PMID:26899618

  10. [Imaging of intestinal ischemia].

    PubMed

    Van Beers, B E; Danse, E; Hammer, F; Goffette, P

    2004-04-01

    Ischemic bowel disease includes acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia, and colon ischemia. Cross-sectional imaging, and more particularly computed tomography, has an increasing role in the detection of acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia. Vascular obstructions or stenoses and changes in the bowel wall can be observed. Functional information can be added with MRI by using sequences that are sensitive to oxygen saturation in the superior mesenteric vein. Arteriography remains the reference examination in patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. PMID:15184799

  11. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the tissues surrounding the veins, and include: Appendicitis Cancer Diverticulitis Liver disease with cirrhosis Pancreatitis Patients ... Mesenteric venous thrombosis. Mayo Clin Proc Read More Appendicitis Blood clots Cirrhosis Diverticulitis Small intestinal ischemia and ...

  12. Non-occlusive Mesenteric Ischemia with Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Lactic Acidosis Following the Administration of a Sodium Glucose Co-transporter 2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gocho, Naoki; Aoki, Ema; Okada, Chiho; Omura, Kazuki; Hirashima, Takeshi; Suzuki, Natsuko; Tanaka, Hideki; Omori, Yasue

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a patient with non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) potentially associated with the administration of a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. A 60-year-old man with type 1 diabetes was transferred to our hospital due to vomiting and respiratory distress. He was treated with insulin, metformin and a SGLT2 inhibitor, which had recently been added. He was diagnosed with intestinal ischemia complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis. Urgent exploratory surgery was performed, and the gangrenous bowel was resected. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of NOMI. The administration of SGLT2 inhibitors therefore requires certain exceptions for type 1 diabetes and cautious monitoring for the occurrence of these possible adverse effects. PMID:27374678

  13. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures Images Audio Pronunciations The ...

  14. Management of Loose, Frequent Stools and Fecal Incontinence in a Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia Patient with Oral Serum-derived Bovine Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Good, Larry; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    AIM Chronic diarrhea with fecal incontinence (FI) is a severe, underreported, and intractable problem in many patients for which limited pharmaceutical options exist. METHODS A retrospective case history was collected after the administration of a prescription medical food composed of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) at 5 g once daily in a patient with chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) for chronic loose, frequent, and urgent stools. The patient was an 84-year-old white male with a 20-year history of progressively worsening chronic diarrhea with six to eight watery stools per day (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Type 7), urgency, nocturnal diarrhea, FI, and postprandial abdominal discomfort before administration of SBI. RESULTS After four weeks of SBI administration, the patient had two to three soft, semi-formed stools (Bristol Stool Form Scale, Types 4 and 5) per day with no nocturnal diarrhea, urgency, or FI, as well as full resolution of abdominal discomfort. In addition, the patient expressed an enhanced quality of life (QoL): able to travel, attend social events, and perform tasks not possible before therapy. CONCLUSION This case underscores how a safe, nutritional therapy may offer a new modality for physicians to address chronic loose, frequent stools with FI in patients with CMI in this difficult to manage gastrointestinal population. PMID:25674029

  15. [Mesenteric panniculitis].

    PubMed

    Ayala Gutiérrez, María Del Mar; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a condition characterized by chronic nonspecific inflammation of the mesentery. There is little and often confusing information about its characteristics and the approach to take once it has been demonstrated by an imaging test. We propose to describe the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological and pathological features of the patients with mesenteric panniculitis reported in the literature, as well as possible disorders causal or associated with mesenteric panniculitis, in the opinion of the authors of each study. Finally, we will review the different therapeutic options used and the response to them. To that end a literature search was performed from the main medical databases selecting ítems with information on these aspects. This information was collected on a database stored in SPSS software for further analysis and summary. PMID:26971978

  16. Endovascular Reconstruction of Complex Arterial Obstructions in the Mesenteric Arcade with 'Kissing Stents': Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Daliri, Armand; Krause, Ulrich C.; Kalinowski, Marc; Heverhagen, Johannes; Froelich, Jens J.

    2008-05-15

    This report describes a technique for advanced endoluminal reconstruction of complex bifurcational arterial obstructions located within the mesenteric arcade deploying applications from percutaneous transluminal coronary artery angioplasty. A patient was treated for persistent mesenteric ischemia during prolonged recovery after initial small bowel resection due to acute mesenteric ischemia. Following endovascular reconstruction of a complex arterial obstruction within the mesenteric arcade, ischemic symptoms subsided quickly and the patient recovered well. According to the literature, this seems to be the first case where such distal reconstruction of the mesenteric arcade has successfully been achieved percutaneously.

  17. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection. PMID:23946612

  18. Mesenteric arterial vasopressin in cats: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lote, K.; Folling, M.; Lekven, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1981-05-01

    The administration of intraaterial mesenteric vasopressin to induce small intestinal ischemia was evaluated in the cat. Small intestinal blood flow was measured by carbonized microsphere distribution and electromagnetic flowmetry. Injection of 99mTc labeled isotope into the superior mesenteric artery was monitored by gamma camera, and isotope kinetics were evaluated as indicators of small intestinal blood flow. Superior mesenteric arterial and small intestinal mucosal blood flow could maximally be reduced to 15%-20% of control by vasopressin administration. 99mTcO4 mesenteric-cardiac transit time was doubled in all animals when small intestinal mucosal blood flow was reduced to less than one-third of control. However, significant blood flow reductions were induced in other abdominal organs, most importantly in retroperitoneal lymph nodes and adipose tissue. Intraarterial mesenteric vasopressin administration does not induce sufficiently severe and specific intestinal ischemia to provide optimal conditions for selective small intestinal hypoxic radioprotection.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Human Mesenteric Lymph

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Peltz, Erik; Campsen, Jeffrey; Kelher, Marguerite; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive animal work has established mesenteric lymph as the mechanistic link between gut ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and distant organ injury. Our trauma and transplant services provide a unique opportunity to assess the relevance of our animal data to human mesenteric lymph under conditions that simulate those used in the laboratory. Mesenteric lymph was collected from eleven patients; with lymphatic injuries, during semi-elective spine reconstruction, or immediately before organ donation. The lymph was tested for its ability to activate human neutrophils in vitro, and was analyzed by label-free proteomic analysis. Human mesenteric lymph primed human PMNs in a pattern similar to that observed in previous rodent, swine, and primate studies. A total of 477 proteins were identified from the 11 subject’s lymph samples with greater than 99% confidence. In addition to classical serum proteins, markers of hemolysis, extracellular matrix components, and general tissue damage were identified. Both tissue injury and shock correlate strongly with production of bioactive lymph. Products of red blood cell hemolysis correlate strongly with human lymph bioactivity and immunoglobulins have a negative correlation with the pro-inflammatory lymph. These human data corroborate the current body of research implicating post shock mesenteric lymph in the development of systemic inflammation and multiple organ failure. Further studies will be required to determine if the proteins identified participate in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure and if they can be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:21192285

  1. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  2. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  3. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  4. A Case of Acute Ischemic Duodenal Ulcer Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection After Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon

    2009-03-15

    We report a case of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-related acute ischemic duodenal ulcer that developed in association with dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. We conclude that the acute duodenal ulcer was developed by ischemia related to superior mesenteric artery dissection during TACE. TACE should be conducted carefully with continuous observation of abdominal arteries.

  5. Silent Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vulnerable Plaque Silent Ischemia | Share Related terms: ischemia, restricted blood flow Ischemia is a condition where the flow of ... used to diagnose silent ischemia: An exercise stress test can show blood flow through your coronary arteries in response to exercise. ...

  6. Aneurysm of the cranial mesenteric artery in a cow.

    PubMed

    Angelos, J A; Anderson, B H; Waurzyniak, B J; Ames, T R; Turner, T A

    1995-09-01

    Exploratory laparotomy of an adult dairy cow, examined because of acute signs of persistent abdominal pain, revealed a firm pulsatile mass with associated fremitus just distal to the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. The cow died acutely 2.5 days after surgery. A dilated, thin-walled, sacculated aneurysm, which had ruptured, was located along the proximal portion of the cranial mesenteric artery. It was postulated that the aneurysm developed secondary to structural defects in the arterial wall, but caused no clinical signs until enlargement and local tissue stretching or circulatory disturbances caused intestinal ischemia, resulting in abdominal pain. Aneurysms of visceral arteries in cattle should be considered as another differential diagnosis for signs of abdominal pain after more common causes such as severe bloat, mesenteric root volvulus, intussusception, cecal dilatation/volvulus, and uterine torsion have been excluded. PMID:7649780

  7. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  8. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  9. The Mesenteric Approach in Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is an ideal surgery for pancreatic head cancer. In cancer surgery, 'isolated' means en bloc resection using a non-touch isolation technique. I have been developing isolated PD for pancreatic cancer since 1981. In this operation, the most important and first step is to use a mesenteric approach instead of Kocher's maneuver. The precise surgical techniques of the mesenteric approach are introduced in this paper. PMID:27215213

  10. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  11. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  12. Mesenteric castleman disease mimicking superior mesenteric artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-02-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is known as a lymphoproliferative disorder, which is most commonly located in the mediastinum. CD occurring in the mesentery is very rare. We report a case of CD in the mesentery, which is mimicking a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm on computed tomography image. PMID:25463333

  13. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension.

    PubMed

    Quick, Christopher M; Criscione, John C; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H

    2014-06-15

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min(-1); Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min(-1)) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min(-1); Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min(-1)) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  14. Functional adaptation of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, John C.; Kotiya, Akhilesh; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Hardy, Joanne; Wilson, Emily; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Laine, Glen A.; Stewart, Randolph H.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph flow is the primary mechanism for returning interstitial fluid to the blood circulation. Currently, the adaptive response of lymphatic vessels to mesenteric venous hypertension is not known. This study sought to determine the functional responses of postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels. We surgically occluded bovine mesenteric veins to create mesenteric venous hypertension to elevate mesenteric lymph flow. Three days after surgery, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 7) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) group animals were evaluated and compared. Contraction frequency (MVH: 2.98 ± 0.75 min−1; Sham: 5.42 ± 0.81 min−1) and fractional pump flow (MVH: 1.14 ± 0.30 min−1; Sham: 2.39 ± 0.32 min−1) were significantly lower in the venous occlusion group. These results indicate that postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by reducing intrinsic contractile activity. PMID:24671245

  15. Murine Model of Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Gubernatorova, Ekaterina O; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Koroleva, Ekaterina P; Jobin, Christian; Tumanov, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a life-threatening condition associated with a broad range of clinical conditions including atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hypotension, necrotizing enterocolitis, bowel transplantation, trauma and chronic inflammation. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a consequence of acute mesenteric ischemia, caused by inadequate blood flow through the mesenteric vessels, resulting in intestinal damage. Reperfusion following ischemia can further exacerbate damage of the intestine. The mechanisms of IR injury are complex and poorly understood. Therefore, experimental small animal models are critical for understanding the pathophysiology of IR injury and the development of novel therapies. Here we describe a mouse model of acute intestinal IR injury that provides reproducible injury of the small intestine without mortality. This is achieved by inducing ischemia in the region of the distal ileum by temporally occluding the peripheral and terminal collateral branches of the superior mesenteric artery for 60 min using microvascular clips. Reperfusion for 1 hr, or 2 hr after injury results in reproducible injury of the intestine examined by histological analysis. Proper position of the microvascular clips is critical for the procedure. Therefore the video clip provides a detailed visual step-by-step description of this technique. This model of intestinal IR injury can be utilized to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of injury and regeneration. PMID:27213580

  16. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  17. Enteral nutrition associated non-occlusive bowel ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Young-Ju; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Kim, Young-Hwan; Hong, Suk-Kyung

    2012-09-01

    We describe two patients, with no previous history of vascular problems but poor lung function, who experienced septic shock due to bowel ischemia. Both were fed an enteral formula rich in fiber using a feeding tube and experienced septic shock with regular enteral feeding. Surgical finding showed hemorrhagic ischemia in the bowel. The pathologic finding suggests these changes may have been due to inspissations of bowel contents, which may put direct pressure on the mucosa of the bowel wall, leading to local impairment of mucosal and submucosal blood flow with subsequent bowel necrosis. Bowel ischemia may have been precipitated by an increased mesenteric blood flow requirement in combination with a metabolically stressed bowel. Patients in the intensive care unit fed a fiber-rich enteral formula may have inspissated bowel contents, leading to bowel ischemia, suggesting that the use of fiber-rich formula should be limited in patients at high-risk of bowel ischemia. PMID:22977764

  18. Effect of plant polyphenols on ischemia-reperfusion injury of the isolated rat heart and vessels.

    PubMed

    Brosková, Z; Drábiková, K; Sotníková, R; Fialová, S; Knezl, V

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effect of selected natural substances in a rat model of heart and mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Experiments were performed on isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, subjected to 30-min global ischemia, followed by 30-min reperfusion. Arbutin, curcumin, rosmarinic acid and extract of Mentha x villosa were applied in the concentration of 1 × 10⁻⁵ mol/l 10 min before the onset of ischemia and during reperfusion, through the perfusion medium. Mesenteric ischemia was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 60 min, subsequent reperfusion lasted 30 min. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by SMA ex vivo was determined by luminol-enhanced chemiluminiscence (CL). The effect of the substances was tested after their incubation with tissue. Curcumin and extract of Mentha x villosa were found to be the most effective in reducing reperfusion-induced dysrhythmias--ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. This effect was accompanied by bradycardic effect. The mesenteric I/R induced an increase in CL in vascular tissue which was dampened by substances tested. All substances tested were found to have antioxidant properties, as demonstrated by a reduction in ROS production in mesenteric vessels. This effect was confirmed in curcumin and extract of Mentha x villosa which reduced reperfusion dyshythmias. PMID:22933407

  19. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  20. Incidental Finding and Management of Mesenteric Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Tohme, Maroon; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mesenteric fibromatosis, also known as mesenteric desmoids, is part of the clinical-pathologic spectrum of deep fibromatosis, which encompasses a group of benign fibro-proliferative processes that are locally aggressive and have the capacity to infiltrate or recur without metastasis. CASE REPORT Case of a 45-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and lung fibrosis, presenting for a left abdominal mass, which was found incidentally during his lung fibrosis imaging. He complained of constipation due to pressure upon his bowel leading to difficulty in defecation. CONCLUSIONS Although there are many overlapping criteria between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mesenteric fibromatosis, making it difficult to discriminate between the two, there are differences that are unique to mesenteric fibromatosis that should be noticed during the diagnosis. In this case, mesenteric fibromatosis was unusual as it is not associated with Gardner's syndrome, desmoid tumors, nor familial adenomatous polyposis, but was an incidental finding. PMID:27279600

  1. Childhood giant omental and mesenteric lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Rasouly, Najibullah; Khpalwak, Hayatullah; Malikzai, Mohammad Omer; Faizi, Ahmad Reshad; Hoshang, Mer Mahmood Shah; Maroof, Sahar; Nasery, Mohammad Nawaz; Farzam, Farhad; Salehzai, Mohibullah; Sadiqi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Omental and mesenteric lipomas are very rare benign lesions of mature adipose tissue. They are well-defined, noninvasive, and encapsulated masses that can be discovered in asymptomatic patients or may cause variable nonspecific symptoms depending on their size and location. The omental and mesenteric lipoma has confusing features in ultrasound; however, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can well characterize and demarcate these lesions. Though few cases of mesenteric and omental lipomas have been reported in the literature, but because of its large size and childhood presentation, the case we present, can be one of the largest childhood omental and mesenteric lipomas ever reported. A 6-year-old girl presented with slowly progressing abdominal distension and repeated dull abdominal pain for last 4 years. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography examination revealed a huge mesenteric and omental lipoma that was resected surgically without any complications. PMID:26973731

  2. Childhood giant omental and mesenteric lipoma.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Rasouly, Najibullah; Khpalwak, Hayatullah; Malikzai, Mohammad Omer; Faizi, Ahmad Reshad; Hoshang, Mer Mahmood Shah; Maroof, Sahar; Nasery, Mohammad Nawaz; Farzam, Farhad; Salehzai, Mohibullah; Sadiqi, Jamshid

    2016-03-01

    Omental and mesenteric lipomas are very rare benign lesions of mature adipose tissue. They are well-defined, noninvasive, and encapsulated masses that can be discovered in asymptomatic patients or may cause variable nonspecific symptoms depending on their size and location. The omental and mesenteric lipoma has confusing features in ultrasound; however, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can well characterize and demarcate these lesions. Though few cases of mesenteric and omental lipomas have been reported in the literature, but because of its large size and childhood presentation, the case we present, can be one of the largest childhood omental and mesenteric lipomas ever reported. A 6-year-old girl presented with slowly progressing abdominal distension and repeated dull abdominal pain for last 4 years. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography examination revealed a huge mesenteric and omental lipoma that was resected surgically without any complications. PMID:26973731

  3. A "CLEAN CASE" OF SYSTEMIC INJURY: MESENTERIC LYMPH AFTER HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK ELICITS A STERILE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jeniann; Slaughter, Anne; Kotter, Cassandra V; Moore, Ernest E; Hauser, Carl J; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Wohlauer, Max; Frank, Daniel N; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Peltz, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Postinjury multiple organ failure results from an inappropriate overwhelming immune response to injury. During trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS), mesenteric ischemia causes gut mucosal breakdown with disruption of the intestinal barrier. It has been proposed that this releases the gut microbiota systemically via postshock mesenteric lymph (PSML), engendering infectious complications. Despite extensive investigation, no clear evidence has been presented for gut bacterial translocation after resuscitation from T/HS. However, such previous studies were limited by available technologies. More sensitive methods, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction, have since emerged for detection of bacterial presence and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to PSML derived from a rat model of T/HS. No bacterial presence was detected in a series of 12 samples, whereas multiple lymph samples showed the presence of DAMPs after T/HS. Thus, we confirmed that bacterial translocation does not exist in PSML after resuscitation from T/HS-associated mesenteric ischemia. However, T/HS does increase the presence of mitochondrial DAMPs in PSML. These results support our current position that PSML elaborates remote organ injury by multiple inflammatory mechanisms, including lipid-mediated proinflammatory stimuli, and by contribution from gut-derived DAMPs. PMID:26196840

  4. A Case of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Arising from the Superior Mesenteric Artery in a Korean Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Jin; Ku, Min Jung; Cho, Sa Sun

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the inferior mesenteric artery are extremely uncommon, since the inferior mesenteric artery is regularly diverged at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. We found a rare case in which the inferior mesenteric artery arose from the superior mesenteric artery. The findings were made during a routine dissection of the cadaver of an 82-yr-old Korean woman. This is the tenth report on this anomaly, the second female and the first Korean. The superior mesenteric artery normally arising from abdominal aorta sent the inferior mesenteric artery as the second branch. The longitudinal anastomosis vessels between the superior mesenteric artery and inferior mesenteric artery survived to form the common mesenteric artery. This anatomical variation concerning the common mesenteric artery is of clinical importance, performing procedures containing the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:22022194

  5. Mesenteric Microcirculatory Dysfunctions and Translocation of Indigenous Bacteria in a Rat Model of Strangulated Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Fernando Luiz; Benabou, Simon; Greco, Karin Vicente; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos; Cruz, José Walber Miranda Costa; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaiba; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli; Silva, Maurício Rocha e; Sannomiya, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    PRUPOSE Bacterial translocation has been shown to occur in critically ill patients after extensive trauma, shock, sepsis, or thermal injury. The present study investigates mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunctions, the bacterial translocation phenomenon, and hemodynamic/metabolic disturbances in a rat model of intestinal obstruction and ischemia. METHODS Anesthetized (pentobarbital 50 mg/kg, i.p.) male Wistar rats (250–350 g) were submitted to intestinal obstruction or laparotomy without intestinal obstruction (Sham) and were evaluated 24 hours later. Bacterial translocation was assessed by bacterial culture of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen, and blood. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the mesenteric microcirculation were assessed by intravital microscopy, and P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expressions were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit, blood gases, lactate, glucose, white blood cells, serum urea, creatinine, bilirubin, and hepatic enzymes were measured. RESULTS About 86% of intestinal obstruction rats presented positive cultures for E. coli in samples of the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and 57% had positive hemocultures. In comparison to the Sham rats, intestinal obstruction induced neutrophilia and increased the number of rolling (~2-fold), adherent (~5-fold), and migrated leukocytes (~11-fold); this increase was accompanied by an increased expression of P-selectin (~2-fold) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (~2-fold) in the mesenteric microcirculation. Intestinal obstruction rats exhibited decreased PaCO2, alkalosis, hyperlactatemia, and hyperglycemia, and increased blood potassium, hepatic enzyme activity, serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin. A high mortality rate was observed after intestinal obstruction (83% at 72 h vs. 0% in Sham rats). CONCLUSION Intestinal obstruction and ischemia in rats is a relevant model for the in vivo study of mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunction

  6. Incidental Finding and Management of Mesenteric Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Tohme, Maroon; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 45 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric fibromatosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgical removal of the mesenteric fibromatosis Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Mesenteric fibromatosis, also known as mesenteric desmoids, is part of the clinical-pathologic spectrum of deep fibromatosis, which encompasses a group of benign fibro-proliferative processes that are locally aggressive and have the capacity to infiltrate or recur without metastasis. Case Report: Case of a 45-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and lung fibrosis, presenting for a left abdominal mass, which was found incidentally during his lung fibrosis imaging. He complained of constipation due to pressure upon his bowel leading to difficulty in defecation. Conclusions: Although there are many overlapping criteria between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mesenteric fibromatosis, making it difficult to discriminate between the two, there are differences that are unique to mesenteric fibromatosis that should be noticed during the diagnosis. In this case, mesenteric fibromatosis was unusual as it is not associated with Gardner’s syndrome, desmoid tumors, nor familial adenomatous polyposis, but was an incidental finding. PMID:27279600

  7. [Enteroscopy and imaging in sclerosing mesenteritis].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, U; Nitzsche, C; Felber, J; Dietrich, C F

    2012-09-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare, benign, and chronic fibrosing inflammatory disease of the mesenteric fatty tissue. Its aetiology is unknown. In the present report we describe a 56-year-old women who presented with postprandial abdominal pain, and weight loss. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mesenteric mass of 15 cm. The findings were typical for this disease. Additionally the patient underwent a single ballon enteroscopy in which the mucosa showed a considerable hyperergic reaction. The histological examination of the ileum was appropriate to support the suspicion. The patient's symptoms responded to a therapy with tamoxifen. PMID:22965632

  8. [Mesenteric trauma: management in austere environments].

    PubMed

    Peycru, T; Biance, N; Avaro, J P; Savoie, P H; Tardat, E; Balandraud, P

    2006-04-01

    Mesenteric trauma, i.e., injuries located in the bowel or organs supplied by the superior mesenteric artery, can be life-threatening. The incidence of these lesions is low. Most occur as result of blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma due mainly to gunshot wounds or road accidents. Management of these serious injuries can be challenging in the military field hospitals. The major problem in austere environment is the unavailabiity of computerized axial and other tools gene rally used for diagnosis. As an alternative to tomography diagnostic peritoneal lavage can be used with a high sensitivity for the detection of mesenteric trauma. The second difficulty is technical. General surgeons without vasular training or supplies must prepared to suspect and reonstuct lesions of the superior mesenteric available resources. PMID:16775948

  9. Increased levels of platelet-activating factor in blood following intestinal ischemia in the dog.

    PubMed

    Filep, J; Hermán, F; Braquet, P; Mózes, T

    1989-01-31

    The possible role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in superior mesenteric artery occlusion induced circulatory collapse was studied in anesthetized dogs. PAF was measured by platelet aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like product in blood was ascertained by thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography and alkaline treatment. Low amount of PAF was detected in the mesenteric blood under normal conditions, during reperfusion PAF levels were significantly higher. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist abolished the fall in mean arterial pressure and the rise in hematocrit due to ischemia/reperfusion. These findings suggest that PAF may play an important role in mesenteric ischemia-induced circulatory collapse. PMID:2916986

  10. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  11. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to mesenteric venous hypertension by becoming weaker pumps.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Nguyen, T L; Quick, C M; Heaps, C L; Hardy, J; Laine, G A; Wilson, E; Stewart, R H

    2015-03-01

    Lymphangions, the segments of lymphatic vessels between two adjacent lymphatic valves, actively pump lymph. Acute changes in transmural pressure and lymph flow have profound effects on lymphatic pump function in vitro. Chronic changes in pressure and flow in vivo have also been reported to lead to significant changes in lymphangion function. Because changes in pressure and flow are both cause and effect of adaptive processes, characterizing adaptation requires a more fundamental analysis of lymphatic muscle properties. Therefore, the purpose of the present work was to use an intact lymphangion isovolumetric preparation to evaluate changes in mesenteric lymphatic muscle mechanical properties and the intracellular Ca(2+) in response to sustained mesenteric venous hypertension. Bovine mesenteric veins were surgically occluded to create mesenteric venous hypertension. Postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels from mesenteric venous hypertension (MVH; n = 6) and sham surgery (Sham; n = 6) animals were isolated and evaluated 3 days after the surgery. Spontaneously contracting MVH vessels generated end-systolic active tension and end-diastolic active tension lower than the Sham vessels. Furthermore, steady-state active tension and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration levels in response to KCl stimulation were also significantly lower in MVH vessels compared with those of the Sham vessels. There was no significant difference in passive tension in lymphatic vessels from the two groups. Taken together, these results suggest that following 3 days of mesenteric venous hypertension, postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels adapt to become weaker pumps with decreased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. PMID:25519727

  12. Use of T-stat to Predict Colonic Ischemia during and after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eugene S.; Pevec, William C.; Link, Daniel P.; Dawson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    As surgeons become more aggressive in treating aneurysms with endovascular techniques, traditional surgical principles of preserving internal iliac arteries and the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) have been challenged. A case is presented where the T-stat device, an FDA approved device for measuring colon ischemia, was used as an adjunctive measure to assist in the successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a patient at high risk for colon ischemia. PMID:18295116

  13. Inferior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula: Case report and world-literature review

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Antonios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Alexandrou, Andreas; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas between the inferior mesenteric artery and vein are rare, with only 26 primary and secondary cases described in the literature. Secondary fistulas occur following operations of the left hemicolon and manifest as abdominal pain, abdominal mass, gastrointestinal bleeding, colonic ischemia and portal hypertension. Symptom intensities are flow-dependent, and can range from minimal symptoms to severe heart failure due to left to right shunt. Diagnosis is usually established by radiological or intraoperative examination. Treatment options include embolization and/or surgical resection. Therapeutic decisions should be adapted to the unique characteristics of the fistula on an individual basis. A new case of a primary arteriovenous fistula is described and discussed along with a complete review of the literature. The patient in this report presented with signs and symptoms of colonic ischemia without portal hypertension. The optimal treatment for this patient required a combination of embolization and surgical operation. The characteristics of these rare inferior mesenteric arteriovenous fistulas are examined and some considerations concerning diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that should be followed are presented. PMID:25009407

  14. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  15. Anatomy of Inferior Mesenteric Artery in Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze Inferior Mesenteric Artery in fetuses through its site of origin, length, diameter, and variation of its branches. Method. 100 fetuses were collected from various hospitals in Warangal at Kakatiya Medical College in Andhra Pradesh, India, and were divided into two groups, group I (second-trimester fetuses) and group II (third-trimester fetuses), followed by dissection. Result. (1) Site of Origin. In group I fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra in 33 out of 34 fetuses (97.2%). In one fetus it was at first lumbar vertebra, 2.8%. In all group II fetuses, origin of Inferior Mesenteric Artery was at third lumbar vertebra. (2) Length. In group I fetuses it ranged between 18 and 30 mm, average being 24 mm except in one fetus where it was 48 mm. In group II fetuses the length ranged from 30 to 34 mm, average being 32 mm. (3) Diameter. In group I fetuses it ranged from 0.5 to 1 mm, and in group II fetuses it ranged from 1 to 2 mm, average being 1.5 mm. (4) Branches. Out of 34 fetuses of group I, 4 fetuses showed variation. In one fetus left colic artery was arising from abdominal aorta, 2.9%. In 3 fetuses, Inferior Mesenteric Artery was giving a branch to left kidney, 8.8%. Out of 66 fetuses in group II, 64 had normal branching. In one fetus left renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery, 1.5%, and in another fetus one accessory renal artery was arising from Inferior Mesenteric Artery and entering the lower pole of left kidney. Conclusion. Formation, course, and branching pattern of an artery depend on development and origin of organs to attain the actual adult position. PMID:27313956

  16. Laparoscopic resection of a jejunal mesenteric pseudocyst: case report

    PubMed Central

    RESTA, G.; TARTARINI, D.; FABBRI, N.; BIANCHINI, E.; ANANIA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and can occur at any age. They can manifest with abdominal pain or compressive mass effect. The exact etiology is unknown. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and laparoscopy are used in diagnosing mesenteric cysts. Laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst is possible and should be considered as the treatment of choice. We present a case of mesenteric pseudocyst of small bowel treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:25644729

  17. [Mesenteric infarct in primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kurz, R; Eder, A; Buck, J; Heinkelein, J

    1997-09-01

    The mesenteric infarction is a rare but life threatening cause of acute abdomen. A 55-year-old woman was referred to the hospital because of acute mesenteric infarction and in the history claudication. In the absence of risk factors (atrial fibrillation, atherosclerosis, nicotin abusus) a postoperative work up was started to identify the cause of the arterial occlusions. A primary antiphospholipid-antibody syndrome was found. The patient is now receiving low-dose aspirin and anticoagulation therapy. The follow-up over now 14 months shows no further events. PMID:9432819

  18. Endovascular management of porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis developing after trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepak; Lopera, Jorge Enrique; Goei, Anthony D

    2013-09-01

    Porto-mesenteric venous thrombosis following a trans-arterial occlusion of a superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. We present a case of endovascular management of one such case treated pharmacomechanically with catheter-directed mesenteric thrombolysis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation without long-term successful outcome. PMID:23475546

  19. A Case of Laparoscopic Mesenteric Cyst Excision

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikalp; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Geller, Matthew; Selbs, Elena; Romero, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of a young, healthy patient with a symptomatic mesenteric cyst. He had a 5-month history of abdominal pain from this disorder, and the case is presented to illustrate the clinical picture and operative management of this rare disorder. PMID:22988537

  20. Successful Treatment of Acute on Chronic Mesenteric Ischaemia by Common Iliac to Inferior Mesenteric Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, D. N.; Shaikh, F. M.; Kavanagh, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischaemia is a rare and potentially fatal condition most commonly due to atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of two or more mesenteric arteries. Multivessel revascularisation of both primary mesenteric vessels, the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is the current mainstay of treatment; however, in a certain cohort of patients, revascularisation one or both vessels may not be possible. Arteries may be technically unreconstructable or the patient may be surgically unfit for the prolonged aortic cross clamping times required. Here we present a case involving a 72-year-old woman with acute on chronic mesenteric ischaemia. She was a high risk surgical patient with severe unreconstructable stenotic disease of the SMA and celiac arteries. She was successfully treated with single vessel revascularisation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) via a common iliac to IMA reversed vein bypass. At two-year follow-up, the graft remains patent and the patient continues to be symptom-free and is maintaining her weight. PMID:26421207

  1. Superior Mesenteric Artery Aneurysm Caused by Aortic Valve Endocarditis: The Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    de Troia, Alessandro; Mottini, Francesca; Biasi, Lukla; Azzarone, Matteo; Tecchio, Tiziano; Salcuni, PierFranco

    2016-02-01

    Infectious aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery are a rare but life-threatening condition due to the risk of visceral ischemia, sepsis, or hemorrhage. In this study, we report the case of a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) secondary to a bioprosthetic valve endocarditis, successfully managed with aneurysm resection and saphenous vein interposition graft. We performed an extensive PubMed-based rewiew of the literature of the last 10 years on SMAA, which include the detection of 38 articles quoting 41 SMAAs. The case histories were divided in 2 groups: 18 cases belonged to nonmycotic group A and 23 cases were included in mycotic group B. In group A, 44.4% of patients were treated surgically, whereas in group B, 90.5%. The 2 study groups significantly differed (P = .01) in terms of surgical treatment. The surgical approach still remains the first choice of treatment in mycotic aneurysm. PMID:26983666

  2. Chylous mesenteric cysts: a rare surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Perri, Giampaolo; Freschi, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is defined as a cyst that is located in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract and may extend from the base of the mesentery into the retroperitoneum. It is often asymptomatic and therefore it is usually found as an incidental finding. Preoperative diagnosis may be possible with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the correct diagnosis can only be made with histology. The first-choice therapy is the complete removal of the cyst, which must be accurately planned according to the anatomy of the lesion, its dimensions and its relationships with major abdominal structures. We present two clinical cases: the one of a 30-year-old man with a mesenteric cyst that was removed by laparoscopy and the other of a 61-year-old woman who underwent open excision of a huge retroperitoneal cyst. PMID:24876395

  3. Fetal and postnatal ovine mesenteric vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Nielsen, Lori C.; Caty, Michael G.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal circulation and mesenteric arterial (MA) reactivity may play a role in preparing the fetus for enteral nutrition. We hypothesized that MA vasoreactivity changes with gestation and vasodilator pathways predominate in the postnatal period. METHODS Small distal MA rings (0.5-mm diameter) were isolated from fetal (116-d, 128-d, 134-d, and 141-d gestation, term ~ 147 d) and postnatal lambs. Vasoreactivity was evaluated using vasoconstrictors (norepinephrine (NE) after pretreatment with propranolol and endothelin-1(ET-1)) and vasodilators (NO donors A23187 and s-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP)). Protein and mRNA assays for receptors and enzymes (endothelin receptor A, alpha-adrenergic receptor 1A (ADRA1A), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5)) were performed in mesenteric arteries. RESULTS MA constriction to NE and ET-1 peaked at 134 d. Relaxation to A23187 and SNAP was maximal after birth. Basal eNOS activity was low at 134 d. ADRA1A mRNA and protein increasedsignificantlyat134danddecreasedpostnatally.sGC and PDE5 protein increased from 134 to 141 d. CONCLUSION Mesenteric vasoconstriction predominates in late-preterm gestation (134 d; the postconceptional age with the highest incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)) followed by a conversion to vasodilatory influences near the time of full-term birth. Perturbations in this ontogenic mechanism, including preterm birth, may be a risk factor for NEC. PMID:26672733

  4. Right-Side Colon Ischemia: Clinical Features, Large Visceral Artery Occlusion, and Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Longstreth, George F; Hye, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Large visceral artery occlusion (LVAO) could underlie right-side colon ischemia (RSCI) but is little known. Objective: To assess patients with RSCI through long-term follow-up, including features and management of LVAO. Main Outcome Measures: Mesenteric ischemia and mortality. Design: Retrospective observational study in an integrated health care system. Results: Of 49 patients (30 women [61.2%]; mean [standard deviation] age, 69.4 [11.9] years), 19 (38.8%) underwent surgery—that is, 5 (83.3%) of 6 who developed RSCI in hospital following surgical procedures and 14 (32.6%) of 43 who had RSCI before hospitalization (p value = 0.03); overall, 5 (10.2%) died. Among 44 survivors with a median (range) follow-up of 5.19 (0.03–14.26) years, 5 (11.4%), including 3 (20.0%) of 15 operated cases, had symptomatic LVAO and underwent angioplasty and stent placement: 2 for abdominal angina that preceded RSCI, 1 for acute mesenteric ischemia 1 week after resection of RSCI, 1 for RSCI 6 weeks after resection of left-side ischemia, and 1 for abdominal angina that began 3 years after spontaneous recovery from RSCI. None had further mesenteric ischemia until death from nonintestinal disease or the end of follow-up (1.6 to 10.2 years later). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for all 44 survivors at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years were 88.6%, 72.3%, 57.6%, and 25.9%, respectively. Thirty-one patients (70.4%) died during follow-up, 19 (61.3%) of a known cause; the 39 patients not treated for LVAO lacked mesenteric ischemia. Conclusion: Patients with RSCI may have symptomatic LVAO; therefore, we advise they undergo careful query for symptoms of abdominal angina and routine visceral artery imaging. PMID:26263388

  5. Laparoscopic excision of mesenteric cyst of sigmoid mesocolon

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarwar, Ajay H; Tayade, Mukund B; Borisa, Ashok D; Kasat, Gaurav V

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumours. They are found in the mesentery of small bowel (66%) and mesentery of large intestine (33%), usually in the right colon. Very few cases have been reported of tumours found in mesentery of descending colon, sigmoid or rectum. Mesenteric cysts do not show classical clinical findings and are detected incidentally during imaging due to absent or non-specific clinical presentation or during management of one of their complications. Ultrasonography (USG)/computed tomography (CT)/ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in diagnosing mesenteric cyst but they cannot determine the origin of cyst. Laparoscopy not only helps in diagnosing the site and origin of the mesenteric cyst but also has a therapeutic role. Laparoscopic treatment of mesenteric cyst is a safe, preferred method of treatment and is a less-invasive surgical technique. Here, we present an unusual case of mesenteric cyst arising from the sigmoid mesocolon treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:23626420

  6. Anatomical variation of the inferior mesenteric vein's drainage pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilaie, Mina

    The purpose of this project is to report the variable drainage pattern of the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) as reported by medical students' observations recorded on anatomical variation data sheets (n = 192). A meta-analysis on the drainage pattern of the inferior mesenteric vein as described in various anatomy resources was conducted (n = 40). The inferior mesenteric vein was observed to drain into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein, and the junction between the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein. Anatomy resources do not commonly report all three drainage sites. It is imperative that all these common drainage sites of the inferior mesenteric vein are stated in anatomy resources, so that students are taught realistic human anatomy including its common variations.

  7. Ischemic Colitis Due to a Mesenteric Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poullos, Peter D.; Thompson, Atalie C.; Holz, Grant; Edelman, Lauren A.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a rare, life-threatening, consequence of mesenteric arteriovenous malformations. Ischemia ensues from a steal phenomenon through shunting, and may be compounded by the resulting portal hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography is the most common first-line test because it is quick, non-invasive, and allows for accurate anatomic characterization. Also, high-resolution three-dimensional images can be created for treatment planning. Magnetic resonance angiography is similarly sensitive for vascular mapping. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and also allows for therapeutic endovascular embolization. Our patient underwent testing using all three of these modalities. We present the first reported case of this entity in a patient with a vascular connective tissue disorder. PMID:25926912

  8. Increased intestinal permeability in endotoxic pigs. Mesenteric hypoperfusion as an etiologic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Antonsson, J.B.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Infusing pigs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreases superior mesenteric artery blood flow (Qsma), suggesting that mesenteric hypoperfusion may be responsible for LPS-induced alterations in gut mucosal permeability. To test this hypothesis, we studied four groups of anesthetized swine. Group 1 animals (N = 6) were infused with LPS (250 micrograms/kg over 1 hour beginning at 60 minutes) and continuously resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (48 mL/kg per hour). In group 2 (N = 5), Qsma was decreased by 50% by means of a mechanical occluder to mimic the LPS-induced alterations in Qsma observed in group I. Group 3 (N = 5) was included to document our ability to detect ischemia/reperfusion-induced alterations in mucosal permeability; in these pigs, Qsma was decreased in steps to zero flow (at 150 to 210 minutes) and then perfusion was restored (at 210 to 270 minutes). Pigs in group 4 (N = 6) served as normal controls; these animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate at the same rate as in group 1 but were not infused with LPS. To assess mucosal permeability, we measured plasma-to-lumen clearances for two markers, chromium 51-labeled edetic acid monohydrate (EDTA) and urea. Loading and maintenance infusions of the markers were given intravenously, and a 20-cm isolated segment of small intestine was continuously perfused at 2 mL/min with Ringer's lactate at 37 degrees C. Results were expressed as the ratio of the clearances for the two probes (CEDTA/CUREA). In group 3, CEDTA/CUREA was 999% +/- 355% of baseline at 270 minutes. In group 1, CEDTA/CUREA was 572% +/- 235% of baseline at 270 minutes. In groups 2 and 4, however, CEDTA/CUREA did not change significantly from the baseline value over the duration of the study. These data suggest that increased mucosal permeability after LPS is due to factors other than (or in addition to) mesenteric hypoperfusion.

  9. Superior mesenteric origin of the proper hepatic artery: embryological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Alakkam, Anas; Hill, Robert V; Saggio, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The hepatic arteries are subject to a great deal of anatomical variation, potentially complicating hepatobiliary surgical procedures as well as general gastrointestinal procedures that involve foregut and midgut structures. We report a case of a rare variant of the proper hepatic artery discovered during dissection of an 84-year-old male cadaver. In this individual, the common hepatic artery was absent and the proper hepatic artery was replaced directly to the superior mesenteric artery. The gastroduodenal artery and the right inferior phrenic artery took origin from the celiac trunk. In addition, there was no identifiable right gastric artery. The celiac trunk gave off three branches: the splenic, left gastric, and gastroduodenal arteries. The entire arterial blood supply to the liver, therefore, was derived from the superior mesenteric artery. Patterns of regression of the ventral branches and the partial disappearance of the ventral anastomotic arteries during embryonic development play a major role in the variations of the gut arteries. An intraoperative encounter with this particular variant carries a significant risk of iatrogenic injury with potentially devastating ischemia and necrotic results. Accurate depiction and definition of the hepatic arterial anatomy are crucial. Variations like the one described here underscore the importance of pre-operative imaging and knowledge of the embryological origins of variation. PMID:26650050

  10. Idiopathic myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins: Rare case of ischemic colitis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Kota; Yamada, Rin; Fujiwara, Takashi; Koizumi, Koichi; Horiguchi, Shin-ichiro; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins (IMHMV) is a rare and poorly understood ischemic colitis that occurs in the rectosigmoid colon of predominantly young, previously healthy, male patients. A 76-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a 1-year history of worsening diarrhea, lower abdominal pain, and weight loss (-6 kg). Laboratory evaluation revealed white blood cell count of 13,200/μL, C-reactive protein level of 2.0 mg/dL (normal range, 0.0-0.3), and negative results for stool culture (including Clostridium difficile). Colonoscopy showed circumferential and edematous narrowing of the sigmoid colon with deep longitude ulceration. Biopsy was done and examination of the specimen demonstrated no specific ischemia. The patient was treated with bowel rest, antibiotics, and i.v. fluids; however, his symptoms worsened. Finally, sigmoidectomy was carried out. Histological examination demonstrated significant myointimal hyperplasia of mesenteric veins leading to thickening and stenosis of the venous lumen. Therefore, the final diagnosis was IMHMV. Three months following sigmoidectomy, he was asymptomatic. PMID:25777655

  11. A NON-INVASIVE DIAGNOSIS OF INTESTINAL ISCHEMIA BY EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AND MASS SPECTROMETRY-PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the potential of exhaled breath analysis by Column Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) as a non invasive and sensitive approach to evaluate mesenteric ischemia in pigs.

    Domestic pigs (n=3) were anesthetized with Guaifenesin/ Fentanyl/ Ketamine/ Xylazine...

  12. Computed tomography (CT) of bowel and mesenteric injury in blunt abdominal trauma: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, including the assessment of blunt bowel and mesenteric injuries. CT signs of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries are bowel wall defect, free air, oral contrast material extravasation, extravasation of contrast material from mesenteric vessels, mesenteric vascular beading, abrupt termination of mesenteric vessels, focal bowel wall thickening, mesenteric fat stranding, mesenteric haematoma and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal fluid. This pictorial essay illustrates CT features of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Pitfalls in interpretation of images are emphasized in proven cases. PMID:23082464

  13. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  14. Giant Aggressive Mesenteric Fibromatosis- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BN, Anandaravi; CD, Jagadish Kumar; M, Mayur; URS, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Fibromatosis are rare, accounting for 0.03% of all tumours. Mesenteric fibromatosis is a very rare (8% of all desmoid neoplasm). Aggressive fibromatosis of mesentery is a rare surgical problem affecting 2-4 per million people. Females are more commonly affected than males (Estrogen acts as a growth factor). It is locally invasive and tends to recur but never metastasize. Here, we are discussing about 24-year-old male presented with progressive abdomen distension associated with pain since one month. Abdominal examination showed a firm non-tender intra-abdominal mass, measuring around 15x14 cm size, with intrinsic mobility, which was perpendicular to mesenteric line, all borders were well-made out. CECT abdomen showed features suggestive of GIST . Elective Laparotomy was done and a giant mass arising from mesentery without any infiltration to the surrounding structures was noted. The entire mass was excised and mesentery repaired. Histopathology showed uniform band of spindle shaped cells arranged in fascicles admixed with blood vessels in a collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemistry showed Beta Catenin +ve, CD 117-ve, CD 34 –ve and SMA-ve, which is confirmative of Fibromatosis. Postoperative period was uneventful. PMID:25859491

  15. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  16. Role of lipase-generated free fatty acids in converting mesenteric lymph from a noncytotoxic to a cytotoxic fluid.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Dong, Wei; Sharpe, Susan M; Sheth, Sharvil U; Palange, David C; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick; Deitch, Edwin A

    2012-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that mesenteric lymph plays a very important role in the development of multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome under critical conditions. Great efforts have been made to identify the biologically active molecules in the lymph. We used a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) model and the superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) model, representing a global and a localized intestinal ischemia-reperfusion insult, respectively, to investigate the role of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the cytotoxicity of mesenteric lymph in rats. Lymph was collected before, during, and after (post) shock or SMAO. The post-T/HS and SMAO lymph, but not the sham lymph, manifested cytotoxicity for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVEC cytotoxicity was associated with increased FFAs, especially the FFA-to-protein ratio. Addition of albumin, especially delipidated albumin, reduced this cytotoxicity. Lipase treatment of trauma-sham shock (T/SS) lymph converted it from a noncytotoxic to a cytotoxic fluid, and its toxicity correlated with the FFA-to-protein ratio in a fashion similar to that of the T/HS lymph, further suggesting that FFAs were the key components leading to HUVEC cytotoxicity. Analysis of lymph by gas chromatography revealed that the main FFAs in the post-T/HS or lipase-treated T/SS lymph were palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. When added to the cell culture at levels comparable to those in T/HS lymph, all these FFAs were cytotoxic, with linoleic acid being the most potent. In conclusion, this study suggests that lipase-generated FFAs are the key components resulting in the cytotoxicity of T/HS and SMAO mesenteric lymph. PMID:22899820

  17. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  18. Mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Wojskowicz, Piotr; Kiśluk, Joanna; Fil, Dawid; Kemona, Andrzej; Dadan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniosis is an acute or chronic, zoonotic disease caused by infection of Gram-negative rods Yersinia enterocolitica. It can be transmitted by the consumption of originally contaminated food products (pork, unpasteurized milk) or secondarily contaminated with animal or vegetable products. The clinical picture of infection may have a variable course is related to the age and physical condition of the patient, or pathogenic properties of microorganisms. Infection caused by Y. enterocolitica can occur in different clinical forms: food poisoning, colitis, mesentric lymphadenitis, erythema nodosum, arthritis, pharyngitis, pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis. The aim of this study was to present a rare case of infection with Y. enterocolitica mesenteric lymph nodes coexistent with appendicitis. PMID:26557944

  19. Mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Wojskowicz, Piotr; Kiśluk, Joanna; Fil, Dawid; Kemona, Andrzej; Dadan, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniosis is an acute or chronic, zoonotic disease caused by infection of Gram-negative rods Yersinia enterocolitica. It can be transmitted by the consumption of originally contaminated food products (pork, unpasteurized milk) or secondarily contaminated with animal or vegetable products. The clinical picture of infection may have a variable course is related to the age and physical condition of the patient, or pathogenic properties of microorganisms. Infection caused by Y. enterocolitica can occur in different clinical forms: food poisoning, colitis, mesentric lymphadenitis, erythema nodosum, arthritis, pharyngitis, pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis. The aim of this study was to present a rare case of infection with Y. enterocolitica mesenteric lymph nodes coexistent with appendicitis. PMID:26557944

  20. Percutaneous transhepatic thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Choi, Lorraine; Lin, Peter H; Dardik, Alan; Eraso, Andrea; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric venous occlusion is a rare yet highly morbid condition that is traditionally treated with anticoagulation while surgery serves as the last resort. Percutaneous intervention provides an effective option with relatively low mortality and morbidity. We herein describe use of transhepatic percutaneous thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis in treating two cases of symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. These cases underscore the fact that transhepatic thrombectomy and thrombolysis are a highly effective strategy for treating acute symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. Several percutaneous techniques are also reviewed. PMID:17382054

  1. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  2. Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis with a vaginal contraceptive ring.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Hecht, Benjamin; Zuiderveld, Loren

    2014-07-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. PMID:25035742

  3. Computed tomography of mesenteric involvement in fulminant pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, R.B.; Federle, M.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1983-04-01

    Although extension into the mesentery has been recognized as a frequent pathway of extrapancreatic spread in acute pancreatitis, it has received relatively little attention in the computed tomography (CT) literature. The medical records and CT scans of 55 patients with severe pancreatitis were reviewed in this study; of these patients, 19 (35%) had mesenteric abnormalities, which in 11 patients (20%) represented the most extensive extrapancreatic site of the most extensive extrapancreatic site of involvement. In fulminant pancreatitis, dissection along the mesentery is an important pathway for spread of pancreatic abscesses or phlegmons. Clinical correlation suggests that a combination of mesenteric with lesser sac and anterior pararenal space involvement is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 19 patients with mesenteric involvement, two died and 14 (74%) required surgery for abscesses, pseudocysts, or, in one case, a colonic fistula. The CT features of the normal mesentery and CT criteria for diagnosing mesenteric inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  4. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Rebecca L.; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  5. Undiagnosed Sjögren's Syndrome Presenting as Mesenteric Panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Burns, Rebecca L; Bhavnagri, Sharukh J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare inflammatory and fibrotic process that affects the small intestine mesentery. It may occur following abdominal surgery or in association with a variety of conditions, including malignancy, infection, and certain autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Herein, an unusual case of mesenteric panniculitis in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome will be presented. The patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, sicca symptoms, fatigue, and arthralgia. An abdominal CT revealed mesenteric fat stranding and prominent lymph nodes of the small intestine mesentery. She was found on laboratory workup to have positive antinuclear and anti-SSa antibodies. Minor salivary gland lip biopsy revealed focal lymphocytic sialadenitis. The patient's symptoms and CT findings improved with corticosteroids. This case suggests that Sjögren's syndrome should be considered as an underlying disease process in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis. PMID:27366340

  6. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  7. Survival with Collateral Circulation after Gastrointestinal Ischemia Caused by Aortic Dissection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Eiji; Endo, Kazuya; Ota, Mitsuhiko; Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Hashimoto, Kenkichi; Egashira, Akinori; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kusumoto, Tetsuya; Ikejiri, Koji

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who presented with gradually intensifying abdominal pain of acute onset and was shown by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examination to have acute aortic dissection (Stanford type B). A diagnosis of gastrointestinal necrosis was made and he underwent emergency surgery. At laparoscopy, he was found to have no superior mesenteric arterial pulse and intestinal necrosis from the upper jejunum to the right transverse colon. Resection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) perfusion area was performed. Postoperatively, ischemia in the perfusion area of the celiac artery was also diagnosed, manifesting as gallbladder necrosis, portal vein gas accompanying gastric wall necrosis, perforation of the remaining upper jejunum, and hepatic and splenic infarction. However, development of a collateral circulation originating in the left colic branch of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) enabled retrograde provision of blood to the celiac artery through the SMA pancreaticoduodenal arcade. Thus, in this case, spontaneous development of a natural bypass created a new route for arterial perfusion, contributing to the patient's survival. When ischemia of the celiac artery and SMA perfusion areas occur, collateral circulation can develop from the IMA. PMID:26462314

  8. Organ distribution of gut-derived bacteria caused by bowel manipulation or ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Redan, J.A.; Rush, B.F. Jr.; Lysz, T.W.; Smith, S.; Machiedo, G.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Translocation of carbon-14-labeled Escherichia coli from the gut was studied at the specified times in the following groups of rats: Group 1, 5 hours after ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; Group 2, 5 hours after laparotomy and exposure of the superior mesenteric artery with gentle removal and replacement of the intestines; and Group 3, 5 hours after handling but no surgical manipulation. Both living and dead bacteria were administered by means of gavage, and the effect of viability, intestinal ischemia without reperfusion, and bowel manipulation on the translocation of enteric bacteria was assessed. We demonstrated that (1) even gentle bowel manipulation causes bacteremia as great as that associated with ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; (2) dead E. coli are absorbed into the blood in the presence of bowel manipulation or ischemia but less effectively than are live E. coli; (3) live bacteria are found in highest concentration in the lung and in descending order in the liver, kidney, heart, and spleen; (4) dead bacteria absorbed from the gut are found in highest concentration in the kidney and the liver. Lesser amounts are found in the lung, spleen, and heart.

  9. Successful Recanalization of Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion by a Combination of Intraarterial Thrombolysis and Mechanical Thrombectomy with a Carotid Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sinak, Igor; Janik, Jan; Mikolajcik, Anton; Mistuna, Dusan

    2013-06-15

    Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion is a life-threatening disease, and acute intestinal ischemia develops from the sudden decrease in perfusion to the intestines. The key to saving the patient's life is early diagnosis, and prompt revascularization of the SMA can prevent intestinal infarction and decrease the risk of bowel segment necrosis. Computed tomographic angiography may be useful for rapid diagnosis. We report recanalization of an SMA occlusion in an 80-year-old man with a combination of intraarterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy with a carotid filter.

  10. Identification of Mouse Mesenteric and Subcutaneous in vitro Adipogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yugo; Otsuki, Michio; Kita, Shunbun; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fat accumulation and the dysfunction of visceral white adipose tissue (WAT), but not subcutaneous WAT, cause abnormalities in whole body metabolic homeostasis. However, no current drugs specifically target visceral WAT. The primary reason for this is that a practical in vitro culture system for mesenteric adipocytes has not been established. To resolve this issue, we sought to identify in vitro adipogenic cells in mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs. First, we examined the expression pattern of surface antigens in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from mouse mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs, and found the expression of 30 stem cell-related surface antigens. Then, to evaluate the adipogenic ability of each fraction, we performed in vitro screening, and identified five candidate markers for mesenteric adipogenic cells and one candidate marker for subcutaneous adipogenic cells. To investigate whether in vitro adipogenic ability accurately reflects the conditions in vivo, we performed transplantation experiments, and identified CD9− CD201+ Sca-1− cells and CD90+ cells as mesenteric and subcutaneous in vitro adipogenic cells, respectively. Furthermore, mature adipocytes derived from mesenteric and subcutaneous adipogenic cells maintained each characteristic phenotype in vitro. Thus, our study should contribute to the development of a useful culture system for visceral adipocytes. PMID:26884347

  11. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    Dysplasia of the renal and cervical arteries are well known, but dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is less frequent and has specific presentation. There have been few reports on the different types of presentations. We report a series of 38 cases and present the characteristic features together with a comparison with data in the literature. These non-atheromatous non-inflammatory lesions of the arterial wall occurred either in a context of fibromuscular disease which cause is unknown (30/38 patients) or in patients with genetic disease such as neurofibromatosis (3/38) or Ehlers-Danlos disease (5/38). The fibromuscular disease presented three aspects with specific characteristics. a) stenosing lesions found predominantly in women with a different morphology than in the other localization (usually associated): irregular diffuse stenosis discovered in patients with hypertension, or ischemic digestive symptoms (6/14 patients). b) Aneurysms, also found predominantly in women, but less frequently associated with other dysplasias. These aneurysms were generally sacciform. Unlike data in the literature, our series only included rupture in 1/8 cases. The aneurysm was discovered during the exploration of abdominal pain or hypertension. c) The third type of fibromuscular disease concerned dissections which were observed in the male population, (except one case of segmental dysplasia), and presented with signs of digestive ischemia in the other seven patients, four in an emergency context requiring immediate treatment. Two genetic diseases were observed. a) Neurofibromatosis led to dysplasia analogous to fibromuscular disease, but with abnormal nerve formations in the wall. For the three cases observed, one involved only the visceral arteries and the two others thoraco-abdominal coarctation. b) We had five patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery. For three there was a fusiform dilatation and in one small aneurysms

  12. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  13. I. Effect of Trichinella spiralis infection on the migration of mesenteric lymphoblasts and mesenteric T lymphoblasts in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Rose, M L; Parrott, D M; Bruce, R G

    1976-11-01

    The migration of [125I]UdR-labelled mesenteric lymph node cells in NIH strain mice at various times after inis produced an enhanced accumulation of mesenteric immunoblasts in the small intestine at 2 and 4 days after infection but not at later times. The enhanced migration occurred when using cells from both uninfected and infected donors, denoting an absence of antigenic specificity. This effect is not secondary to a reduced arrival of cells at sites away from the gut in infected mice, but to a primary increase of the arrival in the small intestine. Mesenteric T lymphoblasts (separated on a nylon-wool column) migrated to the small intestine of uninfected recipients and appear to be a major portion of the population which migrate to the gut of infected recipients. Our results were confirmed using 51Cr to label mesenteric cells. We conclude that the parasite causes the small intestine to become more attractive or retentive for mesenteric blast cells early during infection. PMID:62712

  14. Rare case of sclerosing mesenteritis and low grade follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema; Mahy, Gillian; Roche, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of long standing sclerosing mesenteritis; initially presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a mesenteric mass with surrounding fat oedema and stranding with a pseudocapsule and fat ring sign were clearly visualised on the initial computed tomography scan. Laparotomy showed diffuse thickening at the root of the mesentery and histology from this specimen revealed fat necrosis and reactive lymphoid tissue consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. Initial treatment with steroids and tamoxifen relieved the symptoms and the mass. He was maintained on tamoxifen. Three years later he developed a recurrence of his symptoms and abdominal mass that responded to a course of steroids. Two years following this, he developed a follicular Hodgkin’s lymphoma. PMID:27099861

  15. Rare case of sclerosing mesenteritis and low grade follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Seema; Mahy, Gillian; Roche, Enrico

    2016-04-16

    An unusual case of long standing sclerosing mesenteritis; initially presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a mesenteric mass with surrounding fat oedema and stranding with a pseudocapsule and fat ring sign were clearly visualised on the initial computed tomography scan. Laparotomy showed diffuse thickening at the root of the mesentery and histology from this specimen revealed fat necrosis and reactive lymphoid tissue consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. Initial treatment with steroids and tamoxifen relieved the symptoms and the mass. He was maintained on tamoxifen. Three years later he developed a recurrence of his symptoms and abdominal mass that responded to a course of steroids. Two years following this, he developed a follicular Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27099861

  16. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management. PMID:27097623

  17. Sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas: A mimicker of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scudiere, Jennifer R.; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Herman, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Thornton, Katherine; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Horton, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM), also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, rarely involves the parenchyma of the pancreas. When sclerosing mesenteritis does involve the pancreas, it can mimic pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically with pain, obstructive jaundice, a mass lesion and even the appearance of vascular invasion. We report 6 patients with sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas (mean age 43.2 years, 5 female), and review their clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathology, and outcome. Five of these 6 patients were originally thought to have a primary pancreatic neoplasm. Initial presenting clinical information was available for each patient: all 6 reported abdominal or epigastric pain, 3 reported weight loss, and 2 reported one or more of the following: back pain, fever, abdominal bloating/distention, nausea with/without vomiting, and anorexia. The lesions formed masses with an infiltrative pattern, and all had three key histologic features: fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and fat necrosis—without a known etiology. The inflammatory infiltrate was composed of a mixture of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered eosinophils. Of the five patients with post-treatment clinical information available, four had at least a partial response to treatment with steroids, tamoxifen, azathioprine, resection, or a combination of these, and 1 did not respond. A dramatic response to immunosuppressive therapy is illustrated by the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with the presumptive diagnosis of an unresectable pancreatic cancer. Distinguishing sclerosing mesenteritis from pancreatic carcinoma is crucial to appropriate management, as patients with sclerosing mesenteritis may benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20351487

  18. Catastrophic multiple organ ischemia due to an anti-Pr cold agglutinin developing in a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia after treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Joshua; McMahon, Brandon; Ramsey, Glenn; Kwaan, Hau C

    2009-02-01

    Cold agglutinin disease occurring with cryoglobulinemia is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia that was treated with rituximab and, after response, developed an anti-Pr cold agglutinin that manifested with hemolysis and microvascular occlusion causing mesenteric ischemia and cerebral infarction. Unlike previous reports of patients with cryoglobulinemia and cold agglutinin disease, our patient did not have a detectable cryoprecipitate when his cold agglutinin manifested. PMID:19097173

  19. The evolving concept of physiological ischemia training vs. ischemia preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Lu, Hongjian; Lu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghui; Peng, Qingyun; Ren, Caili; Xiang, Jie; Mei, Chengyao; Li, Jianan

    2015-11-01

    Ischemic heart diseases are the leading cause of death with increasing numbers of patients worldwide. Despite advances in revascularization techniques, angiogenic therapies remain highly attractive. Physiological ischemia training, which is first proposed in our laboratory, refers to reversible ischemia training of normal skeletal muscles by using a tourniquet or isometric contraction to cause physiologic ischemia for about 4 weeks for the sake of triggering molecular and cellular mechanisms to promote angiogenesis and formation of collateral vessels and protect remote ischemia areas. Physiological ischemia training therapy augments angiogenesis in the ischemic myocardium by inducing differential expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, cell migration, protein folding, and generation. It upregulates the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor, and induces angiogenesis, protects the myocardium when infarction occurs by increasing circulating endothelial progenitor cells and enhancing their migration, which is in accordance with physical training in heart disease rehabilitation. These findings may lead to a new approach of therapeutic angiogenesis for patients with ischemic heart diseases. On the basis of the promising results in animal studies, studies were also conducted in patients with coronary artery disease without any adverse effect in vivo, indicating that physiological ischemia training therapy is a safe, effective and non-invasive angiogenic approach for cardiovascular rehabilitation. Preconditioning is considered to be the most protective intervention against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury to date. Physiological ischemia training is different from preconditioning. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical data of physiological ischemia training and its difference from preconditioning. PMID:26664354

  20. Proteome changes in mesenteric lymph induced by sepsis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, PING; LI, YAN; ZHANG, LIAN-DONG; WANG, LIANG-HUA; WANG, XI; HE, CHAO; LIN, ZHAO-FEN

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the changes in mesenteric lymph during the development of sepsis and to identify the distinct proteins involved, as targets for further study. The sepsis animal model was constructed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mesenteric lymph was collected from 28 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into the following four groups (n=7 per group): CLP-6 h, CLP-24 h, sham-6 h and sham-24 h groups. Capillary high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed to analyze the proteome in mesenteric lymph. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis was then conducted to investigate the distinct proteins. Compared with the sham group, 158 distinct proteins were identified in the lymph samples from the CLP group. Five of these proteins associated with the same lipid metabolism pathway were selected, apolipoprotein E (ApoE), annexin A1 (Anxa1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), S100a8 and S100a9. The expression of ApoE, Anxa1, NGAL, S100a8 and S100a9 were all elevated in the progression of sepsis. The five proteins were reported to be closely associated with disease development and may be a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis. In conclusion, identifying proteome changes in mesenteric lymph provides a novel perspective to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying sepsis. PMID:25242054

  1. Ileocolic Arteriovenous Fistula with Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurism: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorio, Miguel Angel de; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Medrano, Joaquin; Schoenholz, Caudio; Rodriguez, Juan; D'Agostino, Horacio

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of a venous aneurysm secondary to an acquired ileocolic arteriovenous fistula in a 64-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain and history of appendectomy. The aneurysm was diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography. Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula between ileocolic branches of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. This vascular abnormality was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  2. Mesenteric artery contraction and relaxation studies using automated wire myography.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Lakeesha E; Williams, Cicely L; Pointer, Mildred A; Awumey, Emmanuel M

    2011-01-01

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. These small vessels of between 100-400 μm in diameter function primarily in directing blood flow to various organs according to the overall requirements of the body. The rat mesenteric artery has a diameter greater than 100 μm. The myography technique, first described by Mulvay and Halpern(1), was based on the method proposed by Bevan and Osher(2). The technique provides information about small vessels under isometric conditions, where substantial shortening of the muscle preparation is prevented. Since force production and sensitivity of vessels to different agonists is dependent on the extent of stretch, according to active tension-length relation, it is essential to conduct contraction studies under isometric conditions to prevent compliance of the mounting wires. Stainless steel wires are preferred to tungsten wires because of oxidation of the latter, which affects recorded responses(3).The technique allows for the comparison of agonist-induced contractions of mounted vessels to obtain evidence for normal function of vascular smooth muscle cell receptors. We have shown in several studies that isolated mesenteric arteries that are contracted with phenylyephrine relax upon addition of cumulative concentrations of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(e;)). The findings led us to conclude that perivascular sensory nerves, which express the G protein-coupled Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR), mediate this vasorelaxation response. Using an automated wire myography method, we show here that mesenteric arteries from Wistar, Dahl salt-sensitive(DS) and Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats respond differently to Ca(2+)(e;). Tissues from Wistar rats showed higher Ca(2+)-sensitivity compared to those from DR and DS. Reduced CaR expression in mesenteric arteries from DS rats correlates with reduced Ca(2+)(e;)-induced relaxation of isolated, pre-contracted arteries. The data

  3. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  4. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Murthy, G; Hargens, A R; Lehman, S; Rempel, D M

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue. PMID:11398857

  5. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  6. [Myocardial responses to ischemia].

    PubMed

    Borisenko, V G; Gubareva, E A; Kade, A Kh

    2010-01-01

    The paper details the types of a myocardial response to impaired blood flow, such as myocardial stunning, hibernation, ischemic preconditioning, warm-up phenomenon, ischemic postconditioning, remodeling, and infarction. According to the pathogenesis, the authors identify several types of myocardial dysfunction in transient ischemic attack--uptake, delivery; and a mixed one. It is concluded the myocardial response to damage depends on a combination of influencing factors, a number of pathophysiological processes starting in the acute phase of ischemia achieve its peak in the late period. PMID:20564927

  7. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  8. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  9. Mesenteric amyloid deposition as the initial presentation of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Mehrnaz

    2011-01-01

    Despite many recent progresses in diagnostic modalities, occasionally the initial manifestation of the diseases may be misleading. Therefore, to consider the uncommon presentations of prevalent diseases may be of help. Plasma-cell dyscrasia is one of the most well-known haematological malignancies. Clonal expansion of plasma cells results in diverse clinical findings, such as renal failure, lytic bone lesion, anaemia, hyperviscosity syndrome and so forth. However, this disease entity rarely presents with abdominal mass due to mesenteric amyloid deposition. Here we report a case of a 53-year-old Iranian woman who presented with a 4-month history of abdominal pain and fullness; she was finally found to suffer from small bowel mesenteric amyloidosis in the context of multiple myeloma. PMID:22714598

  10. Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Formation with Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Tadashi; Kamiya, Chiaki; Suzuki, Jun; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac stenosis or occlusion is attributed partly to increase blood flow at pancreatic arcade from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) system and may play a causal role in true aneurysm of pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDAA) formation. However, despite possible increased blood flow in the pancreatic arcades like celiac stenosis, PDAAs with a stenotic SMA are extremely rare, with only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of PDAA with SMA stenosis and review the literature. PMID:25298835

  11. What else is hiding behind superior mesenteric artery syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Paola; Iacobelli, Barbara Daniela; Torroni, Filippo; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Bagolan, Pietro; Fusaro, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon condition in children. We describe a case of a 7-year-old boy with SMAS that occurred 3 years after a Deloyers' procedure for subtotal colonic Hirschsprung who was admitted for bilious vomit, abdominal pain and diarrhea due to unrecognized celiac disease. This case emphasize that SMAS in children needs a close medical and surgical follow-up to avoid an underestimation of early clinical signs unrelated to surgery. PMID:25972411

  12. Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula embolisation complicated by bowel ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Maher; Issa, Ghada; Muhsen, Shirin; Haydar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistulas are rare, especially when iatrogenic in origin. Management of these fistulas can be surgical or endovascular. Endovascular embolisation is the preferred modality with a low rate of complications. Among the reported complications, bowel ischaemia is considered an unlikely occurrence. We report a case of a complex iatrogenic arterioportal fistula that was managed by endovascular embolisation and controlled through both its inflow and outflow, and was later complicated by bowel ischaemia. PMID:23682091

  13. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  14. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Leiomyosarcoma of the Mesenteric Root: A Strategic Location of a Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Offir

    2015-01-01

    High mesenteric root sarcomas are difficult to manage due to their proximity to the superior mesenteric vessels. Resection of these tumors along with the blood vessels may lead to a complicated and protracted convalescence for the patient. Resection remains the main treatment modality for these tumors. During operation on high mesenteric root sarcomas, sound clinical judgment is needed for the decision not to sacrifice vital blood vessels. PMID:26464571

  16. Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Holloway, Naomi; Thimmesch, Amanda; Wood, John G; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a leading cause of death in traumatic injury. Ischemia and hypoxia in HS and fluid resuscitation (FR) creates a condition that facilitates excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is a major factor causing increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and inflammation in the microcirculation resulting in reperfusion tissue injury. The aim of this study was to determine if ubiquinol (coenzyme Q10) decreases microvascular inflammation following HS and FR. Intravital microscopy was used to measure leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions in the rat mesentery following 1-h of HS and 2-h post FR with or without ubiquinol. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by removing ~ 40% of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats' blood volume to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure <50 mmHg for 1 h. Ubiquinol (1 mg/100 g body weight) was infused intravascularly in the ubiquinol group immediately after 1-h HS. The FR protocol included replacement of the shed blood and Lactate Ringer's in both the control and ubiquinol groups. We found that leukocyte adherence (2.3 ± 2.0), mast cell degranulation (1.02 ± 0.01), and ROS levels (159 ± 35%) in the ubiquinol group were significantly reduced compared to the control group (10.8 ± 2.3, 1.36 ± 0.03, and 343 ± 47%, respectively). In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04). In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation. These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties. PMID:25413319

  17. Segmental "misty mesentery" on FDG PET/CT: an uncommon manifestation of mesenteric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Ameya D; Purandare, Nilendu C; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric lymphomas are commonly seen as bulky hypermetabolic nodal masses on F-FDG PET/CT. Very rarely, these are seen as mesenteric haziness due to localized hyperattenuation of fat, known as "misty mesentery", which morphological imaging-wise has other differentials as well. We report a unique imaging finding of segmental misty mesentery with hypermetabolic mesenteric nodes on FDG PET/CT in a patient who was kept on observation due to inconclusive biopsy, which on follow-up imaging progressed to extensive lymphomatous involvement. Thus, in retrospect, this imaging feature on baseline PET/CT was diagnostic for mesenteric lymphoma. PMID:23797224

  18. Purinergic signalling in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pedata, Felicita; Dettori, Ilaria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Melani, Alessia; Fusco, Irene; Corradetti, Renato; Pugliese, Anna Maria

    2016-05-01

    Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia a primary damage due to the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, i.e microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. Extracellular concentrations of ATP and adenosine in the brain increase dramatically during ischemia in concentrations able to stimulate their respective specific P2 and P1 receptors. Both ATP P2 and adenosine P1 receptor subtypes exert important roles in ischemia. Although adenosine exerts a clear neuroprotective effect through A1 receptors during ischemia, the use of selective A1 agonists is hampered by undesirable peripheral effects. Evidence up to now in literature indicate that A2A receptor antagonists provide protection centrally by reducing excitotoxicity, while agonists at A2A (and possibly also A2B) and A3 receptors provide protection by controlling massive infiltration and neuroinflammation in the hours and days after brain ischemia. Among P2X receptors most evidence indicate that P2X7 receptor contribute to the damage induced by the ischemic insult due to intracellular Ca(2+) loading in central cells and facilitation of glutamate release. Antagonism of P2X7 receptors might represent a new treatment to attenuate brain damage and to promote proliferation and maturation of brain immature resident cells that can promote tissue repair following cerebral ischemia. Among P2Y receptors, antagonists of P2Y12 receptors are of value because of their antiplatelet activity and possibly because of additional anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover strategies that modify adenosine or ATP concentrations at injury sites might be of value to limit damage after ischemia. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and

  19. [Cerebral ischemia in young adults].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P; Endemann, B; Vetter, P

    1991-08-01

    An overview is given over etiology and prognosis of cerebral ischemias until the age of 40. In a time period of 19 years, 168 patients were diagnosed with cerebral ischemia until the age of 40 (91 females, 77 males). The most frequent etiology is premature atherosclerosis in patients with vascular risk factors (up to 50%). Cardiogenic embolism is responsible for 1 to 34% of the cases: cardiac valve diseases and endocarditis being the most frequent sources. In 2 to 19% a vasculitis is diagnosed. While infectious arteritis is especially frequent in countries of the third world, immunovasculitides are common in Europe and the USA. Noninflammatory vasculopathies include spontaneous or traumatic dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia and vascular malformations. A migrainous stroke is especially frequent in female smokers with intake of oral contraceptives. During pregnancy both sinus thrombosis and arterial ischemia occur. Hematologic causes for ischemia are polycythemia, thrombocytosis and genetic diseases (sickle cell anemia, AT3-deficiency). Cerebral ischemia may occur in connection with the ingestion of ergot-derivates. The prognosis of cerebral ischemia in young adults is better than in older stroke-patients. PMID:1937340

  20. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  1. Mesenteric venous thrombosis associated with oral contraceptives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milne, P Y; Thomas, R J

    1976-05-01

    Small-bowel infarction resulting from mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening complication to which young women taking oral contraceptives are liable. The patient characteristically presents with an "acute abdomen" after a variable prodromal period of vague abdominal pain. The correct diagnosis can be made from the macroscopic appearance at laparotomy, provided the surgeon is alert to the condition. An accurate diagnosis is important, as anticoagulation measures must be instituted early to counter the commonly associated thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:1067070

  2. Current Understandings of Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous isolated superior mesenteric artery dissection (SISMAD) has been known as a rare vascular disease. However it is increasingly reported in these days with the development of advanced imaging technology. Underlying etiology, natural course or an optimal management strategy of SISMAD is not exactly known at the moment. During the past 10 years, we have had an interest in this rare vascular disease and collected clinical and image data in 100 or more patients with SISMAD. In this review article, I would like to describe my current understanding of SISMAD on the base of our recent publications in the major vascular surgery journals. PMID:27386450

  3. Ruptured and unruptured mycotic superior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Semel, Marcus E; McGillicuddy, Edward A; Ho, Karen J; Menard, Matthew T; Gates, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    Aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and branches thereof are uncommon but have a high rate of rupture and mortality relative to other visceral artery aneurysms. Historically, the predominant etiology has been infectious; with a renewed rise in intravenous drug abuse rates in the last decade, we hypothesize a resurgence in septic embolic complications may occur in the coming years. Here, we describe the presentation and management of 2 cases of intravenous drug users presenting with infectious endocarditis and SMA main trunk and branch aneurysms, one of which was ruptured. In addition, we review the literature on these rare clinical entities. PMID:25017769

  4. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI. PMID:26902261

  5. Tyrphostin AG 126 reduces intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marzocco, Stefania; Mazzon, Emanuela; Pinto, Aldo; Autore, Giuseppina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of tyrphostin AG126, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in the splanchnic artery occlusion (SAO) shock mediated injury. SAO shock was induced in rats by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk for 45 min. After 1 h of reperfusion, SAO shocked rats developed a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure. Ileum analysis revealed that SAO shock is characterized by a significant (P<0.01) induction in TNF-alpha and IL-1 ileum levels, while immunohistochemistry examination of necrotic ileum demonstrated a marked increase in the immunoreactivity in intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) and nitrotyrosine formation. A significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity (P<0.01) was also observed in rats subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Tyrphostin AG126, given intraperitoneally 30 min before ischemia at the dose of 5 mg/kg, significantly improved mean arterial blood pressure, markedly reduced TNF-alpha and IL-1beta levels and the positive staining of ICAM-1 into the reperfused ileum. Tyrphostin AG126 significantly improved the histological status of the reperfused tissue. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that tyrphostin AG126 exerts multiple protective effects in splanchnic artery occlusion/reperfusion shock and suggests that this tyrosine kinase inhibitor may be a candidate for consideration as a therapeutic intervention for ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:16485131

  6. Relief of superior mesenteric artery syndrome with correction of multiplanar spinal deformity by posterior spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Marecek, Geoffrey S; Barsness, Katherine A; Sarwark, John F

    2010-07-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is obstruction of the third portion of the duodenum by compression between the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Pediatric orthopedists are familiar with this entity, as the association between superior mesenteric artery syndrome and spinal fusion or body casting has been well established. However, patients with spinal deformities usually experience superior mesenteric artery syndrome after orthopedic intervention, with rates after corrective spinal surgery reported between 0.5% and 2.4%. Symptoms of superior mesenteric artery syndrome typically include nausea, bilious emesis, abdominal pain, early satiety, and anorexia. Initial treatment focuses on gastric decompression and maintaining euvolemia and electrolyte balance. The patient should receive enteral nutrition via nasojejunal tube or parenteral nutrition to allow for weight gain and subsequent resolution of the obstruction. The superior mesenteric artery takes off from the duodenum at an angle of 45 degrees to 60 degrees in normal individuals. The third portion of the duodenum is suspended between these vessels by the ligament of Treitz. Any variation in this relationship that decreases the arteriomesenteric angle may induce obstruction. Specifically, lumbar hyperextension or hyperlordosis can traction the mesentery and vessels. Only 2 cases of superior mesenteric artery syndrome in patients with sagittal plane spinal deformity have been described in the literature. In patients with concomitant superior mesenteric artery syndrome and spinal deformity, correction of the deformity may help alleviate the obstruction and result in faster recovery. The contribution of spinal column deformity to the arteriomesenteric angle should not be overlooked. PMID:20608618

  7. TRPM8 Channel Activation Induced by Monoterpenoid Rotundifolone Underlies Mesenteric Artery Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Darizy Flavia; de Almeida, Monica Moura; Chaves, Cinthia Guedes; Braz, Ana Letícia; Gomes, Maria Aparecida; Pinho-da-Silva, Leidiane; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Andrade, Viviane Aguiar; Leite, Maria de Fátima; de Albuquerque, José George Ferreira; Araujo, Islania Giselia Albuquerque; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Correia, Nadja de Azevedo; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2015-01-01

    In this study, our aims were to investigate transient receptor potential melastatin-8 channels (TRPM8) involvement in rotundifolone induced relaxation in the mesenteric artery and to increase the understanding of the role of these thermosensitive TRP channels in vascular tissue. Thus, message and protein levels of TRPM8 were measured by semi-quantitative PCR and western blotting in superior mesenteric arteries from 12 week-old Spague-Dawley (SD) rats. Isometric tension recordings evaluated the relaxant response in mesenteric rings were also performed. Additionally, the intracellular Ca2+ changes in mesenteric artery myocytes were measured using confocal microscopy. Using PCR and western blotting, both TRPM8 channel mRNA and protein expression was measured in SD rat mesenteric artery. Rotundifolone and menthol induced relaxation in the isolated superior mesenteric artery from SD rats and improved the relaxant response induced by cool temperatures. Also, this monoterpene induced an increase in transient intracellular Ca2+. These responses were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with capsazepine or BCTC, both TRPM8 channels blockers. The response induced by rotundifolone was not significantly attenuated by ruthenium red, a non-selective TRP channels blocker, or following capsaicin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1. Our findings suggest that rotundifolone induces relaxation by activating TRPM8 channels in rat superior mesenteric artery, more selectively than menthol, the classic TRPM8 agonist, and TRPM8 channels participates in vasodilatory pathways in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. PMID:26599698

  8. [Mesenteric panniculitis of the colon: barium enema, US, CT, and MRI findings (case report)].

    PubMed

    Kebapçi, Mahmut; Adapinar, Baki; Kaya, Tamer; Kebapçi, Nur

    2004-12-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis as an uncommon disease of unknown etiology characterised by nonspecific inflammation of the fat tissue of the mesentery. In this report, we are presenting a case of mesenteric panniculitis of the rectosigmoid colon in which characteristic findings of barium enema, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were noted. We emphasized the diagnostic significance of these methods. PMID:15611917

  9. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  10. Coexistence of rare arteries in the human celiaco-mesenteric system.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Mabuchi, M; Giuvarasteanu, I; Kikuta, A; Ohtsuka, A

    1998-10-01

    Some rare anomalies of the celiaco-mesenteric system were observed postmortem in a Japanese adult male: a) The left gastric, common hepatic, splenic and superior mesenteric arteries arose independently from the abdominal aorta. b) The anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery of the superior mesenteric artery issued a hepatic artery which ascended along the anterior surface of the pancreas and gave off the right gastroepiploic, right gastric and cystic arteries. c) The common hepatic artery gave off an anastomosing branch to the superior mesenteric artery. d) The left gastric artery gave off the left accessory hepatic artery. e) The splenic artery issued the accessory middle colic artery. f) The left inferior phrenic artery gave off the esophageal branch. These anomalies are discussed in light of a typological system which we proposed in a previous paper for the celiaco-mesenteric system. PMID:9810433

  11. Lymph transport in rat mesenteric lymphatics experiencing edemagenic stress

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Akl, Tony; Coté, Gerard L.; Moore, James E.; Zawieja, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess lymphatic flow adaptations to edema, we evaluated lymph transport function in rat mesenteric lymphatics under normal and edemagenic conditions in situ. Methods Twelve rats were infused with saline (intravenous infusion, 0.2 ml/min/100g body weight) to induce edema. We intravitally measured mesenteric lymphatic diameter and contraction frequency, as well as immune cell velocity and density before, during and after infusion. Results A 10-fold increase in lymph velocity (0.1–1 mm/s) and a 6-fold increase in flow rate (0.1–0.6 μL/min), were observed post-infusion, respectively. There were also increases in contraction frequency and fractional pump flow 1-minute post-infusion. Time-averaged wall shear stress increased 10 fold post-infusion to nearly 1.5 dynes/cm2. Similarly, maximum shear stress rose from 5 dynes/cm2 to 40 dynes/cm2. Conclusions Lymphatic vessels adapted to edemagenic stress by increasing lymph transport. Specifically, the increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity, and shear stress were significant. Lymph pumping increased post-infusion, though changes in lymphatic diameter were not statistically significant. These results indicate that edemagenic conditions stimulate lymph transport via increases in lymphatic contraction frequency, lymph velocity and flow. These changes, consequently, resulted in large increases in wall shear stress, which could then activate NO pathways and modulate lymphatic transport function. PMID:24397756

  12. Phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Inoshita, Naoko; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An 80-year-old woman visited the hospital emergency department with the chief complaints of epigastric pain and vomiting. She was hospitalized urgently following the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome based on abdominal computed tomography findings. Conservative therapy was not effective, and phlegmonous gastritis was diagnosed based on the findings of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy performed on the 12th day of the disease. Undernutrition and reduced physical activity were observed on hospital admission, and proactive nutritional therapy with enteral nutrition was started. An upper gastrointestinal series, performed approximately 1 month later, confirmed the persistence of strictures and impaired gastric emptying. Because conservative therapy was unlikely to improve oral food intake, open total gastrectomy was performed on the 94th day of the disease. Examination of surgically resected specimens revealed marked inflammation and fibrosis, especially in the body of the stomach. Following a good postoperative recovery, the patient was able to commence oral intake and left our hospital on foot approximately 1 month after surgery. PMID:27489695

  13. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  14. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  15. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  16. Effect of perturbations and a meal on superior mesenteric artery flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, J.; Camilleri, M.; Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Our aims were to evaluate to role of superior mesenteric blood flow in the pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension in patients with generalized autonomic failure. METHODS: Twelve patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and 12 healthy controls underwent superior mesenteric artery flow measurements using Doppler ultrasonography during head-up tilt and tilt plus meal ingestion. Autonomic failure was assessed using standard tests of the function of the sympathetic adrenergic, cardiovagal and postganglionic sympathetic sudomotor function. RESULTS: Superior mesenteric flow volume and time-averaged velocity were similar in patients and controls at supine rest; however, responses to cold pressor test and upright tilt were attenuated (p < 0.05) in patients compared to controls. Head-up tilt after the meal evoked a profound fall of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the patients; the reduction of mesenteric blood flow correlated (r = 0.89) with the fall of blood pressure in these patients, providing another manifestation of failed baroreflexes. We make the novel finding that the severity of postprandial orthostatic hypotension regressed negatively with the postprandial increase in mesenteric flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension. CONCLUSION: Mesenteric flow is under baroreflex control, which when defective, results in, or worsens orthostatic hypotension. Its large size and baroreflexivity renders it quantitatively important in the maintenance of postural normotension. The effects of orthostatic stress can be significantly attenuated by reducing the splanchnic-mesenteric volume increase in response to food. Evaluation of mesenteric flow in response to eating and head-up tilt provide important information on intra-abdominal sympathetic adrenergic function, and the ability of the patient to cope with orthostatic stress.

  17. Wilkie's Syndrome or Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Fact or Fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Vera; Deeb, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome (known as Wilkie's syndrome) is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. It is an acquired disorder in which acute angulation of the SMA causes compression of the third part of the duodenum between the SMA and the aorta. This is commonly due to loss of fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions. We report a 17-year-old female who presented with intermittent abdominal pain and intractable vomiting following significant weight loss after hospitalization for pneumonia. Symptoms persisted for 2 years and the patient underwent extensive invasive and non-invasive tests, but to no avail. Thereafter she developed acute high intestinal obstruction, which unraveled her diagnosis. This case emphasizes the challenges in the diagnosis of SMA syndrome and the need for increased awareness of this entity. This will improve early recognition in order to reduce irrelevant tests and unnecessary treatments. PMID:26120301

  18. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Associated with Hormonal Contraceptive Use.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Nobuatsu

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was admitted with a 7-day history of lower abdominal pain and nausea. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness in the lower abdomen without signs of peritonitis. There were no specific findings in the laboratory evaluation. She had a history of dysmenorrhea for 15 years and was taking a combined hormonal contraceptive containing 0.02 mg ethinyl estradiol and 3 mg drospirenone for 19 months. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT). Systemic anticoagulant infusion was immediately administered and the symptoms disappeared within 2 days. The thrombus disappeared after 3 months. This case report suggests that early diagnosis of SMVT and immediate systemic anticoagulant therapy may reduce the rate of intestinal infarction. PMID:27462195

  19. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Associated with Hormonal Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Nobuatsu

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was admitted with a 7-day history of lower abdominal pain and nausea. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness in the lower abdomen without signs of peritonitis. There were no specific findings in the laboratory evaluation. She had a history of dysmenorrhea for 15 years and was taking a combined hormonal contraceptive containing 0.02 mg ethinyl estradiol and 3 mg drospirenone for 19 months. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT). Systemic anticoagulant infusion was immediately administered and the symptoms disappeared within 2 days. The thrombus disappeared after 3 months. This case report suggests that early diagnosis of SMVT and immediate systemic anticoagulant therapy may reduce the rate of intestinal infarction. PMID:27462195

  20. Changes in mesenteric, renal, and aortic flows with +Gx acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. L.; Erickson, H. H.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in man and dogs have indicated that the splanchnic bed might contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration. Eight mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented with Doppler flow probes around the superior mesenteric (SMA) and renal arteries (RA) as well as the terminal aorta (TA). A solid-state pressure transducer was placed in the aorta distal to the flow probe. Using alpha-chloralose anesthesia following a 2-4 week recovery period, the animals were subjected to 120 sec at levels of 5, 10 and 15 +Gx acceleration on a 7.6-m radius centrifuge. The results indicate that both an active component and a mechanical component contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure during +Gx acceleration.

  1. Cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Kalyan, Jiten P; Jonas, Attila; Hanif, Muhammad A; Prionidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms as a result of arterial degenerative disease are rare (0.1-2%), and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) accounts for 3.2% of all reported series. However, mycotic SMA aneurysms (SMAAs) are even rarer, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cryptogenic mycotic aneurysm of SMA by Enterococcus faecalis (EF). We report a case of 77-year-old man with 6-week history of supra pubic/left iliac fossa pain, weight loss and fever. The computed tomography demonstrated an incidental finding of 4.4 × 3-cm SMAA with no primary foci. The subsequent serology and specimen confirmed EF. Aneurysmectomy without bypass grafting along with antimicrobial therapy resulted in full recovery of the patient. PMID:26276703

  2. Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance arterial function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Ground studies indicate that spaceflight may diminish vascular contraction. To examine that possibility, vascular function was measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats immediately after an 18-day shuttle flight. Isolated mesenteric resistance arterial responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were measured using wire myography within 17 h of landing. After flight, maximal contraction to norepinephrine was attenuated (P < 0.001) as was relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (P < 0.05). At high concentrations, acetylcholine caused vascular contraction in vessels from flight animals but not in vessels from vivarium control animals (P < 0.05). The results are consistent with data from ground studies and indicate that spaceflight causes both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent alterations in vascular function. The resulting decrement in vascular function may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

  3. Endovascular Management of Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Barbery, Katuska; Lamus, Daniel; Nanavati, Kunal

    2008-11-15

    The uncommon presentation of an arterioportal fistula (APF) involving the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with a pseudoaneurysm represents a therapeutic challenge. We present the case of a 24-year-old female admitted to the hospital after multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen; the patient underwent multiple surgeries and, in the process, developed a SMA pseudoaneurysm and fistula. The vascular interventional radiology team was consulted for treatment of the pseudoaneurysm and fistula. A covered stent was inserted percutaneously to exclude the APF and the pseudoaneurysm in a single procedure. The patient returned to our service after 21 months for a follow-up CT scan, which demonstrated the stent and the distal vasculature to be patent.

  4. Visceral periadventitial adipose tissue regulates arterial tone of mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Verlohren, Stefan; Dubrovska, Galyna; Tsang, Suk-Ying; Essin, Kirill; Luft, Friedrich C; Huang, Yu; Gollasch, Maik

    2004-09-01

    Periadventitial adipose tissue produces vasoactive substances that influence vascular contraction. Earlier studies addressed this issue in aorta, a vessel that does not contribute to peripheral vascular resistance. We tested the hypothesis that periadventitial adipose tissue modulates contraction of smaller arteries more relevant to blood pressure regulation. We studied mesenteric artery rings surrounded by periadventitial adipose tissue from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The contractile response to serotonin, phenylephrine, and endothelin I was markedly reduced in intact vessels compared with vessels without periadventitial fat. The contractile response to U46619 or depolarizing high K+-containing solutions (60 mmol/L) was similar in vessels with and without periadventitial fat. The K+ channel opener cromakalim induced relaxation of vessels precontracted by serotonin but not by U46619 or high K+-containing solutions (60 mmol/L), suggesting that K+ channels are involved. The intracellular membrane potential of smooth muscle cells was more hyperpolarized in intact vessels than in vessels without periadventitial fat. Both the anticontractile effect and membrane hyperpolarization of periadventitial fat were abolished by inhibition of delayed-rectifier K+ (K(v)) channels with 4-aminopyridine (2 mmol/L) or 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mmol/L). Blocking other K+ channels with glibenclamide (3 micromol/L), apamin (1 micromol/L), iberiotoxin (100 nmol/L), tetraethylammonium ions (1 mmol/L), tetrapentylammonium ions (10 micromol/L), or Ba2+ (3 micromol/L) had no effect. Longitudinal removal of half the perivascular tissue reduced the anticontractile effect of fat by almost 50%, whereas removal of the endothelium had no effect. We suggest that visceral periadventitial adipose tissue controls mesenteric arterial tone by inducing vasorelaxation via K(v) channel activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:15302842

  5. [Transanal Doppler ultrasound for prevention of colonic ischemia following abdominal aortic reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Sakurazawa, K

    1991-10-01

    Colonic gangrene is a fatal complication following aorto-iliac reconstruction. Preservation of a sufficient blood flow through both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the internal iliac artery (IIA) is believed to be important in its prevention. The transanal Doppler ultrasound technique is a new method to explore intraoperative pelvic hemodynamic changes. After identifying the artery responsible for rectal perfusion and then estimating the collateral rectal blood supply which was derived from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after aortic clamping, the treatment for the IMA and the IIA was determined. Out of 49 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), 43 cases (88%) were considered to be SMA-dominant, with ligation of the IMA and the IIA being feasible. The IMA and bilateral IIAs could be ligated uneventfully in 14 AAA cases. And, in fact, the reconstruction of the IMA was performed in only 2 cases (4%). Among 21 cases of aorto-iliac occlusive disease (AIOD), 8 cases (38%) were found to be SMA-non-dominant, which suggests a greater importance in the preservation of intrapelvic circulation in AIOD than in AAA. Adequate intraoperative monitoring, by the transanal Doppler ultrasound technique, is essential for the successful prevention of postoperative colonic ischemia. PMID:1961189

  6. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia: results of a recent series.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Papaspiropoulos, V; Mancini, P; Ceccanei, G

    2004-04-01

    Due to the rarity of the condition, large and prospective series defining the optimal method of digestive arteries revascularization, for the treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia, are lacking. The aim of this consecutive sample clinical study was to test the hypothesis that flexible application of different revascularization methods, according to individual cases, will yield the best results in the management of chronic intestinal ischemia. Eleven patients, of a mean age of 56 years, underwent revascularization of 11 digestive arteries for symptomatic chronic mesenteric occlusive disease. Eleven superior mesenteric arteries and one celiac axis were revascularized. The revascularization techniques included retrograde bypass grafting in 7 cases, antegrade bypass grafting in 2, percutaneous arterial angioplasty in 1, and arterial reimplantation in one case. The donor axis for either reimplantation or bypass grafting was the infrarenal aorta in 4 cases, an infrarenal Dacron graft in 4, and the celiac aorta in one case. Grafting materials included 5 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and 3 Dacron grafts. Concomitant procedures included 3 aorto-ilio-femoral grafts and one renal artery revascularization. Mean follow-up duration was 31 months. There was no operative mortality. Cumulative survival rate was 88.9% at 36 months (SE 12.1%). Primary patency rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). The symptom free rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). Direct reimplantation, antegrade and retrograde bypass grafting, all allow good mid-term results: the choice of the optimal method depends on the anatomic and general patient's status. Associated infrarenal and renal arterial lesions can be safely treated in the same time of digestive revascularization. Angioplasty alone yields poor results and should be limited to patients at poor risk for surgery. PMID:15154575

  7. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, Yoshiki E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy.

  8. Mesenteric Panniculitis in a Thirteen-Year-Old Korean Boy Treated with Prednisolone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Ji Soo

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric mesenteric panniculitis is an extremely rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation, fat necrosis, and fibrosis in the mesenteric adipose tissue. A previously healthy 13-year-old boy was admitted because of right upper abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed increased attenuation and enhancement in the left upper abdominal omental fat and anterior peritoneal wall thickening. A laparoscopic biopsy showed mesenteric panniculitis with chronic inflammation, adiponecrosis, and septal fibrosis. Serological tests for autoimmune diseases, nested polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and special immunohistochemical stains for malignancy were all negative. Symptomatic improvement and improved abnormal findings were achieved after an 8-month treatment with prednisolone according to a follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan. Here, we report a case of pediatric mesenteric panniculitis treated with prednisolone. PMID:27437192

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Volvulus through Mesenteric Defect in Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Scott; Al-Qaraghouli, Mohammed; Hussain, Naveed; Finck, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal midgut volvulus is a rare surgical emergency in which bowel is severely compromised. Rarely the etiology is a mesenteric defect. Early diagnosis is essential and lifesaving in the immediate newborn period. Typically upper gastrointestinal or ultrasound imaging can be suggestive of the diagnosis of volvulus in the neonate. Sometimes, however, the diagnosis may be elusive. Herein, we report on the use of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose a midgut volvulus that occurred through a congenital mesenteric defect. PMID:27551577

  10. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  11. Rupture of an Aneurysm of a Small Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arer, Ilker Murat; Gedikoglu, Murat; Yabanoglu, Hakan; Noyan, Mustafa Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) is an uncommon vascular disorder. Complications such as rupture have been reported. Once complication has been encountered both surgical and endovascular treatment techniques can be considered. Case Report We present a case of 68-year old male patient with SMAA rupture treated by endovascular modality. Conclusions Endovascular therapy is an effective and less invasive option for rupture of superior mesenteric artery aneurysm. PMID:27536338

  12. Binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites in rat mesenteric lymph

    SciTech Connect

    Dueland, S.; Bouillon, R.; Van Baelen, H.; Pedersen, J.I.; Helgerud, P.; Drevon, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    A protein with high affinity for vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in rat mesenteric lymph has been studied. Mesenteric lymph was collected after duodenal instillation of radiolabeled vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. As previously described, approximately 10% of vitamin D3 and 95% of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 recovered in mesenteric lymph were associated with the alpha-globulin fractions. The radioactive vitamin D3 recovered in the lymph fraction with d greater than 1.006 (free of chylomicrons) coeluted with purified rat serum binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites (DBP) from an antirat DBP column. The results obtained by immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that this protein in mesenteric lymph had molecular weight and immunological properties identical with purified serum DBP. Purified serum DBP labeled with /sup 125/I was injected intravenously and mesenteric lymph was collected. results suggesting that DBP may be transferred from blood to mesenteric lymph and that plasma and lymph DBP may have a similar origin.

  13. Anatomical Description and Clinical Relevance of a Rare Variation in the Mesenteric Arterial Arcade Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hansdak, Ranjeeta; Thakur, Avinash; Mehta, Vandana; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    Solitary vascular variations of the mesenteric arteries are extremely rare and have been seldom reported in the past. The aim of this study is to emphasize the anatomical and clinical relevance of one such rare variation of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). The current case anomaly was incidentally observed while guiding the undergraduate medical students in the dissection of the mesenteric region of the abdomen in an Indian cadaver. An Accessory left colic artery was seen to be branching off from the Inferior Mesenteric artery and further dividing into two transverse branches which took part in the formation of arterial arc for the perfusion of the transverse and the descending colon. Awareness of such aberrant branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery helps in optimal selection of the mode of treatment or operative planning. Additionally, this knowledge minimizes possible iatrogenic injuries resulting from surgeries. Moreover, surgical anatomy of anomalous branches of Inferior Mesenteric artery is extremely essential for planning and successfully executing reconstructive procedures using these branches as pedicles for the transposed part of the colon. PMID:26435936

  14. Bardoxolone Methyl Prevents Mesenteric Fat Deposition and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Chi H. L.; Szabo, Alexander; Yu, Yinghua; Camer, Danielle; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric fat belongs to visceral fat. An increased deposition of mesenteric fat contributes to obesity associated complications such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We have investigated the therapeutic effects of bardoxolone methyl (BARD) on mesenteric adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6J mice were administered oral BARD during HFD feeding (HFD/BARD), only fed a high-fat diet (HFD), or fed low-fat diet (LFD) for 21 weeks. Histology and immunohistochemistry were used to analyse mesenteric morphology and macrophages, while Western blot was used to assess the expression of inflammatory, oxidative stress, and energy expenditure proteins. Supplementation of drinking water with BARD prevented mesenteric fat deposition, as determined by a reduction in large adipocytes. BARD prevented inflammation as there were fewer inflammatory macrophages and reduced proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha). BARD reduced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, suggesting an antioxidative stress effect. BARD upregulates energy expenditure proteins, judged by the increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) proteins. Overall, BARD induces preventive effect in HFD mice through regulation of mesenteric adipose tissue. PMID:26618193

  15. Rho Kinase Enhances Contractions of Rat Mesenteric Collecting Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Moor, Andrea N.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1–10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5–50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1–10 μM H1152 or 25–50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose

  16. Rho kinase enhances contractions of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Kristine H; Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Moor, Andrea N; Breslin, Jerome W

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that control phasic and tonic contractions of lymphatic vessels are poorly understood. We hypothesized that rho kinase ROCK, previously shown to increase calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle, enhances lymphatic contractile activity in a similar fashion. Contractions of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels were observed at a luminal pressure of 2 cm H2O in a 37°C bath. The expression of ROCK in isolated rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels was assessed by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The role of ROCK in contractile function was tested using two specific yet structurally distinct inhibitors: H1152 (0.1-10 μM) and Y-27632 (0.5-50 μM). In addition, lymphatics were transfected with constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein (2 μg/ml) to assess gain of contractile function. Vessel diameter and the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were simultaneously measured in a subset of isolated lymphatics loaded with the Ca2+-sensing dye fura-2. The results show expression of both the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms in lymphatic vessels. Inhibition of ROCK increased lymphatic end diastolic diameter and end systolic diameter in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant reductions in lymphatic tone and contraction amplitude were observed after treatment 1-10 μM H1152 or 25-50 μM Y-27632. H1152 (10 μM) also significantly reduced contraction frequency. Transient increases in [Ca2+]i preceded each phasic contraction, however this pattern was disrupted by either 10 μM H1152 or 50 μM Y-27632 in the majority of lymphatics studied. The significant decrease in tone caused by H1152 or Y-27632 was not associated with a significant change in the basal [Ca2+]i between transients. Transfection with ca-ROCK protein enhanced lymphatic tone, but was not associated with a significant change in basal [Ca2+]i. Our data suggest that ROCK mediates normal tonic constriction and influences phasic contractions in lymphatics. We propose that

  17. Leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahbi, Abdullah M; Elmoukaied, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of male infertility. Many surgical approaches are used as each of them has advantages over the other and is preferred by surgeons. Vascular injury has never been reported as a complication of varicocelectomy apart from testicular artery injury. We present a 36-year-old male who developed leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy due to common femoral artery injury. He was successfully treated by using a vein graft. PMID:27022305

  18. Predictive Modeling of Cardiac Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Contextual Alarms Management System (CALMS) project is to develop sophisticated models to predict the onset of clinical cardiac ischemia before it occurs. The system will continuously monitor cardiac patients and set off an alarm when they appear about to suffer an ischemic episode. The models take as inputs information from patient history and combine it with continuously updated information extracted from blood pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG lines. Expert system, statistical, neural network and rough set methodologies are then used to forecast the onset of clinical ischemia before it transpires, thus allowing early intervention aimed at preventing morbid complications from occurring. The models will differ from previous attempts by including combinations of continuous and discrete inputs. A commercial medical instrumentation and software company has invested funds in the project with a goal of commercialization of the technology. The end product will be a system that analyzes physiologic parameters and produces an alarm when myocardial ischemia is present. If proven feasible, a CALMS-based system will be added to existing heart monitoring hardware.

  19. Neuroglobin Protection in Retinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anita S.Y.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Rehak, Matus; Ueki, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a vertebrate globin that is predominantly expressed in the retina and brain. To explore the role of Ngb in retinal neuroprotection during ischemia reperfusion (IR), the authors examined the effect of Ngb overexpression in the retina in vivo by using Ngb-transgenic (Ngb-Tg) mice. Methods. Retinal IR was induced in Ngb overexpressing Ngb-Tg mice and wild type (WT) mice by cannulating the anterior chamber and transiently elevating the IOP for 60 minutes. After Day 7 of reperfusion, the authors evaluated Ngb mRNA and protein expression in nonischemic control as well as ischemic mice and its effect on retinal histology, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis, using morphometry and immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR analysis and Western blot techniques. Results. Ngb-Tg mice without ischemia overexpress Ngb mRNA 11.3-fold (SE ± 0.457, P < 0.05) higher than WT control mice, and this overexpression of Ngb protein was localized to the mitochondria of the ganglion cells, outer and inner plexiform layers, and photoreceptor inner segments. This overexpression of Ngb is associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA damage in Ngb-Tg mice with IR in comparison with WT. Ngb-Tg mice with IR also revealed significant preservation of retinal thickness, significantly less activated caspase 3 protein expression, and apoptosis in comparison with WT mice. Conclusions. Neuroglobin overexpression plays a neuroprotective role against retinal ischemia reperfusion injury due to decreasing of mitochondrial oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:22167093

  20. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  1. Endovascular Treatment of Isolated Dissection of Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    PubMed

    Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Galzerano, G; Setacci, C

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery is extremely rare. In December 2012, a 45-year-old man, without significant comorbidities, presented at the emergency room of another hospital with abdominal pain. The patient was treated with medical therapy and discharged on resolution of the pain. Three months later he returned to the emergency room with a new onset of pain. CT-angiography (CTA) showed an isolated SMA dissection associated with aneurysmal dilatation. The patient was referred to our attention. We attempted endovascular exclusion of the dissecting aneurysm in May 2013. We deployed a self-expandable nitinol stent (BostonSC Adapt 4-9×32 mm) in order to simultaneously repair the dissection, preserve the branches and exclude the aneurysm. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. At 10-month follow-up CTA showed excellent positioning of the stent, patency of the visceral branches and shrinkage of the aneurysm. PMID:26324038

  2. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed. PMID:23395151

  3. Mesenteric lymph flow in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Nagai, Takashi; Coté, Gerard L; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the aging-associated changes, contractile characteristics of mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV), and lymph flow in vivo in male 9- and 24-mo-old Fischer-344 rats. Lymphatic diameter, contraction amplitude, contraction frequency, and fractional pump flow, lymph flow velocity, wall shear stress, and minute active wall shear stress load were determined in MLV in vivo before and after N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) application at 100 μM. The active pumping of the aged rat MLV in vivo was found to be severely depleted, predominantly through the aging-associated decrease in lymphatic contractile frequency. Such changes correlate with enlargement of aged MLV, which experienced much lower minute active shear stress load than adult vessels. At the same time, pumping in aged MLV in vivo may be rapidly increased back to levels of adult vessels predominantly through the increase in contraction frequency induced by nitric oxide (NO) elimination. Findings support the idea that in aged tissues surrounding the aged MLV, the additional source of some yet unlinked lymphatic contraction-stimulatory metabolites is counterbalanced or blocked by NO release. The comparative analysis of the control data obtained from experiments with both adult and aged MLV in vivo and from isolated vessel-based studies clearly demonstrated that ex vivo isolated lymphatic vessels exhibit identical contractile characteristics to lymphatic vessels in vivo. PMID:21873496

  4. Ethyl pyruvate protects colonic anastomosis from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Unal, B; Karabeyoglu, M; Huner, T; Canbay, E; Eroglu, A; Yildirim, O; Dolapci, M; Bilgihan, A; Cengiz, O

    2009-03-01

    Ethyl pyruvate is a simple derivative in Ca(+2)- and K(+)-containing balanced salt solution of pyruvate to avoid the problems associated with the instability of pyruvate in solution. It has been shown to ameliorate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in many organs. It has also been shown that I/R injury delays the healing of colonic anastomosis. In this study, the effect of ethyl pyruvate on the healing of colon anastomosis and anastomotic strength after I/R injury was investigated. Anastomosis of the colon was performed in 32 adult male Wistar albino rats divided into 4 groups of 8 individuals: (1) sham-operated control group (group 1); (2) 30 minutes of intestinal I/R by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (group 2); (3) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 3), ethyl pyruvate was administered as a 50-mg/kg/d single dose; and (4) I/R+ ethyl pyruvate (group 4), ethyl pyruvate administration was repeatedly (every 6 hours) at the same dose (50 mg/kg). On the fifth postoperative day, animals were killed. Perianastomotic tissue hydroxyproline contents and anastomotic bursting pressures were measured in all groups. When the anastomotic bursting pressures and tissue hydroxyproline contents were compared, it was found that they were decreased in group 2 when compared with groups 1, 3, and 4 (P < .05). Both anastomotic bursting pressure (P = .005) and hydroxyproline content (P < .001) levels were found to be significantly increased with ethyl pyruvate administration when compared with group 2. When ethyl pyruvate administration doses were compared, a significant difference was not observed (P > .05). Ethyl pyruvate significantly prevents the delaying effect of I/R injury on anastomotic strength and healing independent from doses of administration. PMID:19064591

  5. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  6. Effects of Ukrain on intestinal apoptosis caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akcılar, Raziye; Akcılar, Aydın; Koçak, Cengiz; Koçak, Fatma Emel; Bayat, Zeynep; Şimşek, Hasan; Şahin, Server; Savran, Bircan

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the antiapoptotic effect of Ukrain on intestinal lesion induced by mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: laparotomy (L), I/R, and Ukrain and I/R (U + I/R). In the U + I/R group, Ukrain (7 mg/kg) was given by intraperitoneal at the beginning of the study. 1 h after ukrain application, ischemia was induced for 30 minutes, and reperfusion was subsequently allowed for 120 minutes in the I/R and U + I/R groups. Rats were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and intestinal tissues were collected for biochemical and molecular examination. Intestinal tissues caspase 3 protein were assayed. Serum Bcl-xL and iNOS were measured. The expression level of caspase-3, Bcl-xL and iNOS in intestinal tissue of rats were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Levels of serum iNOS and mRNA expression were increased in the I/R and decreased in the U + I/R group. In addition, levels of the proapoptotic gene caspase-3 protein and mRNA expression were increased in the I/R and decreased in the U + I/R group. Levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-xL serum and mRNA expression were increased in the U + I/R group. Conclusions: Ukrain can reduce the ischemia-reperfusion injury in the intestinal tissue by inhibiting the cell apoptosis. The mechanism may be correlated with increased Bcl-xL mRNA expressions and decreased mRNA expressions of Caspase-3 and iNOS. PMID:26885190

  7. Caudal mesenteric ganglion in the sheep - macroanatomical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, W; Chrószcz, A; Dudek, A; Janeczek, M; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) is a prevetrebral ganglion which provides innervation to a number of organs in the abdominal and pelvic cavity. The morphology of CaMG and the chemical coding of neurones in this ganglion have been described in humans and many animal species, but data on this topic in the sheep are entirely lacking. This prompted us to undertake a study to determine the localization and morphology of sheep CaMG as well as immunohistochemical properties of its neurons. The study was carried out on 8 adult sheep, weighing from 40 to 60 kg each. The sheep were deeply anaesthetised and transcardially perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. CaMG-s were exposed and their location was determined. Macroanatomical observations have revealed that the ovine CaMG is located at the level of last two lumbar (L5 or L6) and the first sacral (S1) vertebrae. The ganglion represents an unpaired structure composed of several, sequentially arranged aggregates of neurons. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed that nearly all (99.5%) the neurons were DβH-IR and were richly supplied by VACHT-IR nerve terminals forming "basket-like" structures around the perikarya. VACHT-IR neurones were not determined. Many neurons (55%) contained immunoreactivity to NPY, some of them (10%) stained for Met-ENK and solitary nerve cells were GAL-positive. CGRP-IR nerve fibres were numerous and a large number of them simultaneously expressed immunoreactivity to SP. Single, weakly stained neurones were SP-IR and only very few nerve cells weakly stained for VIP. PMID:26172189

  8. Endovascular Therapeutic Approaches for Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, S. Sonesson, B.; Resch, T.

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcome of attempted endovascular intervention in patients with acute embolic or thrombotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. The records of 21 patients during a 3-year period between 2005 and 2008 were retrieved from the in-hospital registry. The first group included 10 patients (6 women and 4 men; median age 78 years) with acute embolic occlusion of the SMA. The median duration of symptoms from symptom onset to angiography was 30 hours (range 6 to 120). Synchronous emboli (n = 12) occurred in 6 patients. Embolus aspiration was performed in 9 patients, and 7 of these had satisfactory results. Complementary local thrombolysis was successful in 2 of 3 patients. Residual emboli were present at completion angiography in all 7 patients who underwent successful aspiration embolectomy, and bowel resection was necessary in only 1 of these patients. One serious complication occurred because of a long SMA dissection. The in-hospital survival rate was 90% (9 of 10 patients). The second group included 11 patients (10 women and 1 man; median age 68 years) with atherosclerotic acute SMA occlusions. The median time of symptom duration before intervention was 97 hours (range 17 to 384). The brachial, femoral, and SMA routes were used in 6, 7, and 5 patients, respectively. SMA stenting was performed through an antegrade (n = 7) or retrograde (n = 3) approach. Bowel resection was necessary in 4 patients. No major complications occurred. The in-hospital survival rate was 82% (9 of 11 patients). Endovascular therapy of acute SMA occlusion provides a good alternative to open surgery.

  9. [Ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gennai, Stéphane; Pison, Christophe; Briot, Raphaël

    2014-09-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage arising from the first hours after transplantation. The first etiology of the primary graft dysfunction in lung is ischemia-reperfusion. It is burdened by an important morbi-mortality. Lung ischemia-reperfusion increases the oxidative stress, inactivates the sodium pump, increases the intracellular calcium, leads to cellular death and the liberation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Researches relative to the reduction of the lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries are numerous but few of them found a place in common clinical practice, because of an insufficient level of proofs. Ex vivolung evaluation is a suitable technique in order to evaluate therapeutics supposed to limit lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries. PMID:24935680

  10. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  11. Measurement of Angiogenesis, Arteriolargenesis, and Lymphangiogenesis Phenotypes by Use of Two-Dimensional Mesenteric Angiogenesis Assay.

    PubMed

    Benest, Andrew V; Bates, David O

    2016-01-01

    Successful therapeutic angiogenesis requires an understanding of how the myriad interactions of growth factors released during angiogenesis combine to form a mature vascular bed. This requires a model in which multiple physiological and cell biological parameters can be identified. The adenoviral-mediated mesenteric angiogenesis assay as described here is ideal for that purpose. The clear, thin, and relatively avascular mesenteric panel can be used to measure increased vessel perfusion by intravital microscopy. In addition, high-powered microvessel analysis is carried out by immunostaining of features essential for the study of angiogenesis or lymphangiogenesis (including endothelium, pericyte, smooth muscle cell area, and proliferation), allowing functional data to be obtained in conjunction with high-power microvessel ultrastructural analysis. Therefore, the mesenteric angiogenesis model offers a robust system to analyze the morphological changes associated with angiogenesis, induced by different agents. PMID:27172966

  12. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  13. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord.

    PubMed

    Balmaseda, M T; Gordon, C; Cunningham, M L; Clairmont, A C

    1987-09-01

    Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. This unusual type of intestinal obstruction known as superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity. It is diagnosed radiologically by an abrupt, vertical cutoff of barium flow in the third portion of the duodenum. The management is primarily medical but occasionally surgical correction is required. Herein, the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome was made in an incomplete quadriplegic woman who had recently undergone surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord. This case was managed successfully with gastrointestinal decompression, proper positioning in the side-lying position, and adequate nutrition. PMID:3631039

  14. Effects of exercise and excitement on mesenteric and renal dynamics in conscious, unrestrained baboons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to measure arterial pressure and mesenteric and renal blood flows from nine unrestrained, conscious baboons during periods of rest, moderate exercise, and extreme excitement. A description of the experiments hardware is presented, including artificial depressants phenylcyclidine hydrochloride, 0.5-1.0 mg/kg, and pentobarbital sodium, 15 mg/kg, and an ultrasonic telemetry flow meter. Results showed rising heart rate and arterial pressure coupled with a reduction of mesenteric and renal flows as the level of exercise was increased. These findings are compared with mesenteric and renal flows somewhat above control level, but relatively stable heart rate and arterial pressure, postprandially. Attention is given to a quantitative analysis of the experimental results.

  15. Relaxin deficiency attenuates pregnancy-induced adaptation of the mesenteric artery to angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sarah A; Leo, Chen Huei; Senadheera, Sevvandi N; Girling, Jane E; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy is associated with reduced peripheral vascular resistance, underpinned by changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function. Failure of the maternal vasculature to adapt correctly leads to serious pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. The peptide hormone relaxin regulates the maternal renal vasculature during pregnancy; however, little is known about its effects in other vascular beds. This study tested the hypothesis that functional adaptation of the mesenteric and uterine arteries during pregnancy will be compromised in relaxin-deficient (Rln(-/-)) mice. Smooth muscle and endothelial reactivity were examined in small mesenteric and uterine arteries of nonpregnant (estrus) and late-pregnant (day 17.5) wild-type (Rln(+/+)) and Rln(-/-) mice using wire myography. Pregnancy per se was associated with significant reductions in contraction to phenylephrine, endothelin-1, and ANG II in small mesenteric arteries, while sensitivity to endothelin-1 was reduced in uterine arteries of Rln(+/+) mice. The normal pregnancy-associated attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries did not occur in Rln(-/-) mice. This adaptive failure was endothelium-independent and did not result from altered expression of ANG II receptors or regulator of G protein signaling 5 (Rgs5) or increases in reactive oxygen species generation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with l-NAME enhanced ANG II-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries of both genotypes, whereas blockade of prostanoid production with indomethacin only increased ANG II-induced contraction in arteries of pregnant Rln(+/+) mice. In conclusion, relaxin deficiency prevents the normal pregnancy-induced attenuation of ANG II-mediated vasoconstriction in small mesenteric arteries. This is associated with reduced smooth muscle-derived vasodilator prostanoids. PMID:26936785

  16. Increased tumour necrosis factor α production in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic patients with ascites

    PubMed Central

    Genescà, J; Martí, R; Rojo, F; Campos, F; Peribáñez, V; Gónzalez, A; Castells, L; Ruiz-Marcellán, C; Margarit, C; Esteban, R; Guardia, J; Segura, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cytokines produced in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic rats with bacterial translocation may participate in circulatory alterations of cirrhosis. Aim: To investigate whether cirrhotic patients present an increased local generation of cytokines in mesenteric lymph nodes. Methods: Mesenteric lymph nodes from 26 cirrhotic and 10 control patients were assessed for tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) and interleukin 6 mRNA and protein expression by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and by enzyme immunoassay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Interleukin 6 levels were not different between cirrhotics and controls. Protein and mRNA TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes from cirrhotics were higher than in controls (p<0.05). Tissue expression of TNF by immunohistochemistry was more abundant in cirrhotics. Ascitic patients showed higher TNF levels (47 (34–54) pg/mg protein) than patients without ascites (18 (17–25) pg/mg protein) (p<0.001). Elevated TNF levels (>28 pg/mg protein) in cirrhotics were associated with a higher Child-Pugh score, the antecedent of ascites, a lower prothrombin rate, and higher bilirubin and blood TNF levels. The strongest association, confirmed by multivariate analysis, was with the presence of ascites (p<0.001). Bacterial infections after transplantation, mainly by enteric bacteria, were only detected in patients with high TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes (33% of patients; p=0.05). Conclusion: Patients with advanced liver cirrhosis, and especially with ascites, have increased local production of TNF in mesenteric lymph nodes that, in common with experimental cirrhosis, may also be induced by bacterial translocation. PMID:12801966

  17. Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm Associated with Celiac Axis Occlusion Treated Using Endovascular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Biswajit; Kuhan, Ganesh; Johnson, Brian; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2006-10-15

    The case of a 30-year-old woman with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery and associated celiac axis occlusion is presented. The patient was successfully treated with celiac artery recanalization and placement of a covered stent within the superior mesenteric artery. Follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months and 3 years demonstrated patency of the covered stent and continued exclusion of the aneurysm. Although the long-term success of this procedure is unknown this management option should be considered where facilities are available, to reduce the increased morbidity associated with open surgical procedure.

  18. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  19. Seatbelt syndrome with superior mesenteric artery syndrome: leave nothing to chance!

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Singla, Apresh A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of seatbelts to legislation has dramatically reduced mortality and morbidity from motor vehicle accidents. However, overtime evidence has emerged of ‘seatbelt syndrome’ (SBS), particularly in the paediatric population. The report describes the diagnosis and management of this rare injury in a 12-year-old boy who sustained a chance lumbar fracture and mesenteric tear resulting in small bowel obstruction. His stay was subsequently complicated by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. This is the first documented case of SBS with SMA syndrome. High index of suspicion and continuity of care, particularly in the setting of a ‘seatbelt sign’, is paramount to timely diagnosis and management. PMID:26564612

  20. Large mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moschos, John; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Paikos, Dimitrios; Tagarakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Zissis; Kadis, Savvas; Katsos, Ioannis; Tarpagos, Anestis

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with severe debilitation, anemia and diarrhea over two months. Colonoscopy revealed many (>100) polyps (familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome). Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass at the left upper abdomen in conjunction with the splenic flexure. Total colectomy with mesenteric mass and adjacent small bowel removal and ileoanal pouch was performed. Examination of the resected mesenteric mass showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with scarce mitosis and infiltration of the adjacent small bowel. We describe for the first time in medical literature the coexistence of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and GIST in a 30-year-old man. PMID:16855925

  1. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: MRI and CT imaging correlated to anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, Th; Danse, E; Sempoux, Ch; Annet, L; Dragean, Ch Anca; Trefois, P; Abbes Orabi, N; Kartheuser, A

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare tumor, classified by WHO of intermediate biological potential with tendency for local recurrence and small risk for distant metastasis. Histologically IMT is a mixture of inflamma- tory cells and myofibroblastic spindle cells proliferation. To our knowledge there is no MRI description of mesenteric IMT in the literature. We would like to emphasize the correlation between medical imaging and anatomical pathology based on our experience of a mesenteric IMT in a 28-year-old patient. PMID:25597213

  2. Percutaneous drainage and sclerosis of mesenteric cysts: literature overview and report of an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Giada; Ferrarese, Alessia; Busso, Marco; Borello, Alessandro; Catalano, Silvia; Surace, Alessandra; Marola, Silvia; Gentile, Valentina; Martino, Valter; Solej, Mario; Nano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 29-years-old male patient, affected by a voluminous post-traumatic mesenteric cyst, a rare abdominal disease; our patient represents a rarely affected age group. Treatment was based on interventional radiology with an US-guided drainage and sclerosis by ethyl alcohol of the lesion. The intervention performed on this patient represents the application of a standardized radiological technique to a new contest, mesenteric cysts, whose gold-standard treatment is represented in literature by surgery. In our case we obtained an optimal result, with complete regression of the treated cyst: it proved to be an effective, feasible, safe and minimally invasive procedure. PMID:25183644

  3. Mesenteric circulation: three-dimensional MR angiography with a gadolinium-enhanced multiecho gradient-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Shirkhoda, A; Konez, O; Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Ellwood, R A; Kirsch, M J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the mesenteric circulation with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, the authors examined 16 individuals (12 patients, four volunteers) with a gadolinium-enhanced, breath-hold, fat-saturated, multiecho, three-dimensional, gradient-echo sequence. Twenty examinations were performed. Grades of 3 or 4 (on a five-point scale [4 = best seen, 0 = not seen]) were applicable to 17 (85%) of 20 MR angiograms obtained in superior mesenteric artery trunks, 15 (75%) in celiac arteries, five (25%) in inferior mesenteric arteries; 15 (75%) of first-order branching, 12 (60%) of second-order branching, and 10 (50%) of third-order branching; 17 (85%) in superior mesenteric veins; and 17 (85%) in portal veins. MR angiography with this technique depicted the mesenteric arterial and venous circulation and the portal vein with excellent resolution in a short time. PMID:8988220

  4. Relationship Between the Levels of Oxidative Stress in Mesenteric and Peripheral Serum and Clinicopathological Variables in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Ahmet Fikret; Kemik, Özgür; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Purisa, Sevim; Tüzün, İshak Sefa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the differences existing between the levels of oxidative stress in peripheral and mesenteric serum in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and Methods One hundred fifty patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgery between May 2005 and March 2010 were prospectively analyzed. The differences between oxidative stress parameters in their peripheral and mesenteric blood were measured. The associations between peripheral and mesenteric levels and the staging and clinicopathological variables were investigated. Results: Oxidative stress parameters were higher in patients with advanced tumor staging (p<0.01), lymph node invasion (p<0.01), and venous invasion (p<0.01). Differences between oxidative stress parameters in peripheral and mesenteric blood samples were also observed. Conclusions: The mesenteric levels of the oxidative stress markers were higher than the peripheral levels in these colorectal cancer patients. Higher levels of these oxidative stress markers are associated with an advanced state of cancer. PMID:25206984

  5. Cerebral ischemia during surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W; Lee, Roger; Huang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia is the pathophysiological condition in which the oxygenated cerebral blood flow is less than what is needed to meet cerebral metabolic demand. It is one of the most debilitating complications in the perioperative period and has serious clinical sequelae. The monitoring and prevention of intraoperative cerebral ischemia are crucial because an anesthetized patient in the operating room cannot be neurologically assessed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the definition, etiology, risk factors, and prevention of cerebral ischemia during surgery.

  6. Perioperative myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shernan, Stanton K

    2003-09-01

    Myocardial I-R injury contributes to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after cardiac surgery. The pathogenesis of I-R injury is complex and involves the activation, coordination, and amplification of several systemic and local proinflammatory pathways (Fig. 4). Treatment and prevention of perioperative morbidity associated with myocardial I-R will ultimately require a multifocal approach. Combining preoperative risk stratification (co-morbidity and surgical complexity), minimizing initiating factors predisposing to SIRS, limiting ischemia duration, and administering appropriate immunotherapy directed toward systemic and local proinflammatory mediators of I-R injury, should all be considered. In addition, the role of the genetic-environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is also being examined. Thus, in the near future, preoperative screening for polymorphisms of certain inflammatory and coagulation genes should inevitably help reduce morbidity by permitting the identification of high-risk cardiac surgical patients and introducing the opportunity for gene therapy or pharmacogenetic intervention [42,64]. PMID:14562561

  7. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eklof, B; Hoevels, J; Ihse, I

    1978-01-01

    The mortality in acute intestinal ischemia is high, and 50% of such patients have previous attacks of abdominal angina due to chronic intestinal ischemia. Vascular reconstruction is remarkably successful in relieving the symptoms of chronic intesintal ischemia and for this reason angiographic examination is recommended in all patients in whom chronic intestinal ischemia is suspected. If the diagnosis is established by arteriography with appropriate supporting evidence, vascular reconstruction should be performed. Images Fig. 1a and b. Fig. 2a and b. Fig. 3b and c. Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b. Fig. 5b. Fig. 6. Fig. 7a. Fig. 7b and c. Fig. 8a and b. Fig. 9a. Fig. 9b. Fig. 9c. PMID:637591

  8. Arteriovenous Fistula of a Colic Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard D. Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy; Bhat, Rajesh

    2010-08-15

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) of the superior mesenteric artery and its branches are exceedingly rare. We report an unusual case of a patient who was found to be symptomatic from such an AVF, with diarrhea and terminal ileal thickening. We describe the findings from magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and catheter angiography and discuss the endovascular management.

  9. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Mohammed H; Chan, Wilson W; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  10. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  11. Mesenteric desmoid-type fibromatosis causing secondary hypertension in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Seon; Jung, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yong-Bong

    2014-01-01

    This report describes an 18-year-old woman presenting with abdominal distension, left flank pain, and hypertension. She had a huge abdominal mass, diagnosed as a mesenteric desmoid-type fibromatosis, causing compression of the left external iliac vessels and ureter, as well as elevated renin concentration and hypertension. After surgical removal of the mass, all signs improved including hypertension. PMID:25264535

  12. Morphological Changes in Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and Lymphocyte Subpopulation Composition in Experimental Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Postovalova, E A; Khochansky, D N; Zolotova, N A; Gao, Yu; Makarova, O V; Dobrynina, M T

    2016-04-01

    Morphological changes in the mesenteric lymph nodes of male C57Bl/6 mice and subpopulation composition of lymphocytes in these nodes were studied in experimental acute and chronic ulcerative colitis induced by sodium dextran sulfate. Acute and chronic ulcerative colitis was associated with the development of reactive changes in the mesenteric lymph nodes. These changes were of mixed type and were characterized by follicular hyperplasia and sinus reaction. The content of CD19(+) B cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes decreased in acute ulcerative colitis, while the content of CD3(+)CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells increased, which presumably reflected activation of Th1 reactions. The increase in the count of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and CD3(+)CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells was due to intensive migration of lymphocytes from the thymus and the colonic compartment of the local immune system. Chronic ulcerative colitis was associated with higher levels of CD19(+) B cells and CD3(+)CD4(+) T helper cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes, which was characteristic of adoptive immunity reactions and chronization of the inflammatory process. PMID:27165070

  13. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  14. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect vasoactivity of these compounds. Objectives were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in mesenteric artery and vein and determine if previous exposure to endophyte-infected tall fescue affec...

  15. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect the vasoactivity of these compounds. The objectives of this study were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in bovine mesenteric artery (MA) and vein (MV) and determine if previous exposure ...

  16. Superior Mesenteric Vein Occlusion Causing Severe Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Two Paediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anna L.; Jones, Matthew; Healey, Andrew; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports about superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in childhood are very rare and have not been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. We describe two cases of severe bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract in children who had undergone complex abdominal surgery at considerable time before. The first child had a tracheoesophageal fistula, corrected by division, gastrostomy insertion, and repair of duodenal rupture. The child presented with severe bleeding from the gastrostomy site and was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the proximal superior mesenteric vein. The second child had a gastroschisis and duodenal atresia, and required duodenoplasty, gastrostomy insertion, hemicolectomy, and adhesiolysis. The child presented with intermittent severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, resulting from collateral vessels at location of the surgical connections. He was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein. In both children, the extensive previous surgery and anastomosis were considered the cause of the mesenteric thrombosis. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis in both cases, in addition to characteristic findings on endoscopy. Paediatricians should suspect this condition in children with severe gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly in children with previous, complex abdominal surgery. PMID:23198238

  17. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  18. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Dominguez, James M; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Following exposure to microgravity, there is a reduced ability of astronauts to augment peripheral vascular resistance, often resulting in orthostatic hypotension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mesenteric arteries and veins will exhibit diminished vasoconstrictor responses after spaceflight. Mesenteric arteries and veins from female mice flown on the Space Transportation System (STS)-131 (n=11), STS-133 (n=6), and STS-135 (n=3) shuttle missions and respective ground-based control mice (n=30) were isolated for in vitro experimentation. Vasoconstrictor responses were evoked in arteries via norepinephrine (NE), potassium chloride (KCl), and caffeine, and in veins through NE across a range of intraluminal pressures (2-12 cmH(2)O). Vasoconstriction to NE was also determined in mesenteric arteries at 1, 5, and 7 d postlanding. In arteries, maximal constriction to NE, KCl, and caffeine were reduced immediately following spaceflight and 1 d postflight. Spaceflight also reduced arterial ryanodine receptor-3 mRNA levels. In mesenteric veins, there was diminished constriction to NE after flight. The results indicate that the impaired vasoconstriction following spaceflight occurs through the ryanodine receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release mechanism. Such vascular changes in astronauts could compromise the maintenance of arterial pressure during orthostatic stress. PMID:23099650

  19. [Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after surgical correction of severe dorso-lumbar deformities. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    Massaioli, N; Rastel-Bogin, P; Schieroni, R; Brayda-Bruno, M; Villata, E; Bonatti, L; Redivo, L; Galliano, R; Busch, R; Borello, G

    1995-12-01

    The authors report two cases of superior mesenteric artery syndrome observed in 22 operations for severe spinal deformities. Medical, dietary and postural treatment enabled the situation to be resolved in one case; whereas an intestinal derotation according to Strong-Valdoni was successfully performed in the other. The various surgical alternatives are discussed. PMID:8725066

  20. Schistosomiasis Presenting as a Case of Acute Appendicitis with Chronic Mesenteric Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wilson W.; Morava-Protzner, Izabella; Kuhn, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of schistosomiasis typically result from the host inflammatory response to parasitic eggs that are deposited in the mucosa of either the gastrointestinal tract or bladder. We present here a case of a 50-year-old gentleman with a rare gastrointestinal presentation of both schistosomal appendicitis and mesenteric thrombosis. PMID:27366174

  1. Ischemia modified albumin: does it change during pneumoperitoneum in robotic prostatectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Ozgen, Serpil Ustalar; Ozveren, Bora; Kilercik, Meltem; Aksu, Ugur; Ay, Binnaz; Tufek, Ilter; Kural, Ali Riza; N.Turkeri, Levent; Toraman, Fevzi

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusion We did not demonstrate any significant mesenteric-splanchnic ischemia which could be detected by serum IMA levels during robotic radical prostatectomies performed under steep Trendelenburg position and when IAP is maintained in between 11-14 mmHg PMID:27136469

  2. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  3. Diagnostic value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide levels in determination of the duration of mesenteric ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Sinan; Karahan, Oguz; Yazici, Suleyman; Guclu, Orkut; Caliskan, Ahmet; Tezcan, Orhan; Yavuz, Celal

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Mesenteric arteries release C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which hyperpolarises vascular smooth muscle. We measured the levels of this peptide after inducing mesenteric ischaemia over a series of time intervals, so as to determine its predictive value in demonstrating the severity of ischaemia in a rat model. Methods A total of 32 rats were allocated to four groups containing eight rats each. Basal CNP reference levels were measured in the control group, which was not exposed to any intervention. In groups I, II and III, mesenteric ischaemia was induced over three, six and nine hours, respectively, and plasma CNP levels were measured afterwards. Mesenteric ischaemia was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Results In comparison with the controls (2.38 ± 0.18 pg/ml), CNP levels were relatively lower in group I (2.54 ± 0.42 pg/ml). However, significant increases in plasma CNP levels were observed over longer periods of ischaemia in group II, at 5.23 ± 0.22 pg/ml, and in group III, at 6.19 ± 0.67 pg/ml (p < 0.05). A significant direct relationship was determined between plasma CNP levels and prolonged intervals of mesenteric ischaemia (R = 0.56, p < 0.001). Conclusion Measuring plasma CNP levels in patients with acute mesenteric ischaemia may be beneficial in estimating the time period over which the ischaemic injury has occurred. PMID:24967686

  4. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role. PMID:25537798

  5. A Vasoactive Role for Endogenous Relaxin in Mesenteric Arteries of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gooi, Jon H.; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin has striking effects on the vascular system. Specifically, endogenous relaxin treatment reduces myogenic reactivity through nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasorelaxation and increases arterial compliance in small resistance arteries. However, less is known about the vascular roles of endogenous relaxin, particularly in males. Therefore, we used male wild-type (Rln+/+) and relaxin knockout (Rln−/−) mice to test the hypothesis that passive wall properties and vascular reactivity in mesenteric arteries would be compromised in Rln−/− mice. Passive compliance was determined in arteries (n = 8–9) mounted on a pressure myograph and in Ca2+-free Krebs containing 2 mM EGTA. Passive volume compliance was significantly (P = 0.01) decreased in the mesenteric arteries of Rln−/− mice. Vascular reactivity was assessed using wire myography. In mesenteric arteries (n = 5) of Rln−/− mice, there was a significant (P<0.03) increase in sensitivity to the vasoconstrictors phenylephrine and thromboxane-mimetic U41669. This enhanced responsiveness to vasoconstrictors was abolished by endothelial denudation, and attributed to impaired NO and prostanoid pathways in Rln−/− mice. Sensitivity to the endothelial agonist acetylcholine was significantly (n = 7–9, P≤0.03) decreased, and this was abolished in the presence of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2 µM). This indicates that prostanoid vasoconstrictor pathways were upregulated in the mesenteric arteries of Rln−/− mice. In summary, we demonstrate endothelial dysfunction and impaired arterial wall remodeling in male mice deficient in relaxin. Thus, our results highlight a role for endogenous relaxin in the maintenance of normal mesenteric artery structure and function in males. PMID:25243460

  6. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Dominguez, James M.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Following exposure to microgravity, there is a reduced ability of astronauts to augment peripheral vascular resistance, often resulting in orthostatic hypotension. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mesenteric arteries and veins will exhibit diminished vasoconstrictor responses after spaceflight. Mesenteric arteries and veins from female mice flown on the Space Transportation System (STS)-131 (n=11), STS-133 (n=6), and STS-135 (n=3) shuttle missions and respective ground-based control mice (n=30) were isolated for in vitro experimentation. Vasoconstrictor responses were evoked in arteries via norepinephrine (NE), potassium chloride (KCl), and caffeine, and in veins through NE across a range of intraluminal pressures (2–12 cmH2O). Vasoconstriction to NE was also determined in mesenteric arteries at 1, 5, and 7 d postlanding. In arteries, maximal constriction to NE, KCl, and caffeine were reduced immediately following spaceflight and 1 d postflight. Spaceflight also reduced arterial ryanodine receptor-3 mRNA levels. In mesenteric veins, there was diminished constriction to NE after flight. The results indicate that the impaired vasoconstriction following spaceflight occurs through the ryanodine receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ release mechanism. Such vascular changes in astronauts could compromise the maintenance of arterial pressure during orthostatic stress.—Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis, R. T., III, Dominguez, J. M., II, Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Effects of spaceflight and ground recovery on mesenteric artery and vein constrictor properties in mice. PMID:23099650

  7. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  8. Diagnosis of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pope, J Hector; Selker, Harry P

    2003-02-01

    A better understanding of coronary syndromes allow physicians to appreciate UAP and AMI as part of a continuum of ACI. ACI is a life-threatening condition whose identification can have major economic and therapeutic importance as far as threatening dysrhythmias and preventing or limiting myocardial infarction size. The identification of ACI continues to challenge the skill of even experienced clinicians, yet physicians continue (appropriately) to admit the overwhelming majority of patients with ACI; in the process, they admit many patients without acute ischemia [2], overestimating the likelihood of ischemia in low-risk patients because of magnified concern for this diagnosis for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Studies of admitting practices from a decade ago have yielded useful clinical information but have shown that neither clinical symptoms nor the ECG could reliably distinguish most patients with ACI from those with other conditions. Most studies have evaluated the accuracy of various technologies for diagnosing ACI, yet only a few have evaluated the clinical impact of routine use. The prehospital 12-lead ECG has moderate sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of ACI. It has demonstrated a reduction of the mean time to thrombolysis by 33 minutes and short-term overall mortality in randomized trials. In the general ED setting, only the ACI-TIPI has demonstrated, in a large-scale multicenter clinical trial, a reduction in unnecessary hospitalizations without decreasing the rate of appropriate admission for patients with ACI. The Goldman chest pain protocol has good sensitivity for AMI but was not shown to result in any differences in hospitalization rate, length of stay, or estimated costs in the single clinical impact study performed. The protocol's applicability to patients with UAP has not been evaluated. Single measurement of biomarkers at presentation to the ED has poor sensitivity for AMI, although most biomarkers have high specificity. Serial

  9. Intestinal Translocation of Clinical Isolates of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in a Rat Model of Bacterial Colonization and Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Karin M.; van der Heijden, Inneke M.; Galvao, Flavio H.; Lopes, Camila G.; Costa, Silvia F.; Abdala, Edson; D’Albuquerque, Luiz A.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a rat model of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli and to evaluate intestinal translocation to blood and tissues after total and partial hepatic ischemia. Methods - We developed a model of rat colonization with VRE and ESBL-E coli. Then we studied four groups of colonized rats: Group I (with hepatic pedicle occlusion causing complete liver ischemia and intestinal stasis); Group II (with partial liver ischemia without intestinal stasis); Group III (surgical manipulation without hepatic ischemia or intestinal stasis); Group IV (anesthetized without surgical manipulation). After sacrifice, portal and systemic blood, large intestine, small intestine, spleen, liver, lungs, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured. Endotoxin concentrations in portal and systemic blood were determined. Results – The best inocula were: VRE: 2.4×1010 cfu and ESBL-E. coli: 1.12×1010 cfu. The best results occurred 24 hours after inoculation and antibiotic doses of 750 µg/mL of water for vancomycin and 2.1 mg/mL for ceftriaxone. There was a significantly higher proportion of positive cultures for ESBL-E. coli in the lungs in Groups I, II and III when compared with Group IV (67%; 60%; 75% and 13%, respectively; p:0.04). VRE growth was more frequent in mesenteric lymph nodes for Groups I (67%) and III (38%) than for Groups II (13%) and IV (none) (p:0.002). LPS was significantly higher in systemic blood of Group I (9.761±13.804 EU/mL−p:0.01). No differences for endotoxin occurred in portal blood. Conclusion –We developed a model of rats colonized with resistant bacteria useful to study intestinal translocation. Translocation occurred in surgical procedures with and without hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and probably occurred via the bloodstream. Translocation was probably lymphatic in the ischemia-reperfusion groups

  10. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Leischik, Roman; Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  11. The transcriptome of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    VanGilder, Reyna L.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Barr, Taura L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular causality and response to stroke is complex. Yet, much of the literature examining the molecular response to stroke has focused on targeted pathways that have been well-characterized. Consequently, our understanding of stroke pathophysiology has made little progress by way of clinical therapeutics since tissue plasminogen activator was approved for treatment nearly a decade ago. The lack of clinical translation is in part due to neuron-focused studies, preclinical models of cerebral ischemia and the paradoxical nature of neuro-inflammation. With the evolution of the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable criteria streamlining research efforts and broad availability of genomic technologies, the ability to decipher the molecular fingerprint of ischemic stroke is on the horizon. This review highlights preclinical microarray findings of the ischemic brain, discusses the transcriptome of cerebral preconditioning and emphasizes the importance of further characterizing the role of the neurovascular unit and peripheral white blood cells in mediating stroke damage and repair within the penumbra. PMID:22381515

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  13. The GPR55 agonist lysophosphatidylinositol relaxes rat mesenteric resistance artery and induces Ca2+ release in rat mesenteric artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    AlSuleimani, Y M; Hiley, C R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), a lipid signalling molecule, activates GPR55 and elevates intracellular Ca2+. Here, we examine the actions of LPI in the rat resistance mesenteric artery and Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells isolated from the artery. Experimental Approach Vascular responses were studied using wire myographs. Single-cell fluorescence imaging was performed using a MetaFluor system. Hypotensive effects of LPI were assessed using a Biopac system. Key Results In isolated arteries, LPI-induced vasorelaxation was concentration- and endothelium-dependent and inhibited by CID 16020046, a GPR55 antagonist. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 had no effect, whereas rimonabant and O-1918 significantly potentiated LPI responses. Vasorelaxation was reduced by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, alone or combined. LPI decreased systemic arterial pressure. GPR55 is expressed in rat mesenteric artery. LPI caused biphasic elevations of endothelial cell intracellular Ca2+. Pretreatment with thapsigargin or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate abolished both phases. The PLC inhibitor U73122 attenuated the initial phase and enhanced the second phase, whereas the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 abolished the late phase but not the early phase. Conclusions and Implications LPI is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator in the rat small mesenteric artery and a hypotensive agent. The vascular response involves activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and is not mediated by CB1 receptors, but unexpectedly enhanced by antagonists of the ‘endothelial anandamide’ receptor. In endothelial cells, LPI utilizes PLC-IP3 and perhaps ROCK-RhoA pathways to elevate intracellular Ca2+. Overall, these findings support an endothelial site of action for LPI and suggest a possible role for GPR55 in vasculature. PMID:25652040

  14. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  15. Sclerosing Mesenteritis and Disturbance of Glucose Metabolism: A New Relationship? A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, João Pedro Tavares; Romão, Vera; Eulálio, Margarida; Jorge, Rita; Breda, Filipe; Calretas, Suzana; Leitão, Sara; Eugénio, Gisela; Santos, Rui; Carvalho, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 51 • Male, 70 • Male, 63 • Male, 67 • Female, 76 Final Diagnosis: Sclerosing mesenteritis Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colcicine Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Sclerosing mesenteritis is an idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic disease that affects the mesentery. It is a rare disease, with the total number of reported cases in the literature ranging from 122 to 300. It mainly affects men in the sixth decade of life, and its etiology remains unknown. Clinical presentation is variable, but it is frequently asymptomatic. Diagnosis is often made by computed tomography (CT) scan, although biopsy may be needed for confirmation. An association between other diseases (e.g., neoplasms) and sclerosing mesenteritis has been described, but the relationship between the latter and glucose changes is not disclosed in the currently available literature. Case Report: Five cases of sclerosing mesenteritis and glucose metabolism disorders (impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes mellitus) were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 65±9.3 years, 80% were male, and all patients were white. Three patients were asymptomatic and the other 2 (40%) had non-specific chronic abdominal pain. Blood tests revealed normal inflammatory parameters (mean HbA1c was 6.4% and fasting blood glucose was 140 mg/dL). The diagnosis was made by abdominal CT scan. The 2 symptomatic patients underwent therapy with colchicine 1 mg/day, with clinical improvement. During the mean 43-month follow-up period, there was no symptomatic progression, thereby maintaining the usual benign course of this condition. Conclusions: Sclerosing mesenteritis has only been described in small series and isolated cases, but its diagnosis is becoming more common due to greater access to diagnostic methods and higher awareness of the disease in the medical community

  16. Tolerance of the Human Kidney to Isolated Controlled Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Joel M.; Ercole, Barbara; Torkko, Kathleen C.; Hilton, William; Bennett, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance of the human kidney to ischemia is controversial. Here, we prospectively studied the renal response to clamp ischemia and reperfusion in humans, including changes in putative biomarkers of AKI. We performed renal biopsies before, during, and after surgically induced renal clamp ischemia in 40 patients undergoing partial nephrectomy. Ischemia duration was >30 minutes in 82.5% of patients. There was a mild, transient increase in serum creatinine, but serum cystatin C remained stable. Renal functional changes did not correlate with ischemia duration. Renal structural changes were much less severe than observed in animal models that used similar durations of ischemia. Other biomarkers were only mildly elevated and did not correlate with renal function or ischemia duration. In summary, these data suggest that human kidneys can safely tolerate 30–60 minutes of controlled clamp ischemia with only mild structural changes and no acute functional loss. PMID:23411786

  17. Progressing Sclerosing Mesenteritis (Mesenteric Panniculitis) Mimics Progression of Malignancy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma on Serial 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William

    2016-04-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma in the proximal stomach. A staging 18F-FDG PET/CT showed an intensely FDG-avid gastric mass, as well as a mildly FDG-avid misty nodular mesentery. After 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a follow-up PET/CT showed partial response of the gastric primary, with increase in the size of nodules in the mesentery and increased FDG uptake, raising concern of secondary malignancy. Biopsy of the mesentery revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation, consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis. PMID:26359565

  18. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  19. Assessment of Renal Ischemia By Optical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J T; Demos, S; Michalopoulou, A; Pierce, J L; Troppmann, C

    2004-01-07

    Introduction: No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts prior to transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Methods: Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes; 8 animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contra-lateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross polarized light scattering images were taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Results: Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450 nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800 nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (p < 0.0001 for each method, one-way ANOVA). All adjacent and non-adjacent time points between 0 and 90 minutes were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's PLSD. Conclusions: Optical spectroscopic methods can accurately quantify warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  20. Changes of loading tensile force-stretch relationships of rabbit mesenteric vein after 21 days of head-down rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Jie; Sun, Hui-Pin; Yue, Yong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Wu, Xing-Yu

    Changes of venous compliance may contribute to postflight orthostatic intolerance; however, direct animal studies to address the changes of venous compliance to microgravity have been rare. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance changes of mesenteric veins of rabbits after 21 days of head-down rest (HDR). Twenty-four healthy male New Zealand Rabbits were randomly divided into 21 days of HDR group, horizontal immobilization group (HIG) and control group (Ctrl), with eight in each. Loading tensile force-stretch relationships of mesenteric vein segments were constructed after 21 d HDR. With the increase of loading tensile force, both longitudinal and circumferential stretches of vein samples increased significantly. Under the same loading tensile force, mesenteric vein of the HDR showed significant increase both in circumferential stretch and longitudinal stretches compared to those of Ctrl group and HIG group. These results indicate that, a 21-day simulated weightlessness leads to increase of mesenteric venous compliance.

  1. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Detection of Microcirculatory Dysfunction in Small Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haifeng; Li, Ruokun; Qiang, Jinwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Li; Sun, Rongxun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging (CTPI) for identifying microcirculatory dysfunction in small intestinal ischemia−reperfusion (IR) injury in a porcine model. Materials and Methods Fifty-two pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) the IR group (n = 24), where intestinal ischemia was induced by separating and clamping the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 2 h, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h (IR-1h, IR-2h, IR-3h, and IR-4h; n = 6, respectively); (2) the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 20), where the SMA was separated without clamping and controlled at postoperative 3, 4, 5, and 6 h (SO-3h, SO-4h, SO-5h, and SO-6h; n = 5, respectively); (3) the ischemia group (n = 4), where the SMA was separated and clamped for 2 h, without reperfusion, and (4) baseline group (n = 4), an additional group that was not manipulated. Small intestinal CTPI was performed at corresponding time points and perfusion parameters were obtained. The distal ileum was resected to measure the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and for histopathological examination. Results The perfusion parameters of the IR groups showed significant differences compared with the corresponding SO groups and the baseline group (before ischemia). The blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability surface (PS) among the 4 IR groups were significantly different. BF and BV were significantly negatively correlated with MDA, and significantly positively correlated with SOD in the IR groups. Histopathologically, the effects of the 2-h ischemic loops were not significantly exacerbated by reperfusion. Conclusion CTPI can be a valuable tool for detecting microcirculatory dysfunction and for dynamic monitoring of small intestinal IR injury. PMID:27458696

  2. Laparoscopic inferior mesenteric to gonadal vein end-to-side bypass: a new attempt for nutcracker syndrome treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Ning; Chen, Shuqiu; Liu, Jin; Sha, Guozhu; Zhu, Weidong; Xu, Bin

    2015-08-01

    The nutcracker syndrome (NCS) is because of the compression of the left renal vein when it passes between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. The treatment of NCS is controversial, and conservative, endovascular stent implantation, open surgical, and laparoscopic treatments have been previously described. In this study, we present a new method of conducting end-to-side anastomosis between the inferior mesenteric and left gonadal vein. The proposed method was proven feasible for treating NCS. PMID:26072721

  3. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  4. Hepatopancreatic arterial ring: bilateral symmetric typology in human celiaco-mesenteric arterial system.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Motohiro; Horiuchi, Kanji; Nishida, Keiichiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Murakami, Takuro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2002-10-01

    The celiac and mesenteric arterial system including the left gastric, splenic, common hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries shows various types of origins, courses, ramifications and anastomoses. In order to explain the various expressions of this system, we have proposed a typological model, in which celiacomesenteric arteries develop as paired or bilaterally symmetrical primordial vessels originated from the anterior aspect of the aorta, and these vessels anastomose each other with longitudinal and horizontal pathways. Here, we report 3 unusual cases characterized by arterial rings, formed by the left gastric, left accessory hepatic, proper hepatic, anterior pancreaticoduodenal, and dorsal pancreatic arteries. The dorsal pancreatic and anterior pancreaticoduodenal arteries are located to the right and left of the embryonic pancreas developing in the dorsal mesentery, respectively. Such hepatopancreatic arterial rings simultaneously containing right and left elements can only be explained using our typological model, in which the concept of paired arteries or bilateral symmetry is introduced. PMID:12530508

  5. Systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiple metastases in a dog.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Tominaga, Makiko; Hirayama, Kazuko; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-02-01

    A 5-year-old female miniature dachshund presenting with persistent vomiting and diarrhea had two concurrent rare pathological conditions: systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiorgan metastases. Neoplastic mast cells formed mass in the mesentery of the cecal-colonic region and were also found in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, adrenal grands, ovaries, bone marrow and other tissues. The cells had intracytoplasmic granules with metachromasia and were immunohistochemically positive for c-kit and histamine. Granulomatous lesions with fungal organisms were present in the heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, subserosal and surrounding adipose tissue of the duodenum, thyroid glands and mesenteric mass, and phagocytosed organisms were detected in the liver and bone marrow. Bacteriologically and immunohistochemically, the fungi were consistent with Candida albicans. PMID:19262039

  6. Primary adenocarcinoma of the small intestine presenting as superior mesenteric artery syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SUN, KE-KANG; WU, XIAOYANG; LIU, GANG; QIAN, HAIXIN; SHEN, XIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon cause of vomiting and weight loss due to compression of the third part of the duodenum by the superior mesenteric artery. Small bowel adenocarcinoma is an uncommon tumor, which is frequently delayed in diagnosis as its symptoms and signs are non-specific. The present study describes a case of SMAS occurring in a 51-year-old man, caused by intestinal obstruction secondary to a primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenal-jejunal junction. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of small bowel adenocarcinoma masquerading as SMAS. The present case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of SMAS in patients with upper bowel obstruction caused by intestinal carcinoma. PMID:26998097

  7. Complement regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses during intestinal ischemia reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Michael R.; Hoffman, Sara M.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2010-01-01

    Innate immune responses including TLR4 and complement activation are required for mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced tissue damage. We examined the regulation of TLR4 and complement activation in a mouse model of intestinal IR. Intestinal IR induced C3 deposition in a TLR4 dependent manner. In addition, in wild-type but not TLR4 deficient mice, IR significantly increased C3 and Factor B (FB) mRNA expression within the intestine. To further examine the role of TLR4 and complement, we administered the complement inhibitor, CR2-Crry, to target local complement activation in wild-type C57Bl/10, and TLR4 deficient B10/ScN mice. TLR4 deficient mice sustained less damage and inflammation after IR than wild-type mice, but administration of CR2-Crry did not further reduce tissue damage. In contrast, CR2-Crry treatment of wild-type mice was accompanied by a reduction in complement activation and in C3 and FB transcription in response to IR. CR2-Crry also significantly decreased intestinal IL-6 and IL-12p40 production in both the wild-type and TLR4 deficient mice. These data indicate that TLR4 regulates extrahepatic complement production while complement regulates TLR4-mediated cytokine production during intestinal IR. PMID:20800895

  8. Water Extract of Mentha x villosa: Phenolic Fingerprint and Effect on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Fialovaa, Silvia; Veizerova, Lucia; Nosalova, Viera; Drabikova, Katarina; Tekelova, Daniela; Grancai, Daniel; Sotnikova, Ruzena

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative analysis of the water extract of Mentha x villosa Huds. leaves was performed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and quantitative analysis was made by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection (LC-DAD). Sixteen phenolic compounds were identified and quantified consisting of 8 phenolic acids/derivatives and 8 flavonoid glycosides (quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, coumaroyl-hexoside, caffeic acid, coumaroylquinic acid, lithospermic acid, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid A, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-rutinoside, eriodictyol-7-O-rutinoside, apigenin-7-O-glucuronide, kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide, chrysoeriol-7-O-rutinoside, and hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside). Luteolin-7- O-rutinoside (25.6 ± 0.7 mg/g dry extract) and rosmarinic acid (17.9 ± 0.4 mg/g dry extract) were the most abundant. High antioxidant activity of this phenolic-rich water extract was confirmed in vitro by DPPH and ABTS tests and ex vivo in the ischemia-reperfusion injured rat superior mesenteric artery. Thus, the water extract of M. x villosa leaves seems to be a promising agent in prevention of tissue injury caused by oxidative stress. PMID:26197521

  9. Transcatheter arterial embolization for traumatic mesenteric bleeding: a 15-year, single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong Soo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for mesenteric bleeding following trauma. METHODS From 2001 to 2015, 12 patients were referred to our interventional unit for mesenteric bleeding following trauma, based on clinical decisions and computed tomography (CT) images. After excluding one patient with no bleeding focus and one patient who underwent emergency surgery, a total of 10 patients (male:female ratio, 9:1; mean age, 52.1 years) who underwent super selective TAE of visceral arteries were included in this study. Technical and clinical success, complications, and 30-day mortality rate were analyzed. RESULTS In 10 patients who underwent TAE, the types of trauma were motor vehicle collision (n=6), fall (n=2), assault (n=1), and penetrating injury (n=1), and the bleeding arteries were in the pancreaticoduodenal arterial arcade (n=4), jejunal artery (n=3), colic artery (n=2), and sigmoid artery (n=1). N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (n=2), microcoils (n=2), and combinations of NBCA, microcoils, or gelatin sponge particles (n=6) were used as embolic agents. Technical success was achieved in all 10 patients, with immediate cessation of bleeding. Clinical success rate was 90% (9/10), and all patients were discharged with no further treatment required for mesenteric bleeding. However, one patient showed rebleeding 10 days later and underwent repeated TAE with successful result. There were no TAE-related ischemic complications such as bowel infarction. The 30-day mortality rate was 0%. CONCLUSION Our clinical experience suggests that TAE used to control mesenteric bleeding following trauma is safe and effective as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery. PMID:27306658

  10. Eugenol dilates mesenteric arteries and reduces systemic BP by activating endothelial cell TRPV4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Wang, Qian; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eugenol, a vanilloid molecule found in some dietary plants, relaxes vasculature in part via an endothelium-dependent process; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we investigated the endothelial cell-mediated mechanism by which eugenol modulates rat mesenteric artery contractility and systemic BP. Experimental Approach The isometric tension of rat mesenteric arteries (size 200–300 μm) was measured using wire myography; non-selective cation currents (ICat) were recorded in endothelial cells using patch clamp electrophysiology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were determined in anaesthetized rats. Key Results Eugenol relaxed endothelium-intact arteries in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was attenuated by endothelium denudation. L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, a combination of TRAM-34 and apamin, selective blockers of intermediate and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and HC-067047, a TRPV4 channel inhibitor, but not indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, reduced eugenol-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact arteries. Eugenol activated HC-067047-sensitive ICat in mesenteric artery endothelial cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TRPV4 knockdown abolished eugenol-induced ICat activation. An i.v. injection of eugenol caused an immediate, transient reduction in both MAP and HR, which was followed by prolonged, sustained hypotension in anaesthetized rats. This sustained hypotension was blocked by HC-067047. Conclusions and Implications Eugenol activates TRPV4 channels in mesenteric artery endothelial cells, leading to vasorelaxation, and reduces systemic BP in vivo. Eugenol may be therapeutically useful as an antihypertensive agent and is a viable molecular candidate from which to develop second-generation TRPV4 channel activators that reduce BP. PMID:25832173