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1

Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris Strain T26, Isolated from Mesophilic Undefined Cheese Starter  

PubMed Central

Leuconostoc is the main group of heterofermentative bacteria found in mesophilic dairy starters. They grow in close symbiosis with the Lactococcus population and are able to degrade citrate. Here we present a draft genome sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris strain T26. PMID:24903867

Kot, W. P.; Hansen, L. H.; S?rensen, S. J.; Broadbent, J. R.; Vogensen, F. K.; Ardo, Y.

2014-01-01

2

Utilization of citrate by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris in continuous culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp.cremoris was grown in continuous culture in lactose medium with varying citrate concentrations. All citrate (10, 25, 50 and 75 mMol\\/l) was used and lactose consumption increased with increasing initial citrate concentrations correlate with an increase of dry cell weight. Citrate lead to an increase of acetate and could be a source of ATPvia acetate kinase pathway.

P. Schmitt; C. Diviès; C. Merlot

1990-01-01

3

Proton Motive Force Generation by Citrolactic Fermentation in Leuconostoc mesenteroides  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides 19D, citrate is transported by a secondary citrate carrier (CitP). Previous studies of the kinetics and mechanism of CitP performed in membrane vesicles of L. mesenteroides showed that CitP catalyzes divalent citrate Hcit2-\\/H+ symport, indicative of metabolic energy generation by citrate metabolism via a secondary mechanism. This study also revealed an efficient exchange of citrate

Claire Marty-Teysset; Clara Posthuma; Juke S. Lolkema; Philippe Schmitt; Charles Divies; Wil N. Konings

1996-01-01

4

Effect of varying citrate levels on C 4 compound formation and on enzyme levels in Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris grown in continuous culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of citrate on diacetyl, acetoin and 2,3-butylene glycol (2,3-BG) production by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris grown in continuous culture at pH 5.2 were studied. In glucose alone end-product production agreed with the theoretical stoichiometry. In the presence of citrate, lactate and acetate production was higher than the theoretical stoichiometry from glucose. Lactate production was constant when the initial

P. Schmitt; C. Diviès

1992-01-01

5

PCR detection of enzyme-encoding genes in Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains of wine origin.  

PubMed

Fifteen isolates of lactic acid bacteria originating from South African grape and wine samples were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides through the taxonomic analysis of their 16S rDNA gene sequences. These isolates were further tested for the presence of genes coding for enzymes of oenological relevance using PCR detection technique. A type strain of Leuc. mesenteroides (NCDO 529(T)) was also incorporated for comparative analysis. From the PCR detection results, the estA, prtP, alsD, alsS, metK, metC and metB genes were present in all the strains tested. The bgl and gshR genes encoding ?-glucosidase and glutathione reductase, respectively, were not detected in some strains. On the other hand, none of the tested strains possessed the genes encoding phenolic acid decarboxylase (padA), citrate permease (citP), citrate lyase (citD, citE and citF) and arginine deiminase pathway enzymes (arcA, arcB and arcC). The verification of PCR-generated fragments was performed by sequencing. GenBank database was used to search for homologous DNA sequences. Neighbour-joining trees based on nucleotide sequences of alsS, estA, metK and mleA genes were also constructed in order to study the phylogenetic relationship between Leuc. mesenteroides strains and closely related species. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that there are genetic heterogeneities between strains of Leuc. mesenteroides species. In conclusion, this study has improved our knowledge on the genetics of oenological strains of Leuc. mesenteroides and their genetic potential to contribute to certain wine aroma compounds. PMID:22805925

Mtshali, Phillip Senzo; Divol, Benoit; du Toit, Maret

2012-04-01

6

Structural and functional features of fructansucrases present in Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293.  

PubMed

Glycosyltransferases produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 (equivalent to NRRL B-1118) were identified. Two glucansucrases and one fructansucrases were observed in batch culture while levC and levL genes, corresponding to two fructansucrases, were isolated from information obtained from the released draft sequence of this Leuconostoc strain genome and cloned in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were shown to be fructansucrases producing a polymer identified by NMR as levan, confirming our recent report stating that these are also mosaic levansucrases bearing structural features of glucansucrases in the amino and carboxy terminal regions, as is also the case of inulosucrase (IslA) from Leuconostoc citreum CW28 and levansucrase (LevS) from L. mesenteroides NRRL B-512F. The recombinant levansucrase LevC was purified and characterized in terms of pH, temperature, and kinetic properties. The enzyme exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetic properties with a K(m) = 27.3 mM and a k(cat) = 282.9 s(-1). This levansucrase behaves mainly as a transferase as only 30% of the substrate is hydrolyzed in a wide range of sucrose concentrations, with higher hydrolytic activities at low substrate concentrations. With this report we experimentally confirm the unusual structural pattern displayed by fructansucrases present in Leuconostoc species that group as a novel sub family of fructansucrases. PMID:17109058

Olvera, Clarita; Centeno-Leija, Sara; López-Munguía, Agustín

2007-07-01

7

Synthesis and characterization of hydroquinone fructoside using Leuconostoc mesenteroides levansucrase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydroquinone (HQ) functions as a skin-whitening agent, but it has the potential to cause dermatitis. We synthesized a HQ fructoside\\u000a (HQ-Fru) as a potential skin-whitening agent by reacting levansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides with HQ as an acceptor and sucrose as a fructofuranose donor. The product was purified using 1-butanol partition and silica-gel\\u000a column chromatography. The structure of the purified HQ-Fru

Jin Kang; Young-Min Kim; Nahyun Kim; Du-Woon Kim; Seung-Hee Nam; Doman Kim

2009-01-01

8

Glucosyltransferase Mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355.  

PubMed

Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355 produces dextrans and alternan from sucrose. Alternan is an unusual dextran-like polymer containing alternating alpha(1-->6)/alpha(1-->3) glucosidic bonds. Cultures were mutagenized with UV and ethyl methanesulfonate, and colony morphology mutants were selected on 10% sucrose plates. Colony morphology variants exhibited changes from parent cultures in the production of one or more glucosyltransferases (GTFs) and glucans. Mutants were characterized by measuring resistance of glucan products to dextranase digestion, by electrophoresis, and by high-pressure liquid chromatography of maltose acceptor products generated from sucrose-maltose mixtures. Some mutants produced almost pure fraction L dextran, and cultures exhibited a single principal GTF band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gels. Other mutants produced glucans enriched for alternan. Colony morphology characteristics (size, smoothness, and opacity) and liquid culture properties (clumpiness, color, and viscosity in 10% sucrose medium) were explained on the basis of GTF production. Three principal GTF bands were detected. PMID:16349346

Smith, M R; Zahnley, J; Goodman, N

1994-08-01

9

Synthesis and characterization of hydroquinone fructoside using Leuconostoc mesenteroides levansucrase.  

PubMed

Hydroquinone (HQ) functions as a skin-whitening agent, but it has the potential to cause dermatitis. We synthesized a HQ fructoside (HQ-Fru) as a potential skin-whitening agent by reacting levansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides with HQ as an acceptor and sucrose as a fructofuranose donor. The product was purified using 1-butanol partition and silica-gel column chromatography. The structure of the purified HQ-Fru was determined by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, and the molecular ion of the product was observed at m/z 295 (C12 H16 O7 Na)(+). The HQ-Fru was identified as 4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-D: -fructofuranoside. The optimum condition for HQ-Fru synthesis was determined using a response surface method (RSM), and the final optimum condition was 350 mM HQ, 115 mM sucrose, and 0.70 U/ml levansucrase, and the final HQ-Fru produced was 1.09 g/l. HQ-Fru showed anti-oxidation activities and inhibition against tyrosinase. The median inhibition concentration (IC(50)) of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity was 5.83 mM, showing higher antioxidant activity compared to beta-arbutin (IC(50) = 6.04 mM). The K ( i ) value of HQ-Fru (1.53 mM) against tyrosinase was smaller than that of beta-arbutin (K ( i ) = 2.8 mM), indicating that it was 1.8-times better as an inhibitor. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation by HQ-Fru was 105.3% that of HQ (100%) and 118.9 times higher than that of beta-arbutin (0.89% of HQ). PMID:19294375

Kang, Jin; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nahyun; Kim, Du-Woon; Nam, Seung-Hee; Kim, Doman

2009-07-01

10

Dextran production by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in the presence of a dextranase producing yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new process for the production of small size dextran is developed in which dextran is produced by cultures of Leuconostoc mesenteroides in the presence of a partially constitutive mutant of Lipomyces starkeyi producing dextranase. Mixed cultures were examined by scanning electron microscopy with ruthenium to show the effects of the mixed culture on low molecular weight dextran (M.W. of

Doman Kim; Hyun-Chang Seo; Donal F. Day

1996-01-01

11

Cloning and expression of levansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512 FMC in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512 FMC produces dextran and levan using sucrose. Because of the industrial importance of dextrans and oligosaccharides synthesized by dextransucrase (one of glycansucrases from L. mesenteroides), much is known about the dextransucrase, including expression and regulation of gene. However, no detailed report about levansucrase, another industrially important glycansucrase from L. mesenteroides, and its gene was available. In this paper, we report the first-time isolation and molecular characterization of a L. mesenteroides levansucrase gene (m1ft). The gene m1ft is composed of 1272-bp nucleotides and codes for a protein of 424 amino acid residues with calculated molecular mass of 47.1 kDa. The purified protein was estimated to be about 51.7 kDa including a His-tag based on SDS-PAGE. It showed an activity band at 103 kDa on a non-denaturing SDS-PAGE, indicating a dimeric form of the active M1FT. M1FT levan structure was confirmed by NMR and dot blot analysis with an anti-levan-antibody. M1FT converted 150 mM sucrose to levan (18%), 1-kestose (17%), nystose (11%) and 1,1,1-kestopentaose (7%) with the liberation of glucose. The M1FT enzyme produced erlose [O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-fructofuranoside] as an acceptor product with maltose. The optimum temperature and pH of this enzyme for levan formation were 30 degrees C and pH 6.2, respectively. M1FT levansucrase activity was completely abolished by 1 mM Hg2+ or Ag2+. The Km and Vmax values for levansucrase were calculated to be 26.6 mM and 126.6 micromol min-1 mg-1. PMID:15652153

Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Mi Young; Seo, Eun Seong; Kim, Doman; Chung, Seon Yong; Kimura, Atsuo; Day, Donal F; Robyt, John F

2005-01-21

12

Monitoring of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DRC starter in fermented vegetable by random integration of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2004, Leuconostoc mesenteroides DRC was first used as a starter culture for achieving higher organoleptic effects in Korean kimchi manufacture. For a better\\u000a understanding of starter growth in a mixed culture system, and for predicting starter predominance in kimchi, a monitoring\\u000a system for the starter was established. The chloramphenicol resistance marker gene (cat) was randomly integrated into chromosomal DNA

Hyun-Ju Eom; Joong Min Park; Min Jae Seo; Myoung-Dong Kim; Nam Soo Han

2008-01-01

13

Properties and uses of dextransucrases elaborated by a new class of Leuconostoc mesenteroides mutants  

Microsoft Academic Search

After chemical mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate, we isolated mutants constitutive for glucansucrases from several Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The mutants produced glucansucrases when grown on D-glucose as well as sucrose. In addition to being constitutive for dextransucrase, each mutant of B-742 produced a dextransucrase that synthesized a dextran of different structure and solubility, and possibly produced only a single dextransucrase. B-512FMC

Doman Kim; John F. Robyt

1996-01-01

14

Effect of phosphate concentration on the production of dextransucrase by Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F.  

PubMed

Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F is the main strain used in industrial fermentations to produce dextransucrase and dextran. This process has been studied since the Second World War, when it was used as blood plasma expander. A study about the effect of phosphate concentration on cell propagation in a semicontinuous shake-flask culture is described in this work. Dextransucrase is obtained by fermentation of the Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F in the presence of sucrose as substrate, a nitrogen source (corn liquor or yeast extract) and minerals. Phosphate is currently used in order to buffer the culture medium. Cell propagation can be done through a repeated batch culture, where dilution in a fresh medium is made with relatively short periods. The standard medium for dextransucrase production is prepared using 0.1 M of K(2)HPO(4). In this work the level of phosphate was increased to 0.3 M, and an increase on biomass and on the enzyme activity was found when phosphate enriched medium was used. Higher phosphate buffer concentration was also able to keep the pH values above 5.0 during the entire process, avoiding enzyme denaturation. PMID:14505164

Rodrigues, S; Lona, L M F; Franco, T T

2003-11-01

15

Structural analysis and characterization of dextran produced by wild and mutant strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides.  

PubMed

An exopolysaccharide known as dextran was produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides KIBGE-IB22 (wild) and L. mesenteroides KIBGE-IB22M20 (mutant). The structure was characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques, whereas surface morphology was analyzed using SEM. A clear difference in the spectral chemical shift patterns was observed in both samples. All the spectral data indicated that the exopolysaccharide produced by KIBGE-IB22 is a mixture of two biopolymers. One was dextran in ?-(1 ? 6) configuration with a small proportion of ?-(1 ? 3) branching and the other was levan containing ?-(2 ? 6) fructan fructofuranosyl linkages. However, remarkably the mutant only produced dextran without any concomitant production of levan. Study suggested that the property of KIBGE-IB22M20, regarding improved production of high molecular weight dextran in a shorter period of fermentation time without any contamination of other exopolysaccharide, could be employed to make the downstream process more feasible and cost effective on large scale. PMID:24274515

Siddiqui, Nadir Naveed; Aman, Afsheen; Silipo, Alba; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

2014-01-01

16

Structural characterization of enzymatically synthesized dextran and oligosaccharides from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 dextransucrase.  

PubMed

Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 dextransucrase synthesized a high molecular mass dextran (>2 × 10(6) Da) with ~85.5% ?-(1?6) linear and ~14.5% ?-(1?3) branched linkages. This high molecular mass dextran containing branched ?-(1?3) linkages can be readily hydrolyzed for the production of enzyme-resistant isomalto-oligosaccharides. The acceptor specificity of dextransucrase for the transglycosylation reaction was studied using sixteen different acceptors. Among the sixteen acceptors used, isomaltose was found to be the best, having 89% efficiency followed by gentiobiose (64%), glucose (30%), cellobiose (25%), lactose (22.5%), melibiose (17%), and trehalose (2.3%) with reference to maltose, a known best acceptor. The ?-linked disaccharide, gentiobiose, showed significant efficiency for oligosaccharide production that can be used as a potential prebiotic. PMID:24237151

Kothari, D; Goyal, A

2013-10-01

17

Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.  

PubMed

Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential. PMID:21290167

Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

2011-06-01

18

Alteration of the growth rate and lag time of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523.  

PubMed

Bacterial profile modification is an important enhanced oil recovery technique used to direct injected water into a reservoir's low permeability zone containing trapped crude oil. During water flooding, the use of bacteria to plug the high permeability water zone and divert flow into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone will have a significant economic impact. However, during the field implementation of bacterial profile modification, the rapid growth of bacteria near the injection well bore may hinder the subsequent injection of growth media so that profile modification of the reservoir occurs only in the immediate vicinity of the well bore. By slowing the growth rate and prolonging the lag phase, the onset of pore-space plugging may be delayed and the biologically active zone extended deep into the reservoir. High substrate loading, high pH values, and the addition of the growth inhibitors sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium benzoate have been used in combination to alter the growth characteristics of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 grown in batch conditions. The highest sucrose concentration used in these studies, 500 g/L, produced lag times 12-fold greater than the slowest lag times achieved at low sucrose concentrations. When L. mesenteroides was grown in media containing 500 g/L sucrose, an alkaline pH value threshold was found above which bacteria did not grow. At this threshold pH value of 8.1, an average lag time of 200 h was observed. Increasing the concentration of sodium benzoate had no effect on lag time, but reduced the growth rate until the threshold concentration of 0.6%, above which bacteria did not grow. Last, it was found that a solution of 0.075 mM sodium dodecylsulfate in media containing 15 g/L sucrose completely inhibited bacterial growth. PMID:11460251

Wolf, B F; Fogler, H S

2001-03-20

19

A new process for the production of clinical dextran by mixed-culture fermentation of Lipomyces starkeyi and Leuconostoc mesenteroides.  

PubMed

A mixed-culture fermentation system was designed for the production of size-limited dextrans. This process was simpler and more economical than traditional methods. It required the establishment of microbial consortia of Lipomyces starkeyi ATCC 74054 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 10830. Controlling initial conditions, growth, and enzyme production by both organisms controlled the product size. In this process, both strains were grown separately and then mixed. Dextran fermentation was then allowed to proceed. At the desired time (and molecular size), the fermentation was harvested. The optimum pH and temperature for production of clinical dextran (75,000 MW) were 5.2 (+/- 0.1) and 28 (+/- 0.5) degrees C, respectively. Varying the ratio of L. mesenteroides to L. starkeyi in the inoculum did not significantly affect either the final cell ratios or dextran production. PMID:7521648

Kim, D; Day, D F

1994-10-01

20

Purification of Leuconostoc mesenteroides Citrate Lyase and Cloning and Characterization of the citCDEFG Gene Cluster  

Microsoft Academic Search

A citrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.6) was purified 25-fold from Leuconostoc mesenteroides and was shown to contain three subunits. The first 42 amino acids of the b subunit were identified, as well as an internal peptide sequence spanning some 20 amino acids into the a subunit. Using degenerated primers from these sequences, we amplified a 1.2-kb DNA fragment by PCR from

SADJIA BEKAL; JOZEF VAN BEEUMEN; BART SAMYN; DOMINIQUE GARMYN; SAMIA HENINI; CHARLES DIVIES

1998-01-01

21

Influence of nitrogen\\/carbon ratio and complementary sugars on dextransucrase production by Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512(f)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of the nitrogen\\/carbon ratio was studied during fermentation with Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512(f) using sucrose as substrate. The enzyme concentration was measured through activity tests and radiotracer tests with [14C]phenylalanine. In batch fermentation a slowing down in the rate of enzyme synthesis was observed with a decrease in the nitrogen\\/carbon ratio. Addition of pulses of nitrogen when the

M. Lopretti; E. Martinez; L. Torres; R. Perdomo; M. Santos; A. E. Rodrigues

1999-01-01

22

Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 Isolated from Pulque, a Traditional Mexican Alcoholic Fermented Beverage  

PubMed Central

Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 was isolated from the traditional Mexican pulque beverage. We report its draft genome sequence, assembled in 6 contigs consisting of 1,874,188 bp and no plasmids. Genome annotation predicted a total of 1,800 genes, 1,687 coding sequences, 52 pseudogenes, 9 rRNAs, 51 tRNAs, 1 noncoding RNA, and 44 frameshifted genes. PMID:25377708

Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Campos, Itzia; Giles-Gomez, Martha; Bolivar, Francisco

2014-01-01

23

Expression and characterization of dextransucrase gene dsrX from Leuconostoc mesenteroides in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

The dextransucrase gene dsrX from Leuconostoc mesenteroides CGMCC 1.544 was cloned into the vector pET-28a(+) and expressed as a N-terminal His(6)-tag fusion protein of 167.57 kDa in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). DsrX with the high volumetric activity of 8.8 U ml(-1) culture and the specific activity of 97.37 U mg(-1) crude enzyme extracts was measured in the optimized recombinant expression system. The resultant expression level of the fusion protein amounted to 24.5% of the total cell proteins. The results of affinity chromatography and western blotting indicated that the three sensitive sites of proteolysis existed in the N-terminal catalytic domain of DsrX. Both the recombinant and native enzyme activity were slightly activated by 1 mmol l(-1) Mn(2+) and strongly inhibited by 1 mmol l(-1) Cu(2+) or Al(3+), and their optimum pH values were 5.4. The optimum temperature of the recombinant enzyme for dextran synthesis was 30 degrees C, which was 10 degrees C less than that of the native one. The transglucosylation products of two enzymes were studied by using thin layer chromatography and high-performance anion exchange chromatography. It could be concluded that the better sample-pretreatment temperature in SDS-PAGE was 37 degrees C, which significantly improved the detection of thermal instable enzyme than that of 100 degrees C. PMID:18207273

Yalin, Yang; Jin, Luo; Jianhua, Wang; Da, Teng; Zigang, Tian

2008-02-29

24

Synthesis and Characterization of Isomaltulose-Derived Oligosaccharides Produced by Transglucosylation Reaction of Leuconostoc mesenteroides Dextransucrase.  

PubMed

This paper reports the efficient enzymatic synthesis of a homologous series of isomaltulose-derived oligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization ranging from 3 to 9 through the transglucosylation reaction using a dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F. The total oligosaccharide yield obtained under optimal conditions was 41-42% (in weight with respect to the initial amount of isomaltulose) after 24-48 h of reaction. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural characterization indicated that dextransucrase specifically transferred glucose moieties of sucrose to the C-6 of the nonreducing glucose residue of isomaltulose. Likewise, monitoring the progression of the content of each individual oligosaccharide indicated that oligosaccharide acceptor products of low molecular weight acted in turn as acceptors for further transglucosylation to yield oligosaccharides of a higher degree of polymerization. The produced isomaltulose-derived oligosaccharides can be considered as isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMOs) because they are linked by only ?-(1?6) bonds. In addition, having isomaltulose as the core structure, these IMO-like structures could possess appealing bioactive properties that could find potential applications as functional food ingredients. PMID:25175804

Barea-Alvarez, Montserrat; Benito, Maria Teresa; Olano, Agustín; Jimeno, Maria Luisa; Moreno, F Javier

2014-09-17

25

Genomic and Proteomic Characterization of Bacteriocin-Producing Leuconostoc mesenteroides Strains Isolated from Raw Camel Milk in Two Southwest Algerian Arid Zones  

PubMed Central

Information on the microbiology of camel milk is very limited. In this work, the genetic characterization and proteomic identification of 13 putative producing bacteriocin Leuconostoc strains exhibiting antilisterial activity and isolated from camel milk were performed. DNA sequencing of the 13 selected strains revealed high homology among the 16S rRNA genes for all strains. In addition, 99% homology with Leuconostoc mesenteroides was observed when these sequences were analysed by the BLAST tool against other sequences from reference strains deposited in the Genbank. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF MS) which allowed for the identification of 2 mass peaks 6242?m/z and 5118?m/z that resulted to be specific to the species L. mesenteroides. Remarkably, the phyloproteomic tree provided more intraspecific information of L. mesenteroides than phylogenetic analysis. Accordingly, phyloproteomic analysis grouped L. mesenteroides strains into different subbranches, while all L. mesenteroides isolates were grouped in the same branch according to phylogenetic analysis. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first report on the use of MALDI-TOF MS on the identification of LAB isolated from camel milk. PMID:24809059

Benmechernene, Zineb; Fernandez-No, Inmaculada; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Kihal, Mebrouk; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velazquez, Jorge

2014-01-01

26

Leuconostoc Mesenteroides Growth in Food Products: Prediction and Sensitivity Analysis by Adaptive-Network-Based Fuzzy Inference Systems  

PubMed Central

Background An adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was compared with an artificial neural network (ANN) in terms of accuracy in predicting the combined effects of temperature (10.5 to 24.5°C), pH level (5.5 to 7.5), sodium chloride level (0.25% to 6.25%) and sodium nitrite level (0 to 200 ppm) on the growth rate of Leuconostoc mesenteroides under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methods The ANFIS and ANN models were compared in terms of six statistical indices calculated by comparing their prediction results with actual data: mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), root mean square error (RMSE), standard error of prediction percentage (SEP), bias factor (Bf), accuracy factor (Af), and absolute fraction of variance (R2). Graphical plots were also used for model comparison. Conclusions The learning-based systems obtained encouraging prediction results. Sensitivity analyses of the four environmental factors showed that temperature and, to a lesser extent, NaCl had the most influence on accuracy in predicting the growth rate of Leuconostoc mesenteroides under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The observed effectiveness of ANFIS for modeling microbial kinetic parameters confirms its potential use as a supplemental tool in predictive mycology. Comparisons between growth rates predicted by ANFIS and actual experimental data also confirmed the high accuracy of the Gaussian membership function in ANFIS. Comparisons of the six statistical indices under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions also showed that the ANFIS model was better than all ANN models in predicting the four kinetic parameters. Therefore, the ANFIS model is a valuable tool for quickly predicting the growth rate of Leuconostoc mesenteroides under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:23705023

Wang, Hue-Yu; Wen, Ching-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Lee, I-Nong; Kao, Hao-Yun; Lee, I-Chen; Ho, Wen-Hsien

2013-01-01

27

Immobilization of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F on Eupergit C supports.  

PubMed

Dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F was immobilized on epoxy-activated acrylic polymers with different textural properties (Eupergit C and Eupergit C 250L). Prior to immobilization, dextransucrase was treated with dextranase to remove the dextran layer covering the enzyme surface, thus increasing the accessibility of its reactive groups to the epoxide centers of the support. Elimination of 99% of the initial carbohydrate content was determined by the anthrone method. To prevent enzyme inactivation, the immobilization was carried out at pH 5.4, at which the coupling to the support took place through the carboxylic groups of the enzyme. The effects of the amount (mg) of dextransucrase added per gram of support (from 0.2:1 to 30:1), temperature and contact time were studied. Maximum activity recovery of 22% was achieved using Eupergit C 250L. Using this macroporous support, the maximum specific activity (710 U/g biocatalyst) was significantly higher than that obtained with the less porous Eupergit C (226 U/g biocatalyst). The dextransucrase immobilized on Eupergit C 250L showed similar optimal temperature (30 degrees C) and pH (5-6) compared with the native enzyme. In contrast, a notable stabilization effect at 30 degrees C was observed as a consequence of immobilization. After a fast partial inactivation, the dextransucrase immobilized on Eupergit C 250L maintained more than 40% of the initial activity over the following 2 days. The features of this immobilized system are very attractive for its application in batch and fixed-bed bioreactors. PMID:15458325

Gómez de Segura, Aránzazu; Alcalde, Miguel; Yates, Malcolm; Rojas-Cervantes, M Luisa; López-Cortés, Nieves; Ballesteros, Antonio; Plou, Francisco J

2004-01-01

28

Identification and functional characterization of levS, a gene encoding for a levansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512 F.  

PubMed

A Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512 F levansucrase gene, (levS), was isolated, sequenced and cloned in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was shown to be a fructosyltransferase producing a polymer identified by (13)C-NMR as levan. Based on sequence analysis, we found that this levansucrase is a mosaic protein, bearing structural features of glucosyltransferases in the amino and carboxy terminal regions similarly to inulosucrase from Leuconostoc citreum. The phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal region domain of levansucrases from L. mesenteroides demonstrates that they group together into a novel putative sub-family of genes and evolved long before all other glucosyltransferases, while their catalytic domain structure is species related. PMID:16632262

Morales-Arrieta, Sandra; Rodríguez, Maria Elena; Segovia, Lorenzo; López-Munguía, Agustín; Olvera-Carranza, Clarita

2006-07-01

29

Optimization of dextran production by Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512 using cheap and local sources of carbohydrate and nitrogen.  

PubMed

Using pure components for the fermentation medium in dextran production imposes high costs on the industry. In the present study, the economic production of dextran using local and cheap sources of carbohydrate and nitrogen was investigated. Different concentrations of molasses and wheat-bran extract, after filtration, steam sterilization and pH adjustment, were inoculated with a fresh suspension of Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Cultures were incubated, and then diluted with an equal volume of ethanol. The bacteria were pelleted, and an aliquot of the supernatant was diluted with ethanol and dextran was precipitated. The supernatant was removed and the precipitate was dissolved in a minimal volume of water. Activated charcoal was added and the solution was boiled. The solution was filtered and protein impurities removed by 2-methylbutan-2-ol/chloroform extraction. Dextran was again precipitated with cold ethanol as described above, and the precipitate was dried in a desiccator. Optimum conditions and composition of culture media for dextran production using sugar-beet molasses and wheat bran were determined. The best results were obtained when 20% (w/v) molasses and 15% (w/v) wheat bran were used. The optimal initial pH for dextran production was 7.5. PMID:12927026

Behravan, Javad; Bazzaz, B Seddigheh Fazly; Salimi, Zohreh

2003-12-01

30

Glucosylation of the flavonoid, astragalin by Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512FMCM dextransucrase acceptor reactions and characterization of the products.  

PubMed

Astragalin (kaempferol-3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, Ast) glucosides were synthesized by the acceptor reaction of a dextransucrase produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512FMCM with astragalin and sucrose. Each glucoside was purified and their structures were assigned as kaempferol-3-O-?-D-glucopyranosyl-(1?3)-O-?-D-glucopyranoside (or kaempferol-3-O-?-D-nigeroside, Ast-G1') and kaempferol-3-O-?-D-glucopyranosyl-(1?6)-O-?-D-glucopyranoside (or kaempferol-3-O-?-D-isomaltoside, Ast-G1) for one glucose transferred, and kaempferol-3-O-?-D-isomaltooligosacharide (Ast-IMO or Ast-Gn; n=2-8). The astragalin glucosides exhibited 8.3-60.6% higher inhibitory effects on matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression, 18.8-20.3% increased antioxidant effects, and 3.8-18.8% increased inhibition activity of melanin synthesis compared to control (without the addition of compound), depending on the number of glucosyl residues linked to astragalin. These novel compounds could be used to further expand the industrial applications of astragalin glucosides, in particular in the cosmetics industry. PMID:22133440

Kim, Go-Eun; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Seo, Eun-Seong; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Park, Jun-Seong; Kim, Duck-Hee; Kim, Do-Won; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Sunwoo, Changshin; Kim, Doman

2012-01-01

31

Pre-treatment step with Leuconostoc mesenteroides or L. pseudomesenteroides strains removes furfural from Zymomonas mobilis ethanolic fermentation broth.  

PubMed

Furfural is an inhibitor of growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis. This study used a naturally occurring (not GMO) biological pre-treatment to reduce that amount of furfural in a model fermentation broth. Pre-treatment involved inoculating and incubating the fermentation broth with strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. The Leuconostoc strains converted furfural to furfuryl alcohol without consuming large amounts of dextrose in the process. Coupling this pre-treatment to ethanolic fermentation reduced furfural in the broth and improved growth, dextrose uptake and ethanol formation. Pre-treatment permitted ethanol formation in the presence of 5.2 g L(-1) furfural, which was otherwise inhibitive. The pre-treatment and presence of the Leuconostoc strains in the fermentation broth did not interfere with Z. mobilis ethanolic fermentation or the amounts of ethanol produced. The method suggests a possible technique for reducing the effect that furfural has on the production of ethanol for use as a biofuel. PMID:25048957

Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

2014-10-01

32

Biotransformation of Ginsenoside Rb1 to Prosapogenins, Gypenoside XVII, Ginsenoside Rd, Ginsenoside F2, and Compound K by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DC102  

PubMed Central

Ginsenoside Rb1is the main component in ginsenosides. It is a protopanaxadiol-type ginsenoside that has a dammarane-type triterpenoid as an aglycone. In this study, ginsenoside Rb1 was transformed into gypenoside XVII, ginsenoside Rd, ginsenoside F2 and compound K by glycosidase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides DC102. The optimum time for the conversion was about 72 h at a constant pH of 6.0 to 8.0 and the optimum temperature was about 30?. Under optimal conditions, ginsenoside Rb1 was decomposed and converted into compound K by 72 h post-reaction (99%). The enzymatic reaction was analyzed by highperformance liquid chromatography, suggesting the transformation pathway: ginsenoside Rb1? gypenoside XVII and ginsenoside Rd?ginsenoside F2?compound K. PMID:23717079

Quan, Lin-Hu; Piao, Jin-Ying; Min, Jin-Woo; Kim, Ho-Bin; Kim, Sang-Rae; Yang, Dong-Uk; Yang, Deok Chun

2011-01-01

33

Recombinant sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides: characterization, kinetic studies of transglucosylation, and application of immobilised enzyme for production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate.  

PubMed

Sucrose phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose (alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2-beta-D-fructofuranoside) and phosphate into D-fructose and alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate. We report on the molecular cloning and expression of the structural gene encoding sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LmSPase) in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant enzyme, containing an 11 amino acid-long N-terminal metal affinity fusion peptide, was overproduced 60-fold in comparison with the natural enzyme. It was purified to apparent homogeneity using copper-loaded Chelating Sepharose and obtained in 20% yield with a specific activity of 190 Umg(-1). LmSPase was covalently attached onto Eupergit C with a binding efficiency of 50% and used for the continuous production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate from sucrose and phosphate (600 mM each) in a packed-bed immobilised enzyme reactor (30 degrees C, pH 7.0). The reactor was operated at a stable conversion of 91% (550 mM product) and productivity of approximately 11 gl(-1)h(-1) for up to 600 h. A kinetic study of transglucosylation by soluble LmSPase was performed using alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate as the donor substrate and various alcohols as acceptors. D- and L-arabitol were found to be good glucosyl acceptors. PMID:17215056

Goedl, Christiane; Schwarz, Alexandra; Minani, Alphonse; Nidetzky, Bernd

2007-03-30

34

Isolation of halotolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis from intestinal tract of coastal fish.  

PubMed

We isolated lactic acid bacteria from the intestinal tract of the pufferfish Takifugu niphobles caught in Shimoda, Shizuoka, Japan by using MRS broth prepared with 50% seawater. Additional screening was carried out using phenotypic tests such as Gram staining, cell morphology, catalase, oxidase and fermentation of glucose. Subsequently 227 isolates screened by the phenotypic tests were subjected to species-specific PCR for Lactococcus lactis, resulting in four positive isolates. The 16S rRNA gene sequences from three isolates were highly similar to that of L. lactis subsp. lactis (DNA database accession number M58837), while that of one isolate was identical to that of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (AB023246). These isolates were characterized by API 50 CH for carbohydrate fermentation and other phenotypic criteria for salt tolerance, and the characteristics were compared with those of L. lactis subsp. lactis from a cheese starter culture. The carbohydrate fermentation profiles of these isolates were characteristic of L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, whereas the tolerance of these isolates to salt was higher than that of L. lactis subsp. lactis from the cheese starter culture: the new L. lactis isolates showed high salt tolerance in MRS-agar plates containing 200% seawater or 6% sodium chloride. This is the first report of the isolation of halotolerant strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis from a marine environment. PMID:18068256

Itoi, Shiro; Abe, Takeshi; Washio, Sayaka; Ikuno, Erika; Kanomata, Yuna; Sugita, Haruo

2008-01-15

35

Estudio microbiológico de ajo (Allium sativum L.) y cebolla (Allium cepa L.) deshidratados  

Microsoft Academic Search

3 , Lactobacillus spp. y Leuconostoc mesenteroides subesp. mesenteroides entre 10 y 50. Se identificaron: Penicillium spp., Monilia spp. Lactobacillus brevis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subesp. mesenteroides y levaduras en ajo; Mucor spp., Penicillium spp., Monilia spp., Lactobacillus brevis y levaduras en dos tipos de cebolla. Leuconostoc mesenteroides subesp. mesenteroides sólo se detectó en un tipo de cebolla. En ajos deshidratados y

S. R. FUSELLI; B. FILSINGER; R. FRITZ; M. I. YEANNES

36

Exploitation of sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.) puree added of stem infusion through fermentation by selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides were identified from 8 cultivars of sweet cherry by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and subjected to typing by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. Representative isolates from each species and each cultivar were screened based on the kinetics of growth on cherry puree added

Raffaella Di Cagno; Rosalinda Fortunata Surico; Giovanna Minervini; Carlo Giuseppe Rizzello; Raffaella Lovino; Maurizio Servili; Agnese Taticchi; Sefania Urbani; Marco Gobbetti

2011-01-01

37

Synthesis and characterization of ampelopsin glucosides using dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-1299CB4: glucosylation enhancing physicochemical properties.  

PubMed

Novel ampelopsin glucosides (AMPLS-Gs) were enzymatically synthesized and purified using a Sephadex LH-20 column. Each structure of the purified AMPLS-Gs was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance, and the ionic product of AMPLS-G1 was observed at m/z 505 (C??H??O??·Na)? using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. AMPLS-G1 was identified as ampelopsin-4'-O-?-D-glucopyranoside. The optimum condition for AMPLS-G1, determined using response surface methodology, was 70 mM ampelopsin, 150 mM sucrose, and 1 U/mL dextransucrase, which resulted in an AMPLS-G1 yield of 34 g/L. The purified AMPLS-G1 displayed 89-fold increased water solubility and 14.5-fold browning resistance compared to those of AMPLS and competitive inhibition against tyrosinase with a K(i) value of 40.16 ?M. This value was smaller than that of AMPLS (K(i)=62.56 ?M) and much smaller than that of ?-arbutin (K(i)=514.84 ?M), a commercial active ingredient of whitening cosmetics. These results indicate the potential of AMPLS and AMPLS-G1 as superior ingredients for functional cosmetics. PMID:23040385

Woo, Hye-Jin; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; Kim, Go-Eun; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Jun-Seong; Kim, Duwoon; Cha, Jaeho; Moon, Young-Hwan; Nam, Seung-Hee; Xia, Yong-mei; Kimura, Atsuo; Kim, Doman

2012-12-10

38

Polyphasic characterization of the lactic acid bacteria in kefir  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lactic acid bacteria of kefir were isolated and characterized using phenotypical, biochemical, and genotypical methods. Polyphasic analyses of results permitted the identification of the microflora to the strain level. The genus Lactobacillus was represented by the species Lb. kefir and Lb. kefiranofaciens. Both subspecies of Lactococcus lactis (lactis and cremoris) were isolated. Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris was also found.The

Isabelle Mainville; Normand Robert; Byong Lee; Edward R. Farnworth

2006-01-01

39

Development and use of a selective medium for isolation of Leuconostoc spp. from vegetables and dairy products.  

PubMed Central

A selective medium (LUSM medium) for the isolation of Leuconostoc spp. was developed. This medium contained 1.0% glucose, 1.0% Bacto Peptone (Difco), 0.5% yeast extract (BBL), 0.5% meat extract (Difco), 0.25% gelatin (Difco), 0.5% calcium lactate, 0.05% sorbic acid, 75 ppm of sodium azide (Sigma), 0.25% sodium acetate, 0.1% (vol/vol) Tween 80, 15% tomato juice, 30 micrograms of vancomycin (Sigma) per ml, 0.20 microgram of tetracycline (Serva) per ml, 0.5 mg of cysteine hydrochloride per ml, and 1.5% agar (Difco). LUSM medium was used successfully for isolation and enumeration of Leuconostoc spp. in dairy products and vegetables. Of 116 colony isolates obtained from fresh raw milk, curdled milk, or various vegetables, 115 were identified as members of the genus Leuconostoc. A total of 89 of these isolates were identified to species; 13.5% of the isolates were Leuconostoc cremoris, 7.9% were Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, 11.2% were Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum, 16.9% were Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. paramesenteroides, 10.1% were leuconostoc lactis, and 40.4% were Leuconostoc oenos. When we compared the counts obtained for two Leuconostoc strains, Leuconostoc dextranicum 181 and L. cremoris JLL8, on MRS agar and LUSM medium, we found no significant difference between the values obtained on the two media. PMID:8434926

Benkerroum, N; Misbah, M; Sandine, W E; Elaraki, A T

1993-01-01

40

Co-culture experiments demonstrate the usefulness of Lactobacillus sakei 10A to prolong the shelf-life of a model cooked ham  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the usefulness of two selected lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus sakei subsp. carnosus (10A) and the lactocin S producing L. sakei 148 (LS5), to extend the shelf-life of cooked meat products. The interaction between these potential protective cultures and the spoilage organisms, Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM4) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (BT1), were examined in co-culture studies on a model cooked

L. Vermeiren; F. Devlieghere; J. Debevere

2006-01-01

41

Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Italian ryegrass silage.  

PubMed

Twenty-three lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from three cultivars (Akiaoba, Nagahahikari and Tachiwase) of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) silage were precisely characterized by a combination of phenotypic tests, genotypic 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and rapid PCR-based analyses, focusing on their useful phenotypes for silage preparation as inoculants. We successfully identified both at the species and subspecies levels: phenotypically novel Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei subsp. carnosus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum and Pediococcus parvulus. This is the first report to elucidate the presence of Lactobacillus coryniformis ssp. torquens and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum in Italian ryegrass silages. Physiological and biochemical tests revealed that phenotypic characteristics are different among the different strains of the same species and subspecies, and that the isolates show unique and diverse phenotypes related to fermentation factors, such as available carbohydrates, optimal growth pH and temperature. These results suggest that, for various well-preserved silage preparations, the isolates may be useful in producing novel inoculants corresponding to their optimally climatic and ecological niches. PMID:22339691

Tohno, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hisami; Nomura, Masaru; Kitahara, Maki; Ohkuma, Moriya; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Cai, Yimin

2012-02-01

42

Original article Restoring catalase activity in Staphylococcus aureus subsp.  

E-print Network

Original article Restoring catalase activity in Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius leads; accepted 15 February 2010) Abstract � Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius, a microaerophilic / pathogenesis / catalase / abscess disease / sheep 1. INTRODUCTION Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Effects of initial air removal methods on microorganisms and characteristics of fermented plant beverages.  

PubMed

The effects of 3 different methods for removing the initial air on the properties of fermented plant beverages produced from phom-nang seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) and wild forest noni (Morinda coreia Ham.) were investigated. Only method M which covered the space above the fermentation liquid with a water filled plastic bag produced no surface film of yeast, had the highest acidity and also antibacterial activity from both plants after 90 days of fermentation. However, the yeast count still exceeded the standard guidelines for plant beverages. The fermented beverage from wild forest noni showed more antibacterial activity against 3 of 4 pathogenic bacteria tested than that from the phomnang seaweed, probably for its higher levels of acidity and ethanol content. Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from the fermentation samples from days 1-5 using the method M from both fermented plant beverages were Leuconostoc mesenteroides supsp. mesenteroides and Leu. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum while presence of Lactobacilus plantarum was only recorded at days 4-5 in the wild forest noni beverage. From days 6-14 the isolates were Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus brevis from wild forest noni beverage, whereas only L. brevis was not detected in the seaweed beverage. During days 21-45 both beverages had a similar LAB population of L. plantarum and L. brevis while L. coryniformis was only found in the wild forest noni beverage. Between days 60-90 in both plant beverages only L. plantarum and Lactobacillius sp. were detected. PMID:18817186

Kantachote, Duangporn; Charernjiratrakul, Wilawan

2008-01-15

44

Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis subsp. nov., isolated from vegetable matrices.  

PubMed

Fourteen strains isolated from vegetable sources and identified as belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum presented an atypical pattern of amplification with a species-specific multiplex-PCR assay. Phylogenetic analysis of two protein-encoding genes, recA (encoding the recombinase A protein) and cpn60 (encoding the GroEL chaperonin), as well as phenotypic and genomic traits revealed a homogeneous group of very closely related strains for which subspecies status is proposed, with the name Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis. The type strain is DKO 22(T) (=CIP 108320(T)=DSM 16365(T)). PMID:16014493

Bringel, Françoise; Castioni, Anna; Olukoya, Daniel K; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Dellaglio, Franco

2005-07-01

45

Phylogeography of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, Europe  

PubMed Central

Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates from Austria, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and Romania were placed into an existing phylogeographic framework. Isolates from Italy were assigned to phylogenetic group B.FTNF002–00; the other isolates, to group B.13. Most F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates from Europe belong to these 2 geographically segregated groups. PMID:22305204

Gyuranecz, Miklos; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Seibold, Erik; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Makrai, Laszlo; Fodor, Laszlo; Fabbi, Massimo; Vicari, Nadia; Johansson, Anders; Busch, Joseph D.; Vogler, Amy J.; Keim, Paul

2012-01-01

46

Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. phaseoli subsp. nov., pathogenic in bean.  

PubMed

A yellow Gram-reaction-positive bacterium isolated from bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was identified as Clavibacter michiganensis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Molecular methods were employed in order to identify the subspecies. Such methods included the amplification of specific sequences by PCR, 16S amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), RFLP and multilocus sequence analysis as well as the analysis of biochemical and phenotypic traits including API 50CH and API ZYM results. The results showed that strain LPPA 982T did not represent any known subspecies of C. michiganensis. Pathogenicity tests revealed that the strain is a bean pathogen causing a newly identified bacterial disease that we name bacterial bean leaf yellowing. On the basis of these results, strain LPPA 982T is regarded as representing a novel subspecies for which the name Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. phaseoli subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LPPA 982T (=CECT 8144T=LMG 27667T). PMID:24554636

González, Ana J; Trapiello, Estefanía

2014-05-01

47

Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water  

EPA Science Inventory

Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

48

Enterobacter hormaechei subsp. oharae subsp. nov., E. hormaechei subsp. hormaechei comb. nov., and E. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii subsp. nov., Three New Subspecies of Clinical Importance  

PubMed Central

Six species and six additional genovars are combined within the so-called Enterobacter cloacae complex, with one of them being the species Enterobacter hormaechei. In a recent population genetic study, two genetic clusters were found in close phylogenetic proximity to the genetic cluster of E. hormaechei. In order to prove the hypothesis that these three genetic clusters belong to the same species, we performed cross-hybridization experiments in microplates with DNAs of representatives of each genetic cluster. The close phylogenetic relationship among the clusters was reflected by their relatively low ?Tm values, ranging from 0.3 to 4.8, confirming the hypothesis that the clusters are parts of the same species. These clusters can be distinguished from the other species of the E. cloacae complex, which have ?Tm values of 5.6 to 10.3. Forty-eight E. hormaechei strains from the different genetic clusters were phenotypically characterized with 129 biochemical tests. In this way, E. hormaechei could be differentiated from the other species of the E. cloacae complex because it tests negative in the 3-hydroxy-butyrate test. The three genetic clusters of E. hormaechei could also be differentiated from each other by using phenotypic tests. Hence, we propose three new subspecies of E. hormaechei corresponding to genetic clusters VI, VII, and VIII of the E. cloacae complex. E. hormaechei subsp. hormaechei comb. nov. corresponds to the original species description, as it gives negative results for the adonitol, d-arabitol, d-sorbitol, and d-melibiose tests and a positive result for the dulcitol test. E. hormaechei subsp. oharae subsp. nov. gives negative results for the dulcitol, adonitol, and d-arabitol tests and positive results for the d-sorbitol and d-melibiose tests. E. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii subsp. nov. gives a negative result for the dulcitol test and positive results for the adonitol, d-arabitol, d-sorbitol, and d-melibiose tests. Among the members of the E. cloacae complex, E. hormaechei seems to be the species most frequently recovered from clinical specimens. PMID:16000451

Hoffmann, Harald; Stindl, Sibylle; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Stumpf, Anita; Mehlen, Andre; Monget, Daniel; Pierard, Denis; Ziesing, Stefan; Heesemann, Jurgen; Roggenkamp, Andreas; Schleifer, Karl H.

2005-01-01

49

In vivo application and dynamics of lactic acid bacteria for the four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese.  

PubMed

Twelve lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously selected in vitro (Gaglio et al., 2014), were evaluated in situ for their potential to act as starter cultures for the continuous four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese, made with raw ewes' milk. The strains belonged to Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and Streptococcus thermophilus. LAB were first inoculated in multiple-strain combinations on the basis of their optimal growth temperatures in three process conditions which differed for milk treatment and medium for strain development: process 1, growth of strains in the optimal synthetic media and pasteurised milk; process 2, growth of strains in whey based medium (WBM) and pasteurised milk; and process 3, growth of strains in WBM and raw milk. The strains that acidified the curds in short time, as shown by a pH drop, were all mesophilic and were then tested in a single inoculum through process 3. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis applied to the colonies isolated from the highest dilutions of samples confirmed the dominance of the added strains after curd acidification, stretching and storage. After 15days of refrigerated storage, the decrease in pH values showed an activity of the mesophilic strains at low temperatures, but only Lc. lactis subsp. cremoris PON153, Ln. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides PON259 and PON559 increased their number during the 15days at 7°C. A sensory evaluation indicated that the cheeses obtained by applying protocol 3 and by inoculation with lactococci are the most similar to the protected denomination of origin (PDO) cheese and received the best scores by the judges. Thus, the experimental cheeses obtained with raw milk and inoculated with single and multiple combinations of lactococci were subjected to the analysis of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) carried out by a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique coupled with gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). The dominance of lactococci over thermophilic LAB of raw milk was verified during summer production and, based on the combination of VOC profiles and sensory evaluation of the final cheeses, the multi-strain Lactococcus culture resulted in the most suitable starter preparation for the full-year production of Vastedda-like cheese. PMID:24598514

Gaglio, Raimondo; Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Cruciata, Margherita; Miraglia, Viviana; Corona, Onofrio; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Portolano, Baldassare; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

2014-05-01

50

Original article Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC  

E-print Network

Original article Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC identification by PCR in sperm of seminal) diagnosis for the detection and identification of Mycoplasma, we investigated mycoplasmas contaminating was neg- ative. Furthermore, we have investigated mycoplasmas isolated from semen of healthy breeding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

Metagenomic Analysis of Kimchi, a Traditional Korean Fermented Food ? †  

PubMed Central

Kimchi, a traditional food in the Korean culture, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this study, metagenomic approaches were used to monitor changes in bacterial populations, metabolic potential, and overall genetic features of the microbial community during the 29-day fermentation process. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from kimchi samples obtained periodically and was sequenced using a 454 GS FLX Titanium system, which yielded a total of 701,556 reads, with an average read length of 438 bp. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes from the metagenome indicated that the kimchi microbiome was dominated by members of three genera: Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella. Assignment of metagenomic sequences to SEED categories of the Metagenome Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) server revealed a genetic profile characteristic of heterotrophic lactic acid fermentation of carbohydrates, which was supported by the detection of mannitol, lactate, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation products. When the metagenomic reads were mapped onto the database of completed genomes, the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 23K genomes were highly represented. These same two genera were confirmed to be important in kimchi fermentation when the majority of kimchi metagenomic sequences showed very high identity to Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus genes. Besides microbial genome sequences, a surprisingly large number of phage DNA sequences were identified from the cellular fractions, possibly indicating that a high proportion of cells were infected by bacteriophages during fermentation. Overall, these results provide insights into the kimchi microbial community and also shed light on fermentation processes carried out broadly by complex microbial communities. PMID:21317261

Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Park, Moon Su; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

2011-01-01

52

Identification and characterization of Leuconostoc carnosum, associated with production and spoilage of vacuum-packaged, sliced, cooked ham.  

PubMed

Leuconostoc carnosum was shown to be the specific spoilage organism in vacuum-packaged, sliced, cooked ham showing spoilage during 3 weeks of shelf life. Identification of the specific spoilage organism was done by use of phenotypic data and ClaI, EcoRI, and HindIII reference strain ribopatterns. One hundred L. carnosum isolates associated with the production and spoilage of the ham were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), together with some meat-associated Leuconostoc species: L. citreum, L. gelidum, L. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum, and L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. ApaI and SmaI digests divided the industrial L. carnosum strains into 25 different PFGE types, ApaI and SmaI types being consistent. Only one specific PFGE type was associated with the spoiled packages. This type also was detected in air and raw-meat mass samples. The spoilage strain did not produce bacteriocins. Only seven isolates belonging to three different PFGE types produced bacteriocins. Similarity analysis of the industrial L. carnosum strains revealed a homogeneous cluster which could be divided into eight subclusters consisting of strains having at most three-fragment differences. The L. carnosum cluster was clearly distinguished from the other meat-associated leuconostoc clusters, with the exception of the L. carnosum type strain. Ribotyping can be very helpful in the identification of L. carnosum, but its discriminatory power is too weak for strain characterization. PFGE provides good discrimination for studies dealing with the properties of homogeneous L. carnosum strains. PMID:9726876

Björkroth, K J; Vandamme, P; Korkeala, H J

1998-09-01

53

Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov., isolated from humans and reptiles.  

PubMed

A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of 13 Campylobacter fetus-like strains from humans (n?=?8) and reptiles (n?=?5). The results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS and genomic data from sap analysis, 16S rRNA gene and hsp60 sequence comparison, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and whole genome sequencing demonstrated that these strains are closely related to C. fetus but clearly differentiated from recognized subspecies of C. fetus. Therefore, this unique cluster of 13 strains represents a novel subspecies within the species C. fetus, for which the name Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. is proposed, with strain 03-427(T) (?=?ATCC BAA-2539(T)?=?LMG 27499(T)) as the type strain. Although this novel taxon could not be differentiated from C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis using conventional phenotypic tests, MALDI-TOF MS revealed the presence of multiple phenotypic biomarkers which distinguish Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov. from recognized subspecies of C. fetus. PMID:24899653

Fitzgerald, Collette; Tu, Zheng Chao; Patrick, Mary; Stiles, Tracy; Lawson, Andy J; Santovenia, Monica; Gilbert, Maarten J; van Bergen, Marcel; Joyce, Kevin; Pruckler, Janet; Stroika, Steven; Duim, Birgitta; Miller, William G; Loparev, Vladimir; Sinnige, Jan C; Fields, Patricia I; Tauxe, Robert V; Blaser, Martin J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

2014-09-01

54

The spoilage microflora of cured, cooked turkey breasts prepared commercially with or without smoking.  

PubMed

Lactobacillus sakei subsp. carnosus was predominant in the spoilage flora of sliced, vacuum-packed, smoked, oven-cooked turkey breast fillets which developed mild, sour spoilage flavors after 4 weeks storage at 4 degrees C. In contrast, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides predominated in the spoilage flora of sliced, vacuum-packed, unsmoked, boiled turkey breast fillets from the same plant which were also stored at 4 degrees C. The spoilage flora of the unsmoked breasts grew faster than that of the smoked breasts and was more diverse. Lactobacillus sakei, Weissella viridescens and an atypical group of leuconostoc-like bacteria were also members of the unsmoked turkey breasts flora. Consequently, the unsmoked breasts spoiled after 2 weeks at 4 degrees C: the packs swelled and the meat developed strong sour odors and flavors and abundant slime. Except for the unidentified leuconostocs, which apparently survived boiling of the unsmoked turkey, all the spoilage organisms contaminated the meats during the slicing and vacuum packaging operations. From their biochemical reactions and cellular fatty acid profiles, the atypical leuconostocs were more closely related to Leuconostoc carnosum than W. viridescens. Carnobacteria and Brochothrix thermosphacta were present in relatively large numbers on the raw turkey, but were not numerous in the spoilage flora of the cooked, vacuum-packed meat products. PMID:10857539

Samelis, J; Kakouri, A; Rementzis, J

2000-06-01

55

Isolation and identification of cultivable lactic acid bacteria in traditional yak milk products of Gansu Province in China.  

PubMed

Various traditional fermented yak milk and raw milk foods could be considered as an abundant resource for obtaining novel lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with unique properties. Eighty-eight samples of yak milk products were collected from Gansu Province in China. Three hundred and nineteen strains of LAB isolated from these samples were identified by phenotypic methods, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technology. Among the isolates, one hundred and sixty-four isolates (51.41% of the total) were classified under Lactobacilli, and one hundred and fifty-five (48.59%) belonged to cocci. All the isolates were classified to six genera (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Weissella) and twenty-one species. Lactobacillus helveticus (87 strains), Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides (49 strains), Streptococcus thermophilus (39 strains), Lactobacillus casei (31 strains) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (19 strains) were considered as the predominant populations in the yak milk products. The results showed that there were abundant genus and species LAB existing in yak milk products in Gansu Province in China. The obtained LAB pure cultures may be a valuable source for further starter selection. PMID:22688240

Bao, QiuHua; Liu, WenJun; Yu, Jie; Wang, Weihong; Qing, ManJun; Chen, Xia; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jiachao; Zhang, Wenyi; Qiao, Jianmin; Sun, Tiansong; Zhang, Heping

2012-01-01

56

Biocontrol of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum using bacteriophage PP1.  

PubMed

Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora) is a plant pathogen that causes soft rot and stem rot diseases in several crops, including Chinese cabbage, potato, and tomato. To control this bacterium, we isolated a bacteriophage, PP1, with lytic activity against P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the PP1 phage belongs to the Podoviridae family of the order Caudovirales, which exhibit icosahedral heads and short non-contractile tails. PP1 phage showed high specificity for P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and several bacteria belonging to different species and phyla were resistant to PP1. This phage showed rapid and strong lytic activity against its host bacteria in liquid medium and was stable over a broad range of pH values. Disease caused by P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum was significantly reduced by PP1 treatment. Overall, PP1 bacteriophage effectively controls P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. PMID:23727798

Lim, Jeong-A; Jee, Samnyu; Lee, Dong Hwan; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Oh, Changsik; Heu, Sunggi

2013-08-01

57

Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybrid- ization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive

Markku J. Lehtola; Eila Torvinen; Ilkka T. Miettinen; C. William Keevil

2006-01-01

58

Deoxyribonucleic Acid Homology Studies of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei sp. nov., subsp. paracasei and subsp. tolerans, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus sp. nov., comb. nov  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-DNA hybridizations were performed on strains of Lactobacillus casei. Our results indicate that this species as presently constituted is genomically very heterogeneous. The majority of strains designated L. casei subsp. casei, together with members of L. casei subsp. alactosus, L. casei subsp. pseudoplantarum, and L. casei subsp. tolerans, exhibited high levels of DNA relatedness with each other but

MATTHEW D. COLLINS; BRIAN A. PHILLIPS; PAOLO ZANONI

59

Phylogeny of Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus based on universally conserved protein-coding sequences and implications for the taxonomy of these two genera. Proposal of new taxa: X. vietnamensis sp. nov., P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis subsp. nov., P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis subsp. nov., P. temperata subsp. khanii subsp. nov., P. temperata subsp. tasmaniensis subsp. nov., and the reclassification of P. luminescens subsp. thracensis as P. temperata subsp. thracensis comb. nov.  

PubMed

We used the information from a set of concatenated sequences from four genes (recA, gyrB, dnaN and gltX) to investigate the phylogeny of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus (entomopathogenic bacteria associated with nematodes of the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema, respectively). The robustness of the phylogenetic tree obtained by this multigene approach was significantly better than that of the tree obtained by a single gene approach. The comparison of the topologies of single gene phylogenetic trees highlighted discrepancies which have implications for the classification of strains and new isolates; in particular, we propose the transfer of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. thracensis to Photorhabdus temperata subsp. thracensis comb. nov. (type strain CIP 108426T =DSM 15199T). We found that, within the genus Xenorhabdus, strains or isolates that shared less than 97 % nucleotide identity (NI), calculated on the concatenated sequences of the four gene fragments (recA, gyrB, dnaN and gltX) encompassing 3395 nucleotides, did not belong to the same species. Thus, at the 97% NI cutoff, we confirm the current 20 species of the genus Xenorhabdus and propose the description of a novel species, Xenorhabdus vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain VN01T =CIP 109945T =DSM 22392T). Within each of the three current species of the genus Photorhabdus, P. asymbiotica, P. luminescens and P. temperata, strains or isolates which shared less than 97% NI did not belong to the same subspecies. Comparisons of the four gene fragments plus the rplB gene fragment analysed separately led us to propose four novel subspecies: Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis subsp. nov. (type strain HG29T =CIP 109949T =DSM 22391T), P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis subsp. nov. (type strain C8404T = CIP 109946T =DSM 22397T), P. temperata subsp. khanii subsp. nov. (type strain C1T =NC19(T) =CIP 109947T =DSM 3369T), and P. temperata subsp. tasmaniensis subsp. nov. (type strain T327T =CIP 109948T =DSM 22387T). PMID:19783607

Tailliez, Patrick; Laroui, Christine; Ginibre, Nadège; Paule, Armelle; Pagès, Sylvie; Boemare, Noël

2010-08-01

60

Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis in Humans, Thailand  

PubMed Central

We identified Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis in pre-enriched blood of 4 patients from Thailand. Nucleotide sequences for transfer-messenger RNA gene, citrate synthase gene, and the 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer were identical or closely related to those for the strain that has been considered pathogenic since initially isolated from a human in Wyoming, USA. PMID:22607728

Kosoy, Michael Y.; Diaz, Maureen H.; Winchell, Jonas; Baggett, Henry; Maloney, Susan A.; Boonmar, Sumalee; Bhengsri, Saithip; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Peruski, Leonard F.

2012-01-01

61

Use of PCR-Based Methods for Rapid Differentiation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two PCR-based methods, specific PCR and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR), were used for rapid and reliable differentiation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. PCR with a single combination of primers which targeted the proline iminopeptidase (pepIP) gene of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus allowed amplification of genomic fragments specific for the two subspecies when either

SANDRA TORRIANI; GIACOMO ZAPPAROLI; FRANCO DELLAGLIO

1999-01-01

62

Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Strain Durban.  

PubMed

We report the genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strain Durban, isolated from a patient with salmonellosis and typhoid fever. The strain is closely related to S. enterica subsp. enterica strain P125109 but differs in loss of the SE20 prophage and acquisition of a prophage similar to ELPhiS. PMID:24812224

Russell, Daniel A; Bowman, Charles A; Hatfull, Graham F

2014-01-01

63

Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Achillea nobilis L. subsp. sipylea and subsp. neilreichii  

Microsoft Academic Search

plant materials are not known in some studies. The present study was carried out for the first time to determine the chemical composition of the essential oils of A. nobilis subsp. sipylea and A. nobilis subsp. neilreichii collected from Turkey, and their antimicrobial activities were tested against eight Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria strains and Candida albicans. The percentage

C. Karamenderes; N. U. Karabay Yavasoglu; U. Zeybek

2007-01-01

64

Discrimination of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense from Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus in Clinical Isolates by Multiplex PCR  

PubMed Central

The rapidly growing mycobacterium M. abscessus sensu lato is the causative agent of emerging pulmonary and skin diseases and of infections following cosmetic surgery and postsurgical procedures. M. abscessus sensu lato can be divided into at least three subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. Clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria were previously identified as M. abscessus by DNA-DNA hybridization. More than 30% of these 117 clinical isolates were differentiated as M. abscessus subsp. massiliense using combinations of multilocus genotyping analyses. A much more cost-effective technique to distinguish M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, a multiplex PCR assay, was developed using the whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense JCM15300 as a reference. Several primer sets were designed for single PCR to discriminate between the strains based on amplicons of different sizes. Two of these single-PCR target sites were chosen for development of the multiplex PCR assay. Multiplex PCR was successful in distinguishing clinical isolates of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from samples previously identified as M. abscessus. This approach, which spans whole-genome sequencing and clinical diagnosis, will facilitate the acquisition of more-precise information about bacterial genomes, aid in the choice of more relevant therapies, and promote the advancement of novel discrimination and differential diagnostic assays. PMID:24197885

Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fukano, Hanako; Sakakibara, Yumi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wada, Shinpei; Ishii, Norihisa; Makino, Masahiko; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

2014-01-01

65

Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. noenieputensis subsp. nov., a symbiotic bacterium associated with a novel Heterorhabditis species related to Heterorhabditis indica.  

PubMed

The bacterial symbiont AM7(T), isolated from a novel entomopathogenic nematode species of the genus Heterorhabditis, displays the main phenotypic traits of the genus Photorhabdus and is highly pathogenic to Galleria mellonella. Phylogenetic analysis based on a multigene approach (16S rRNA, recA, gyrB, dnaN, gltX and infB) confirmed the classification of isolate AM7(T) within the species Photorhabdus luminescens and revealed its close relatedness to Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis, P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii and P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis. The five concatenated protein-encoding sequences (4197 nt) of strain AM7(T) revealed 95.8, 95.4 and 94.9?% nucleotide identity to sequences of P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis HG29(T), P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii FRG04(T) and P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis C8404(T), respectively. These identity values are less than the threshold of 97?% proposed for classification within one of the existing subspecies of P. luminescens. Unlike other strains described for P. luminescens, strain AM7(T) produces acid from adonitol, sorbitol and xylitol, assimilates xylitol and has no lipase activity on medium containing Tween 20 or 60. Strain AM7(T) is differentiated from P. luminescens subsp. caribbeanensis by the assimilation of N-acetylglucosamine and the absence of haemolytic activity. Unlike P. luminescens subsp. akhurstii, strain AM7(T) does not assimilate mannitol, and it is distinguished from P. luminescens subsp. hainanensis by the assimilation of trehalose and citrate, the inability to produce indole from tryptophan and the presence of acetoin production and urease activity. Strain AM7(T) (?=?ATCC BAA-2407(T) ?=?DSM 25462(T)) belongs to a novel subspecies, and is proposed as the type strain of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. noenieputensis sp. nov. PMID:22984141

Ferreira, Tiarin; van Reenen, Carol; Pagès, Sylvie; Tailliez, Patrick; Malan, Antoinette P; Dicks, Leon M T

2013-05-01

66

Reclassification of Leuconostoc gasicomitatum as Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum comb. nov., description of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. aenigmaticum subsp. nov., designation of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gelidum subsp. nov. and emended description of Leuconostoc gelidum.  

PubMed

In the present study we investigated the taxonomic status of 20 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) originating from packaged meat. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, these strains were shown to belong to the genus Leuconostoc with Leuconostoc gelidum, Leuconostoc inhae and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum as the closest phylogenetic relatives. The novel strains shared more than 70?% DNA-DNA relatedness with type and reference strains of both L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between L. gelidum type and reference strains and L. gasicomitatum type and reference strains were also above 70?%, showing that all these strains belonged to the same species. Sequence analyses of concatenated atpA, pheS, and rpoA genes demonstrated that the novel strains as well as type and reference strains of L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum are phylogenetically closely related, but form three clearly separated subgroups. Numerical analysis of HindIII ribopatterns and phenotypic tests supported this subdivision. Based on the data presented in this study, we propose to reclassify Leuconostoc gasicomitatum as Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum comb. nov. (type strain, LMG 18811(T)?=?DSM 15947(T)). The novel strains isolated in the present study represent a novel subspecies, for which the name Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. aenigmaticum subsp. nov. is proposed, with POUF4d(T) (?=?LMG 27840(T)?=?DSM 19375(T)) as the type strain. The proposal of these two novel subspecies automatically creates the subspecies Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gelidum subsp. nov. (type strain, NCFB 2775(T)?=?DSM 5578(T)). An emended description of Leuconostoc gelidum is also provided. PMID:24431060

Rahkila, Riitta; De Bruyne, Katrien; Johansson, Per; Vandamme, Peter; Björkroth, Johanna

2014-04-01

67

New Phenolics from Linum mucronatum subsp. orientale  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Lignans and flavonoids are widely distributed phenolics in the plant kingdom. Aryltetralin type lignans (podophyllotoxin derivatives) as the major secondary metabolites of Linum species play an important role in the production of chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, lignans and flavonoid glycosides from aerial parts of Linum mucronatum subsp. orientale were isolated and identified. Methods: The phytochemical investigation has been carried out on Hexane, DCM and MeOH extracts of the plant. Separation of chemical constituents was done using different chromatography (CC, prep-TLC, GC/MS and HPLC) methods. The major compounds of dichloromethane (DCM) and methanol extracts were isolated and their structures were elucidated using co-chromatography in the presence of known lignans, HPLC and NMR techniques. Results: Our results showed that podophyllotoxin and 6-MeO-?- peltatin, as new compound, are the major lignans of the DCM extract of L. mucronatum subsp. orientale. Two new flavonoid glycosides were also elucidated in the methanolic extract. Conclusion: The DCM and methanol extracts of L. mucronatum were found to contain aryltetralin-type lignans and flavonoids. The occurrence of 6-MeO-?- peltatin and flavonoids in L. mucronatum has been reported for the first time. PMID:25337464

Zare, Khadijeh; Movafeghi, Ali; Mohammadi, Sayed Abolghasem; Asnaashari, Solmaz; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

2014-01-01

68

Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea  

PubMed Central

The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed. PMID:25288994

Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Beom; Lim, Jeong-A; Han, Sang-Wook; Heu, Sunggi

2014-01-01

69

Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of pediococci.  

PubMed Central

Over a 43-month period, 23 separate isolates of nonenterococcal alpha- and nonhemolytic streptococci were reported by our clinical microbiology laboratory to be resistant to vancomycin. This constituted 0.32% of nonenterococcal alpha- and nonhemolytic streptococci reported and 4.4% of such streptococci upon which susceptibility testing was performed. Of 13 isolates which were available for further study, all were highly resistant to vancomycin (MIC greater than or equal to 1,024 micrograms/ml), but none were actually streptococci. Three were clearly gram-positive rods by Gram stain and were found to be homofermentative lactobacilli. Two strains with elongated gram-positive cocci from colonies on agar showed small gram-positive rods when grown in thioglycolate broth and were physiologically identified as Lactobacillus confusus. Two isolates with lenticular gram-positive cocci appeared to be Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. Six gram-positive isolates with round cells from growth on agar and from broth were arranged in tetrads in broth and closely resembled Pediococcus acidilactici. Twelve additional strains of pediococci that were not of human origin were also found to be highly resistant to vancomycin. These findings confirm published reports of clinical isolation of organisms resembling pediococci and suggest that clinically isolated, vancomycin-resistant bacteria which superficially resemble streptococci are probably other lactic acid bacteria. PMID:2380362

Riebel, W J; Washington, J A

1990-01-01

70

Sources and distribution of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni in turkeys  

E-print Network

and enumeration of C. fetus subsp. jejune from turkey eggs and meat. Enrichment was in Brucella broth supplemented with ferrous sulfate, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyru- vate, and five antimicrobial agents. Plating was on Brucella agar supplemented... ml of broth were as low as 0. 3 to 3. 3. Also, in this study, an effort was made to identify the source of C. fetus subsp. ~e uni in turkeys. C. fetus subsp. ~e uni was not isolated from fertile turkey eggs or from newly hatched poults...

Acuff, Gary Royce

2012-06-07

71

Comparisons of genetic and morphological distance with heterosis between Medicago sativa subsp. sativa and subsp. falcata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass yield heterosis has been shown to exist between Medicago sativasubsp. sativa and Medica gosativa subsp. falcata. The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of what morphological and genetic factors were most highly\\u000a correlated with total biomass yield heterosis. We calculated genetic distances among nine sativa and five falcate genotypes\\u000a based on amplified fragment length polymorphism

Heathcliffe Riday; E. Charles Brummer; T. Austin Campbell; Diane Luth; Patricia M. Cazcarro

2003-01-01

72

Antioxidant potentials and rosmarinic acid levels of the methanolic extracts of Salvia verticillata (L.) subsp. verticillata and S. verticillata (L.) subsp. amasiaca (Freyn & Bornm.) Bornm  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to examine the in vitro antioxidant activities and rosmarinic acid levels of the methanol extracts of Salvia verticillata subsp. verticillata and S. verticillata subsp. amasiaca. The extracts were screened for their possible antioxidant activity by two complementary test systems, namely DPPH free radical-scavenging and ?-carotene\\/linoleic acid systems. In the first case, S. verticillata subsp. verticillata was

Bektas Tepe; Ozgur Eminagaoglu; H. Askin Akpulat; Enes Aydin

2007-01-01

73

Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia: an emerging infection.  

PubMed

The importance of group C and G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis) as a significant pathogen has recently been better recognized. S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis disease can range in severity from milder skin and soft-tissue conditions such as wound infection, erysipelas, and cellulitis, to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, thus sharing the clinical picture with S. pyogenes. The most common clinical manifestation of bacteremia is cellulitis. An increase in the incidence of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia has been recognized. Invasive forms of this infection are most commonly found in elderly patients with underlying comorbidities and skin breakdown. The case fatality in bacteremia has been reported to be 15-18%. In this review, the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and emm types of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia are summarized. PMID:24682845

Rantala, S

2014-08-01

74

Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Strain HD-1  

PubMed Central

We report here the complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain HD-1, which serves as the primary U.S. reference standard for all commercial insecticidal formulations of B. thuringiensis manufactured around the world. PMID:25035322

Day, Michael; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Dyer, David

2014-01-01

75

Original article Natural black pine (Pinus nigra subsp salzmannii)  

E-print Network

Pinus nigra subsp salzmannii has its cen- tral core of distribution in the dolomite-lime- stone mountain granitic range, representing a special paleogeographic and phytogenetic interest (Regato et al, 1992

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Zur cytotaxonomie von Veronica chamaedrys L. agg., II.: subsp. micans M. Fischer , subsp. nova, eine weitere diploide Sippe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Veronica chamaedrys L. subsp.micans M.Fischer\\u000a , unterscheidet sich vonV. chamaedrys L. subsp.chamaedrys hauptsächlich durch die meist hellgrün gefärbten und im Leben oberseits stets schwach glänzenden Laubblätter, deren Blattrand durchschnittlich mehr (9–11) Zähne aufweist, durch die stets drüsenlose Infloreszenzbehaarung, die kleineren Blüten mit schmäleren Sepalen und hellblau (nicht leuchtend-sattblau) gefärbten Corollen sowie durch die diploide Chromosomenzahl (2 n=16). Sie tritt in

Manfred Fischer

1973-01-01

77

Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strain 9231-Abomsa.  

PubMed

Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is the etiological agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete and annotated genome sequence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain 9231-Abomsa. PMID:25323727

Dupuy, Virginie; Thiaucourt, François

2014-01-01

78

Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strain 9231-Abomsa  

PubMed Central

Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is the etiological agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete and annotated genome sequence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain 9231-Abomsa. PMID:25323727

Thiaucourt, Francois

2014-01-01

79

Single PCR and nested PCR with a mimic molecule for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants. The current methods for detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis are slow and insensitive. We report the use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on IS900 to confirm growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in primary bacterial cultures from bovine tissue and fecal samples. The use

Stina Englund; András Ballagi-Pordány; Göran Bölske; Karl-Erik Johansson

1999-01-01

80

Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).  

PubMed

Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii has not been detected previously in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We tested whole blood from 60 white-tailed deer for Bartonella spp. DNA; three (5%) were positive for Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. This is the first detection of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in white-tailed deer. PMID:23568932

Chitwood, M Colter; Maggi, Ricardo G; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne; Toliver, Marcée; DePerno, Christopher S

2013-04-01

81

Isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni from migratory waterfowl.  

PubMed Central

Since the sources from which humans acquire Campylobacter enteritis are only partially known, we studied the frequency of carriage of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni in migratory waterfowl. Cecal contents of various species of wild ducks were cultured on selective media that contained antibiotics to inhibit normal flora. Thirty-five percent of the 445 ducks cultured harbored C. fetus subsp. jejuni. Migratory waterfowl are yet another reservoir for this enteric pathogen and may be of public health importance for humans in the contamination of water or when used as food. PMID:7217334

Luechtefeld, N A; Blaser, M J; Reller, L B; Wang, W L

1980-01-01

82

Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts.  

PubMed

The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity.LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated.Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods. PMID:22963659

Yang, En; Fan, Lihua; Jiang, Yueming; Doucette, Craig; Fillmore, Sherry

2012-01-01

83

Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts  

PubMed Central

The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity. LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated. Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods. PMID:22963659

2012-01-01

84

Linear Plasmid in the Genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus  

PubMed Central

Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel analysis of genomic DNA of the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus revealed the presence of a previously unreported extrachromosomal element. This new element was demonstrated to be a linear plasmid. Of 11 strains evaluated, all contained either a 90-kb (pCSL1) or a 140-kb (pCSL2) linear plasmid. PMID:11976316

Brown, Susan E.; Knudson, Dennis L.; Ishimaru, Carol A.

2002-01-01

85

Novel cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans  

SciTech Connect

A cyanide-metabolizing bacterium, strain DF3, isolated from soil was identified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. Whole cells and cell extracts of strain DF3 catalyzed hydrolysis of cyanide to formate and ammonia (HCN + 2H{sub 2}O {r arrow} HCOOH + NH{sub 3}) without forming formamide as a free intermediate. The cyanide-hydrolyzing activity was inducibly produced in cells during growth in cyanide-containing media. Cyanate (OCN{sup {minus}}) and a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles were not hydrolyzed by intact cells of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3. Strain DF3 hydrolyzed cyanide with great efficacy. Thus, by using resting induced cells at a concentration of 11.3 mg (dry weight) per ml, the cyanide concentration could be reduced from 0.97 M (approximately 25,220 ppm) to less than 77 nM (approximately 0.002 ppm) in 55 h. Enzyme purification established that cyanide hydrolysis by A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was due to a single intracellular enzyme. The molecular mass of the active enzyme (purity, {gt}97% as determined by amino acid sequencing) was estimated to be {gt}300,000 Da. The cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was tentatively named cyanidase to distinguish it from known nitrilases (EC 3.5.5.1) which act on organic nitriles.

Ingvorsen, K.; Hojer-Pederson, B.; Godtfredsen, S.E. (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

1991-06-01

86

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius strain ST1464 genome sequence  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is responsible for Morel's disease in animals and a cause of abscess in humans. It is characterized by a microaerophilic growth, contrary to the other strains of S. aureus. The 2,604,446-bp genome (32.7% GC content) of S. anaerobius ST1464 comprises one chromosome and no plasmids. The chromosome contains 2,660 open reading frames (ORFs), 49 tRNAs and three complete rRNAs, forming one complete operon. The size of ORFs ranges between 100 to 4,600 bp except for two ORFs of 6,417 and 7,173 bp encoding segregation ATPase and non-ribosomal peptide synthase, respectively. The chromosome harbors Staphylococcus phage 2638A genome and incomplete Staphylococcus phage genome PT1028, but no detectable CRISPRS. The antibiotic resistance gene for tetracycline was found although Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is susceptible to tetracycline in-vitro. Intact oxygen detoxification genes encode superoxide dismutase and cytochrome quinol oxidase whereas the catalase gene is impaired by a stop codon. Based on the genome, in-silico multilocus sequence typing indicates that S. aureus subsp. anaerobius emerged as a clone separated from all other S. aureus strains, illustrating host-adaptation linked to missing functions. Availability of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius genome could prompt the development of post-genomic tools for its rapid discrimination from S. aureus. PMID:24501641

Elbir, Haitham; Robert, Catherine; Nguyen, Ti Thien; Gimenez, Gregory; El Sanousi, Sulieman M.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Raoult, Didier

2013-01-01

87

Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum  

PubMed Central

Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff) Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1?25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3) had the highest (P<0.05) antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%), esters (5.24%), acids (4.87%) and alcohols (2.21%). Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. PMID:24714388

Cai, Jin; Feng, Jia; Xie, Shulian; Wang, Feipeng; Xu, Qiufeng

2014-01-01

88

Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase homologue  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify potential opsonic targets of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, a treponemal genomic expression library was constructed and differentially screened with opsonic and non-opsonic T. pallidum antisera. This method identified an immunoreactive clone containing an open reading frame encoding a 356 residue protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated the translated protein to be a homologue of glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase, a glycerol metabolizing

Caroline E. Stebeck; Jeanne M. Shaffer; Thomas W. Arroll; Sheila A. Lukehart; Wesley C. Van Voorhis

1997-01-01

89

Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).  

PubMed

The species Lactococcus lactis currently includes three subspecies; L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, isolated from milk sources, and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, isolated from the leafhopper Hordnia circellata. In this study, three strains, designated L105(T), I3 and L101, were isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These strains were closely related to members of the species Lactococcus lactis. Strain L105(T) showed 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of the type strains L. lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 604(T) and L. lactis subsp. hordniae NCDO 2181(T) and showed 99.9 % similarity to the type strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO 607(T). Analysis of two housekeeping genes, rpoB and recA, confirmed the close relationship between the novel strains and L. lactis subsp. cremoris with similarities of 99.3 and 99.7 %, respectively. The three strains could, however, be differentiated from their closest relatives on the basis of several phenotypic characteristics, as was the case for L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, which were also closely related on the basis of 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA gene sequence similarities. The strains isolated in this study represent a new subspecies, for which the name Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L105(T) (?= LMG 24662(T) ?= DSM 21502(T)). PMID:20833888

Pérez, Tania; Balcázar, José Luis; Peix, Alvaro; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol

2011-08-01

90

Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans subsp. nov. Isolated from the External Auditory Meatus of Dogs with External Ear Otitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new subspecies, Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. couguluns, was isolated from the external auditory meatus of dogs suffering from external ear otitis and is described on the basis of studies of 21 strains. Phenotypic studies showed that these strains are more closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius than to other staphylococci, but DNA hybridization studies indicated that they are closely related to

SHIZUNOBU IGIMI; EIJI TAKAHASHI; TOMOTARI MITSUOKA

91

Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I, United States.  

PubMed

We used whole-genome analysis and subsequent characterization of geographically diverse strains using new genetic signatures to identify distinct subgroups within Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I: A.I.3, A.I.8, and A.I.12. These subgroups exhibit complex phylogeographic patterns within North America. The widest distribution was observed for A.I.12, which suggests an adaptive advantage. PMID:24755401

Birdsell, Dawn N; Johansson, Anders; Öhrman, Caroline; Kaufman, Emily; Molins, Claudia; Pearson, Talima; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Naumann, Amber; Vogler, Amy J; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Larsson, Pär; Forsman, Mats; Sjödin, Andreas; Gillece, John D; Schupp, James; Petersen, Jeannine M; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M

2014-05-01

92

Chromones and flavanones from artemisia campestris subsp. maritima  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the acetone extract of Artemisia campestris subsp. maritima six flavanones, two chromones and the coumarin scopoletin were isolated. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxychromone and 5,7-dimethoxychromone are new compounds, while the flavanone eriodictyol-7,3?-dimethyl ether is reported for the first time in this species. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. The unequivocal assignments of carbon resonances, mainly made by using 1D

João M. J. Vasconcelos; Artur M. S. Silva; José A. S. Cavaleiro

1998-01-01

93

Isolation by genomic subtraction of DNA probes specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.  

PubMed Central

Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica is a pathogen of potatoes in Europe because of its ability to induce blackleg symptoms early in the growing season. However, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora is not able to produce such severe symptoms under the same conditions. On the basis of the technique described by Straus and Ausubel (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:1889-1893, 1990), we isolated DNA sequences of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica 86.20 that were absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26. Six DNA fragments ranging from ca. 180 to 400 bp were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. Each fragment was further hybridized with 130 microorganisms including 87 E. carotovora strains. One probe was specific for typical E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains, two probes hybridized with all E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains and with a few E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains, and two probes recognized only a subset of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains. The last probe was absent from the genomic DNA of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora CH26 but was present in the genomes of many strains, including those of other species and genera. This probe is homologous to the putP gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a proline carrier. Further use of the probes is discussed. Images PMID:8117082

Darrasse, A; Kotoujansky, A; Bertheau, Y

1994-01-01

94

Comparison of pectic enzymes produced by Erwinia chrysanthemi, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.  

PubMed Central

Erwinia spp. that cause soft-rot diseases in plants produce a variety of extracellular pectic enzymes. To assess the correlation between patterns of pectic enzyme production and taxonomic classification, we compared the enzymes from representative strains. Supernatants obtained from polygalacturonate-grown cultures of nine strains of Erwinia chrysanthemi, three strains of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and three strains of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica were concentrated and subjected to ultrathin-layer polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing. Pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, and exo-poly-alpha-D-galacturonosidase activities were visualized by staining diagnostically buffered pectate-agarose overlays with ruthenium red after incubation of the overlays with the isoelectric focusing gels. The isoelectric focusing profiles of pectate lyase and polygalacturonase were nearly identical for strains of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, showing three pectate lyase isozymes with isoelectric points higher than 8.7 and a polygalacturonase with pI of ca. 10.2. Isoelectric focusing profiles of the E. chrysanthemi pectic enzymes were substantially different. Although there was considerable intraspecific heterogeneity, all strains produced at least four isozymes of pectate lyase, which could be divided into three groups: basic (pI, ca. 9.0 to 10.0), slightly basic (pI, ca. 7.0 to 8.5), and acidic (pI, ca. 4.0 to 5.0). Several strains of E. chrysanthemi also produced a single form of exo-poly-alpha-D-galacturonosidase (pI, ca. 8.0).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3752996

Ried, J L; Collmer, A

1986-01-01

95

Refined, Circular Restriction Map of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Plasmid Carrying the Mosquito Larvicidal Genes1  

E-print Network

Refined, Circular Restriction Map of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Plasmid Carrying, 1999 All the genetic elements responsible for the mosquito larval toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Press The mosquito larvicidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is included

Zaritsky, Arieh

96

Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a longitudinal study of three dairy herds.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate whether cows that were low shedders of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were passively shedding or truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also investigated whether it is possible that these M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected animals could have been infected as adults by contemporary high-shedding animals (supershedders). The M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates were obtained from a longitudinal study of three dairy herds in the northeastern United States. Isolates were selected from fecal samples and tissues at slaughter from all animals that were culture positive at the same time that supershedders were present in the herds. Shedding levels (CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis/g of feces) for the animals at each culture-positive occasion were determined. Using a multilocus short-sequence-repeat technique, we found 15 different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from a total of 142 isolates analyzed. Results indicated herd-specific infection patterns; there was a clonal infection in herd C, with 89% of isolates from animals sharing the same strain, whereas herds A and B showed several different strains infecting the animals at the same time. Tissues from 80% of cows with at least one positive fecal culture (other than supershedders) were culture positive, indicating a true M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. The results of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain typing and observed shedding levels showed that at least 50% of low shedders have the same strain as that of a contemporary supershedder. Results of this study suggest that in a dairy herd, more of the low-shedding cows are truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis than are passively shedding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The sharing of strains between low shedders and the contemporary supershedders suggests that low shedders may have been infected by environmental exposure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:21209171

Pradhan, Abani K; Mitchell, Rebecca M; Kramer, Aagje J; Zurakowski, Michael J; Fyock, Terry L; Whitlock, Robert H; Smith, Julia M; Hovingh, Ernest; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Schukken, Ynte H

2011-03-01

97

Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a Longitudinal Study of Three Dairy Herds?  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate whether cows that were low shedders of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were passively shedding or truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also investigated whether it is possible that these M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected animals could have been infected as adults by contemporary high-shedding animals (supershedders). The M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates were obtained from a longitudinal study of three dairy herds in the northeastern United States. Isolates were selected from fecal samples and tissues at slaughter from all animals that were culture positive at the same time that supershedders were present in the herds. Shedding levels (CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis/g of feces) for the animals at each culture-positive occasion were determined. Using a multilocus short-sequence-repeat technique, we found 15 different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from a total of 142 isolates analyzed. Results indicated herd-specific infection patterns; there was a clonal infection in herd C, with 89% of isolates from animals sharing the same strain, whereas herds A and B showed several different strains infecting the animals at the same time. Tissues from 80% of cows with at least one positive fecal culture (other than supershedders) were culture positive, indicating a true M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. The results of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain typing and observed shedding levels showed that at least 50% of low shedders have the same strain as that of a contemporary supershedder. Results of this study suggest that in a dairy herd, more of the low-shedding cows are truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis than are passively shedding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The sharing of strains between low shedders and the contemporary supershedders suggests that low shedders may have been infected by environmental exposure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:21209171

Pradhan, Abani K.; Mitchell, Rebecca M.; Kramer, Aagje J.; Zurakowski, Michael J.; Fyock, Terry L.; Whitlock, Robert H.; Smith, Julia M.; Hovingh, Ernest; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S.; Karns, Jeffrey S.; Schukken, Ynte H.

2011-01-01

98

SHORTER NOTES Botrychium lanceolatum subsp. angustisegmentum in Ohio.--In the treat-  

E-print Network

SHORTER NOTES Botrychium lanceolatum subsp. angustisegmentum in Ohio.--In the treat- ment, Botrychium lanceolatum subsp. angustisegmentum, as encompassing an area extending from Ontario's Lake­2001 the Ohio Department of Natural Resources listed B. lanceolatum as extirpated because no Ohio collections

Barker, Michael S.

99

Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strain SEJ  

PubMed Central

Salmonella enterica constitutes a group of enteric pathogens with a broad host range, including humans, reptiles, and birds. S. enterica subsp. enterica is a common cause of inflammatory diarrhea in humans. We present the draft genome of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strain SEJ, including a 59-kbp plasmid. PMID:25342692

Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Frey, K. G.; Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Chertkov, O.; Freitas, T.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Minogue, T. D.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.; Xu, Y.

2014-01-01

100

Development of Luminescent Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis for Rapid Screening of Vaccine Candidates in Mice  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a slowly growing mycobacterial species, requiring 6 to 8 weeks of culture before colonies can be counted visually. Here, we describe the development of luminescent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expressing luxAB genes of Vibrio harveyi and its use for vaccine testing in an experimental mouse model, replacing fastidious CFU counting by rapid luminometry. PMID:16714604

Rosseels, Valerie; Roupie, Virginie; Zinniel, Denise; Barletta, Raul G.; Huygen, Kris

2006-01-01

101

Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strain SEJ.  

PubMed

Salmonella enterica constitutes a group of enteric pathogens with a broad host range, including humans, reptiles, and birds. S. enterica subsp. enterica is a common cause of inflammatory diarrhea in humans. We present the draft genome of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strain SEJ, including a 59-kbp plasmid. PMID:25342692

Bishop-Lilly, K A; Frey, K G; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Minogue, T D; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

2014-01-01

102

SALMONELLA ENTERICA SUBSP. ENTERICA IN CATTLE EGRET (BUBULCUS IBIS) CHICKS FROM CENTRAL TEXAS: PREVALENCE,  

E-print Network

SALMONELLA ENTERICA SUBSP. ENTERICA IN CATTLE EGRET (BUBULCUS IBIS) CHICKS FROM CENTRAL TEXAS% to 95%. Seventeen Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes were isolated, of which the 4,5,12:i of Salmonella, but provided no evidence of transmission between these two species. Similar conclusions were

Mora, Miguel A.

103

Complete Genome Sequence of the Strong Mutator Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Heidelberg Strain B182  

E-print Network

Complete Genome Sequence of the Strong Mutator Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype the first complete genome sequence of the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Heidelberg B182 (cB182_4750; GC, 52.2%) and one circular plasmid of 37,581 bp (pB182_37; GC, 42.8%). Salmonella

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

Genetic diversity and phylogeography in two diploid ferns, Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum and A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens, in the western Mediterranean.  

PubMed

Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum and A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens are diploid rock ferns of limestone outcrops of the western Mediterranean region. Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum occurs from Valencia through northeastern Spain to the Alpes-Maritimes and Swiss Jura. Asplenium petrarchae subsp. bivalens occurs only on Majorca, in Valencia and possibly in southern Spain. We analysed allozyme and chloroplast genetic marker diversity in 75 populations of A. fontanum subsp. fontanum and 12 populations of A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens sampled from across their respective ranges. The two species show similar levels of species and population genetic diversity to one another and to other diploid European Asplenium taxa. Both are predominantly outbreeding, as indicated by F(IS) = 0.108 and 0.167 respectively. Substantial between-population differentiation results largely from differentiation between regions. Isolation by distance operates over limited geographic ranges, up to 50 km. In A. fontanum subsp. fontanum, the major geographical differentiation between Valencia and the rest of the taxon range probably represents an ancient range fragmentation. A less pronounced differentiation divides populations in the SW from those in the NE of the range, with evidence for a biogeographic link between the eastern Pyrenees and southeastern France. High diversity in the Pyrenees may either represent ancient population differentiation, or a suture zone. In A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens, populations on Majorca exhibit a subset of the genetic diversity present in Valencia, although the two regions are strongly differentiated by differing allele frequencies. Dispersal from the mainland may have founded Majorcan populations, although a role for in situ island survival cannot be excluded. PMID:19863721

Hunt, H V; Ansell, S W; Russell, S J; Schneider, H; Vogel, J C

2009-12-01

105

Bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins from white salsify ( Tragopogon porrifolius subsp. porrifolius)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A phytochemical investigation of three accessions of Tragopogon porrifolius L. subsp. porrifolius (Asteraceae, Lactuceae) yielded three new bibenzyl derivatives, 5,4?-dihydroxy-3-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?3)-?-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, 2-carboxyl-3,4?-dihydroxy-5-?-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, tragopogonic acid (2?carboxyl-3?,5?,4?-trihydroxyphenylethanone) and three dihydroisocoumarin derivatives, including the new natural product 6-O-methylscorzocreticoside I. One of the isolated bibenzyl derivatives is considered to be a precursor to the biosynthesis of dihydroisocoumarins. Structures of new compounds were established by HR

Christian Zidorn; Ulrike Lohwasser; Susanne Pschorr; Daniela Salvenmoser; Karl-Hans Ongania; Ernst P. Ellmerer; Andreas Börner; Hermann Stuppner

2005-01-01

106

Stilbenes and flavonoids from Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis.  

PubMed

The first stilbene possessing a ?-aminobutyric acid lactam function, artocarpene (1), and a new flavanone, 2-hydroxynaringenin 4'-O-?-d-glucopyranoside (2), were isolated from the stems of Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis along with four known compounds, 2-hydroxynaringenin (3), oxyresveratrol (4), 3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-prenylstilbene (5) and norartocarpetin (6). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1 exhibited weak antioxidant activity and 2 displayed weak cytotoxicity against human lung cancer A549 cell line. PMID:21316425

Ti, Huihui; Wu, Ping; Lin, Lidong; Wei, Xiaoyi

2011-06-01

107

Exploitation of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) puree added of stem infusion through fermentation by selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

Strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides were identified from 8 cultivars of sweet cherry by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and subjected to typing by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. Representative isolates from each species and each cultivar were screened based on the kinetics of growth on cherry puree added of (10%, v/v) stem infusion (CP-SI). A protocol for processing and storage of CP-SI, which included fermentation by selected autochthonous P. pentosaceus SWE5 and L. plantarum FP3 (started CP-SI) or spontaneous fermentation (unstarted CP-SI), was set up. Starters grew and remained viable at elevated cell numbers (ca. 9.0 log cfu g(-1)) during 60 days of storage at 4 °C. The number of presumptive lactic acid bacteria of the unstarted CP-SI did not exceed the value of ca. 3.0 log cfu g(-1). Consumption of carbohydrates (e.g., glucose and fructose) by starter lactic acid bacteria was limited as well as it was the lactic acid fermentation. Consumption of organic acids (e.g., malic acid) and free amino acids was evident, especially, throughout storage. Compared to CP-SI before processing, the concentrations of total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins did not vary in the started CP-SI. The concentration of anthocyanins slightly decreased in the unstarted CP-SI. The antioxidant activity, expressed as the scavenging activity toward DPPH radical, was found at highest level in the started CP-SI which approached that found in CP-SI before processing. During storage, viscosity and, especially, color indexes of started CP-SI were higher than those found in the unstarted CP-SI. Fermentation by autochthonous lactic acid bacteria seemed to also positively interfere with the sensory attributes of CP-SI. PMID:21569932

Di Cagno, Raffaella; Surico, Rosalinda Fortunata; Minervini, Giovanna; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Lovino, Raffaella; Servili, Maurizio; Taticchi, Agnese; Urbani, Sefania; Gobbetti, Marco

2011-08-01

108

Characterization of transposon insertion out- mutants of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora defective in enzyme export and of a DNA segment that complements out mutations in E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, and Erwinia chrysanthemi.  

PubMed Central

Soft-rotting Erwinia spp. export degradative enzymes to the cell exterior (Out+), a process contributing to their ability to macerate plant tissues. Transposon (Tn5, Tn10, Tn10-lacZ) insertion Out- mutants were obtained in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 by using plasmid and bacteriophage lambda delivery systems. In these mutants, pectate lyases, polygalacturonase, and cellulase, which are normally excreted into the growth medium, accumulated in the periplasm. However, localization of the extracellular protease was not affected. The Out- mutants were impaired in their ability to macerate potato tuber tissue. Out+ clones were identified in a cosmid library of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 by their ability to complement mutants. Localization of cyclic phosphodiesterase in the periplasm indicated that the Out+ plasmids did not cause lysis or a nonspecific protein release. The Out+ derivatives of the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 mutants regained the ability to macerate potato tuber tissue. Our data indicate that a cluster of several genes is required for the Out+ phenotype. While one plasmid, pAKC260, restored the Out+ phenotype in each of the 31 mutants of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, and Erwinia chrysanthemi, it failed to render Escherichia coli export proficient. Homologs of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 out DNA were detected by Southern hybridizations in subspecies of E. carotovora under high-stringency conditions. In contrast, E. chrysanthemi sequences bearing homology to the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 out DNA were detectable only under low-stringency hybridization. Thus, although the out genes are functional in these two soft-rotting bacterial groups, the genes appear to have diverged. Images PMID:2160934

Murata, H; Fons, M; Chatterjee, A; Collmer, A; Chatterjee, A K

1990-01-01

109

Biological activity of harpin produced by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.  

PubMed

Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii causes Stewart's wilt of sweet corn. A hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) secretion system is needed to produce water-soaking and wilting symptoms in corn and to cause a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. Sequencing of the hrp cluster revealed a putative harpin gene, hrpN. The product of this gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to elicit the HR in tobacco and systemic resistance in radishes. The protein was designated HrpN(Pnss). Like other harpins, it was heat stable and protease sensitive, although it was three- to fourfold less active biologically than Erwinia amylovora harpin. We used antibodies to purified HrpN(Pnss) to verify that hrpN mutants could not produce harpin. This protein was secreted into the culture supernatant and was produced by strains of P. stewartii subsp. indologenes. In order to determine the importance of HrpN(Pnss) in pathogenesis on sweet corn, three hrpN::Tn5 mutants were compared with the wild-type strain with 50% effective dose, disease severity, response time, and growth rate in planta as parameters. In all tests, HrpN(Pnss) was not required for infection, growth, or virulence in corn or endophytic growth in related grasses. PMID:11605962

Ahmad, M; Majerczak, D R; Pike, S; Hoyos, M E; Novacky, A; Coplin, D L

2001-10-01

110

Intestinal colonization of neonatal animals by Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.  

PubMed Central

Neonatal mice (2.3 to 2.8 g) were inoculated intragastrically with different human isolates of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. At weekly intervals thereafter, mice were sacrificed and dilution plate counts were performed on segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Mice were uniformly colonized by some strains for 2 weeks, whereas other strains were being cleared at that time. One strain (BO216) persisted in some mice for 3 weeks. The greatest number of organisms (10(7)) was recovered from the cecum and large intestine. The small intestine had from 10(2) to 10(5) colony-forming units. Colonization of the stomach was not found consistently. One strain killed 13% of the infected mice. Deaths occurred between 1 and 5 days postinfection. Two other strains killed a smaller percentage of challenged animals, and two additional strains killed none. Retarded weight gain was noticed in some, but not all, of the infected mice. The intestines of neonatal rats and rabbits were colonized much the same as those of mice, whereas hamsters were resistant to colonization. Preweanling mice, up to about 6.5 to 7.0 g, could be colonized with C. fetus subsp. jejuni after intragastric challenge, but weanling mice of larger weight (9.8 g) and young adult mice (18.3 g) could not. Scanning electron photomicrographs of the lower ileum showed campylobacters in and below the dried mucous gel that lines the intestines. The use of this model for additional studies is discussed. Images PMID:7287188

Field, L H; Underwood, J L; Pope, L M; Berry, L J

1981-01-01

111

Glycosylation of DsbA in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis?†  

PubMed Central

In Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, DsbA has been shown to be an essential virulence factor and has been observed to migrate to multiple protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. In this work, we show that the protein is modified with a 1,156-Da glycan moiety in O-linkage. The results of mass spectrometry studies suggest that the glycan is a hexasaccharide, comprised of N-acetylhexosamines, hexoses, and an unknown monosaccharide. Disruption of two genes within the FTT0789-FTT0800 putative polysaccharide locus, including a galE homologue (FTT0791) and a putative glycosyltransferase (FTT0798), resulted in loss of glycan modification of DsbA. The F. tularensis subsp. tularensis ?FTT0798 and ?FTT0791::Cm mutants remained virulent in the murine model of subcutaneous tularemia. This indicates that glycosylation of DsbA does not play a major role in virulence under these conditions. This is the first report of the detailed characterization of the DsbA glycan and putative role of the FTT0789-FTT0800 gene cluster in glycan biosynthesis. PMID:21803994

Thomas, Rebecca M.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Tessier, Luc; Kilmury, Sara L. N.; Ding, Wen; Harmer, Nicholas; Michell, Stephen L.; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Titball, Richard W.; Prior, Joann L.

2011-01-01

112

Stability evaluation of freeze-dried Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in oral capsules  

PubMed Central

Freeze-drying is a common preservation technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Various studies have investigated the effect of different cryoprotectants on probiotics during freeze-drying. However, information on the effect of cryoprotectants on the stability of some Lactobacillus strains during freeze-drying seems scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish production methods for preparation of oral capsule probiotics containing Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus. It was also of interest to examine the effect of various formulations of cryoprotectant media containing skim milk, trehalose and sodium ascorbate on the survival rate of probiotic bacteria during freeze-drying at various storage temperatures. Without any cryoprotectant, few numbers of microorganisms survived. However, microorganisms tested maintained higher viability after freeze-drying in media containing at least one of the cryoprotectants. Use of skim milk in water resulted in an increased viability after lyophilization. Media with a combination of trehalose and skim milk maintained a higher percentage of live microorganisms, up to 82%. In general, bacteria retained a higher number of viable cells in capsules containing freeze-dried bacteria with sodium ascorbate after three months of storage. After this period, a marked decline was observed in all samples stored at 23°C compared to those stored at 4°C. The maximum survival rate (about 72-76%) was observed with media containing 6% skim milk, 8% trehalose and 4% sodium ascorbate. PMID:23181077

Jalali, M.; Abedi, D.; Varshosaz, J.; Najjarzadeh, M.; Mirlohi, M.; Tavakoli, N.

2012-01-01

113

Stability evaluation of freeze-dried Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in oral capsules.  

PubMed

Freeze-drying is a common preservation technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Various studies have investigated the effect of different cryoprotectants on probiotics during freeze-drying. However, information on the effect of cryoprotectants on the stability of some Lactobacillus strains during freeze-drying seems scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish production methods for preparation of oral capsule probiotics containing Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerance and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus. It was also of interest to examine the effect of various formulations of cryoprotectant media containing skim milk, trehalose and sodium ascorbate on the survival rate of probiotic bacteria during freeze-drying at various storage temperatures. Without any cryoprotectant, few numbers of microorganisms survived. However, microorganisms tested maintained higher viability after freeze-drying in media containing at least one of the cryoprotectants. Use of skim milk in water resulted in an increased viability after lyophilization. Media with a combination of trehalose and skim milk maintained a higher percentage of live microorganisms, up to 82%. In general, bacteria retained a higher number of viable cells in capsules containing freeze-dried bacteria with sodium ascorbate after three months of storage. After this period, a marked decline was observed in all samples stored at 23°C compared to those stored at 4°C. The maximum survival rate (about 72-76%) was observed with media containing 6% skim milk, 8% trehalose and 4% sodium ascorbate. PMID:23181077

Jalali, M; Abedi, D; Varshosaz, J; Najjarzadeh, M; Mirlohi, M; Tavakoli, N

2012-01-01

114

A comparative study of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis in experimentally infected pigs  

PubMed Central

Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (Maa) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) are opportunistic pathogens that may infect several species, including humans and pigs. Mah is however more frequently isolated from pigs than Maa, and it is unclear if this is due to difference in virulence or in exposure to the two organisms. Clinical isolates of each subspecies were administered perorally to ten domestic pigs, respectively. The animals were sacrificed at six and 12 weeks after inoculation. At necropsy, macroscopic lesions were recorded, and tissue samples were collected for mycobacterial culture, IS1245 real time PCR and histopathological examination. Culturing was also performed on faecal samples collected at necropsy. Results Macroscopic and histopathological lesions were detected in pigs infected with each subspecies, and bacterial growth and histopathological changes were demonstrated, also in samples from organs without gross pathological lesions. Six weeks after inoculation, live Mah was detected in faeces, as opposed to Maa. The presence of live mycobacteria was also more pronounced in Mah infected tonsils. In comparison, the Maa isolate appeared to have a higher ability of intracellular replication in porcine macrophages compared to the Mah isolate. Conclusions The study shows that both subspecies were able to infect pigs. Additionally, the more extensive shedding of Mah might cause pig-to-pig transmission and contribute to the higher incidence of infection caused by this subspecies. PMID:22284630

2012-01-01

115

Effects of Roundup(®) and glyphosate on three food microorganisms: Geotrichum candidum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.  

PubMed

Use of many pesticide products poses the problem of their effects on environment and health. Amongst them, the effects of glyphosate with its adjuvants and its by-products are regularly discussed. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the real impact on biodiversity and ecosystems of Roundup(®), a major herbicide used worldwide, and the glyphosate it contains, by the study of their effects on growth and viability of microbial models, namely, on three food microorganisms (Geotrichum candidum, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) widely used as starters in traditional and industrial dairy technologies. The presented results evidence that Roundup(®) has an inhibitory effect on microbial growth and a microbicide effect at lower concentrations than those recommended in agriculture. Interestingly, glyphosate at these levels has no significant effect on the three studied microorganisms. Our work is consistent with previous studies which demonstrated that the toxic effect of glyphosate was amplified by its formulation adjuvants on different human cells and other eukaryotic models. Moreover, these results should be considered in the understanding of the loss of microbiodiversity and microbial concentration observed in raw milk for many years. PMID:22362186

Clair, Emilie; Linn, Laura; Travert, Carine; Amiel, Caroline; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Panoff, Jean-Michel

2012-05-01

116

Seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in urban and rural dogs in Turkey.  

PubMed

The seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was investigated in stray urban dogs and shepherd and farm guard dogs from rural areas sampled from 10 provinces of Turkey. Sera from 855 dogs were examined for the presence of anti-B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii antibodies by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Overall, 56 (6.6%) of the 855 dogs examined, including 16 (3%) of the 522 stray dogs and 40 (12%) of the 333 rural dogs, were seropositive. This is the first report on prevalence of antibodies to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in dogs in Turkey. PMID:20574140

Celebi, Bekir; Taylan Ozkan, Aysegul; Kilic, Selcuk; Akca, Atilla; Koenhemsi, Lora; Pasa, Serdar; Yildiz, Kader; Mamak, Nuri; Guzel, Murat

2010-11-01

117

Integrative Cloning, Expression, and Stability of the cryIA(c) Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a Recombinant Strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis  

PubMed Central

A bacterial endophyte was engineered for insecticidal activity against the European corn borer. The cryIA(c) gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was introduced into the chromosome of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis by using an integrative plasmid vector. The integration vectors pCG740 and pCG741 included the replicon pGEM5Zf(+), which is maintained in Escherichia coli but not in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; tetM as a marker for selection in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; and a chromosomal fragment of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis to allow for homologous recombination between the vector and the bacterial chromosome. Insertion of vector DNA into the chromosome was demonstrated by DNA hybridization. Recombinant strains MDR1.583 and MDR1.586 containing the cryIA(c) gene were shown to produce the 133,000-kDa protoxin and several smaller immunoreactive proteins. Both strains were equally toxic to insect larvae in bioassays. Significant insecticidal activity was demonstrated in planta. The cryIA(c) gene and the tetM gene introduced into strain MDR1.586 were shown to be deleted from some cells, thereby giving rise to a noninsecticidal segregant population. In DNA hybridization experiments and insect bioassays, these segregants were indistinguishable from the wild-type strain. Overall, these results demonstrate the plausibility of genetically engineered bacterial endophytes for insect control. Images PMID:16349179

Lampel, Jay S.; Canter, Gayle L.; Dimock, Michael B.; Kelly, Jeffrey L.; Anderson, James J.; Uratani, Brenda B.; Foulke, James S.; Turner, John T.

1994-01-01

118

Comparative Genomic Hybridizations Reveal Genetic Regions within the Mycobacterium avium Complex That Are Divergent from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates†  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is genetically similar to other members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), some of which are nonpathogenic and widespread in the environment. We have utilized an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis whole-genome microarray representing over 95% of the predicted coding sequences to examine the genetic conservation among 10 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, two isolates each of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and a single isolate each of both Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Genomic DNA from each isolate was competitively hybridized with DNA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K10, and open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present, divergent, or intermediate. None of the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates had ORFs classified as divergent. The two M. avium subsp. avium isolates had 210 and 135 divergent ORFs, while the two M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates examined had 77 and 103 divergent ORFs. Similarly, 130 divergent ORFs were identified in M. intracellulare. A set of 97 ORFs were classified as divergent or intermediate in all of the nonparatuberculosis MAC isolates tested. Many of these ORFs are clustered together on the genome in regions with relatively low average GC content compared with the entire genome and contain mobile genetic elements. One of these regions of sequence divergence contained genes homologous to a mammalian cell entry (mce) operon. Our results indicate that closely related MAC mycobacteria can be distinguished from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by multiple clusters of divergent ORFs. PMID:15774884

Paustian, Michael L.; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P.

2005-01-01

119

Bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins from white salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius subsp. porrifolius).  

PubMed

A phytochemical investigation of three accessions of Tragopogon porrifolius L. subsp. porrifolius (Asteraceae, Lactuceae) yielded three new bibenzyl derivatives, 5,4'-dihydroxy-3-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, 2-carboxyl-3,4'-dihydroxy-5-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, tragopogonic acid (2'carboxyl-3',5',4''-trihydroxyphenylethanone) and three dihydroisocoumarin derivatives, including the new natural product 6-O-methylscorzocreticoside I. One of the isolated bibenzyl derivatives is considered to be a precursor to the biosynthesis of dihydroisocoumarins. Structures of new compounds were established by HR mass spectrometry, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Moreover, radical scavenging activities of the polyphenolic compounds were measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay; two of the bibenzyls showed moderate and two of the dihydroisocoumarins showed weak radical scavenging activities. The chemosystematic impact of bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins is discussed briefly. PMID:15964041

Zidorn, Christian; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Pschorr, Susanne; Salvenmoser, Daniela; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Börner, Andreas; Stuppner, Hermann

2005-07-01

120

Antimicrobial phenolics and unusual glycerides from Helichrysum italicum subsp. microphyllum.  

PubMed

During a large-scale isolation campaign for the heterodimeric phloroglucinyl pyrone arzanol (1a) from Helichrysum italicum subsp. microphyllum, several new phenolics as well as an unusual class of lipids named santinols (5a-c, 6-8) have been characterized. Santinols are angeloylated glycerides characterized by the presence of branched acyl- or keto-acyl chains and represent a hitherto unreported class of plant lipids. The antibacterial activity of arzanol and of a selection of Helichrysum phenolics that includes coumarates, benzofurans, pyrones, and heterodimeric phloroglucinols was evaluated, showing that only the heterodimers showed potent antibacterial action against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. These observations validate the topical use of Helichrysum extracts to prevent wound infections, a practice firmly established in the traditional medicine of the Mediterranean area. PMID:23265253

Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Pollastro, Federica; Chianese, Giuseppina; Minassi, Alberto; Gibbons, Simon; Arunotayanun, Warunya; Mabebie, Blessing; Ballero, Mauro; Appendino, Giovanni

2013-03-22

121

Molecular characterization of three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus phages.  

PubMed

In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

2014-09-01

122

Humoral response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium in naturally infected ring-neck doves (Streptopelia risoria)  

E-print Network

Creation of a reliable and easy to use serologic test would greatly improve ante mortem diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and aid in the control of avian mycobacteriosis, particularly in captive birds. In order to determine whether...

Gray, Patricia Lara-Lynn

2009-05-15

123

Comparative Genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Reveals a Strict Monophyletic Bifidobacterial Taxon  

PubMed Central

Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe

2013-01-01

124

Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis infection in waterfowl: first confirmation in animals.  

PubMed Central

We report the first description, confirmed by bacteriologic and molecular (polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) analysis, of an infection in animals caused by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, affecting waterfowl. PMID:11747704

Goyache, J.; Vela, A. I.; Gibello, A.; Blanco, M. M.; Briones, V.; González, S.; Téllez, S.; Ballesteros, C.; Domínguez, L.; Fernández-Garayzábal, J. F.

2001-01-01

125

MAO-A inhibition profiles of some benzophenone glucosides from Gentiana verna subsp. pontica.  

PubMed

Gentiana verna L. subsp. pontica (Soltok.) Hayek, G. pyrenaica L., and G. verna L. subsp. balcanica Pritchard from Turkey were tested for their MAO-A inhibitory effects. A photometric peroxidase linked MAO-A bioassay performed on the H20 extracts prepared from the methanolic extracts of the title plants revealed the potential effect of G. verna subsp. pontica and three benzophenone glucosides; 2,3'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone-6-O-beta-glucopyranoside (1), 2,4,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone-6-O-beta-glucopyranoside (maclurin-6-O-f-glucopyranoside) (2) and 2,4,3'-trihydroxy-benzophenone-6-O-beta-glucopyranoside (3) isolated from G. verna subsp. pontica. Among the benzophenone glucosides 1 and 2 exhibited significant inhibition of MAO-A (IC50 = 31.3 +/- 4 microM and 41 +/- 4.7 microM resp.). PMID:24868869

Kaya, Duygu; Jäger, Anna K; Yalçin, Funda N; Ersöz, Tayfun

2014-04-01

126

Experimental Paratuberculosis in Calves following Inoculation with a Rabbit Isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

PubMed Central

The role of wildlife species in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis has been the subject of increased research efforts following the discovery of natural paratuberculosis in free-living rabbits from farms in east Scotland. This paper describes the experimental inoculation of young calves with an isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from a free-living rabbit. After a 6-month incubation period, all eight calves inoculated with the rabbit isolate had developed histopathological and/or microbiological evidence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Similar results were obtained from a group of calves infected with a bovine isolate of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The virulence of the rabbit isolate for calves demonstrated in this study suggests that rabbits are capable of passing paratuberculosis to domestic ruminants and that wildlife reservoirs of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis should therefore be considered when formulating control plans for the disease. PMID:11526132

Beard, P. M.; Stevenson, K.; Pirie, A.; Rudge, K.; Buxton, D.; Rhind, S. M.; Sinclair, M. C.; Wildblood, L. A.; Jones, D. G.; Sharp, J. M.

2001-01-01

127

Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433.  

PubMed

Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

2014-01-01

128

Tomato Transcriptional Changes in Response to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis Reveal  

E-print Network

Tomato Transcriptional Changes in Response to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis Reveal, causing bacterial wilt and canker disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Host responses to gram in tomato are largely unexplored. To investigate plant responses activated during this compatible

Sessa, Guido

129

Capsular exopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.  

PubMed

In the dairy industry, exopolysaccharides (EPS) contribute to improving the texture and viscosity of cheese and yoghurt and also receive increasing attention because of their beneficial properties for health. For lactic acid bacteria, the production of EPS is well studied. However, for dairy propionibacteria the biosynthesis of EPS is poorly documented. A polysaccharide synthase-encoding gene was identified in the genome of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii TL 34 (CIP 103027). This gene best aligns with Tts, the polysaccharide synthase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 37 that is responsible for the production of a beta-glucan capsular polysaccharide. PCR amplification showed the presence of an internal fragment of this gene in twelve strains of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii with a ropy phenotype in YEL+ medium. The gene sequence is highly conserved, as less than 1% of nucleotides differed among the 10 strains containing the complete gtf gene. The same primers failed to detect the gene in Propionibacterium acidipropionici strain TL 47, which is known to excrete exopolysaccharides in milk. The presence of (1-->3, 1-->2)-beta-d-glucan capsule was demonstrated for 7 out of 12 strains by agglutination with a S. pneumoniae-type 37-specific antiserum. The presence of mRNA corresponding to the gene was detected by RT-PCR in three strains at both exponential and stationary growth phases. This work represents the first identification of a polysaccharide synthase gene of P. freudenreichii, and further studies will be undertaken to elucidate the role of capsular EPS. PMID:18524407

Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Falentin, Hélène; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lapointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

2008-07-31

130

Determination of kinetic properties of polyphenol oxidase from Thymus ( Thymus longicaulis subsp. chaubardii var. chaubardii)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Thymus longicaulis subsp. chaubardii var. chaubardii is described. Polyphenol oxidase of Thymus was isolated by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and dialysis. The effects of substrate specificity, pH, temperature, heat-inactivation and glutathione inhibitor on polyphenol oxidase activity obtained from T. longicaulis subsp. chaubardii var. chaubardii were investigated. Polyphenol oxidase showed activity toward catechol, 4-methylcatechol

Serap Dogan; Mehmet Dogan

2004-01-01

131

The Citrate Transport System of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis Is Induced by Acid Stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citrate transport in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis is catalyzed by citrate permease P (CitP), which is encoded by the plasmidic citP gene. We have shown previously that citP is included in the citQRP operon, which is mainly transcribed from the P1 promoter in L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis. Furthermore, transcription of citQRP and citrate transport are not

NIEVES GARCIA-QUINTANS; CHRISTIAN MAGNI; DIEGO DE MENDOZA; PALOMA LOPEZ

1998-01-01

132

Local evolution of obligate autogamy in Epipactis helleborine subsp. neerlandica (Orchidaceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isozyme analysis was used to assess the origin of the DanishEpipactis renzii, a local endemic of open coastal dunes. It seems to have evolved recently in several local populations of the more or less allogamousE. helleborine subsp.neerlandica. The obligately autogamousE. renzii is restricted to the easternmost part of the Danish range ofE. helleborine subsp.neerlandica, indicating that transition to obligate autogamy

H. Æ. Pedersen; B. K. Ehlers

2000-01-01

133

Die Unkraut-Hirse ( Panicum miliaceum subsp. ruderale ) — neue Tatsachen und Befunde  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Weed-Broomcorn Millet,Panicum miliaceum L. subsp.ruderale (Kitag.)Tzvelev, until now observed only in Asiatic countries, is also present in Austria (C. Europe). Whereas the cultivatedP. miliaceum subsp.miliaceum, devoid of all natural dispersal ability, cannot actively spread, the Weed-Broomcorn Millet can do so successfully and is increasingly infesting fields ofZea mays. Its spikelets disarticulate at maturity below the glumes, and moreover the

Hildemar Scholz

1983-01-01

134

Biosynthetic origin of the nitrogen atom in cyanamide in Vicia villosa subsp. varia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural cyanamide (NH2CN) has recently been found in three Leguminosae plants: Vicia villosa subsp. varia, Vicia cracca and Robinia pseudo-acacia. As cyanamide has long been thought to be absent in nature, its physiological role and biosynthesis are totally unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated the incorporation of N from [N]nitrate and [N]ammonium into cyanamide using shoots of V. villosa subsp.

Tsunashi Kamo; Kenji Kato; Shun Abe; Mitsuru Hirota; Hiroko Yamaya; Syuntaro Hiradate; Yoshiharu Fujii

2009-01-01

135

Decreased Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to Mosquito Larvae after Contact with Leaf Litter  

PubMed Central

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

2012-01-01

136

Adaptation and response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to bile: a proteomic and physiological approach.  

PubMed

Bile salts are natural detergents that facilitate the digestion and absorption of the hydrophobic components of the diet. However, their amphiphilic nature makes them very inhibitory for bacteria and strongly influences bacterial survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress is therefore crucial for the persistence of bacteria in the human colonic niche. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a probiotic bacterium with documented health benefits, is applied largely in fermented dairy products. In this study, the effect of bile salts on proteomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA 4549 and its bile-resistant derivative B. animalis subsp. lactis 4549dOx was analyzed, leading to the identification of proteins which may represent the targets of bile salt response and adaptation in B. animalis subsp. lactis. The comparison of the wild-type and the bile-resistant strain responses allowed us to hypothesize about the resistance mechanisms acquired by the derivative resistant strain and about the bile salt response in B. animalis subsp. lactis. In addition, significant differences in the levels of metabolic end products of the bifid shunt and in the redox status of the cells were also detected, which correlate with some differences observed between the proteomes. These results indicate that adaptation and response to bile in B. animalis subsp. lactis involve several physiological mechanisms that are jointly dedicated to reduce the deleterious impact of bile on the cell's physiology. PMID:17827318

Sánchez, Borja; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Johansen, Eric; Zagorec, Monique; Margolles, Abelardo

2007-11-01

137

Tomato Fruit and Seed Colonization by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis through External and Internal Routes  

PubMed Central

The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, causal agent of bacterial wilt and canker of tomato, is an economically devastating pathogen that inflicts considerable damage throughout all major tomato-producing regions. Annual outbreaks continue to occur in New York, where C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis spreads via infected transplants, trellising stakes, tools, and/or soil. Globally, new outbreaks can be accompanied by the introduction of contaminated seed stock; however, the route of seed infection, especially the role of fruit lesions, remains undefined. In order to investigate the modes of seed infection, New York C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis field strains were stably transformed with a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). A constitutively eGFP-expressing virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate, GCMM-22, was used to demonstrate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis could not only access seeds systemically through the xylem but also externally through tomato fruit lesions, which harbored high intra- and intercellular populations. Active movement and expansion of bacteria into the fruit mesocarp and nearby xylem vessels followed, once the fruits began to ripen. These results highlight the ability of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to invade tomato fruits and seeds through multiple entry routes. PMID:24014525

Tancos, Matthew A.; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

2013-01-01

138

Adaptation and Response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to Bile: a Proteomic and Physiological Approach?  

PubMed Central

Bile salts are natural detergents that facilitate the digestion and absorption of the hydrophobic components of the diet. However, their amphiphilic nature makes them very inhibitory for bacteria and strongly influences bacterial survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress is therefore crucial for the persistence of bacteria in the human colonic niche. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a probiotic bacterium with documented health benefits, is applied largely in fermented dairy products. In this study, the effect of bile salts on proteomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA 4549 and its bile-resistant derivative B. animalis subsp. lactis 4549dOx was analyzed, leading to the identification of proteins which may represent the targets of bile salt response and adaptation in B. animalis subsp. lactis. The comparison of the wild-type and the bile-resistant strain responses allowed us to hypothesize about the resistance mechanisms acquired by the derivative resistant strain and about the bile salt response in B. animalis subsp. lactis. In addition, significant differences in the levels of metabolic end products of the bifid shunt and in the redox status of the cells were also detected, which correlate with some differences observed between the proteomes. These results indicate that adaptation and response to bile in B. animalis subsp. lactis involve several physiological mechanisms that are jointly dedicated to reduce the deleterious impact of bile on the cell's physiology. PMID:17827318

Sanchez, Borja; Champomier-Verges, Marie-Christine; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G.; Johansen, Eric; Zagorec, Monique; Margolles, Abelardo

2007-01-01

139

Tomato fruit and seed colonization by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis through external and internal routes.  

PubMed

The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, causal agent of bacterial wilt and canker of tomato, is an economically devastating pathogen that inflicts considerable damage throughout all major tomato-producing regions. Annual outbreaks continue to occur in New York, where C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis spreads via infected transplants, trellising stakes, tools, and/or soil. Globally, new outbreaks can be accompanied by the introduction of contaminated seed stock; however, the route of seed infection, especially the role of fruit lesions, remains undefined. In order to investigate the modes of seed infection, New York C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis field strains were stably transformed with a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). A constitutively eGFP-expressing virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate, GCMM-22, was used to demonstrate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis could not only access seeds systemically through the xylem but also externally through tomato fruit lesions, which harbored high intra- and intercellular populations. Active movement and expansion of bacteria into the fruit mesocarp and nearby xylem vessels followed, once the fruits began to ripen. These results highlight the ability of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to invade tomato fruits and seeds through multiple entry routes. PMID:24014525

Tancos, Matthew A; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Smart, Christine D

2013-11-01

140

Decreased toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to mosquito larvae after contact with leaf litter.  

PubMed

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

Tetreau, Guillaume; Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

2012-08-01

141

Genetic variation in Mediterranean Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae; Gnaphalieae): do disjunct populations of subsp. microphyllum have a common origin?  

PubMed

The yellow-flowered everlasting daisy Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae, Gnaphalieae) is widely distributed in the Mediterranean basin, where it grows in continuous and widespread populations in diverse open habitats. Helichrysum italicum subsp. microphyllum has a disjunct distribution in the Balearic Islands (Majorca and Dragonera), Corsica, Sardinia, Crete and Cyprus. Numerous morphological intermediates between subsp. italicum and subsp. microphyllum are known from Corsica, where the two subspecies co-occur. The aims of the study were to investigate if subsp. microphyllum has a common origin, constituting an independent gene pool from subsp. italicum, or if the morphological differences between subsp. microphyllum and subsp. italicum have arisen independently in different locations from a common wider gene pool. Our analyses of AFLP, cpDNA sequences and morphological characters show that there is geographic structure to the genetic variation within H. italicum, with eastern and western Mediterranean groups, which do not correspond with the division into subsp. microphyllum and subsp. italicum as currently circumscribed. Local selection on quantitative trait loci provides sufficient explanation for the morphological divergence observed and is consistent with genetic data. Within the western Mediterranean group of the species we found considerable polymorphism in chloroplast DNA sequences among and within some populations. Comparison with chloroplast DNA sequences from other Helichrysum species showed that some chloroplast haplotypes are shared across species. PMID:21668609

Galbany-Casals, M; Blanco-Moreno, J M; Garcia-Jacas, N; Breitwieser, I; Smissen, R D

2011-07-01

142

The influences of fish infusion broth on the biogenic amines formation by lactic acid bacteria  

PubMed Central

The influences of fish infusion decarboxylase broth (IDB) on biogenic amines (BA) formation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were investigated. BA productions by single LAB strains were tested in five different fish (anchovy, mackerel, white shark, sardine and gilthead seabream) IDB. The result of the study showed that significant differences in ammonia (AMN) and BA production were observed among the LAB strains in fish IDB (p < 0.05). The highest AMN and TMA production by LAB strains were observed for white shark IDB. The all tested bacteria had decarboxylation activity in fish IDB. The uppermost accumulated amines by LAB strains were tyramine (TYM), dopamine, serotonin and spermidine. The maximum histamine production was observed in sardine (101.69 mg/L) and mackerel (100.84 mg/L) IDB by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and Pediococcus acidophilus, respectively. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Pediococcus acidophilus had a high TYM producing capability (2943 mg/L and 1157 mg/L) in sardine IDB. PMID:24294229

Kuley, Esmeray; Ozogul, Fatih; Balikci, Esra; Durmus, Mustafa; Ayas, Deniz

2013-01-01

143

Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis ATCC 27673 Is a Genomically Unique Strain within Its Conserved Subspecies  

PubMed Central

Many strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are considered health-promoting probiotic microorganisms and are commonly formulated into fermented dairy foods. Analyses of previously sequenced genomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis have revealed little genetic diversity, suggesting that it is a monomorphic subspecies. However, during a multilocus sequence typing survey of Bifidobacterium, it was revealed that B. animalis subsp. lactis ATCC 27673 gave a profile distinct from that of the other strains of the subspecies. As part of an ongoing study designed to understand the genetic diversity of this subspecies, the genome of this strain was sequenced and compared to other sequenced genomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. animalis subsp. animalis. The complete genome of ATCC 27673 was 1,963,012 bp, contained 1,616 genes and 4 rRNA operons, and had a G+C content of 61.55%. Comparative analyses revealed that the genome of ATCC 27673 contained six distinct genomic islands encoding 83 open reading frames not found in other strains of the same subspecies. In four islands, either phage or mobile genetic elements were identified. In island 6, a novel clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) locus which contained 81 unique spacers was identified. This type I-E CRISPR-cas system differs from the type I-C systems previously identified in this subspecies, representing the first identification of a different system in B. animalis subsp. lactis. This study revealed that ATCC 27673 is a strain of B. animalis subsp. lactis with novel genetic content and suggests that the lack of genetic variability observed is likely due to the repeated sequencing of a limited number of widely distributed commercial strains. PMID:23995933

Loquasto, Joseph R.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G.; Stahl, Buffy; Chen, Chun

2013-01-01

144

Stability of the delta-endotoxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a recombinant strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis.  

PubMed Central

Deletion of chromosomally inserted gene sequences from Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis, a xylem-inhabiting endophyte, was studied in vitro and in planta. We found that nonreplicating plasmid pCG610, which conferred resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline and contained segments of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis genomic DNA, integrated into a homologous sequence in the bacterial chromosome. In addition, pCG610 contains two copies of the gene encoding the CryIA(c) insecticidal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73. Using drug resistance phenotypes and specific DNA probes, we found that the loss of all three genes arose both in vitro under nonselective conditions and in planta. The resulting segregants are probably formed by recombination between the repeated DNA sequences flanking pCG610 that resulted from the integration event into the chromosome. Eventually, segregants predominated in the bacterial population. The loss of the integrated plasmid from C. xyli subsp. cynodontis revealed a possible approach for decreasing the environmental consequences of recombinant bacteria for agricultural use. Images PMID:1664710

Turner, J T; Lampel, J S; Stearman, R S; Sundin, G W; Gunyuzlu, P; Anderson, J J

1991-01-01

145

PRELIMINARY STUDY ON LOCALISATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN UDDER OF SEROPOSITIVE EWES STUDIO PRELIMINARE DELLA LOCALIZZAZIONE DI MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS NELLA MAMMELLA DI PECORE SIEROPOSITIVE  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to evaluate the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in milk and mammary apparatus of seropositive ewes, samples of mammary gland and supramammary lymph nodes were collected from 20 Comisana breed sheep. Milk of 14 out of 20 ewes was available for sampling. Intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes were also collected in order to confirm MAP infection.

S. Preziuso; M. L. Marenzoni; A. R. Attili; C. Valente; V. Cuteri

146

Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves  

PubMed Central

A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

2013-01-01

147

Anti-tumour activity of Digitalis purpurea L. subsp. heywoodii.  

PubMed

Recent research has shown the anticancer effects of digitalis compounds suggesting their possible use in medical oncology. Four extracts obtained from the leaves of Digitalis purpurea subsp. heywoodii have been assessed for cytotoxic activity against three human cancer cell lines, using the SRB assay. All of them showed high cytotoxicity, producing IC50 values in the 0.78 - 15 microg/mL range with the methanolic extract being the most active, in non toxic concentrations. Steroid glycosides (gitoxigenin derivatives) were detected in this methanolic extract. Gitoxigenin and gitoxin were evaluated in the SRB assay using the three human cancer cell lines, showing IC50 values in the 0.13 - 2.8 microM range, with the renal adenocarcinoma cancer cell line (TK-10) being the most sensitive one. Morphological apoptosis evaluation of the methanolic extract and both compounds on the TK-10 cell line showed that their cytotoxicity was mediated by an apoptotic effect. Finally, possible mechanisms involved in apoptosis induction by digitalis compounds are discussed. PMID:14531018

López-Lázaro, Miguel; Palma De La Peña, Nieves; Pastor, Nuria; Martín-Cordero, Carmen; Navarro, Eduardo; Cortés, Felipe; Ayuso, María Jesús; Toro, María Victoria

2003-08-01

148

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and its dipteran-specific toxins.  

PubMed

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six ?-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

Ben-Dov, Eitan

2014-04-01

149

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins  

PubMed Central

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six ?-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

Ben-Dov, Eitan

2014-01-01

150

Immunological response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in chickens  

PubMed Central

Abstract Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and culture are 2 common diagnostic tests for detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in Johne’s disease, but they are not as sensitive as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, inhibitors can coextract with the target DNA and cause interference in PCR. Development of an immune capture assay followed by PCR amplification can alleviate this problem. In this study, we were able to induce an immune response in chickens using heat or formalin inactivated Map. The purified immunoglobulin (Ig)Y has a molecular weight of 160 kDa. The titers were at 1:6400 and 1:12 800 at weeks 5 to 6 and 8 to 9, respectively, as determined by the IDEXX modified ELISA kit for Johne’s disease. The IgY produced from inactivated bacterial cells had no effect on its ability to recognize live Map cells as illustrated by immunofluorescence assay and immune capture PCR results. PMID:15581226

2004-01-01

151

Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.  

PubMed

Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (?Xacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection. PMID:25180689

Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

2014-10-01

152

Infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Results in Rapid Interleukin-1? Release and Macrophage Transepithelial Migration  

PubMed Central

Pathogen processing by the intestinal epithelium involves a dynamic innate immune response initiated by pathogen-epithelial cell cross talk. Interactions between epithelium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have not been intensively studied, and it is currently unknown how the bacterium-epithelial cell cross talk contributes to the course of infection. We hypothesized that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis harnesses host responses to recruit macrophages to the site of infection to ensure its survival and dissemination. We investigated macrophage recruitment in response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis using a MAC-T bovine macrophage coculture system. We show that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection led to phagosome acidification within bovine epithelial (MAC-T) cells as early as 10 min, which resulted in upregulation of interleukin-1? (IL-1?) at transcript and protein levels. Within 10 min of infection, macrophages were recruited to the apical side of MAC-T cells. Inhibition of phagosome acidification or IL-1? abrogated this response, while MCP-1/CCL-2 blocking had no effect. IL-1? processing was dependent upon Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular medium and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations, as determined by EGTA and BAPTA-AM [1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N?,N?-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester)] treatments. Thus, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an opportunist that takes advantage of extracellular Ca2+-dependent phagosome acidification and IL-1? processing in order to efficiently transverse the epithelium and enter its niche—the macrophage. PMID:22778093

Lamont, Elise A.; O'Grady, Scott M.; Davis, William C.; Eckstein, Torsten

2012-01-01

153

Spatial analysis of Yersinia pestis and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii seroprevalence in California coyotes (Canis latrans).  

PubMed

Zoonotic transmission of sylvatic plague caused by Yersinia pestis occurs in California, USA. Human infections with various Bartonella species have been reported recently. Coyotes (Canis latrans) are ubiquitous throughout California and can become infected with both bacterial agents, making the species useful for surveillance purposes. This study examined the geographic distribution of 863 coyotes tested for Y. pestis and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii serologic status to gain insight into the natural history of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and to characterize the spatial distribution of the two agents. We found 11.7% of specimens positive to Y. pestis and 35.5% positive to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. The two pathogens had distinct spatial clusters: Y. pestis was more prevalent in eastern portions of the state and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in coastal regions. Prevalence of Y. pestis increased with increasing elevation, whereas prevalence of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii decreased with increasing elevation. There were differences in the proportions of positive animals on a yearly basis to both pathogens. PMID:12507856

Hoar, B R; Chomel, B B; Rolfe, D L; Chang, C C; Fritz, C L; Sacks, B N; Carpenter, T E

2003-01-15

154

Persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in Urban Environments following Spraying?†‡  

PubMed Central

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki is applied extensively in North America to control the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. Since B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki shares many physical and biological properties with Bacillus anthracis, it is a reasonable surrogate for biodefense studies. A key question in biodefense is how long a biothreat agent will persist in the environment. There is some information in the literature on the persistence of Bacillus anthracis in laboratories and historical testing areas and for Bacillus thuringiensis in agricultural settings, but there is no information on the persistence of Bacillus spp. in the type of environment that would be encountered in a city or on a military installation. Since it is not feasible to release B. anthracis in a developed area, the controlled release of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki for pest control was used to gain insight into the potential persistence of Bacillus spp. in outdoor urban environments. Persistence was evaluated in two locations: Fairfax County, VA, and Seattle, WA. Environmental samples were collected from multiple matrices and evaluated for the presence of viable B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki at times ranging from less than 1 day to 4 years after spraying. Real-time PCR and culture were used for analysis. B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was found to persist in urban environments for at least 4 years. It was most frequently detected in soils and less frequently detected in wipes, grass, foliage, and water. The collective results indicate that certain species of Bacillus may persist for years following their dispersal in urban environments. PMID:21926205

Van Cuyk, Sheila; Deshpande, Alina; Hollander, Attelia; Duval, Nathan; Ticknor, Lawrence; Layshock, Julie; Gallegos-Graves, LaVerne; Omberg, Kristin M.

2011-01-01

155

Fate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Swiss Hard and Semihard Cheese Manufactured from Raw Milk  

PubMed Central

Raw milk was artificially contaminated with declumped cells of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a concentration of 104 to 105 CFU/ml and was used to manufacture model hard (Swiss Emmentaler) and semihard (Swiss Tisliter) cheese. Two different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were tested, and for each strain, two model hard and semihard cheeses were produced. The survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was monitored over a ripening period of 120 days by plating out homogenized cheese samples onto 7H10-PANTA agar. In both the hard and the semihard cheeses, counts decreased steadily but slowly during cheese ripening. Nevertheless, viable cells could still be detected in 120-day cheese. D values were calculated at 27.8 days for hard and 45.5 days for semihard cheese. The most important factors responsible for the death of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cheese were the temperatures applied during cheese manufacture and the low pH at the early stages of cheese ripening. Since the ripening period for these raw milk cheeses lasts at least 90 to 120 days, the D values found indicate that 103 to 104 cells of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per g will be inactivated. PMID:11526024

Spahr, U.; Schafroth, K.

2001-01-01

156

Estimation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Growth Parameters: Strain Characterization and Comparison of Methods?  

PubMed Central

The growth rate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was assessed by different methods in 7H9 medium supplemented with OADC (oleic acid, albumin, dextrose, catalase), Tween 80, and mycobactin J. Generation times and maximum specific growth rates were determined by wet weight, turbidometric measurement, viable count, and quantitative PCR (ParaTB-Kuanti; F57 gene) for 8 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains (K10, 2E, 316F, 81, 445, 764, 22G, and OVICAP 49). Strain-to-strain differences were observed in growth curves and calculated parameters. The quantification methods gave different results for each strain at specific time points. Generation times ranged from an average of 1.4 days for viable count and qPCR to approximately 10 days for wet weight and turbidometry. The wet-weight, turbidometry, and ParaTB-Kuanti qPCR methods correlated best with each other. Generally, viability has been assessed by viable count as a reference method; however, due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clumping problems and the presence of noncultivable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells, we conclude that qPCR of a single-copy gene may be used reliably for rapid estimation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacterial numbers in a sample. PMID:22003015

Elguezabal, Natalia; Bastida, Felix; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gonzalez, Nuria; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramon A.

2011-01-01

157

Detection and Verification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Fresh Ileocolonic Mucosal Biopsy Specimens from Individuals with and without Crohn's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a robust and phenotypically versatile pathogen which causes chronic inflammation of the intestine in many species, including primates. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is widespread in domestic livestock and is present in retail pasteurized cows' milk in the United Kingdom and, potentially, elsewhere. Water supplies are also at risk. The involvement of M. avium subsp.

Tim J. Bull; Elizabeth J. McMinn; Karim Sidi-Boumedine; Angela Skull; Damien Durkin; Penny Neild; Glenn Rhodes; Roger Pickup; John Hermon-Taylor

2003-01-01

158

Distribution of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in Soil of a Swiss Wetland Reserve after 22 Years of Mosquito Control?†  

PubMed Central

Recurrent treatments with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis are required to control the floodwater mosquito Aedes vexans that breeds in large numbers in the wetlands of the Bolle di Magadino Reserve in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. Interventions have been carried out since 1988. In the present study, the spatial distribution of resting B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores in the soil was measured. The B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis concentration was determined in soil samples collected along six transects covering different elevations within the periodically flooded zones. A total of 258 samples were processed and analyzed by quantitative PCR that targeted an identical fragment of 159 bp for the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cry4Aa and cry4Ba genes. B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores were found to persist in soils of the wetland reserve at concentrations of up to 6.8 log per gram of soil. Continuous accumulation due to regular treatments could be excluded, as the decrease in spores amounted to 95.8% (95% confidence interval, 93.9 to 97.7%). The distribution of spores was correlated to the number of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis treatments, the elevation of the sampling point, and the duration of the flooding periods. The number of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis treatments was the major factor influencing the distribution of spores in the different topographic zones (P < 0.0001). These findings indicated that B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores are rather immobile after their introduction into the environment. PMID:21498758

Guidi, Valeria; Patocchi, Nicola; Lüthy, Peter; Tonolla, Mauro

2011-01-01

159

The genome of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449: insights into the evolution of a fish pathogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of furunculosis, a bacterial septicaemia of salmonid fish. While other species of Aeromonas are opportunistic pathogens or are found in commensal or symbiotic relationships with animal hosts, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causes disease in healthy fish. The genome sequence of A. salmonicida was determined to provide

Michael E Reith; Rama K Singh; Bruce Curtis; Jessica M Boyd; Anne Bouevitch; Jennifer Kimball; Janet Munholland; Colleen Murphy; Darren Sarty; Jason Williams; John HE Nash; Stewart C Johnson; Laura L Brown

2008-01-01

160

The effectiveness of plant essential oils on the growth of Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oregano, thyme, dictamnus, marjoram, lavender, rosemary, sage and pennyroyal essential oils were tested for their effectiveness against Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. (Fusarium solani var. coeruleum), and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis on artificial growth media. The chemical composition of the oils was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth of Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was

Dimitra J Daferera; Basil N Ziogas; Moschos G Polissiou

2003-01-01

161

Draft Genome Sequences of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis bv. venerealis Strain B6 and bv. intermedius Strain 642-21.  

PubMed

Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis is an important venereal pathogen. We sequenced the genomes of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis bv. venerealis strain B6 and bv. intermedius strain 642-21. The genetic variability of these Australian strains will facilitate the study of mechanisms of geographical adaptation of these pathogens that impact livestock. PMID:25278524

Barrero, Roberto A; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Indjein, Léa; Venus, Bronwyn; Keeble-Gagnère, Gabriel; Power, John; Bellgard, Matthew I; Lew-Tabor, Ala E

2014-01-01

162

Complete Genome Sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis Strain DSM46306, a Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen of Grasses  

PubMed Central

We announce the complete genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis, a vascular pathogen of Bermuda grass. The species also comprises Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, a sugarcane pathogen. Since these two subspecies have genome sequences available, a comparative analysis will contribute to our understanding of the differences in their biology and host specificity. PMID:24201198

Zerillo, Marcelo Marques; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Kitajima, Joao Paulo

2013-01-01

163

Copper tolerance in the macrolichens Cladonia furcata and Cladina arbuscula subsp. mitis is constitutive rather than inducible  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we assessed the degree of copper (Cu) tolerance in two common lichen species (Cladonia furcata and Cladina arbuscula subsp. mitis) that grow on both uncontaminated substrata and the surface of waste heaps from abandoned old Cu-mines. Regardless of their locality, populations of these lichens contain identical strains of photobionts (Asterochloris clade A in C. arbuscula subsp. mitis

Martin Ba?kor; Evelin Ramóna Péli; Ivana Vantová

2011-01-01

164

Draft Genome Sequences of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis bv. venerealis Strain B6 and bv. intermedius Strain 642-21  

PubMed Central

Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis is an important venereal pathogen. We sequenced the genomes of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis bv. venerealis strain B6 and bv. intermedius strain 642-21. The genetic variability of these Australian strains will facilitate the study of mechanisms of geographical adaptation of these pathogens that impact livestock. PMID:25278524

Barrero, Roberto A.; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Indjein, Lea; Venus, Bronwyn; Keeble-Gagnere, Gabriel; Power, John

2014-01-01

165

Culture and Serologic Survey for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection among Southeastern White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

From July 1998 through October 2002, radiometric culture (ileocecal lymph node, mesenteric lymph node, and feces) and serologic testing by enzyme-linked immunosor- bent assay (ELISA) were used to survey white- tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from the southeastern United States for infection by My- cobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Mptb), the causative agent of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease). Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was

William R. Davidson; Elizabeth J. B. Manning; Victor F. Nettles; D. B. Warnell

166

Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk?  

PubMed Central

Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies in this study appear to be good starter candidates. PMID:21666023

Fernandez, Elena; Alegria, Angel; Delgado, Susana; Martin, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

2011-01-01

167

Complete Genome Sequences of Virulent Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strains F38 and ILRI181  

PubMed Central

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a severe epidemic affecting mainly domestic Caprinae species but also affects wild Caprinae species. M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae belongs to the “Mycoplasma mycoides cluster.” The disease features prominently in East Africa, in particular Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. CCPP also endangers wildlife and thus affects not only basic nutritional resources of large populations but also expensively built-up game resorts in affected countries. Here, we report the complete sequences of two M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains: the type strain F38 and strain ILRI181 isolated druing a recent outbreak in Kenya. Both genomes have a G+C content of 24% with sizes of 1,016,760 bp and 1,017,183 bp for strains F38 and ILRI181, respectively. PMID:25323717

Liljander, Anne; Schieck, Elise; Gluecks, Ilona; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

2014-01-01

168

Complete Genome Sequences of Virulent Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strains F38 and ILRI181.  

PubMed

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a severe epidemic affecting mainly domestic Caprinae species but also affects wild Caprinae species. M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae belongs to the "Mycoplasma mycoides cluster." The disease features prominently in East Africa, in particular Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. CCPP also endangers wildlife and thus affects not only basic nutritional resources of large populations but also expensively built-up game resorts in affected countries. Here, we report the complete sequences of two M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains: the type strain F38 and strain ILRI181 isolated druing a recent outbreak in Kenya. Both genomes have a G+C content of 24% with sizes of 1,016,760 bp and 1,017,183 bp for strains F38 and ILRI181, respectively. PMID:25323717

Falquet, Laurent; Liljander, Anne; Schieck, Elise; Gluecks, Ilona; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

2014-01-01

169

Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. dhakensis Isolated from Feces, Water and Fish in Mediterranean Spain  

PubMed Central

Eight Aeromonas hydrophila-like arabinose-negative isolates from diverse sources (i.e., river freshwater, cooling-system water pond, diseased wild European eels, and human stools) sampled in Valencia (Spain) during 2004–2005, were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and extensive biochemical testing along with reference strains of most Aeromonas species. These isolates and all reference strains of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis and A. aquariorum showed a 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 99.8–100%, and they all shared an identical phenotype. This matched exactly with that of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis since all strains displayed positive responses to the Voges-Prokauer test and to the use of dl-lactate. This is the first report of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis recovered from environmental samples, and further, from its original isolation in India during 1993–1994. This was accurately identified and segregated from other clinical aeromonads (A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, A. caviae, A. veronii biovars veronii and sobria, A. trota, A. schubertii and A. jandaei) by using biochemical key tests. The API 20 E profile for all strains included in A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis was 7047125. The prevalence of this species in Spanish sources was higher for water (9.4%) than for feces (6%) or eels (1.3%). Isolates recovered as pure cultures from diseased eels were moderately virulent (LD50 of 3.3×106 CFU fish?1) to challenged eels in experimental trials. They were all resistant to ticarcillin, amoxicillin-clavuranic acid, cefoxitin, and imipenem, regardless of its source. Our data point to A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis as an emerging pathogen for humans and fish in temperate countries. PMID:22472298

Esteve, Consuelo; Alcaide, Elena; Blasco, Maria Dolores

2012-01-01

170

Oral immunoadjuvant activity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei in dextran-fed layer chickens.  

PubMed

We recently reported that synbiotic Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei together with specific substrate dextran elicited an enhancement in humoral immune response against bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model antigen in BALB/c mice. The present study was designed to evaluate the oral immunoadjuvant effects of the synbiotic in layer chickens. Using a PCR assay, L. casei subsp. casei was detected specifically in the intestinal chyme of chickens (10 d of age, Julia strain) fed ad libitum on a diet supplemented with 75 mg dextran/kg (dextran-supplemented diet, DSD) and administered orally with 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU) L. casei subsp. casei in 0.1 ml PBS with the aid of an intubation needle at 1, 2 and 3 d of age. Furthermore, oral administration of 10(7) CFU L. casei subsp. casei at 1-3 d of age significantly enhanced the production of anti-BSA antibody in DSD-fed chickens (60 d of age) administered orally with 1 mg BSA at 32 and 33 d of age and subcutaneously with 5 microg BSA at 33 d of age. In addition, among bacterial numbers tested, 10(6) CFU L. casei subsp. casei together with dextran induced an effective increase in humoral immune response to mixed inactivated vaccines against Newcastle disease and avian infectious bronchitis, and the treatment may be advantageous in protecting against these infectious diseases in chickens in actual application. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of L. casei subsp. casei with dextran leads to immunomodulation of humoral immune responses. PMID:16469163

Ogawa, Tomohiko; Asai, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yasuda, Kenji

2006-02-01

171

Persistence and recycling of bioinsecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores in contrasting environments: evidence from field monitoring and laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

Sprays of commercial preparations of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis are widely used for the control of mosquito larvae. Despite an abundant literature on B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis field efficiency on mosquito control, few studies have evaluated the fate of spores in the environment after treatments. In the present article, two complementary experiments were conducted to study the effect of different parameters on B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis persistence and recycling, in field conditions and in the laboratory. First, we monitored B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis persistence in the field in two contrasting regions in France: the Rhône-Alpes region, where mosquito breeding sites are temporary ponds under forest cover with large amounts of decaying leaf matter on the ground and the Mediterranean region characterized by open breeding sites such as brackish marshes. Viable B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores can persist for months after a treatment, and their quantity is explained both by the vegetation type and by the number of local treatments. We found no evidence of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis recycling in the field. Then, we tested the effect of water level, substrate type, salinity and presence of mosquito larvae on the persistence/recycling of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores in controlled laboratory conditions (microcosms). We found no effect of change in water level or salinity on B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis persistence over time (75 days). B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores tended to persist longer in substrates containing organic matter compared to sand-only substrates. B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis recycling only occurred in presence of mosquito larvae but was unrelated to the presence of organic matter. PMID:24402370

Duchet, Claire; Tetreau, Guillaume; Marie, Albane; Rey, Delphine; Besnard, Gilles; Perrin, Yvon; Paris, Margot; David, Jean-Philippe; Lagneau, Christophe; Després, Laurence

2014-04-01

172

Characterization of Free Exopolysaccharides Secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides  

PubMed Central

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS), also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical ?(1?>6)-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan) and associated with an antigenic switch constitutes a finely tuned mechanism that may be involved in virulence. PMID:23869216

Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Tardy, Florence; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Gaurivaud, Patrice

2013-01-01

173

Reproductive biology of the andromonoecious Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae) is cultivated in many African regions for its edible kernels used as a soup thickener. The plant, an annual, andromonoecious, trailing-vine species, is of high social, cultural and economic value for local communities. In order to improve the yield of this crop, the first step and our aim were to elucidate its breeding system. Methods Eight experimental pollination treatments were performed during three growing seasons to assess spontaneous selfing, self-compatibility and effects of pollen source (hermaphroditic vs. male flowers). Pollination success was determined by pollen tube growth and reproductive success was assessed by fruit, seed and seedling numbers and characteristics. The pollinator guild was surveyed and the pollination distance determined both by direct observations and by indirect fluorescent dye dispersal. Key Results The species is probably pollinated by several Hymenoptera, principally by Hypotrigona para. Pollinator flight distances varied from 25 to 69 cm. No evidence for apomixis or spontaneous self-pollination in the absence of insect visitors was found. The self-fertility index (SFI = 0) indicated a total dependence on pollinators for reproductive success. The effects of hand pollination on fruit set, seed number and seedling fitness differed among years. Pollen tube growth and reproductive success did not differ between self- and cross-pollinations. Accordingly, a high self-compatibility index for the fruit set (SCI = 1·00) and the seed number (SCI = 0·98) and a low inbreeding depression at all developmental stages (cumulative ? = 0·126) suggest a high selfing ability. Finally, pollen origin had no effect on fruit and seed sets. Conclusions This andromonoecious species has the potential for a mixed mating system with high dependence on insect-mediated pollination. The selfing rate through geitonogamy should be important. PMID:19671577

Kouonon, Leonie C.; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Zoro Bi, Arsene I.; Bertin, Pierre; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Dje, Yao

2009-01-01

174

Seroepidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii infection in California coyotes, 1994-1998.  

PubMed

The prevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in coyotes (Canis latrans) in California ranged from 51% in central to 34% in southern and 7% in northern California. Seropositive coyotes were more likely to be from coastal than inland counties (p clustered distribution of Bartonella seropositivity in coyotes suggests that B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii infection is vectorborne. Further investigation is warranted to evaluate which arthropods are vectors and what the mode of transmission is from wildlife to domestic dogs and possibly humans. PMID:10511529

Chang, C; Yamamoto, K; Chomel, B B; Kasten, R W; Simpson, D C; Smith, C R; Kramer, V L

1999-01-01

175

Essential oil composition of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae - Periplocoideae).  

PubMed

The essential oil of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae) from Lampedusa Island was obtained by hydrodistillation and its composition was analysed. The analyses allowed the identification and quantification of 64 volatile compounds belonging to different classes. The most abundant compounds were nonacosane, heptacosane, hentriacontane and ?-cadinene. Among the volatile compounds identified in the fruits of P. laevigata subsp. angustifolia, 31 are present in other taxa of Apocynaceae, 19 have antimicrobial activity and four are pheromones for the butterfly Danaus chrysippus. The possible ecological role of the volatile compounds found is briefly discussed. PMID:21859258

Zito, Pietro; Sajeva, Maurizio; Bruno, Maurizio; Maggio, Antonella; Rosselli, Sergio; Senatore, Felice; Formisano, Carmen

2011-08-01

176

Genome-Wide DNA Microarray Analysis of Francisella tularensis Strains Demonstrates Extensive Genetic Conservation within the Species but Identifies Regions That Are Unique to the Highly Virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Francisella tularensis is a potent pathogen and a possible bioterrorism agent. Little is known, however, to ex- plain the molecular basis for its virulence and the distinct differences in virulence found between the four rec- ognized subspecies, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. holarc- tica, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida. We developed a DNA microarray

Martien Broekhuijsen; Par Larsson; Anders Johansson; Mona Bystrom; Ulla Eriksson; Eva Larsson; Richard G. Prior; Anders Sjostedt; Richard W. Titball; Mats Forsman; TNO Prins

2003-01-01

177

Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils of Different Parts of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. excelsa and J. excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan (Cupressaceae)  

PubMed Central

The essential oils of branchlets and fruits of Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa and Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos were examined for their antioxidant activity. The compositions of the essential oils were studied by GC and GC-MS. To evaluation the antioxidants activity of the volatile oils, pure components and positive controls at different concentrations, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) screening methods, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, deoxyribose degradation test and modified deoxyribose degradation test were employed. The results of the present study demonstrate some antioxidant activity for the tested essential oils obtained from various parts of both plants. It indicates that the use of these essential oils, in very low concentrations, may be useful as a natural preservative. However before any final conclusion, it is suggested that the antioxidant activity of these oils should also be evaluated by using lipid solvent system methods. PMID:24250416

Emami, Sayyed Ahmad; Abedindo, Bibi Fatemeh; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

2011-01-01

178

Physical and genetic map of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 chromosome: comparison with that of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL 1403 reveals a large genome inversion.  

PubMed Central

A physical and genetic map of the chromosome of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris reference strain MG1363 was established. The physical map was constructed for NotI, ApaI, and SmaI enzymes by using a strategy that combines creation of new rare restriction sites by the random-integration vector pRL1 and ordering of restriction fragments by indirect end-labeling experiments. The MG1363 chromosome appeared to be circular and 2,560 kb long. Seventy-seven chromosomal markers were located on the physical map by hybridization experiments. Integration via homologous recombination of pRC1-derived plasmids allowed a more precise location of some lactococcal genes and determination of their orientation on the chromosome. The MG1363 chromosome contains six rRNA operons; five are clustered within 15% of the chromosome and transcribed in the same direction. Comparison of the L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 physical map with those of the two L. lactis subsp. lactis strains IL1403 and DL11 revealed a high degree of restriction polymorphism. At the genetic organization level, despite an overall conservation of gene organization, strain MG1363 presents a large inversion of half of the genome in the region containing the rRNA operons. PMID:7751295

Le Bourgeois, P; Lautier, M; van den Berghe, L; Gasson, M J; Ritzenthaler, P

1995-01-01

179

Multilocus sequence analysis of Vibrio tapetis, the causative agent of Brown Ring Disease: description of Vibrio tapetis subsp. britannicus subsp. nov.  

PubMed

Vibrio tapetis is the causative agent of an epizootic infection described in adult clams called Brown Ring Disease (BRD). The isolation of the pathogen from different hosts showed strain variability both at serological and genetic level, allowing the description of three major groups related to the host origin of the isolates. In this work we performed for the first time a phylogenetic study for this pathogen. When including the closest related Vibrio species, all strains of V. tapetis appeared as a robust monophyletic cluster in the trees generated from all genes studied, namely 16S rRNA, atpA, fstZ, gapA, pyrH, recA, rpoA and rpoD and topA, as well as from their concatenated sequences. On the other hand, V. tapetis strains appeared clearly separated in two main clusters, sharing a similarity percentage for the concatenated sequences from 95 to 95.2% and values of DDH between 65.5 and 79.8%. Both clusters are themselves variable, with isolates within each cluster grouped according their host origin. The two clusters are easily distinguishable for their capacity to produce acid from mannitol and arabinose and for the use of citrate. Therefore, the results obtained supported the existence of two subspecies within this pathogen for which the names V. tapetis subsp. tapetis and V. tapetis subsp. britannicus subsp. nov. are proposed. PMID:23394813

Balboa, Sabela; Romalde, Jesús L

2013-05-01

180

Bioprocessing of some agro-industrial residues for endoglucanase production by the new subsp.; Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J  

PubMed Central

The use of low cost agro-industrial residues for the production of industrial enzymes is one of the ways to reduce significantly production costs. Cellulase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil and decayed agricultural wastes. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-J, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties, together with 16S rDNA sequence. It is proposed that strain NEAE-J should be included in the species Streptomyces albogriseolus as a representative of a novel sub-species, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J and sequencing product was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number JN229412. This organism was tested for its ability to produce endoglucanase and release reducing sugars from agro-industrial residues as substrates. Sugarcane bagasse was the most suitable substrate for endoglucanase production. Effects of process variables, namely incubation time, temperature, initial pH and nitrogen source on production of endoglucanase by submerged fermentation using Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus have been studied. Accordingly optimum conditions have been determined. Incubation temperature of 30 °C after 6 days, pH of 6.5, 1% sugarcane bagasse as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source were found to be the optimum for endoglucanase production. Optimization of the process parameters resulted in about 2.6 fold increase in the endoglucanase activity. Therefore, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus coud be potential microorganism for the intended application.

El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Abdelwahed, Nayera A.M.; Saber, Wesam I.A.; Mohamed, Asem A.

2014-01-01

181

Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis Vatr1 and Vatr2 transcriptional regulators are required for virulence in tomato.  

PubMed

The plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a gram-positive bacterium responsible for wilt and canker disease of tomato. Although disease development is well characterized and diagnosed, molecular mechanisms of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis virulence are poorly understood. Here, we identified and characterized two C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis transcriptional regulators, Vatr1 and Vatr2, that are involved in pathogenicity of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Vatr1 and Vatr2 belong to TetR and MocR families of transcriptional regulators, respectively. Mutations in their corresponding genes caused attenuated virulence, with the ?vatr2 mutant showing a more dramatic effect than ?vatr1. Although both mutants grew well in vitro and reached a high titer in planta, they caused reduced wilting and canker development in infected plants compared with the wild-type bacterium. They also led to a reduced expression of the ethylene-synthesizing tomato enzyme ACC-oxidase compared with wild-type C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and to reduced ethylene production in the plant. Transcriptomic analysis of wild-type C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and the two mutants under infection-mimicking conditions revealed that Vatr1 and Vatr2 regulate expression of virulence factors, membrane and secreted proteins, and signal-transducing proteins. A 70% overlap between the sets of genes positively regulated by Vatr1 and Vatr2 suggests that these transcriptional regulators are on the same molecular pathway responsible for C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis virulence. PMID:24940988

Savidor, Alon; Chalupowicz, Laura; Teper, Doron; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Barash, Isaac; Sessa, Guido

2014-10-01

182

Whole-Genome Sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Strains Isolated from Agricultural Sources.  

PubMed

We report the draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strain CVM42234, isolated from chick feed in 2012, and S. Cubana strain 76814, isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 bp, respectively. PMID:24459266

Benahmed, Faiza H; Gopinath, Gopal R; Wang, Hua; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Grim, Christopher; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; McClelland, Michael; Ayers, Sherry; Abbott, Jason; Desai, Prerak; Frye, Jonathan G; Weinstock, George; Hammack, Thomas S; Hanes, Darcy E; Rasmussen, Mark A; Davidson, Maureen K

2014-01-01

183

Complete Genome Sequences of 16 Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis  

PubMed Central

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important zoonotic food-borne pathogen causing serious human illnesses frequently linked to poultry products. Here, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 16 S. Enteritidis strains with common pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage types (8, 13, 13a, and 14b) that predominate in North America. PMID:24762938

Rehman, Muhammad A.; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Ross, Ashley; Al-Lami, Mariam; Boerlin, Patrick; Chui, Linda; Devenish, John; Bekal, Sadjia; Graham, Morag; Amoako, Kingsley K.

2014-01-01

184

EFFECT OF REMOVAL OF THE CYTOLYTIC FACTOR OF 'BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS' SUBSP. 'ISRAELENSIS' ON MOSQUITO TOXICITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Solubilized crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was fractionated by affinity chromotography using a monoclonal antibody directed against the crystal's 28 kDa peptide. The 28 kDa peptide ws found to be relatively nontoxic to mosquito larvae although it doe...

185

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS AND FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS RAFINESQUE, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. ortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 x 10 6 to 6.5 x 10 6 CFU/ml with bo...

186

Draft Genome Sequence of the Flagellated Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans Strain CFBP 4884.  

PubMed

We report the draft genome sequence of the flagellated strain CFBP 4884 of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans, which was isolated in an outbreak of common bacterial blight of beans along with non-flagellated strains. Comparative genomics will allow one to decipher the genomic diversity of strains cohabiting in epidemics. PMID:25291773

Indiana, A; Briand, M; Arlat, M; Gagnevin, L; Koebnik, R; Noël, L D; Portier, P; Darrasse, A; Jacques, M A

2014-01-01

187

Genome sequence of the enterobacterial phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and characterization of virulence factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae is notable for its well studied human pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, Shigella, and Escherichia spp. However, it also contains several plant pathogens. We report the genome sequence of a plant pathogenic enterobacterium, Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) strain SCRI1043, the causative agent of soft rot and blackleg potato diseases. Approximately 33% of Eca genes are not

K. S. Bell; M. Sebaihia; L. Pritchard; M. T. G. Holden; L. J. Hyman; M. C. Holeva; N. R. Thomson; S. D. Bentley; L. J. C. Churcher; K. Mungall; R. Atkin; N. Bason; K. Brooks; T. Chillingworth; K. Clark; J. Doggett; A. Fraser; Z. Hance; H. Hauser; K. Jagels; S. Moule; H. Norbertczak; D. Ormond; C. Price; M. A. Quail; M. Sanders; D. Walker; S. Whitehead; G. P. C. Salmond; P. R. J. Birch; J. Parkhill; I. K. Toth

2004-01-01

188

Assessing potato tubers for susceptibility to bacterial soft rot ( erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica )  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory method is described of assessing the susceptibility of tubers to soft rot (Erwinia carotovora subsp.atroseptica). A bacterial suspension is placed in a hole drilled into the tuber cortex, the weighed tubers are placed in damp airtight boxes that are then gassed with nitrogen and incubated for 5 days at 25°C. The rotted tissue is washed out and the

W. F. Bourne; D. C. McCalmont; R. L. Wastie

1981-01-01

189

Isolation and characterisation of transposon-induced mutants of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica exhibiting reduced virulence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blackleg pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) causes an economically important disease of potatoes. We selected a genetically amenable Eca strain for the genetic analysis of virulence. Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate nine mutants which exhibited reduced virulence (Rvi-) of strain SCRI1043. Following physiological characterisation, mutants were divided into three classes: (1) auxotrophs; (2) extracellular enzyme mutants; and

Jay C. D. Hinton; Julie M. Sidebotham; Lizbeth J. Hyman; Michel C. M. Pérombelon; George P. C. Salmond

1989-01-01

190

The germination characteristics of a population of Zannichellia palustris subsp. pedicellata  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the germination characteristics of Zannichellia palustris L. subsp. pedicellata (Wahlemb. et Rosen) Hegi seeds collected from a population along the margin of the Orbetello Lagoon (Tuscany, Italy) was examined. The effect of variations in duration of seed after-ripening and environmental parameters such as light, temperature and culture medium salinity on germination was assessed. In addition, germination ability

Tiziana Lombardi; Stefano Bedini; Antonino Onnis

1996-01-01

191

Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Free-Ranging Birds and Mammals on Livestock Premises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract

Joseph L. Corn; Elizabeth J. B. Manning; Srinand Sreevatsan; John R. Fischer

2005-01-01

192

Essential oil composition of Tanacetum vulgare subsp. siculum (Guss.) Raimondo et Spadaro (Asteraceae) from Sicily.  

PubMed

Ninety-four components of the essential oils from aerial parts and capitula of Tanacetum vulgare subsp. siculum (Guss.) Raimondo et Spadaro were detected. Alpha-Thujone, beta-thujone and 1,8-cineole were the main constituents of the oils. The analysis allows the assignment of this Tanacetum species to the thujone chemotype. PMID:19476007

Formisano, Carmen; Senatore, Felice; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Bellone, Gabriella; Spadaro, Vivienne

2009-04-01

193

Rocket Immunoelectrophoresis of the Entomocidal Parasporal Crystal of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki†  

PubMed Central

Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to quantitate the soluble parasporal crystal of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The method described is rapid, reliable, specific, and extremely accurate, and it can be used to measure crystal toxin in commercial microbial insecticides that contain a mixture of spores, vegetative cells, and carrier materials. Images PMID:16345656

Andrews, R. E.; Iandolo, J. J.; Campbell, B. S.; Davidson, L. I.; Bulla, L. A.

1980-01-01

194

Complete Genome Sequence of the Quality Control Strain Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923 is commonly used as a control strain for susceptibility testing to antibiotics and as a quality control strain for commercial products. We present the completed genome sequence for the strain, consisting of the chromosome and a 27.5-kb plasmid. PMID:25377701

Treangen, Todd J.; Maybank, Rosslyn A.; Enke, Sana; Friss, Mary Beth; Diviak, Lynn F.; Karaolis, David K. R.; Koren, Sergey; Ondov, Brian; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.

2014-01-01

195

Mosquito larvicidal activity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis  

E-print Network

Mosquito larvicidal activity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing toxin genes from Bacillus and the regulatory P20 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were introduced into the nitrogen by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Mosquitocidal Anabaena; N-Endotoxin; Bacillus thuringiensis

Zaritsky, Arieh

196

The nucleotide sequence of a carboxymethylcellulase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for one of the carboxymethycellulases (CMCase), expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, has been determined. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame, commencing with an ATG start codon, of 2886 base pairs followed by a TAA stop codon. The gene was shown to code for a signal peptide which closely

Judith Hall; Harry J. Gilbert

1988-01-01

197

Molecular Evidence of Perinatal Transmission of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae to a Child?  

PubMed Central

Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella henselae, or DNA of both organisms was amplified and sequenced from blood, enrichment blood cultures, or autopsy tissues from four family members. Historical and microbiological results support perinatal transmission of Bartonella species in this family. It is of clinical relevance that Bartonella spp. may adversely influence human reproductive performance. PMID:20392912

Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Maggi, Ricardo G.; Farmer, Peter; Mascarelli, Patricia E.

2010-01-01

198

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in a Patient with HIV, Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne disease in ruminants, has been incriminated as the cause of Crohn disease in humans. We report the first case of human infection with MAP in a patient with HIV; infection was confirmed by obtaining isolates from several different specimen types.

Elvira Richter; Johannes Wessling; Norbert Lügering; Wolfram Domschke; Sabine Rüsch-Gerdes

199

Genome Sequence of the Persistent Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Senftenberg Strain SS209  

PubMed Central

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Senftenberg is an emerging serotype in poultry production which has been found to persist in animals and the farm environment. We report the genome sequence and annotation of the SS209 strain of S. Senftenberg, isolated from a hatchery, which was identified as persistent in broiler chickens. PMID:22493197

Boumart, Zineb; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Helene; Gendrault, Annie; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Chemaly, Marianne; Velge, Philippe

2012-01-01

200

Intraspecific variability of the essential oil of Calamintha nepeta subsp. nepeta from Southern Italy (Apulia).  

PubMed

The essential oil of 46 spontaneous plants of Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi subsp. nepeta growing wild in Sud, Italy (Salento, Apulia), were investigated by GC/MS. Fifty-seven components were identified in the oil representing over the 98% of the total oil composition. Four chemotypes were identified: piperitone oxide, piperitenone oxide, piperitone-menthone and pulegone. PMID:22646908

Negro, C; Notarnicola, S; De Bellis, L; Miceli, A

2013-03-01

201

Novel mutations in TLR genes cause hyporesponsiveness to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Toll like receptors (TLR) play the central role in the recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Mutations in the TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 genes may change the ability to recognize PAMPs and cause altered responsiveness to the bacterial pathogens. RESULTS: The study presents association between TLR gene mutations and increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection.

Mangesh R Bhide; Rastislav Mucha; Ivan Mikula Jr; Lucia Kisova; Rostislav Skrabana; Michal Novak

2009-01-01

202

Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have

Daniel Garrido; Jae Han Kim; J. Bruce German; Helen E. Raybould; David A. Mills; Vladimir Uversky

2011-01-01

203

Mycobacterium avium Subsp. avium Infection in Four Veal Calves: Differentiation from Intestinal Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (Maa) is an intracellular pathogen belonging to the Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC). Reservoirs of MAC are the natural environment, wildlife and domestic animals. In adult bovine, MAC infections are typically caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map). Maa infections in bovine are rarely reported but may cause clinical disease and pathological lesions similar to those observed in paratuberculosis or those induced by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Therefore, differentiation of MAC from MTBC infection should be attempted, especially if unusual mycobacterial lesions are encountered. Four veal calves from a fattening farm dying with clinical signs of otitis media, fever, and weight loss were submitted for necropsy. Samples from affected organs were taken for histologic investigation, bacteriologic culture, and bacterial specification using PCR. Macroscopic thickening of the intestinal mucosa was induced by granulomatous enteritis and colitis. Intracytoplasmic acid-fast bacteria were detected by Ziehl-Neelsen stains and PCR revealed positive results for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Clinical and pathological changes of Maa infection in veal calves had features of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and the MTBC. Therefore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection should be considered in cases of granulomatous enteritis in calves. PMID:24689051

Rossier, Christophe; Baehler, Corinne; Schmitt, Sarah

2014-01-01

204

Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR  

EPA Science Inventory

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne?s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn?s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne?s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

205

Draft Genome Sequence of the Flagellated Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans Strain CFBP 4884  

PubMed Central

We report the draft genome sequence of the flagellated strain CFBP 4884 of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans, which was isolated in an outbreak of common bacterial blight of beans along with non-flagellated strains. Comparative genomics will allow one to decipher the genomic diversity of strains cohabiting in epidemics. PMID:25291773

Indiana, A.; Briand, M.; Arlat, M.; Gagnevin, L.; Koebnik, R.; Noel, L. D.; Portier, P.; Darrasse, A.

2014-01-01

206

Development and application of a multilocus sequence typing scheme for Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus.  

PubMed

Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (formerly known as S. bovis biotype I) is a commensal of the gastrointestinal tract in animals and in up to 15% of healthy humans. Furthermore, it is a facultative pathogen that can cause infectious endocarditis, mastitis, and septicemia. The number of infections is increasing, but the transmission routes and zoonotic potential remain unknown. To assess the zoonotic potential and characterize the epidemiological structure of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, we established a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. We amplified and sequenced internal fragments of seven housekeeping genes. The resulting sequences were analyzed with BioNumerics software 6.6 by using the unweighted-pair group method using average linkages algorithm. A total of 101 S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strains isolated from animals, humans, and environmental samples were analyzed and divided into 50 sequence types. Our first results highlight the importance of this MLST scheme for investigating the epidemiology, transmission patterns, and infection chains of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. PMID:24789199

Dumke, J; Hinse, D; Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

2014-07-01

207

An IS 900-like sequence found in a Mycobacterium sp. other than Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The insertion sequence IS900 has been considered specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) and has, therefore, been used as the target gene for diagnostic PCR of M. paratuberculosis. From a healthy dairy cow we have isolated and characterised a mycobacterium harbouring one copy of a sequence with 94% identity to IS900 at the nucleic acid level. The isolate

Stina Englund; Göran Bölske; Karl-Erik Johansson

2002-01-01

208

Chemical, antifungal and cytotoxic evaluation of the essential oil of Thymus zygis subsp. sylvestris  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several Thymus species are used since olden times in traditional medicine, due to recognized therapeutic properties, namely the antimicrobial activity of their essential oils. In the present study we evaluated the composition and the antifungal activity (MIC and MLC) of four type oils obtained from Thymus zygis subsp. sylvestris, an Iberian endemic Lamiaceae, against yeasts, dermatophyte and Aspergillus strains. Moreover,

M. J. Gonçalves; M. T. Cruz; C. Cavaleiro; M. C. Lopes; L. Salgueiro

2010-01-01

209

Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain  

PubMed Central

Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity. PMID:25278529

Oliveira, Leticia C.; Saraiva, Tessalia D. L.; Soares, Siomar C.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Sa, Pablo H. C. G.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Miranda, Fabio; Freire, Matheus; Renan, Wendel; Junior, Alberto F. O.; Santos, Anderson R.; Pinto, Anne C.; Souza, Bianca M.; Castro, Camila P.; Diniz, Carlos A. A.; Rocha, Clarissa S.; Mariano, Diego C. B.; de Aguiar, Edgar L.; Folador, Edson L.; Barbosa, Eudes G. V.; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Goncalves, Lucas A.; Guimaraes, Luis C.; Azevedo, Marcela; Agresti, Pamela C. M.; Silva, Renata F.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Almeida, Sintia S.; Hassan, Syed S.; Pereira, Vanessa B.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Pereira, Ulisses P.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Pereira, Felipe L.; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C. P.; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson

2014-01-01

210

Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain  

PubMed Central

Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; King, Jordon C. K.; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

2014-01-01

211

Function and Protective Capacity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious syphilis, caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, remains a public health concern worldwide. The immune-response evasion mechanisms employed by T. pallidum are poorly under- stood, and prior attempts to identify immunoprotective antigens for subsequent vaccine design have been unsuc- cessful. Previous investigations conducted in our laboratory identified the T. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase as a potential immunoprotective

CAROLINE E. CAMERON; CHRISTA CASTRO; SHEILA A. LUKEHART; WESLEY C. VAN VOORHIS

1998-01-01

212

Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain.  

PubMed

Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

Giacani, Lorenzo; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L; King, Jordon C K; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

2014-01-01

213

Broad Conservation of Milk Utilization Genes in Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis as Revealed by Comparative Genomic Hybridization ? †  

PubMed Central

Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are the third-largest solid component of milk. Their structural complexity renders them nondigestible to the host but liable to hydrolytic enzymes of the infant colonic microbiota. Bifidobacteria and, frequently, Bifidobacterium longum strains predominate the colonic microbiota of exclusively breast-fed infants. Among the three recognized subspecies of B. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis achieves high levels of cell growth on HMOs and is associated with early colonization of the infant gut. The B. longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 genome features five distinct gene clusters with the predicted capacity to bind, cleave, and import milk oligosaccharides. Comparative genomic hybridizations (CGHs) were used to associate genotypic biomarkers among 15 B. longum strains exhibiting various HMO utilization phenotypes and host associations. Multilocus sequence typing provided taxonomic subspecies designations and grouped the strains between B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. longum. CGH analysis determined that HMO utilization gene regions are exclusively conserved across all B. longum subsp. infantis strains capable of growth on HMOs and have diverged in B. longum subsp. longum strains that cannot grow on HMOs. These regions contain fucosidases, sialidases, glycosyl hydrolases, ABC transporters, and family 1 solute binding proteins and are likely needed for efficient metabolism of HMOs. Urea metabolism genes and their activity were exclusively conserved in B. longum subsp. infantis. These results imply that the B. longum has at least two distinct subspecies: B. longum subsp. infantis, specialized to utilize milk carbon, and B. longum subsp. longum, specialized for plant-derived carbon metabolism. PMID:20802066

LoCascio, Riccardo G.; Desai, Prerak; Sela, David A.; Weimer, Bart; Mills, David A.

2010-01-01

214

Effect of Three Factors in Cheese Production (pH, Salt, and Heat) on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Viability  

PubMed Central

Low pH and salt are two factors contributing to the inactivation of bacterial pathogens during a 60-day curing period for cheese. The kinetics of inactivation for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains ATCC 19698 and Dominic were measured at 20°C under different pH and NaCl conditions commonly used in processing cheese. The corresponding D values (decimal reduction times; the time required to kill 1 log10 concentration of bacteria) were measured. Also measured were the D values for heat-treated and nonheated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 50 mM acetate buffer (pH 5.0, 2% [wt/vol] NaCl) and a soft white Hispanic-style cheese (pH 6.0, 2% [wt/vol] NaCl). Samples were removed at various intervals until no viable cells were detected using the radiometric culture method (BACTEC) for enumeration of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. NaCl had little or no effect on the inactivation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and increasing NaCl concentrations were not associated with decreasing D values (faster killing) in the acetate buffer. Lower pHs, however, were significantly correlated with decreasing D values of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the acetate buffer. The D values for heat-treated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ATCC 19698 in the cheese were higher than those predicted by studies done in acetate buffer. The heat-treated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains had lower D values than the nonheated cells (faster killing) both in the acetate buffer (pH 5, 2% [wt/vol] NaCl) and in the soft white cheese. The D value for heat-treated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ATCC 19698 in the cheese (36.5 days) suggests that heat treatment of raw milk coupled with a 60-day curing period will inactivate about 103 cells of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml. PMID:10742208

Sung, Nackmoon; Collins, Michael T.

2000-01-01

215

Regulation of the production of extracellular pectinase, cellulase, and protease in the soft rot bacterium Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora: evidence that aepH of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 activates gene expression in E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, and Escherichia coli.  

PubMed Central

The production of pectolytic enzymes (pectate lyase [Pel] and polygalacturonase [Peh]), cellulase (Cel), and protease (Prt) is activated in the soft rot bacterium Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora by aepA (activator of extracellular protein production) and celery extract (Y. Liu, H. Murata, A. Chatterjee, and A. K. Chatterjee, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 6:299-308, 1993). We recently isolated a new class of mutants of strain E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 which overproduces Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt. From the overproducing strain AC5034, we identified an activator locus, designated aepH*, which stimulated Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt production in E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 or its derivatives. The nucleotide sequence of the aepH* DNA segment revealed an open reading frame of 141 bp that could encode a small (5.45-kDa) highly basic (pI 11.7) protein of 47 amino acid residues. Analyses of deletions and MudI insertions indicated that the activator function required the 508-bp DNA segment which contains this open reading frame. The wild-type locus, aepH+, is localized within a DNA segment upstream of aepA. An AepH- strain constructed by exchanging aepH+ with aepH*::MudI was deficient in Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt production; exoenzyme production was restored upon the introduction of a plasmid carrying aepH+ or aepH*. Plasmids carrying either aepH+ or aepH* activated the production of Pel-1, Peh-1, and Cel in Escherichia coli HB101 carrying the cognate genes. The aepH effect in E. coli was due to the activation of transcription, as indicated by assays of pel-1 and peh-1 mRNAs. The aepH+ and aepH* plasmids also stimulated Pel, Peh, Cel, and Prt production in other wild-type E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains as well as in E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica. Although the stimulatory effect was generally more pronounced with aepH* than with aepH+, the extent of activation in the wild-type strains depended upon the bacterial strain and the growth medium. Southern blot hybridization revealed the presence of aepH homologs in E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, and provided physical evidence for linkage between aepA and aepH homologs in genomes of these bacteria. We conclude that aepH-mediated activation of exoprotein gene expression is a feature common to most strains of E. carotovora. Images PMID:7944360

Murata, H; Chatterjee, A; Liu, Y; Chatterjee, A K

1994-01-01

216

Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Free-Ranging Birds and Mammals on Livestock Premises  

PubMed Central

Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants (“7,5”) appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock. PMID:16269731

Corn, Joseph L.; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R.

2005-01-01

217

Induction of B Cell Responses upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis ?  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to determine if experimental infection of neonatal calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis would invoke changes in the percentages of total B cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell population and of subpopulations of B cells as determined by CD5, CD25, and CD45RO markers during a 12-month period. Experimental infection groups included control (noninfected), oral (infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10), oral/DXM (pretreatment with dexamethasone before oral inoculation), i.p. (intraperitoneal inoculation), and oral/M (oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from a cow with clinical disease) groups. Over the course of the study, the percentages of total B cells in nonstimulated and antigen-stimulated cell cultures increased for oral and i.p. group calves, with the highest percentages noted at 3 and 6 months. Oral/M group calves had increased percentages of activated B cells, as determined by CD5dim and CD5bright markers, at 9 and 12 months. Experimental infection by all methods resulted in increased expression of CD25+ and CD45RO+ B cells early in the study, but the most significant results were observed at 12 months for oral/DXM and oral/M group calves. Immunoblot analyses with a whole-cell sonicate of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis demonstrated the most reactivity with sera from i.p. group calves and the least reactivity with sera from oral group calves. Further evidence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody responses in the i.p. group calves was demonstrated using the ethanol vortex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EvELISA) method. In summary, an induction of B cell responses was noted after experimental infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, with differences in responses noted according to the method of experimental inoculation. PMID:21543587

Stabel, J. R.; Bannantine, J. P.; Eda, Shigetoshi; Robbe-Austerman, S.

2011-01-01

218

Microbiology of controlled rotting of egusi ( Colocynthis citrullus L.) fruits for the harvesting of the seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microorganisms isolated from naturally rotting egusi fruits which are used as a source of dietary seeds, were mainly bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis, B. polymyxa, B. megaterium, B. pumilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, La. brevis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. cloacae, Klebsiella aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Micrococcus and Candida spp. The rotting period of egusi fruits could be decreased

J. A. N. Obeta; C. Abriba

1994-01-01

219

NMR spectroscopic analysis of exopolysaccharides produced by Leuconostoc citreum and Weissella confusa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dextrans are the main exopolysaccharides produced by Leuconostoc species. Other dextran-producing lactic acid bacteria include Streptococci, Lactobacilli, and Weissella species. Commercial production and structural analysis has focused mainly on dextrans from Leuconostoc species, particularly on Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains. In this study, we used NMR spectroscopy techniques to analyze the structures of dextrans produced by Leuconostoc citreum E497 and Weissella confusa

Ndegwa Henry Maina; Maija Tenkanen; Hannu Maaheimo; Riikka Juvonen; Liisa Virkki

2008-01-01

220

Evaluation of meat born lactic acid bacteria as protective cultures for the biopreservation of cooked meat products  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, 91 strains, originating from meat products, were subjected to a step-by-step screening and characterisation to search for potential protective cultures to be used in the cooked cured meat industry. Strains were first tested on their homofermentative and psychrotrophic character and salt tolerance. Secondly, the antibacterial capacities towards Listeria monocytogenes, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc carnosum and Brochotrix thermosphacta were

L. Vermeiren; F. Devlieghere; J. Debevere

2004-01-01

221

Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antihypertensive effect of fermented milk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Milk was fermented with a total of 25 lactic acid bacteria to assay in vitro inhibitory activity towards angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE). The tested strains belonged to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lacobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus. raffinolactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris. The ACE inhibitory potencies of theses strains varied and

Anne Pihlanto; Tarja Virtanen; Hannu Korhonen

2010-01-01

222

Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

2013-01-01

223

Changes in transcription profiles reflect strain contributions to defined cultures of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris during milk fermentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cheddar cheese production uses mixed starters composed of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains with complementary or competing enzymatic activity. However, strain interactions within the same subspecies are difficult\\u000a to investigate by conventional microbiological methods. This study uses fluorescent RNA arbitrarily primed PCR (FRAP-PCR)\\u000a to analyze the association of three L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains (LL074, LL225, and LL390 with proteinase

Fabien Dachet; Denis Roy; Gisèle LaPointe

224

Contrasting Results of Culture-Dependent and Molecular Analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Wood Bison  

PubMed Central

Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations. PMID:23686265

De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

2013-01-01

225

Selection of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria from fermented olives by in vitro tests.  

PubMed

The present study aims to evaluate the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from naturally fermented olives and select candidates to be used as probiotic starters for the improvement of the traditional fermentation process and the production of newly added value functional foods. Seventy one (71) lactic acid bacterial strains (17 Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 1 Ln. pseudomesenteroides, 13 Lactobacillus plantarum, 37 Lb. pentosus, 1 Lb. paraplantarum, and 2 Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei) isolated from table olives were screened for their probiotic potential. Lb. rhamnosus GG and Lb. casei Shirota were used as reference strains. The in vitro tests included survival in simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions, antimicrobial activity (against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7), Caco-2 surface adhesion, resistance to 9 antibiotics and haemolytic activity. Three (3) Lb. pentosus, 4 Lb. plantarum and 2 Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains demonstrated the highest final population (>8 log cfu/ml) after 3 h of exposure at low pH. The majority of the tested strains were resistant to bile salts even after 4 h of exposure, while 5 Lb. plantarum and 7 Lb. pentosus strains exhibited partial bile salt hydrolase activity. None of the strains inhibited the growth of the pathogens tested. Variable efficiency to adhere to Caco-2 cells was observed. This was the same regarding strains' susceptibility towards different antibiotics. None of the strains exhibited ?-haemolytic activity. As a whole, 4 strains of Lb. pentosus, 3 strains of Lb. plantarum and 2 strains of Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei were found to possess desirable in vitro probiotic properties similar to or even better than the reference probiotic strains Lb. casei Shirota and Lb. rhamnosus GG. These strains are good candidates for further investigation both with in vivo studies to elucidate their potential health benefits and in olive fermentation processes to assess their technological performance as novel probiotic starters. PMID:23200662

Argyri, Anthoula A; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Karatzas, Kimon-Andreas G; Tsakalidou, Effie; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Tassou, Chrysoula C

2013-04-01

226

[Detection of bacteriophages of siphoviridae family in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora].  

PubMed

It was established that the polylysogenic phage system of culture Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora 91P includes: a) defective bacteriophages of Myoviridae family, which are displayed as macromolecular carotovoricins b) valuable highly unstable temperate phage, which can be attributed to the family Myoviridae, and which, perhaps, is an analogue of phage ZF40 [6], and c) resistant to osmotic shock temperate phage of family Siphoviridae. This phage, called TIRI, consists of isometric head 50 nm in diameter and a rigid tail structure 203 nm long. A characteristic feature of the phage tail is an evident transverse striation, which is also indicative for the tail-like particle of the defective temperate phage of the strain 48A-7/4b. In general, the phage system of E carotovora subsp. carotovora is similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa with its R- and F-bacteriocins, and phages of the families Myoviridae and Siphoviridae. PMID:22308753

Ivanitsa, T V; Tovkach, F I

2011-01-01

227

Insertion and amplification of foreign genes in the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis chromosome.  

PubMed Central

The plasmid pE194 is unable to replicate in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (formerly Streptococcus lactis). When linked to resident bacteriophage sequences, pE194 was able to integrate into the L. lactis subsp. lactis chromosome either by Campbell-like recombination or by double crossing over with deletion. Integration occurred into the DNA of the prophage and prevented its multiplication. When a selective pressure was applied to an integrant in which pE194 was flanked by two direct repeats of prophage fragment, amplification of pE194 and the prophage fragment was observed. The pE194 copy number was assessed at six to nine, and amplification was stable upon growth under nonselective conditions. Images PMID:2504115

Chopin, M C; Chopin, A; Rouault, A; Galleron, N

1989-01-01

228

Genomic Diversity of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora and Its Correlation with Virulence  

PubMed Central

We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the genomic diversity of the enterobacterial plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. The results obtained with each method showed that E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains isolated from one ecological niche, potato plants, are surprisingly diverse compared to related pathogens. A comparison of 23 partial mdh sequences revealed a maximum pairwise difference of 10.49% and an average pairwise difference of 2.13%, values which are much greater than the maximum variation (1.81%) and average variation (0.75%) previously reported for Escherichia coli. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of I-CeuI-digested genomic DNA revealed seven rrn operons in all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora strains examined except strain WPP17, which had only six copies. We identified 26 I-CeuI restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns and observed significant polymorphism in fragment sizes ranging from 100 to 450 kb for all strains. We detected large plasmids in two strains, including the model strain E. carotovora subsp. carotovora 71. The two least virulent strains had an unusual chromosomal structure, suggesting that a particular pulsotype is correlated with virulence. To compare chromosomal organization of multiple enterobacterial genomes, several genes were mapped onto I-CeuI fragments. We identified portions of the genome that appear to be conserved across enterobacteria and portions that have undergone genome rearrangements. We found that the least virulent strain, WPP17, failed to oxidize cellobiose and was missing several hrp and hrc genes. The unexpected variability among isolates obtained from clonal hosts in one region and in one season suggests that factors other than the host plant, potato, drive the evolution of this common environmental bacterium and key plant pathogen. PMID:15128563

Yap, Mee-Ngan; Barak, Jeri D.; Charkowski, Amy O.

2004-01-01

229

Novel phytases from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697.  

PubMed

Two novel phytases have been characterized from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The enzymes belong to a new subclass within the histidine acid phytases, are highly specific for the hydrolysis of phytate, and render myo-inositol triphosphate as the final hydrolysis product. They represent the first phytases characterized from this group of probiotic microorganisms, opening the possibilities for their use in the processing of high-phytate-content foods. PMID:22582052

Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Sanz-Penella, Juan Mario; Yebra, María J; Monedero, Vicente; Haros, Monika

2012-07-01

230

Novel Phytases from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697  

PubMed Central

Two novel phytases have been characterized from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The enzymes belong to a new subclass within the histidine acid phytases, are highly specific for the hydrolysis of phytate, and render myo-inositol triphosphate as the final hydrolysis product. They represent the first phytases characterized from this group of probiotic microorganisms, opening the possibilities for their use in the processing of high-phytate-content foods. PMID:22582052

Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Sanz-Penella, Juan Mario; Yebra, María J.

2012-01-01

231

Complete genome sequence of a plant associated bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCMB5033.  

PubMed

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCMB5033 is of special interest for its ability to promote host plant growth through production of stimulating compounds and suppression of soil borne pathogens by synthesizing antibacterial and antifungal metabolites or priming plant defense as induced systemic resistance. The genome of B. amyloliquefaciens UCMB5033 comprises a 4,071,167 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 3,912 protein-coding genes, 86 tRNA genes and 10 rRNA operons. PMID:25197456

Niazi, Adnan; Manzoor, Shahid; Bejai, Sarosh; Meijer, Johan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

2014-06-15

232

Characterization of the Highly Autolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Strains CO and 2250  

PubMed Central

Two highly autolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains (CO and 2250) were selected and analyzed for their autolytic properties. Both strains showed maximum lysis when grown in M17 broth containing a limiting concentration of glucose (0.4 to 0.5%) as the carbohydrate source. Lysis did not vary greatly with pH or temperature but was reduced when strains were grown on lactose or galactose. Growth in M17 containing excess glucose (1%) prevented autolysis, although rapid lysis of L. lactis subsp. cremoris CO did occur in the presence of 1% glucose if sodium fluoride (an inhibitor of glycolysis) was added to the medium. Maximum cell lysis in a buffer system was observed early in the stationary phase, and for CO, two pH optima were observed for log-phase and stationary-phase cells (6.5 and 8.5, respectively). Autolysins were extracted from the cell wall fraction of each strain by using either 4% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, or 4 M lithium chloride, and their activities were analyzed by renaturing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on gels containing Micrococcus luteus or L. lactis subsp. cremoris CO cells as the substrate. More than one lytic band was observed on each substrate, with the major band having an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa for CO. Each lytic band was present throughout growth and lysis. These results suggest that at least two different autolytic enzymes are present in the autolytic L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains. The presence of the lactococcal cell wall hydrolase gene, acmA (G. Buist, J. Kok, K. J. Leenhouts, M. Dabrowska, G. Venema, and A. J. Haandrikman, J. Bacteriol. 177:1554-1563, 1995), in strains 2250 and CO was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Analysis of an acmA deletion mutant of 2250 confirmed that the gene was involved in cell separation and had a role in cell lysis. PMID:16535702

Riepe, H. R.; Pillidge, C. J.; Gopal, P. K.; Mckay, L. L.

1997-01-01

233

Avian wildlife reservoir of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni, Yersinia spp., and Salmonella spp. in Norway.  

PubMed

Cloacal swabs from 540 wild-living birds were cultured for Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni, Yersinia spp., and Salmonella spp. The carrier rates detected were as follows: C. fetus subsp. jejuni, 28.4%; Yersinia spp., 1.2%; and Salmonella spp., 0.8%. All birds were apparently healthy when captured. C. fetus subsp. jejuni was isolated from 11 of the 40 bird species examined. Among birds inhabiting the city of Oslo, the highest isolation rate was found in crows (Corvus corone cornix) (89.8%), followed by gulls (Larus spp.) (50.0%) and domestic pigeons (Columba livia domesticus) (4.2%). The gulls and crows scavenge on refuse dumps. High carrier rates were also detected among the following birds from nonurban, coastal areas: puffin (Fratercula arctica) (51.3%), common tern (Sterna hirundo) (5.6%), common gull (Larus canus) (18.9%), black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) (13.2%), and herring gull (Larus argentatus) (4.2%). The list of species harboring C. fetus subsp. jejuni also includes the Ural owl (Strix uralensis), goldeneye (Bucephala clangula), and reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus). The following five Yersinia strains were isolated: Y. kristensenii (two strains), Y. intermedia (two strains), and "Yersinia X2" (one strain). Four strains belonging to the genus Salmonella were isolated from three different species of gulls. These isolates were identified as S. typhimurium, S. indiana, and S. djugu. The results indicate that campylobacters are a normal component of the intestinal flora in several bird species, whereas Salmonella and Yersinia carriers are more sporadic. PMID:6338824

Kapperud, G; Rosef, O

1983-02-01

234

[The characteristic of the colispecific bacteriocins of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora Ec153].  

PubMed

It has been shown for the first time that macromolecular carotovoricins from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora Ec153 strain are active to Escherichia coli and posses endonuclease activity. It has been established that 19.1% of strains isolated from the patients are sensitive to these bacteriocins. The type and the form of these particles have been also determined and they show resemblance with phage objects. PMID:19938602

Krylova, E D; Tovkach, F I

2009-01-01

235

Mapping of the chromosome of bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2  

SciTech Connect

Two Hfr-like donor strains of bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) 3-2 were developed by integration into the chromosome of the conjugative plasmid R471a via homology with transposon Tn9. Using these and two donor strains created earlier, we constructed the genetic map of a fragment of the chromosome of strain Eca 3-2. The location of 14 loci is shown in this map. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Nikolaichik, E.A.; Pesnyakevich, A.G. [Belarussian State Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

1995-07-01

236

Resistance of tubers from different potato cultivars to soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechanically harvested tubers of 14 potato cultivars grown on both loamy sand and silt loam soils were evaluated for resistance\\u000a to bacterial soft rot caused byErwinia carotovora subsp.atroseptica. Cultivars were also assayed for calcium and dry matter content to determine possible correlations with soft rot resistance.\\u000a \\u000a Resistance of potato tubers to bacterial soft rot was assayed after harvest by inoculating

Kuo-Ching Tzeng; Raymond G. McGuire; Arthur Kelman

1990-01-01

237

Complete Genome Sequence of Type Strain Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida ATCC 43137  

PubMed Central

Soft-tissue infection by Pasteurella multocida in humans is usually associated with a dog- or cat-related injury, and these infections can become aggressive. We sequenced the type strain P. multocida subsp. multocida ATCC 43137 into a single closed chromosome consisting of 2,271,840 bp (40.4% G+C content), which is currently available in the NCBI GenBank under the accession number CP008918. PMID:25342682

Davenport, K. W.; Daligault, H. E.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Frey, K. G.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Lo, C. C.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.; Scholz, M. B.; Teshima, H.

2014-01-01

238

Experimental Paratuberculosis in Calves following Inoculation with a Rabbit Isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of wildlife species in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis has been the subject of increased research efforts following the discovery of natural paratuberculosis in free-living rabbits from farms in east Scotland. This paper describes the experimental inoculation of young calves with an isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from a free-living rabbit. After a 6-month incubation period, all

P. M. Beard; K. Stevenson; A. Pirie; K. Rudge; D. Buxton; S. M. Rhind; M. C. Sinclair; L. A. Wildblood; D. G. Jones; J. M. Sharp

2001-01-01

239

Characterization of the Highly Autolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Strains CO and 2250  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two highly autolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains (CO and 2250) were selected and analyzed for their autolytic properties. Both strains showed maximum lysis when grown in M17 broth containing a limiting concentration of glucose (0.4 to 0.5%) as the carbohydrate source. Lysis did not vary greatly with pH or temperature but was reduced when strains were grown on lactose

HEIDI R. RIEPE; CHRISTOPHER J. PILLIDGE; PRAMOD K. GOPAL; LARRY L. MCKAY

240

Hydraulic redistribution in Eucalyptus kochii subsp. borealis with variable access to fresh groundwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salinity caused by land clearing is an important cause of land degradation in the Western Australian wheatbelt. Returning\\u000a a proportion of the cleared land to higher water use perennial vegetation is one option for reducing or slowing the salinisation\\u000a of land. Over the course of a year patterns of water use by Eucalyptus kochii subsp borealis (C. Gardner) D. Nicolle,

K. Brooksbank; D. A. White; E. J. Veneklaas; J. L. Carter

2011-01-01

241

Bilateral polyploidization in Dactylis glomerata L. subsp. lusitanica : occurrence, morphological and genetic characteristics of first polyploids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary InDactylis glomerata L. subsp.lusitanica, triploid and tetraploid plants were obtained by bilateral sexual polyploidization in crosses between diploid parents known to produce 2n gametes. The polyploid and diploid progeny were compared for allozyme diversity (allele number and heterozygosity), phenological (pollen fertility, inflorescence emergence date), cellular (stomatic cell size) and morphological characters (vegetative biomass, seed weight, total seed number per

F. Bretagnolle; R. Lumaret

1995-01-01

242

Antioxidant and antiproliferative activity of Hypericum hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson essential oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to assess the antioxidant and antiproliferative potential of the essential oil of Hypericum hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson. Analysis of the oil composition revealed that sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (69.3%) dominate, cis-?-guaiene, ?-selinene and (E)-caryophyllene being the most representative. Significant values of antioxidant activity were found using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2?-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assays.

Luana Quassinti; Giulio Lupidi; Filippo Maggi; Gianni Sagratini; Fabrizio Papa; Sauro Vittori; Armandodoriano Bianco; Massimo Bramucci

2012-01-01

243

Zur Cytotaxonomie von Veronica chamaedrys L., I.: subsp. vindobonensis M. Fischer , eine neue, diploide Sippe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Außer typischerVeronica chamaedrys L. findet sich in Österreich eine Sippe mit deutlich dichterer und kürzerer Behaarung der Sepalen, meist merklich tiefer eingeschnittenen Laubblättern, immer rein zweizeiliger Behaarung der Hauptachse und hellblauen, seltener rosa Blüten. Diese Sippe wurde auf Grund ihrer diploiden Chromosomenzahl (2 n=16) entdeckt und wird alsVeronica chamaedrys L. subsp.vindobonensis M.Fischer\\u000a neu beschrieben. Sie wächst nur an trocken-warmen Standorten

Manfred Fischer

1970-01-01

244

Complete Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis KLDS4.0325  

PubMed Central

We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis KLDS4.0325, a probiotic bacterium isolated from homemade koumiss in Xinjiang, China. We have determined the complete genome sequence of strain KLDS4.0325, which consists of a chromosome and three plasmids and reveals genes that are likely to be involved in dairy fermentation and that have probiotic qualities. PMID:24285665

Yang, Xiaochun; Wang, Yutang

2013-01-01

245

An ultrastructural study of the mature spermatozoid of the fern Asplenium trichomanes L. subsp. trichomanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asplenium trichomanes L. subsp. trichomanes spermatozoids are spirals of about five turns. Keels link the elements of the microtubular ribbon with the plates of the lamellar\\u000a layer (LL) which are uninterrupted, parallel and curved with an inner angle of about 150. Electron-opaque filaments connect\\u000a the microtubules of the multilayered structure (MLS) and the osmiophilic crest, the LL and the MLS-associated

P. Gori; Simonetta Muccifora; Sheridan L. Woo; Lorenza M. Bellani

1997-01-01

246

MglA Regulates Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida (Francisella novicida) Response to Starvation and Oxidative Stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

MglA is a transcriptional regulator of genes that contribute to the virulence of Francisella tularensis, a highly infectious pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. This study used a label-free shotgun proteomics method to determine the F. tularensis subsp. novicida (F. novicida) proteins that are regulated by MglA. The differences in relative protein amounts between wild-type F. novicida and the

Tina Guina; Dragan Radulovic; Arya J. Bahrami; Diana L. Bolton; Laurence Rohmer; Kendan A. Jones-Isaac; Jinzy Chen; Larry A. Gallagher; Byron Gallis; Soyoung Ryu; Greg K. Taylor; Mitchell J. Brittnacher; Colin Manoil; David R. Goodlett

2007-01-01

247

Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in tissue samples of cattle and buffaloes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue samples were collected at random from cattle (Bos taurus) and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) from an abattoir of the district of Lahore and were analyzed for the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis through acid-fast staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Body condition of animals and diarrhea were recorded. Most\\u000a of the animals were emaciated. Diarrhea was

Farhan Anwar Khan; Zafar Iqbal Chaudhry; Muhammad Ijaz Ali; Shahid Khan; Naima Mumtaz; Ijaz Ahmad

2010-01-01

248

Isolation, Characterization, and Identification of Bacteria Associated with the Zinc Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens subsp. Calaminaria  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated bacterial populations associated with the Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens subsp. calaminaria grown in a soil collected from an abandoned Zn-Pb mine and smelter in Plombières, Belgium. The bacterial population of the nonrhizospheric soil consisted of typical soil bacteria, some exhibiting multiple heavy-metal resistance characteristics that often are associated with polluted substrates: 7.8% and 4% of the population survived

C. Lodewyckx; M. Mergeay; J. Vangronsveld; H. Clijsters; D. Van Der Lelie

2002-01-01

249

Citrate Cycle Intermediates in the Metabolism of Aspartate and Lactate by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.  

PubMed

Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii metabolized 7 mol of aspartate to 6 mol of succinate, 4 mol of CO(2), and 7 mol of ammonia. When lactate, sparged with 100% CO(2), was fermented at pH 5.5, unexpectedly high ratios of propionate to acetate were obtained (i.e., 3.2 to 3.8:1). Citrate cycle intermediates may be involved in these fermentations. PMID:16347477

Crow, V L

1987-10-01

250

Genetic and biochemical characterization of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus produces exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which play a role in the rheological properties of fermented food products. Lb. bulgaricus Lfi5 produces a high-molecular-weight EPS composed of galactose, glucose, and rhamnose in the molar ratio 5:1:1. An 18-kb DNA region containing 14 genes, designated epsA to epsN, was isolated by genomic DNA library screening and inverted PCR. The predicted

Gilbert Thierry Lamothe; Laure Jolly; Beat Mollet; Francesca Stingele

2002-01-01

251

Complete Genome Sequence of Type Strain Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida ATCC 43137.  

PubMed

Soft-tissue infection by Pasteurella multocida in humans is usually associated with a dog- or cat-related injury, and these infections can become aggressive. We sequenced the type strain P. multocida subsp. multocida ATCC 43137 into a single closed chromosome consisting of 2,271,840 bp (40.4% G+C content), which is currently available in the NCBI GenBank under the accession number CP008918. PMID:25342682

Davenport, K W; Daligault, H E; Minogue, T D; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Lo, C C; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Scholz, M B; Teshima, H; Johnson, S L

2014-01-01

252

Proximate composition and technological properties of fresh blackthorn ( Prunus spinosa L. subsp dasyphylla (Schur.)) fruits  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the chemical and physical properties of blackthorn (Prunus spinosa subsp. dasyphlla (Schur.)) fruits growing wild in Konya province were determined. Proximate analysis such as dry matter, crude oil, crude protein, crude fibre, crude energy, ash, water-soluble and alcohol-soluble extract, pH and acid and mineral contents were established in this work. Al, B, Ca, K, Mg, Na, P

Derya Arslan; Musa Özcan

2005-01-01

253

Ingestion and Adsorption of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Gammarus lacustris in the Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Several groups of Gammarus lacustris adults were exposed to solutions containing 0.5 and 5.0 mg of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis per liter for 1- or 24-h periods by using traditional static bioassay exposure procedures. During a postexposure holding period, fecal pellets were removed and plated on tryptic soy agar to determine B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spore content. The experiments verified that traditional exposure procedures assure ingestion of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores and provided a mean dose estimate of 1,948 spores ingested per test animal with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 891 to 4,296 (1-h exposure, 5.0 mg/liter). It was also found that dose level is highly dependent upon both exposure duration and concentration and that relatively short exposures can result in a relatively long-term retention of spores postexposure (?30 days). Body burden experiments established that large numbers of spores adsorb to the bodies of test animals during exposure and may in part explain the long-term retention of spores in the test system postexposure. These results imply that in field applications of microbial control agents, toxicologically unaffected but exposed organisms might transport the agent to untreated sites, expanding the effective treatment area and the number of organisms exposed. PMID:16347242

Brazner, John C.; Anderson, Richard L.

1986-01-01

254

Ingestion and Adsorption of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Gammarus lacustris in the Laboratory.  

PubMed

Several groups of Gammarus lacustris adults were exposed to solutions containing 0.5 and 5.0 mg of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis per liter for 1- or 24-h periods by using traditional static bioassay exposure procedures. During a postexposure holding period, fecal pellets were removed and plated on tryptic soy agar to determine B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spore content. The experiments verified that traditional exposure procedures assure ingestion of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores and provided a mean dose estimate of 1,948 spores ingested per test animal with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 891 to 4,296 (1-h exposure, 5.0 mg/liter). It was also found that dose level is highly dependent upon both exposure duration and concentration and that relatively short exposures can result in a relatively long-term retention of spores postexposure (>/=30 days). Body burden experiments established that large numbers of spores adsorb to the bodies of test animals during exposure and may in part explain the long-term retention of spores in the test system postexposure. These results imply that in field applications of microbial control agents, toxicologically unaffected but exposed organisms might transport the agent to untreated sites, expanding the effective treatment area and the number of organisms exposed. PMID:16347242

Brazner, J C; Anderson, R L

1986-12-01

255

Genetic Variability and Population Structure of Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes (Hamamelidaceae) Based on AFLP Analysis.  

PubMed

Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes is an endangered species in China. Genetic diversity and structure analysis of this species was investigated using amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. Nei's gene diversity ranged from 0.1290 to 0.1394. The AMOVA indicated that 75.06% of variation was distributed within populations, while the between-group component 5.04% was smaller than the between populations-within-group component 19.90%. Significant genetic differentiation was detected between populations. Genetic and geographical distances were not correlated. PCA and genetic structure analysis showed that populations from East China were together with those of the Nanling Range. These patterns of genetic diversity and levels of genetic variation may be the result of D. c. subsp. longipes restricted to several isolated habitats and "excess flowers production, but little fruit set". It is necessary to protect all existing populations of D. c. subsp. longipes in order to preserve as much genetic variation as possible. PMID:25250583

Yu, Yi; Fan, Qiang; Shen, Rujiang; Guo, Wei; Jin, Jianhua; Cui, Dafang; Liao, Wenbo

2014-01-01

256

Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology  

PubMed Central

In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at ?18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

2013-01-01

257

Survival and Dormancy of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Environment  

PubMed Central

The survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was studied by culture of fecal material sampled at intervals for up to 117 weeks from soil and grass in pasture plots and boxes. Survival for up to 55 weeks was observed in a dry fully shaded environment, with much shorter survival times in unshaded locations. Moisture and application of lime to soil did not affect survival. UV radiation was an unlikely factor, but infrared wavelengths leading to diurnal temperature flux may be the significant detrimental component that is correlated with lack of shade. The organism survived for up to 24 weeks on grass that germinated through infected fecal material applied to the soil surface in completely shaded boxes and for up to 9 weeks on grass in 70% shade. The observed patterns of recovery in three of four experiments and changes in viable counts were indicative of dormancy, a hitherto unreported property of this taxon. A dps-like genetic element and relA, which are involved in dormancy responses in other mycobacteria, are present in the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome sequence, providing indirect evidence for the existence of physiological mechanisms enabling dormancy. However, survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the environment is finite, consistent with its taxonomic description as an obligate parasite of animals. PMID:15128561

Whittington, Richard J.; Marshall, D. Jeff; Nicholls, Paul J.; Marsh, Ian B.; Reddacliff, Leslie A.

2004-01-01

258

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 cleaves allergenic peptides of ?-lactoglobulin.  

PubMed

Whey, a cheese by-product used as a food additive, is produced worldwide at 40.7 million tons per year. ?-Lactoglobulin (BLG), the main whey protein, is poorly digested and is highly allergenic. We aimed to study the contribution of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 to BLG digestion and to analyse its ability to degrade the main allergenic sequences of this protein. Pre-hydrolysis of BLG by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 increases digestion of BLG assayed by an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal system. Moreover, peptides from hydrolysis of the allergenic sequences V41-K60, Y102-R124, C121-L140 and L149-I162 were found when BLG was hydrolysed by this strain. Interestingly, peptides possessing antioxidant, ACE inhibitory, antimicrobial and immuno-modulating properties were found in BLG degraded by both the Lactobacillus strain and digestive enzymes. To conclude, pre-hydrolysis of BLG by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 has a positive effect on BLG digestion and could diminish allergenic reactions. PMID:25306364

Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira M; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela

2015-03-01

259

New Type of Antimicrobial Protein Produced by the Plant Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis  

PubMed Central

It has previously been shown that the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis secretes a 14-kDa protein, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis AMP-I (CmmAMP-I), that inhibits growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the causal agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. Using sequences obtained from tryptic fragments, we have identified the gene encoding CmmAMP-I and we have recombinantly produced the protein with an N-terminal intein tag. The gene sequence showed that CmmAMP-I contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide for Sec-dependent secretion. The recombinant protein was highly active, with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of approximately 10 pmol, but was not toxic to potato leaves or tubers. CmmAMP-I does not resemble any known protein and thus represents a completely new type of bacteriocin. Due to its high antimicrobial activity and its very narrow inhibitory spectrum, CmmAMP-1 may be of interest in combating potato ring rot disease. PMID:23851100

Liu, Zhanliang; Ma, Ping; Holtsmark, Ingrid; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

2013-01-01

260

Antigenic and Genetic Characterization of Lipoprotein LppQ from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC  

PubMed Central

Lipoprotein LppQ, a predominant 48-kDa antigen, and its corresponding gene, lppQ, were characterized in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, the etiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. The lppQ gene is specific to M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and was found in the type strain and in field strains isolated in Europe, Africa, and Australia, as well as in vaccinal strains. LppQ is encoded as a precursor with a consensus sequence for prokaryotic signal peptidase II and a lipid attachment site. The leader sequence shows significant prominent transmembrane helix structure with a predicted outside-to-inside helix formation capacity. The N-terminal domain of the mature LppQ was shown to be surface exposed. It induced a strong, specific, early, and persistent immune response in naturally and experimentally infected animals. The C-terminal domain of LppQ possesses an integral membrane structure built up of repeated units, rich in hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids, which have a pore formation potential. A recombinant peptide representing the N-terminal domain of LppQ was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of nine Mycoplasma-specific TGA (Trp) codons into universal TGG (Trp) codons and expression in Escherichia coli hosts. It was used for serodetection of cattle infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, in which it was detected postinfection for significantly longer than conventional serological test reactions. PMID:10882657

Abdo, El-Mostafa; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

2000-01-01

261

Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas Rafinesque, under Laboratory Conditions  

PubMed Central

Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. Mortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 × 106 to 6.5 × 106 CFU/ml with both formulations was attributed to severe dissolved oxygen depletion due to formulation ingredients rather than to direct toxicity from the parasporal crystal. No adverse effects were observed at 6.4 × 105 CFU/ml and below. Fathead minnows rapidly accumulated high numbers of spores with 1 h of exposure to 2.2 × 105 CFU of Mosquito Attack per ml, producing whole-body counts of 4.0 × 106 CFU per fish. Comparison of counts on gastrointestinal tract samples and whole-body samples and high numbers of spores in feces indicated that ingestion was the major route of exposure. B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spore counts decreased rapidly after transfer of fish to clean water, with a drop of over 3 orders of magnitude in 1 day. Spores were rarely detected in fish after 8 days but were detectable in feces for over 2 weeks. These findings suggest that fish could influence the dissemination of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, and possibly other microbial agents, in the aquatic environment. PMID:16348271

Snarski, Virginia M.

1990-01-01

262

Genetic Variability and Population Structure of Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes (Hamamelidaceae) Based on AFLP Analysis  

PubMed Central

Disanthus cercidifolius subsp. longipes is an endangered species in China. Genetic diversity and structure analysis of this species was investigated using amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. Nei's gene diversity ranged from 0.1290 to 0.1394. The AMOVA indicated that 75.06% of variation was distributed within populations, while the between-group component 5.04% was smaller than the between populations-within-group component 19.90%. Significant genetic differentiation was detected between populations. Genetic and geographical distances were not correlated. PCA and genetic structure analysis showed that populations from East China were together with those of the Nanling Range. These patterns of genetic diversity and levels of genetic variation may be the result of D. c. subsp. longipes restricted to several isolated habitats and “excess flowers production, but little fruit set”. It is necessary to protect all existing populations of D. c. subsp. longipes in order to preserve as much genetic variation as possible. PMID:25250583

Yu, Yi; Fan, Qiang; Shen, Rujiang; Guo, Wei; Jin, Jianhua; Cui, Dafang; Liao, Wenbo

2014-01-01

263

Expression and characterization of the periplasmic cobalamin-binding protein of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida.  

PubMed

Abstract Cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) is an essential cofactor in a variety of enzymatic reactions and most prokaryotes contain transport systems to import vitamin B(12). A gene coding for a periplasmic cobalamin-binding protein of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida was identified by in silico analysis of sequences from a genomic library. The open reading frame was composed of 834 bp encoding a protein of 277 amino acids. The protein showed 61% identity with the vitamin B(12)-binding protein precursor of P. profundum, 53% identity with the corresponding protein of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 43% identity with the periplasmic binding protein BtuF of Escherichia coli. The expression of the native protein was investigated in P. damselae subsp. piscicida, but BtuF was weakly expressed under normal conditions. To characterize the BtuF of P. damselae subsp. piscicida, the recombinant protein was expressed with a C-terminal His(6)-tag and purified; the molecular weight was estimated to be approximately 30 kDa. The protein does not contain any free thiol group, consistent with the view that the two cysteine residues are involved in a disulphide bond. The purified BtuF binds cyanocobalamin with an affinity constant of 6 +/- 2 microm. PMID:19490395

Boiani, R; Andreoni, F; Serafini, G; Bianconi, I; Pierleoni, R; Dominici, S; Gorini, F; Magnani, M

2009-09-01

264

Developing microbial spoilage population in vacuum-packaged charcoal-broiled European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).  

PubMed

Microbiological and sensory changes in vacuum-packaged charcoal-broiled river lampreys from three lamprey processing plants were monitored as a function of time at 8 degrees C. The lampreys were examined every 7 days up to 8 weeks for aerobic plate count (APC) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The highest mean APC and LAB were 6.01 log CFU/g and 4.86 log CFU/g, respectively. Only 6 out of 15 lots reached an APC value of 7.0 log CFU/g during storage. The sensory scores remained at the baseline levels after 8 weeks' storage. Twenty-seven isolates were randomly picked from MRS agar and identified to species level using a 16S and 23S rDNA HindIII RFLP (ribotyping) database and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene if no database match was obtained. Twelve of the 27 isolates were identified as Lactobacillus curvatus subsp. curvatus, and two Leuconostoc mesenteroides and one Weissella halotolerans strain were also detected. Twelve isolates were not identified by the LAB database. However, they possessed very high (99.9%) 16S gene sequence similarity with either Staphylococcus warneri or Staphylococcus pasteuri type strains. The LAB detected, with the exception of W. halotolerans, have commonly been associated with spoilage of fishery products, but in these vacuum-packaged lampreys, they were not the dominant organisms within the developing spoilage population. PMID:15862876

Merivirta, Lauri O; Koort, Joanna M K; Kivisaari, Meija; Korkeala, Hannu; Björkroth, K Johanna

2005-05-25

265

Co-culture experiments demonstrate the usefulness of Lactobacillus sakei 10A to prolong the shelf-life of a model cooked ham.  

PubMed

This study investigated the usefulness of two selected lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus sakei subsp. carnosus (10A) and the lactocin S producing L. sakei 148 (LS5), to extend the shelf-life of cooked meat products. The interaction between these potential protective cultures and the spoilage organisms, Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM4) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (BT1), were examined in co-culture studies on a model cooked ham product at 7 degrees C under vacuum packaged conditions. Furthermore, the influence of the glucose content of the model cooked ham on the interaction phenomena was investigated. When artificially contaminating the model cooked ham with BT1 at 10(2) cfu/g in combination with 10A at 10(5) cfu/g, the growth of BT1 was significantly slower compared to a simultaneous mono-culture experiment. In a similar experiment with LM4, LM4 reached a level of 10(7) cfu/g +/-14 days later when LM4 grew together with 10A compared to its growth in mono-culture. The lactocin S producing LS5 did not demonstrate an inhibitory action towards LM4 or BT1 and is therefore not useful as protective culture on cooked meat products. The glucose level of the model cooked ham had no influence on the observed antagonistic interactions of 10A towards LM4 or BT1, indicating that the action of the biopreservative 10A in cooked meat products is independent of the substrate glucose. PMID:16380186

Vermeiren, L; Devlieghere, F; Debevere, J

2006-04-15

266

Effect of Soil Slope on the Appearance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Water Running off Grassland Soil after Application of Contaminated Slurry  

PubMed Central

The study assessed the effect of soil slope on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transport into rainwater runoff from agricultural soil after application of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry. Under field conditions, 24 plots of undisturbed loamy soil 1 by 2 m2 were placed on platforms. Twelve plots were used for water runoff: 6 plots at a 3% slope and 6 plots at a 15% slope. Half of the plots of each slope were treated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry, and half were not treated. Using the same experimental design, 12 plots were established for soil sampling on a monthly basis using the same spiked slurry application and soil slopes. Runoff following natural rainfall was collected and analyzed for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, coliforms, and turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected in runoff from all plots treated with contaminated slurry and one control plot. A higher slope (15%) increased the likelihood of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detection but did not affect the likelihood of finding coliforms. Daily rainfall increased the likelihood that runoff would have coliforms and the coliform concentration, but it decreased the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentration in the runoff. When there was no runoff, rain was associated with increased M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations. Coliform counts in runoff were related to runoff turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis presence/absence, however, was related to turbidity. Study duration decreased bacterial detection and concentration. These findings demonstrate the high likelihood that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in slurry spread on pastures will contaminate water runoff, particularly during seasons with high rainfall. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis contamination of water has potential consequences for both animal and human health. PMID:23542616

Alfaro, M.; Salazar, F.; Troncoso, E.; Mitchell, R. M.; Ramirez, L.; Naguil, A.; Zamorano, P.; Collins, M. T.

2013-01-01

267

Novel Feature of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Highlighted by Characterization of the Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Adhesin  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis comprises two genotypically defined groups, known as the cattle (C) and sheep (S) groups. Recent studies have reported phenotypic differences between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis groups C and S, including growth rates, infectivity for macrophages, and iron metabolism. In this study, we investigated the genotypes and biological properties of the virulence factor heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) for both groups. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, HBHA is a major adhesin involved in mycobacterium-host interactions and extrapulmonary dissemination of infection. To investigate HBHA in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, we studied hbhA polymorphisms by fragment analysis using the GeneMapper technology across a large collection of isolates genotyped by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-IS900) analyses. Furthermore, we analyzed the structure-function relationships of recombinant HBHA proteins of types C and S by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses. In silico analysis revealed two forms of HBHA, corresponding to the prototype genomes for the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This observation was confirmed using GeneMapper on 85 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, including 67 strains of type C and 18 strains of type S. We found that HBHAs from all type C strains contain a short C-terminal domain, while those of type S present a long C-terminal domain, similar to that produced by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The purification of recombinant HBHA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis of both types by heparin-Sepharose chromatography highlighted a correlation between their affinities for heparin and the lengths of their C-terminal domains, which was confirmed by SPR analysis. Thus, types C and S of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis may be distinguished by the types of HBHA they produce, which differ in size and adherence properties, thereby providing new evidence that strengthens the genotypic differences between the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:23974028

Lefrancois, Louise H.; Bodier, Christelle C.; Cochard, Thierry; Canepa, Sylvie; Raze, Dominique; Lanotte, Philippe; Sevilla, Iker A.; Stevenson, Karen; Behr, Marcel A.; Locht, Camille

2013-01-01

268

Novel feature of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, highlighted by characterization of the heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis comprises two genotypically defined groups, known as the cattle (C) and sheep (S) groups. Recent studies have reported phenotypic differences between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis groups C and S, including growth rates, infectivity for macrophages, and iron metabolism. In this study, we investigated the genotypes and biological properties of the virulence factor heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) for both groups. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, HBHA is a major adhesin involved in mycobacterium-host interactions and extrapulmonary dissemination of infection. To investigate HBHA in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, we studied hbhA polymorphisms by fragment analysis using the GeneMapper technology across a large collection of isolates genotyped by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-IS900) analyses. Furthermore, we analyzed the structure-function relationships of recombinant HBHA proteins of types C and S by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses. In silico analysis revealed two forms of HBHA, corresponding to the prototype genomes for the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This observation was confirmed using GeneMapper on 85 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, including 67 strains of type C and 18 strains of type S. We found that HBHAs from all type C strains contain a short C-terminal domain, while those of type S present a long C-terminal domain, similar to that produced by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The purification of recombinant HBHA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis of both types by heparin-Sepharose chromatography highlighted a correlation between their affinities for heparin and the lengths of their C-terminal domains, which was confirmed by SPR analysis. Thus, types C and S of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis may be distinguished by the types of HBHA they produce, which differ in size and adherence properties, thereby providing new evidence that strengthens the genotypic differences between the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:23974028

Lefrancois, Louise H; Bodier, Christelle C; Cochard, Thierry; Canepa, Sylvie; Raze, Dominique; Lanotte, Philippe; Sevilla, Iker A; Stevenson, Karen; Behr, Marcel A; Locht, Camille; Biet, Franck

2013-11-01

269

Prevalence and Acquisition of the Genes for Zoocin A and Zoocin A Resistance in Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus  

PubMed Central

Zoocin A is a streptococcolytic enzyme produced by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain 4881. The zoocin A gene (zooA) and the gene specifying resistance to zoocin A (zif) are adjacent on the chromosome and are divergently transcribed. Twenty-four S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains were analyzed to determine the genetic difference between three previously characterized as zoocin A producers (strains 4881, 9g and 9h) and the twenty-one non-producers. LT-PCR and Southern hybridization studies revealed that none of the non-producer strains possessed zooA or zif. RAPD and PFGE showed that the 24 strains were a genetically diverse population with 8 RAPD profiles. S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains 9g and 9h appeared genetically identical to each other, but quite different from 4881. Sequences derived from 4881 and 9g showed that zooA and zif were integrated into the chromosome adjacent to the gene flaR. A comparison of these sequences with the genome sequences of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains H70 and MGCS10565 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047 suggests that flaR flanks a region of genome plasticity in this species. PMID:19357799

O'Rourke, Anna-Lee D.; Simmonds, Robin S.; Gargis, Amy S.; Sloan, Gary L.

2009-01-01

270

recA is required in the induction of pectin lyase and carotovoricin in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora.  

PubMed Central

Pectin lyase (PNL) and the bacteriocin carotovoricin (CTV) were induced in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora 71 by the DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C, nalidixic acid, and UV light. To determine whether the recA product was involved in the expression of these damage-inducible phenotypes, we cloned the E. carotovora subsp. carotovora recA+ gene, inactivated it by Tn5 insertion, and constructed an E. carotovora subsp. carotovora recA::Tn5 strain by gene replacement via homologous recombination. The RecA- strain was more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate, nitroquinoline oxide, and UV light than its RecA+ parent. The recA mutation did not affect the production of pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase, and protease or the ability to cause soft rot of potato tubers. With this mutant, unlike with the RecA+ parent strain, PNL and CTV were not induced by mitomycin C or detected in potato tuber tissue. The RecA+ phenotype, including the inducibility of PNL and CTV, could, however, be restored in the mutant in trans by the recA+ gene from either E. carotovora subsp. carotovora or Escherichia coli. We conclude that, in E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, the recA product is required in the induction of PNL and CTV. Images PMID:4044526

Zink, R T; Engwall, J K; McEvoy, J L; Chatterjee, A K

1985-01-01

271

"Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis" in neck lymph nodes of children and their environment examined by culture and triplex quantitative real-time PCR.  

PubMed

"Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis" often causes cervical lymphadenitis in children; its prompt and accurate identification enables adequate therapy, tracing, and prevention. The aims of this study were to determine the causative agent of lymphadenitis using culture, PCR, and triplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods with DNA directly isolated from tissue, as well as to identify possible sources of infection from the environment. We confirmed the diagnoses by detecting M. avium subsp. hominissuis using qPCR with DNA directly isolated from lymph node biopsy specimens of two patients. In order to trace the source of infection from the environment, a method of DNA isolation from soil and other environmental samples, such as dust, cobwebs, and compost, was developed. The triplex qPCR examination revealed the presence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in a high proportion of the environmental samples (42.8% in the first patient's house and 47.6% in the second patient's house). Both patients were also exposed to M. avium subsp. avium, which was present due to the breeding of infected domestic hens. The high infectious dose of M. avium subsp. hominissuis or the increased susceptibility of humans to M. avium subsp. hominissuis compared to M. avium subsp. avium could be the reason why the children were infected with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. PMID:21084514

Kaevska, Marija; Slana, Iva; Kralik, Petr; Reischl, Udo; Orosova, Jaroslava; Holcikova, Alena; Pavlik, Ivo

2011-01-01

272

"Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis" in Neck Lymph Nodes of Children and their Environment Examined by Culture and Triplex Quantitative Real-Time PCR ?  

PubMed Central

“Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” often causes cervical lymphadenitis in children; its prompt and accurate identification enables adequate therapy, tracing, and prevention. The aims of this study were to determine the causative agent of lymphadenitis using culture, PCR, and triplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods with DNA directly isolated from tissue, as well as to identify possible sources of infection from the environment. We confirmed the diagnoses by detecting M. avium subsp. hominissuis using qPCR with DNA directly isolated from lymph node biopsy specimens of two patients. In order to trace the source of infection from the environment, a method of DNA isolation from soil and other environmental samples, such as dust, cobwebs, and compost, was developed. The triplex qPCR examination revealed the presence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in a high proportion of the environmental samples (42.8% in the first patient's house and 47.6% in the second patient's house). Both patients were also exposed to M. avium subsp. avium, which was present due to the breeding of infected domestic hens. The high infectious dose of M. avium subsp. hominissuis or the increased susceptibility of humans to M. avium subsp. hominissuis compared to M. avium subsp. avium could be the reason why the children were infected with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. PMID:21084514

Kaevska, Marija; Slana, Iva; Kralik, Petr; Reischl, Udo; Orosova, Jaroslava; Holcikova, Alena; Pavlik, Ivo

2011-01-01

273

La presenza di colesterolo nella frazione sterolica dell'olio dei semi di Solanum nigrum L. subsp. nigrum e Solanum dulcamara L  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of cholesterol in the sterolic fraction in the oil of the seeds of Solanum nigrum L. subsp. nigrum and Solanum dulcamara L.—The sterol fraction of oil in Solanum nigrum L. subsp. nigrum and Solanum dulcamara L. seeds has been analysed by GLC. The amounts of cholesterol we have found are 8% and 23% respectively, in relation to the

Paola Gastaldo; Paola Profumo; Enrico Tiscornia; Maria Angela Pagano

1977-01-01

274

DrsG from Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis inhibits the antimicrobial peptide LL-37.  

PubMed

SIC and DRS are related proteins present in only 4 of the >200 Streptococcus pyogenes emm types. These proteins inhibit complement-mediated lysis and/or the activity of certain antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). A gene encoding a homologue of these proteins, herein called DrsG, has been identified in the related bacterium Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Here we show that geographically dispersed isolates representing 14 of 50 emm types examined possess variants of drsG. However, not all isolates within the drsG-positive emm types possess the gene. Sequence comparisons also revealed a high degree of conservation in different S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis emm types. To examine the biological activity of DrsG, recombinant versions of two major DrsG variants, DrsGS and DrsGL, were expressed and purified. Western blot analysis using antisera raised to these proteins demonstrated both variants to be expressed and secreted into culture supernatants. Unlike SIC, but similar to DRS, DrsG does not inhibit complement-mediated lysis. However, like both SIC and DRS, DrsG is a ligand of the cathelicidin LL-37 and is inhibitory to its bactericidal activity in in vitro assays. Conservation of prolines in the C-terminal region also suggests that these residues are important in the biology of this family of proteins. This is the first report demonstrating the activity of an AMP-inhibitory protein in S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and suggests that inhibition of AMP activity is the primary function of this family of proteins. The acquisition of the complement-inhibitory activity of SIC may reflect its continuing evolution. PMID:24664506

Smyth, Danielle; Cameron, Ainslie; Davies, Mark R; McNeilly, Celia; Hafner, Louise; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

2014-06-01

275

Phylogeography and seed dispersal in islands: the case of Rumex bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis (Polygonaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Rumex bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis is an endemic taxon to Macaronesia with diaspore polymorphism. The origin and colonizing route of this taxon in Macaronesia was studied using molecular data and information on diaspore types. Methods Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used in 260 plants from 22 populations of R. bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis, four from the Madeiran archipelago and 18 from the Canary archipelago. Diaspore production was analysed in 9–50 plants from each population used for AFLP analysis. One hundred and one plants from the Madeiran archipelago and 375 plants from the Canary Islands were studied. For each plant the type of diaspore produced was recorded. Key Results Overall populations had low genetic diversity but they showed a geographical pattern of genetic diversity that was higher in the older eastern islands than in the younger western ones. Two types of dispersible diaspores were found: in the eastern Canary islands (Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and Gran Canaria), plants produced exclusively long-dispersible diaspores, whereas in the western Canary islands (Tenerife, La Gomera, El Hierro) and the Madeiran archipelago plants produced exclusively short-dispersible diaspores. Genetically, the studied populations fell into four main island groups: Lanzarote–Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Tenerife–El Hierro and La Gomera–Madeira archipelago. Conclusions A Moroccan origin of R. bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis is hypothesized with a colonization route from the eastern to the western islands. In addition, at least one gene flow event from La Gomera to the Madeiran archipelago has taken place. During the colonization process the type of dispersible diaspore changed so that dispersability decreased in populations of the westernmost islands. PMID:23267005

Talavera, Maria; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Arista, Montserrat

2013-01-01

276

Characterization of a New Bacteriocin, Carocin D, from Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21? †  

PubMed Central

Two different bacteriocins, carotovoricin and carocin S1, had been found in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, which causes soft-rot disease in diverse plants. Previously, we reported that the particular strain Pcc21, producing only one high-molecular-weight bacteriocin, carried a new antibacterial activity against the indicator strain Pcc3. Here, we report that this new antibacterial activity is due to a new bacteriocin produced by strain Pcc21 and named carocin D. Carocin D is encoded by the caroDK gene located in the genomic DNA together with the caroDI gene, which seems to encode an immunity protein. N-terminal amino acid sequences of purified carocin D were determined by Edman degradation. In comparison with the primary translation product of caroDK, it was found that 8 amino acids are missing at the N terminus. This finding proved that carocin D is synthesized as a precursor peptide and that 8 amino acids are removed from its N terminus during maturation. Carocin D has two putative translocation domains; the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are homologous to those of Escherichia coli colicin E3 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa S-type pyocin, respectively. When caroDK and caroDI genes were transformed into carocin D-sensitive bacteria such as Pcc3, the bacteria became resistant to this bacteriocin. Carocin D has one putative DNase domain at the extreme C terminus and showed DNase activity in vitro. This bacteriocin had slight tolerance to heat but not to proteases. The caroDK gene was present in only 5 of 54 strains of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. These results indicate that carocin D is a third bacteriocin found in P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and this bacteriocin can be readily expressed in carocin D-sensitive nonpathogenic bacteria, which may have high potential as a biological control agent in the field. PMID:20870796

Roh, Eunjung; Park, Tae-Ho; Kim, Myung-il; Lee, Seungdon; Ryu, Sangryeol; Oh, Chang-Sik; Rhee, Sangkee; Kim, Doo-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Heu, Sunggi

2010-01-01

277

Essential oil of Juniperus communis subsp. alpina (Suter) ?elak needles: chemical composition, antifungal activity and cytotoxicity.  

PubMed

Essential oils are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria and fungi. In the present work the composition and the antifungal activity of the oils of Juniperus communis subsp. alpina (Suter) ?elak were evaluated. Moreover, the skin cytotoxicity, at concentrations showing significant antifungal activity, was also evaluated. The oils were isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were used to evaluate the antifungal activity of the oil against dermatophytes (Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, M. gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. mentagrophytes var. interdigitale, T. rubrum, T. verrucosum), yeasts (Candida albicans, C. guillermondii, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans) and Aspergillus species (Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. niger). Cytotoxicity was tested in HaCaT keratinocytes through the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Essential oil of J. communis subsp. alpina needles was predominantly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons (78.4%), with the main compounds being sabinene (26.2%), ?-pinene (12-9%) and limonene (10.4%). Results concerning the antifungal activity demonstrated the potential of needle oil against dermatophytes, particularly for Microsporum canis and Trichophyton rubrum with MIC and MLC of 0.32 ?L/mL. Furthermore, evaluation of cell viability showed no significant cytotoxicity in HaCaT keratinocytes at concentrations between 0.32 and 0.64 ?L/mL. These results show that it is possible to find appropriate doses of J. communis subsp. alpina oil with both antifungal activity and a very low detrimental effect on keratinocytes. PMID:22294341

Cabral, C; Francisco, V; Cavaleiro, C; Gonçalves, M J; Cruz, M T; Sales, F; Batista, M T; Salgueiro, L

2012-09-01

278

Early Immune Markers Associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model ?  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Groups for experimental infection included control (noninfected), oral (infected orally with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10), oral/DXM (pretreatment with dexamethasone before oral inoculation), intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, and oral/M (oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from a cow with clinical disease) groups. One of the earliest markers to emerge was antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-?). Only i.p. inoculated calves had detectable antigen-specific IFN-? responses at 7 days, with responses of the other infection groups becoming detectable at 90 and 120 days. All infection groups maintained robust IFN-? responses for the remainder of the study. At 1 month, calves in the oral and oral/M groups had higher antigen-stimulated interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels than calves in the other treatment groups, but IL-10 secretion declined by 12 months for all calves. T-cell activation markers such as CD25, CD26, CD45RO, and CD5 were significantly upregulated in infected calves compared to noninfected controls. Oral inoculation of calves resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation at 9 and 12 months, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) secretion at 6 and 12 months. These results demonstrate that infection of naïve calves with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis invoked early immunologic responses characterized by robust antigen-specific IFN-? responses and induction of CD25 and CD45RO expression on T-cell subsets. These were followed by antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, iNOS secretion, and expression of CD26 and CD5bright markers in the latter part of the 12-month study. PMID:21228140

Stabel, J. R.; Robbe-Austerman, S.

2011-01-01

279

Persistence and Decontamination of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii Spores on Corroded Iron in a Model Drinking Water System?  

PubMed Central

Persistence of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores on corroded iron coupons in drinking water was studied using a biofilm annular reactor. Spores were inoculated at 106 CFU/ml in the dechlorinated reactor bulk water. The dechlorination allowed for observation of the effects of hydraulic shear and biofilm sloughing on persistence. Approximately 50% of the spores initially adhered to the corroded iron surface were not detected after 1 month. Addition of a stable 10 mg/liter free chlorine residual after 1 month led to a 2-log10 reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii, but levels on the coupons quickly stabilized thereafter. Increasing the free chlorine concentration to 25 or 70 mg/liter had no additional effect on inactivation. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores injected in the presence of a typical distribution system chlorine residual (?0.75 mg/liter) resulted in a steady reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii over 1 month, but levels on the coupons eventually stabilized. Adding elevated chlorine levels (10, 25, and 70 mg/liter) after 1 month had no effect on the rate of inactivation. Decontamination with elevated free chlorine levels immediately after spore injection resulted in a 3-log10 reduction within 2 weeks, but the rate of inactivation leveled off afterward. This indicates that free chlorine did not reach portions of the corroded iron surface where B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores had adhered. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores are capable of persisting for an extended time in the presence of high levels of free chlorine. PMID:17308186

Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Rice, Eugene W.; Bishop, Paul L.

2007-01-01

280

Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in Lactose-Grown Chemostat Cocultures  

PubMed Central

Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations. PMID:23872557

Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J. H.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Pronk, Jack T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Bron, Peter A.

2013-01-01

281

Salmonella enterica Suppresses Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Population and Soft Rot Progression by Acidifying the Microaerophilic Environment  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Although enteric human pathogens are usually studied in the context of their animal hosts, a significant portion of their life cycle occurs on plants. Plant disease alters the phyllosphere, leading to enhanced growth of human pathogens; however, the impact of human pathogens on phytopathogen biology and plant health is largely unknown. To characterize the interaction between human pathogens and phytobacterial pathogens in the phyllosphere, we examined the interactions between Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli O157:H7 with regard to bacterial populations, soft rot progression, and changes in local pH. The presence of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum enhanced the growth of both S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 on leaves. However, in a microaerophilic environment, S. enterica reduced P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum populations and soft rot progression by moderating local environmental pH. Reduced soft rot was not due to S. enterica proteolytic activity. Limitations on P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum growth, disease progression, and pH elevation were not observed on leaves coinoculated with E. coli O157:H7 or when leaves were coinoculated with S. enterica in an aerobic environment. S. enterica also severely undermined the relationship between the phytobacterial population and disease progression of a P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum budB mutant defective in the 2,3-butanediol pathway for acid neutralization. Our results show that S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 interact differently with the enteric phytobacterial pathogen P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. S. enterica inhibition of soft rot progression may conceal a rapidly growing human pathogen population. Whereas soft rotted produce can alert consumers to the possibility of food-borne pathogens, healthy-looking produce may entice consumption of contaminated vegetables. PMID:23404399

Kwan, Grace; Charkowski, Amy O.; Barak, Jeri D.

2013-01-01

282

A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2  

SciTech Connect

A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2 was constructed on the basis of the R471a plasmid and Tn5 and Tn9 using Hfr-like donors. Forty-six genes, including phytopathogenicity genes, were located on the basis of interrupted mating experiment results and analysis of coinheritance of markers on a map of 183 min in length. The similarity and differences of chromosomal genetic maps of Erwinia genus bacteria are discussed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Nikolaichik, E.A.; Pesnyakevich, A.G. [Belarussian State Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

1995-08-01

283

Complete Genome Sequence of the Ethanol-Producing Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis Centrotype ATCC 29191  

PubMed Central

Zymomonas mobilis is an ethanologenic bacterium that has been studied for use in biofuel production. Of the sequenced Zymomonas strains, ATCC 29191 has been described as the phenotypic centrotype of Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis, the taxon that harbors the highest ethanol-producing Z. mobilis strains. ATCC 29191 was isolated in Kinshasa, Congo, from palm wine fermentations. This strain is reported to be a robust levan producer, while in recent years it has been employed in studies addressing Z. mobilis respiration. Here we announce the finishing and annotation of the ATCC 29191 genome, which comprises one chromosome and three plasmids. PMID:23045486

Desiniotis, Andreas; Kouvelis, Vassili N.; Davenport, Karen; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Typas, Milton A.

2012-01-01

284

Chemical Composition and Seasonal Variation of Hypericum hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson Essential Oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of leaves (LV), flowers (FL) and fruits (FR) of Hypericum hircinum subsp. majus from Marche (Italy), were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS). Ninety-two volatile components were identified in the oils, representing 81.41–94.36% of the total oils. The major compounds were cis-?-guaiene (23.25–41.23%) and ?-selinene (8.48–25.20%) in LV, ?-selinene

F. Maggi; B. Tirillini; S. Vittori; G. Sagratini; F. Papa

2010-01-01

285

Three new glycosides from the leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla subsp. serrata (THUNB.) MAKINO.  

PubMed

Three new glycosides, 7-deoxyloganic acid beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester (1), (3R)-hydrangenol 8,4'-di-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), and (6R,7E,9R)-megastigma-4,7-dien-3-one 9,13-di-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), have been isolated from the leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla subsp. serrata (THUNB.) MAKINO (Saxifragaceae). The structures of 1-3 were elucidated on the basis of spectral data and chemical evidence. PMID:18379120

Kikuchi, Masao; Kakuda, Rie; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Yaoita, Yasunori

2008-04-01

286

Genetic IS901 RFLP diversity among Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from four pheasant flocks  

PubMed Central

IS901 RFLP analysis of 36 Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) isolates from 15 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and two goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) from four pheasant farms was performed. Using this method, six different IS901 RFLP types (E, F, G, M, Q, and V) were identified. The distribution of IS901 RFLP profiles was tightly linked to individual flocks. Matching IS901 RFLP profiles observed in the present study indicate MAA transmission between pheasants and goshawks in the same locality. In two flocks, different pheasants within a flock as well as in various organs of five individual pheasants were found to have two distinct IS901 RFLP profiles. PMID:23388436

Moravkova, Monika; Lamka, Jiri; Slany, Michal

2013-01-01

287

Genetic IS901 RFLP diversity among Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from four pheasant flocks.  

PubMed

IS901 RFLP analysis of 36 Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) isolates from 15 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and two goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) from four pheasant farms was performed. Using this method, six different IS901 RFLP types (E, F, G, M, Q, and V) were identified. The distribution of IS901 RFLP profiles was tightly linked to individual flocks. Matching IS901 RFLP profiles observed in the present study indicate MAA transmission between pheasants and goshawks in the same locality. In two flocks, different pheasants within a flock as well as in various organs of five individual pheasants were found to have two distinct IS901 RFLP profiles. PMID:23388436

Moravkova, Monika; Lamka, Jiri; Slany, Michal; Pavlik, Ivo

2013-01-01

288

Complete genome sequence of the ethanol-producing Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis centrotype ATCC 29191.  

PubMed

Zymomonas mobilis is an ethanologenic bacterium that has been studied for use in biofuel production. Of the sequenced Zymomonas strains, ATCC 29191 has been described as the phenotypic centrotype of Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis, the taxon that harbors the highest ethanol-producing Z. mobilis strains. ATCC 29191 was isolated in Kinshasa, Congo, from palm wine fermentations. This strain is reported to be a robust levan producer, while in recent years it has been employed in studies addressing Z. mobilis respiration. Here we announce the finishing and annotation of the ATCC 29191 genome, which comprises one chromosome and three plasmids. PMID:23045486

Desiniotis, Andreas; Kouvelis, Vassili N; Davenport, Karen; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Typas, Milton A; Pappas, Katherine M

2012-11-01

289

Purification and characterization of a prolidase from Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei IFPL 731.  

PubMed Central

A peptidase showing a high level of specificity towards dipeptides of the X-Pro type was purified to homogeneity from the cell extract of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei IFPL 731. The enzyme was a monomer having a molecular mass of 41 kDa. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 to 7.5 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Metal chelating agents completely inhibited enzyme activity, indicating that the prolidase was a metalloenzyme. The Michaelis constant (K(m)) and Vmax for several proline-containing dipeptides were determined. PMID:8979358

Fernández-Esplá, M D; Martín-Hernández, M C; Fox, P F

1997-01-01

290

High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle  

PubMed Central

Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines (S. A. Bustin et al., Clin. Chem. 55:611–622, 2009, doi:10.1373/clinchem.2008.112797). The HT-J assay has been approved for use in JD control programs in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:24352996

Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

2014-01-01

291

A novel thermo-alkali stable catalase–peroxidase from Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi subsp. incaldaniensis : purification and characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel thermo-alkali-stable catalase–peroxidase from Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi subsp. incaldaniensis subsp. nov., strain 20AG, was purified and characterized. The protein purified from the cells resulted in 110-fold purification\\u000a with a specific activity of 35,000 U\\/mg. The enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 72 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE\\u000a and the total molecular mass measured by gel filtration was 280 kDa. The heme content

Valeria Calandrelli; Agata Gambacorta; Ida Romano; Vito Carratore; Licia Lama

2008-01-01

292

High-throughput direct fecal PCR assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sheep and cattle.  

PubMed

Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines (S. A. Bustin et al., Clin. Chem. 55:611-622, 2009, doi:10.1373/clinchem.2008.112797). The HT-J assay has been approved for use in JD control programs in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:24352996

Plain, Karren M; Marsh, Ian B; Waldron, Anna M; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F; Begg, Douglas J; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

2014-03-01

293

Environmental Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Different Climatic Zones of Eastern Australia  

PubMed Central

The duration of survival of both the S and C strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces was quantified in contrasting climatic zones of New South Wales, Australia, and detailed environmental temperature data were collected. Known concentrations of S and C strains in feces placed on soil in polystyrene boxes were exposed to the environment with or without the provision of shade (70%) at Bathurst, Armidale, Condobolin, and Broken Hill, and subsamples taken every 2 weeks were cultured for the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The duration of survival ranged from a minimum of 1 week to a maximum of 16 weeks, and the provision of 70% shade was the most important factor in extending the survival time. The hazard of death for exposed compared to shaded samples was 20 and 9 times higher for the S and C strains, respectively. Site did not affect the survival of the C strain, but for the S strain, the hazard of death was 2.3 times higher at the two arid zone sites (Broken Hill and Condobolin) than at the two temperate zone sites (Bathurst and Armidale). Temperature measurements revealed maximum temperatures exceeding 60°C and large daily temperature ranges at the soil surface, particularly in exposed boxes. PMID:24463974

Begg, Douglas J.; Dhand, Navneet K.; Watt, Bruce; Whittington, Richard J.

2014-01-01

294

Persistent Infection or Successive Reinfection of Deer Mice with Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis?  

PubMed Central

Bartonella infections are common in rodents. From 1994 to 2006, longitudinal studies of a rodent community, consisting mainly of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), were conducted in southwestern Colorado to study hantaviruses. Blood samples from deer mice captured one or more times during the period 2003 to 2006 (n = 737) were selected to study bartonellae in deer mice. Bartonellae were found to be widely distributed in that population, with an overall prevalence of 82.4% (607/737 mice). No correlation was found between bartonella prevalence and deer mouse weight or sex. Persistent or successive infections with bartonellae were observed in deer mice captured repeatedly, with a prevalence of 83.9% (297/354), and the infection appeared to last for more than 1 year in some of them. Persistent infection with bartonellae may explain the high prevalence of these bacteria in deer mice at this site and, perhaps, elsewhere. Genetic analysis demonstrated that deer mouse-borne bartonella isolates at this site belong to the same species, B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis, demonstrating a specific relationship between B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis and deer mice. PMID:21239553

Bai, Ying; Calisher, Charles H.; Kosoy, Michael Y.; Root, J. Jeffrey; Doty, Jeffrey B.

2011-01-01

295

Cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity and composition of essential oil from Tanacetum balsamita L. subsp. balsamita.  

PubMed

The aerial parts of Tanacetum balsamita subsp. balsamita were collected at full flowering stage from Tabriz, Iran. The essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC and GC-MS. Twenty seven components were identified, representing 99.2% of the total oil. Carvone (51.0%), beta-thujone (20.8%), 1,8-cineole (4.4%) and alpha-thujone (3.2%) were the main components. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of T. balsamita subsp. balsamita was studied against eight Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, B. pumulis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and three fungi (Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger). The results of the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil according to the disc diffusion method and MIC values indicated that the oil exhibited moderate to high antimicrobial activity. The in vitro toxicological study based on the MTT cytotoxicity assay on human fetal skin fibroblast (HFSF) and Monkey kidney (Vero) cell lines showed IC50 values of 2500 and 1250 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:19370888

Yousefzadi, Morteza; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Sonboli, Ali; Miraghasi, Farah; Ghiasi, Shahla; Arman, Mitra; Mosaffa, Nariman

2009-01-01

296

Molecular Characterization of Pigmented and Nonpigmented Isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Five pigmented isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS900-RFLP), and IS1311 polymorphism analysis using PCR. All of the pigmented isolates exhibited one of three distinct PFGE profiles with SnaBI, designated 9, 10, and 11, and with SpeI, designated 7, 8, and 9, which generated three multiplex profiles designated [9-7], [10-8], and [11-9]. All of the pigmented isolates had the same IS900-RFLP BstEII and PvuII profiles. The IS900-RFLP BstEII profile was new, but the IS900-RFLP PvuII profile corresponded to PvuII type 6 of a sheep strain described by Cousins and colleagues (D. V. Cousins, S. N. Williams, A. Hope, and G. J. Eamens, Aust. Vet. J. 78:184-190, 2000). IS1311-PCR analysis typed all of the pigmented isolates as sheep (S) strains. The genetic relationship between pigmented and nonpigmented isolates was investigated by using multiplex PFGE data from the analysis of both the 5 pigmented isolates and 88 nonpigmented isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from a variety of host species and geographic locations. It was possible to classify the isolates into two distinct types designated type I, comprising the pigmented isolates, and type II, comprising the nonpigmented isolates, which exhibit a very broad host range. PMID:11980962

Stevenson, Karen; Hughes, Valerie M.; de Juan, Lucia; Inglis, Neil F.; Wright, Frank; Sharp, J. Michael

2002-01-01

297

Experimental Inoculation of BFDV-Positive Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) with Two Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Isolates  

PubMed Central

Beak and feather disease virus- (BFDV-) positive (naturally infected) but clinically healthy budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were inoculated with two isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolated from naturally infected golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) and peafowl (Pavo cristatus). During a period of more than two months after inoculation, samples of cloacal and crop swabs, faeces, and blood were obtained for BFDV and Mycobacterium avium testing with PCR. Birds were euthanized nine weeks after inoculation. All infected budgerigars developed signs typical of mycobacteriosis, but more advanced clinical and pathological changes were visible in the group infected with the pheasant isolate. Only a few cloacal and crop swab samples were positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium despite advanced pathological changes in the internal organs. In the groups infected with mycobacterium isolates the frequency of BFDV-positive samples was higher than in the control group. In the infected groups the frequency of BFDV was substantially higher in the cloacal swabs of birds inoculated with the pheasant isolate than in the peafowl-isolate-infected group. PMID:24738057

Sapierzynski, Rafal; Szeleszczuk, Piotr

2014-01-01

298

Chemical and biological investigations of a toxic plant from Central Africa, Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana.  

PubMed

Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg/kg) of its aqueous extract, administered orally to adult Wistar rats. This study demonstrated that the freeze-dried aqueous extract (5%, w/w) possesses high toxicity. The extract caused hypothermia, neurological disorders, including extensor reflex of maximal convulsive induced-seizures at about 2 h after the administered dose, and death occurred (LD50=370 mg/kg) in a dose dependent manner. Blood parameter evaluation revealed slight variations, but these might not have clinical relevance. Histological examination of internal organs (lungs, liver, heart and kidneys) did not reveal any abnormality in the treated group compared to the control. Therefore, it can be concluded that Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana aqueous extract, given orally, is toxic and that its target is the central nervous system. General phytochemical screening revealed that the plant did not contain significant amounts of products known to be toxic, such as alkaloids or cardioactive glycosides, but only catechic tannins, amino acids, saponins and other aphrogen principles in the three parts of the species (fruit, leave and bark). PMID:16174557

Karangwa, C; Esters, V; Frédérich, M; Tits, M; Kadima, J N; Damas, J; Noirfalise, A; Angenot, L

2006-02-20

299

Multi-Method Approach for Characterizing the Interaction between Fusarium verticillioides and Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. Kurstaki  

PubMed Central

Bacterial antagonists used as biocontrol agents represent part of an integrated management program to reduce pesticides in the environment. Bacillus thuringiensis is considered a good alternative as a biocontrol agent for suppressing plant pathogens such as Fusarium. In this study, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, indirect immunofluorescence, and high performance liquid chromatography to determine the interaction between B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki LFB-FIOCRUZ (CCGB) 257 and F. verticillioides MRC 826, an important plant pathogen frequently associated with maize. B. thuringiensis showed a strong in vitro suppressive effect on F. verticillioides growth and inhibited fumonisin production. Flow cytometry analysis was found to be adequate for characterizing the fungal cell oscillations and death during these interactions. Further studies of the antagonistic effect of this isolate against other fungi and in vivo testing are necessary to determine the efficacy of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in controlling plant pathogens. This is the first report on the use of flow cytometry for quantifying living and apoptotic F. verticillioides cells and the B. thuringiensis Cry 1Ab toxin. PMID:24739804

Rocha, Liliana O.; Tralamazza, Sabina Moser.; Reis, Gabriela M.; Rabinovitch, Leon; Barbosa, Cynara B.; Correa, Benedito

2014-01-01

300

Response of Endophytic Bacterial Communities in Potato Plants to Infection with Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica  

PubMed Central

The term endophyte refers to interior colonization of plants by microorganisms that do not have pathogenic effects on their hosts, and various endophytes have been found to play important roles in plant vitality. In this study, cultivation-independent terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA directly amplified from plant tissue DNA was used in combination with molecular characterization of isolates to examine the influence of plant stress, achieved by infection with the blackleg pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, on the endophytic population in two different potato varieties. Community analysis clearly demonstrated increased bacterial diversity in infected plants compared to that in control plants. The results also indicated that the pathogen stress had a greater impact on the bacteria population than the plant genotype had. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of isolated endophytes revealed a broad phylogenetic spectrum of bacteria, including members of the ?, ?, and ? subgroups of the Proteobacteria, high- and low-G+C-content gram-positive organisms, and microbes belonging to the Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides group. Screening of the isolates for antagonistic activity against E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica revealed that 38% of the endophytes protected tissue culture plants from blackleg disease. PMID:11976096

Reiter, Birgit; Pfeifer, Ulrike; Schwab, Helmut; Sessitsch, Angela

2002-01-01

301

Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototype Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363?  

PubMed Central

Lactococcus lactis is of great importance for the nutrition of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This paper describes the genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, the lactococcal strain most intensively studied throughout the world. The 2,529,478-bp genome contains 81 pseudogenes and encodes 2,436 proteins. Of the 530 unique proteins, 47 belong to the COG (clusters of orthologous groups) functional category “carbohydrate metabolism and transport,” by far the largest category of novel proteins in comparison with L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403. Nearly one-fifth of the 71 insertion elements are concentrated in a specific 56-kb region. This integration hot-spot region carries genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids and a repeat sequence specifically found on plasmids and in the “lateral gene transfer hot spot” in the genome of Streptococcus thermophilus. Although the parent of L. lactis MG1363 was used to demonstrate lysogeny in Lactococcus, L. lactis MG1363 carries four remnant/satellite phages and two apparently complete prophages. The availability of the L. lactis MG1363 genome sequence will reinforce its status as the prototype among lactic acid bacteria through facilitation of further applied and fundamental research. PMID:17307855

Wegmann, Udo; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; Buist, Girbe; Shearman, Claire; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Goesmann, Alexander; Gasson, Michael J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Kok, Jan

2007-01-01

302

Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans  

PubMed Central

Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts. PMID:24093021

Rivas, Amable J.; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

2013-01-01

303

Persistent infection or successive reinfection of deer mice with Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis.  

PubMed

Bartonella infections are common in rodents. From 1994 to 2006, longitudinal studies of a rodent community, consisting mainly of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), were conducted in southwestern Colorado to study hantaviruses. Blood samples from deer mice captured one or more times during the period 2003 to 2006 (n = 737) were selected to study bartonellae in deer mice. Bartonellae were found to be widely distributed in that population, with an overall prevalence of 82.4% (607/737 mice). No correlation was found between bartonella prevalence and deer mouse weight or sex. Persistent or successive infections with bartonellae were observed in deer mice captured repeatedly, with a prevalence of 83.9% (297/354), and the infection appeared to last for more than 1 year in some of them. Persistent infection with bartonellae may explain the high prevalence of these bacteria in deer mice at this site and, perhaps, elsewhere. Genetic analysis demonstrated that deer mouse-borne bartonella isolates at this site belong to the same species, B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis, demonstrating a specific relationship between B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis and deer mice. PMID:21239553

Bai, Ying; Calisher, Charles H; Kosoy, Michael Y; Root, J Jeffrey; Doty, Jeffrey B

2011-03-01

304

Antioxidant Potential, Lipid Peroxidation Inhibition and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii Extracts  

PubMed Central

The antioxidant activity of different Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii extracts was tested by measuring their ability to scavenge reactive hydroxyl radical during the Fenton reaction, using ESR spectroscopy. Also, the influence of these extracts on lipid peroxyl radicals obtained during lipid peroxidation of: (I) sunflower oil (37 ºC, 3h) induced by 4,4?-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid) (ACVA) and (II) liposomes induced by 2,2?-azobis(2- amidino-propane)dihydrochloride (AAPH) was studied. n-Butanol extract had the best antioxidant activity (100% at 0.5 mg/mL in Fenton reaction system; 89.21% at 5 mg/mL in system I; 83.38% at 5 mg/mL in system II). The antioxidant activities of the extracts significantly correlated with total phenolic content. The antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii extracts was investigated. Petroleum ether, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts expressed a wide range of inhibiting activity against both grampositive and gram-negative bacteria.

Cetkovic, Gordana S.; Canadanovic-Brunet, Jasna M.; Djilas, Sonja M.; Tumbas, Vesna T.; Markov, Sinisa L.; Cvetkovic, Dragoljub D.

2007-01-01

305

Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection in Swine Associated with Peat Used for Bedding  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections in swine, resulting in economic losses. Additionally, the zoonotic aspect of such infections is of concern. In the southeastern region of Norway in 2009 and 2010, an increase in condemnation of pig carcasses with tuberculous lesions was seen at the meat inspection. The use of peat as bedding in the herds was suspected to be a common factor, and a project examining pigs and environmental samples from the herds was initiated. Lesions detected at meat inspection in pigs originating from 15 herds were sampled. Environmental samples including peat from six of the herds and from three peat production facilities were additionally collected. Samples were analysed by culture and isolates genotyped by MLVA analysis. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 35 out of 46 pigs, in 16 out of 20 samples of peat, and in one sample of sawdust. MLVA analysis demonstrated identical isolates from peat and pigs within the same farms. Polyclonal infection was demonstrated by analysis of multiple isolates from the same pig. To conclude, the increase in condemnation of porcine carcasses at slaughter due to mycobacteriosis seemed to be related to untreated peat used as bedding.

Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Lium, Bjørn; Jørgensen, Anne; Djønne, Berit

2014-01-01

306

A metabolic enzyme as a primary virulence factor of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony.  

PubMed

During evolution, pathogenic bacteria have developed complex interactions with their hosts. This has frequently involved the acquisition of virulence factors on pathogenicity islands, plasmids, transposons, or prophages, allowing them to colonize, survive, and replicate within the host. In contrast, Mycoplasma species, the smallest self-replicating organisms, have regressively evolved from gram-positive bacteria by reduction of the genome to a minimal size, with the consequence that they have economized their genetic resources. Hence, pathogenic Mycoplasma species lack typical primary virulence factors such as toxins, cytolysins, and invasins. Consequently, little is known how pathogenic Mycoplasma species cause host cell damage, inflammation, and disease. Here we identify a novel primary virulence determinant in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Small Colony (SC), which causes host cell injury. This virulence factor, released in significant amounts in the presence of glycerol in the growth medium, consists of toxic by-products such as H2O2 formed by l-alpha-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), a membrane-located enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of glycerol. When embryonic calf nasal epithelial cells are infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in the presence of physiological amounts of glycerol, H2O2 is released inside the cells prior to cell death. This process can be inhibited with monospecific anti-GlpO antibodies. PMID:16166545

Pilo, Paola; Vilei, Edy M; Peterhans, Ernst; Bonvin-Klotz, Laetitia; Stoffel, Michael H; Dobbelaere, Dirk; Frey, Joachim

2005-10-01

307

Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a Farm-Scale Biogas Plant Supplied with Manure from Paratuberculosis-Affected Dairy Cattle?  

PubMed Central

In this study, products from all steps of anaerobic digestion at a farm-scale biogas plant supplied with manure from paratuberculosis-affected dairy cattle were examined and quantified for the presence of the causal agent of paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, using culture and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were detected using culture in fermentors for up to 2 months; the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (101 cells/g) was demonstrated in all anaerobic fermentors and digestate 16 months after initiation of work at a biogas plant, using IS900 qPCR. F57 qPCR was able to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (102 cells/g) at up to 12 months. According to these results, a fermentation process that extended beyond 2 months removed all viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and therefore rendered its product M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free. However, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was found during all the examined periods (more than 1 year), which could be explained by either residual DNA being released from dead cells or by the presence of viable cells whose amount was under the limit of cultivability. As the latter hypothesis cannot be excluded, the safety of the final products of digestion used for fertilization or animal bedding cannot be defined, and further investigation is necessary to confirm or refute this risk. PMID:21398476

Slana, I.; Pribylova, R.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

2011-01-01

308

Derivation of Mutants of Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum Deficient in Export of Pectolytic Enzymes with Potential for Biological Control of Potato Soft Rot  

PubMed Central

Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum Ecb168 produces an antibiotic(s) that suppresses growth of the related bacterium Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora in culture and in wounds of potato tubers. Strain Ecb168 also produces and secretes pectolytic enzymes and causes a vascular necrosis and root rot of sugar beet. Genes (out) involved in secretion of pectolytic enzymes by Ecb168 were localized to two HindIII fragments (8.5 and 10.5 kb) of Ecb168 genomic DNA by hybridization to the cloned out region of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and by complementation of Out- mutants of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora. Out- mutants of Ecb168, which did not secrete pectate lyase into the culture medium, were obtained when deletions internal to either HindIII fragment were introduced into the genome of Ecb168 through marker exchange mutagenesis. Out- mutants of Ecb168 were complemented to the Out+ phenotype by introduction of the corresponding cloned HindIII fragment. Out- mutants of Ecb168 were less virulent than the Out+ parental strain on potato tubers. Strain Ecb168 and Out- derivatives inhibited the growth of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora in culture, indicating that the uncharacterized antibiotic(s) responsible for antagonism was exported through an out-independent mechanism. Strain Ecb168 and Out- derivatives reduced the establishment of large populations of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora in wounds of potato tubers and suppressed tuber soft rot caused by E. carotovora subsp. carotovora. PMID:16349316

Costa, Jose M.; Loper, Joyce E.

1994-01-01

309

Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in soil, crops, and ensiled feed following manure spreading on infected dairy farms  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study was to determine the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in soil, crops, and ensiled feeds following manure spreading. This bacterium was often found in soil samples, but less frequently in harvested feeds and silage. Spreading of manure on fields used for crop harvest is preferred to spreading on grazing pastures. PMID:24179246

Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Hovingh, Ernest; Whitlock, Robert H.; Sweeney, Raymond W.

2013-01-01

310

Adult Invasive and Noninvasive Infections Due to Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in France from 2006 to 2010  

PubMed Central

We characterized 182 Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis isolates and analyzed the epidemiological data on the corresponding infections. stG6, stG485, and stG6792 were the 3 most prevalent invasive emm types among the 27 different emm types recovered. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed for macrolides (26.4%) and tetracycline (34.6%). PMID:23698531

Plainvert, Celine; Collobert, Gislene; Touak, Gerald; Bouvet, Anne

2013-01-01

311

Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in formalin- fixed, paraffin embedded tissues of goats by IS 900 polymerase chain reaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the present study was to optimise and evaluate a procedure for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections from cases of naturally occurring paratuberculosis in goats. A pilot study assessed 3 procedures for extraction of DNA for detection by PCR. The procedure that gave the most consistent results involved removal of

B. N. Tripathi; K. Stevenson

312

Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces roseochromogenes subsp. oscitans DS 12.976, Producer of the Aminocoumarin Antibiotic Clorobiocin.  

PubMed

Streptomyces roseochromogenes subsp. oscitans DS 12.976 is the producer of the gyrase-inhibiting aminocoumarin antibiotic clorobiocin. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, in which we identified the clorobiocin gene cluster as well as an unusually high number (43) of further putative secondary metabolite clusters. PMID:24407645

Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Heide, Lutz; Apel, Alexander Kristian

2014-01-01

313

Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces roseochromogenes subsp. oscitans DS 12.976, Producer of the Aminocoumarin Antibiotic Clorobiocin  

PubMed Central

Streptomyces roseochromogenes subsp. oscitans DS 12.976 is the producer of the gyrase-inhibiting aminocoumarin antibiotic clorobiocin. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, in which we identified the clorobiocin gene cluster as well as an unusually high number (43) of further putative secondary metabolite clusters. PMID:24407645

Ruckert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jorn; Heide, Lutz

2014-01-01

314

Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties  

PubMed Central

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. PMID:25035318

El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle

2014-01-01

315

Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese  

PubMed Central

Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

2014-01-01

316

Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese.  

PubMed

Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

Velly, H; Renault, P; Abraham, A-L; Loux, V; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Fonseca, F; Bouix, M

2014-01-01

317

Recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from nematode larvae cultured from the faeces of sheep with Johne’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to determine whether trichostrongylid nematode larvae become contaminated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis when they develop in the faeces of sheep with Johne’s disease. Nematode larvae were hatched from ova in the faecal samples of affected sheep. Larval sheaths were removed and these as well as exsheathed larvae were subjected to radiometric culture for M.paratuberculosis. The

R. J Whittington; J. B Lloyd; L. A Reddacliff

2001-01-01

318

Genome Sequences of Strain ATCC 29281 and Pin and Northern Red Oak Isolates of Lonsdalea quercina subsp. quercina.  

PubMed

Two bacteria identified as Lonsdalea quercina subsp. quercina were isolated from oak trees showing symptoms of drippy blight. Here, we present their draft genome assemblies, as well as that of the type strain of this species. To our knowledge, these are the first published genome sequences of this subspecies of Lonsdalea quercina. PMID:24926062

Ibarra Caballero, Jorge; Zerillo, Marcelo M; Snelling, Jacob; Cranshaw, Whitney; Boucher, Christina; Tisserat, Ned

2014-01-01

319

Draft genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1, a fecal bacterium of giant pandas.  

PubMed

Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a ?-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome. PMID:23209197

Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong; Tan, Xue-Mei

2012-12-01

320

Infection due to extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype infantis in a neonatal unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the investigation and control of an outbreak of extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Infantis in a neonatal unit in Brazil. Methods: A case-control study for risk factors for Salmonella Infantis systemic infection, environmental cultures, and evaluation of staffing and overcrowding and an assessment of infection control practices were performed. Results: During July 1998 to

Carmem Lúcia Pessoa-Silva; Cristiana M. Toscano; Beatriz Meurer Moreira; Ana Lúcia Santos; Ana Cristina Cisne Frota; Claude Andre Solari; Efigênia L. T. Amorim; Maria da Gloria S. Carvalho; Lúcia Martins Teixeira; William R. Jarvis

2002-01-01

321

Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map) from Feral Cats on a Dairy Farm with Map-infected Cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paratuberculosis is an economical- ly important disease of dairy cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map). The role of nonruminant, nondomestic animals in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis in cattle is unclear. To examine nonruminant, nondomestic animals for the presence of Map, 25 feral cats, nine mice (species unknown), eight rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), six rac- coons (Procyon lotor), and three

Mitchell V. Palmer; William C. Stoffregen; Jeremy G. Carpenter; Judith R. Stabel

2005-01-01

322

Evaluation of four commercial serum ELISAs for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in dairy cows  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the first 3months of 2006, a study was performed on four dairy cattle herds with a history of clinical paratuberculosis, to evaluate different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Serum samples obtained from 326 animals were analysed using four ELISAs to detect antibodies to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Kappa (?) concordance coefficients in pairwise comparisons of the ELISA outcomes ranged

Francisco J. Diéguez; Ana M. González; Santiago Menéndez; María J. Vilar; María L. Sanjuán; Eduardo Yus; Ignacio Arnaiz

2009-01-01

323

Reproductive potential and seed fate of Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra (marula) in the low altitude savannas of South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra (marula) is a well-studied, keystone tree species with high ecological, commercial and cultural value, significant gaps in our understanding of its reproductive biology exist, particularly the factors limiting fruit and seed production, seed fate and the persistence of the seed bank. Therefore, a detailed quantitative assessment of these factors was conducted at five sites

C. V. Helm; S. L. Scott; E. T. F. Witkowski

2011-01-01

324

Management of Sinapis alba subsp. mairei winter cover crop residues for summer weed control in southern Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sinapis alba subsp. mairei (H. Lindb. fil.) Maire, a wild subspecies of S. alba L., which is distributed throughout the Mediterranean basin, has been recently introduced in southern Spain as a winter cover crop in olive groves. The reason behind using this cover crop is for the reduction of Verticillium dahliae inoculum. The effectiveness of this cover crop for weed

C. Alcántara; A. Pujadas; M. Saavedra

2011-01-01

325

First Fully Closed Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Associated with a Food-Borne Outbreak.  

PubMed

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana (Salmonella serovar Cubana) is associated with human and animal disease. Here, we used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the first complete genome sequence of Salmonella serovar Cubana CFSAN002050, which was isolated from fresh alfalfa sprouts during a multistate outbreak in 2012. PMID:25359917

Hoffmann, Maria; Muruvanda, Tim; Pirone, Cary; Korlach, Jonas; Timme, Ruth; Payne, Justin; Evans, Peter; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W; Allard, Marc W

2014-01-01

326

First Fully Closed Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Associated with a Food-Borne Outbreak  

PubMed Central

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana (Salmonella serovar Cubana) is associated with human and animal disease. Here, we used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the first complete genome sequence of Salmonella serovar Cubana CFSAN002050, which was isolated from fresh alfalfa sprouts during a multistate outbreak in 2012. PMID:25359917

Muruvanda, Tim; Pirone, Cary; Korlach, Jonas; Timme, Ruth; Payne, Justin; Evans, Peter; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W.; Allard, Marc W.

2014-01-01

327

Culture- and quantitative IS900 real-time PCR-based analysis of the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a controlled dairy cow farm environment.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to monitor the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in environmental samples taken from a Holstein farm with a long history of clinical paratuberculosis. A herd of 606 head was eradicated, and mechanical cleaning and disinfection with chloramine B with ammonium (4%) was carried out on the farm; in the surrounding areas (on the field and field midden) lime was applied. Environmental samples were collected before and over a period of 24 months after destocking. Only one sample out of 48 (2%) examined on the farm (originating from a waste pit and collected before destocking) was positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by cultivation on solid medium (Herrold's egg yolk medium). The results using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a total of 81% of environmental samples with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 3.09 × 10(3) were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis before destocking compared to 43% with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 5.86 × 10(2) after 24 months. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive samples were detected in the cattle barn as well as in the calf barn and surrounding areas. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from different matrices: floor and instrument scrapings, sediment, or scraping from watering troughs, waste pits, and cobwebs. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was also detected in soil and plants collected on the field midden and the field 24 months after destocking. Although the proportion of positive samples decreased from 64% to 23% over time, the numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were comparable. PMID:22773642

Moravkova, M; Babak, V; Kralova, A; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

2012-09-01

328

Culture- and Quantitative IS900 Real-Time PCR-Based Analysis of the Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a Controlled Dairy Cow Farm Environment  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to monitor the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in environmental samples taken from a Holstein farm with a long history of clinical paratuberculosis. A herd of 606 head was eradicated, and mechanical cleaning and disinfection with chloramine B with ammonium (4%) was carried out on the farm; in the surrounding areas (on the field and field midden) lime was applied. Environmental samples were collected before and over a period of 24 months after destocking. Only one sample out of 48 (2%) examined on the farm (originating from a waste pit and collected before destocking) was positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by cultivation on solid medium (Herrold's egg yolk medium). The results using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a total of 81% of environmental samples with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 3.09 × 103 were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis before destocking compared to 43% with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 5.86 × 102 after 24 months. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive samples were detected in the cattle barn as well as in the calf barn and surrounding areas. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from different matrices: floor and instrument scrapings, sediment, or scraping from watering troughs, waste pits, and cobwebs. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was also detected in soil and plants collected on the field midden and the field 24 months after destocking. Although the proportion of positive samples decreased from 64% to 23% over time, the numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were comparable. PMID:22773642

Moravkova, M.; Babak, V.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

2012-01-01

329

Chemical decontamination with N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium hydroxide improves recovery of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms from cultured milk.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is shed into the milk and feces of cows with advanced Johne's disease, allowing the transmission of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk. The parameters investigated included chemical decontamination with N-acetyl-l-cysteine-sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), alone and in combination with antibiotics (vancomycin, amphotericin B, and nalidixic acid), and the efficacy of solid (Herrold's egg yolk medium [HEY]) and liquid (Bactec 12B and para-JEM) culture media. For each experiment, raw milk samples from a known noninfected cow were inoculated with 10(2) to 10(8) CFU/ml of live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms. The results indicate that an increased length of exposure to NALC-NaOH from 5 to 30 min and an increased concentration of NaOH from 0.5 to 2.0% did not affect the viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Additional treatment of milk samples with the antibiotics following NALC-NaOH treatment decreased the recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells more than treatment with NALC-NaOH alone. The Bactec 12B medium was the superior medium of the three evaluated for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk, as it achieved the lowest threshold of detection. The optimal conditions for NALC-NaOH decontamination were determined to be exposure to 1.50% NaOH for 15 min followed by culture in Bactec 12B medium. This study demonstrates that chemical decontamination with NALC-NaOH resulted in a greater recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from milk than from samples treated with hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HPC). Therefore, it is important to optimize milk decontamination protocols to ensure that low concentrations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be detected. PMID:23637290

Bradner, L; Robbe-Austerman, S; Beitz, D C; Stabel, J R

2013-07-01

330

Variation in the molecular weight of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida antigens when cultured under different conditions in vitro  

PubMed Central

The antigenicity of Photobacterium damselae (Ph. d.) subsp. piscicida, cultured in four different growth media [tryptone soya broth (TSB), glucose-rich medium (GRM), iron-depleted TSB (TSB + IR-), and iron-depleted GRM (GRM + IR-)] was compared by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis using sera obtained from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) raised against live or heat-killed Ph. d. subsp. piscicida. The antigenic expression of Ph. d. subsp. piscicida was found to differ depending on the culture medium used. A significantly higher antibody response was obtained with iron-depleted bacteria by ELISA compared with non-iron depleted bacteria obtained from the sera of sea bass raised against live Ph. d. subsp. piscicida. The sera from sea bass raised against live bacteria showed a band at 22 kDa in bacteria cultured in TSB + IR- or GRM+ IR- when bacteria that had been freshly isolated from fish were used for the screening, while bands at 24 and 47 kDa were observed with bacteria cultured in TSB or GRM. When bacteria were passaged several times on tryptic soya agar prior to culturing in the four different media, only bands at 24 and 47 kDa were recognized, regardless of the medium used to culture the bacteria. It would appear that the molecular weight of Ph. d. subsp. piscicida antigens change in the presence of iron restriction, and sera from sea bass infected with live bacteria are able to detect epitopes on the antigens after this shift in molecular weight. PMID:17679772

Thompson, Kim D.; Volpatti, Donatella; Galeotti, Marco; Adams, A.

2007-01-01

331

In Silico Identification of Epitopes in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Proteins That Were Upregulated under Stress Conditions  

PubMed Central

Johne's disease in ruminants is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is difficult, especially in the early stages. To date, ideal antigen candidates are not available for efficient immunization or immunodiagnosis. This study reports the in silico selection and subsequent analysis of epitopes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins that were found to be upregulated under stress conditions as a means to identify immunogenic candidate proteins. Previous studies have reported differential regulation of proteins when M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is exposed to stressors which induce a response similar to dormancy. Dormancy may be involved in evading host defense mechanisms, and the host may also mount an immune response against these proteins. Twenty-five M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins that were previously identified as being upregulated under in vitro stress conditions were analyzed for B and T cell epitopes by use of the prediction tools at the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource. Major histocompatibility complex class I T cell epitopes were predicted using an artificial neural network method, and class II T cell epitopes were predicted using the consensus method. Conformational B cell epitopes were predicted from the relevant three-dimensional structure template for each protein. Based on the greatest number of predicted epitopes, eight proteins (MAP2698c [encoded by desA2], MAP2312c [encoded by fadE19], MAP3651c [encoded by fadE3_2], MAP2872c [encoded by fabG5_2], MAP3523c [encoded by oxcA], MAP0187c [encoded by sodA], and the hypothetical proteins MAP3567 and MAP1168c) were identified as potential candidates for study of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses within infected hosts. PMID:22496492

Gurung, Ratna B.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.

2012-01-01

332

Bioactive alkaloids produced by Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. Neoaurantiaca, an endophytic bacterium from Salvia miltiorrhiza.  

PubMed

Eleven compounds were isolated from the culture of an endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. Neoaurantiaca in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods as cyclo-(Gly-L-Ala) (1), cyclo-(L-Ala-L-Ala) (2), cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly) (3), cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Ser) (4), cyclo-(L-Ala-trans-4-hydroxy-L-Pro) (5), cyclo-(L-Val-L-Pro) (6), cyclo-(Gly-L-Tyr) (7), cyclo-(L-Ala-L-Tyr) (8), cyclo-(L-Tyr-trans-4-hydroxy-L-Pro) (9), 3-methylhydantoin (10) and 2-piperidinone (11). All these compounds were isolated from this bacterium for the first time. The brine shrimp lethality, antifungal and antibacterial activities of these compounds were evaluated. The results indicated that some cyclodipeptides may play an important role in plant-bacteria interactions. PMID:22765159

Li, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Hao-Yu; Duan, Jia-Li; Gao, Jin-Ming; Xue, Quan-Hong

2013-03-01

333

Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus.  

PubMed

The chemical composition of the essential oil of the leaves of Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus (Viv.) Greuter & Burdet, (Cistaceae), was investigated by GC/MS. Thirty-nine components were identified, representing 73.9% (based on % total peak area by GC) of the oil composition. The main components of the oil were alpha-cadinene (6.5%), delta-cadinene (5.6%), viridiflorol (5.4%), bulnesol (6.3%), ledol (3.8%), alpha-copaene (3.8%), beta-selinene (3.4%), cubenene (3.3%), manoyl oxide (9.9%) and 13-epi-manoyl oxide (3.4%). Antibacterial studies were carried out in vitro against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. PMID:9342956

Demetzos, C; Katerinopoulos, H; Kouvarakis, A; Stratigakis, N; Loukis, A; Ekonomakis, C; Spiliotis, V; Tsaknis, J

1997-10-01

334

Biological Role of Pigment Production for the Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii  

PubMed Central

Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a yellow carotenoid pigment. A nonpigmented mutant was selected from a bank of mutants generated by random transposon mutagenesis. The transposon insertion site was mapped to the crtB gene, encoding a putative phytoene synthase, an enzyme involved in the early steps of carotenoid biosynthesis. We demonstrate here that the carotenoid pigment imparts protection against UV radiation and also contributes to the complete antioxidant pathway of P. stewartii. Moreover, production of this pigment is regulated by the EsaI/EsaR quorum-sensing system and significantly contributes to the virulence of the pathogen in planta. PMID:22820327

Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey

2012-01-01

335

Citrate can partially replace carbon dioxide required for growth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis.  

PubMed

Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis was grown as batch cultures on a chemically defined medium. No growth was observed when the cultures were sparged with pure nitrogen (1.3 l l-1 min-1) whereas the cultures displayed exponential growth in the presence of minute amounts of carbon dioxide (0.035 mol-% of the inlet gas). However, in the former case, the addition of citrate restored growth. This suggested that oxaloacetate required for aspartate biosynthesis can be formed by the carboxylation of pyruvate or by citrate catabolism. When the cultures were heavily sparged with nitrogen (2.6 l l-1 min-1), no growth was observed even in the presence of citrate. This indicated that growth in these conditions was repressed by the absence of carbon dioxide required in some other biosynthetic reaction than in the carboxylation of pyruvate leading to oxaloacetate/aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:10792674

Henriksen, C M; Curic, M; Nilsson, D

2000-05-01

336

Cytolytic peptide fragments of Cyt1Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.  

PubMed

Cyt1Aa is the major and most active component of the parasporal crystal of the Gram-positive soil entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. The Cyt1Aa protoxin exhibits some hemolytic and cytolytic activity. However, highly active 22-25 kDa toxins are obtained after proteolysis of Cyt1Aa from both the N- and the C-termini. As shown in this study, preliminary binding of the protoxin to polylamellary liposomes or partial denaturation of Cyt1Aa and further processing by several exogenous proteases yielded short 4.9-11.5 kDa cytolytic peptide fragments of Cyt1Aa. The shortest 51 amino acid peptide was obtained after pre-incubation of Cyt1Aa with SDS and proteolysis with proteinase K. This peptide was purified, identified as the Ile87-Asp137 fragment of Cyt1Aa and was shown to exhibit more than 30 % hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes. PMID:22875467

Nisnevitch, Marina; Nikonov, Svetlana; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

2013-03-01

337

Infection of the thyroid gland caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus.  

PubMed

We report what we consider to be the first case of an abscess of the thyroid gland due to Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus (C. fetus) in a patient suffering from hyperthyroidism. C. fetus is known as a rare and opportunistic pathogen in humans, causing a broad variety of systemic infections. Acquisition by humans is thought to occur through contact with animals or animal products and to start as a gastro-intestinal colonization. The detection of C. fetus in stool is challenging, since culture efforts are generally directed in order to fulfil growth requirements of C.jejuni, a much more common enteric pathogen. Detection of C. fetus in non-stool samples is even more challenging since routine culture doesn't imply prolonged incubation (>72h), selective media and microaerophilic conditions. It is therefore not unlikely that human infections caused by C. fetus occur more often than generally assumed. PMID:17547296

Goegebuer, T; Verhaeghe, J P; Verlinde, A; De Laere, E; Surmont, I

2007-01-01

338

Quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) survival in monocyte-derived macrophages.  

PubMed

Real-time PCR assays were developed to quantitate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. We measured the absolute number of both host cells and bacteria in in vitro challenge assays. Results obtained from real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) DNA copy counts were compared to visual quantitation of fluorescent-stained MAP in macrophages. Conclusions from our original visual analysis were supported by the second (qPCR) methodology; however, the qPCR assay proved to be more consistent between samples and was easier to perform. There was a strain-to-strain difference in growth curves between fluorescent quantitation (FQ) and qPCR that we believe to be a consequence of bacterial growth characteristics in FQ. In summary, real-time PCR assays provided a more accurate and precise method for evaluating intracellular growth dynamics when comparing strains of MAP. PMID:20832125

Mitchell, Rebecca M; Gollnick, Nicole S; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Russell, David G; Schukken, Ynte H

2011-01-01

339

[Dissociation of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorumrelated to the changes in the cell wall lipopolysaccharide].  

PubMed

It is shown for the first time that population heterogeneity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is applicable to a wide range of strains and therefore is a universal characteristic. Using the method of specific selection with the help of carotovoricins which are identical to the phage tails a set of population dissociants of different types was obtained, due to the fact that S-LPS is the part of the cell wall which contains their attachment sites. It was determined that changes in S-lipopolysaccharides lead to the formation of SR-, R-forms of P. carotovorum. A suggestion is made that the changes in the surface structures of dissociants have a significant impact on secretion types II and III--the main pathogenicity factor of some bacteria. The results presented are a prerequisite for studying the direction, the reasons for dissociation process and its impact on the pathogenicity of P. carotovorum. PMID:22545443

Tovkach, F I; Romaniuk, L V; Gorb, T E; Ostapchuk, A N; Muchnik, F V

2012-01-01

340

Antioxidant and antiproliferative activity of Hypericum hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson essential oil.  

PubMed

This study was undertaken to assess the antioxidant and antiproliferative potential of the essential oil of Hypericum hircinum L. subsp. majus (Aiton) N. Robson. Analysis of the oil composition revealed that sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (69.3%) dominate, cis-?-guaiene, ?-selinene and (E)-caryophyllene being the most representative. Significant values of antioxidant activity were found using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assays. The essential oil revealed antiproliferative activity as evaluated on human glioblastoma (T98G), human prostatic adenocarcinoma (PC3), human squamous carcinoma (A431) and mouse melanoma (B16-F1) tumour cell lines by MTT assay. PMID:22480321

Quassinti, Luana; Lupidi, Giulio; Maggi, Filippo; Sagratini, Gianni; Papa, Fabrizio; Vittori, Sauro; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Bramucci, Massimo

2013-01-01

341

Two new species of Lactarius associated with Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta in Mexico.  

PubMed

In pure stands of Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta trees from Sierra Norte de Puebla (central Mexico) two undescribed ectomycorrhizal species of Lactarius were discovered. Distinction of the two new species is based on morphological characters and supported with phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS region and part of the gene that encodes for the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2). The phylogenies inferred recovered the two species in different clades strongly supported by posterior probabilities and bootstrap values. The new Lactarius species are recognized as part of the assemblage of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Alnus acuminata. Information about these taxa includes the morphological variation achieved along 16 monitories 2010-2013. Descriptions are provided. They are accompanied by photos including SEM photomicrographs of basidiospores and information on differences between them and other related taxa from Europe and the United States. PMID:24895428

Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay, Edith

2014-01-01

342

Development of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in Sugarcane  

PubMed Central

Ratoon stunt, caused by the xylem-limited coryneform bacterium Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx), is a deep bacteriosis and prevalent in most of sugarcane-producing countries. Based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), we developed a method for detecting Lxx. The major advantages of the LAMP method are visual judgment by color and time saving with only 60?min for identification of Lxx and without the need for costly PCR apparatus and gel scanner. In the present study, positive and negative samples detected by the LAMP method were clearly distinguishable. When total DNA extracted from internode juice was used as the template, the sensitivity of LAMP was 10 times higher than that of the conventional PCR detection. The LAMP assay is a highly specific, rapid, and sensitive method for the diagnosis of ratoon stunt caused by Lxx in sugarcane. This is the first report of LAMP-based assay for the detection of Lxx in sugarcane. PMID:23710444

Liu, Jing; Guo, Jinlong; Chen, Rukai; Grisham, Michael Paul

2013-01-01

343

Mechanism of inhibited growth of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.  

PubMed

Physiological studies were conducted in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of inhibition of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii occurred in media supplemented with 1% glucose, indicating that glucose utilization by the latter bacterium was not responsible for growth inhibition of the former bacterium. The medium pH in which P. shermanii inhibited the growth of B. pumilus was 4.3. Propionic acid was positively identified in the culture medium in which B. pumilus was inhibited by P. shermanii. The presence of propionic acid and a low medium pH may account for the inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii. Sodium lactate concentrations of 0.8-1.0% were essential for the continuous growth of and propionic acid production by P. shermanii. Thus, use of P. shermanii to inhibit B. pumilus in foods would likely require a lactate source. PMID:8060789

Marshall, D L; Odame-Darkwah, J K

1994-04-01

344

Fermentation performance of an exopolysaccharide-producing strain of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.  

PubMed

The formation of exopolysaccharide (EPS) and extracellular metabolites was studied in a strain of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (NCFB 2483), grown under batch culture conditions in a semi-defined medium incorporating lactose and casein hydrolysate. Performance parameters were derived from the fermentation data, and kinetic models were applied in order to describe the production of EPS, extracellular metabolites, and biomass produced. Lactose was split intracellularly, with the resultant galactose being exported from the cell, and the glucose being metabolised further to EPS and lactic acid. Production of EPS, lactate, and galactose was closely growth-associated and followed a pattern of primary kinetics. A marginally lower galactose level relative to the modelled levels throughout most of the time course of the fermentation suggests that not all galactose is exported from the cell, and that a low level of flux to other metabolites, such as EPS, might exist. PMID:14618406

Welman, A D; Maddox, I S

2003-11-01

345

Exopolysaccharide and extracellular metabolite production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, grown on lactose in continuous culture.  

PubMed

Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2483, when grown on lactose in continuous culture, showed increasing specific yields and volumetric productivities of exopolysaccharide (EPS) with increasing dilution rate. Specific and volumetric productivities of lactate and galactose, as extracellular metabolites, increased in response to the incremental changes in the dilution rate up to 0.4 h(-1). Elevated Y(p/s) values determined for EPS (0.025 g EPS x g lactose(-1)) at the dilution rates of 0.3 h(-1)-0.4 h(-1), relative to those determined at lower dilution rates, suggest a diversion of carbon flux towards EPS being associated with the higher rates of growth. PMID:14571975

Welman, Alan; Maddox, Ian; Archer, Richard

2003-09-01

346

Spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through soil and grass on a mouflon (Ovis aries) pasture.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to describe spatial contamination of the environment on a mouflon pasture, as well as to assess the contamination of grass and roots after surface contamination and in depth contamination with feces and buried tissues from animals infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis). Samples of soil, roots, and aerial parts of plants were collected from different locations inside the mouflon pasture, and one control sample site was chosen outside the area where the animals are living. M. a. paratuberculosis DNA was present in all the examined sites and was more often detected in roots than in soil. DNA was detected at up to 80 cm of depth and was spatially more widespread than the initial hypothesis of M. a. paratuberculosis leaching vertically into deeper layers of soil. This study broadens our knowledge of the spread and persistence of M. a. paratuberculosis in an environment with highly infected animals. PMID:24880776

Kaevska, Marija; Lvoncik, S; Lamka, J; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

2014-10-01

347

Results of Multiple Diagnostic Tests for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and in Controls  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis has been incriminated as a cause of Crohn's disease (CD); however, studies to date have been relatively small and generally only used a single diagnostic assay. The objective of the study was to reexamine the association of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and CD using multiple diagnostic tests. Five methods were used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in 439 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and 324 control subjects in the United States and Denmark. Most assays were adaptations of diagnostic tests for this infection performed routinely on animals. PCR for IS900, a genetic element unique to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, was positive significantly more often on resected bowel and lymph node tissues from CD patients (19.0%) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (26.2%) than from controls (6.3%) (P < 0.05). Positive IS900 PCR results occurred more often in U.S. than in Danish IBD patients, 32.0 versus 13.3% (P = 0.025). The majority of Danish patients were bacillus Calmette-Guérin (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) vaccinated (CD, 77.5%; UC, 86.6%; controls, 83.0%) whereas none of the U.S. patients with IBD and only 2% of U.S. controls were vaccinated. Among Danish IBD patients, positive PCR findings were four times more common among subjects who were not BCG vaccinated (33.3%) than among BCG vaccinates (8.8%, P = 0.02). Culture of the same tissues tested by PCR using modified BACTEC 12B medium failed to grow M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from patients or controls. U.S. CD patients had the highest serological evidence (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for serum antibodies) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection (20.7% of patients positive) which was higher than for all UC patients studied (6.1%) or healthy controls (3.8%, P < 0.005). Among Danish patients alone, however, no significant differences in rates of ELISA-positive results among CD, UC, or control patients were found. For 181 study subjects, both IS900 PCR and ELISA were performed. Although 11 were ELISA positive and 36 were PCR positive, in no instance was a patient positive by both tests, suggesting that these states are mutually exclusive. Evaluation of cytokine-mediated immune responses of IBD patients was complicated by the influence of immunosuppressive therapy given most IBD patients. Gamma interferon (IFN-?) release by peripheral blood leukocytes after M. avium purified protein derivative PPD antigen stimulation showed significantly lower responses in CD patients than in UC patients or controls in both U.S. (by ex vivo assay) and Danish (by in vitro assay) populations (P < 0.05). Interleukin-5 responses were not different among CD, UC, or control groups. Collectively, the PCR, ELISA, and IFN-? tests for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis together with the unexpected observation that BCG vaccination influenced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detection, lead us to conclude that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, or some similarly fastidious mycobacterial species, infects at least a subset of IBD patients. Whether the infection is primary (causal) or secondary, it may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of IBD. PMID:11101567

Collins, Michael T.; Lisby, Gorm; Moser, Claus; Chicks, Debra; Christensen, Steen; Reichelderfer, Mark; H?iby, Niels; Harms, Bruce A.; Thomsen, Ole ?.; Skibsted, Ulrik; Binder, Vibeke

2000-01-01

348

Comparative chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi subsp. glandulosa (Req.) Nyman and Calamintha grandiflora (L.) Moench (Labiatae).  

PubMed

The two studied Calamintha species showed different polyphenolic content and sterol composition. Calamintha grandiflora possessed twice the polyphenolic content of Calamintha nepeta subsp. glandulosa, while the latter contained a higher number of sterols. Among them, stigmast-5-en-3?-ol was found to be the major constituent. The methanolic extract of C. grandiflora was more potent than the C. nepeta subsp. glandulosa methanolic extract in a DPPH assay, while the activity of the C. grandiflora EtOAc fraction was weaker than its C. nepeta subsp. glandulosa counterpart. Fractions of C. nepeta subsp. glandulosa showed higher activity using a ?-carotene bleaching test. The petrol ether fraction of C. grandiflora showed significant inhibition of NO production. PMID:21861645

Conforti, Filomena; Marrelli, Mariangela; Statti, Giancarlo; Menichini, Federica; Uzunov, Dimitar; Solimene, Umberto; Menichini, Francesco

2012-01-01

349

Long Lasting Persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis (Bti) in Mosquito Natural Habitats  

PubMed Central

Background The detrimental effects of chemical insecticides on the environment and human health have lead to the call for biological alternatives. Today, one of the most promising solutions is the use of spray formulations based on Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) in insect control programs. As a result, the amounts of Bti spread in the environment are expected to increase worldwide, whilst the common belief that commercial Bti is easily cleared from the ecosystem has not yet been clearly established. Methodology/Main Findings In this study, we aimed to determine the nature and origin of the high toxicity toward mosquito larvae found in decaying leaf litter collected in several natural mosquito breeding sites in the Rhône-Alpes region. From the toxic fraction of the leaf litter, we isolated B. cereus-like bacteria that were further characterized as B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis using PCR amplification of specific toxin genes. Immunological analysis of these Bti strains showed that they belong to the H14 group. We finally used amplified length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to show that the strains isolated from the leaf litter were closely related to those present in the commercial insecticide used for field application, and differed from natural worldwide genotypes. Conclusions/Significance Our results raise the issue of the persistence, potential proliferation and environmental accumulation of human-spread Bti in natural mosquito habitats. Such Bti environmental persistence may lengthen the exposure time of insects to this bio-insecticide, thereby increasing the risk of resistance acquisition in target insects, and of a negative impact on non-target insects. PMID:18941501

Tilquin, Mathieu; Paris, Margot; Reynaud, Stéphane; Despres, Laurence; Ravanel, Patrick; Geremia, Roberto A.; Gury, Jérôme

2008-01-01

350

Genetic and Physiological Responses of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to Hydrogen Peroxide Stress  

PubMed Central

Consumer interest in probiotic bifidobacteria is increasing, but industry efforts to secure high cell viability in foods is undermined by these anaerobes' sensitivity to oxidative stress. To address this limitation, we investigated genetic and physiological responses of two fully sequenced Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, BL-04 and DSM 10140, to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress. Although the genome sequences for these strains are highly clonal, prior work showed that they differ in both intrinsic and inducible H2O2 resistance. Transcriptome analysis of early-stationary-phase cells exposed to a sublethal H2O2 concentration detected significant (P < 0.05) changes in expression of 138 genes in strain BL-04 after 5 min and 27 genes after 20 min. Surprisingly, no significant changes in gene expression were detected in DSM 10140 at either time. Genomic data suggested that differences in H2O2 stress resistance might be due to a mutation in a BL-04 gene encoding long-chain fatty acid coenzyme A (CoA) ligase. To explore this possibility, membrane fatty acids were isolated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results confirmed that the strains had significantly different lipid profiles: the BL-04 membrane contained higher percentages of C14:0 and C16:0 and lower percentages of C18:1n9. Alteration of the DSM 10140 membrane lipid composition using modified growth medium to more closely mimic that of BL-04 yielded cells that showed increased intrinsic resistance to lethal H2O2 challenge but did not display an inducible H2O2 stress response. The results show that deliberate stress induction or membrane lipid modification can be employed to significantly improve H2O2 resistance in B. animalis subsp. lactis strains. PMID:23772066

Oberg, Taylor S.; Ward, Robert E.; Steele, James L.

2013-01-01

351

Physical and genetic map of the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403.  

PubMed Central

A combined physical and genetic map of the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 was determined. We constructed a restriction map for the NotI, ApaI, and SmaI enzymes. The order of the restriction fragments was determined by using the randomly integrative plasmid pRL1 and by performing indirect end-labeling experiments. The strain IL1403 chromosome was found to be circular and 2,420 kb in size. A total of 24 chromosomal markers were mapped on the chromosome by performing hybridization experiments with gene probes for L. lactis and various other bacteria. Integration of pRC1-derived plasmids via homologous recombination allowed more precise location of some lactococcal genes and allowed us to determine the orientation of these genes on the chromosome. Recurrent sequences, such as insertion elements and rRNA gene (rrn) clusters, were also mapped. At least seven copies of IS1076 were present and were located on 50% of the chromosome. In contrast, no copy of ISS1RS was detected. Six ribosomal operons were found on the strain IL1403 chromosome; five were located on 16% of the chromosome and were transcribed in the same direction. A comparison of the physical maps of L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and DL11 showed that these two strains are closely related and that the variable regions are located mainly near the rrn gene clusters. In contrast, despite major restriction pattern dissimilarities between L. lactis IL1403 and MG1363, the overall genetic organization of the genome seems to be conserved between these two strains. Images PMID:1328163

Le Bourgeois, P; Lautier, M; Mata, M; Ritzenthaler, P

1992-01-01

352

Identification and characterization of three previously undescribed crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan.  

PubMed

The total protoxin complement in the parasporal body of mosquitocidal strain, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan 367, was determined by use of a polyacrylamide gel block coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of eight protoxins were identified from this strain, including five reported protoxins (Cry11Ba, Cry19Aa, Cry24Aa, Cry25Aa, and Cyt2Bb), as well as three previously undescribed (Cry30Ca, Cry60Aa, and Cry60Ba) in this isolate. It was interesting that the encoding genes of three new protoxins existed as cry30Ca-gap-orf2 and cry60Ba-gap-cry60Aa. The cry30Ca and a downstream orf2 gene were oriented in the same direction and separated by 114 bp, and cry60Ba was located 156 bp upstream from and in the same orientation to cry60Aa. The three new protoxin genes were cloned from B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan and expressed in an acrystalliferous strain under the control of cyt1A gene promoters and the STAB-SD stabilizer sequence. Recombinant strain containing only cry30Ca did not produce visible inclusion under microscope observation, while that containing both cry30Ca and orf2 could produce large inclusions. Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba synthesized either alone or together in the acrystalliferous host could yield large inclusions. In bioassays using the fourth-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba alone or together had estimated 50% lethal concentrations of 2.9 to 7.9 ?g/ml; however, Cry30Ca with or without ORF2 was not toxic to this mosquito. PMID:23524673

Sun, Yunjun; Zhao, Qiang; Xia, Liqiu; Ding, Xuezhi; Hu, Quanfang; Federici, Brian A; Park, Hyun-Woo

2013-06-01

353

Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.  

PubMed

Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ? 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1?/? (IL-1?/?), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex. PMID:24814797

Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

2014-08-01

354

In vivo morphological and antigenic characteristics of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida  

PubMed Central

The present study was conducted to examine the morphology and antigenicity of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida by culturing the bacterium in vivo in the peritoneal cavity of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) within dialysis bags with either a low molecular weight (LMW) cut-off of 25 kDa or a high molecular weight (HMW) cut-off of 300 kDa. Differences were observed in the growth rate between the bacteria cultured in vivo or in vitro. Bacteria cultured in vivo were smaller and produced a capsular layer, which was more prominent in bacteria cultured in the HMW bag. Antigenicity was examined by Western blot analysis using sera from sea bass injected with live Ph. d. subsp. piscicida. The sera recognised bands at 45 and 20 kDa in bacteria cultured in vivo in the LMW bag. Bacteria cultured in vivo in the HMW bag did not express the 45 kDa band when whole cell extracts were examined, although the antigen was present in their extracellular products. In addition, these bacteria had a band at 18 kDa rather than 20 kDa. Differences in glycoprotein were also evident between bacteria cultured in vitro and in vivo. Bacteria cultured in vitro in LMW and HMW bags displayed a single 26 kDa band. Bacteria cultured in the LMW bag in vivo displayed bands at 26 and 27 kDa, while bacteria cultured in vivo in the HMW bag possessed only the 27 kDa band. These bands may represent sialic acid. The significance of the changes observed in the bacterium's structure and antigenicity when cultured in vivo is discussed. PMID:18487938

Thompson, Kim D.; Volpatti, Donatella; Galeotti, Marco; Adams, A.

2008-01-01

355

Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates Recovered from Wild Animal Species  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterial isolates were obtained by radiometric culture from 33 different species of captive or free-ranging animals (n = 106) and environmental sources (n = 3) from six geographic zones within the United States. The identities of all 109 isolates were confirmed by using mycobactin J dependence and characterization of five well-defined molecular markers, including two integration loci of IS900 (loci L1 and L9), one Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis)-specific sequence (locus 251), and one M. avium subsp. avium-specific marker (IS1245), as well as hsp65 and IS1311 restriction endonuclease analyses. Seventy-six acid-fast isolates were identified as M. paratuberculosis, 15 were identified as belonging to the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex (but not M. paratuberculosis), and the remaining 18 were identified as mycobacteria outside the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex. Fingerprinting by multiplex PCR for IS900 integration loci clustered 67 of the 76 M. paratuberculosis strains into a single clade (designated clade A18) and had a Simpson's diversity index (D) of 0.53. In contrast, sequence-based characterization of a recently identified M. paratuberculosis short sequence repeat (SSR) region enabled the differentiation of the M. paratuberculosis isolates in clade A18 into seven distinct alleles (D = 0.75). The analysis revealed eight subtypes among the 33 species of animals, suggesting the interspecies transmission of specific strains. Taken together, the results of our analyses demonstrate that SSR analysis enables the genetic characterization of M. paratuberculosis isolates from different host species and provide evidence for the host specificity of some M. paratuberculosis strains as well as sharing of strains between wild and domesticated animal species. PMID:15071028

Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Strother, Megan; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

2004-01-01

356

Detection and Verification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Fresh Ileocolonic Mucosal Biopsy Specimens from Individuals with and without Crohn's Disease  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a robust and phenotypically versatile pathogen which causes chronic inflammation of the intestine in many species, including primates. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is widespread in domestic livestock and is present in retail pasteurized cows' milk in the United Kingdom and, potentially, elsewhere. Water supplies are also at risk. The involvement of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Crohn's disease (CD) in humans has been uncertain because of the substantial difficulties in detecting this pathogen. In its Ziehl-Neelsen staining-negative form, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is highly resistant to chemical and enzymatic lysis. The present study describes the development of optimized sample processing and DNA extraction procedures with fresh human intestinal mucosal biopsy specimens which ensure access to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA and maximize detection of these low-abundance pathogens. Also described are two nested PCR methodologies targeted at IS900, designated IS900[L/AV] and IS900[TJ1-4], which are uniquely specific for IS900. Detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in mucosal biopsy specimens was also evaluated by using mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures (Becton Dickinson). IS900[L/AV] PCR detected M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 34 of 37 (92%) patients with CD and in 9 of 34 (26%) controls without CD (noninflammatory bowel disease [nIBD] controls) (P = 0.0002; odds ratio = 3.47). M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected by IS900[L/AV] PCR in MGIT cultures after 14 to 88 weeks of incubation in 14 of 33 (42%) CD patients and 3 of 33 (9%) nIBD controls (P = 0.0019; odds ratio = 4.66). Nine of 15 (60%) MGIT cultures of specimens from CD patients incubated for more than 38 weeks were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In each case the identity of IS900 from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was verified by amplicon sequencing. The rate of detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in individuals with CD is highly significant and implicates this chronic enteric pathogen in disease causation. PMID:12843021

Bull, Tim J.; McMinn, Elizabeth J.; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Skull, Angela; Durkin, Damien; Neild, Penny; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger; Hermon-Taylor, John

2003-01-01

357

kdgR Ecc Negatively Regulates Genes for Pectinases, Cellulase, Protease, Harpin Ecc , and a Global RNA Regulator in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora produces extracellular pectate lyase (Pel), polygalacturonase (Peh), cellulase (Cel), and protease (Prt). The concerted actions of these enzymes largely determine the virulence of this plant-pathogenic bacterium. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora also produces HarpinEcc, the elicitor of the hypersensitive reaction. We document here that KdgREcc (Kdg, 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate; KdgR, general re- pressor of genes involved in pectin and

YANG LIU; GUOQIAO JIANG; YAYA CUI; ASITA MUKHERJEE; WEI LEI MA; ARUN K. CHATTERJEE

1999-01-01

358

Ecological interaction of a biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens strain producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol with the soft rot potato pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erwinia carotovora subspecies atroseptica is the agent of soft rot of potato and causes important crop damage in Europe. Synthetic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) inhibited the growth of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica under in vitro conditions and Pseudomonas fluorescens F113, which produces DAPG, was studied for biocontrol of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica. Wild-type F113 (or the spontaneous rifampicin-resistant mutant F113Rif) inhibited growth

Don Cronin; Yvan Moënne-Loccoz; Anne Fenton; Colum Dunne; David N Dowling; Fergal O'Gara

1997-01-01

359

The chromosome map of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. canadensis HD224 is highly similar to that of the Bacillus cereus type strain ATCC 14579  

Microsoft Academic Search

A physical map of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. canadensis HD224 chromosome based on AscI, NotI, and SfiI restriction sites has been established. The chromosome map of 4.3 Mb was similar to a revised map of the chromosome of the B. cereus type strain ATCC 14579, except that the B. thuringiensis subsp. canadensis HD224 chromosome lacked a NotI site and had

Cathrine Rein Carlson; Trine Johansen; Anne-Brit Kolstø

1996-01-01

360

Comparison of Culture and a Novel 5 Taq Nuclease Assay for Direct Detection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in Clinical Specimens from Cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis-specific 5 Taq nuclease PCR assay using a 3 minor groove binder- DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) was developed based on a subspecies-specific fragment of unknown identity (S. Hum, K. Quinn, J. Brunner, and S. L. On, Aust. Vet. J. 75:827-831, 1997). The assay specifically detected four C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains with no observed cross-reaction with

Lyle McMillen; Geoffry Fordyce; Vivienne J. Doogan; Ala E. Lew

361

Prevalence and comparison of Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus in raw and fermented dairy products from East and West Africa.  

PubMed

Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius (Sii) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus are members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) associated with human infections. SBSEC-related endocarditis was furthermore associated with rural residency in Southern Europe. SBSEC members are increasingly isolated as predominant species from fermented dairy products in Europe, Asia and Africa. African variants of Sii displayed dairy adaptations to lactose metabolism paralleling those of Streptococcus thermophilus including genome decay. In this study, the aim was to assess the prevalence of Sii and possibly other SBSEC members in dairy products of East and West Africa in order to identify their habitat, estimate their importance in dairy fermentation processes and determine geographic areas affected by this potential health risk. Presumptive SBSEC members were isolated on semi-selective M17 and SM agar media. Subsequent genotypic identification of isolates was based on rep-PCR fingerprinting and SBSEC-specific16S rRNA gene PCR assay. Detailed identification was achieved through application of novel primers enhancing the binding stringency in partial groES/groEL gene amplification and subsequent DNA sequencing. The presence of S. thermophilus-like lacS and lacZ genes in the SBSEC isolates was determined to elucidate the prevalence of this dairy adaptation. Isolates (n = 754) were obtained from 72 raw and 95 fermented milk samples from Côte d'Ivoire and Kenya on semi-selective agar media. Colonies of Sii were not detected from raw milk despite high microbial titers of approximately 10(6)CFU/mL on M17 agar medium. However, after spontaneous milk fermentation Sii was genotypically identified in 94.1% of Kenyan samples and 60.8% of Kenyan isolates. Sii prevalence in Côte d'Ivoire displayed seasonal variations in samples from 32.3% (June) to 40.0% (Dec/Jan) and isolates from 20.5% (June) to 27.7% (Dec/Jan) present at titers of 10(6)-10(8)CFU/mL. lacS and lacZ genes were detected in all Kenyan and 25.8% (June) to 65.4% (Dec/Jan) of Ivorian Sii isolates. Regional differences in prevalence of Sii and dairy adaptations were observed, but no clear effect of dairy animal, fermentation procedure and climate was revealed. Conclusively, the high prevalence of Sii in Kenya, Côte d'Ivoire in addition to Somalia, Sudan and Mali strongly indicates a pivotal role of Sii in traditional African dairy fermentations potentially paralleling that of typical western dairy species S. thermophilus. Putative health risks associated with the consumption of high amounts of live Sii and potential different degrees of evolutionary adaptation or ecological colonization require further epidemiologic and genomic investigations, particularly in Africa. PMID:24131584

Jans, Christoph; Kaindi, Dasel Wambua Mulwa; Böck, Désirée; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Kouamé-Sina, Sylvie Mireille; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

2013-10-15

362

Differentiation of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae, the Cause of American Foulbrood of Honeybees, by Using PCR and Restriction Fragment Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA  

PubMed Central

A rapid procedure for the identification of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood (AFB) disease of honeybees (Apis mellifera L.), based on PCR and restriction fragment analysis of the 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) is described. Eighty-six bacterial strains belonging to 39 species of the genera Paenibacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, and Virgibacillus were characterized. Amplified rDNA was digested with seven restriction endonucleases. The combined data from restriction analysis enabled us to distinguish 35 profiles. Cluster analysis revealed that P. larvae subsp. larvae and Paenibacillus larvae subsp. pulvifaciens formed a group with about 90% similarity; however, the P. larvae subsp. larvae restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern produced by endonuclease HaeIII was found to be unique and distinguishable among other closely related bacteria. This pattern was associated with DNA extracted directly from honeybee brood samples showing positive AFB clinical signs that yielded the restriction profile characteristic of P. larvae subsp. larvae, while no amplification product was obtained from healthy larvae. The method described here is particularly useful because of the short time required to carry it out and because it allows the differentiation of P. larvae subsp. larvae-infected larvae from all other species found in apiarian sources. PMID:12089057

Alippi, Adriana M.; López, Ana Claudia; Aguilar, O. Mario

2002-01-01

363

Genome-Wide DNA Microarray Analysis of Francisella tularensis Strains Demonstrates Extensive Genetic Conservation within the Species but Identifies Regions That Are Unique to the Highly Virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis  

PubMed Central

Francisella tularensis is a potent pathogen and a possible bioterrorism agent. Little is known, however, to explain the molecular basis for its virulence and the distinct differences in virulence found between the four recognized subspecies, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida. We developed a DNA microarray based on 1,832 clones from a shotgun library used for sequencing of the highly virulent strain F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4. This allowed a genome-wide analysis of 27 strains representing all four subspecies. Overall, the microarray analysis confirmed a limited genetic variation within the species F. tularensis, and when the strains were compared, at most 3.7% of the probes showed differential hybridization. Cluster analysis of the hybridization data revealed that the causative agents of type A and type B tularemia, i.e., F. tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, respectively, formed distinct clusters. Despite marked differences in their virulence and geographical origin, a high degree of genomic similarity between strains of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis and F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica was apparent. Strains from Japan clustered separately, as did strains of F. tularensis subsp. novicida. Eight regions of difference (RD) 0.6 to 11.5 kb in size, altogether comprising 21 open reading frames, were identified that distinguished strains of the moderately virulent subspecies F. tularensis subsp. holarctica and the highly virulent subspecies F. tularensis subsp. tularensis. One of these regions, RD1, allowed for the first time the development of an F. tularensis-specific PCR assay that discriminates each of the four subspecies. PMID:12843022

Broekhuijsen, Martien; Larsson, Par; Johansson, Anders; Bystrom, Mona; Eriksson, Ulla; Larsson, Eva; Prior, Richard G.; Sjostedt, Anders; Titball, Richard W.; Forsman, Mats

2003-01-01

364

Genetic uniformity of international isolates of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli , causal agent of ratoon stunting disease of sugarcane  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international collection of the sugarcane ratoon stunting disease pathogen, Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, was analysed to assess genetic diversity. DNA fingerprinting using BOX primers was performed on 105 isolates, comprising\\u000a 65 Australian isolates and an additional 40 isolates from Indonesia (n=8), Japan (n=1), USA (n=3), Brazil (n=2), Mali (n=2), Zimbabwe (n=13), South Africa (n=9) and Réunion (n=2). Sixty-two of

A. J. Young; L. A. Petrasovits; B. J. Croft; M. Gillings; S. M. Brumbley

2006-01-01

365

Roquette, Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa a good host for long-term maintenance of aphid vectors of potato viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1971, we have used roquette,Eruca vesicaria (L.) Cav. subsp.sativa (Mill.) Thell., as a host for prolonged maintenance of colonies of the green peach aphid,Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the potato aphid,Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas). When roquette plants were kept in a growth chamber with 12 hour light and dark periods and a temperature regime\\u000a of 20°C light and 15°C dark, or

R. W. Goth; R. E. Webb

1980-01-01

366

Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a 2-year study period, 252 animals from dairy herds infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 119 animals from non-infected herds were subjected to repeated blood and faecal sampling. Animals were retrospectively grouped by infection status as infected, exposed (culture negative animals from infected herds), or non-infected animals, and by age, 12–23 months (1+ year), 24–35 months (2+ years),

A. Huda; G. Jungersen; P. Lind

2004-01-01

367

Antimicrobial Effects of a Hexapetide KCM21 against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small but effective cationic peptides with variable length. In previous study, four hexapeptides were identified that showed antimicrobial activities against various phytopathogenic bacteria. KCM21, the most effective antimicrobial peptide, was selected for further analysis to understand its modes of action by monitoring inhibitory effects of various cations, time-dependent antimicrobial kinetics, and observing cell disruption by electron microscopy. The effects of KCM21 on Gram-negative strain, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Gram-positive strain, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis were compared. Treatment with divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ inhibited the bactericidal activities of KCM21 significantly against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The bactericidal kinetic study showed that KCM21 killed both bacteria rapidly and the process was faster against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. The electron microscopic analysis revealed that KCM21 induced the formation of micelles and blebs on the surface of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells, while it caused cell rupture against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells. The outer membrane alteration and higher sensitivity to Ca2+ suggest that KCM21 interact with the outer membrane of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells during the process of killing, but not with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells that lack outer membrane. Considering that both strains had similar sensitivity to KCM21 in LB medium, outer membrane could not be the main target of KCM21, instead common compartments such as cytoplasmic membrane or internal macromolecules might be a possible target(s) of KCM21.

Choi, Jeahyuk; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Moon, Eunpyo

2014-01-01

368

Allozyme Diversity and Geographic Variation among Populations of the Locally Endangered Taxon Carex magellanica subsp. irrigua (Cyperaceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carex magellanica subsp. irrigua is a wet habitat taxon that is extinct or declining in the Baltic States and Central Europe, but still quite common in northern\\u000a areas, in Fennoscandia and Alaska. We investigated the extent of genetic variation within and among populations and geographic\\u000a regions of this subspecies. Isozyme electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels was applied to characterize genetic diversity

Thea Kull; Tatjana Oja

2010-01-01

369

Activation of flavonoid biosynthesis in roots of Vicia sativa subsp. nigra plants by inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infective (nodulating) Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae (R.l. viciae) bacteria release Nod factors which stimulate the release of nodulation gene-inducing flavanones and chalcones from roots of the host plant Vicia sativa subsp. nigra (K. Recourt et al., Plant Mol Biol 16: 841–852; H.P. Spaink et al., Nature 354: 125–130). The hypothesis that this release results from increased synthesis of flavonoids was

Kees Recourt; Arjen J. van Tunen; Leon A. Mur; Anton A. N. Brussel; Ben J. J. Lugtenberg; Jan W. Kijne

1992-01-01

370

Survival of plains cottonwood ( Populus deltoides subsp. Monilifera ) and saltcedar ( Tamarix ramosissima ) seedlings in response to flooding  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the response of first year saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) and plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp.monilifera) seedlings to flooding in fall (25 days) and spring (28 days) using potgrown plants (12–18 individuals\\/26.5-liter pot). Seedlings\\u000a were initially counted in all pots prior to fall treatment. Survival was calculated as the proportion of seedlings in cach\\u000a pot still alive following spring treatment.

Douglas N. Gladwin; James E. Roelle

1998-01-01

371

Physiological Aspects of Cadmium and Nickel Toxicity in the Lichens Peltigera rufescens and Cladina arbuscula Subsp. mitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating the effect of Cd2+ and Ni2+ containing solutions on selected physiological parameters (metal uptake, chlorophyll a fluorescence, assimilation pigment composition, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance production, and ergosterol content)\\u000a in the lichens Peltigera rufescens and Cladina arbuscula subsp. mitis growing on historic copper mine-spoil heaps at ?ubietová-Podlipa, Slovakia. Physiological measurements did not confirm

Martin Ba?kor; Jozef Ková?ik; Juraj Piovár; Tommaso Pisani; Stefano Loppi

2010-01-01

372

Physiological comparison of copper toxicity in the lichens Peltigera rufescens (Weis) Humb. and Cladina arbuscula subsp. mitis (Sandst.) Ruoss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peltigera rufescens (Weis) Humb. with a prokaryotic photobiont Nostoc sp. and Cladina arbuscula subsp. mitis (Sandst.) Ruoss with a eukaryotic photobiont Trebouxia sp. were studied to determine the copper sensitivity of lichens with different algal symbionts. Samples growing on historic\\u000a copper mine-spoil heaps at ?ubietová–Podlipa, Slovakia were assessed for physiological parameters, including total and intracellular\\u000a uptake of copper, assimilation pigmentation,

Martin Ba?kor; Jozef Ková?ik; Alexander Dzubaj; Miriam Ba?korová

2009-01-01

373

Pollination in small islands by occasional visitors: the case of Daucus carota subsp. commutatus (Apiaceae) in the Columbretes archipelago, Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the pollination ecology and related floral traits of the species Daucus carota subsp. commutatus in the isolated archipelago of Columbretes, E. Spain, where bees are absent. Two populations were studied: a small population\\u000a found on a relatively large island (Grossa) inhabited nowadays by three people; and a larger population on a smaller uninhabited\\u000a island (Foradada). The plant,

Celeste Pérez-Bañón; Theodora Petanidou

2007-01-01

374

Evaluation of a Rapid Fecal PCR Test for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dairy Cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high-throughput TaqMan PCR assay for detection of bovine paratuberculosis was evaluated by using fecal samples from 1,808 dairy cattle in seven naturally infected herds and 347 dairy cattle in seven herds considered free of paratuberculosis. Fecal, blood, and milk samples were submitted to laboratories where the PCR-based assay, three different fecal culture procedures for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (centrifugation,

Scott J. Wells; Michael T. Collins; Kay S. Faaberg; Carrie Wees; Saraya Tavornpanich; Kristine R. Petrini; James E. Collins; Natalia Cernicchiaro; Robert H. Whitlock

2006-01-01

375

Ecological conditions and the distribution of alpine juniper ( Juniperus communis subsp. alpina ) in the Hrubý Jeseník Mts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Hrubý Jeseník Mts of the Czech Republic, research was carried out from 2001–2005 aimed at completing an up-to-date\\u000a census of alpine juniper [Juniperus communis subsp. alpine (Smith) ?elakovský] and an evaluation of the overall health status of the populations, and at investigating the impacts of\\u000a the main environmental factors on the viability of this species. 13 sites were

Miroslav Zeidler; Marek Banaš; Michaela Ženatá

2009-01-01

376

Dissemination of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium var. Copenhagen Clonal Types through a Contract Heifer-Raising Operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium var. Copenhagen isolates from a heifer-raising operation and from 11 dairy herds that had their calves contracted to the heifer-raising operation were examined for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. Results of the study showed that the heifer-raising operation could serve as a clearinghouse for Salmonella serovar Typhimurium var. Copenhagen and perhaps other Salmonella serotypes.

Narasimha V. Hegde; Michelle L. Cook; David R. Wolfgang; Brenda C. Love; Carol C. Maddox; Bhushan M. Jayarao

2005-01-01

377

The wildlife hosts of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Czech Republic during the years 2002-2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine the wildlife hosts of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in the Czech Republic. A total of 8 796 wildlife animals were examined by culture of faecal or tissue samples during the years 2002-2007. MAP was isolated from 12 (0.5%) out of 2 296 red deer ( Cervus elaphus), two (0.2%) out of

M. Kopecna; I. Trcka; J. Lamka; M. Moravkova; P. Koubek; M. Heroldova; V. Mrlik; A. Kralova; I. Pavlik

378

Sequence Diversity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum tprK in Human Syphilis Lesions and Rabbit-Propagated Isolates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tprK gene of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the causative agent of venereal syphilis, belongs to a 12-member gene family and encodes a protein with a predicted cleavable signal sequence and predicted transmembrane domains. Except for the Nichols type strain, all rabbit-propagated isolates of T. pallidum examined thus far are comprised of mixed populations of organisms with heterogeneous tprK sequences.

Rebecca E. LaFond; Arturo Centurion-Lara; Charmie Godornes; Anne M. Rompalo; Wesley C. Van Voorhis; Sheila A. Lukehart

2003-01-01

379

Complete genome sequence of Polynucleobacter necessarius subsp. asymbioticus type strain (QLW-P1DMWA-1T)  

SciTech Connect

Polynucleobacter necessarius subsp. asymbioticus Hahn et al. 2009 is one of currently two subspecies of P. necessarius. While P. necessarius subsp. asymbioticus is a free-living bacterium, the closely related second subspecies, P. necessarius subsp. necessarius is an obligate endosymbiont living in the cytoplasm of freshwater ciliates of the genus Euplotes aediculatus. The two P. necessarius subspecies were the closest thus far reported phylogenetic neighbors that differ in their lifestyle as obligately free-living vs. obligate endosymbiontic, and they are the only members of the genus Polynucleobacter with completely sequenced genomes. The genome-sequenced strain represents a group of closely related strains not distinguishable by 16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS or glnA sequences, which is persistent in the home habitat of the strain and frequently contributes > 10% of total bacterial numbers in water samples of the habitat. The 2,159,490 bp long chromosome with a total of 2,088 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2006.

Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Kerrie W. [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wu, Qinglong L. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Limnology, Mondsee, Austria; Pockl, Matthias [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Limnology, Mondsee, Austria; Hahn, Martin W. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Limnology, Mondsee, Austria; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2012-01-01

380

Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response  

PubMed Central

In this study, we tested the hypothesis that milk oligosaccharides may contribute not only to selective growth of bifidobacteria, but also to their specific adhesive ability. Human milk oligosaccharides (3?sialyllactose and 6?sialyllactose) and a commercial prebiotic (Beneo Orafti P95; oligofructose) were assayed for their ability to promote adhesion of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Treatment with the commercial prebiotic or 3?sialyllactose did not enhance adhesion. However, treatment with 6?sialyllactose resulted in increased adhesion (4.7 fold), while treatment with a mixture of 3?- and 6?-sialyllactose substantially increased adhesion (9.8 fold) to HT-29 intestinal cells. Microarray analyses were subsequently employed to investigate the transcriptional response of B. longum subsp. infantis to the different oligosaccharide treatments. This data correlated strongly with the observed changes in adhesion to HT-29 cells. The combination of 3?- and 6?-sialyllactose resulted in the greatest response at the genetic level (both in diversity and magnitude) followed by 6?sialyllactose, and 3?sialyllactose alone. The microarray data was further validated by means of real-time PCR. The current findings suggest that the increased adherence phenotype of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis resulting from exposure to milk oligosaccharides is multi-faceted, involving transcription factors, chaperone proteins, adhesion-related proteins, and a glycoside hydrolase. This study gives additional insight into the role of milk oligosaccharides within the human intestine and the molecular mechanisms underpinning host-microbe interactions. PMID:23805302

Kavanaugh, Devon W.; O’Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F.; Slattery, Helen; Lane, Jonathan; Clyne, Marguerite; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh; Hickey, Rita M.

2013-01-01

381

Characterization of genes required for the pathogenicity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 in Chinese cabbage.  

PubMed

Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is a well-known plant pathogen that causes severe soft rot disease in various crops, resulting in considerable economic loss. To identify pathogenicity-related factors, Chinese cabbage was inoculated with 5314 transposon mutants of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 derived using Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. A total of 35 reduced-virulence or avirulent mutants were isolated, and 14 loci were identified. The 14 loci could be functionally grouped into nutrient utilization (pyrD, purH, purD, leuA and serB), production of plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) (expI, expR and PCC21_023220), motility (flgA, fliA and flhB), biofilm formation (expI, expR and qseC), susceptibility to antibacterial plant chemicals (tolC) and unknown function (ECA2640). Among the 14 genes identified, qseC, tolC and PCC21_023220 are novel pathogenicity factors of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum involved in biofilm formation, phytochemical resistance and PCWDE production, respectively. PMID:23676432

Lee, Dong Hwan; Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Juneok; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Choi, Minseon; Oh, Changsik; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yun, Jongchul; Heu, Sunggi

2013-07-01

382

Characterization of genes required for the pathogenicity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 in Chinese cabbage  

PubMed Central

Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is a well-known plant pathogen that causes severe soft rot disease in various crops, resulting in considerable economic loss. To identify pathogenicity-related factors, Chinese cabbage was inoculated with 5314 transposon mutants of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21 derived using Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. A total of 35 reduced-virulence or avirulent mutants were isolated, and 14 loci were identified. The 14 loci could be functionally grouped into nutrient utilization (pyrD, purH, purD, leuA and serB), production of plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) (expI, expR and PCC21_023220), motility (flgA, fliA and flhB), biofilm formation (expI, expR and qseC), susceptibility to antibacterial plant chemicals (tolC) and unknown function (ECA2640). Among the 14 genes identified, qseC, tolC and PCC21_023220 are novel pathogenicity factors of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum involved in biofilm formation, phytochemical resistance and PCWDE production, respectively. PMID:23676432

Lee, Dong Hwan; Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Juneok; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyusuk; Choi, Minseon; Oh, Changsik; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yun, Jongchul

2013-01-01

383

Improved trehalose production from biodiesel waste using parent and osmotically sensitive mutant of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aerobic conditions.  

PubMed

Trehalose is an important nutraceutical of wide commercial interest in the food processing industry. Recently, crude glycerol was reported to be suitable for the production of trehalose using a food microbe, Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii, under static flask conditions. Similarly, enhanced trehalose yield was reported in an osmotically sensitive mutant of the same strain under anaerobic conditions. In the present study, an effort was made to achieve higher production of trehalose, propionic acid, and lactic acid using the parent and an osmotically sensitive mutant of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aeration conditions. Under aeration conditions (200 rpm in shake flasks and 30 % air saturation in a batch reactor), biomass was increased and approximately 98 % of crude glycerol was consumed. In the parent strain, a trehalose titre of 361 mg/l was achieved, whereas in the mutant strain a trehalose titre of 1.3 g/l was produced in shake flask conditions (200 rpm). In the mutant strain, propionic and lactic acid yields of 0.53 and 0.21 g/g of substrate were also achieved with crude glycerol. Similarly, in controlled batch reactor culturing conditions a final trehalose titre of approximately 1.56 g/l was achieved with the mutant strain using crude glycerol as the substrate. Enhanced production of trehalose using P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii from waste under aeration conditions is reported here. Higher production of trehalose was not due to a higher yield of trehalose but to a higher final biomass concentration. PMID:22526328

Ruhal, Rohit; Choudhury, Bijan

2012-08-01

384

Specific Discrimination of Three Pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes by carB-Based Oligonucleotide Microarray  

PubMed Central

It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes. PMID:24185846

Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun

2014-01-01

385

Fermenting Cucumber, a Potential Source for the Isolation of Pediocin-Like Bacteriocin Producers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A strain of Pediococcus acidilactici CFR K7 isolated from cucumber, produced an antimicrobial peptide which acted against Leuconostoc mesenteroides, selected strains of Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. The partially purified bacteriocin had molecular weight of ~4.6 kDa, heat stability in a range of 40–121 °C and was\\u000a active over a wide range of pH (2.0–9.0). This bacteriocin possessed strong antilisterial

Prakash M. Halami; A. Ramesh; A. Chandrashekar

2005-01-01

386

Synthesis, structural analysis and application of novel acarbose-fructoside using levansucrase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acarbose-fructoside (acarbose-Fru) was newly synthesized via the acceptor reaction of a levansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512 FMC with acarbose and sucrose. The resultant product was separated with 10.5% purification yield via Bio-gel P-2 column chromatography and HPLC. Its structure was determined to be 1I-?-d-fructofuranosyl ?-acarbose, according to the results of 1H, 13C, HSQC, and HMBC analyses. Acarbose-Fru was inhibited competitively

Seung-Hee Nam; Young-Hwan Moon; Jin Kang; Young-Min Kim; John F. Robyt; Doman Kim

2009-01-01

387

Efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a sanitizer for tanks used for aseptic juice storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aseptic tank model system was used to study the efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas as a potential sanitizing agent for commercial epoxy-lined juice storage tanks. Selected spoilage micro-organisms (Lactobacillus buchneri, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Eurotiumspp.,Penicilliumspp,Candidaspp. andSaccharomyces cerevisiae) were surface inoculated on to epoxy-coated stainless steel strips, placed in the model tank and subjected to different ClO2gas treatments. The varied treatment

Y. Han; A. M. Guentert; R. S. Smith; R. H. Linton; P. E. Nelson

1999-01-01

388

Sucrose phosphorylases catalyze transglycosylation reactions on carboxylic acid compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two sucrose phosphorylases were employed for glycosylation of carboxylic acid compounds. Streptococcus mutans sucrose phosphorylase showed remarkable transglycosylating activity, especially under acidic conditions. Leuconostoc mesenteroides sucrose phosphorylase exhibited very weak transglycosylating activity. Three main products were detected from the reaction\\u000a mixture using benzoic acid and sucrose as an acceptor and a donor molecule, respectively. These compounds were identified\\u000a as 1-O-benzoyl

Kazuhisa Sugimoto; Koji Nomura; Hiromi Nishiura; Kohji Ohdan; Takahisa Nishimura; Hideo Hayashi; Takashi Kuriki

2008-01-01

389

Effect of Extracts of the Bark of Saccoglottis gabonensis on the Microflora of Palm Wine.  

PubMed

Direct addition of the bark of Saccoglottis gabonensis to fresh palm juice followed by microbial enumeration every 6 hr showed that the bark inhibited bacterial growth appreciably. The effect of various extracts of the bark on two bacterial species isolated from palm wine (Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum) was studied by using the paper disc method. It was observed that three of the five constituents of the bark showed inhibitory effect on the bacteria. PMID:16349950

Faparusi, S I; Bassir, O

1972-12-01

390

Effect of inoculating lactic acid bacteria starter cultures on the nitrite concentration of fermenting Chinese paocai  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Chinese paocai (a type of mildly salted and lactic acid fermented vegetable) were studied for their ability to deplete nitrite during fermentation. Lactobacillus pentosus, Lb. plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lb. brevis, Lb. lactis, Lb. fermentum depleted 99.6%, 99.3%, 99.2%, 97.0%, 98.5% and 98.8% of the initial nitrite present in de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS)

Ping-Mei Yan; Wen-Tong Xue; Sze-Sze Tan; Hui Zhang; Xiao-Hui Chang

2008-01-01

391

Mixed culture fermentation for the production of clinical quality dextran with starch and sucrose  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed culture fermentations containing a dextranase-producing yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi, and a dextransucrase-producing bacterium, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, produced dextrans of selected size using sucrose and starch. Dextran and starch hydrolyzates, produced by a Lipomyces starkeyi dextranase and amylase, were incorporated into the dextran and formed small size dextran (Mr = 40kDa). The yields of total and clinical dextran in mixed culture fermentation

Doman Kim; Deok-Young Jhon; Kwan-Hwa Park; Donal F. Day

1996-01-01

392

Classification of Lytic Bacteriophages Attacking Dairy Leuconostoc Starter Strains  

PubMed Central

A set of 83 lytic dairy bacteriophages (phages) infecting flavor-producing mesophilic starter strains of the Leuconostoc genus was characterized, and the first in-depth taxonomic scheme was established for this phage group. Phages were obtained from different sources, i.e., from dairy samples originating from 11 German dairies (50 Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides [Ln. pseudomesenteroides] phages, 4 Ln. mesenteroides phages) and from 3 external phage collections (17 Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages, 12 Ln. mesenteroides phages). All phages belonged to the Siphoviridae family of phages with isometric heads (diameter, 55 nm) and noncontractile tails (length, 140 nm). With the exception of one phage (i.e., phage ?LN25), all Ln. mesenteroides phages lysed the same host strains and revealed characteristic globular baseplate appendages. Phage ?LN25, with different Y-shaped appendages, had a unique host range. Apart from two phages (i.e., phages P792 and P793), all Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages shared the same host range and had plain baseplates without distinguishable appendages. They were further characterized by the presence or absence of a collar below the phage head or by unique tails with straight striations. Phages P792 and P793 with characteristic fluffy baseplate appendages could propagate only on other specific hosts. All Ln. mesenteroides and all Ln. pseudomesenteroides phages were members of two (host species-specific) distinct genotypes but shared a limited conserved DNA region specifying their structural genes. A PCR detection system was established and was shown to be reliable for the detection of all Leuconostoc phage types. PMID:23563949

Ali, Yahya; Kot, Witold; Atamer, Zeynep; Hinrichs, Jorg; Vogensen, Finn K.; Heller, Knut J.

2013-01-01

393

The microbial flora of sugary kefir grain (the gingerbeer plant): biosynthesis of the grain from Lactobacillus hilgardii producing a polysaccharide gel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The microflora of sugary kefir grains was principally mesophilic and consisted chiefly of lactic acid bacteria [Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus hilgardii (=brevis),Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp.dextranicum, Streptococcus lactis] and a small proportion of yeasts (Zygosaccharomyces florentinus, Torulospora pretoriensis, Kloeckera apiculata, Candida lambica andC. valida). Few coliforms and faecal streptococci were observed. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed that the filamentous yeasts adhered

M. Pidoux

1989-01-01

394

The Genome Sequence of the Tomato-Pathogenic Actinomycete Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382 Reveals a Large Island Involved in Pathogenicity? †  

PubMed Central

Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a plant-pathogenic actinomycete that causes bacterial wilt and canker of tomato. The nucleotide sequence of the genome of strain NCPPB382 was determined. The chromosome is circular, consists of 3.298 Mb, and has a high G+C content (72.6%). Annotation revealed 3,080 putative protein-encoding sequences; only 26 pseudogenes were detected. Two rrn operons, 45 tRNAs, and three small stable RNA genes were found. The two circular plasmids, pCM1 (27.4 kbp) and pCM2 (70.0 kbp), which carry pathogenicity genes and thus are essential for virulence, have lower G+C contents (66.5 and 67.6%, respectively). In contrast to the genome of the closely related organism Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the genome of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis lacks complete insertion elements and transposons. The 129-kb chp/tomA region with a low G+C content near the chromosomal origin of replication was shown to be necessary for pathogenicity. This region contains numerous genes encoding proteins involved in uptake and metabolism of sugars and several serine proteases. There is evidence that single genes located in this region, especially genes encoding serine proteases, are required for efficient colonization of the host. Although C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis grows mainly in the xylem of tomato plants, no evidence for pronounced genome reduction was found. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis seems to have as many transporters and regulators as typical soil-inhabiting bacteria. However, the apparent lack of a sulfate reduction pathway, which makes C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis dependent on reduced sulfur compounds for growth, is probably the reason for the poor survival of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in soil. PMID:18192381

Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Abt, Birte; Bekel, Thomas; Burger, Annette; Engemann, Jutta; Flugel, Monika; Gaigalat, Lars; Goesmann, Alexander; Grafen, Ines; Kalinowski, Jorn; Kaup, Olaf; Kirchner, Oliver; Krause, Lutz; Linke, Burkhard; McHardy, Alice; Meyer, Folker; Pohle, Sandra; Ruckert, Christian; Schneiker, Susanne; Zellermann, Eva-Maria; Puhler, Alfred; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Kaiser, Olaf; Bartels, Daniela

2008-01-01

395

A siderophore biosynthesis gene cluster from the fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida is structurally and functionally related to the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island.  

PubMed

Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, the causative agent of fish pasteurellosis, produces a siderophore which is distinct from that produced by P. damselae subsp. damselae. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, a subsp. piscicida-specific DNA region of 35 kb was identified in strain DI21, and 11 genes were defined: dahP, araC1, araC2, frpA, irp8, irp2, irp1, irp3, irp4, irp9 and irp5. The sequence of the predicted proteins encoded by these genes showed significant similarity with the proteins responsible for the synthesis and transport of the siderophore yersiniabactin, encoded within the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI). Southern hybridization demonstrated that this gene cluster is exclusive to some European subsp. piscicida isolates. Database searches revealed that a similar gene cluster is present in Photobacterium profundum SS9 and Vibrio cholerae RC385. An irp1 gene (encoding a putative non-ribosomal peptide synthetase) insertional mutant (CS31) was impaired for growth under iron-limiting conditions and unable to produce siderophores, and showed an approximately 100-fold decrease in degree of virulence for fish. The subsp. piscicida DI21 strain, but not CS31, promoted the growth of a Yersinia enterocolitica irp1 mutant. Furthermore, a yersiniabactin-producing Y. enterocolitica strain as well as purified yersiniabactin were able to cross-feed strains DI21 and CS31, suggesting that the subsp. piscicida siderophore might be functionally and structurally related to yersiniabactin. The differential occurrence among P. damselae strains, and the low sequence similarity to siderophore synthesis genes described in other members of the Vibrionaceae, suggest that this genetic system might have been acquired by horizontal transfer in P. damselae subsp. piscicida, and might have a common evolutionary origin with the Yersinia HPI. PMID:17074903

Osorio, Carlos R; Juiz-Río, Sandra; Lemos, Manuel L

2006-11-01

396

Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from a Traditional Jeotgal Product in Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seventeen lactic acid bacterial strains (LAB) were isolated using MRS agar medium from Jeotgal, a Korean fermented food, purchased at the Jukdo market of Pohang. To identify the strains isolated, they were tested by examining their cell morphologies, gram-staining, catalase activity, arginine hydrolase activity, D-L lactate form and carbohydrate fermentation. According to the phenotypic characteristics, three strains were tent atively identified as Lactobacillus spp., ten were Enterococcus spp. (or Streptococcus spp., or Pediococcus spp.) and the rest were Leuconostoc spp. (or Weissella spp.). Five strains among 17 were chosen by preliminary bacteriocin activity test. Four bacterial strains which inhibited both indicator microorganisms were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results are as follows; Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 4), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 5), Leuconostoc mesenteroides(HK 11), Streptococcus salivarius(HK 8). In order to check LAB which are showing a high survival rate in gut, we investigated three strains inhibiting both indicator microorganisms in artificial gastric acid and bile juice -all except HK8. The three strains mentioned above grew in extreme low acid conditions.

Cho, Gyu Sung; Do, Hyung Ki

2006-06-01

397

Inhibition of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides subsp. denitrificans grown in light under denitrifying conditions.  

PubMed Central

The inclusion of nitrate or nitrite in cultures of Rhodobacter spaeroides subsp. denitrificans grown heterotrophically in light depressed the formation of bacteriochlorophyll a. The pigment biosynthesis was inhibited at the stage of the reduction of chlorophyllide (chlorin) to bacteriochlorophyllide (tetrahydroporphyrin) since 3-hydroxyethylchlorophyllide a accumulated in the culture medium. The addition of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid to these cultures resulted in a complete restoration of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis accompanied by the accumulation of 3-vinylbacteriopheophorbide. This indicates that under these conditions bacteriochlorophyll was formed via an alternative route, in which the reduction of chlorins to tetrahydroporphyrins precedes modifications of the C-3 side chain. The multiple forms of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase were purified from cells grown with and without nitrate. Antibodies against these proteins were raised in rabbits and used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for various forms of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase. In denitrifying cells, the amount and activity of fraction I of the enzyme was reduced by approximately 40 and 30%, respectively. Partly active enzymes from both types of cells were activated by cystine trisulfide. Images PMID:3654581

Michalski, W P; Nicholas, D J

1987-01-01

398

High-level Relatedness among Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense Strains from Widely Separated Outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Three recently sequenced strains isolated from patients during an outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense infections at a cystic fibrosis center in the United States were compared with 6 strains from an outbreak at a cystic fibrosis center in the United Kingdom and worldwide strains. Strains from the 2 cystic fibrosis outbreaks showed high-level relatedness with each other and major-level relatedness with strains that caused soft tissue infections during an epidemic in Brazil. We identified unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms in cystic fibrosis and soft tissue outbreak strains, separate single-nucleotide polymorphisms only in cystic fibrosis outbreak strains, and unique genomic traits for each subset of isolates. Our findings highlight the necessity of identifying M. abscessus to the subspecies level and screening all cystic fibrosis isolates for relatedness to these outbreak strains. We propose 2 diagnostic strategies that use partial sequencing of rpoB and secA1 genes and a multilocus sequence typing protocol. PMID:24565502

Tettelin, Herve; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Agrawal, Sonia; Aitken, Moira L.; Shallom, Shamira; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Strong, Michael; Nogueira de Moura, Vinicius Calado; De Groote, Mary Ann; Duarte, Rafael S.; Hine, Erin; Parankush, Sushma; Su, Qi; Daugherty, Sean C.; Fraser, Claire M.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wallace, Richard J.; Holland, Steven M.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Jackson, Mary

2014-01-01

399

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in an Italian Cohort of Type 1 Diabetes Pediatric Patients  

PubMed Central

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Recent studies have linked MAP to type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Sardinian population. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MAP infection in a T1D cohort from continental Italy compared with healthy control subjects. 247 T1D subjects and 110 healthy controls were tested for the presence of MAP. MAP DNA was detected using IS900-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presence of antibodies towards a MAP antigen, heparin binding hemoagglutinin (HBHA), was detected by ELISA. We demonstrated a higher MAP DNA prevalence in plasma samples from T1D patients and a stronger immune response towards MAP HBHA, compared with healthy control subjects. Moreover, in the recent onset patients, we observed an association between anti-MAP antibodies and HLA DQ2 (DQA1 0201/DQB1 0202). These findings taken together support the hypothesis of MAP as an environmental risk factor for the development of T1D in genetically predisposed subjects, probably involving a mechanism of molecular mimicry between MAP antigens and pancreatic islet ?-cells. PMID:22844325

Manca Bitti, Maria Luisa; Masala, Speranza; Capasso, Francesca; Rapini, Novella; Piccinini, Simona; Angelini, Federica; Pierantozzi, Andrea; Lidano, Roberta; Pietrosanti, Silvia; Paccagnini, Daniela; Sechi, Leonardo A.

2012-01-01

400

Phenolic Glycosides with antiproteasomal activity from Centaurea urvillei DC. subsp. urvillei.  

PubMed

A new flavanone glycoside, naringenin-7-O-?-D-glucuronopyranoside, and a new flavonol glycoside, 6-hydroxykaempferol-7-O-?-D-glucuronopyranoside were isolated together with 12 known compounds, 5 flavone glycoside; hispidulin-7-O-?-D-glucuronopyranoside, apigenin-7-O-?-D-methylglucuronopyranoside, hispidulin-7-O-?-D-methylglucuronopyranoside, hispidulin-7-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, apigenin-7-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, a flavonol; kaempferol, two flavone; apigenin, and luteolin, a flavanone glycoside; eriodictyol-7-O-?-D-glucuronopyranoside, and three phenol glycoside; arbutin, salidroside, and 3,5-dihydroxyphenethyl alcohol-3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside from Centaurea urvillei subsp. urvillei. The structure elucidation of the new compounds was achieved by a combination of one- ((1)H and (13)C) and two-dimensional NMR techniques (G-COSY, G-HMQC, and G-HMBC) and LC-ESI-MS. The isolated compounds were tested for their antiproteasomal activity. The results indicated that kaempferol, a well known and widely distributed flavonoid in the plant kingdom, was the most active antiproteasomal agent, followed by apigenin, eriodictyol-7-O-?-D-glucuronopyranoside, 3,5-dihydroxyphenethyl alcohol-3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside, and salidroside, respectively. PMID:20937505

Gülcemal, Derya; Alanku?-Çal??kan, Ozgen; Karaalp, Canan; Ors, Ahmet Uygar; Ballar, Petek; Bedir, Erdal

2010-11-22

401

Identification of heme uptake genes in the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida.  

PubMed

Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis in fish, can use heme as the sole iron source. We applied the Fur Titration Assay to isolate a cluster including six genes hutAZXBCD that showed similarity to heme uptake genes of other Gram-negative bacteria, and three genes orf123 of unknown function. The spatial organization of these nine genes, arranged in five transcriptional units, was similar to that of a homologous cluster in A. hydrophila. When a TonB system was provided, this cluster allowed Escherichia coli 101ESD (an ent mutant, unable to synthesize enterobactin) to utilize hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources. Mutation of hutB, a gene that encodes a predicted periplasmic hemin-binding protein, caused a drastic defect in the ability of A. salmonicida to grow with hemin as unique source of iron. Interestingly, a mutant for hutA gene (encoding the outer membrane hemin receptor) showed initially a reduced ability to grow with hemin as sole iron source, but after 24 h it achieved growth levels similar to parental strain. Thus mutation of hutA could not abolish the growth with hemin as iron source, suggesting that redundant outer membrane heme transport functions might be encoded in the A. salmonicida genome. PMID:18535817

Najimi, Mohsen; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

2008-10-01

402

Biochemical and thermal stabilization parameters of polygalacturonase from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora BR1.  

PubMed

With emphasis on thermal behavior in presence of different pH conditions and salts, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of purified polygalacturonase (PG) of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) BR1 were studied since characterization of an enzyme is significant in the context of burgeoning biotechnological applications. Thermodynamic parameters for polygalacturonic acid hydrolysis by purified PG were, deltaH* = 7.98 kJ/mol, deltaG* = 68.86 kJ/mol, deltaS*= -194.48 J/mol/K, deltaG(E-S) = -1.04 kJ/mol and deltaG(E-T) = -8.96 kJ/mol. Its turnover number (k(cat)) was 21/sec. Purified PG was stable in 20-50 degrees C temperature range and was deactivated at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. Thermodynamic parameters (deltaH*, deltaG*, deltaS*) for irreversible inactivation of PG at different temperatures (30-60 degrees C) were determined, where effectiveness of various salts and different pH (4-8) individually for thermal stability of PG were characterized. The efficacy of various salts for thermal stability of PG was in the following order: MgCl? >BaCl? >KCl >CaCl? >NaCl. Present work projects biochemical, thermodynamics of substrate hydrolysis as well as thermal stabilization parameters of PG from Ecc. PMID:20668400

Maisuria, Vimal B; Patel, Vilas A; Nerurkar, Anuradha S

2010-07-01

403

Dendroclimatic potential of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) from the Northern Great Plains, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new 368-year tree-ring chronology (A.D. 1643–2010) has been developed in western North Dakota using plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) growing on the relatively undisturbed floodplain of the Little Missouri River in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. We document many slow-growing living trees between 150–370 years old that contradict the common understanding that cottonwoods grow fast and die young. In this northern location, cottonwood produces distinct annual rings with dramatic interannual variability that strongly crossdate. The detrended tree-ring chronology is significantly positively correlated with local growing season precipitation and soil moisture conditions (r ?=? 0.69). This time series shows periods of prolonged low radial tree growth during the known droughts of the instrumental record (e.g. 1931–1939 and 1980–1981) and also during prehistory (e.g. 1816–1823 and 1856–1865) when other paleoclimate studies have documented droughts in this region. Tree rings of cottonwood will be a useful tool to help reconstruct climate, streamflow, and the floodplain history of the Little Missouri River and other northern river systems.

Edmonson, Jesse; Friedman, Jonathan; Meko, David; Touchan, Ramzi; Scott, Julian; Edmonson, Alan

2014-01-01

404

Anaerobic Nitrate Respiration by Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica during Potato Tuber Invasion  

PubMed Central

The in planta induction of anaerobic nitrate respiration by Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica in relation to the in situ oxygen status in soft rotting potato tubers has been investigated. In vitro experiments have shown that nitrate was required for the induction of respiratory nitrate reductase activity in E. carotovora. In addition, oxygen was found to repress this activity. Expression of respiratory nitrate reductase was found in E. carotovora cells extracted from soft rotting potato tuber tissue. However, the rate of nitrite production in these cells was approximately 70-fold lower than the rate recorded in fully induced anaerobic cultures. Oxygen measurements in soft rotting potato tubers indicated that the invading bacteria encounter the lowest oxygen concentration at the interphase between healthy and macerated tissue. Consequently, growth of bacteria present in this specific zone will be stimulated by nitrate which is present in sufficient amounts in tuber tissue. A high nitrate content of the tuber will most likely facilitate the proliferation of E. carotovora in the tuber tissue. PMID:16349082

Smid, Eddy J.; Jansen, Antonius H. J.; Tuijn, Cees J.

1993-01-01

405

Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.  

PubMed

We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection. PMID:24283140

Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

2013-09-01

406

From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts to control JD through traditional animal management practices are complicated by MAP’s ability to cause long-term environmental contamination as well as difficulties associated with diagnosis of JD in the pre-clinical stages. As such, there is particular emphasis on the development of an effective vaccine. This is a daunting challenge, in large part due to MAP’s ability to subvert protective host immune responses. Accordingly, there is a priority to understand MAP’s interaction with the bovine host: this may inform rational targets and approaches for therapeutic intervention. Here we review the early host defenses encountered by MAP and the strategies employed by the pathogen to avert or subvert these responses, during the critical period between ingestion and the establishment of persistent infection in macrophages. PMID:24885748

2014-01-01

407

MglA Regulates Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida (Francisella novicida) Response to Starvation and Oxidative Stress? †  

PubMed Central

MglA is a transcriptional regulator of genes that contribute to the virulence of Francisella tularensis, a highly infectious pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. This study used a label-free shotgun proteomics method to determine the F. tularensis subsp. novicida (F. novicida) proteins that are regulated by MglA. The differences in relative protein amounts between wild-type F. novicida and the mglA mutant were derived directly from the average peptide precursor ion intensity values measured with the mass spectrometer by using a suite of mathematical algorithms. Among the proteins whose relative amounts changed in an F. novicida mglA mutant were homologs of oxidative and general stress response proteins. The F. novicida mglA mutant exhibited decreased survival during stationary-phase growth and increased susceptibility to killing by superoxide generated by the redox-cycling agent paraquat. The F. novicida mglA mutant also showed increased survival upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide, likely due to increased amounts of the catalase KatG. Our results suggested that MglA coordinates the stress response of F. tularensis and is likely essential for bacterial survival in harsh environments. PMID:17644593

Guina, Tina; Radulovic, Dragan; Bahrami, Arya J.; Bolton, Diana L.; Rohmer, Laurence; Jones-Isaac, Kendan A.; Chen, Jinzy; Gallagher, Larry A.; Gallis, Byron; Ryu, Soyoung; Taylor, Greg K.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Manoil, Colin; Goodlett, David R.

2007-01-01

408

Cytotoxicity Analysis of Three Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis ?-Endotoxins towards Insect and Mammalian Cells  

PubMed Central

Three members of the ?-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL. PMID:23029407

Teixeira Correa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araujo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

2012-01-01

409

Rhizosphere microbial densities and trace metal tolerance of the nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum serpyllifolium subsp. lusitanicum.  

PubMed

In this study we determine culturable microbial densities (total heterotrophs, ammonifiers, amylolytics and cellulolytics) and bacterial resistance to Co, Cr, and Ni in bulk and rhizosphere soils of three populations of the Ni-hyperaccumulator Alyssum serpyllifolium subsp. lusitanicum and the excluder Dactylis glomerata from ultramafic sites (two populations in Northeast (NE) Portugal (Samil (S), Morais (M)) and one population in Northwest (NW) Spain (Melide (L)). The relationship between bioavailable metal concentrations (H2O-soluble) and microbial densities were analysed. Significant differences in microbial densities and metal-resistance were observed between the two species and their three populations. The hyperaccumulator showed higher microbial densities (except cellulolytics) and a greater rhizosphere effect, but this was only observed in S and M populations. These populations of A. serpyllifolium also showed selective enrichment of Ni-tolerant bacteria at the rhizosphere where Ni solubility was enhanced (densities of Ni-resistant bacteria were positively correlated with H2O-soluble Ni). These rhizobacteria could solubilise Ni in the soil and potentially improve phytoextraction strategies. PMID:19810353

Becerra-Castro, C; Monterroso, C; García-Lestón, M; Prieto-Fernández, A; Acea, M J; Kidd, P S

2009-08-01

410

Impact of imperfect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccines in dairy herds: a mathematical modeling approach.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the potential impacts of imperfect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) vaccines on the dynamics of MAP infection in US dairy herds using a mathematical modeling approach. Vaccine-based control programs have been implemented to reduce the prevalence of MAP infection in some dairy herds; however, MAP vaccines are imperfect. Vaccines can provide partial protection for susceptible calves, reduce the infectiousness of animals shedding MAP, lengthen the latent period of infected animals, slow the progression from low shedding to high shedding in infectious animals, and reduce clinical disease. To quantitatively study the impacts of imperfect MAP vaccines, we developed a deterministic multi-group vaccination model and performed global sensitivity analyses. Our results explain why MAP vaccination might have a beneficial, negligible, or detrimental effect in the reduction of prevalence and show that vaccines that are beneficial to individual animals may not be useful for a herd-level control plan. The study suggests that high efficacy vaccines that are aimed at reducing the susceptibility of the host are the most effective in controlling MAP transmission. This work indicates that MAP vaccination should be integrated into a comprehensive control program that includes test-and-cull intervention and improved calf rearing management. PMID:22921715

Lu, Zhao; Schukken, Ynte H; Smith, Rebecca L; Mitchell, Rebecca M; Gröhn, Yrjö T

2013-02-01

411

Isolation, characterization and biological role of camelysin from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.  

PubMed

The present study reports a simple rapid method for isolating the zinc-containing metalloprotease camelysin from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) by extraction from intact bacterial cells with egg L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine containing monolamellar liposomes, followed by separation on a sucrose gradient. Characterization of the isolated camelysin revealed a molecular weight of 23 kDa and a pI of 6.2. The camelysin exhibited maximal activity against the substrate azocasein at a temperature of 37 degrees C and pH 7.5. However, the enzyme's activity remained high also at basic pH values (8-10). In a rich growth medium (LB), camelysin appeared at the late logarithmic phase of Bti growth and reached its maximum in the stationary phase. Camelysin was shown to activate the protoxins Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba produced by Bti. The hemolytic activity of Cyt1Aa increased from 40 to 70% and that of Cyt2Ba from 6 to 50% in the presence of 50% (w/w) camelysin. It is concluded that these protoxins can be activated not only by insect gut proteases, but also by the endogeneous metalloprotease camelysin of the Bti bacterium. PMID:20127334

Nisnevitch, Marina; Sigawi, Sasi; Cahan, Rivka; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

2010-09-01

412

Genetic mapping of agronomic traits in false flax (Camelina sativa subsp. sativa).  

PubMed

The crucifer oilseed plant false flax (Camelina sativa subsp. sativa) possesses numerous valuable agronomic attributes that make it attractive as an alternative spring-sown crop for tight crop rotations. The oil of false flax is particularly rich in polyunsaturated C18-fatty acids, making it a valuable renewable feedstock for the oleochemical industry. Because of the minimal interest in the crop throughout the 20th century, breeding efforts have been limited. In this study, a genetic map for C. sativa was constructed, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, in a population of recombinant inbred lines that were developed, through single-seed descent, from a cross between 'Lindo' and 'Licalla', 2 phenotypically distinct parental varieties. Three Brassica simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were also integrated into the map, and 1 of these shows linkage to oil-content loci in both C. sativa and Brassica napus. Fifty-five other SSR primer combinations showed monomorphic amplification products, indicating partial genome homoeology with the Brassica species. Using data from field trials with different fertilization treatments (0 and 80 kg N/ha) at multiple locations over 3 years, the map was used to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed yield, oil content, 1000-seed mass, and plant height. Some yield QTLs were found only with the N0 treatment, and might represent loci contributing to the competitiveness of false flax in low-nutrient soils. The results represent a starting point for future marker-assisted breeding. PMID:17426770

Gehringer, A; Friedt, W; Lühs, W; Snowdon, R J

2006-12-01

413

From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.  

PubMed

Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts to control JD through traditional animal management practices are complicated by MAP's ability to cause long-term environmental contamination as well as difficulties associated with diagnosis of JD in the pre-clinical stages. As such, there is particular emphasis on the development of an effective vaccine. This is a daunting challenge, in large part due to MAP's ability to subvert protective host immune responses. Accordingly, there is a priority to understand MAP's interaction with the bovine host: this may inform rational targets and approaches for therapeutic intervention. Here we review the early host defenses encountered by MAP and the strategies employed by the pathogen to avert or subvert these responses, during the critical period between ingestion and the establishment of persistent infection in macrophages. PMID:24885748

Arsenault, Ryan J; Maattanen, Pekka; Daigle, Joanna; Potter, Andrew; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

2014-01-01

414

Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biofilms on livestock watering trough materials.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection that affects ruminants. Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne's disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess its survival in agricultural environments. The goal of this 365-day study was to evaluate the ability of Map to persist in mixed-community biofilms on materials commonly used to construct livestock watering troughs. Map was inoculated into 32l of trough water containing either concrete, plastic, galvanized or stainless steel trough materials. The concentration of Map was determined by using quantitative, real-time PCR to target the IS900 sequence in DNA extracts. High concentrations of Map were detected on all trough materials after 3 days (around 1 x 10(5)cells cm(-2)). Based on the best-fit slopes, the time required for a 99% reduction (t(99)) in biofilm-associated Map cells was 144 and 115 days for plastic and stainless steel trough materials, respectively. Map concentrations did not decrease on concrete and galvanized steel trough materials. These results suggest that Map survives well in biofilms present on livestock watering trough materials. To inhibit spread of this organism and exposure of susceptible animals to Map on infected farms, best management practices aimed at maintaining biofilm-free trough surfaces should be included in any Johne's control plan. PMID:19717251

Cook, Kimberly L; Britt, Jenks S; Bolster, Carl H

2010-02-24

415

Protein inclusions produced by the entomopathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophilus subsp. nematophilus.  

PubMed Central

The entomopathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophilus subsp. nematophilus produces two types of intracellular inclusion bodies during in vitro culture. Large cigar-shaped inclusions (designated type 1) and smaller ovoid inclusions (designated type 2) were purified from cell lysates, using differential centrifugation in discontinuous glycerol gradients and isopycnic density gradient centrifugation in sodium diatrizoate. The inclusions, composed almost exclusively of protein, are readily soluble at high and low pH values and in the presence of cation chelators such as EDTA, anionic detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate), or protein denaturants (urea, NaBr). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified inclusions revealed a single 26-kilodalton protein (IP-1) in type 1 inclusions and a 22-kilodalton protein (IP-2) in type 2 inclusions. Analysis of these proteins by isoelectric focusing in the presence of 8 M urea showed that IP-1 is acidic and IP-2 is neutral. Furthermore, each protein occurred in multiple forms differing slightly in isoelectric point. Other variations in peptides released by trypsin digestion, immunological properties, and amino acid composition revealed significant structural differences between IP-1 and IP-2. Kinetic studies using light microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting procedures showed that inclusion protein synthesis occurs only during the second half of exponential culture growth. Synthesis of inclusion proteins and their aggregation to form inclusions occurred concurrently. Possible functions for these abundant proteins are discussed. Images PMID:3667532

Couche, G A; Gregson, R P

1987-01-01

416

Chemical composition and biological assays of essential oils of Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi subsp. nepeta (Lamiaceae).  

PubMed

Aerial parts of wild Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi subsp. nepeta growing spontaneously on the Mediterranean coast (Sardinia Island, Italy) and on the Atlantic coast (Portugal) were used as a matrix for the supercritical extraction of volatile oil with CO(2). The collected extracts were analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS methods and their compositions were compared with that of the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation, but the differences were not relevant. A strong chemical variability was observed in the essential oils depending on the origin of the samples. The results showed the presence of two chemotypes of C. nepeta. In all Italian samples, pulegone, piperitenone oxide and piperitenone were the main components (64.4-39.9%; 2.5-19.1%; 6.4-7.7%); conversely, the oil extracted from Portuguese C. nepeta is predominantly composed of isomenthone (35.8-51.3%), 1,8-cineole (21.1-21.4%) and trans-isopulegone (7.8-6.0%). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were used to evaluate the antifungal activity of the oils against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida guillermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Epidermophyton floccosum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus. The Italian oil, rich in pulegone, exhibited significant antifungal activity against Aspergillus and dermatophyte strains, with MIC values of 0.32-1.25 µL mL(-1). PMID:20981614

Marongiu, B; Piras, A; Porcedda, S; Falconieri, D; Maxia, A; Gonçalves, M J; Cavaleiro, C; Salgueiro, L

2010-11-01

417

Humoral response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium in naturally infected ring-neck doves (Streptopelia risoria).  

PubMed

Creation of a reliable and easy to use serologic test would greatly improve ante mortem diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and aid in the control of avian mycobacteriosis, particularly in captive birds. In order to determine whether serodiagnostics could be of value in testing ring-neck doves (Streptopelia risoria) for M. a. avium infection, Western blot analysis was used to assess the humoral response of ring-neck doves exposed to M. a. avium, and to evaluate whether an association could be made between the humoral response and necropsy findings, histopathology, culture, and PCR testing. Western blot results were examined for reactivity patterns associating humoral response with infection status, severity and type of lesions (diffuse vs. multifocal granulomatous inflammation) and phenotype (white vs. non-white). A sensitivity of 88.24% and a specificity of 100% were achieved utilizing Western blot analysis to detect M. a. avium infection in ring-neck doves, offering a negative predictive value of 93% and a positive predictive value of 100%. While Western blot analysis results did not reflect lesion severity, lesion type did partially correspond with the humoral response. The findings of the present study indicate that serologic testing can be used as a valuable ante mortem screening tool for identifying ring-neck doves infected with M. a. avium. PMID:18639937

Gray, P L; Saggese, M D; Phalen, D N; Tizard, I

2008-10-15

418

Outbreak of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infection in one flock of domestic pigeons.  

PubMed

An outbreak of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infection was diagnosed in one breed of domestic pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica) in the Czech Republic. Nodular granulomatous lesions were found in 42 (9.7%) pigeons of the 435 examined; histopathologic examination of livers with gross lesions of mycobacteriosis from 15 randomly sele