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Sample records for mesenteroides subsp mesenteroides

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Strain J18, Isolated from Kimchi

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Se Hee

    2012-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides is one of the most predominant lactic acid bacterial groups during kimchi fermentation. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides J18, which was isolated from kimchi. The genome of the strain consists of a 1,896,561-bp chromosome and five plasmids. PMID:22247530

  2. Characterization of the major dehydrogenase related to d-lactic acid synthesis in Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Park, Jung-Mi; Seo, Eunyoung; Ahn, Ji Eun; Kim, Tae-Jip; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Han, Nam Soo

    2012-10-10

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 is a lactic acid bacterium that converts pyruvate mainly to d-(-)-lactic acid by using d-(-)-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhD). The aim of this study was to identify the gene responsible for d-lactic acid formation in this organism and to characterize the enzyme to facilitate the production of optically pure d-lactic acid. A genomic analysis of L. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 revealed that 7 genes encode lactate-related dehydrogenase. According to transcriptomic, proteomic, and phylogenetic analyses, LEUM_1756 was the major gene responsible for the production of d-lactic acid. The LEUM_1756 gene, of 996bp and encoding 332 amino acids (36.5kDa), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star from an inducible pET-21a(+) vector. The enzyme was purified by Ni-NTA column chromatography and showed a specific activity of 4450U/mg, significantly higher than those of other previously reported ldhDs. The gel permeation chromatography analysis showed that the purified enzyme exists as tetramers in solution and this was the first report among lactic acid bacteria. The pH and temperature optima were pH 8.0 and 30°C, respectively, for the pyruvate reduction reaction, and pH 11.0 and 20°C, respectively, for the lactate oxidation reaction. The K(m) kinetic parameters for pyruvate and lactate were 0.58mM and 260mM, respectively. In addition, the k(cat) values for pyruvate and lactate were 2900s(-1) and 2280s(-1), respectively. The enzyme was not inhibited by Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Na(+), or urea, but was inhibited by 1mM Zn(2+) and 1mM SDS. PMID:22975125

  3. Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris Strain T26, Isolated from Mesophilic Undefined Cheese Starter

    PubMed Central

    Kot, W. P.; Hansen, L. H.; Sørensen, S. J.; Broadbent, J. R.; Vogensen, F. K.; Ardö, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc is the main group of heterofermentative bacteria found in mesophilic dairy starters. They grow in close symbiosis with the Lactococcus population and are able to degrade citrate. Here we present a draft genome sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris strain T26. PMID:24903867

  4. Purification and characterization of a bacteriocin from an oenological strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Halil; Salih, Bekir; Bozoğlu, Faruk

    2016-05-18

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF), which improves organoleptic properties and biologic stability of some wines, may cause wine spoilage if uncontrolled. Bacteriocins were reported as efficient preservatives to control MLF through their bactericidal effect on malolactic bacteria. Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris W3 isolated from wine produces an inhibitory substance that is bactericidal against malolactic bacteria in model wine medium. Treatment of the culture supernatant of strain W3 with proteases eliminated the inhibitory activity, which proved that it is a true bacteriocin and we tentatively termed it mesentericin W3. The bacteriocin inhibited the growth of food-borne pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, and malolactic bacteria. It was active over a wide pH range and stable to organic solvents and heat. Mesentericin W3 was purified to homogeneity by a pH-mediated cell adsorption-desorption method, cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and reverse-phase chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy (MS) and partial amino acid sequence analysis revealed that mesentericin W3 was identical to mesentericin Y105. PMID:25837975

  5. Leuconostoc mesenteroides SJRP55: A Bacteriocinogenic Strain Isolated from Brazilian Water Buffalo Mozzarella Cheese.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Aline Teodoro; Jeronymo-Ceneviva, Ana Beatriz; Silva, Luana Faria; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; Choiset, Yvan; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Dousset, Xavier; Penna, Ana Lúcia Barretto

    2014-12-01

    The production of bacteriocins by Leuconostoc mesenteroides represents an important opportunity for exploration of their potential use for industrial purpose. The antimicrobial compounds produced by L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides SJRP55 strain were characterized and purified. Cell-free supernatant of Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides SJRP55 produced antibacterial compounds against Listeria spp. strains and not inhibiting against Lactobacillus spp. The antimicrobial substances were stable at high temperatures (100 °C for 2 h and 121 °C for 20 min) and low pH (pH 2-4) values, but sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and resistant to α-amylase, lipase and catalase enzymes. The optimal temperature for active peptides production was 25 °C. The antimicrobial compounds were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity column and reverse-phase chromatography. Mass spectrometry and amino acids analyses showed that the bacteriocins were identical to mesentericin Y105 and B105. The producer strain's DNA analysis revealed presence of open reading frames possibly coding for virulence factors, such as enterococcal surface protein (esp), collagen adhesion (ace) and intrinsic vancomycin resistance (vanA); however, biogenic amines encoding genes were not observed. Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides SJRP55 is a promising biopreservative culture in fermented milk, and the purified bacteriocins can also be applied in food preservation. PMID:24907159

  6. Probiotic Properties of Leuconostoc mesenteroides Isolated from Aguamiel of Agave salmiana.

    PubMed

    Diana, Castro-Rodríguez; Humberto, Hernández-Sánchez; Jorge, Yáñez Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Four lactic acid bacteria, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, were isolated from aguamiel the sap obtained from Agave salmiana from México and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The probiotic potential of these strains was evaluated and compared with a commercial probiotic (Lactobacillus plantarum 299v) from human origin. All the strains survived the in vitro gastrointestinal simulation conditions: the stomach simulation (3 h, pH 2, 37 °C) and the intestinal simulation (4 h, bile salts 0.5%, 37 °C). All the strains showed a strong hydrophilic character with n-hexadecane and chloroform assays, and all the strains showed a mucin adhesion rate similar to that of L. plantarum 299v. The strains of L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides exhibited similar antimicrobial activity against some pathogens in comparison with L. plantarum 299v. Some antibiotics inhibited the growth of the strains. L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides exhibited in vitro probiotic potential, and it could be better characterized through future in vivo tests. PMID:25690572

  7. Production of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum 213M0 isolated from Mongolian fermented mare milk, airag.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kensuke; Yoshida, Saki; Aikawa, Hiroki; Hano, Chihiro; Bolormaa, Tsognemekh; Burenjargal, Sedkhuu; Miyamoto, Taku

    2016-03-01

    Strain 213M0 was selected with productivity of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) among 235 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Mongolian fermented milk 'airag'. Strain 213M0 was species-identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum by morphological observation, carbohydrate fermentation profiling and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Incubation temperature proper to produce the BLIS was 25°C rather than 30 and 37°C, and the production actively proceeded during the exponential growth phase of the producer cells. Antibacterial effect of BLIS 213M0 was limited to all nine strains of Listeria sp. bacteria and seven strains of LAB cocci among 53 tested strains, which corresponds to a typical feature of the class IIa pediocin-like bacteriocins. BLIS 213M0 was not inactivated in every broad pH range solution (pH 2.0-11.0), and was stable against storage at 25°C for 1 week and heating at 121°C for 15 min under pH 4.5. Peptide frame of BLIS 213M0 was confirmed by inactivation with some peptidases, and then its molecular weight was estimated to be 2.6-3.0 kDa using an in situ activity assay following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The estimated size was different from the other Leuconostoc bacteriocins already reported. These results suggest that BLIS 213M0 would be a novel listericidal bacteriocin. PMID:26388181

  8. Sequence analysis of Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteriophage (phi)1-A4 isolated from industrial vegetable fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable fermentations rely on the proper succession of a variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) including Leuconostoc mesenteroides. L. mesenteroides initiates the fermentation, producing lactic and acetic acids, CO2, and many flavor compounds. As the fermentation proceeds, L. mesenteroides dies of...

  9. Biofilm formation by strains of Leuconostoc citreum and L. mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To compare for the first time biofilm formation among strains of Leuconostoc citreum and L. mesenteroides that produce varying types of extracellular glucans. Methods and Results: Twelve strains of Leuconostoc sp. that produce extracellular glucans were compared for their capacity to produ...

  10. Leuconostoc mesenteroides growth kinetics with application to bacterial profile modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lappan, R.E.; Fogler, H.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    Bacterial profile modification (BPM) is being developed as an oil recovery technique that uses bacteria to selectively plug oil depleted zones within a reservoir to divert displacing fluids into oil-rich zones. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, which produces dextran when supplied with sucrose, is a bacterium that is technically feasible for use in profile modification. However, the technique requires controlled bacterial growth to produce selective plugging. A kinetic model for the production of cells and polysaccharides has been developed for L. mesenteroides bacteria. This model, based on data from batch growth experiments, predicts saccharide utilization, cell generation, and dextran production. The underlying mechanism is the extracellular breakdown of sucrose into glucose and fructose and the subsequent production of polysaccharide. The monosaccharides are then available for growth. Accompanying sucrose consumption is the utilization of yeast extract. The cell requires a complex media that is provided by yeast extract as a source of vitamins and amino acids. Varying the concentration ratio of yeast extract to sucrose in the growth media provides a means of controlling the amount of polymer produced per cell. Consequently, in situ bacteria growth can be controlled by the manipulation of nutrient media composition, thereby providing the ability to create an overall strategy for the use of L. mesenteroides bacteria for profile modification.

  11. Sequence Analysis of Leuconostoc mesenteroides Bacteriophage Φ1-A4 Isolated from an Industrial Vegetable Fermentation▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Z.; Altermann, E.; Breidt, F.; Kozyavkin, S.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetable fermentations rely on the proper succession of a variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Leuconostoc mesenteroides initiates fermentation. As fermentation proceeds, L. mesenteroides dies off and other LAB complete the fermentation. Phages infecting L. mesenteroides may significantly influence the die-off of L. mesenteroides. However, no L. mesenteroides phages have been previously genetically characterized. Knowledge of more phage genome sequences may provide new insights into phage genomics, phage evolution, and phage-host interactions. We have determined the complete genome sequence of L. mesenteroides phage Φ1-A4, isolated from an industrial sauerkraut fermentation. The phage possesses a linear, double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 29,508 bp with a G+C content of 36%. Fifty open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted. Putative functions were assigned to 26 ORFs (52%), including 5 ORFs of structural proteins. The phage genome was modularly organized, containing DNA replication, DNA-packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis, and DNA regulation/modification modules. In silico analyses showed that Φ1-A4 is a unique lytic phage with a large-scale genome inversion (∼30% of the genome). The genome inversion encompassed the lysis module, part of the structural protein module, and a cos site. The endolysin gene was flanked by two holin genes. The tail morphogenesis module was interspersed with cell lysis genes and other genes with unknown functions. The predicted amino acid sequences of the phage proteins showed little similarity to other phages, but functional analyses showed that Φ1-A4 clusters with several Lactococcus phages. To our knowledge, Φ1-A4 is the first genetically characterized L. mesenteroides phage. PMID:20118355

  12. Glucosyltransferase Mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael R.; Zahnley, James; Goodman, Nelson

    1994-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355 produces dextrans and alternan from sucrose. Alternan is an unusual dextran-like polymer containing alternating α(1→6)/α(1→3) glucosidic bonds. Cultures were mutagenized with UV and ethyl methanesulfonate, and colony morphology mutants were selected on 10% sucrose plates. Colony morphology variants exhibited changes from parent cultures in the production of one or more glucosyltransferases (GTFs) and glucans. Mutants were characterized by measuring resistance of glucan products to dextranase digestion, by electrophoresis, and by high-pressure liquid chromatography of maltose acceptor products generated from sucrose-maltose mixtures. Some mutants produced almost pure fraction L dextran, and cultures exhibited a single principal GTF band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gels. Other mutants produced glucans enriched for alternan. Colony morphology characteristics (size, smoothness, and opacity) and liquid culture properties (clumpiness, color, and viscosity in 10% sucrose medium) were explained on the basis of GTF production. Three principal GTF bands were detected. Images PMID:16349346

  13. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose in Lactococcus lactis using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Production of DsrI was optimized using several different background vectors, signal peptides, str...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Three Antibiotic-Resistant Leuconostoc mesenteroides Strains of Dairy Origin

    PubMed Central

    Campedelli, Ilenia; Flórez, Ana Belén; Salvetti, Elisa; Delgado, Susana; Orrù, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Alegría, Ángel; Felis, Giovanna E.; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides is a lactic acid bacterium (LAB) commonly associated with fermented foods. Here, we report the genome sequence of three selected dairy strains, showing atypical antibiotic resistances (AR). Genome analysis provided a better understanding of the genetic bases of AR in Leuconostoc and its potential transferability among foodborne bacteria. PMID:26358600

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Three Antibiotic-Resistant Leuconostoc mesenteroides Strains of Dairy Origin.

    PubMed

    Campedelli, Ilenia; Flórez, Ana Belén; Salvetti, Elisa; Delgado, Susana; Orrù, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Alegría, Ángel; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides is a lactic acid bacterium (LAB) commonly associated with fermented foods. Here, we report the genome sequence of three selected dairy strains, showing atypical antibiotic resistances (AR). Genome analysis provided a better understanding of the genetic bases of AR in Leuconostoc and its potential transferability among foodborne bacteria. PMID:26358600

  16. Biofilm formation by exopolysaccharide mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. A set of mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Another mutant of NRRL B-1355, strain R1510, produces ...

  17. Insoluble Glucans from Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. Mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Our recent work demonstrated that biofilms from all strains con...

  18. Characterization of Alternan, a high molar mass polysaccharide from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, by FFF-MALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Native alternan is a high molar mass homopolymer of D-glucose produced by some strains of the bacterium Lueconostoc mesenteroides. It consists of glucose units that alternate their linkages between alpha-(1-6) and alpha-(1-3) between glucosyl units. The glucose units contained in the polysaccharid...

  19. Technological Aptitude and Applications of Leuconostoc mesenteroides Bioactive Strains Isolated from Algerian Raw Camel Milk

    PubMed Central

    Benmechernene, Zineb; Chentouf, Hanane Fatma; Yahia, Bellil; Fatima, Ghazi; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Two strains (B7 and Z8) of the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subspecies mesenteroides that were isolated from Algerian camel milk from an initial pool of 13 strains and demonstrated a high ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria spp. were selected and characterised at the phenotypic and genotypic levels. Probiotic profiling and inhibition spectra against food borne pathogens in mixed cultures were also investigated. The bacteriocin produced by L. mesenteroides strain B7 was identified as leucocin B by specific PCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that both Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains exhibited a marked probiotic profile, showing high survival at low pH (2-3 and 4) in the presence of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% of bile salts and at pH 3 in the presence of 3 mg/mL pepsin. Susceptibility testing against antimicrobial agents was also performed for both strains. When tested in a mixed culture with Listeria innocua, Listeria ivanovii, or Staphylococcus aureus, strain B7 reduced the numbers of these species by 1.87, 1.78, and 1.38 log units, respectively. Consequently, these two strains were found to possess good probiotic properties in vitro and a high capacity for Listeria spp. inhibition in mixed cultures. Therefore, these strains have a favourable technological aptitude and a potential application as novel probiotic starters. PMID:24392451

  20. Technological aptitude and applications of Leuconostoc mesenteroides bioactive strains isolated from Algerian raw camel milk.

    PubMed

    Benmechernene, Zineb; Chentouf, Hanane Fatma; Yahia, Bellil; Fatima, Ghazi; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Two strains (B7 and Z8) of the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subspecies mesenteroides that were isolated from Algerian camel milk from an initial pool of 13 strains and demonstrated a high ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria spp. were selected and characterised at the phenotypic and genotypic levels. Probiotic profiling and inhibition spectra against food borne pathogens in mixed cultures were also investigated. The bacteriocin produced by L. mesenteroides strain B7 was identified as leucocin B by specific PCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that both Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains exhibited a marked probiotic profile, showing high survival at low pH (2-3 and 4) in the presence of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% of bile salts and at pH 3 in the presence of 3 mg/mL pepsin. Susceptibility testing against antimicrobial agents was also performed for both strains. When tested in a mixed culture with Listeria innocua, Listeria ivanovii, or Staphylococcus aureus, strain B7 reduced the numbers of these species by 1.87, 1.78, and 1.38 log units, respectively. Consequently, these two strains were found to possess good probiotic properties in vitro and a high capacity for Listeria spp. inhibition in mixed cultures. Therefore, these strains have a favourable technological aptitude and a potential application as novel probiotic starters. PMID:24392451

  1. Effects of mutations on the insoluble glucan synthesized by Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118 glucansucrase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve different amino acids were each substituted for Threonine-654 in a cloned glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118 (DSR-I). The native enzyme produces a water-insoluble glucan containing approximately 44 mol% 1,3-disubstituted a-D-glucopyranosyl units and 29 mol% 1,6-disubstit...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides 406 Isolated from the Traditional Fermented Mare Milk Airag in Tuv Aimag, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Hano, Chihiro; Yoshida, Saki; Nguyen, Tien Thi Thuy; Wulijideligen; Tashiro, Kosuke; Arakawa, Kensuke; Miyamoto, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides406 was isolated from the traditional fermented mare milk airag in Tuv Aimag, Mongolia. This strain produces an antilisterial bacteriocin. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:27013047

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides 213M0, Isolated from Traditional Fermented Mare Milk Airag in Bulgan Aimag, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Hano, Chihiro; Yoshida, Saki; Bolormaa, Tsognemekh; Burenjargal, Sedkhuu; Nguyen, Co Thi Kim; Tashiro, Kosuke; Arakawa, Kensuke; Miyamoto, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides 213M0 was isolated from traditional fermented mare milk airag in Bulgan Aimag, Mongolia. This strain produces a listericidal bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:27034488

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides 213M0, Isolated from Traditional Fermented Mare Milk Airag in Bulgan Aimag, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Hano, Chihiro; Yoshida, Saki; Bolormaa, Tsognemekh; Burenjargal, Sedkhuu; Nguyen, Co Thi Kim; Tashiro, Kosuke; Arakawa, Kensuke; Miyamoto, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides213M0 was isolated from traditional fermented mare milk airag in Bulgan Aimag, Mongolia. This strain produces a listericidal bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:27034488

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides 406 Isolated from the Traditional Fermented Mare Milk Airag in Tuv Aimag, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Hano, Chihiro; Yoshida, Saki; Nguyen, Tien Thi Thuy; Wulijideligen; Tashiro, Kosuke; Arakawa, Kensuke; Miyamoto, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides 406 was isolated from the traditional fermented mare milk airag in Tuv Aimag, Mongolia. This strain produces an antilisterial bacteriocin. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:27013047

  6. Characterization of strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides by analysis of soluble whole-cell protein pattern, DNA fingerprinting and restriction of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    1997-05-01

    Of 215 leuconostocs isolated from field grass, natural whey cultures and water-buffalo milk, 178 were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides while 37 strains could not be identified. Biochemical characterization allowed seven groups to be defined. Representative strains of each group and different habitat and nine reference strains were selected for further analyses. Protein profiles appeared suitable for species discrimination, but did not differentiate between the three subspecies of Leuc. mesenteroides. The technique also showed some differences among equivocal strains. DNA fingerprinting for most strains of Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides examined showed a different restriction pattern from that of the type strain. Ribotyping was not useful for discriminating species and subspecies of the genus Leuconostoc: Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides and ssp. dextranicum showed the same ribopattern as Leuc. lactis while Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. cremoris exhibited a pattern distinct from all the other species examined. On the basis of ARDRA-PCR, two main groups could be distinguished: the larger group included Leuc. mesenteroides, Leuc. lactis, Leuc. pseudomesenteroides and some unidentifiable strains; the second one included Leuc. citreum, Leuc. fallax, Weissella paramesenteroides and some unidentified strains. PMID:9172399

  7. Effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter cultures on microbial communities and metabolites during kimchi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Lee, Hyo Jung; Seo, Hye-Young; Park, Wan-Soo; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-02-15

    Kimchi fermentation usually relies upon the growth of naturally-occurring various heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB). This sometimes makes it difficult to produce kimchi with uniform quality. The use of Leuconostoc mesenteroides as a starter has been considered to produce commercial fermented kimchi with uniform and good quality in Korea. In this study, a combination of a barcoded pyrosequencing strategy and a (1)H NMR technique was used to investigate the effects of Leu. mesenteroides strain B1 as a starter culture for kimchi fermentation. Baechu (Chinese cabbage) and Chonggak (radish) kimchi with and without Leu. mesenteroides inoculation were prepared, respectively and their characteristics that included pH, cell number, bacterial community, and metabolites were monitored periodically for 40 days. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis showed that the numbers of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) in starter kimchi decreased more quickly than that in non-starter kimchi. Members of the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella were dominant LAB regardless of the kimchi type or starter inoculation. Among the three genera, Leuconostoc was the most abundant, followed by Lactobacillus and Weissella. The use of Leu. mesenteroides as a starter increased the Leuconostoc proportions and decreased the Lactobacillus proportions in both type of kimchi during kimchi fermentation. However, interestingly, the use of the kimchi starter more highly maintained the Weissella proportions of starter kimchi compared to that in the non-starter kimchi until fermentation was complete. Metabolite analysis using the (1)H NMR technique showed that both Baechu and Chonggak kimchi with the starter culture began to consume free sugars earlier and produced a little greater amounts of lactic and acetic acids and mannitol. Metabolite analysis demonstrated that kimchi fermentation using Leu. mesenteroides as a starter was completed earlier with more production of kimchi

  8. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans.

    PubMed

    Skory, Christopher D; Côté, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose using a nisin-controlled gene expression system in Lactococcus lactis. These polymers have potential for production of biodegradable gels, fibers, and films. We optimized production of DsrI using several different background vectors, signal peptides, strains, induction conditions, and bioreactor parameters to increase extracellular accumulation. Optimal production of the enzyme utilized a high-copy plasmid, pMSP3535H3, which contains a nisin immunity gene, L. lactis LM0230, and bioreactors maintained at pH 6.0 to stabilize the enzyme. We were able to significantly improve growth using the lactic acid inhibitor heme and by continuous removal of lactic acid with anion exchange resins, but enzyme production was less than the controls. The recombinant enzyme under optimized conditions accumulated in the culture medium to approximately 380 mg/L, which was over 150-fold higher compared to the native L. mesenteroides strain. Methods are also included for purification of DsrI utilizing the glucan-binding domain of the enzyme. PMID:26239071

  9. Effect of a single point mutation on the interaction of glucans with a glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type strain of the lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides produces a water-insoluble glucan from sucrose via an extracellular glucansucrase. Substitution of an amino acid that is coupled with the +2 subsite adjacent to the transition stabilizer of this glucansucrase, results in signific...

  10. Cloning, expression, and characterization of an insoluble glucan-producing glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have cloned a glucansucrase from the type strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (NRRL B-1118; ATCC 8293) and successfully expressed the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The recombinant processed enzyme has a putative sequence identical to the predicted secreted native enzyme (1,473 amino acids; 161,468...

  11. Glucan binding regions of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F.

    PubMed

    Funane, K; Ookura, T; Kobayashi, M

    1998-01-01

    We isolated glucan-binding peptides of a dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F. The dextransucrase was bound to DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Sephadex G-100, and mutan from Streptococcus mutans. Mild trypsin digestion dissociated the enzyme and glucan binding. In the presence of ammonium sulfate, several peptides were bound to glucan after trypsin digestion. Four main mutan-binding peptides were obtained by this method, and those amino acid sequences were analyzed. One of them was identical with the dextran-binding peptide that contains lysine, which was previously isolated by differential chemical modification with o-phthalaldehyde. We also found mutan-binding peptides in sucrose- and dextran-binding regions and a lysine-rich region. Also, there was a peptide similar in sequence to glucan-binding A-repeat of streptococcal glucosyltransferases. PMID:9501523

  12. Alteration of the growth rate and lag time of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B F; Fogler, H S

    2001-03-20

    Bacterial profile modification is an important enhanced oil recovery technique used to direct injected water into a reservoir's low permeability zone containing trapped crude oil. During water flooding, the use of bacteria to plug the high permeability water zone and divert flow into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone will have a significant economic impact. However, during the field implementation of bacterial profile modification, the rapid growth of bacteria near the injection well bore may hinder the subsequent injection of growth media so that profile modification of the reservoir occurs only in the immediate vicinity of the well bore. By slowing the growth rate and prolonging the lag phase, the onset of pore-space plugging may be delayed and the biologically active zone extended deep into the reservoir. High substrate loading, high pH values, and the addition of the growth inhibitors sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium benzoate have been used in combination to alter the growth characteristics of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 grown in batch conditions. The highest sucrose concentration used in these studies, 500 g/L, produced lag times 12-fold greater than the slowest lag times achieved at low sucrose concentrations. When L. mesenteroides was grown in media containing 500 g/L sucrose, an alkaline pH value threshold was found above which bacteria did not grow. At this threshold pH value of 8.1, an average lag time of 200 h was observed. Increasing the concentration of sodium benzoate had no effect on lag time, but reduced the growth rate until the threshold concentration of 0.6%, above which bacteria did not grow. Last, it was found that a solution of 0.075 mM sodium dodecylsulfate in media containing 15 g/L sucrose completely inhibited bacterial growth. PMID:11460251

  13. Enzyme-resistant isomalto-oligosaccharides produced from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 dextran hydrolysis for functional food application.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Damini; Goyal, Arun

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 was produced and purified using polyethylene glycol fractionation. In our earlier study, it was reported that L. mesenteroides dextransucrase synthesizes a high-molecular mass dextran (>2 × 10(6)  Da) with ∼85.5% α-(1→6) linear and ∼14.5% α-(1→3) branched linkages. Isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMOs) were synthesized through depolymerization of dextran by the action of dextranase. The degree of polymerization of IMOs was 2-10 as confirmed by mass spectrometry. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of α-(1→3) linkages in the synthesized IMOs. The IMOs were resistant to dextranase, α-glucosidase, and α-amylase, and therefore can have potential application as food additives in the functional foods. PMID:25939683

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 Isolated from Pulque, a Traditional Mexican Alcoholic Fermented Beverage.

    PubMed

    Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Campos, Itzia; Giles-Gómez, Martha; Bolívar, Francisco; Escalante, Adelfo

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 was isolated from the traditional Mexican pulque beverage. We report its draft genome sequence, assembled in 6 contigs consisting of 1,874,188 bp and no plasmids. Genome annotation predicted a total of 1,800 genes, 1,687 coding sequences, 52 pseudogenes, 9 rRNAs, 51 tRNAs, 1 noncoding RNA, and 44 frameshifted genes. PMID:25377708

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 Isolated from Pulque, a Traditional Mexican Alcoholic Fermented Beverage

    PubMed Central

    Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Campos, Itzia; Giles-Gómez, Martha; Bolívar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 was isolated from the traditional Mexican pulque beverage. We report its draft genome sequence, assembled in 6 contigs consisting of 1,874,188 bp and no plasmids. Genome annotation predicted a total of 1,800 genes, 1,687 coding sequences, 52 pseudogenes, 9 rRNAs, 51 tRNAs, 1 noncoding RNA, and 44 frameshifted genes. PMID:25377708

  16. In vitro probiotic profiling of novel Enterococcus faecium and Leuconostoc mesenteroides from Tunisian freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    El-Jeni, Rim; El Bour, Monia; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Böhme, Karola; Fernández-No, Inmaculada C; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss

    2016-01-01

    Novel lactic acid bacteria isolated from different organs of freshwater fish were examined for their potential application as probiotics in raw and processed foods. Four isolates of Enterococcus faecium and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were identified at the molecular level by 16S rRNA sequencing and random amplification of polymorphic DNA - polymerase chain reaction, and their antimicrobial activity against a panel of pathogens and food-poisoning bacteria was investigated. The whole bacteriocins of the 4 isolates were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences in PCR. The isolates exhibited high inhibitory activities against food-borne pathogens and spoilage microbial species and have significant probiotic profiles, since they survived at pH 3.0 and in the presence of bile salts, pancreatin, and pepsin, without any detectable hemolytic activity. Further, moderate heat resistance, adhesion ability to steel surfaces, and sensitivity to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents were revealed for all the isolates. These results highlight the specific probiotic properties of the strains and give evidence for potential application in minimally processed foods subjected to moderate heat processing. PMID:26651241

  17. Genomic and Proteomic Characterization of Bacteriocin-Producing Leuconostoc mesenteroides Strains Isolated from Raw Camel Milk in Two Southwest Algerian Arid Zones

    PubMed Central

    Benmechernene, Zineb; Fernández-No, Inmaculada; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Kihal, Mebrouk; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of camel milk is very limited. In this work, the genetic characterization and proteomic identification of 13 putative producing bacteriocin Leuconostoc strains exhibiting antilisterial activity and isolated from camel milk were performed. DNA sequencing of the 13 selected strains revealed high homology among the 16S rRNA genes for all strains. In addition, 99% homology with Leuconostoc mesenteroides was observed when these sequences were analysed by the BLAST tool against other sequences from reference strains deposited in the Genbank. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF MS) which allowed for the identification of 2 mass peaks 6242 m/z and 5118 m/z that resulted to be specific to the species L. mesenteroides. Remarkably, the phyloproteomic tree provided more intraspecific information of L. mesenteroides than phylogenetic analysis. Accordingly, phyloproteomic analysis grouped L. mesenteroides strains into different subbranches, while all L. mesenteroides isolates were grouped in the same branch according to phylogenetic analysis. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first report on the use of MALDI-TOF MS on the identification of LAB isolated from camel milk. PMID:24809059

  18. Genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteriocin-producing Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains isolated from raw camel milk in two southwest Algerian arid zones.

    PubMed

    Benmechernene, Zineb; Fernández-No, Inmaculada; Quintela-Baluja, Marcos; Böhme, Karola; Kihal, Mebrouk; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of camel milk is very limited. In this work, the genetic characterization and proteomic identification of 13 putative producing bacteriocin Leuconostoc strains exhibiting antilisterial activity and isolated from camel milk were performed. DNA sequencing of the 13 selected strains revealed high homology among the 16S rRNA genes for all strains. In addition, 99% homology with Leuconostoc mesenteroides was observed when these sequences were analysed by the BLAST tool against other sequences from reference strains deposited in the Genbank. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF MS) which allowed for the identification of 2 mass peaks 6242 m/z and 5118 m/z that resulted to be specific to the species L. mesenteroides. Remarkably, the phyloproteomic tree provided more intraspecific information of L. mesenteroides than phylogenetic analysis. Accordingly, phyloproteomic analysis grouped L. mesenteroides strains into different subbranches, while all L. mesenteroides isolates were grouped in the same branch according to phylogenetic analysis. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first report on the use of MALDI-TOF MS on the identification of LAB isolated from camel milk. PMID:24809059

  19. Reduction of d-lactate content in sauerkraut using starter cultures of recombinant Leuconostoc mesenteroides expressing the ldhL gene.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qing; Li, Ling; Moon, Jin Seok; Cho, Seung Kee; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Soo Jin; Han, Nam Soo

    2016-05-01

    The d-form of lactate, which causes metabolic stress upon excessive dietary intake, is mainly produced by Leuconostoc sp., the predominant species in sauerkraut. To shift the metabolic flux of d-lactate from pyruvate to l-lactate, we expressed the l-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhL) gene in Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293. The ldhL gene from Lactobacillus plantarum was introduced into L. mesenteroides using the shuttle vectors pLeuCM and pLeuCM42. To elevate the expression level of ldhL in L. mesenteroides, the nucleotides for pyruvate kinase promoter were fused to ldhL and cloned into above vectors to construct pLC18pkL and pLC42pkL. As results, introduction of pLC42pkL in L. mesenteroides significantly improved both l-LDH activity and l-lactate productivity during fermentation, decreasing the d-/l-lactate ratio. When used as a starter culture for sauerkraut fermentation, recombinant L. mesenteroides harboring pLC42pkL increased l-lactate concentration and decreased d-lactate concentration compared to the wild type strain. We newly developed a recombinant L. mesenteroides which has high l-lactate dehydrogenase activity and applied this strain to minimize the harmful effect of d-lactate during the sauerkraut fermentation. To the best of our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time the effective use of recombinant Leuconostoc sp. for quality improvement of fermented foods. PMID:26472127

  20. Conserved Repeat Motifs and Glucan Binding by Glucansucrases of Oral Streptococci and Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Deepan S. H.; Joucla, Gilles; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Russell, Roy R. B.

    2004-01-01

    Glucansucrases of oral streptococci and Leuconostoc mesenteroides have a common pattern of structural organization and characteristically contain a domain with a series of tandem amino acid repeats in which certain residues are highly conserved, particularly aromatic amino acids and glycine. In some glucosyltransferases (GTFs) the repeat region has been identified as a glucan binding domain (GBD). Such GBDs are also found in several glucan binding proteins (GBP) of oral streptococci that do not have glucansucrase activity. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of 20 glucansucrases and GBP showed the widespread conservation of the 33-residue A repeat first identified in GtfI of Streptococcus downei. Site-directed mutagenesis of individual highly conserved residues in recombinant GBD of GtfI demonstrated the importance of the first tryptophan and the tyrosine-phenylalanine pair in the binding of dextran, as well as the essential contribution of a basic residue (arginine or lysine). A microplate binding assay was developed to measure the binding affinity of recombinant GBDs. GBD of GtfI was shown to be capable of binding glucans with predominantly α-1,3 or α-1,6 links, as well as alternating α-1,3 and α-1,6 links (alternan). Western blot experiments using biotinylated dextran or alternan as probes demonstrated a difference between the binding of streptococcal GTF and GBP and that of Leuconostoc glucansucrases. Experimental data and bioinformatics analysis showed that the A repeat motif is distinct from the 20-residue CW motif, which also has conserved aromatic amino acids and glycine and which occurs in the choline-binding proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other organisms. PMID:15576779

  1. Construction of a Recombinant Leuconostoc mesenteroides CJNU 0147 Producing 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid, a Bifidogenic Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (DHNA), a precursor of menaquinone (vitamin K2), has an effect on growth stimulation of bifidobacteria and prevention of osteoporosis, making it a promising functional food material. Therefore, we tried to clone the menB gene encoding DHNA synthase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides CJNU 0147. Based on the genome sequence of Leu. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 (GenBank accession no., CP000414), a primer set (Leu_menBfull_F and Leu_menBfull_R) was designed for the PCR amplification of menB gene of CJNU 0147. A DNA fragment (1,190 bp), including the menB gene, was amplified, cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector, and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of MenB (DHNA synthase) protein of CJNU 0147 had a 98% similarity to the corresponding protein of ATCC 8293. The menB gene was subcloned into pCW4, a lactic acid bacteria - E. coli shuttle vector, and transferred to CJNU 0147. The transcription of menB gene of CJNU 0147 (pCW4::menB) was increased, when compared with those of CJNU 0147 (pCW4) and CJNU 0147 (−). The DHNA was produced from it at a detectable level, indicating that the cloned menB gene of CJNU 0147 encoded a DHNA synthase which is responsible for the production of DHNA, resulting in an increase of bifidogenic growth stimulation activity. PMID:26877648

  2. Impregnation of cotton fabric with silver nanoparticles synthesized by dextran isolated from bacterial species Leuconostoc mesenteroides T3.

    PubMed

    Davidović, Slađana; Miljković, Miona; Lazić, Vesna; Jović, Danica; Jokić, Bojan; Dimitrijević, Suzana; Radetić, Maja

    2015-10-20

    This study was aimed to highlight the possibility of cotton fabric impregnation with silver nanoparticles synthesized by dextran isolated from Leuconostoc mesenteroides T3 in order to obtain antimicrobial properties. The fabrication of dextran was proved by FTIR spectroscopy. Particle sizes of synthesized dextran and silver nanoparticles were measured by dynamic light scattering method. The presence of silver nanoparticles on the surface of cotton fabric was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction measurements and reflectance spectrophotometry. Antimicrobial activity of cotton fabric impregnated with silver nanoparticles was tested against bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and fungus Candida albicans. The results indicated that synthesized silver nanoparticles can provide satisfactory antimicrobial activity. However, maximum reduction (99.9%) of all tested microorganisms can be obtained only when 1.0mmolL(-1) colloid consisting of silver nanoparticles is applied. PMID:26256192

  3. Effect of Lactococcus lactis CLFP 100 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides CLFP 196 on Aeromonas salmonicida Infection in brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; Vendrell, Daniel; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; Múzquiz, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis in salmonid fish. This pathogen is important from an epizootic perspective because fish surviving an outbreak can remain lifelong asymptomatic carriers, serving as reservoirs of infection. As a result, the early detection and the control of infection are essential to prevent the spread of new furunculosis outbreaks. We have thus analyzed the effect of probiotic administration on the incidence of A. salmonicida in brown trout (Salmo trutta), that were subjected to temperature stress. Treatment with probiotic strains (Lactococcus lactis CLFP 100 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides CLFP 196) resulted in a higher survival rate after challenge, activation of phagocytic cells in the head kidney, and a lower rate of pathogen proliferation in the intestine as determined by real-time PCR. PMID:19556745

  4. In vitro and in vivo probiotic assessment of Leuconostoc mesenteroides P45 isolated from pulque, a Mexican traditional alcoholic beverage.

    PubMed

    Giles-Gómez, Martha; Sandoval García, Jorge Giovanni; Matus, Violeta; Campos Quintana, Itzia; Bolívar, Francisco; Escalante, Adelfo

    2016-01-01

    Pulque is a Mexican traditional alcoholic, non-distilled, fermented beverage produced by the fermentation of the sap, known as aguamiel, extracted from several maguey (Agave) species. Pulque has traditionally been considered a healthy beverage due to its nutrient content and also a traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and intestinal infections. During pulque fermentation, the development of acidity, alcohol and viscosity define its final sensorial properties, developing an enriched environment where dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB), including diverse Leuconostoc species, are present. Because traditional pulque is consumed directly from the fermentation vessel, the naturally associated LAB are ingested and reach the human small intestine alive. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo probiotic assessment of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain P45 isolated from pulque. This isolated LAB species exhibited lysozyme, acid (pH 3.5) and bile salts (0.1 and 0.3 % oxgall) resistance. Antibacterial activity against the pathogens Listeria monocytogenes, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium were observed in assays involving cell-to-cell contact, cell-free 2× concentrated supernatants and cell-to-cell contact under exopolysaccharide-producing conditions. The in vivo probiotic assessment showed an anti-infective activity of L. mesenteroides P45 against S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in challenged male and female BALB/c mice. Analysis of the available genome sequence of strain P45 allowed identified a pre-bacteriocin coding gene and six peptidoglycan hydrolase enzymes, probably involved in the antimicrobial activity of this strain. The results presented in this study support some potential microbial mechanisms associated with the beneficial effects on human health of this LAB involved in the fermentation of pulque. PMID:27375977

  5. Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus sakei as bio-protective culture to eliminate Leuconostoc mesenteroides spoilage and improve the shelf life and sensorial characteristics of commercial cooked bacon.

    PubMed

    Comi, Giuseppe; Andyanto, Debbie; Manzano, Marisa; Iacumin, Lucilla

    2016-09-01

    Cooked bacon is a typical Italian meat product. After production, cooked bacon is stored at 4 ± 2 °C. During storage, the microorganisms that survived pasteurisation can grow and produce spoilage. For the first time, we studied the cause of the deterioration in spoiled cooked bacon compared to unspoiled samples. Moreover, the use of bio-protective cultures to improve the quality of the product and eliminate the risk of spoilage was tested. The results show that Leuconostoc mesenteroides is responsible for spoilage and produces a greening colour of the meat, slime and various compounds that result from the fermentation of sugars and the degradation of nitrogen compounds. Finally, Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis and Lactobacillus sakei were able to reduce the risk of Leuconostoc mesenteroides spoilage. PMID:27217354

  6. Change in Flavonoid Composition and Antioxidative Activity during Fermentation of Onion (Allium cepa L.) by Leuconostoc mesenteroides with Different Salt Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Geon; Cho, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Young-Min; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in flavonoid composition and antioxidative activity during fermentation of onion (Allium cepa L.) by Leuconostoc mesenteroides with different NaCl concentrations. In order to qualify and quantify the flavonoids during fermentation of onion, 7 flavonoids, [quercetin 3,7-O-β-d-diglucopyranoside (Q3,7G), quercetin 3,4'-O-β-d-diglucopyranoside (Q3,4'G), quercetin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (Q3G), quercetin 4'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (Q4'G), isorhamnetin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (IR3G), quercetin (Q), and isorhamnetin (IR)], were isolated and identified from onion. During fermentation, the contents of flavonoid glucosides (Q3,7G, Q3,4'G, Q3G, Q4'G, and IR3G) gradually decreased, whereas the contents of flavonoid aglycones (Q, IR) gradually increased. Decline rates of the flavonoid glucosides increased with the addition of L. mesenteroides. Furthermore, the activity of β-glucosidase, which is produced by L. mesenteroides, is dose-dependently inhibited with different NaCl concentrations during fermentation. The presence of L. mesenteroides enhanced the antioxidative activity of onion as demonstrated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and reducing power assays. The enhancement of antioxidative activity was considered because the content of flavonoid aglycones increased during fermentation. However, the addition of NaCl may decrease the antioxidative activity; we surmise that this phenomenon occurs because of the inhibition of β-glucosidase by NaCl. Therefore, we conclude that the addition of NaCl may be useful for the regulation of antioxidative activity via the control of β-glucosidase action, during the fermentation of flavonoid glucoside-rich foods. PMID:27175820

  7. Delineation of the roles of amino acids involved in the catalytic functions of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Vought, V; Ciccone, T; Davino, M H; Fairbairn, L; Lin, Y; Cosgrove, M S; Adams, M J; Levy, H R

    2000-12-12

    The roles of particular amino acids in substrate and coenzyme binding and catalysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic analysis, and determination of binding constants. The enzyme from this species has functional dual NADP(+)/NAD(+) specificity. Previous investigations in our laboratories determined the three-dimensional structure. Kinetic studies showed an ordered mechanism for the NADP-linked reaction while the NAD-linked reaction is random. His-240 was identified as the catalytic base, and Arg-46 was identified as important for NADP(+) but not NAD(+) binding. Mutations have been selected on the basis of the three-dimensional structure. Kinetic studies of 14 mutant enzymes are reported and kinetic mechanisms are reported for 5 mutant enzymes. Fourteen substrate or coenzyme dissociation constants have been measured for 11 mutant enzymes. Roles of particular residues are inferred from k(cat), K(m), k(cat)/K(m), K(d), and changes in kinetic mechanism. Results for enzymes K182R, K182Q, K343R, and K343Q establish Lys-182 and Lys-343 as important in binding substrate both to free enzyme and during catalysis. Studies of mutant enzymes Y415F and Y179F showed no significant contribution for Tyr-415 to substrate binding and only a small contribution for Tyr-179. Changes in kinetics for T14A, Q47E, and R46A enzymes implicate these residues, to differing extents, in coenzyme binding and discrimination between NADP(+) and NAD(+). By the same measure, Lys-343 is also involved in defining coenzyme specificity. Decrease in k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the D374Q mutant enzyme defines the way Asp-374, unique to L. mesenteroides G6PD, modulates stabilization of the enzyme during catalysis by its interaction with Lys-182. The greatly reduced k(cat) values of enzymes P149V and P149G indicate the importance of the cis conformation of Pro-149 in accessing the correct transition state. PMID

  8. Role of nutrients and environmental conditions for the production of dextransucrase from L. mesenteroides KIBGE-IB26.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Samina; Aman, Afsheen; Bano, Saeeda; Sidduiqui, Nadir Naveed; Ansari, Asma; Qader, Shah AliUl

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial strains capable of producing dextransucrase enzyme were isolated from different fruits and vegetables sources. In primary screening, five strains were selected on the basis dextransucrase production and among them L. mesenteroides KIBGE- IB26 isolated from bottle gourd (Lagenaria Vulgaris) was selected for further studies. For the enhancement of enzyme production, different physicochemical parameters were optimized. Maximum production of dextransucrase was achieved after 06 hrs using sucrose (20.0 g/l) as a substrate at 25°C. Maximum dextransucrase production was achieved when medium pH was kept 7.5 before sterilization. In addition, medium was also supplemented with CaCl2 and K2HPO4 and maximum enzyme production was achieved at 0.0025 g/dl calcium chloride and 2.0 g/dl K₂HPO₄with enzyme activity of 87 DSU/ml/hr. Production of dextransucrase in shorter period of time makes this strain an attractive candidate for commercial production of dextransucrase. PMID:26639490

  9. Identification and Characterization of Leucocyclicin Q, a Novel Cyclic Bacteriocin Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides TK41401▿

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yoshimitsu; Ono, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Haruo; Mu, Fuqin; Sawa, Naruhiko; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The culture supernatant of Leuconostoc mesenteroides TK41401, isolated from Japanese pickles, possessed antimicrobial activity against broad range of a bacterial genera and particularly strong activity against Bacillus coagulans, the major contaminant of pickles. An antimicrobial peptide was purified in three chromatographic steps, and its molecular mass was determined to be 6,115.59 Da by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS). The primary structure of this peptide was determined by amino acid and DNA sequencing, and these analyses revealed that it was translated as a 63-residue precursor. This precursor showed high similarity to the precursor of lactocyclicin Q, a cyclic bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus sp. strain QU 12. The molecular weight calculated after cyclization, which was presumed to involve the same process as in lactocyclicin Q (between L3 and W63), agreed with that estimated by ESI-TOF MS. This peptide was proved to be a novel cyclic bacteriocin, and it was termed leucocyclicin Q. The antimicrobial spectrum of this bacteriocin clearly differed from that of lactocyclicin Q, even though their primary structures were quite similar. This is the first report of a cyclic bacteriocin produced by a strain of the genus Leuconostoc. PMID:21948835

  10. Effect of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F Dextransucrase Carboxy-Terminal Deletions on Dextran and Oligosaccharide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Monchois, Vincent; Reverte, Augustin; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Monsan, Pierre; Willemot, René-Marc

    1998-01-01

    Dextransucrase (DSR-S) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F is a glucosyltransferase that catalyzes synthesis of soluble dextran from sucrose. In the presence of efficient acceptor molecules, such as maltose, the reaction pathway is shifted toward glucooligosaccharide synthesis. Like glucosyltransferases from oral streptococci, DSR-S possesses a C-terminal glucan-binding domain composed of a series of tandem repeats. In order to determine the role of the C-terminal region of DSR-S in dextran or oligosaccharide synthesis, four DSR-S genes with deletions at the 3′ end were constructed. The results showed that the C-terminal region modulated the initial velocity of dextran synthesis but that the Km for sucrose, the optimum pH, and the activation energy were all unaffected by the deletions. The C-terminal domain modulated the rate of oligosaccharide synthesis whatever acceptor molecule was used (a good acceptor molecule such as maltose or a poor acceptor molecule such as fructose). The C-terminal domain seemed to play no role in the catalytic process in dextran and oligosaccharide synthesis. In fact, it seems that the role of the C-terminal domain of DSR-S may be to facilitate the translation of dextran and oligosaccharides from the catalytic site. PMID:9572930

  11. Lime application for the efficient production of nutraceutical glucooligosaccharides from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-742 (ATCC13146).

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Hwan; Madsen, Lee; Chung, Chang-Ho; Kim, Doman; Day, Donal F

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the production of glucooligosaccharides via a fermentation of sucrose with Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-742 using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to control the pH. Because NaOH is expensive, we sought to minimize the cost of our process by substituting hydrated lime and saccharate of lime (lime sucrate) in its place. The yield of glucooligosaccharides using either 5 % lime (41.4 ± 0.5 g/100 g) or 5 % lime sucrate (40.0 ± 1.4 g/100 g) were both similar to the NaOH control (42.4 ± 1.5 g/100 g). Based on this, it appears that the cost associated with pH control in our process can be reduced by a factor of approximately 2.4 using lime instead of NaOH. Because our chromatographic stage is based on a Ca(2+)-form resin to separate glucooligosaccharides, the use of lime not only negates the need for costly de-salting via ion-exchange (elimination of two ion-exchange sections) prior to separation, but also greatly reduces the resin regeneration cost. PMID:25533635

  12. Pre-treatment step with Leuconostoc mesenteroides or L. pseudomesenteroides strains removes furfural from Zymomonas mobilis ethanolic fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Manter, Daniel K

    2014-10-01

    Furfural is an inhibitor of growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis. This study used a naturally occurring (not GMO) biological pre-treatment to reduce that amount of furfural in a model fermentation broth. Pre-treatment involved inoculating and incubating the fermentation broth with strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. The Leuconostoc strains converted furfural to furfuryl alcohol without consuming large amounts of dextrose in the process. Coupling this pre-treatment to ethanolic fermentation reduced furfural in the broth and improved growth, dextrose uptake and ethanol formation. Pre-treatment permitted ethanol formation in the presence of 5.2 g L(-1) furfural, which was otherwise inhibitive. The pre-treatment and presence of the Leuconostoc strains in the fermentation broth did not interfere with Z. mobilis ethanolic fermentation or the amounts of ethanol produced. The method suggests a possible technique for reducing the effect that furfural has on the production of ethanol for use as a biofuel. PMID:25048957

  13. Exploitation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains to improve shelf life, rheological, sensory and functional features of prickly pear (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) fruit puree.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Filannino, Pasquale; Vincentini, Olimpia; Lanera, Alessia; Cavoski, Ivana; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides were identified from raw prickly pear (Opuntia ficus-indica L.). Five autochthonous strains were selected based on the kinetics of growth and acidification on prickly pear fruit juice, and the capacity to synthesize exo-polysaccharides. All selected Leuc. mesenteroides strains showed an in vitro mucilage-degrading capability. A protocol for processing and storage of fermented prickly pear fruit puree (FP) was set up. Unstarted FP and chemically acidified FP were used as the controls. Starters grew and remained viable at elevated cell numbers during 21 days of storage at 4 °C. Contaminating Enterobacteriaceae and yeasts were found only in the controls. Viscosity and serum separation distinguished started FP compared to the controls. Colour parameters, browning index, sensory attributes, antimicrobial activity, vitamin C and betalains levels were positively affected by lactic acid fermentation. Increase of free radical scavenging activity in ethyl acetate soluble extract suggested an effect of selected strains on phenolic profiles. Started FP markedly inhibited the inflammatory status of Caco-2/TC7 cells, and also contributed to maintaining the integrity of tight junctions. Started FP scavenged the reactive oxygen species generated by H2O2 on Caco-2 cells. All selected strain variously affected the immunomodulatory activity towards anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27375258

  14. Comparison of activity to stimulate mucosal IgA production between Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NTM048 and type strain JCM6124 in mice

    PubMed Central

    MATSUZAKI, Chiaki; MATSUMOTO, Kenji; KATOH, Toshihiko; YAMAMOTO, Kenji; HISA, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NTM048 and type strain JCM6124T on the murine immune system were characterized. Although the bacterial cells and exopolysaccharides of each strain induced immunoglobulin A production in Peyer’s patch cells, the effects of NTM048 were more potent than those of JCM6124T. Oral administration of the cells of each strain increased the fecal immunoglobulin A content in NTM048-treated mice, but not in JCM6124T-treated mice. A flow cytometric analysis showed that the CD4+ T-cell populations in the mouse spleens tended to increase in the NTM048 group. These results suggest that immunomodulating ability is characteristic of strain NTM048. PMID:26858930

  15. Synergistic effects of probiotic Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Bacillus subtilis in malted ragi (Eleucine corocana) food for antagonistic activity against V. cholerae and other beneficial properties.

    PubMed

    VidyaLaxme, B; Rovetto, A; Grau, R; Agrawal, Renu

    2014-11-01

    Finger millet (Elucine corocana), locally known as ragi, and probiotics have been recognized for their health benefits. In the present work we describe novel probiotic ragi malt (functional food) that has been prepared using ragi and probiotic Leuconostoc mesenteroides (Lm) and Bacillus subtilis natto (Bs), alone and in combination, for antagonistic activity against Vibrio cholerae (Vc). In vitro studies using pure cultures showed that each probiotic strain (Lm or Bs) was able to inhibit the planktonic growth of Vc as well as its ability to make biofilms and adhere to extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, Fn) that may function in vivo as initial ports of entrance of the pathogen. Interestingly, the combination of both probiotic strains (Lm plus Bs) produced the strongest activity against the Vc. When both cultures were used together in the ragi malt the antimicrobial activity against Vc was enhanced due to synergistic effect of both probiotic strains. The inclusion of both probiotic strains in the functional food produced higher amounts of beneficial fatty acids like linoleic and linolenic acid and increased the mineral content (iron and zinc). The viability and activity of Lm and Bs against Vc was further enhanced with the use of adjuvants like ascorbic acid, tryptone, cysteine hydrochloride and casein hydrolysate in the ragi malt. In sum, the intake of probiotic ragi malt supplemented with Lm and Bs may provide nutrition, energy, compounds of therapeutic importance and antagonistic activity against Vc to a large extent to the consumer. PMID:26396299

  16. Recombinant sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides: characterization, kinetic studies of transglucosylation, and application of immobilised enzyme for production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Schwarz, Alexandra; Minani, Alphonse; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-03-30

    Sucrose phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose (alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2-beta-D-fructofuranoside) and phosphate into D-fructose and alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate. We report on the molecular cloning and expression of the structural gene encoding sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LmSPase) in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant enzyme, containing an 11 amino acid-long N-terminal metal affinity fusion peptide, was overproduced 60-fold in comparison with the natural enzyme. It was purified to apparent homogeneity using copper-loaded Chelating Sepharose and obtained in 20% yield with a specific activity of 190 Umg(-1). LmSPase was covalently attached onto Eupergit C with a binding efficiency of 50% and used for the continuous production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate from sucrose and phosphate (600 mM each) in a packed-bed immobilised enzyme reactor (30 degrees C, pH 7.0). The reactor was operated at a stable conversion of 91% (550 mM product) and productivity of approximately 11 gl(-1)h(-1) for up to 600 h. A kinetic study of transglucosylation by soluble LmSPase was performed using alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate as the donor substrate and various alcohols as acceptors. D- and L-arabitol were found to be good glucosyl acceptors. PMID:17215056

  17. Identification of an arginine residue in the dual coenzyme-specific glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that plays a key role in binding NADP+ but not NAD+.

    PubMed

    Levy, H R; Vought, V E; Yin, X; Adams, M J

    1996-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides can utilize either NADP or NAD as coenzyme. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure has been solved (Rowland et al., 1994, Structure 2, 1073-1087) and shown to contain a conventional nucleotide binding domain. NADP+ was modeled into the structure by superimposing the beta alpha beta domain and that of coenzyme-bound 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (Adams et al., 1994, Structure 2, 651-658), enabling us to identify Arg-46 as a potentially important residue for NADP+ binding. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed mutant enzymes in which Arg-46 was replaced by glutamine (R46Q) and alanine (R46A) and examined their kinetic properties. The principal effects in these mutant enzymes were that the Km and Ki values for NADP+ increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over those of the wild-type enzyme. No other kinetic constant was altered more than 6.5-fold. Changing this single amino acid leads to mutant glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases with coenzyme specificities that favor NAD+, whereas the wild-type enzyme prefers NADP+ as coenzyme. These results confirm that Arg-46 plays a key role in NADP+ binding by contributing a positively charged planar residue that interacts primarily with the 2'-adenosine phosphate. The Arg residue corresponding to Arg-46 in L. mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is conserved in all glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases and, presumably, plays the same role in all these enzymes. PMID:8579362

  18. Acid–base catalysis in Leuconostoc mesenteroides sucrose phosphorylase probed by site-directed mutagenesis and detailed kinetic comparison of wild-type and Glu237→Gln mutant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The role of acid–base catalysis in the two-step enzymatic mechanism of α-retaining glucosyl transfer by Leuconostoc mesenteroides sucrose phosphorylase has been examined through site-directed replacement of the putative catalytic Glu237 and detailed comparison of purified wild-type and Glu237→Gln mutant enzymes using steady-state kinetics. Reactions with substrates requiring Brønsted catalytic assistance for glucosylation or deglucosylation were selectively slowed at the respective step, about 105-fold, in E237Q. Azide, acetate and formate but not halides restored catalytic activity up to 300-fold in E237Q under conditions in which the deglucosylation step was rate-determining, and promoted production of the corresponding α-glucosides. In situ proton NMR studies of the chemical rescue of E237Q by acetate and formate revealed that enzymatically formed α-glucose 1-esters decomposed spontaneously via acyl group migration and hydrolysis. Using pH profiles of kcat/Km, the pH dependences of kinetically isolated glucosylation and deglucosylation steps were analysed for wild-type and E237Q. Glucosylation of the wild-type proceeded optimally above and below apparent pKa values of about 5.6 and 7.2 respectively whereas deglucosylation was dependent on the apparent single ionization of a group of pKa≈5.8 that must be deprotonated for reaction. Glucosylation of E237Q was slowed below apparent pKa≈6.0 but had lost the high pH dependence of the wild-type. Deglucosylation of E237Q was pH-independent. The results allow unequivocal assignment of Glu237 as the catalytic acid–base of sucrose phosphorylase. They support a mechanism in which the pKa of Glu237 cycles between ≈7.2 in free enzyme and ≈5.8 in glucosyl enzyme intermediate, ensuring optimal participation of the glutamate residue side chain at each step in catalysis. Enzyme deglucosylation to an anionic nucleophile took place with Glu237 protonated or unprotonated. The results delineate how conserved active

  19. Glucooligosaccharides from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-742 (ATCC 13146): a potential prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Chung, C-H; Day, D F

    2002-10-01

    There is an emerging market for functional oligosaccharides for use in foods. Currently, technology for the production of oligosaccharides is limited to extraction from plant sources, acid or enzymatic hydrolysis of polysaccharides or synthesis by transglycosylation reactions. Oligosaccharides can also be produced using a Leuconostoc fermentation and restricting the polymer size by addition of maltose. Maltose limits the dextransucrase reaction, yielding high concentrations of alpha-glucooligosaccharides. Branched oligomers produced by this process were readily catabolized by bifidobacteria and lactobacilli but were not readily utilized by either Salmonella sp. or Escherichia coli, pointing toward their use in intestinal microflora modification. PMID:12355319

  20. Probiotic Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris and Streptococcus thermophilus induce IL-12 and IFN-γ production

    PubMed Central

    Kekkonen, Riina A; Kajasto, Elina; Miettinen, Minja; Veckman, Ville; Korpela, Riitta; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the capacity of potentially probiotic strains from six bacterial genera to induce cytokine production alone or in combinations in order to identify potential enhancing or synergistic effects in order to select probiotic bacteria for in vivo purposes. METHODS: Cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in response to stimulation with eleven different potentially probiotic bacterial strains from Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc and Propionibacterium genera was analysed. Production and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-10 were determined by ELISA and Northern blotting, respectively. RESULTS: All tested bacteria induced TNF-α production. The best inducers of Th1 type cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ were Streptococcus and Leuconostoc strains. All Bifidobacterium and Propionibacterium strains induced higher IL-10 production than other studied bacteria. Stimulation of PBMC with any bacterial combinations did not result in enhanced cytokine production suggesting that different bacteria whether gram-positive or gram-negative compete with each other during host cell interactions. CONCLUSION: The probiotic S. thermophilus and Leuconostoc strains are more potent inducers of Th1 type cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ than the probiotic Lactobacillus strains. Bacterial combinations did not result in enhanced cytokine production. PMID:18300344

  1. Production of insoluble glucans using modified recombinant glycosyltransferase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucansucrases catalyze the transfer of D-glucopyranosyl units from sucrose to form a-glucan chains. Glucansucrases are capable of catalyzing the synthesis of several different a-glucosidic linkages that affect molecular mass, branching, and solubility of the polysaccharide. In general, a-glucans co...

  2. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  3. Reduction of porous media permeability from in situ Leuconostoc mesenteroides growth and dextran production

    SciTech Connect

    Lappan, R.E.; Fogler, H.S.

    1996-04-05

    In situ growth of bacteria in a porous medium can alter the permeability of that media. This article reveals that the rate of permeability alteration can be controlled by the inoculation strategy, nutrient concentrations, and injection rates. Based on experimental observations a phenomenological model has been developed to describe the inoculation of the porous medium, the in situ growth of bacteria, and the permeability decline of the porous medium. This model consists of two phases that describe the bacteria in the porous medium: (1) the nongrowth phase in which cell transport and retention are occurring; and (2) the growth phase in which the retained cells grow and plug the porous media. Transition from the transport phase to the growth phase is governed by the growth lag time of the cells within the porous medium. The importance of the inoculum injection strategy and the nutrient injection strategy is illustrated by the model.

  4. Effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter culture on fermentation of cabbage with reduced salt concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sauerkraut fermentations rely upon selection of naturally occurring lactic acid bacteria by addition of 2.0 to 2.25% granulated sodium chloride (NaCl) to shredded cabbage. Excess brine generated is a waste product with high levels of organic material (BOD) and non-biodegradable NaCl. The objective...

  5. Pre-treatment step with Leuconostoc mesenteroides or L. pseudomesenteroides strains removes furfural from Zymomonas mobilis ethanolic fermentation broth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural (furan-2-carboxaldehyde), formed during dilute acid hydrolysis of biomass, is an inhibitor of growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis. The present study used a biological pre-treatment to reduce that amount of furfural in a model biofuel fermentation broth. The pre-treatment in...

  6. Effect of a single point mutation on the interaction of glucans with a glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous work showed that substitution of an amino acid that is coupled with the +2 subsite adjacent to the transition stabilizer of a glucansucrase, which produces a water-insoluble glucan, resulted in significant changes in the structures and yields of the water-insoluble glucans produced. We ...

  7. Effect of a single point mutation on the interaction of glucans with a glucansucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1118.

    PubMed

    Côté, Gregory L; Skory, Christopher D

    2016-06-16

    Our previous work showed that substitution of an amino acid that is coupled with the +2 subsite adjacent to the transition stabilizer of a glucansucrase, which produces a water-insoluble glucan, resulted in significant changes in the structures and yields of the water-insoluble glucans produced. We now describe how these changes affect the ability of the glucansucrase to bind to exogenous glucans, and how these glucans can influence the yield, product structures, and kinetics of the mutant glucansucrases. The activity of the wild-type enzyme, with threonine at position 654, is not significantly activated by added dextran, and the yield of water-insoluble glucan from sucrose is only slightly increased by dextran. Mutant T654Y is not affected at all by the addition of dextran. However, several mutant enzymes exhibit markedly lower yields of glucan relative to the wild type; these lower yields can be partially or completely overcome by the addition of water-soluble dextran. Although evidence indicates that the soluble dextran is incorporated into water-insoluble glucan, the increased yields cannot be accounted for solely by incorporation of the dextran into insoluble product. Furthermore, these DsrI mutants are significantly activated by exogenous glucans. The addition of dextran does not markedly change the KM for sucrose in the mutant enzymes, but does increase the Vmax of the reaction. These effects apparently depend on the presence of unbranched sequences of α1→6-linked D-glucose units in the glucan. PMID:27131127

  8. Experimental Sugar Beet Cultivars Evaluated for Resistance Bacterial Root Rot in Idaho, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, a study was conducted to identify resistan...

  9. Commercial Sugar Beet Cultivars Evaluated for Resistance to Bacterial Root Rot in Idaho, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, a study was conducted to identify resistan...

  10. Cultivar selection for bacterial root rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States, which has frequently been found in association with Rhizoctonia root rot. To reduce the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, st...

  11. Cultivar selection for sugarbeet root rot resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  12. Sugarbeet Cultivar Evaluation for Bacterial Root Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugarbeet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, studies were conducted to establish an assa...

  13. Cultivar Selection for Sugar Beet Root Rot Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial root rots in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (Rs) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum (Lm) can lead to root yield losses greater than 50%. To reduce the impact of these root rots on sucrose loss in the field, storage, and factories, studies were conducted t...

  14. Transgenic sugar beet cultivars evaluated for resistance to bacterial root rot in Idaho, 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is an important problem in sugar beets because of issues it causes in the field, storage, and factories. Thirty-three transgenic (roundup ready) sugar beet cultivars were grown in a commercial irrigated field. Four roots fro...

  15. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Brazilian water buffalo mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luana Faria; Casella, Tiago; Gomes, Elisangela Soares; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; De Dea Lindner, Juliano; Penna, Ana Lúcia Barretto

    2015-02-01

    The water buffalo mozzarella cheese is a typical Italian cheese which has been introduced in the thriving Brazilian market in the last 10 y, with good acceptance by its consumers. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role in the technological and sensory quality of mozzarella cheese. In this study, the aim was to evaluate the diversity of the autochthones viable LAB isolated from water buffalo mozzarella cheese under storage. Samples were collected in 3 independent trials in a dairy industry located in the southeast region of Brazil, on the 28th day of storage, at 4 ºC. The LAB were characterized by Gram staining, catalase test, capacity to assimilate citrate, and production of CO2 from glucose. The diversity of LAB was evaluated by RAPD-PCR (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction), 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and by Vitek 2 system. Twenty LAB strains were isolated and clustered into 12 different clusters, and identified as Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus helveticus. Enterococcus species were dominant and citrate-positive. Only the strains of L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and L. fermentum produced CO2 from glucose and were citrate-positive, while L. casei was only citrate positive. This is the first report which elucidates the LAB diversity involved in Brazilian water buffalo mozzarella cheese. Furthermore, the results show that despite the absence of natural whey cultures as starters in production, the LAB species identified are the ones typically found in mozzarella cheese. PMID:25597646

  16. Evaluation of Two Lactic Acid Bacteria Starter Cultures for the Fermentation of Natural Black Table Olives (Olea europaea L cv Kalamon).

    PubMed

    Papadelli, Marina; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Georgalaki, Marina; Anastasiou, Rania; Manolopoulou, Eugenia; Lytra, Ioanna; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    The production of Greek-style natural black table olives remains an empirical process relying on spontaneous fermentation despite its economic significance. For this reason producers often resort to increased NaCl concentration of the brine to secure quality of the product. In this study we employ two lactic acid bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Lm139 and Lactobacillus pentosus DSM 16366 as starters in separate laboratory low salinity fermentations of "Kalamon" cultivar olives, processed according to the Greek-style method. L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Lm139 was previously isolated from Kalamon olives laboratory spontaneous fermentations, while L. pentosus DSM 16366 was isolated from fermenting green olives prepared according to the Spanish-style method. Spontaneous olives fermentation was also performed as a control. Microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the brines revealed that the use of the starters had a significant effect on the olives fermentation, leading to a faster acidification due to the more efficient consumption of soluble sugars in the brines. The final pH value reached by each starter culture used indicates a successful lactic fermentation. The production of lactic acid by the starters and the concomitant drop of the pH value proved to inhibit enterobacteria in a shorter period of time compared to the spontaneous fermentation. Concluding, the use of either of the two lactic acid bacteria as starters in Greek-style Kalamon olives fermentation could lead to a more controllable fermentation at lower salinities. The resulting product could be of higher quality with extended shelf-life while being at the same time safer for the consumer. PMID:26638534

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of sucrose-derived oligosaccharides produced by a constitutive mutant L. mesenteroides B-512FMCM dextransucrase in high fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Gyung; Lee, Hee Jae; Cho, Jae-Young; Kim, Kanghwa; Yang, Soo Jin; Kim, Doman

    2016-08-26

    Oligosaccharide (OS) is used as a sugar replacement as well as an ingredient in functional foods because of its beneficial effects, mainly on reducing calorie content and promoting intestinal health. By contrast, the effects of OS on inflammation are less well investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sucrose-derived OS on glucose control and inflammation in high fat (HF) diet-fed mice. Male C57BL6 mice were randomly assigned to six treatment groups (n = 10-14 mice per group): 1) lean control (CON), 2) HF control, 3) HF-low sucrose (LS, 100 mg/kg/day), 4) HF-high sucrose (HS, 1000 mg/kg/day), 5) HF-low OS (LOS, 100 mg/kg/day), and 6) HF-high OS (HOS, 1000 mg/kg/day). PBS (vehicle), sucrose, and OS were administered by stomach gavage. Body weight, food intake, and markers of liver function (activities of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) were not affected by the treatments. HOS treatment decreased levels of serum glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance compared with sucrose treatment. However, serum adiponectin levels of the HOS group were higher than those of the sucrose groups. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fetuin-A were lower in the HOS group than in the sucrose groups. Hepatic gene expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and related factors (fetuin-A, NF-κB, TLR4, TNF-alpha, and IL-6) were decreased and the levels of insulin signaling-related molecules (sirtuin 1, insulin receptor, and Akt) were increased in HOS-treated mice as compared with sucrose-treated mice. These results demonstrate that OS treatment is effective in improving glucose control and inflammation in high fat diet-fed mice. PMID:27342664

  18. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn K; Gøbel, Rikke; Michaelsen, Kim F; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars H; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2011-03-01

    The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children randomized to intake of one of the probiotic strain or placebo. Microbial composition was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR and, in a subset of subjects, by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core population of the Lactobacillus group was identified as Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus oris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, while the bifidobacterial community included Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium catenulatum. The fecal numbers of L. acidophilus and B. lactis increased significantly after intervention, indicating survival of the ingested bacteria. The levels of Bifidobacterium correlated positively (P=0.03), while the levels of the Lactobacillus group negatively (P=0.01) with improvement of atopic eczema evaluated by the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis index. This correlation was observed across the whole study cohort and not attributed to the probiotic intake. The main conclusion of the study is that administration of L. acidophilus NCFM and B. lactis Bi-07 does not affect the composition and diversity of the main bacterial populations in feces. PMID:21204871

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E.; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Campedelli, Ilenia; Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  1. Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis subsp. nov., isolated from vegetable matrices.

    PubMed

    Bringel, Françoise; Castioni, Anna; Olukoya, Daniel K; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Dellaglio, Franco

    2005-07-01

    Fourteen strains isolated from vegetable sources and identified as belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum presented an atypical pattern of amplification with a species-specific multiplex-PCR assay. Phylogenetic analysis of two protein-encoding genes, recA (encoding the recombinase A protein) and cpn60 (encoding the GroEL chaperonin), as well as phenotypic and genomic traits revealed a homogeneous group of very closely related strains for which subspecies status is proposed, with the name Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis. The type strain is DKO 22(T) (=CIP 108320(T)=DSM 16365(T)). PMID:16014493

  2. Dissecting the taxonomic heterogeneity within Propionibacterium acnes: proposal for Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Dekio, Itaru; Culak, Renata; Misra, Raju; Gaulton, Tom; Fang, Min; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Rajendram, Dunstan; Gharbia, Saheer E; Shah, Haroun N

    2015-12-01

    Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. are described. These emanate from the three known phylotypes of P. acnes, designated types I, II and III. Electron microscopy confirmed the filamentous cell shape of type III, showing a striking difference from types I/II, which were short rods. Biochemical tests indicated that, in types I/II, either the pyruvate, l-pyrrolidonyl arylamidase or d-ribose 2 test was positive, whereas all of these were negative among type III strains. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) spectra, which profile mainly their ribosomal proteins, were different between these two groups. Surface-enhanced laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) spectra of all phylotypes revealed a specific protein biomarker that was overexpressed in type III strains compared with types I/II only when grown aerobically. Reference strains had high whole-genome similarity between types I (>91 %) and II (>75 %), but a considerably lower level of 72 % similarity with type III. recA and gyrB sequence dendrograms confirmed the distant relatedness of type III, indicating the presence of two distinct centres of variation within the species P. acnes. On the other hand, cellular fatty acid profiles and 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness (>99.3 %) circumscribed the species. Thus, we propose two subspecies, Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. for types I/II and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. for type III. The type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes is NCTC 737T ( = ATCC 6919T = JCM 6425T = DSM 1897T = CCUG 1794T), while the type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum is K124T ( = NCTC 13655T = JCM 18919T). PMID:26432704

  3. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  4. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  5. In vivo application and dynamics of lactic acid bacteria for the four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Raimondo; Scatassa, Maria Luisa; Cruciata, Margherita; Miraglia, Viviana; Corona, Onofrio; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Portolano, Baldassare; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Twelve lactic acid bacteria (LAB), previously selected in vitro (Gaglio et al., 2014), were evaluated in situ for their potential to act as starter cultures for the continuous four-season production of Vastedda-like cheese, made with raw ewes' milk. The strains belonged to Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and Streptococcus thermophilus. LAB were first inoculated in multiple-strain combinations on the basis of their optimal growth temperatures in three process conditions which differed for milk treatment and medium for strain development: process 1, growth of strains in the optimal synthetic media and pasteurised milk; process 2, growth of strains in whey based medium (WBM) and pasteurised milk; and process 3, growth of strains in WBM and raw milk. The strains that acidified the curds in short time, as shown by a pH drop, were all mesophilic and were then tested in a single inoculum through process 3. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis applied to the colonies isolated from the highest dilutions of samples confirmed the dominance of the added strains after curd acidification, stretching and storage. After 15days of refrigerated storage, the decrease in pH values showed an activity of the mesophilic strains at low temperatures, but only Lc. lactis subsp. cremoris PON153, Ln. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides PON259 and PON559 increased their number during the 15days at 7°C. A sensory evaluation indicated that the cheeses obtained by applying protocol 3 and by inoculation with lactococci are the most similar to the protected denomination of origin (PDO) cheese and received the best scores by the judges. Thus, the experimental cheeses obtained with raw milk and inoculated with single and multiple combinations of lactococci were subjected to the analysis of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) carried out by a headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique coupled

  6. Leucobacter musarum subsp. musarum sp. nov., subsp. nov., Leucobacter musarum subsp. japonicus subsp. nov., and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov., three nematopathogenic bacteria isolated from Caenorhabditis, with an emended description of Leucobacter celer

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Three Gram-stain-positive, irregular-rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from nematodes collected from Santa Antao, Cabo Verde (CBX151T, CBX152T) and Kakegawa, Japan (CBX130T). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strains CBX130T, CBX151T and CBX152T were shown to belong to the genus Leucobacter. This affiliation was supported by chemotaxonomic data (2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell wall; major respiratory quinones MK-10 and MK-11; major polar lipids phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; major fatty acids anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0). Strains CBX130T and CBX152T were found to share salient characteristics. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical analysis, strain CBX152T represents a novel species of the genus Leucobacter, for which the name Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) is proposed. Two subspecies of Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. are proposed: Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. musarum subsp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) and Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. japonicus subsp. nov. (type strain CBX130T = DSM 27158T = CIP 110719T). The third novel strain, CBX151T, showed genetic similarities with Leucobacter celer NAL101T indicating that these strains belong to the same species. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical differences it is proposed to split the species Leucobacter celer into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter celer subsp. celer subsp. nov. (type strain NAL101T = KACC 14220T = JCM 16465T) and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov. (type strain CBX151T = DSM 27159T = CIP 110720T), and to emend the description of Leucobacter celer Shin et al. 2011. PMID:26275616

  7. Nutritional features of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis.

    PubMed

    Varel, V H; Bryant, M P

    1974-08-01

    Studies of three reference strains of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis showed that they grow well in a minimal defined medium containing glucose, hemin, vitamin B(12), minerals, bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer, NH(4)Cl, and sulfide. The vitamin B(12) requirement of 0.1 ng/ml was replaced with 7.5 mug of methionine. Cysteine or sulfide was an excellent source of sulfur, thioglycolate was a poor source, and thiosulfate, methionine, beta-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, sulfate, or sulfite did not serve as sole sources of sulfur. Neither single amino acids, nitrate, urea, nor a complex mixture of L-amino acids or peptides effectively replaced ammonia as the nitrogen source. Comparative studies with a few strains of other subspecies of B. fragilis including B. fragilis subsp. vulgatus, B. fragilis subsp. thetaiotaomicron, and B. fragilis subsp. distasonis indicate that they exhibit similar growth responses in the minimal medium. A single strain of B. fragilis subsp. ovatus required other materials. The results indicate the great biosynthetic ability of these organisms and suggest that, in their ecological niche within the large intestine, many nutrients such as amino acids are in very low supply, whereas materials such as ammonia, heme, and vitamin B(12), or related compounds, must be available during much of the time. PMID:4853401

  8. Metagenomic Analysis of Kimchi, a Traditional Korean Fermented Food ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Park, Moon Su; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2011-01-01

    Kimchi, a traditional food in the Korean culture, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this study, metagenomic approaches were used to monitor changes in bacterial populations, metabolic potential, and overall genetic features of the microbial community during the 29-day fermentation process. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from kimchi samples obtained periodically and was sequenced using a 454 GS FLX Titanium system, which yielded a total of 701,556 reads, with an average read length of 438 bp. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes from the metagenome indicated that the kimchi microbiome was dominated by members of three genera: Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella. Assignment of metagenomic sequences to SEED categories of the Metagenome Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) server revealed a genetic profile characteristic of heterotrophic lactic acid fermentation of carbohydrates, which was supported by the detection of mannitol, lactate, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation products. When the metagenomic reads were mapped onto the database of completed genomes, the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 23K genomes were highly represented. These same two genera were confirmed to be important in kimchi fermentation when the majority of kimchi metagenomic sequences showed very high identity to Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus genes. Besides microbial genome sequences, a surprisingly large number of phage DNA sequences were identified from the cellular fractions, possibly indicating that a high proportion of cells were infected by bacteriophages during fermentation. Overall, these results provide insights into the kimchi microbial community and also shed light on fermentation processes carried out broadly by complex microbial communities. PMID:21317261

  9. Identification and Characterization of Leuconostoc carnosum, Associated with Production and Spoilage of Vacuum-Packaged, Sliced, Cooked Ham

    PubMed Central

    Björkroth, K. J.; Vandamme, P.; Korkeala, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    Leuconostoc carnosum was shown to be the specific spoilage organism in vacuum-packaged, sliced, cooked ham showing spoilage during 3 weeks of shelf life. Identification of the specific spoilage organism was done by use of phenotypic data and ClaI, EcoRI, and HindIII reference strain ribopatterns. One hundred L. carnosum isolates associated with the production and spoilage of the ham were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), together with some meat-associated Leuconostoc species: L. citreum, L. gelidum, L. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum, and L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. ApaI and SmaI digests divided the industrial L. carnosum strains into 25 different PFGE types, ApaI and SmaI types being consistent. Only one specific PFGE type was associated with the spoiled packages. This type also was detected in air and raw-meat mass samples. The spoilage strain did not produce bacteriocins. Only seven isolates belonging to three different PFGE types produced bacteriocins. Similarity analysis of the industrial L. carnosum strains revealed a homogeneous cluster which could be divided into eight subclusters consisting of strains having at most three-fragment differences. The L. carnosum cluster was clearly distinguished from the other meat-associated leuconostoc clusters, with the exception of the L. carnosum type strain. Ribotyping can be very helpful in the identification of L. carnosum, but its discriminatory power is too weak for strain characterization. PFGE provides good discrimination for studies dealing with the properties of homogeneous L. carnosum strains. PMID:9726876

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis Strain LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii Strain LMG 15993.

    PubMed

    Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Chapman, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies, C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis isolate LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii isolate LMG 15993. PMID:27417840

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis Strain LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii Strain LMG 15993

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Emma; Chapman, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies, C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis isolate LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii isolate LMG 15993. PMID:27417840

  12. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  13. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus in homosexual males.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, H R; McIntyre, L

    1983-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus was isolated from the stools of two homosexual males. One was asymptomatic at the time of isolation. The other presented with diarrhea. Both isolates were initially grown at 42 degrees C. This organism should be included among the list of organisms that are found in homosexual males. PMID:6630480

  14. Identification of Coccoidal Bacteria in Traditional Fermented Milk Products from Mongolia, and the Fermentation Properties of the Predominant Species, Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the coccoidal bacteria present in 188 samples of fermented yaks', mares' and cows' milk products collected from 12 different regions in Mongolia. Furthermore, we evaluated the fermentation properties of ten selected isolates of the predominant species, Streptococcus (S.) thermophiles, during the process of milk fermentation and subsequent storage of the resulting yoghurt at 4℃. Overall, 159 isolates were obtained from 188 samples using M17 agar. These isolates were presumed to be lactic acid bacteria based on their gram-positive and catalase-negative properties, and were identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These coccoid isolates were distributed in four genera and six species: Enterococcus (E.) durans, Enterococcus (E.) faecalis, Lactococcus (Lac.) subsp. lactis, Leuconostoc (Leuc.) lactis, Leuconostoc (Leuc.) mesenteroides. subsp. mesenteroides and S. thermophilus. Among these S. thermophilus was the most common species in most samples. From evaluation of the fermentation characteristics (viable counts, pH, titratable acidity [TA]) of ten selected S. thermophilus isolates we could identify four isolates (IMAU 20246, IMAU20764, IMAU20729 and IMAU20738) that were fast acid producers. IMAU20246 produced the highest concentrations of lactic acid and formic acid. These isolates have potential as starter cultures for yoghurt production. PMID:26761898

  15. Probiotic properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from water-buffalo mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Jeronymo-Ceneviva, Ana Beatriz; de Paula, Aline Teodoro; Silva, Luana Faria; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Franco, Bernadette Dora G Mello; Penna, Ana Lúcia B

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the probiotic properties (stability at different pH values and bile salt concentration, auto-aggregation and co-aggregation, survival in the presence of antibiotics and commercial drugs, study of β-galactosidase production, evaluation of the presence of genes encoding MapA and Mub adhesion proteins and EF-Tu elongation factor, and the presence of genes encoding virulence factor) of four LAB strains (Lactobacillus casei SJRP35, Leuconostoc citreum SJRP44, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus SJRP57 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides SJRP58) which produced antimicrobial substances (antimicrobial peptides). The strains survived the simulated GIT modeled in MRS broth, whole and skim milk. In addition, auto-aggregation and the cell surface hydrophobicity of all strains were high, and various degrees of co-aggregation were observed with indicator strains. All strains presented low resistance to several antibiotics and survived in the presence of commercial drugs. Only the strain SJRP44 did not produce the β-galactosidase enzyme. Moreover, the strain SJRP57 did not show the presence of any genes encoding virulence factors; however, the strain SJRP35 presented vancomycin resistance and adhesion of collagen genes, the strain SJRP44 harbored the ornithine decarboxylase gene and the strain SJRP58 generated positive results for aggregation substance and histidine decarboxylase genes. In conclusion, the strain SJRP57 was considered the best candidate as probiotic cultures for further in vivo studies and functional food products development. PMID:25117002

  16. Removal of odorous compounds from poultry manure by microorganisms on perlite--bentonite carrier.

    PubMed

    Gutarowska, Beata; Matusiak, Katarzyna; Borowski, Sebastian; Rajkowska, Aleksandra; Brycki, Bogumił

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted using poultry manure (PM) from a laying hen farm. Six strains of bacteria and one strain of yeast, selected on the base of the previous study, were investigated to evaluate their activity in the removal of odorous compounds from poultry manure: pure cultures of Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii LOCK 0272, Bacillus megaterium LOCK 0963, Pseudomonas sp. LOCK 0961, Psychrobacter faecalis LOCK 0965, Leuconostoc mesenteroides LOCK 0964, Streptomyces violaceoruber LOCK 0967, and Candida inconspicua LOCK 0272 were suspended in water solution and applied for PM deodorization. The most active strains in the removal of volatile odorous compounds (ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, isobutyric acid) belonged to B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, L. mesenteroides, C. inconspicua, and P. faecalis. In the next series of experiments, a mixed culture of all tested strains was immobilized on a mineral carrier being a mixture of perlite and bentonite (20:80 by weight). That mixed culture applied for PM deodorization was particularly active against ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, which were removed from the exhaust gas by 20.8% and 17.5%, respectively. The experiments also showed that during deodorization the microorganisms could reduce the concentrations of proteins and amino acids in PM. In particular, the mixed culture was active against cysteine and methionine, which were removed from PM by around 45% within 24 h of deodorization. PMID:24768836

  17. Isolation and identification of cultivable lactic acid bacteria in traditional yak milk products of Gansu Province in China.

    PubMed

    Bao, QiuHua; Liu, WenJun; Yu, Jie; Wang, Weihong; Qing, ManJun; Chen, Xia; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jiachao; Zhang, Wenyi; Qiao, Jianmin; Sun, Tiansong; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Various traditional fermented yak milk and raw milk foods could be considered as an abundant resource for obtaining novel lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with unique properties. Eighty-eight samples of yak milk products were collected from Gansu Province in China. Three hundred and nineteen strains of LAB isolated from these samples were identified by phenotypic methods, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technology. Among the isolates, one hundred and sixty-four isolates (51.41% of the total) were classified under Lactobacilli, and one hundred and fifty-five (48.59%) belonged to cocci. All the isolates were classified to six genera (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Weissella) and twenty-one species. Lactobacillus helveticus (87 strains), Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides (49 strains), Streptococcus thermophilus (39 strains), Lactobacillus casei (31 strains) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (19 strains) were considered as the predominant populations in the yak milk products. The results showed that there were abundant genus and species LAB existing in yak milk products in Gansu Province in China. The obtained LAB pure cultures may be a valuable source for further starter selection. PMID:22688240

  18. Identification of Coccoidal Bacteria in Traditional Fermented Milk Products from Mongolia, and the Fermentation Properties of the Predominant Species, Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the coccoidal bacteria present in 188 samples of fermented yaks’, mares’ and cows’ milk products collected from 12 different regions in Mongolia. Furthermore, we evaluated the fermentation properties of ten selected isolates of the predominant species, Streptococcus (S.) thermophiles, during the process of milk fermentation and subsequent storage of the resulting yoghurt at 4℃. Overall, 159 isolates were obtained from 188 samples using M17 agar. These isolates were presumed to be lactic acid bacteria based on their gram-positive and catalase-negative properties, and were identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These coccoid isolates were distributed in four genera and six species: Enterococcus (E.) durans, Enterococcus (E.) faecalis, Lactococcus (Lac.) subsp. lactis, Leuconostoc (Leuc.) lactis, Leuconostoc (Leuc.) mesenteroides. subsp. mesenteroides and S. thermophilus. Among these S. thermophilus was the most common species in most samples. From evaluation of the fermentation characteristics (viable counts, pH, titratable acidity [TA]) of ten selected S. thermophilus isolates we could identify four isolates (IMAU 20246, IMAU20764, IMAU20729 and IMAU20738) that were fast acid producers. IMAU20246 produced the highest concentrations of lactic acid and formic acid. These isolates have potential as starter cultures for yoghurt production. PMID:26761898

  19. Disparate Host Immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antigens in Calves Inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii, and M. bovis

    PubMed Central

    Waters, W. R.; Bannantine, J. P.; Palmer, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and a criticism of the current tests that are used for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins were evaluated for antigenic specificity compared to a whole-cell sonicate preparation (MPS). Measures of cell-mediated immunity to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were compared in calves inoculated with live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium (M. avium), Mycobacterium kansasii, or Mycobacterium bovis. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses to MPS were observed in all calves that were exposed to mycobacteria compared to control calves at 4 months postinfection. Pooled recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins also elicited nonspecific IFN-γ responses in inoculated calves, with the exception of calves infected with M. bovis. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins failed to elicit antigen-specific responses for the majority of immune measures; however, the expression of CD25 and CD26 was upregulated on CD4, CD8, gamma/delta (γδ) T, and B cells for the calves that were inoculated with either M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. avium after antigen stimulation of the cells. Stimulation with MPS also resulted in the increased expression of CD26 on CD45RO+ CD25+ T cells from calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium. Although recombinant proteins failed to elicit specific responses for the calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the differences in immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were dependent upon mycobacterial exposure. The results demonstrated a close alignment in immune responses between calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and those inoculated with M. avium that were somewhat disparate from the responses in calves infected with M. bovis, suggesting

  20. The first closed genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus venerealis biovar intermedius is a variant of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, the causative agent of Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis. In contrast to Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis which is restricted to the genital tract of cattle, Campylobacter fetus subsp. vener...

  1. Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov., occurring in human clinical material.

    PubMed

    Švec, Pavel; De Bel, Annelies; Sedláček, Ivo; Petráš, Petr; Gelbíčová, Tereza; Černohlávková, Jitka; Mašlanˇová, Ivana; Cnockaert, Margo; Varbanovová, Ivana; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vandamme, Peter; Pantuček, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Seven coagulase-negative, oxidase-negative and novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci assigned tentatively as Staphylococcus petrasii were investigated in this study in order to elucidate their taxonomic position. All strains were initially shown to form a genetically homogeneous group separated from remaining species of the genus Staphylococcus by using a repetitive sequence-based PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)5 primer. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, gap and tuf sequences showed that the group is closely related to Staphylococcus petrasii but separated from the three hitherto known subspecies, S. petrasii subsp. petrasii, S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus and S. petrasii subsp. jettensis. Further investigation using automated ribotyping, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, fatty acid methyl ester analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biotyping confirmed that the analysed group represents a novel subspecies within S. petrasii, for which the name Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRL/St 12/356(T) ( = CCM 8529(T) = LMG 28327(T)). PMID:25829332

  2. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Alkyl Gallates against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. C.; Regasini, L. O.; Petrônio, M. S.; Silva, D. H. S.; Bolzani, V. S.; Belasque, J.; Sacramento, L. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a serious disease that affects all the cultivars of citrus in subtropical citrus-producing areas worldwide. There is no curative treatment for citrus canker; thus, the eradication of infected plants constitutes the only effective control of the spread of X. citri subsp. citri. Since the eradication program in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is under threat, there is a clear risk of X. citri subsp. citri becoming endemic in the main orange-producing area in the world. Here we evaluated the potential use of alkyl gallates to prevent X. citri subsp. citri growth. These esters displayed a potent anti-X. citri subsp. citri activity similar to that of kanamycin (positive control), as evaluated by the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA). The treatment of X. citri subsp. citri cells with these compounds induced altered cell morphology, and investigations of the possible intracellular targets using X. citri subsp. citri strains labeled for the septum and centromere pointed to a common target involved in chromosome segregation and cell division. Finally, the artificial inoculation of citrus with X. citri subsp. citri cells pretreated with alkyl gallates showed that the bacterium loses the ability to colonize its host, which indicates the potential of these esters to protect citrus plants against X. citri subsp. citri infection. PMID:23104804

  4. Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ranae subsp. nov., isolated from septicaemic farmed frogs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Pearson, Marianne; Kämpfer, Peter; Denys, Rik; Cnockaert, Margo; Inglis, Valerie; Swings, Jean

    2003-05-01

    A group of seven sucrose-negative Aeromonas strains (referred to as group Au) isolated from the internal organs of septicaemic farmed frogs (Rana rugulosa) in Thailand was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study including fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) and ERIC-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rDNA sequencing, microplate DNA-DNA hybridizations and extensive phenotypic characterization. Comparison of FAFLP and ERIC-PCR fingerprints indicated that the group Au isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas hydrophila DNA hybridization group (HG) 1 in which they represent a genotypic subgroup closely affiliated to A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila and subsp. dhakensis. One representative of the Au group exhibited > or = 99.0% 16S rDNA sequence similarity with the type strains of the two A. hydrophila subspecies. DNA-DNA hybridization with type and reference strains of all known Aeromonas taxa revealed that the Au group represented a homogeneous taxon that exhibited the highest relatedness with members of the two A. hydrophila subspecies, ranging from 75 to 93%. Phenotypic characterization on the basis of 152 features further revealed that the Au group isolates differed from A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila or subsp. dhakensis in a total of 13 biochemical properties. Of these, assimilation of L-glycine and isobutyrate as sole carbon source, acid production from salicin and D-sucrose, and aesculin hydrolysis were of diagnostic value. From the results of this study, it can be concluded that the Aeromonas frog isolates of the Au group represent a new subspecies of A. hydrophila, for which the name Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ranae subsp. nov. is proposed. Its type strain is Au-1D12(T) (=LMG 19707(T) = CCUG 46211(T)). PMID:12807217

  5. Reclassification of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. pulvifaciens and Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae as Paenibacillus larvae without subspecies differentiation.

    PubMed

    Genersch, Elke; Forsgren, Eva; Pentikäinen, Jaana; Ashiralieva, Ainura; Rauch, Sandra; Kilwinski, Jochen; Fries, Ingemar

    2006-03-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study of the two subspecies of Paenibacillus larvae, Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae and Paenibacillus larvae subsp. pulvifaciens, supported the reclassification of the subspecies into one species, Paenibacillus larvae, without subspecies separation. Our conclusions are based on the analysis of six reference strains of P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens and three reference strains and 44 field isolates of P. larvae. subsp. larvae. The latter originated from brood or honey of clinically diseased honey bee colonies or from honey of both clinically diseased and asymptomatic colonies from Sweden, Finland and Germany. Colony and spore morphology, as well as the metabolism of mannitol and salicin, did not allow a clear identification of the two subspecies and SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins did not support the subspecies differentiation. For genomic fingerprinting, repetitive element-PCR fingerprinting using ERIC primers and PFGE of bacterial DNA were performed. The latter method is a high-resolution DNA fingerprinting method proven to be superior to most other methods for biochemical and molecular typing and has not previously been used to characterize P. larvae. ERIC-PCR identified four different genotypes, while PFGE revealed two main clusters. One cluster included most of the P. larvae subsp. larvae field isolates, as well as all P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens reference strains. The other cluster comprised the pigmented variants of P. larvae subsp. larvae. 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for some strains. Finally, exposure bioassays demonstrated that reference strains of P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens were pathogenic for honey bee larvae, producing symptoms similar to reference strains of P. larvae subsp. larvae. In comparison with the type strain for P. larvae subsp. larvae, ATCC 9545T, the P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens strains tested were even more virulent, since they showed a shorter LT100. An emended description of the species is given

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  7. Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue displays pathogenic properties different from those of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Wicher, K; Wicher, V; Abbruscato, F; Baughn, R E

    2000-06-01

    The present study described the susceptibility of C4D guinea pigs to cutaneous infection with Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue Haiti B strain. The general manifestations of the disease in adults and neonates differ, to a certain degree, from those induced by T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain. Noticeable differences between the infections were reflected in the character of the skin lesions, their onset and persistence, and the kinetics of the humoral response. The incidence and dissemination of cutaneous yaws lesions in very young guinea pigs were remarkably different from the low frequency observed in a similar age group of syphilis infection, 100 versus 17%, respectively. Moreover, as opposed to T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue does not cross the placenta. Offspring born to yaws-infected mothers did not produce immunoglobulin M antibodies and their organs, examined by PCR and rabbit infectivity test (RIT), were all negative. Examination of a large number of tissues and organs in adult, neonate, and maternal yaws by PCR and RIT clearly demonstrated that, unlike syphilis, there was a low incidence and short persistence of the yaws pathogen in internal organs. These findings stress the dermotropic rather than the organotropic character of yaws and provide further evidence of distinctive biological and pathological differences between yaws and venereal syphilis. PMID:10816466

  8. Characterization of certain bacterial strains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo-Mera, A; Caro, I; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Rúa, J; Ferrero, M A; García-Armesto, M R

    2011-08-01

    The present work was aimed at characterizing 12 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to obtain improved potential starter or probiotic cultures that could be used for making dairy products from ewe's milk and cow's milk. Eight strains with antimicrobial properties, isolated from ewe's milk and from cheese made from ewe's and/or cow's milk, were studied. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (five strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (one strain of each species). Additionally, four strains were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection: Lactobacillus casei 393 (isolated from cheese), L. lactis subsp. lactis 11454 (origin nonspecified and a producer of nisin), and two strains isolated from human feces (L. paracasei subsp. paracasei 27092 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus 53103, antibacterial agent producer). All E. faecalis strains showed at least one virulence factor (either hemolysin or gelatinase), which emphasizes the importance of these studies in this species. Both L. lactis strains and most Lactobacillus spp. were good acidifiers in ewe's milk and cow's milk at 30°C. High β-galactosidase activity, as well as aminopeptidase activities that favor the development of desirable flavors in cheese, were detected in all Lactobacillus spp. strains. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 showed α-fucosidase activity (thought to help colonization of the intestine) and lack of α-glucosidase activity (a trait considered positive for diabetic and obese humans). This last enzymatic activity was also lacking in L. lactis ATCC 11454. L. mesenteroides was the only strain D(2)-lactic acid producer. The selection of any particular strain for probiotic or dairy cultures should be performed according to the technological and/or functional abilities needed. PMID:21819671

  9. Complete genome sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strain LMG9260 and Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strain LMG15993

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies: subsps. hyointestinalis and lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of the subsp. h...

  10. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  11. Cultivable endophytic bacteria from leaf bases of Agave tequilana and their role as plant growth promoters

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Julia del C.; la Mora-Amutio, Marcela De; Plascencia-Correa, Luis A.; Audelo-Regalado, Esmeralda; Guardado, Francisco R.; Hernández-Sánchez, Elías; Peña-Ramírez, Yuri J.; Escalante, Adelfo; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Agave tequilana Weber var. ‘Azul’ is grown for the production of tequila, inulin and syrup. Diverse bacteria inhabit plant tissues and play a crucial role for plant health and growth. In this study culturable endophytic bacteria were extracted from leaf bases of 100 healthy Agave tequilana plants. In plant tissue bacteria occurred at mean population densities of 3 million CFU/g of fresh plant tissue. Three hundred endophytic strains were isolated and 16s rDNA sequences grouped the bacteria into eight different taxa that shared high homology with other known sequences. Bacterial endophytes were identified as Acinectobacter sp., A. baumanii, A. bereziniae, Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter hormaechei, Bacillus sp. Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas sp., Enterococcus casseliflavus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and Gluconobacter oxydans. Isolates were confirmed to be plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) by their capacities for nitrogen fixation, auxin production, phosphate solubilization, or antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum AC132. E. casseliflavus JM47 and K. oxytoca JM26 secreted the highest concentrations of IAA. The endophyte Acinectobacter sp. JM58 exhibited the maximum values for nitrogen fixation and phosphate solubilization index (PSI). Inhibition of fungi was found in Pseudomonas sp. JM9p and K. oxytoca JM26. Bacterial endophytes show promise for use as bio-inoculants for agave cultivation. Use of endophytes to enhance cultivation of agave may be particularly important for plants produced by micropropagation techniques, where native endophytes may have been lost. PMID:25763038

  12. Metabolic engineering and adaptive evolution for efficient production of D-lactic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kwon, Eunice Y; Kim, Yong Hwan; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for microbial production of lactic acid (LA) as a monomer of biodegradable poly lactic acid (PLA). Both optical isomers, D-LA and L-LA, are required to produce stereocomplex PLA with improved properties. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient production of D-LA. D-LA production was achieved by expressing highly stereospecific D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA, LEUM_1756) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 in S. cerevisiae lacking natural LA production activity. D-LA consumption after glucose depletion was inhibited by deleting DLD1 encoding D-lactate dehydrogenase and JEN1 encoding monocarboxylate transporter. In addition, ethanol production was reduced by deleting PDC1 and ADH1 genes encoding major pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, and glycerol production was eliminated by deleting GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. LA tolerance of the engineered D-LA-producing strain was enhanced by adaptive evolution and overexpression of HAA1 encoding a transcriptional activator involved in weak acid stress response, resulting in effective D-LA production up to 48.9 g/L without neutralization. In a flask fed-batch fermentation under neutralizing condition, our evolved strain produced 112.0 g/L D-LA with a yield of 0.80 g/g glucose and a productivity of 2.2 g/(L · h). PMID:26596574

  13. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  14. Cell surface characteristics of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, C; Bouley, C; Cayuela, C; Bouttier, S; Bourlioux, P; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    1997-01-01

    Hydrophilic and electrostatic cell surface properties of eight Lactobacillus strains were characterized by using the microbial adhesion to solvents method and microelectrophoresis, respectively. All strains appeared relatively hydrophilic. The strong microbial adhesion to chloroform, an acidic solvent, in comparison with microbial adhesion to hexadecane, an apolar n-alkane, demonstrated the particularity of lactobacilli to have an important electron donor and basic character and consequently their potential ability to generate Lewis acid-base interactions with a support. Regardless of their electrophoretic mobility (EM), strains were in general slightly negatively charged at alkaline pH. A pH-dependent behavior concerning cell surface charges was observed. The EM decreased progressively with more acidic pHs for the L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains until the isoelectric point (IEP), i.e., the pH value for which the EM is zero. On the other hand, the EM for the L. rhamnosus strains was stable from pH 8 to pH 3 to 4, at which point there was a shift near the IEP. Both L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains were characterized by an IEP of around 4, whereas L. rhamnosus strains possessed a markedly lower IEP of 2. The present study showed that the cell surface physicochemical properties of lactobacilli seem to be, at least in part and under certain experimental conditions, particular to the bacterial species. Such differences detected between species are likely to be accompanied by some particular changes in cell wall chemical composition. PMID:9143109

  15. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  16. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  17. Description of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae sp. nov., isolated from human infections, with two subspecies, Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov., and demonstration that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella variicola.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2014-09-01

    Strains previously classified as members of Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogroups KpI, KpII-A, KpII-B and KpIII were characterized by 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analysis based on rpoB, fusA, gapA, gyrA and leuS genes, average nucleotide identity and biochemical characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that KpI and KpIII corresponded to K. pneumoniae and Klebsiella variicola, respectively, whereas KpII-A and KpII-B formed two well-demarcated sequence clusters distinct from other members of the genus Klebsiella. Average nucleotide identity between KpII-A and KpII-B was 96.4 %, whereas values lower than 94 % were obtained for both groups when compared with K. pneumoniae and K. variicola. Biochemical properties differentiated KpII-A, KpII-B, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola, with acid production from adonitol and l-sorbose and ability to use 3-phenylproprionate, 5-keto-d-gluconate and tricarballylic acid as sole carbon sources being particularly useful. Based on their genetic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the names Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. for strains of KpII-A and KpII-B, respectively. The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae sp. nov. and of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 01A030(T) ( = SB11(T) = CIP 110771(T) = DSM 28211(T)). The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 07A044(T) ( = SB30(T) = CIP 110770(T) = DSM 28212(T)). Both strains were isolated from human blood cultures. This work also showed that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of K. variicola. PMID:24958762

  18. Exopolysaccharide hydrogels for corrosion inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exopolysaccharide production by micro-organisms have several industrial applications in food, pharmaceuticals, or other industries. Lactic acid bacteria such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LM) are endemic to the environment and produce extracellular polymeric glucans such as dextran. Dextrans cause s...

  19. DNA fingerprinting of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut fermentations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies using traditional biochemical methods to study the ecology of commercial sauerkraut fermentations revealed that four lactic acid bacteria species, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were the primary microorganisms in...

  20. Effect of dextransucrase cellobiose acceptor products on the growth of human gut bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective fermentation by human gut bacteria of gluco-oligosaccharides obtained from the reaction between the glucosyl group of sucrose and cellobiose, catalyzed by dextransucrases from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, has been evaluated. Oligosaccharides were fractionated according to their molecula...

  1. Analysis of Mannitol, as Tracer of Bacterial Infections in Cane and Beet Sugar Factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, formed mainly by Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteria, is a sensitive marker of sugarcane and sugarbeet deterioration that can predict multiple processing problems. The delivery of consignments of deteriorated sugarcane or sugar beets to factories can detrimentally affect multiple process un...

  2. Analysis of Mannitol, as Tracer of Bacterial Infections in Cane and Beet Sugar Factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, formed mainly by Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteria, is a sensitive marker of sugarcane and sugarbeet deterioration that can predict multiple processing problems. The delivery of consignments of deteriorated sugarcane or sugar beets to factories can detrimentally affect multiple process u...

  3. Molecular fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica derby isolated from tropical seafood in South India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Surendran, P K; Thampuran, Nirmala

    2008-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains isolated from different seafood were genotyped by PCR-ribotyping and ERIC-PCR assays. This study has ascertained the genetic relatedness among serovars prevalent in tropical seafood. PCR-ribotyping exhibited genetic variation in both Salmonella serovars, and ribotype profile (II) was most predominant, which was observed in 10/18 of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and 7/17 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Cluster analysis of ERIC-PCR for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium strains exhibited nine different banding patterns and four strains showed >95% genetic homology within the cluster pairs. ERIC-PCR produced more genetic variations in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium; nevertheless, both methods were found to be comparable for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Discrimination index of PCR-ribotyping for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium isolates was obtained at 0.674 and index value 0.714 was observed for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains. Molecular fingerprinting investigation highlighted the hypothesis of diverse routes of Salmonella contamination in seafood as multiple clones of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby were detected in same or different seafood throughout the study period. PMID:18480975

  4. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lehtola, Markku J.; Torvinen, Eila; Miettinen, Ilkka T.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive and grow in drinking-water biofilms and possibly transmit via drinking water. The designed PNA probe (MAV148) specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other mycobacteria and mycolic acid-containing bacteria. From the range of bacterial strains tested, only M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were hybridized. The PNA FISH method was applied successfully to detect M. avium subsp. avium spiked in water samples and biofilm established within a Propella biofilm reactor fed with potable water from a distribution supply. PMID:16391126

  5. Neonatal mortality in puppies due to bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Vela, Ana I; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F

    2006-02-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  6. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  7. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. PMID:26507830

  8. Disparate host immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii and M. bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and criticism of current tests for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, host immune responses to antigen preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), consis...

  9. Potential Transmission Pathways of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Jessika; Hinse, Dennis; Vollmer, Tanja; Schulz, Jochen; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus), a member of group D streptococci, is an inhabitant of the animal and human gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, it is a facultative pathogen which causes e.g. endocarditis, septicemia and mastitis. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus may be transmitted either directly or indirectly between animals and humans. However, the transmission routes are an unsolved issue. In this study, we present systematic analyses of an S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolate of an infective endocarditis patient in relation to isolates of his laying hen flock. Isolates from pooled droppings of laying hens, pooled dust samples and human blood culture were characterized by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and DNA fingerprinting. MLST revealed the same allelic profile of isolates from the human blood culture and from the droppings of laying hens. In addition, these isolates showed clonal identity regarding a similar DNA fingerprinting pattern. For the first time, we received a hint that transmission of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus between poultry and humans may occur. This raises the question about the zoonotic potential of isolates from poultry and should be considered in future studies. PMID:25978355

  10. Simultaneous detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii based on microsphere immunoreaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Jinfeng; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-04-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis (Cmn) and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pss) are two plant pathogens that can cause tremendous agricultural economic losses. This novel method based on microsphere immunoreaction was developed for the simultaneous detection of Cmn and Pss in maize. This multiplex method was constructed based on microsphere immunodetection with fluorescent labels such as quantum dots (QDs) and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) for the detection of Cmn and Pss. Captured QDs and R-PE serve as signal reporters for fluorescent readout. The principle of this method is based on a sandwich immunoreaction. Cmn and Pss captured by the microspheres were detected using flow cytometry. The limit of detection of this method was 10 times lower than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and its analysis time (1 h) was much shorter compared with ELISA (6-8 h). The method, which has been proven to be an effective approach to multiplex detection of plant bacteria (Cmn and Pss as models), not only increased the varieties but also improved the sensitivity. The microsphere immunoreaction provides a universal method for the multiplex determination of microbes because of its high sensitivity, specificity, and speed. In the future, the method will be more fully validated in vivo to detect diversiform bacteria. PMID:23169888

  11. Sugar Utilization and Acid Production by Free and Entrapped Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in a Whey Permeate Medium

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Pascal; Paquin, Celine; Lacroix, Christophe

    1989-01-01

    Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis entrapped in k-carrageenan-locust bean gum gel performed similarly to free cells in the conversion of lactose to lactic acid. Bead diameter influenced the fermentation rate. Cells entrapped in smaller beads (0.5 to 1.0 mm) showed higher release rates, higher lactose, glucose, and formic acid utilization, higher galactose accumulation, and higher lactic acid production than did cells entrapped in larger beads (1.0 to 2.0 mm). Values for smaller beads were comparable with those for free cells. Immobilization affected the fermentation rate of lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Entrapped cells of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus demonstrated a lower lactic acid production than did free cells in batch fermentation. The kinetics of the production of formic and pyruvic acids by L. lactis subsp. lactis and S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus are presented. PMID:16347822

  12. Mechanisms involved in quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Nuno T; Assunção, Patrícia; Poveda, José B; Tavío, María M

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri is a causative agent of contagious agalactia in goats. In this study, M. mycoides subsp. capri mutants were selected for resistance to fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin) by serial passes in broth with increasing concentrations of antibiotic. Mutations conferring cross-resistance to the three fluoroquinolones were found in the quinolone resistance determining regions of the four genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Different mutations in the DNA gyrase GyrA subunit suggest a different mechanism of inhibition between norfloxacin and the other tested fluoroquinolones. The presence of an adenosine triphosphate-dependent efflux system was suggested through the use of the inhibitor orthovanadate. PMID:25951987

  13. Mannitol production by lactic acid bacteria grown in supplemented carob syrup.

    PubMed

    Carvalheiro, Florbela; Moniz, Patrícia; Duarte, Luís C; Esteves, M Paula; Gírio, Francisco M

    2011-01-01

    Detailed kinetic and physiological characterisation of eight mannitol-producing lactic acid bacteria, Leuconostoc citreum ATCC 49370, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris ATCC19254, L. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum ATCC 19255, L. ficulneum NRRL B-23447, L. fructosum NRRL B-2041, L. lactis ATCC 19256, Lactobacillus intermedius NRRL 3692 and Lb. reuteri DSM 20016, was performed using a carob-based culture medium, to evaluate their different metabolic capabilities. Cultures were thoroughly followed for 30 h to evaluate consumption of sugars, as well as production of biomass and metabolites. All strains produced mannitol at high yields (>0.70 g mannitol/g fructose) and volumetric productivities (>1.31 g/l h), and consumed fructose and glucose simultaneously, but fructose assimilation rate was always higher. The results obtained enable the studied strains to be divided mainly into two groups: one for which glucose assimilation rates were below 0.78 g/l h (strains ATCC 49370, ATCC 19256 and ATCC 19254) and the other for which they ranged between 1.41 and 1.89 g/l h (strains NRRL B-3692, NRRL B-2041, NRRL B-23447 and DSM 20016). These groups also exhibited different mannitol production rates and yields, being higher for the strains with faster glucose assimilation. Besides mannitol, all strains also produced lactic acid and acetic acid. The best performance was obtained for L. fructosum NRRL B-2041, with maximum volumetric productivity of 2.36 g/l h and the highest yield, stoichiometric conversion of fructose to mannitol. PMID:20820868

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NBRC 16556.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Oguchi, Akio; Hamada, Moriyuki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain NBRC 16556, deposited as Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus into the NBRC culture collection. An average nucleotide identity analysis confirmed that the taxonomic identification is correct. The genome sequence will serve as a valuable reference for genome mining to search new secondary metabolites. PMID:27198007

  15. Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius strain ST1464 genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Robert, Catherine; Nguyen, Ti Thien; Gimenez, Grégory; El Sanousi, Sulieman M.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is responsible for Morel's disease in animals and a cause of abscess in humans. It is characterized by a microaerophilic growth, contrary to the other strains of S. aureus. The 2,604,446-bp genome (32.7% GC content) of S. anaerobius ST1464 comprises one chromosome and no plasmids. The chromosome contains 2,660 open reading frames (ORFs), 49 tRNAs and three complete rRNAs, forming one complete operon. The size of ORFs ranges between 100 to 4,600 bp except for two ORFs of 6,417 and 7,173 bp encoding segregation ATPase and non-ribosomal peptide synthase, respectively. The chromosome harbors Staphylococcus phage 2638A genome and incomplete Staphylococcus phage genome PT1028, but no detectable CRISPRS. The antibiotic resistance gene for tetracycline was found although Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is susceptible to tetracycline in-vitro. Intact oxygen detoxification genes encode superoxide dismutase and cytochrome quinol oxidase whereas the catalase gene is impaired by a stop codon. Based on the genome, in-silico multilocus sequence typing indicates that S. aureus subsp. anaerobius emerged as a clone separated from all other S. aureus strains, illustrating host-adaptation linked to missing functions. Availability of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius genome could prompt the development of post-genomic tools for its rapid discrimination from S. aureus. PMID:24501641

  16. Recurrent Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Bacteremia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joshua R.; Leber, Amy; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant with recurrent bacteremia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, likely transmitted from mother to infant. Our case highlights the importance of an epidemiological history and molecular diagnostics in ascertaining insights into transmission, pathogenesis, and optimal management. PMID:26179301

  17. Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jin; Feng, Jia; Xie, Shulian; Wang, Feipeng; Xu, Qiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff) Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1∶25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3) had the highest (P<0.05) antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%), esters (5.24%), acids (4.87%) and alcohols (2.21%). Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. PMID:24714388

  18. Hidden Gems in the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    If 4,350 genes annotated in the M. avium subsp paratuberculosis strain K-10 genome wasn’t already enough to study, more genes have recently been uncovered, hidden deep within this genome sequence. Genomic and proteomic studies, both published and unpublished, have revealed a handful of new genes mi...

  19. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  20. Toxic shock syndrome related to Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed; Vialette, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    We describe a documented streptococcal toxic shock syndrome linked to horse-to-man transmission of Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus. The patient was treated successfully with respiratory and haemodynamic support in conjunction with antibiotic treatment associated with polyvalent human immunoglobulin and high-volume venovenous haemofiltration. PMID:24014562

  1. Substructure within Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolates from Australian Wildlife▿

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sandra K.; Bull, C. Michael; Gordon, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of 56 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strains isolated from Australian wildlife hosts was performed. The results of population assignment algorithms revealed that the 56 strains could be subdivided into two distinct clades. Strains belonging to the two clades were further distinguished phenotypically, genotypically, and with respect to host distribution. PMID:21378038

  2. Description and history of Syringa oblata subsp. oblata 'Frank Meyer'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accession of Syringa oblata subsp. oblata (PI 23031) collected in China by Frank Meyer in 1908was given the name ‘Frank Meyer’ by Father Fiala in 1988. To be established according to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, a new cultivar name must be accompanied by a descrip...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale is a naturally attenuated subtype that has been used as a vaccine for a century. We sequenced the genome of this organism and compared it to those of virulent senso stricto A. marginale strains. The comparison markedly narrows the number of outer membrane protein ...

  4. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  5. Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Tania; Balcázar, José Luis; Peix, Alvaro; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol

    2011-08-01

    The species Lactococcus lactis currently includes three subspecies; L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, isolated from milk sources, and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, isolated from the leafhopper Hordnia circellata. In this study, three strains, designated L105(T), I3 and L101, were isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These strains were closely related to members of the species Lactococcus lactis. Strain L105(T) showed 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of the type strains L. lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 604(T) and L. lactis subsp. hordniae NCDO 2181(T) and showed 99.9 % similarity to the type strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO 607(T). Analysis of two housekeeping genes, rpoB and recA, confirmed the close relationship between the novel strains and L. lactis subsp. cremoris with similarities of 99.3 and 99.7 %, respectively. The three strains could, however, be differentiated from their closest relatives on the basis of several phenotypic characteristics, as was the case for L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, which were also closely related on the basis of 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA gene sequence similarities. The strains isolated in this study represent a new subspecies, for which the name Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L105(T) ( = LMG 24662(T)  = DSM 21502(T)). PMID:20833888

  6. Analysis of labdane-type diterpenes from Cistus creticus (subsp. creticus and subsp. eriocephalus), by GC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Anastasaki, T; Demetzos, C; Perdetzoglou, D; Gazouli, M; Loukis, A; Harvala, C

    1999-12-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis of labdane-type diterpenes of the hexane extracts and of the essential oils of the leaves, fruits and resin "Ladano", of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus and Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus, have been carried out by GC and GC-MS analysis using two capillary chromatographic columns, i.e., HP-5MS and CP-Wax. The methanolic extract of the fruits of C. creticus subsp. creticus was examined and seven labdane diterpenes were isolated and identified by spectroscopic methods. Data on the investigation of labdane diterpenes by GC and GC-MS is limited and most of them have never been analysed by this method. The results obtained by this analysis could be useful for identifying them in crude plant extracts. Manoyl oxides were studied further for the percentage content of their isomers. The hexane extracts of the two subspecies as well as the manoyl oxide isomers isolated from the methanolic extract of the fruits of C. creticus subsp. creticus, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Global numerical differences of these C. creticus subspecies, based on labdane diterpenes content in the hexane extracts as well as in the essential oils, were established by statistical methods. Phenotypic differences are discussed. PMID:10630116

  7. Insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae: gene cloning and characterization and comparison with B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki CryIA(c) toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Von Tersch, M A; Robbins, H L; Jany, C S; Johnson, T B

    1991-01-01

    Genes encoding insecticidal crystal proteins were cloned from three strains of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae and two strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. Characterization of the B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae toxin genes showed that they are most closely related to cryIA(c) from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The cloned genes were introduced into Bacillus host strains, and the spectra of insecticidal activities of each Cry protein were determined for six pest lepidopteran insects. CryIA(c) proteins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae are as active as CryIA(c) proteins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki against Trichoplusia ni, Lymantria dispar, Heliothis zea, and H. virescens but are significantly less active against Plutella xylostella and, in some cases, Ostrinia nubilalis. The sequence of a cryIA(c) gene from B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae was determined (GenBank M35524) and compared with that of cryIA(c) from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The two genes are more than 99% identical and show seven amino acid differences among the predicted sequences of 1,177 amino acids. Images PMID:2014985

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation. PMID:24786958

  10. The influence of the cell free solution of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food borne-pathogens in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    PubMed

    Toy, Nurten; Özogul, Fatih; Özogul, Yesim

    2015-04-15

    The function of cell-free solutions (CFSs) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on tyramine and other biogenic amine production by different food borne-pathogens (FBPs) was investigated in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) using HPLC. Cell free solutions were prepared from four LAB strains. Two different concentrations which were 50% (5 ml CFS+5 ml medium/1:1) and 25% (2.5 ml CFS+7.5 ml medium/1:3) CFS and the control without CFS were prepared. Both concentration of CFS of Streptococcus thermophilus and 50% CFS of Pediococcus acidophilus inhibited tyramine production up to 98% by Salmonella paratyphi A. Tyramine production by Escherichia coli was also inhibited by 50% CFS of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 25% CFS of Leuconostoc lactis. subsp. cremoris. The inhibitor effect of 50% CFS of P. acidophilus was the highest on tyramine production (55%) by Listeria monocytogenes, following Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris (20%) whilst 25% CFS of Leu. mes. subsp. cremoris and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis showed stimulator effects (160%). The stimulation effects of 50% CFS of S. thermophilus and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis were more than 70% by Staphylococcus aureus comparing to the control. CFS of LAB strains showed statistically inhibitor effect since lactic acid inhibited microbial growth, decreased pH quickly and reduced the formation of AMN and BAs. Consequently, in order to avoid the formation of high concentrations of biogenic amines in fermented food by bacteria, it is advisable to use CFS for food and food products. PMID:25465993

  11. Construction of targeted insertion mutations in Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jirong; Zogaj, Xhavit; Barker, Jeffrey R; Klose, Karl E

    2007-10-01

    Francisella tularensis is one of the most deadly bacterial agents, yet most of the genetic determinants of pathogenesis are still unknown. We have developed an efficient targeted mutagenesis strategy in the model organism F. tularensis subsp. novicida by utilizing universal priming of optimized antibiotic resistance cassettes and splicing by overlap extension (SOE). This process enables fast and efficient construction of targeted insertion mutations in F. tularensis subsp. novicida that have characteristics of nonpolar mutations; optimized targeted mutagenesis strategies will promote the study of this mysterious bacterium and facilitate vaccine development against tularemia. Moreover the general strategy of gene disruption by PCR-based antibiotic resistance cassette insertion is broadly applicable to many bacterial species. PMID:18019340

  12. Colonization patterns of an mCherry-tagged Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense strain in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Kubheka, Gugulethu C; Coutinho, Teresa A; Moleleki, Ntsane; Moleleki, Lucy N

    2013-12-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense is a newly identified member of the potato soft rot enterobacteriaceae. The pathogenesis of this pathogen is still poorly understood. In this study, an mCherry-P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense-tagged strain was generated to study P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense-potato plant interactions. Prior to use, the tagged strain was evaluated for in vitro growth, plasmid stability, and virulence on potato tubers and shown to be similar to the wild type. Four potato cultivars were evaluated for stem-based resistance against P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy and in vitro viable cell counts showed that P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense is able to penetrate roots of a susceptible potato cultivar as early as 12 h postinoculation and migrate upward into aerial stem parts. Due to the phenotypic differences observed between tolerant and susceptible cultivars, a comparison of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense colonization patterns in these cultivars was undertaken. In the susceptible cultivar, P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense cells colonized the xylem tissue, forming "biofilm-like" aggregates that led to occlusion of some of the vessels. In contrast, in the tolerant cultivar, P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense appeared as free-swimming planktonic cells with no specific tissue localization. This suggests that there are resistance mechanisms in the tolerant cultivar that limit aggregation of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense in planta and, hence, the lack of symptom development in this cultivar. PMID:23758294

  13. Characterization of Tetragenococcus strains from sugar thick juice reveals a novel species, Tetragenococcus osmophilus sp. nov., and divides Tetragenococcus halophilus into two subspecies, T. halophilus subsp. halophilus subsp. nov. and T. halophilus subsp. flandriensis subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Justé, A; Van Trappen, S; Verreth, C; Cleenwerck, I; De Vos, P; Lievens, B; Willems, K A

    2012-01-01

    Most bacteria recovered so far from sugar thick juice during storage represent strains of the species Tetragenococcus halophilus. Recently, several Gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming cocci with other physiological and genetic traits were isolated from sugar thick juice samples from different origins. In this study, representative isolates were investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between these isolates and their closest relative, Tetragenococcus muriaticus, was 97.4%. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between isolate T1(T), representing the newly found Tetragenococcus isolates, and T. muriaticus was 57%. Isolate T1(T) had a DNA G+C content of 36.7 mol%. Phylogenetic data and genomic and phenotypic features demonstrated that the isolates represent a novel species, for which the name Tetragenococcus osmophilus sp. nov. is proposed with T1(T) as the type strain (=LMG 26041(T) =DSM 23765(T)). Additionally, T. halophilus isolates from high-salt and high-sugar environments showed clear differences in several physiological and genetic characteristics like RAPD fingerprints and 16S rRNA gene sequences. DNA-DNA hybridizations, however, showed 79 to 80% relatedness between osmophilic and halophilic T. halophilus isolates, demonstrating that the different strains belong to the same species. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic differences observed, as well as the different origins of the strains and the industrial relevance of thick juice degradation, two subspecies of T. halophilus are described in this manuscript: T. halophilus subsp. halophilus subsp. nov. for the strains isolated from salt media and T. halophilus subsp. flandriensis subsp. nov. for the strains isolated from sugar-rich environments, which were first isolated in Flanders, Belgium. The type strains for the subspecies are IAM 1676(T) (=LMG 11490(T) =DSM 20339(T)) and T5(T) (=LMG 26042(T) =DSM 23766(T)), respectively. PMID:21357458

  14. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Group A.I, United States

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Johansson, Anders; Öhrman, Caroline; Kaufman, Emily; Molins, Claudia; Pearson, Talima; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Naumann, Amber; Vogler, Amy J.; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Larsson, Pär; Forsman, Mats; Sjödin, Andreas; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James; Petersen, Jeannine M.; Keim, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We used whole-genome analysis and subsequent characterization of geographically diverse strains using new genetic signatures to identify distinct subgroups within Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I: A.I.3, A.I.8, and A.I.12. These subgroups exhibit complex phylogeographic patterns within North America. The widest distribution was observed for A.I.12, which suggests an adaptive advantage. PMID:24755401

  15. PEDIOCIN PRODUCTION IN MILK BY PEDIOCOCCUS ACIDILACTICI IN CO-CULTURE WITH STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS AND LACTOBACILLUS DELBRUECKII SUBSP. BULGARICUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of pediocin in milk by Pediococcus acidilactici was evaluated in co-culture with the dairy fermentation cultures Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The cultures were tested singly or in different combinations...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Virulent Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Isolate Causing Soft Rot of Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Onkendi, Edward M; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Kwenda, Stanford; Naidoo, Sanushka; Moleleki, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense causes soft rot and blackleg diseases on potatoes, ornamentals, and other crops of economic importance. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a highly virulent P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense strain, PcbHPI01, isolated from a cucumber in South Africa. PMID:26744374

  17. First isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp Paratuberculosis from commercial pasteurized milk in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Paolicchi, Fernando; Cirone, Karina; Morsella, Claudia; Gioffré, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis was isolated from two out of seventy samples (2.86 %) of pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized milk. The isolates were positives to IS900 PCR and showed a C17 RFLP pattern, the most prevalent in Argentina. The present study is the first report of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis culture from pasteurized milk in Argentina. PMID:24031925

  18. Proposal for designation of F38-type caprine mycoplasmas as Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae subsp. nov. and consequent obligatory relegation of strains currently classified as M. capricolum (Tully, Barile, Edward, Theodore, and Ernø 1974) to an additional new subspecies, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Leach, R H; Ernø, H; MacOwan, K J

    1993-07-01

    A subspecies relationship with the existing species Mycoplasma capricolum is appropriate for the F38 group of mycoplasmas, the causative agent of classical contagious caprine pleuropneumonia. We believe that this classification is justified on the basis of the close DNA-DNA relationship recently reported for isolates belonging to the two groups and the other known serological and biological similarities and differences of these organisms. Strain F38T (T = type strain) and taxonomically indistinguishable strains are therefore proposed as members of a new subspecies of M. capricolum, M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. Strain F38 (= NCTC 10192) is the type strain of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae subsp. nov. As a consequence of this subdivision of the species M. capricolum, strains previously classified as M. capricolum are now necessarily relegated to subspecies status, as M. capricolum subsp. capricolum subsp. nov. Strain California kid (= ATCC 27343 = NCTC 10154) is the type strain of M. capricolum, as well as of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum. A taxonomic description of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and a brief amended description of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum are presented. PMID:8347517

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  1. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  2. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  4. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhe; Geng, Jianing; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Haiying; Yi, Li; Lei, Meng; Lu, Cheng-ping; Fan, Hong-jie; Hu, Songnian

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen. It has caused a very large economic loss in the swine industry of China and has become a threat to human health. We announce the complete genome sequence of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246, which provides opportunities to understand its pathogenesis mechanism and genetic basis. PMID:21914890

  5. Genome Sequence of an Epidemic Isolate of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Reynolds, Paul R; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, collectively called BRA100, were associated with outbreaks of postsurgical skin infections across various regions of Brazil from 2003 to 2009. We announce the draft genome sequence of a newly sequenced BRA100 strain, M. abscessus subsp. bolletii CRM-0020, isolated from a patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:23950125

  6. Biosystematic studies on Enicostema axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal subsp. Axillare (Gentianaceae) in peninsular India.

    PubMed

    Shahina, P M; Nampy, Santhosh

    2014-05-01

    The pantropical genus Enicostema (Gentianaceae) has three species and two sub species world over, namely, E. verticillatum (L.) Engl. (America), E. elizabethae Veldkamp (Madagascar) and E. axillare having 3 subsp. viz., subsp. axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal (India), subsp. latilobum (N.E. Br.) A. Raynal (East Africa) and subsp. littorale (Blume) A. Raynal (Indonesia). The present study aims to delimit the Indian taxa based on field and herbarium studies. Comparative morphology is studied using live as well as consulting wide range of specimens housed at various herbaria. The anatomy of leaf, stem, and root is studied using free hand sections and from epidermal peelings. The seed and pollen morphology are studied under SEM. Information on anatomy, palynology and seed micromorphology of E. axillare subsp. axillare is provided for the first time. PMID:26031003

  7. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Bukuljac, a homemade goat's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Milica; Terzic-Vidojevic, Amarela; Jovcic, Branko; Begovic, Jelena; Golic, Natasa; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2008-02-29

    The Bukuljac cheese is traditionally homemade cheese, produced from heat-treated goat's milk without the addition of any bacterial starter culture. The presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Bukuljac cheese has been analyzed by using a polyphasic approach including microbiological and molecular methods such as rep-PCR with (GTG)5 primer. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei represents a dominant strain in the microflora of analyzed cheese. Out of 55 Gram-positive and catalase-negative isolates, 48 belonged to L. paracasei subsp. paracasei species. Besides lactobacilli, five Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and two Enterococcus faecalis were found. Results of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA extracted directly from the fresh cheese revealed the presence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Only lactobacilli showed a high proteolytic activity and hydrolyzed alpha(s1)- and beta-caseins. They are also producers of diacetyl. In addition, 34 out of 55 isolates, all determined as lactobacilli, showed the ability of auto-aggregation. Among 55 isolates, 50 also exhibited antimicrobial activity. PMID:18177967

  8. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  9. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  10. Assessing the inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during composting of livestock carcasses.

    PubMed

    Tkachuk, Victoria L; Krause, Denis O; McAllister, Tim A; Buckley, Katherine E; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve; Ominski, Kim H

    2013-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  11. Assessing the Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Composting of Livestock Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Tkachuk, Victoria L.; Krause, Denis O.; McAllister, Tim A.; Buckley, Katherine E.; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  12. Subspeciation of Bifidobacterium longum by multilocus approaches and amplified fragment length polymorphism: Description of B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov., isolated from the faeces of piglets.

    PubMed

    Yanokura, Emiko; Oki, Kaihei; Makino, Hiroshi; Modesto, Monica; Pot, Bruno; Mattarelli, Paola; Biavati, Bruno; Watanabe, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    The species Bifidobacterium longum is currently divided into three subspecies, B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis. This classification was based on an assessment of accumulated information on the species' phenotypic and genotypic features. The three subspecies of B. longum were investigated using genotypic identification [amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)]. By using the AFLP and the MLSA methods, we allocated 25 strains of B. longum into three major clusters corresponding to the three subspecies; the cluster comprising the strains of B. longum subsp. suis was further divided into two subclusters differentiable by the ability to produce urease. By using the MLST method, the 25 strains of B. longum were divided into eight groups: four major groups corresponding to the results obtained by AFLP and MLSA, plus four minor disparate groups. The results of AFLP, MLSA and MLST analyses were consistent and revealed a novel subspeciation of B. longum, which comprised three known subspecies and a novel subspecies of urease-negative B. longum, for which the name B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Su 851(T)=DSM 28597(T)=JCM 19995(T). PMID:26007614

  13. Study of the Ecology of Fresh Sausages and Characterization of Populations of Lactic Acid Bacteria by Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Iacumin, Lucilla; Urso, Rosalinda; Cantoni, Carlo; Comi, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a polyphasic approach was used to study the ecology of fresh sausages and to characterize populations of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The microbial profile of fresh sausages was monitored from the production day to the 10th day of storage at 4°C. Samples were collected on days 0, 3, 6, and 10, and culture-dependent and -independent methods of detection and identification were applied. Traditional plating and isolation of LAB strains, which were subsequently identified by molecular methods, and the application of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to DNA and RNA extracted directly from the fresh sausage samples allowed the study in detail of the changes in the bacterial and yeast populations during storage. Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactobacillus sakei were the main populations present. In particular, B. thermosphacta was present throughout the process, as determined by both DNA and RNA analysis. Other bacterial species, mainly Staphylococcus xylosus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and L. curvatus, were detected by DGGE. Moreover, an uncultured bacterium and an uncultured Staphylococcus sp. were present, too. LAB strains isolated at day 0 were identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, L. casei, and Enterococcus casseliflavus, and on day 3 a strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides was identified. The remaining strains isolated belonged to L. sakei. Concerning the yeast ecology, only Debaryomyces hansenii was established in the fresh sausages. Capronia mansonii was initially present, but it was not detected after the first 3 days. At last, L. sakei isolates were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR and repetitive DNA element PCR. The results obtained underlined how different populations took over at different steps of the process. This is believed to be the result of the selection of the particular population, possibly due to the low storage temperature employed. PMID:15066777

  14. Intestinal colonization of neonatal animals by Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L H; Underwood, J L; Pope, L M; Berry, L J

    1981-01-01

    Neonatal mice (2.3 to 2.8 g) were inoculated intragastrically with different human isolates of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. At weekly intervals thereafter, mice were sacrificed and dilution plate counts were performed on segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Mice were uniformly colonized by some strains for 2 weeks, whereas other strains were being cleared at that time. One strain (BO216) persisted in some mice for 3 weeks. The greatest number of organisms (10(7)) was recovered from the cecum and large intestine. The small intestine had from 10(2) to 10(5) colony-forming units. Colonization of the stomach was not found consistently. One strain killed 13% of the infected mice. Deaths occurred between 1 and 5 days postinfection. Two other strains killed a smaller percentage of challenged animals, and two additional strains killed none. Retarded weight gain was noticed in some, but not all, of the infected mice. The intestines of neonatal rats and rabbits were colonized much the same as those of mice, whereas hamsters were resistant to colonization. Preweanling mice, up to about 6.5 to 7.0 g, could be colonized with C. fetus subsp. jejuni after intragastric challenge, but weanling mice of larger weight (9.8 g) and young adult mice (18.3 g) could not. Scanning electron photomicrographs of the lower ileum showed campylobacters in and below the dried mucous gel that lines the intestines. The use of this model for additional studies is discussed. Images PMID:7287188

  15. Biological activity of harpin produced by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Majerczak, D R; Pike, S; Hoyos, M E; Novacky, A; Coplin, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii causes Stewart's wilt of sweet corn. A hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) secretion system is needed to produce water-soaking and wilting symptoms in corn and to cause a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. Sequencing of the hrp cluster revealed a putative harpin gene, hrpN. The product of this gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to elicit the HR in tobacco and systemic resistance in radishes. The protein was designated HrpN(Pnss). Like other harpins, it was heat stable and protease sensitive, although it was three- to fourfold less active biologically than Erwinia amylovora harpin. We used antibodies to purified HrpN(Pnss) to verify that hrpN mutants could not produce harpin. This protein was secreted into the culture supernatant and was produced by strains of P. stewartii subsp. indologenes. In order to determine the importance of HrpN(Pnss) in pathogenesis on sweet corn, three hrpN::Tn5 mutants were compared with the wild-type strain with 50% effective dose, disease severity, response time, and growth rate in planta as parameters. In all tests, HrpN(Pnss) was not required for infection, growth, or virulence in corn or endophytic growth in related grasses. PMID:11605962

  16. Glycosylation of DsbA in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rebecca M; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Tessier, Luc; Kilmury, Sara L N; Ding, Wen; Harmer, Nicholas; Michell, Stephen L; Oyston, Petra C F; Titball, Richard W; Prior, Joann L

    2011-10-01

    In Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, DsbA has been shown to be an essential virulence factor and has been observed to migrate to multiple protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. In this work, we show that the protein is modified with a 1,156-Da glycan moiety in O-linkage. The results of mass spectrometry studies suggest that the glycan is a hexasaccharide, comprised of N-acetylhexosamines, hexoses, and an unknown monosaccharide. Disruption of two genes within the FTT0789-FTT0800 putative polysaccharide locus, including a galE homologue (FTT0791) and a putative glycosyltransferase (FTT0798), resulted in loss of glycan modification of DsbA. The F. tularensis subsp. tularensis ΔFTT0798 and ΔFTT0791::Cm mutants remained virulent in the murine model of subcutaneous tularemia. This indicates that glycosylation of DsbA does not play a major role in virulence under these conditions. This is the first report of the detailed characterization of the DsbA glycan and putative role of the FTT0789-FTT0800 gene cluster in glycan biosynthesis. PMID:21803994

  17. Nested PCR for ultrasensitive detection of the potato ring rot bacterium, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I M; Bartoszyk, I M; Gundersen, D E; Mogen, B; Davis, R E

    1997-01-01

    Oligonucleotide primers derived from sequences of the 16S rRNA gene (CMR16F1, CMR16R1, CMR16F2, and CMR16R2) and insertion element IS1121 of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (CMSIF1, CMSIR1, CMSIF2, and CMISR2) were used in nested PCR to detect the potato ring rot bacterium C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Nested PCR with primer pair CMSIF1-CMSIR1 followed by primer pair CMSIF2-CMSIR2 specifically detected C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, while nested PCR with CMR16F1-CMR16R1 followed by CMR16F2-CMR16R2 detected C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and the other C. michiganensis subspecies. In the latter case, C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus can be differentiated from the other subspecies by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of the nested PCR products (16S rDNA sequences). The nested PCR assays developed in this work allow ultrasensitive detection of very low titers of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus which may be present in symptomiess potato plants or tubers and which cannot be readily detected by direct PCR (single PCR amplification). RFLP analysis of PCR products provides for an unambiguous confirmation of the identify of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. PMID:9212412

  18. Role of Blossoms in Watermelon Seed Infestation by Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli.

    PubMed

    Walcott, R R; Gitaitis, R D; Castro, A C

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT The role of watermelon blossom inoculation in seed infestation by Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli was investigated. Approximately 98% (84/87) of fruit developed from blossoms inoculated with 1 x 10(7) or 1 x 10(9) CFU of A. avenae subsp. citrulli per blossom were asymptomatic. Using immunomagnetic separation and the polymerase chain reaction, A. avenae subsp. citrulli was detected in 44% of the seed lots assayed, despite the lack of fruit symptoms. Furthermore, viable colonies were recovered from 31% of the seed lots. Of these lots, 27% also yielded seedlings expressing bacterial fruit blotch symptoms when planted under conditions of 30 degrees C and 90% relative humidity. A. avenae subsp. citrulli was detected and recovered from the pulp of 33 and 19%, respectively, of symptomless fruit whose blossoms were inoculated with A. avenae subsp. citrulli. The ability to penetrate watermelon flowers was not unique to A. avenae subsp. citrulli, because blossoms inoculated with Pantoea ananatis also resulted in infested seed and pulp. The data indicate that watermelon blossoms are a potential site of ingress for fruit and seed infestation by A. avenae subsp. citrulli. PMID:18942974

  19. Strong genetic differentiation between North American and European populations of Phytophthora alni subsp. uniformis.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Jaime; Adams, Gerard C; Halkett, Fabien; Catal, Mursel; Husson, Claude; Nagy, Zoltán Á; Hansen, Everett M; Marçais, Benoît; Frey, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni has been one of the most important diseases of natural ecosystems in Europe during the last 20 years. The emergence of P. alni subsp. alni -the pathogen responsible for the epidemic-is linked to an interspecific hybridization event between two parental species: P. alni subsp. multiformis and P. alni subsp. uniformis. One of the parental species, P. alni subsp. uniformis, has been isolated in several European countries and, recently, in North America. The objective of this work was to assess the level of genetic diversity, the population genetic structure, and the putative reproduction mode and mating system of P. alni subsp. uniformis. Five new polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to contrast both geographical populations. The study comprised 71 isolates of P. alni subsp. uniformis collected from eight European countries and 10 locations in North America. Our results revealed strong differences between continental populations (Fst = 0.88; Rst = 0.74), with no evidence for gene flow. European isolates showed extremely low genetic diversity compared with the North American collection. Selfing appears to be the predominant mating system in both continental collections. The results suggest that the European P. alni subsp. uniformis population is most likely alien and derives from the introduction of a few individuals, whereas the North American population probably is an indigenous population. PMID:23095465

  20. Profiling Bovine Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection by Using Protein Arrays▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Paustian, Michael L.; Waters, W. Ray; Stabel, Judith R.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Li, Lingling; Kapur, Vivek

    2008-01-01

    With the genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis determined, technologies are now being developed for construction of protein arrays to detect the presence of antibodies against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in host serum. The power of this approach is that it enables a direct comparison of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins to each other in relation to their immunostimulatory capabilities. In this study, 93 recombinant proteins, produced in Escherichia coli, were arrayed and spotted onto nitrocellulose. These proteins include unknown hypothetical proteins and cell surface proteins as well as proteins encoded by large sequence polymorphisms present uniquely in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Also included were previously reported or known M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens to serve as a frame of reference. Sera from healthy control cattle (n = 3) and cattle infected with either M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium bovis were exposed to the array to identify nonspecific or cross-reactive epitopes. These data demonstrated a degree of cross-reactivity with the M. avium subsp. avium proteins that was higher than the degree of cross-reactivity with the more distantly related M. bovis proteins. Finally, sera from naturally infected cattle (n = 3) as well as cattle experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (n = 3) were used to probe the array to identify antigens in the context of Johne's disease. Three membrane proteins were the most strongly detected in all serum samples, and they included an invasion protein, an ABC peptide transport permease, and a putative GTPase protein. This powerful combination of genomic information, molecular tools, and immunological assays has enabled the identification of previously unknown antigens of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:18039835

  1. A proposal to unify two subspecies of Staphylococcus equorum: Staphylococcus equorum subsp. equorum and Staphylococcus equorum subsp. linens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Kim, Hye-Rim; Han, Seulhwa; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Twelve isolates from jeotgal, a Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, identified as Staphylococcus equorum were compared by phenotypic and genotypic methods to determine their precise taxonomic identities at the subspecies level. Four strains and three strains had complete 16S rRNA gene sequence matches with S. equorum subsp. equorum DSM 20674(T) and S. equorum subsp. linens DSM 15097(T), respectively. Five strains showed 99.9 % identity with the sequences of both type strains. In our DNA-DNA hybridization analyses among two type strains and two isolates, the similarities were over 72 % and were higher than the similarities presented at the subspecies proposal. Physiological characteristics such as sugar utilization, β-galactosidase activity, novobiocin resistance and salt tolerance, which were adopted for subspecies separation, could not be applied to assign the isolates to a taxonomic unit. Antibiotic susceptibility, hemolytic activity, biofilm formation and protein profiles did not present markers to divide the isolates into either of the subspecies. Multilocus sequence typing of the sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and five housekeeping genes did not produce any coherent relationship among the isolates and type strains. Repetitive element-PCR fingerprinting using ERIC (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus) primers classified 12 isolates to three genotypes, and the genotypes of both type strains coincided with two isolates expressing different characteristics. Based on these phenotypic and genotypic analyses results, we propose to unify the present two subspecies of S. equorum into one species, S. equorum. PMID:24057981

  2. Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis subsp. nov., a bacterium accumulating poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate from acetone-butanol bioprocess residues.

    PubMed

    Schroll, G; Busse, H J; Parrer, G; Rölleke, S; Lubitz, W; Denner, E B

    2001-04-01

    The authors have previously isolated a solvent tolerant bacterium, strain G(T), (T = type strain) capable to convert acetone-butanol bioprocess residues into poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. Strain G(T) was initially identified as Alcaligenes spp by standard bacteriological tests. In this study the taxonomic position of the bacterium was investigated in detail. The 165 rDNA sequence analysis, the G + C content of DNA (56 mol%) and the presence of ubiquinone Q-8 confirmed strain G(T) as a representative of the genus Alcaligenes. In the polyamine pattern of the bacterium putrescine and cadaverine were detected, but only trace amounts of 2-hydroxyputrescine. The extremely low content of 2-hydroxyputrescine is remarkable, since this unique diamine is a common marker for beta-proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA demonstrated that Alcaligenes sp. G(T) is most closely related to the species Alcaligenes faecalis (99.6% sequence similarity to A. faecalis HR4 and 98.7% sequence similarity to A. faecalis [ATCC 8750T = DSM 30030T]. On the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness (56% similarity), the unique polyamine pattern, the physiological and biochemical differences strain G(T) could be distinguished from the species A. faecalis. Therefore, a new subspecies for the species Alcaligenes faecalis is proposed; Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis subsp. nov. PMID:11403397

  3. Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus subsp. nov. a phenol-degrading, denitrifying bacterium isolated from a graywater bioprocessor.

    PubMed

    Rehfuss, Marc; Urban, James

    2005-07-01

    A Gram (-) coccobacillary bacterium, J(T), was isolated from a graywater bioprocessor. 16S rRNA and biochemical analysis has revealed strain J(T) closely resembles Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 8750T and A. faecalis subsp. parafaecalis DSM 13975T, but is a distinct, previously uncharacterized isolate. Strain J(T), along with the type strain of A. faecalis and its previously described subspecies share the ability to aerobically degrade phenol. The degradation rates of phenol for strain J(T) and reference phenol degrading bacteria were determined by photometrically measuring the change in optical density when grown on 0.1% phenol as the sole carbon source, followed by addition of Gibb's reagent to measure depletion of substrate. The phenol degradation rates of strain J(T) was found to exceed that of the phenol hydroxylase group III bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, with isolate J(T) exhibiting a doubling time of 4.5 h. The presence of the large subunit of the multicomponent phenol hydroxylase gene in strain J(T) was confirmed by PCR. The presence of the nirK nitrite reductase gene as demonstrated by PCR as well as results obtained from nitrite media indicated denitrification at least to N2O. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, fatty acid analysis and results from DNA DNA hybridization, we propose assigning a novel subspecies of Alcaligenes faecalis, to be named Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus with the type strain J(T) (= DSM 16503) (= NRRL B-41076). PMID:16094869

  4. Seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in urban and rural dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Taylan Ozkan, Aysegul; Kilic, Selcuk; Akca, Atilla; Koenhemsi, Lora; Pasa, Serdar; Yildiz, Kader; Mamak, Nuri; Guzel, Murat

    2010-11-01

    The seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was investigated in stray urban dogs and shepherd and farm guard dogs from rural areas sampled from 10 provinces of Turkey. Sera from 855 dogs were examined for the presence of anti-B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii antibodies by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Overall, 56 (6.6%) of the 855 dogs examined, including 16 (3%) of the 522 stray dogs and 40 (12%) of the 333 rural dogs, were seropositive. This is the first report on prevalence of antibodies to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in dogs in Turkey. PMID:20574140

  5. High quality draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01

    PubMed Central

    Hu, XinJun; Li, Ang; Lv, LongXian; Yuan, Chunhui; Guo, Lihua; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Qian, GuiRong; Zheng, BeiWen; Guo, Jing; Li, LanJuan

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii belongs to the family Staphylococcaceae in the order Bacillales, class Bacilli and phylum Firmicutes. The increasing relevance of S. cohnii to human health prompted us to determine the genomic sequence of Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01, a multidrug-resistant isolate from a hospital in China. Here we describe the features of S. cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01, together with the genome sequence and its annotation. This is the first genome sequence of the species Staphylococcus cohnii. PMID:25197460

  6. Comparative Genomic Hybridizations Reveal Genetic Regions within the Mycobacterium avium Complex That Are Divergent from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates†

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L.; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is genetically similar to other members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), some of which are nonpathogenic and widespread in the environment. We have utilized an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis whole-genome microarray representing over 95% of the predicted coding sequences to examine the genetic conservation among 10 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, two isolates each of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and a single isolate each of both Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Genomic DNA from each isolate was competitively hybridized with DNA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K10, and open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present, divergent, or intermediate. None of the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates had ORFs classified as divergent. The two M. avium subsp. avium isolates had 210 and 135 divergent ORFs, while the two M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates examined had 77 and 103 divergent ORFs. Similarly, 130 divergent ORFs were identified in M. intracellulare. A set of 97 ORFs were classified as divergent or intermediate in all of the nonparatuberculosis MAC isolates tested. Many of these ORFs are clustered together on the genome in regions with relatively low average GC content compared with the entire genome and contain mobile genetic elements. One of these regions of sequence divergence contained genes homologous to a mammalian cell entry (mce) operon. Our results indicate that closely related MAC mycobacteria can be distinguished from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by multiple clusters of divergent ORFs. PMID:15774884

  7. Integrative Cloning, Expression, and Stability of the cryIA(c) Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a Recombinant Strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, Jay S.; Canter, Gayle L.; Dimock, Michael B.; Kelly, Jeffrey L.; Anderson, James J.; Uratani, Brenda B.; Foulke, James S.; Turner, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A bacterial endophyte was engineered for insecticidal activity against the European corn borer. The cryIA(c) gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was introduced into the chromosome of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis by using an integrative plasmid vector. The integration vectors pCG740 and pCG741 included the replicon pGEM5Zf(+), which is maintained in Escherichia coli but not in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; tetM as a marker for selection in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; and a chromosomal fragment of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis to allow for homologous recombination between the vector and the bacterial chromosome. Insertion of vector DNA into the chromosome was demonstrated by DNA hybridization. Recombinant strains MDR1.583 and MDR1.586 containing the cryIA(c) gene were shown to produce the 133,000-kDa protoxin and several smaller immunoreactive proteins. Both strains were equally toxic to insect larvae in bioassays. Significant insecticidal activity was demonstrated in planta. The cryIA(c) gene and the tetM gene introduced into strain MDR1.586 were shown to be deleted from some cells, thereby giving rise to a noninsecticidal segregant population. In DNA hybridization experiments and insect bioassays, these segregants were indistinguishable from the wild-type strain. Overall, these results demonstrate the plausibility of genetically engineered bacterial endophytes for insect control. Images PMID:16349179

  8. The in vitro effect of six antimicrobials against Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolated from sheep and goats in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, W; Nicholas, R A J; Janakat, S; Abu-Basha, E; Ayling, R D

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory disease in sheep and goats is a major problem in Jordan and is often associated with Mycoplasma species. Without effective vaccines, control is mainly by chemotherapy, but the uncontrolled use of antimicrobials has led to concerns about the potential development of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of chloramphenicol, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, tylosin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline was determined against 32 isolates of Mycoplasma species-M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (6), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (8) and M. putrefaciens (18), all isolated from either nasal swabs or milk, from sheep and goats in different regions of Jordan. The antimicrobial susceptibility showed some Mycoplasma species-specific differences, with M. capricolum subsp. capricolum being more susceptible to tylosin and erythromycin. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were the least effective for all three Mycoplasma species. No trends or significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibilities were observed between sheep and goat isolates, between milk or nasal swab isolates, or between isolates from different regions of Jordan. Some isolates of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum and M. putrefaciens showed higher MIC levels with oxytetracycline, as did two isolates of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC with tylosin, possibly indicating signs of development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17405622

  9. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii produces an endoglucanase that is required for full virulence in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a xylem-dwelling bacterium, is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt and blight of sweet corn. The goal of this study was to characterize the only gene in the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii genome predicted to encode an endoglucanase (EGase); this gene was designated engY. Culture supernatants from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli expressing recombinant EngY protein possessed both EGase and xylanase activities. Deletion of engY abolished EGase and xylanase activity, demonstrating that EngY appears to be the major EGase or xylanase produced by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Most importantly, our results show that EngY contributes to movement in the xylem and disease severity during the wilting phase of Stewart's wilt but is not required for water-soaked lesion formation. PMID:22122328

  10. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  11. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum type strain 03-427T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum has been isolated from reptiles and humans. This Campylobacter subspecies is genetically distinct from other C. fetus subspecies. Here we present the first whole genome sequence for this C. fetus subspecies....

  12. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis reveals a strict monophyletic bifidobacterial taxon.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  13. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433

    PubMed Central

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A.; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  14. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433.

    PubMed

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  15. Experimental Paratuberculosis in Calves following Inoculation with a Rabbit Isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Beard, P. M.; Stevenson, K.; Pirie, A.; Rudge, K.; Buxton, D.; Rhind, S. M.; Sinclair, M. C.; Wildblood, L. A.; Jones, D. G.; Sharp, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The role of wildlife species in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis has been the subject of increased research efforts following the discovery of natural paratuberculosis in free-living rabbits from farms in east Scotland. This paper describes the experimental inoculation of young calves with an isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from a free-living rabbit. After a 6-month incubation period, all eight calves inoculated with the rabbit isolate had developed histopathological and/or microbiological evidence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Similar results were obtained from a group of calves infected with a bovine isolate of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The virulence of the rabbit isolate for calves demonstrated in this study suggests that rabbits are capable of passing paratuberculosis to domestic ruminants and that wildlife reservoirs of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis should therefore be considered when formulating control plans for the disease. PMID:11526132

  16. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  17. Volatile Components Emitted from the Liverwort Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazutoshi; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Kawakami, Yukihiko; Ochiai, Nozomi; Yabe, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The volatile components from the thalloid liverwort, Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. The monocyclic monoterpene aldehyde, perillaldehyde was identified for the first time as the major component and its content was about 50% of the volatiles, along with β-pinene, limonene, β-caryophyllene, α-selinene and β-selinene as minor volatiles. Using MD (Multi-dimensional) GC-MS analysis equipped with a chiral column as the second column, the chirality was determined of both perillaldehyde and limonene, which was considered as the precursor of perillaldehyde. Both compounds were (S)-(-)-enantiomers (over 99.0 %) and (R)-enantiomers (less than 0.5 %). This is the first report of the existence of perillaldehyde in liverworts. PMID:27032216

  18. Bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins from white salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius subsp. porrifolius).

    PubMed

    Zidorn, Christian; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Pschorr, Susanne; Salvenmoser, Daniela; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Börner, Andreas; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-07-01

    A phytochemical investigation of three accessions of Tragopogon porrifolius L. subsp. porrifolius (Asteraceae, Lactuceae) yielded three new bibenzyl derivatives, 5,4'-dihydroxy-3-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, 2-carboxyl-3,4'-dihydroxy-5-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, tragopogonic acid (2'carboxyl-3',5',4''-trihydroxyphenylethanone) and three dihydroisocoumarin derivatives, including the new natural product 6-O-methylscorzocreticoside I. One of the isolated bibenzyl derivatives is considered to be a precursor to the biosynthesis of dihydroisocoumarins. Structures of new compounds were established by HR mass spectrometry, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Moreover, radical scavenging activities of the polyphenolic compounds were measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay; two of the bibenzyls showed moderate and two of the dihydroisocoumarins showed weak radical scavenging activities. The chemosystematic impact of bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins is discussed briefly. PMID:15964041

  19. Carbon sources of natural cyanamide in Vicia villosa subsp. varia.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Kasahara, Ryohei; Abe, Shun; Hirota, Mitsuru; Sugano, Mami; Yamaya, Hiroko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    The ¹³C labels of [¹³C]carbon dioxide and D-[¹³C₆]glucose were incorporated into cyanamide (NH₂CN) when they were administered to Vicia villosa subsp. varia shoots. In contrast, the administration of sodium [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate did not affect the relative area of the [M + 1]+ ion of cyanamide in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate was incorporated into organic acids that are part of the citric acid cycle, such as succinate and fumarate, confirming that the shoots absorbed and metabolised it. These observations demonstrated that the carbon atom of cyanamide is derived from any of the carbohydrates that are present upstream of pyruvate in the metabolic pathway. PMID:20954091

  20. Novel fermentation media for production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Kumar, K Anup

    2003-08-01

    The production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (deBarjac) (Bti) as a biopesticide is not cost-effective using existing fermentation technology. In this study, we explored the use of several less expensive alternative culture media (potato, common sugar, and Bengal gram) for the growth and production of Bti. Growth was obtained in all tested media and was comparable to that obtained in conventional medium (Luria-Bertani). Toxicity assays showed that the toxin produced from the novel growth media were effective in killing larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti and toxicity was comparable to that produced from Luria-Bertani medium. These observations suggest that potato can be used as a cheap source of culture medium for the production of Bti toxin in mosquito control programs. PMID:14503573

  1. Neisseria elongata subsp elongata infective endocarditis following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Joanne May; Fife, Amanda; Baghai, Max; Dworakowski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old Argentinian woman presented with a 3-week history of fever, night sweats, myalgia and lethargy following a work trip to Uganda where she ran a marathon. Malarial screens were negative but C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil count were raised and she was anaemic. A new pansystolic murmur was heard over the mitral valve and the transthoracic echocardiogram showed a large vegetation (>1 cm) with at least moderate mitral regurgitation. Blood cultures grew Neisseria elongata, subsp elongata treated initially with ceftriaxone then oral ciprofloxacin to complete 4 weeks of treatment. CT scan revealed a wedge-shaped area of low attenuation in the spleen in keeping with a splenic infarct. Seven days postadmission, the patient underwent a successful mitral valve repair. Recovery was complicated by a likely embolic infarct in the right frontal lobe, but the patient was discharged 12 days postoperative with no neurological sequelae. PMID:26655669

  2. Efficient production of nonactin by Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yulian; Zheng, Shaolun

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the production of the cyclic macrotetrolide nonactin from the fermentation culture of Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus. Nonactin is a member of a family of naturally occurring cyclic ionophores known as the macrotetrolide antibiotics. Our fermentation procedure of Streptomyces griseus was performed at 30 °C and 200 rev·min(-1) for 5 days on a rotary shaker. Diaion HP-20 and Amberlite XAD-16 were added to the fermentation medium. Isolated yield of nonactin was up to 80 mg·L(-1) using our methodology. Nonactin is commonly known as an ammonium ionophore and also exhibits antibacterial, antiviral, and antitumor activities. It is also widely used for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes and sensors. Chemical synthesis of nonactin has been achieved by some groups; however, overall yields are very low, making efficient biosynthesis an attractive means of production. PMID:27405846

  3. Seed-associated subspecies of the genus Clavibacter are clearly distinguishable from Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Alvarez, Anne M

    2015-03-01

    The genus Clavibacter contains one recognized species, Clavibacter michiganensis. Clavibacter michiganensis is subdivided into subspecies based on host specificity and bacteriological characteristics, with Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis causing bacterial canker of tomato. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is often spread through contaminated seed leading to outbreaks of bacterial canker in tomato production areas worldwide. The frequent occurrence of non-pathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-like bacteria (CMB) is a concern for seed producers because Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a quarantine organism and detection of a non-pathogenic variant may result in destruction of an otherwise healthy seed lot. A thorough biological and genetic characterization of these seed-associated CMB strains was performed using standard biochemical tests, cell wall analyses, metabolic profiling using Biolog, and single-gene and multilocus sequence analyses. Combined, these tests revealed two distinct populations of seed-associated members of the genus Clavibacter that differed from each other, as well as from all other described subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis. DNA-DNA hybridization values are 70 % or higher, justifying placement into the single recognized species, C. michiganensis, but other analyses justify separate subspecies designations. Additionally, strains belonging to the genus Clavibacter isolated from pepper also represent a distinct population and warrant separate subspecies designation. On the basis of these data we propose subspecies designations for separate non-pathogenic subpopulations of Clavibacter michiganensis: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. californiensis subsp. nov. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. chilensis subsp. nov. for seed-associated strains represented by C55(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2691(T) = CFBP 8216(T)) and ZUM3936(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2690(T) = CFBP 8217(T

  4. Detection of Goss's Wilt Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis in Maize by Loop-Mediated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; de Silva, Asoka; Heuchelin, Scott A; Chaky, Jennifer L; Alvarez, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The Goss's wilt pathogen, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, can cause considerable losses in maize (Zea mays) production. Diagnosis of Goss's wilt currently is based on symptomology and identification of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, following isolation on a semiselective medium and/or serological testing. In an effort to provide a more efficient identification method, a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) assay was developed to detect the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP)-type C4-dicarboxylate transport system large permease component and tested using strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, all other C. michiganensis subspecies and several genera of nontarget bacteria. Only strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis reacted positively with the LAMP assay. The LAMP assay was then used to identify bacterial isolates from diseased maize. 16S rDNA and dnaA sequence analyses were used to confirm the identity of the maize isolates and validate assay specificity. The Cmm ImmunoStrip assay was included as a presumptive identification test of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis at the species level. The Cmn-LAMP assay was further tested using symptomatic leaf tissue. The Cmn-LAMP assay was run in a hand-held real-time monitoring device (SMART-DART) and performed equally to in-lab quantitative polymerase chain reaction equipment. The Cmn-LAMP assay accurately identified C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and has potential as a field test. The targeted sequence also has potential application in other molecular detection platforms. PMID:26595113

  5. Tomato fruit and seed colonization by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis through external and internal routes.

    PubMed

    Tancos, Matthew A; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Smart, Christine D

    2013-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, causal agent of bacterial wilt and canker of tomato, is an economically devastating pathogen that inflicts considerable damage throughout all major tomato-producing regions. Annual outbreaks continue to occur in New York, where C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis spreads via infected transplants, trellising stakes, tools, and/or soil. Globally, new outbreaks can be accompanied by the introduction of contaminated seed stock; however, the route of seed infection, especially the role of fruit lesions, remains undefined. In order to investigate the modes of seed infection, New York C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis field strains were stably transformed with a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). A constitutively eGFP-expressing virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate, GCMM-22, was used to demonstrate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis could not only access seeds systemically through the xylem but also externally through tomato fruit lesions, which harbored high intra- and intercellular populations. Active movement and expansion of bacteria into the fruit mesocarp and nearby xylem vessels followed, once the fruits began to ripen. These results highlight the ability of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to invade tomato fruits and seeds through multiple entry routes. PMID:24014525

  6. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization. PMID:16177367

  7. Decreased Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to Mosquito Larvae after Contact with Leaf Litter

    PubMed Central

    Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

  8. Pork Meat as a Potential Source of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kritas, Spyridon; Govaris, Alexander; Burriel, Angeliki R.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae was isolated from 13 of 123 slaughtered pigs in central Greece. The samples cultured were feces, ileum tissue, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gallbladder swabs. A total of 74 isolates from 492 samples were identified as Salmonella spp. by use of standard laboratory culture media and two commercial micromethods and by use of a polyvalent slide agglutination test for the detection of O and H antigens. Among them were 19 (25.68%) suspected to be S. enterica subsp. arizonae according to analysis with standard laboratory culture media. Of those, 14 were identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae by the API 20E (bioMérieux, France) and the Microgen GnA+B-ID (Microgen Bioproducts, Ltd., United Kingdom) identification systems. All the isolates were tested for resistance to 23 antimicrobials. Strains identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae were resistant to 17 (70.8%) antibiotics. The highest proportions of resistance were observed for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (71.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), ampicillin (64.3%), and amoxicillin (57.1%). Two isolates were resistant to aztreonam (7.1%) and tigecycline (7.1%), used only for the treatment of humans. Thus, pork meat may play a role in the transmission of antibiotic-resistant S. enterica subsp. arizonae to human consumers. This is the first report of S. enterica subsp. arizonae isolation from pigs. PMID:24335956

  9. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  10. Quick detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli by PCR and necleotide sequence analysis of PCR amplicons from Chinese Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quick polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx), the bacterial causal agent of ratoon stunting disease (RSD) of sugarcane, in crude juice samples from stalks. After removal of abiotic impurities and large molecular weight microorgani...

  11. Stability of the delta-endotoxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a recombinant strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J T; Lampel, J S; Stearman, R S; Sundin, G W; Gunyuzlu, P; Anderson, J J

    1991-01-01

    Deletion of chromosomally inserted gene sequences from Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis, a xylem-inhabiting endophyte, was studied in vitro and in planta. We found that nonreplicating plasmid pCG610, which conferred resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline and contained segments of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis genomic DNA, integrated into a homologous sequence in the bacterial chromosome. In addition, pCG610 contains two copies of the gene encoding the CryIA(c) insecticidal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73. Using drug resistance phenotypes and specific DNA probes, we found that the loss of all three genes arose both in vitro under nonselective conditions and in planta. The resulting segregants are probably formed by recombination between the repeated DNA sequences flanking pCG610 that resulted from the integration event into the chromosome. Eventually, segregants predominated in the bacterial population. The loss of the integrated plasmid from C. xyli subsp. cynodontis revealed a possible approach for decreasing the environmental consequences of recombinant bacteria for agricultural use. Images PMID:1664710

  12. Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov., a pigmented bacterium isolated from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and emended description of L. chromiireducens.

    PubMed

    Muir, Rachel E; Tan, Man-Wah

    2007-12-01

    A yellow-pigmented, Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, irregular rod-shaped bacterium (strain TAN 31504(T)) was isolated from the bacteriophagous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, DNA G+C content of 69.5 mol%, 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan, major menaquinone MK-11, abundance of anteiso- and iso-fatty acids, polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol and a number of shared biochemical characteristics, strain TAN 31504(T) was placed in the genus Leucobacter. DNA-DNA hybridization comparisons demonstrated a 91 % DNA-DNA relatedness between strain TAN 31504(T) and Leucobacter chromiireducens LMG 22506(T) indicating that these two strains belong to the same species, when the recommended threshold value of 70 % DNA-DNA relatedness for the definition of a bacterial species by the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics is considered. Based on distinct differences in morphology, physiology, chemotaxonomic markers and various biochemical characteristics, it is proposed to split the species L. chromiireducens into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. chromiireducens subsp. nov. (type strain L-1(T)=CIP 108389(T)=LMG 22506(T)) and Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov. (type strain TAN 31504(T)=DSM 18340(T)=ATCC BAA-1336(T)). PMID:18048723

  13. Compositions of essential oils and trichomes of Teucrium chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ayla; Demirci, Betül; Başer, K Hüsnü C

    2009-01-01

    Teucrium chamaedrys L. is a member of the Lamiaceae family and is represented in the Flora of Turkey by six subspecies. The aerial organs of T. chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil. bears numerous eglandular and glandular trichomes. Eglandular trichomes are simple, long-multicellular with cuticular micropapillae, and glandular hairs are of peltate and capitate types. The peltate hairs consist of a basal cell, a short unicellular stalk, and multicellular secretory head, and the capitate ones possess 1-2 stalk cells and one glandular head cell. The aerial parts were subjected to microdistillation for the isolation of volatiles. The analysis was simultaneously performed by using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components were characterized as beta-caryophyllene (18%), nonacosane (12%), germacrene D (11%), caryophyllene oxide (7%), and alpha-pinene (7%) for subsp. trapezunticum, and caryophyllene oxide (23%), alpha-pinene (11%), and caryophyllenol II (5%) for subsp. syspirense. PMID:19180459

  14. Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

  15. Quantification of the Sensitivity of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica to Low pH and High Organic Acids using Propidium Monoazide and Quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map) and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica (S. enterica) are two pathogens that are a concern to food and animal safety due to their ability to withstand harsh conditions encountered in the natural environment and within the host during pathogenesis. Acid...

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

  17. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  18. [Phenolic acid derivatives from Bauhinia glauca subsp. pernervosa].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao-Li; Wu, Zeng-Bao; Zheng, Zhi-Hui; Lu, Xin-Hua; Liang, Hong; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Qing-Ying; Zhao, Yu-Ying

    2011-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Bauhinia glauca subsp. pernervosa, eleven phenolic acids were isolated from a 95% ethanol extract by using a combination of various chromatographic techniques including column chromatography over silica gel, ODS, MCI, Sephadex LH-20, and semi-preparative HPLC. By spectroscopic techniques including 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 2D NMR, and HR-ESI-MS, these compounds were identified as isopropyl O-beta-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (1), ethyl O-beta-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (2), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-(6'-O-galloyl)-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), gallic acid (5), methyl gallate (6), ethyl gallate (7), protocatechuic acid (8), 3, 5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (9), erigeside C (10) and glucosyringic acid (11). Among them, compound 1 is a new polyhydroxyl compound; compounds 2, 10, and 11 were isolated from the genus Bauhinia for the first time, and the other compounds were isolated from the plant for the first time. Compounds 6 and 8 showed significant protein tyrosine phosphatase1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity in vitro with the IC50 values of 72.3 and 54.1 micromol x L(-1), respectively. PMID:22007520

  19. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Tae; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-07-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  20. Description of a novel adhesin of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  1. Enhancement of Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis BSA (L. lactis BSA) was isolated from a commercial fermented product (BSA Food Ingredients, Montreal, Canada) containing mixed bacteria that are used as starter for food fermentation. In order to increase the bacteriocin production by L. lactis BSA, different fermentation conditions were conducted. They included different volumetric combinations of two culture media (the Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth and skim milk), agitation level (0 and 100 rpm) and concentration of commercial nisin (0, 0.15, and 0.30 µg/ml) added into culture media as stimulant agent for nisin production. During fermentation, samples were collected and used for antibacterial evaluation against Lactobacillus sakei using agar diffusion assay. Results showed that medium containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk gave better antibacterial activity as compared to other medium formulations. Agitation (100 rpm) did not improve nisin production by L. lactis BSA. Adding 0.15 µg/ml of nisin into the medium-containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk caused the highest nisin activity of 18,820 AU/ml as compared to other medium formulations. This activity was 4 and ~3 times higher than medium containing 100 % MRS broth without added nisin (~4700 AU/ml) and 100 % MRS broth with 0.15 µg/ml of added nisin (~6650 AU/ml), respectively. PMID:27147536

  2. [Reactivating factor of Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei: isolation and characterization].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Rogozhin, E A; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Nikolaev, I V; Turova, T P

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a producer strain of reactivating factor (RF) is identical to a typical strain of Luteococcus japonicus DSM 10546 from the Propionibacteriaceae family according to the physiological and biochemical properties and the sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments. A number of phenotypical differences from the model strain allowed the producer strain to be considered a subspecies of Luteococcus japonicus, and it was named Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei. At cultivation of the producer, RF is secreted into the medium and plays the role of a signaling molecule. RF antioxidant activities towards various organic radicals may be a possible mechanism of its protective and reactivating effects. Metabolites secreted by the L. casei producer strain into the culture medium were separated by a combination of liquid chromatographies. Four components possessing biological activities were found. The most active one was studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, which revealed that it is a polypeptide. Primary identification of some amino acid residues was performed. Sugar residues were found in the structure. PMID:25842902

  3. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Wajima, Takeaki; Morozumi, Miyuki; Hanada, Shigeo; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Chiba, Naoko; Iwata, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We collected β-hemolytic streptococci (1,611 isolates) from patients with invasive streptococcal infections in Japan during April 2010–March 2013. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) was most common (n = 693); 99% of patients with SDSE infections were elderly (mean age 75 years, SD ±15 years). We aimed to clarify molecular and epidemiologic characteristics of SDSE isolates and features of patient infections. Bacteremia with no identified focus of origin and cellulitis were the most prevalent manifestations; otherwise, clinical manifestations resembled those of S. pyogenes infections. Clinical manifestations also differed by patient’s age. SDSE isolates were classified into 34 emm types; stG6792 was most prevalent (27.1%), followed by stG485 and stG245. Mortality rates did not differ according to emm types. Multilocus sequence typing identified 46 sequence types and 12 novel types. Types possessing macrolide- and quinolone-resistance genes were 18.4% and 2.6%, respectively; none showed β-lactam resistance. Among aging populations, invasive SDSE infections are an increasing risk. PMID:26760778

  4. Characterization of N-deoxyribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Masaki, Takeharu; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2007-10-01

    A nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase-homologous gene was detected by homological search in the genomic DNA of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The gene yejD is composed of 477 nucleotides encoding 159 amino acids with only 25% identity, which is low in comparison to the amino acid sequences of the N-deoxyribosyltransferases from other lactic acid bacteria, i.e. Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus helveticus. The residues responsible for catalytic and substrate-binding sites in known enzymes are conserved at Gln49, Asp73, Asp93 (or Asp95), and Glu101, respectively. The recombinant YejD expressed in Escherichia coli shows a 2-deoxyribosyl transfer activity to and from both bases of purine and pyrimidine, showing that YejD should be categorized as a class II N-deoxyribosyltransferase. Interestingly, the base-exchange activity as well as the heat stability of YejD was enhanced by the presence of monovalent cations such as K(+), NH(4)(+), and Rb(+), indicating that the Lactococcus enzyme is a K(+)-activated Type II enzyme. However, divalent cations including Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) significantly inhibit the activity. Whether or not the yejD gene product actually participates in the nucleoside salvage pathway of Lc. lactis remains unclear, but the lactic acid bacterium possesses the gene coding for the nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase activated by K(+) on its genome. PMID:17881307

  5. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  6. Description of a Novel Adhesin of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  7. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant. PMID:22475940

  8. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.

    PubMed

    Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (ΦXacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection. PMID:25180689

  9. THE ABILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS TO ENTER BOVINE EPITHELIAL CELLS IS INFLUENCED BY PREEXPOSURE TO A HYPEROSMOLAR ENVIRONMENT AND INTRACELLULAR PASSAGE IN BOVINE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the cause of Johne’s disease in cattle and other ruminants. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection of the bovine host is not well understood; however, it is assumed that crossing the bovine intestinal mucosa is important in order for M. avium subsp...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyuan; Meng, Yonghong; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis Strain DSM46306, a Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen of Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Zerillo, Marcelo Marques; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Kitajima, João Paulo

    2013-01-01

    We announce the complete genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis, a vascular pathogen of Bermuda grass. The species also comprises Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, a sugarcane pathogen. Since these two subspecies have genome sequences available, a comparative analysis will contribute to our understanding of the differences in their biology and host specificity. PMID:24201198

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  13. Xylella fastidiosa Isolates from Both subsp. multiplex and fastidiosa Cause Disease on Southern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) Under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J E; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2015-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited gram-negative plant pathogen that affects numerous crop species, including grape, citrus, peach, pecan, and almond. Recently, X. fastidiosa has also been found to be the cause of bacterial leaf scorch on blueberry in the southeastern United States. Thus far, all X. fastidiosa isolates obtained from infected blueberry have been classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; however, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates are also present in the southeastern United States and commonly cause Pierce's disease of grapevines. In this study, seven southeastern U.S. isolates of X. fastidiosa, including three X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates from grape, one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolate from elderberry, and three X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry, were used to infect the southern highbush blueberry 'Rebel'. Following inoculation, all isolates colonized blueberry, and isolates from both X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa caused symptoms, including characteristic stem yellowing and leaf scorch symptoms as well as dieback of the stem tips. Two X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry caused more severe symptoms than the other isolates examined, and infection with these two isolates also had a significant impact on host mineral nutrient content in sap and leaves. These findings have potential implications for understanding X. fastidiosa host adaptation and expansion and the development of emerging diseases caused by this bacterium. PMID:25738552

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Strain S31A1, Isolated from Equine Infectious Endometritis.

    PubMed

    da Piedade, Isabelle; Skive, Bolette; Christensen, Henrik; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus S31A1, a strain isolated from equine infectious endometritis in Denmark. Comparative analyses of this genome were done with four published reference genomes: S. zooepidemicus strains MGCS10565, ATCC 35246, and H70 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047. PMID:24009118

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Strain S31A1, Isolated from Equine Infectious Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Skive, Bolette; Christensen, Henrik; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus S31A1, a strain isolated from equine infectious endometritis in Denmark. Comparative analyses of this genome were done with four published reference genomes: S. zooepidemicus strains MGCS10565, ATCC 35246, and H70 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047. PMID:24009118

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Virulent Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strains F38 and ILRI181

    PubMed Central

    Liljander, Anne; Schieck, Elise; Gluecks, Ilona; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a severe epidemic affecting mainly domestic Caprinae species but also affects wild Caprinae species. M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae belongs to the “Mycoplasma mycoides cluster.” The disease features prominently in East Africa, in particular Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. CCPP also endangers wildlife and thus affects not only basic nutritional resources of large populations but also expensively built-up game resorts in affected countries. Here, we report the complete sequences of two M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains: the type strain F38 and strain ILRI181 isolated druing a recent outbreak in Kenya. Both genomes have a G+C content of 24% with sizes of 1,016,760 bp and 1,017,183 bp for strains F38 and ILRI181, respectively. PMID:25323717

  17. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  18. Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductases C and D Are Major Antigens Constitutively Expressed by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Reitan, Liv J.; Holstad, Gudmund; Wiker, Harald G.

    2000-01-01

    Antigens characteristic for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and by absorbing out cross-reactive antigens by using a polyclonal and polyvalent Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium antiserum. Two antigens were present in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and not detected in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. They were identified as antigens 17 and 20 in a CIE reference system for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens. Purified antigen 20 was identified as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) while the N-terminal part of purified antigen 17 showed 80% homology with alkyl hydroperoxide reductase D (AhpD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AhpC had a nonreduced mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to a molecular mass of 45 kDa and is probably a homodimer linked with disulfide bridges in its native form. AhpD had a mobility corresponding to 19 kDa. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against AhpC and AhpD reacted with 9 strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but not with 20 other mycobacterial strains except for a Mycobacterium gordonae strain, against which a weak cross-reactive band was produced. Goats experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had strong gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses toward both AhpC and AhpD, and they also had antibodies against AhpC. The ability of AhpC and AhpD to induce IFN-γ production shows that these proteins potentially could be used in future vaccines or in diagnostic assays. These results further show that AhpC and AhpD are immunologically important proteins which are constitutively and highly expressed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis without the bacteria being submitted to oxidative stress and that the specificities of antigens can be a matter of different levels of protein expression in various species as well as distinct structural differences. PMID:10639449

  19. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Radosevich, Thomas J.; Stabel, Judith R.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Kapur, Vivek; Paustian, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne's disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced from BALB/c mice immunized with a whole-cell extract of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A total of 10 hybridomas producing MAbs to proteins ranging from 25 to 85 kDa were obtained. All MAbs showed some degree of cross-reactivity when they were analyzed against a panel of whole-cell protein lysates comprising seven different mycobacterial species. The MAbs were characterized by several methods, which included isotype analysis, specificity analysis, epitope analysis, reactivity in immunoblot assays, and electron microscopy. The identities of the antigens that bound to two selected MAbs were determined by screening an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis lambda phage expression library. This approach revealed that MAb 9G10 detects MAP1643 (isocitrate lyase) and that MAb 11G4 detects MAP3840 (a 70-kDa heat shock protein), two proteins present in high relative abundance in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The epitopes for MAb 11G4 were mapped to the N-terminal half of MAP3840, whereas MAb 9G10 bound to the C-terminal half of MAP1643. Aptamers, nucleic acids that bind to specific protein sequences, against the hypothetical protein encoded by MAP0105c were also generated and tested for their binding to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis as well as other mycobacteria. These detection reagents may be beneficial in many JD research applications. PMID:17344350

  20. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  1. Characterization of Free Exopolysaccharides Secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Tardy, Florence; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS), also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical β(1−>6)-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan) and associated with an

  2. Characterization of the Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida type IV pilus.

    PubMed

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Chakraborty, Subhra; Liu, Jirong; Thanassi, David G; Klose, Karl E

    2008-07-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularaemia. Type IV pili (Tfp) genes are present in the genomes of all F. tularensis subspecies. We show that the wild-type F. tularensis subsp. novicida expresses pilus fibres on its surface, and mutations in the Tfp genes pilF and pilT disrupt pilus biogenesis. Mutations in other Tfp genes (pilQ and pilG) do not eliminate pilus expression. A mutation in pilE4 eliminates pilus expression, whereas mutations in the other pilin subunits pilE1-3 and pilE5 do not, suggesting that pilE4 is the major pilus structural subunit. The virulence regulator MglA is required for pilus expression, and it regulates the transcription of a putative Tfp glycosylation gene (FTN0431). However, MglA does not regulate transcription of pilF, pilT or pilE4, and a strain lacking FTN0431 still expresses pili; thus, it is unclear how MglA regulates pilus expression. Only pilF was also required for protein secretion, while pilE4 and pilT were not, indicating that there is very little overlap of the protein secretion/Tfp functions of the pil genes. The protein secretion component pilE1 was more important for in vitro intramacrophage growth and mouse virulence than the Tfp component pilE4. Our results provide the first genetic characterization of the novel Tfp system of F. tularensis. PMID:18599841

  3. Reproductive biology of the andromonoecious Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kouonon, Leonie C.; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Zoro Bi, Arsene I.; Bertin, Pierre; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Dje, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae) is cultivated in many African regions for its edible kernels used as a soup thickener. The plant, an annual, andromonoecious, trailing-vine species, is of high social, cultural and economic value for local communities. In order to improve the yield of this crop, the first step and our aim were to elucidate its breeding system. Methods Eight experimental pollination treatments were performed during three growing seasons to assess spontaneous selfing, self-compatibility and effects of pollen source (hermaphroditic vs. male flowers). Pollination success was determined by pollen tube growth and reproductive success was assessed by fruit, seed and seedling numbers and characteristics. The pollinator guild was surveyed and the pollination distance determined both by direct observations and by indirect fluorescent dye dispersal. Key Results The species is probably pollinated by several Hymenoptera, principally by Hypotrigona para. Pollinator flight distances varied from 25 to 69 cm. No evidence for apomixis or spontaneous self-pollination in the absence of insect visitors was found. The self-fertility index (SFI = 0) indicated a total dependence on pollinators for reproductive success. The effects of hand pollination on fruit set, seed number and seedling fitness differed among years. Pollen tube growth and reproductive success did not differ between self- and cross-pollinations. Accordingly, a high self-compatibility index for the fruit set (SCI = 1·00) and the seed number (SCI = 0·98) and a low inbreeding depression at all developmental stages (cumulative δ = 0·126) suggest a high selfing ability. Finally, pollen origin had no effect on fruit and seed sets. Conclusions This andromonoecious species has the potential for a mixed mating system with high dependence on insect-mediated pollination. The selfing rate through geitonogamy should be important. PMID:19671577

  4. Isofuranodiene is the main volatile constituent of Smyrnium perfoliatum L. subsp. perfoliatum growing in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Papa, Fabrizio; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Cianfaglione, Kevin; Maggi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil hydrodistilled from the aerial parts of Smyrnium perfoliatum subsp. perfoliatum growing in central Italy was analysed by GC-MS. The main peak in the gas chromatogram was given by the furanosesquiterpene curzerene which is the Cope rearrangement product of isofuranodiene formed into injector and column during the gas chromatographic run. A truthful quantification of these compounds was achieved by HPLC-DAD analysis which showed that isofuranodiene is the main volatile component (180.0 mg/g eo) of S. perfoliatum subsp. perfoliatum, while curzerene occurs in small amounts (18.1 mg/g eo). PMID:26134598

  5. Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils of Different Parts of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. excelsa and J. excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan (Cupressaceae).

    PubMed

    Emami, Sayyed Ahmad; Abedindo, Bibi Fatemeh; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The essential oils of branchlets and fruits of Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa and Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos were examined for their antioxidant activity. The compositions of the essential oils were studied by GC and GC-MS. To evaluation the antioxidants activity of the volatile oils, pure components and positive controls at different concentrations, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) screening methods, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, deoxyribose degradation test and modified deoxyribose degradation test were employed. The results of the present study demonstrate some antioxidant activity for the tested essential oils obtained from various parts of both plants. It indicates that the use of these essential oils, in very low concentrations, may be useful as a natural preservative. However before any final conclusion, it is suggested that the antioxidant activity of these oils should also be evaluated by using lipid solvent system methods. PMID:24250416

  6. Peyer's Patch-Deficient Mice Demonstrate That Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Translocates across the Mucosal Barrier via both M Cells and Enterocytes but Has Inefficient Dissemination ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Luiz E.; Petrofsky, Mary; Sommer, Sandra; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the agent of Johne's disease, infects ruminant hosts by translocation through the intestinal mucosa. A number of studies have suggested that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with M cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. The invasion of the intestinal mucosa by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, a pathogen known to interact with intestinal cells, was compared. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was capable of invading the mucosa, but it was significantly less efficient at dissemination than M. avium subsp. hominissuis. B-cell knockout (KO) mice, which lack Peyer's patches, were used to demonstrate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis enters the intestinal mucosa through enterocytes in the absence of M cells. In addition, the results indicated that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had equal abilities to cross the mucosa in both Peyer's patch and non-Peyer's patch segments of normal mice. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was also shown to interact with epithelial cells by an α5β1 integrin-independent pathway. Upon translocation, dendritic cells ingest M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but this process does not lead to efficient dissemination of the infection. In summary, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with the intestinal mucosa by crossing both Peyer's patches and non-Peyer's patch areas but does not translocate or disseminate efficiently. PMID:20498259

  7. Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov., and reclassification of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440T as later synonym of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 8062 T.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Spröer, Cathrin; Beck, Brian; Bagley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Isolate RS1(T) isolated from used metalworking fluid was found to be a Gram-negative, motile, and non-spore forming rod. Based on phylogenetic analyses with 16S rRNA, isolate RS1(T) was placed into the mendocina sublineage of Pseudomonas. The major whole cell fatty acids were C(18:1)omega7c (32.6%), C(16:0) (25.5%), and C(15:0) ISO 2OH/C(16:1)omega7c (14.4%). The sequence similarities of isolate RS1(T) based on gyrB and rpoD genes were 98.9 and 98.0% with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and 98.5 and 98.1% with Pseudomonas oleovorans, respectively. The ribotyping pattern showed a 0.60 similarity with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 0.63 with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC17440(T). The DNA G + C content of isolate RS1(T) was 62.2 mol.%. The DNA-DNA relatedness was 73.0% with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 79.1% with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical, and molecular studies, isolate RS1(T) is considered to represent a new subspecies of P. oleovorans. Furthermore, based on the DNA-DNA relatedness (>70%), chemotaxonomic, and molecular profile, P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T) and P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) should be united under the same name; according to the rules of priority, P. oleovorans, the first described species, is the earlier synonym and P. pseudoalcaligenes is the later synonym. As a consequence, the division of the species P. oleovorans into two novel subspecies is proposed: P. oleovorans subsp. oleovorans subsp. nov. (type strain ATCC 8062(T) = DSM 1045(T) = NCIB 6576(T)), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov. (type strain RS1(T) = ATCC BAA-1494(T) = DSM 21016(T)). PMID:19936829

  8. Bioprocessing of some agro-industrial residues for endoglucanase production by the new subsp.; Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Abdelwahed, Nayera A.M.; Saber, Wesam I.A.; Mohamed, Asem A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of low cost agro-industrial residues for the production of industrial enzymes is one of the ways to reduce significantly production costs. Cellulase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil and decayed agricultural wastes. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-J, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties, together with 16S rDNA sequence. It is proposed that strain NEAE-J should be included in the species Streptomyces albogriseolus as a representative of a novel sub-species, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J and sequencing product was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number JN229412. This organism was tested for its ability to produce endoglucanase and release reducing sugars from agro-industrial residues as substrates. Sugarcane bagasse was the most suitable substrate for endoglucanase production. Effects of process variables, namely incubation time, temperature, initial pH and nitrogen source on production of endoglucanase by submerged fermentation using Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus have been studied. Accordingly optimum conditions have been determined. Incubation temperature of 30 °C after 6 days, pH of 6.5, 1% sugarcane bagasse as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source were found to be the optimum for endoglucanase production. Optimization of the process parameters resulted in about 2.6 fold increase in the endoglucanase activity. Therefore, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus coud be potential microorganism for the intended application. PMID:25242966

  9. Morphological, chemical and genetic differentiation of two subspecies of Cistus creticus L. (C. creticus subsp. eriocephalus and C. creticus subsp. corsicus).

    PubMed

    Paolini, Julien; Falchi, Alessandra; Quilichini, Yann; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Cian, Marie-Cecile De; Varesi, Laurent; Costa, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Cistus creticus L., an aromatic species from the Mediterranean area, contains various diterpenes bearing the labdane skeleton. The production of essential oil from this species has potential economic value, but so far, it has not been optimized. In order to contribute to a better knowledge of this species and to its differentiation, the morphological characters, volatile chemical composition and genetic data of two subspecies (C. creticus subsp. eriocephalus and C. creticus subsp. corsicus) were investigated. The leaf trichomes were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of Corsican essential oil (C. creticus subsp. corsicus) has been reported using GC, GC/MS and 13C NMR; the main constituents were oxygenated labdane diterpenes (33.9%) such as 13-epi-manoyl oxide (18.5%). Using plant material (54 samples) collected from 18 geographically distinct areas of the islands of Corsica and Sardinia, the basis of variation in the headspace solid-phase microextraction volatile fraction and an inter-simple sequence repeat genetic analysis were also examined. It was shown that the two subspecies of C. creticus differed in morphology, essential oil production, volatile fraction composition and genetic data. PMID:19660770

  10. Foliar application of biofilm formation-inhibiting compounds enhances control of citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2014-02-01

    Citrus canker caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is an economically important disease of citrus worldwide. Biofilm formation plays an important role in early infection of X. citri subsp. citri on host leaves. In this study, we assessed the hypothesis that small molecules inhibiting biofilm formation reduce X. citri subsp. citri infection and enhance the control of citrus canker disease. D-leucine and 3-indolylacetonitrile (IAN) were found to prevent biofilm formation by X. citri subsp. citri on different abiotic surfaces and host leaves at a concentration lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that IAN repressed expression of chemotaxis/motility-related genes in X. citri subsp. citri. In laboratory experiments, planktonic and biofilm cells of X. citri subsp. citri treated with D-leucine and IAN, either alone or in combination, were more susceptible to copper (CuSO4) than those untreated. In greenhouse assays, D-leucine and IAN applied alone or combined with copper reduced both the number of canker lesions and bacterial populations of X. citri subsp. citri on citrus host leaves. This study provides the basis for the use of foliar-applied biofilm inhibitors for the control of citrus canker alone or combined with copper-based bactericides. PMID:23901828