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Sample records for mesoderm

  1. Efficient ectopic gene expression targeting chick mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kerby C; Pira, Charmaine U; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Ratz, Beate; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Eichele, Gregor

    2002-07-01

    The chick model has been instrumental in illuminating genes that regulate early vertebrate development and pattern formation. Targeted ectopic gene expression is critical to dissect further the complicated gene interactions that are involved. In an effort to develop a consistent method to ectopically introduce and focally express genes in chick mesoderm, we evaluated and optimized several gene delivery methods, including implantation of 293 cells laden with viral vectors, direct adenoviral injection, and electroporation (EP). We targeted the mesoderm of chick wing buds between stages 19 and 21 (Hamburger and Hamilton stages) and used beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to document gene transfer. Expression constructs using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, the beta-actin promoter, and vectors with an internal ribosomal entry sequence linked to GFP (IRES-GFP) were also compared. After gene transfer, we monitored expression for up to 3 days. The functionality of ectopic expression was demonstrated with constructs containing the coding sequences for Shh, a secreted signaling protein, or Hoxb-8, a transcription factor, both of which can induce digit duplication when ectopically expressed in anterior limb mesoderm. We identified several factors that enhance mesodermal gene transfer. First, the use of a vector with the beta-actin promoter coupled to the 69% fragment of the bovine papilloma virus yielded superior mesodermal expression both by markers and functional results when compared with several CMV-driven vectors. Second, we found the use of mineral oil to be an important adjuvant for EP and direct viral injection to localize and contain vector within the mesoderm at the injection site. Lastly, although ectopic expression could be achieved with all three methods, we favored EP confined to the mesoderm with insulated microelectrodes (confined microelectroporation- CMEP), because vector construction is rapid, the method is efficient, and results

  2. Evolutionary conservation of early mesoderm specification by mechanotransduction in Bilateria

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Bouclet, Adrien; Ahmadi, Padra; Mitrossilis, Démosthène; Driquez, Benjamin; Brunet, Anne-Christine; Henry, Laurent; Serman, Fanny; Béalle, Gaëlle; Ménager, Christine; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Yanicostas, Constantin; Le-Roy, Damien; Dempsey, Nora M.; Plessis, Anne; Farge, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The modulation of developmental biochemical pathways by mechanical cues is an emerging feature of animal development, but its evolutionary origins have not been explored. Here we show that a common mechanosensitive pathway involving β-catenin specifies early mesodermal identity at gastrulation in zebrafish and Drosophila. Mechanical strains developed by zebrafish epiboly and Drosophila mesoderm invagination trigger the phosphorylation of β-catenin–tyrosine-667. This leads to the release of β-catenin into the cytoplasm and nucleus, where it triggers and maintains, respectively, the expression of zebrafish brachyury orthologue notail and of Drosophila Twist, both crucial transcription factors for early mesoderm identity. The role of the β-catenin mechanosensitive pathway in mesoderm identity has been conserved over the large evolutionary distance separating zebrafish and Drosophila. This suggests mesoderm mechanical induction dating back to at least the last bilaterian common ancestor more than 570 million years ago, the period during which mesoderm is thought to have emerged. PMID:24281726

  3. The origin of mesoderm in phoronids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Gary; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2002-01-01

    Descriptive studies of phoronid development have concluded that the mesoderm of these animals originates from the endoderm during gastrulation. This interpretation has been tested by labeling one blastomere of 4- through 16-cell embryos and examining the position and germ layers occupied by the labeled clones of cells in the larva. No 2 injections gave rise to identical clones of cells, suggesting that the cleavage program does not generate cells of unique identity and that cell fates are established at later developmental time points. In many cases, a relatively large sector composed of ectodermal cells was labeled. When these labeled cells were adjacent to the mouth or anus of the larva, muscle and mesenchyme cells originated from the labeled clones. Under these circumstances, nerve cells also originated from these labeled sectors. These labeling studies also showed that endodermal cells can give rise to mesodermal and neural cells. These results suggest that nerve and muscle cells are induced to form at ectodermal-endodermal boundaries from both germ layers. These marking experiments also confirmed the observation that nerve cells originate both from the apical organ and the trunk region and show for the first time that the intestine originates by ingression of posterior ectoderm.

  4. Mesoderm layer formation in Xenopus and Drosophila gastrulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklbauer, Rudolf; Müller, H.-Arno J.

    2011-08-01

    During gastrulation, the mesoderm spreads out between ectoderm and endoderm to form a mesenchymal cell layer. Surprisingly the underlying principles of mesoderm layer formation are very similar in evolutionarily distant species like the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the frog, Xenopus laevis, in which the molecular and the cellular basis of mesoderm layer formation have been extensively studied. Complementary expression of growth factors in the ectoderm and their receptors in the mesoderm act to orient cellular protrusive activities and direct cell movement, leading to radial cell intercalation and the spreading of the mesoderm layer. This mechanism is contrasted with generic physical mechanisms of tissue spreading that consider the adhesive and physical properties of the cells and tissues. Both mechanisms need to be integrated to orchestrate mesenchymal morphogenesis.

  5. Hedgehog signaling patterns mesoderm in the sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Katherine D.; Warner, Jacob; Hertzler, Philip H.; McClay, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is essential for patterning many structures in vertebrates including the nervous system, chordamesoderm, limb and endodermal organs. In the sea urchin, a basal deuterostome, Hh signaling is shown to participate in organizing the mesoderm. At gastrulation the Hh ligand is expressed by the endoderm downstream of the Brachyury and FoxA transcription factors in the endomesoderm gene regulatory network. The co-receptors Patched (Ptc) and Smoothened (Smo) are expressed by the neighboring skeletogenic and non-skeletogenic mesoderm. Perturbations of Hh, Ptc and Smo cause embryos to develop with skeletal defects and inappropriate non-skeletogenic mesoderm patterning, although initial specification of mesoderm occurs without detectable abnormalities. Perturbations of the pathway caused late defects in skeletogenesis and in the non-skeletogenic mesoderm, including altered numbers of pigment and blastocoelar cells, randomized left-right asymmetry of coelomic pouches, and disorganized circumesophageal muscle causing an inability to swallow. Together the data support the requirement of Hh signaling in patterning each of the mesoderm subtypes in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:19393640

  6. Genetic Tagging During Human Mesoderm Differentiation Reveals Tripotent Lateral Plate Mesodermal Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Jia; Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Evseenko, Denis; Zhu, Yuhua; He, Chong Bin; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M

    2016-05-01

    Although clonal studies of lineage potential have been extensively applied to organ specific stem and progenitor cells, much less is known about the clonal origins of lineages formed from the germ layers in early embryogenesis. We applied lentiviral tagging followed by vector integration site analysis (VISA) with high-throughput sequencing to investigate the ontogeny of the hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal lineages as they emerge from human embryonic mesoderm. In contrast to studies that have used VISA to track differentiation of self-renewing stem cell clones that amplify significantly over time, we focused on a population of progenitor clones with limited self-renewal capability. Our analyses uncovered the critical influence of sampling on the interpretation of lentiviral tag sharing, particularly among complex populations with minimal clonal duplication. By applying a quantitative framework to estimate the degree of undersampling we revealed the existence of tripotent mesodermal progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells, and the subsequent bifurcation of their differentiation into bipotent endothelial/hematopoietic or endothelial/mesenchymal progenitors. Stem Cells 2016;34:1239-1250. PMID:26934332

  7. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also required to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.

  8. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also requiredmore » to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.« less

  9. Mesodermal expression of Moz is necessary for cardiac septum development.

    PubMed

    Vanyai, Hannah K; Thomas, Tim; Voss, Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Ventricular septal defects (VSDs) are the most commonly occurring congenital heart defect. They are regularly associated with complex syndromes, including DiGeorge syndrome and Holt-Oram syndrome, which are characterised by haploinsufficiency for the T-box transcription factors TBX1 and TBX5, respectively. The histone acetyltransferase monocytic leukaemia zinc finger protein, MOZ (MYST3/KAT6A), is required for the expression of the Tbx1 and Tbx5 genes. Homozygous loss of MOZ results in DiGeorge syndrome-like defects including VSD. The Moz gene is expressed in the ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal aspects of the developing pharyngeal apparatus and heart; however it is unclear in which of these tissues MOZ is required for heart development. The role of MOZ in the activation of Tbx1 would suggest a requirement for MOZ in the mesoderm, because deletion of Tbx1 in the mesoderm causes VSDs. Here, we investigated the tissue-specific requirements for MOZ in the mesoderm. We demonstrate that Mesp1-cre-mediated deletion of Moz results in high penetrance of VSDs and overriding aorta and a significant decrease in MOZ-dependant Tbx1 and Tbx5 expression. Together, our data suggest that the molecular pathogenesis of VSDs in Moz germline mutant mice is due to loss of MOZ-dependant activation of mesodermal Tbx1 and Tbx5 expression. PMID:25912687

  10. Mesoderm, Cooked Up Fast and Served to Order.

    PubMed

    Kyba, Michael

    2016-08-01

    New sequencing technologies have made it possible to interrogate with unprecedented depth the intrinsic changes experienced by cells as they transit the arena of development. Recently in Cell, Loh, Chen, and colleagues investigated early lineage-restricted human mesoderm cell types and their precursors going back to pluripotency (Loh et al., 2016). PMID:27494669

  11. Gut endoderm takes flight from the wings of mesoderm.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Angela C H; Rossant, Janet

    2014-12-01

    The endoderm layer destined to be primitive gut is a mosaic of earlier visceral endoderm and definitive endoderm that arises later, during gastrulation. Live imaging now reveals that in mouse embryos, definitive endoderm cells egress from underlying mesoderm and intercalate into the overlying cell layer. This process requires SOX17-mediated control of basement membrane organization. PMID:25434463

  12. Trunk exoskeleton in teleosts is mesodermal in origin

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kaneko, Takuya; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Yano, Tohru; Inohaya, Keiji; Kinoshita, Masato; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate mineralized skeleton is known to have first emerged as an exoskeleton that extensively covered the fossil jawless fish. The evolutionary origin of this exoskeleton has long been attributed to the emergence of the neural crest, but experimental evaluation for this is still poor. Here we determine the embryonic origin of scales and fin rays of medaka (teleost trunk exoskeletons) by applying long-term cell labelling methods, and demonstrate that both tissues are mesodermal in origin. Neural crest cells, however, fail to contribute to these tissues. This result suggests that the trunk neural crest has no skeletogenic capability in fish, instead highlighting the dominant role of the mesoderm in the evolution of the trunk skeleton. This further implies that the role of the neural crest in skeletogenesis has been predominant in the cephalic region from the early stage of vertebrate evolution. PMID:23535660

  13. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  14. Mesoderm patterning and morphogenesis in the polychaete Alitta virens (Spiralia, Annelida): Expression of mesodermal markers Twist, Mox, Evx and functional role for MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Vitaly V; Filimonova, Daria A; Kupriashova, Ekaterina E; Kostyuchenko, Roman P

    2016-05-01

    Mesoderm represents the evolutionary youngest germ layer and forms numerous novel tissues in bilaterian animals. Despite the established conservation of the gene regulatory networks that drive mesoderm differentiation (e.g. myogenesis), mechanisms of mesoderm specification are highly variable in distant model species. Thus, broader phylogenetic sampling is required to reveal common features of mesoderm formation across bilaterians. Here we focus on a representative of Spiralia, the marine annelid Alitta virens, whose mesoderm development is still poorly investigated on the molecular level. We characterize three novel early mesodermal markers for A. virens - Twist, Mox, and Evx - which are differentially expressed within the mesodermal lineages. The Twist mRNA is ubiquitously distributed in the fertilized egg and exhibits specific expression in endomesodermal- and ectomesodermal-founder cells at gastrulation. Twist is expressed around the blastopore and later in a segmental metameric pattern. We consider this expression to be ancestral, and in support of the enterocoelic hypothesis of mesoderm evolution. We also revealed an early pattern of the MAPK activation in A. virens that is different from the previously reported pattern in spiralians. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway by U0126 disrupts the metameric Twist and Mox expression, indicating an early requirement of the MAPK cascade for proper morphogenesis of endomesodermal tissues. PMID:27000638

  15. Heterogeneity of Mesp1+ mesoderm revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Chan, Howe H W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Mesp1 is a transcription factor that promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into different mesoderm lineages including hematopoietic, cardiac and skeletal myogenic. This occurs via at least two transient cell populations: a common hematopoietic/cardiac progenitor population and a common cardiac/skeletal myogenic progenitor population. It is not established whether Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells are intrinsically heterogeneous, or are simply capable of multiple lineage decisions. In the current study, we applied single-cell RNA-seq to analyze Mesp1+ mesoderm. Initial whole transcriptome analysis showed a surprising homogeneity among Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells. However, this apparent global homogeneity masked an intrinsic heterogeneity revealed by interrogating a panel of early mesoderm patterning factors. This approach enabled discovery of subpopulations primed for hematopoietic or cardiac development. These studies demonstrate the heterogeneic nature of Mesp1+ mesoderm. PMID:27131741

  16. The role of FGF signaling in establishment and maintenance of mesodermal gene expression in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Russell B.; Harland, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    FGF signaling is important for the formation of mesoderm in vertebrates, and when it is perturbed in Xenopus, most trunk and tail mesoderm fails to form. Here we have further dissected the activities of FGF in patterning the embryo by addressing its inductive and maintenance roles. We show that FGF signaling is necessary for the establishment of xbra expression in addition to its well-characterized role in maintaining xbra expression. The role of FGF signaling in organizer formation is not clear in Xenopus. We find that FGF signaling is essential for the initial specification of paraxial mesoderm but not for activation of several pan-mesodermal and most organizer genes; however, early FGF signaling is necessary for the maintenance of organizer gene expression into the neurula stage. Inhibition of FGF signaling prevents VegT activation of specific mesodermal transcripts. These findings illuminate how FGF signaling contributes to the establishment of distinct types of mesoderm. PMID:18386826

  17. Factors that coordinate mesoderm specification from neuromesodermal progenitors with segmentation during vertebrate axial extension.

    PubMed

    Martin, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the vertebrate body depends on the precise timing and coordination of molecular and morphological events. During vertebrate embryogenesis, the paraxial mesoderm is segmented into structures called somites in a progressive fashion from the anterior to the posterior at the same time as the entire body axis elongates in the posterior direction. Evidence from several vertebrate species indicates that new paraxial mesoderm is continuously induced from neuromesodermal progenitors at the posterior-most end of the embryo. The newly forming mesoderm exists in a specialized environment called the mesodermal progenitor niche. This review will discuss how the progenitor niche coordinates the continuous addition of new mesoderm to the body axis with proper segmentation of this mesoderm upon exit from the niche. I will focus on evidence that the t-box transcription factor Brachyury and its downstream transcriptional targets serve as the primary factors coordinating mesoderm specification with somitogenesis. I will end with a discussion of recent exciting work regarding the cell-cycle and migratory behavior of mesodermal cells as they exit the progenitor niche, which may serve to further integrate new mesoderm production with proper segmentation. PMID:26658097

  18. Resolving early mesoderm diversification through single-cell expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Scialdone, Antonio; Tanaka, Yosuke; Jawaid, Wajid; Moignard, Victoria; Wilson, Nicola K; Macaulay, Iain C; Marioni, John C; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-07-14

    In mammals, specification of the three major germ layers occurs during gastrulation, when cells ingressing through the primitive streak differentiate into the precursor cells of major organ systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear, as numbers of gastrulating cells are very limited. In the mouse embryo at embryonic day 6.5, cells located at the junction between the extra-embryonic region and the epiblast on the posterior side of the embryo undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and ingress through the primitive streak. Subsequently, cells migrate, either surrounding the prospective ectoderm contributing to the embryo proper, or into the extra-embryonic region to form the yolk sac, umbilical cord and placenta. Fate mapping has shown that mature tissues such as blood and heart originate from specific regions of the pre-gastrula epiblast, but the plasticity of cells within the embryo and the function of key cell-type-specific transcription factors remain unclear. Here we analyse 1,205 cells from the epiblast and nascent Flk1(+) mesoderm of gastrulating mouse embryos using single-cell RNA sequencing, representing the first transcriptome-wide in vivo view of early mesoderm formation during mammalian gastrulation. Additionally, using knockout mice, we study the function of Tal1, a key haematopoietic transcription factor, and demonstrate, contrary to previous studies performed using retrospective assays, that Tal1 knockout does not immediately bias precursor cells towards a cardiac fate. PMID:27383781

  19. Case report of a 22-week fetus with 47,XXX karyotype and multiple lower mesodermal defects.

    PubMed

    Hoang, M P; Wilson, K S; Schneider, N R; Timmons, C F

    1999-01-01

    A 22-week stillborn fetus with 47,XXX karyotype had lower mesodermal defects consisting of irregular fusion of the sacral vertebrae, anal agenesis, multicystic dysplasia of a horseshoe kidney, a single umbilical artery, dysplastic ovaries, and uterine hypoplasia. This case provides additional evidence for an association between trisomy X and genitourinary defects including lower mesodermal defects sequence. PMID:9841707

  20. Expression of the prospective mesoderm genes twist, snail, and mef2 in penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiankai; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Sellars, Melony J; Xiang, Jianhai; Hertzler, Philip L

    2016-07-01

    In penaeid shrimp, mesoderm forms from two sources: naupliar mesoderm founder cells, which invaginate during gastrulation, and posterior mesodermal stem cells called mesoteloblasts, which undergo characteristic teloblastic divisions. The primordial mesoteloblast descends from the ventral mesendoblast, which arrests in cell division at the 32-cell stage and ingresses with its sister dorsal mesendoblast prior to naupliar mesoderm invagination. The naupliar mesoderm forms the muscles of the naupliar appendages (first and second antennae and mandibles), while the mesoteloblasts form the mesoderm, including the muscles, of subsequently formed posterior segments. To better understand the mechanism of mesoderm and muscle formation in penaeid shrimp, twist, snail, and mef2 cDNAs were identified from transcriptomes of Penaeus vannamei, P. japonicus, P. chinensis, and P. monodon. A single Twist ortholog was found, with strong inferred amino acid conservation across all three species. Multiple Snail protein variants were detected, which clustered in a phylogenetic tree with other decapod crustacean Snail sequences. Two closely-related mef2 variants were found in P. vannamei. The developmental mRNA expression of these genes was studied by qPCR in P. vannamei embryos, larvae, and postlarvae. Expression of Pv-twist and Pv-snail began during the limb bud stage and continued through larval stages to the postlarva. Surprisingly, Pv-mef2 expression was found in all stages from the zygote to the postlarva, with the highest expression in the limb bud and protozoeal stages. The results add comparative data on the development of anterior and posterior mesoderm in malacostracan crustaceans, and should stimulate further studies on mesoderm and muscle development in penaeid shrimp. PMID:27129985

  1. Wnt signaling and tbx16 form a bistable switch to commit bipotential progenitors to mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Bouldin, Cortney M.; Manning, Alyssa J.; Peng, Yu-Hsuan; Farr, Gist H.; Hung, King L.; Dong, Alice; Kimelman, David

    2015-01-01

    Anterior to posterior growth of the vertebrate body is fueled by a posteriorly located population of bipotential neuro-mesodermal progenitor cells. These progenitors have a limited rate of proliferation and their maintenance is crucial for completion of the anterior-posterior axis. How they leave the progenitor state and commit to differentiation is largely unknown, in part because widespread modulation of factors essential for this process causes organism-wide effects. Using a novel assay, we show that zebrafish Tbx16 (Spadetail) is capable of advancing mesodermal differentiation cell-autonomously. Tbx16 locks cells into the mesodermal state by not only activating downstream mesodermal genes, but also by repressing bipotential progenitor genes, in part through a direct repression of sox2. We demonstrate that tbx16 is activated as cells move from an intermediate Wnt environment to a high Wnt environment, and show that Wnt signaling activates the tbx16 promoter. Importantly, high-level Wnt signaling is able to accelerate mesodermal differentiation cell-autonomously, just as we observe with Tbx16. Finally, because our assay for mesodermal commitment is quantitative we are able to show that the acceleration of mesodermal differentiation is surprisingly incomplete, implicating a potential separation of cell movement and differentiation during this process. Together, our data suggest a model in which high levels of Wnt signaling induce a transition to mesoderm by directly activating tbx16, which in turn acts to irreversibly flip a bistable switch, leading to maintenance of the mesodermal fate and repression of the bipotential progenitor state, even as cells leave the initial high-Wnt environment. PMID:26062939

  2. The distribution of Dishevelled in convergently extending mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Panousopoulou, Eleni; Tyson, Richard A; Bretschneider, Till; Green, Jeremy B A

    2013-10-15

    Convergent extension (CE) is a conserved morphogenetic movement that drives axial lengthening of the primary body axis and depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. In Drosophila epithelia, a polarised subcellular accumulation of PCP core components, such as Dishevelled (Dvl) protein, is associated with PCP function. Dvl has long been thought to accumulate in the mediolateral protrusions in Xenopus chordamesoderm cells undergoing CE. Here we present a quantitative analysis of Dvl intracellular localisation in Xenopus chordamesoderm cells. We find that, surprisingly, accumulations previously observed at mediolateral protrusions of chordamesodermal cells are not protrusion-specific but reflect yolk-free cytoplasm and are quantitatively matched by the distribution of the cytoplasm-filling lineage marker dextran. However, separating cell cortex-associated from bulk Dvl signal reveals a statistical enrichment of Dvl in notochord-somite boundary-(NSB)-directed protrusions, which is dependent upon NSB proximity. Dvl puncta were also observed, but only upon elevated overexpression. These puncta showed no statistically significant spatial bias, in contrast to the strongly posteriorly-enriched GFP-Dvl puncta previously reported in zebrafish. We propose that Dvl distribution is more subtle and dynamic than previously appreciated and that in vertebrate mesoderm it reflects processes other than protrusion as such. PMID:23876427

  3. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W.; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-01-01

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects. PMID:23112163

  4. Generation of an expandable intermediate mesoderm restricted progenitor cell line from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathan; Richter, Jenna; Cutts, Josh; Bush, Kevin T; Trujillo, Cleber; Nigam, Sanjay K; Gaasterland, Terry; Brafman, David; Willert, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering entered a new era with the development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), which are capable of unlimited expansion whilst retaining the potential to differentiate into all mature cell populations. However, these cells harbor significant risks, including tumor formation upon transplantation. One way to mitigate this risk is to develop expandable progenitor cell populations with restricted differentiation potential. Here, we used a cellular microarray technology to identify a defined and optimized culture condition that supports the derivation and propagation of a cell population with mesodermal properties. This cell population, referred to as intermediate mesodermal progenitor (IMP) cells, is capable of unlimited expansion, lacks tumor formation potential, and, upon appropriate stimulation, readily acquires properties of a sub-population of kidney cells. Interestingly, IMP cells fail to differentiate into other mesodermally-derived tissues, including blood and heart, suggesting that these cells are restricted to an intermediate mesodermal fate. PMID:26554899

  5. Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kyle M; Chen, Angela; Koh, Pang Wei; Deng, Tianda Z; Sinha, Rahul; Tsai, Jonathan M; Barkal, Amira A; Shen, Kimberle Y; Jain, Rajan; Morganti, Rachel M; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; George, Benson M; Wernig, Gerlinde; Salomon, Rachel E A; Chen, Zhenghao; Vogel, Hannes; Epstein, Jonathan A; Kundaje, Anshul; Talbot, William S; Beachy, Philip A; Ang, Lay Teng; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-07-14

    Stem-cell differentiation to desired lineages requires navigating alternating developmental paths that often lead to unwanted cell types. Hence, comprehensive developmental roadmaps are crucial to channel stem-cell differentiation toward desired fates. To this end, here, we map bifurcating lineage choices leading from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. We defined the extrinsic signals controlling each binary lineage decision, enabling us to logically block differentiation toward unwanted fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward 80%-99% pure human mesodermal lineages at most branchpoints. This strategy enabled the generation of human bone and heart progenitors that could engraft in respective in vivo models. Mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes in mesoderm development uncovered somite segmentation, a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by HOPX expression. Collectively, this roadmap enables navigation of mesodermal development to produce transplantable human tissue progenitors and uncover developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27419872

  6. Ectopic Expression Screen Identifies Genes Affecting Drosophila Mesoderm Development Including the HSPG Trol

    PubMed Central

    Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2014-01-01

    Gastrulation of the embryo involves coordinate cell movements likely supported by multiple signaling pathways, adhesion molecules, and extracellular matrix components. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have a major role in Drosophila melanogaster mesoderm migration; however, few other inputs are known and the mechanism supporting cell movement is unclear. To provide insight, we performed an ectopic expression screen to identify secreted or membrane-associated molecules that act to support mesoderm migration. Twenty-four UAS insertions were identified that cause lethality when expressed in either the mesoderm (Twi-Gal4) or the ectoderm (69B-Gal4). The list was narrowed to a subset of 10 genes that were shown to exhibit loss-of-function mutant phenotypes specifically affecting mesoderm migration. These include the FGF ligand Pyramus, α-integrins, E-cadherin, Cueball, EGFR, JAK/STAT signaling components, as well as the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) Terribly reduced optic lobes (Trol). Trol encodes the ortholog of mammalian HSPG Perlecan, a demonstrated FGF signaling cofactor. Here, we examine the role of Trol in Drosophila mesoderm migration and compare and contrast its role with that of Syndecan (Sdc), another HSPG previously implicated in this process. Embryos mutant for Trol or Sdc were obtained and analyzed. Our data support the view that both HSPGs function to support FGF-dependent processes in the early embryo as they share phenotypes with FGF mutants: Trol in terms of effects on mesoderm migration and caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) migration and Sdc in terms of dorsal mesoderm specification. The differential roles uncovered for these two HSPGs suggest that HSPG cofactor choice may modify FGF-signaling outputs. PMID:25538103

  7. Neural crest induction by paraxial mesoderm in Xenopus embryos requires FGF signals.

    PubMed

    Monsoro-Burq, Anne-Hélène; Fletcher, Russell B; Harland, Richard M

    2003-07-01

    At the border of the neural plate, the induction of the neural crest can be achieved by interactions with the epidermis, or with the underlying mesoderm. Wnt signals are required for the inducing activity of the epidermis in chick and amphibian embryos. Here, we analyze the molecular mechanisms of neural crest induction by the mesoderm in Xenopus embryos. Using a recombination assay, we show that prospective paraxial mesoderm induces a panel of neural crest markers (Slug, FoxD3, Zic5 and Sox9), whereas the future axial mesoderm only induces a subset of these genes. This induction is blocked by a dominant negative (dn) form of FGFR1. However, neither dnFGFR4a nor inhibition of Wnt signaling prevents neural crest induction in this system. Among the FGFs, FGF8 is strongly expressed by the paraxial mesoderm. FGF8 is sufficient to induce the neural crest markers FoxD3, Sox9 and Zic5 transiently in the animal cap assay. In vivo, FGF8 injections also expand the Slug expression domain. This suggests that FGF8 can initiate neural crest formation and cooperates with other DLMZ-derived factors to maintain and complete neural crest induction. In contrast to Wnts, eFGF or bFGF, FGF8 elicits neural crest induction in the absence of mesoderm induction and without a requirement for BMP antagonists. In vivo, it is difficult to dissociate the roles of FGF and WNT factors in mesoderm induction and neural patterning. We show that, in most cases, effects on neural crest formation were parallel to altered mesoderm or neural development. However, neural and neural crest patterning can be dissociated experimentally using different dominant-negative manipulations: while Nfz8 blocks both posterior neural plate formation and neural crest formation, dnFGFR4a blocks neural patterning without blocking neural crest formation. These results suggest that different signal transduction mechanisms may be used in neural crest induction, and anteroposterior neural patterning. PMID:12783784

  8. Cripto is required for mesoderm and endoderm cell allocation during mouse gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Ding, Jixiang

    2013-01-01

    During mouse gastrulation, cells in the primitive streak undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transformation and the resulting mesenchymal cells migrate out laterally to form mesoderm and definitive endoderm across the entire embryonic cylinder. The mechanisms underlying mesoderm and endoderm specification, migration, and allocation is poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the function of mouse Cripto, a member of the EGF-CFC gene family that is highly expressed in the primitive streak and migrating mesoderm cells on embryonic day 6.5. Conditional inactivation of Cripto during gastrulation leads to varied defects in mesoderm and endoderm development. Mutant embryos display accumulation of mesenchymal cells around the shortened primitive streak indicating a functional requirement of Cripto during the formation of mesoderm layer in gastrulation. In addition, some mutant embryos showed poor formation and abnormal allocation of definitive endoderm cells on embryonic day 7.5. Consistently, many mutant embryos that survived to embryonic day 8.5 displayed defects in ventral closure of the gut endoderm causing cardia bifida. Detailed analyses revealed that both the Fgf8-Fgfr1 pathway and p38 MAP kinase activation are partially affected by the loss of Cripto function. These results demonstrate a critical role for Cripto during mouse gastrulation, especially in mesoderm and endoderm formation and allocation. PMID:23747598

  9. Mesodermal expression of integrin α5β1 regulates neural crest development and cardiovascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dong; Wang, Xia; Mittal, Ashok; Dhiman, Sonam; Hou, Shuan-Yu; Degenhardt, Karl; Astrof, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Integrin α5-null embryos die in mid-gestation from severe defects in cardiovascular morphogenesis, which stem from defective development of the neural crest, heart and vasculature. To investigate the role of integrin α5β1 in cardiovascular development, we used the Mesp1Cre knock-in strain of mice to ablate integrin α5 in the anterior mesoderm, which gives rise to all of the cardiac and many of the vascular and muscle lineages in the anterior portion of the embryo. Surprisingly, we found that mutant embryos displayed numerous defects related to the abnormal development of the neural crest such as cleft palate, ventricular septal defect, abnormal development of hypoglossal nerves, and defective remodeling of the aortic arch arteries. We found that defects in arch artery remodeling stem from the role of mesodermal integrin α5β1 in neural crest proliferation and differentiation into vascular smooth muscle cells, while proliferation of pharyngeal mesoderm and differentiation of mesodermal derivatives into vascular smooth muscle cells was not defective. Taken together our studies demonstrate a requisite role for mesodermal integrin α5β1 in signaling between the mesoderm and the neural crest, thereby regulating neural crest-dependent morphogenesis of essential embryonic structures. PMID:25242040

  10. biniou (FoxF), a central component in a regulatory network controlling visceral mesoderm development and midgut morphogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zaffran, Stephane; Küchler, Axel; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Frasch, Manfred

    2001-01-01

    The subdivision of the lateral mesoderm into a visceral (splanchnic) and a somatic layer is a crucial event during early mesoderm development in both arthropod and vertebrate embryos. In Drosophila, this subdivision leads to the differential development of gut musculature versus body wall musculature. Here we report that biniou, the sole Drosophila representative of the FoxF subfamily of forkhead domain genes, has a key role in the development of the visceral mesoderm and the derived gut musculature. biniou expression is activated in the trunk visceral mesoderm primordia downstream of dpp, tinman, and bagpipe and is maintained in all types of developing gut muscles. We show that biniou activity is essential for maintaining the distinction between splanchnic and somatic mesoderm and for differentiation of the splanchnic mesoderm into midgut musculature. biniou is required not only for the activation of differentiation genes that are expressed ubiquitously in the trunk visceral mesoderm but also for the expression of dpp in parasegment 7, which governs proper midgut morphogenesis. Activation of dpp is mediated by specific Biniou binding sites in a dpp enhancer element, which suggests that Biniou serves as a tissue-specific cofactor of homeotic gene products in visceral mesoderm patterning. Based upon these and other data, we propose that the splanchnic mesoderm layers in Drosophila and vertebrate embryos are homologous structures whose development into gut musculature and other visceral organs is critically dependent on FoxF genes. PMID:11691840

  11. The convergence of Notch and MAPK signaling specifies the blood progenitor fate in the Drosophila mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Grigorian, Melina; Mandal, Lolitika; Hakimi, Manuel; Ortiz, Irma; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Blood progenitors arise from a pool of pluripotential cells (“hemangioblasts”) within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm. The fact that the cardiogenic mesoderm consists of only a small number of highly stereotypically patterned cells that can be queried individually regarding their gene expression in normal and mutant embryos, is one of the significant advantages that Drosophila offers to dissect the mechanism specifying the fate of these cells. We show in this paper that the expression of the Notch ligand Delta (Dl) reveals segmentally reiterated mesodermal clusters (“cardiogenic clusters”) that constitute the cardiogenic mesoderm. These clusters give rise to cardioblasts, blood progenitors and nephrocytes. Cardioblasts emerging from the cardiogenic clusters accumulate high levels of Dl, which is required to prevent more cells from adopting the cardioblast fate. In embryos lacking Dl function, all cells of the cardiogenic clusters become cardioblasts, and blood progenitors are lacking. Concomitant activation of the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) is required for the specification and maintenance of the cardiogenic mesoderm; in addition, the spatially restricted localization of some of the FGFR ligands may be instrumental in controlling the spatial restriction of the Dl ligand to presumptive cardioblasts. PMID:21382367

  12. Temporal and spatial requirements for Nodal-induced anterior mesendoderm and mesoderm in anterior neurulation.

    PubMed

    Gonsar, Ngawang; Coughlin, Alicia; Clay-Wright, Jessica A; Borg, Bethanie R; Kindt, Lexy M; Liang, Jennifer O

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish with defective Nodal signaling have a phenotype analogous to the fatal human birth defect anencephaly, which is caused by an open anterior neural tube. Previous work in our laboratory found that anterior open neural tube phenotypes in Nodal signaling mutants were caused by lack of mesendodermal/mesodermal tissues. Defects in these mutants are already apparent at neural plate stage, before the neuroepithelium starts to fold into a tube. Consistent with this, we found that the requirement for Nodal signaling maps to mid-late blastula stages. This timing correlates with the timing of prechordal plate mesendoderm and anterior mesoderm induction, suggesting these tissues act to promote neurulation. To further identify tissues important for neurulation, we took advantage of the variable phenotypes in Nodal signaling-deficient sqt mutant and Lefty1-overexpressing embryos. Statistical analysis indicated a strong, positive correlation between a closed neural tube and presence of several mesendoderm/mesoderm-derived tissues (hatching glands, cephalic paraxial mesoderm, notochord, and head muscles). However, the neural tube was closed in a subset of embryos that lacked any one of these tissues. This suggests that several types of Nodal-induced mesendodermal/mesodermal precursors are competent to promote neurulation. PMID:26528772

  13. The entire mesodermal mantle behaves as Spemann's organizer in dorsoanterior enhanced Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Kao, K R; Elinson, R P

    1988-05-01

    The body plan of Xenopus laevis can be respecified by briefly exposing early cleavage stage embryos to lithium. Such embryos develop exaggerated dorsoanterior structures such as a radial eye and cement gland (K.R. Kao, Y. Masui, and R.P. Elinson, 1986, Nature (London) 322, 371-373). In this paper, we demonstrate that the enhanced dorsoanterior phenotype results from an overcommitment of mesoderm to dorsoanterior mesoderm. Histological and immunohistochemical observations reveal that the embryos have a greatly enlarged notochord with very little muscle tissue. In addition, they develop a radial, beating heart, suggesting that lithium also specifies anterior mesoderm and pharyngeal endoderm. Randomly oriented diametrically opposed marginal zone grafts from lithium-treated embryos, when transplanted into ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated axis-deficient hosts, rescue dorsal axial structures. These transplantation experiments demonstrate that the entire marginal zone of the early gastrula consists of presumptive dorsal mesoderm. Vital dye marking experiments also indicate that the entire marginal zone maps to the prominent proboscis that is composed of chordamesoderm and represents the long axis of the embryo. These results suggest that lithium respecifies the mesoderm of Xenopus laevis embryos so that it differentiates into the Spemann organizer. We suggest that the origin of the dorsoanterior enhanced phenotypes generated by lithium and the dorsoanterior deficient phenotypes generated by uv irradiation are due to relative quantities of organizer. Our evidence demonstrates the existence of a continuum of body plan phenotypes based on this premise. PMID:3282938

  14. Analysis of extraembryonic mesodermal structure formation in the absence of morphological primitive streak.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Zhu, Yuanqi; Warner, Dennis; Ding, Jixiang

    2016-08-01

    During mouse gastrulation, the primitive streak is formed on the posterior side of the embryo. Cells migrate out of the primitive streak to form the future mesoderm and endoderm. Fate mapping studies revealed a group of cell migrate through the proximal end of the primitive streak and give rise to the extraembryonic mesoderm tissues such as the yolk sac blood islands and allantois. However, it is not clear whether the formation of a morphological primitive streak is required for the development of these extraembryonic mesodermal tissues. Loss of the Cripto gene in mice dramatically reduces, but does not completely abolish, Nodal activity leading to the absence of a morphological primitive streak. However, embryonic erythrocytes are still formed and assembled into the blood islands. In addition, Cripto mutant embryos form allantoic buds. However, Drap1 mutant embryos have excessive Nodal activity in the epiblast cells before gastrulation and form an expanded primitive streak, but no yolk sac blood islands or allantoic bud formation. Lefty2 embryos also have elevated levels of Nodal activity in the primitive streak during gastrulation, and undergo normal blood island and allantois formation. We therefore speculate that low level of Nodal activity disrupts the formation of morphological primitive streak on the posterior side, but still allows the formation of primitive streak cells on the proximal side, which give rise to the extraembryonic mesodermal tissues formation. Excessive Nodal activity in the epiblast at pre-gastrulation stage, but not in the primitive streak cells during gastrulation, disrupts extraembryonic mesoderm development. PMID:27273137

  15. The convergence of Notch and MAPK signaling specifies the blood progenitor fate in the Drosophila mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Melina; Mandal, Lolitika; Hakimi, Manuel; Ortiz, Irma; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-05-01

    Blood progenitors arise from a pool of pluripotential cells ("hemangioblasts") within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm. The fact that the cardiogenic mesoderm consists of only a small number of highly stereotypically patterned cells that can be queried individually regarding their gene expression in normal and mutant embryos is one of the significant advantages that Drosophila offers to dissect the mechanism specifying the fate of these cells. We show in this paper that the expression of the Notch ligand Delta (Dl) reveals segmentally reiterated mesodermal clusters ("cardiogenic clusters") that constitute the cardiogenic mesoderm. These clusters give rise to cardioblasts, blood progenitors and nephrocytes. Cardioblasts emerging from the cardiogenic clusters accumulate high levels of Dl, which is required to prevent more cells from adopting the cardioblast fate. In embryos lacking Dl function, all cells of the cardiogenic clusters become cardioblasts, and blood progenitors are lacking. Concomitant activation of the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) is required for the specification and maintenance of the cardiogenic mesoderm; in addition, the spatially restricted localization of some of the FGFR ligands may be instrumental in controlling the spatial restriction of the Dl ligand to presumptive cardioblasts. PMID:21382367

  16. Mesodermal Gene Expression in the Acoel Isodiametra pulchra Indicates a Low Number of Mesodermal Cell Types and the Endomesodermal Origin of the Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Chiodin, Marta; Børve, Aina; Berezikov, Eugene; Ladurner, Peter; Martinez, Pedro; Hejnol, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Acoelomorphs are bilaterally symmetric small marine worms that lack a coelom and possess a digestive system with a single opening. Two alternative phylogenetic positions of this group within the animal tree are currently debated. In one view, Acoelomorpha is the sister group to all remaining Bilateria and as such, is a morphologically simple stepping stone in bilaterian evolution. In the other, the group is a lineage within the Deuterostomia, and therefore, has derived a simple morphology from a more complex ancestor. Acoels and the closely related Nemertodermatida and Xenoturbellida, which together form the Acoelomorpha, possess a very limited number of cell types. To further investigate the diversity and origin of mesodermal cell types we describe the expression pattern of 12 orthologs of bilaterian mesodermal markers including Six1/2, Twist, FoxC, GATA4/5/6, in the acoel Isodiametra pulchra. All the genes are expressed in stem cells (neoblasts), gonads, and at least subsets of the acoel musculature. Most are expressed in endomesodermal compartments of I. pulchra developing embryos similar to what has been described in cnidarians. Our molecular evidence indicates a very limited number of mesodermal cell types and suggests an endomesodermal origin of the gonads and the stem cell system. We discuss our results in light of the two prevailing phylogenetic positions of Acoelomorpha. PMID:23405161

  17. Hedgehog/Patched-associated rhabdomyosarcoma formation from delta1-expressing mesodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nitzki, F; Cuvelier, N; Dräger, J; Schneider, A; Braun, T; Hahn, H

    2016-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma. In children, the 2 major RMS subtypes are alveolar and embryonal RMS. Aberrant Hedgehog/Patched1 (Hh/Ptch) signaling is a hallmark of embryonal RMS. We demonstrate that mice carrying a Ptch mutation in mesodermal Delta1-expressing cells develop embryonal-like RMS at a similar rate as mice harboring a Ptch mutation in the germline or the brachury-expressing mesoderm. The tumor incidence decreases dramatically when Ptch is mutated in Myf5- or Pax3-expressing cells. No RMS develop from Myogenin/Mef2c-expressing cells. This suggests that Hh/Ptch-associated RMS are derived from Delta1-positive, Myf5-negative, Myogenin-negative and Pax3-negative mesodermal progenitors that can undergo myogenic differentiation but lack stable lineage commitment. Additional preliminary genetic data and data on mesodermal progenitors further imply an interplay of Hh/Ptch and Delta/Notch signaling activity during RMS initiation. In contrast, Wnt signals supposedly suppress RMS formation because RMS multiplicity decreases after inactivation of the Wnt-inhibitor Wif1. Finally, our results strongly suggest that the tumor-initiating event determines the lineage of RMS origin. PMID:26387541

  18. How the sea squirt nucleus tells mesoderm Not to be endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Parton, Richard M.; Davis, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    Sea squirts are simple invertebrate chordates. In this issue, Takatori et al show nuclear migration within ascidian mesendodermal cells enables polarized localization of Not mRNA, which encodes a homeobox protein that distinguishes mesoderm from endoderm fates. The link between nuclear migration and mRNA localization suggests exciting parallels with protostomes. PMID:20951340

  19. Mesodermal origin of median fin mesenchyme and tail muscle in amphibian larvae.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuka; Kurth, Thomas; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Tazaki, Akira; Ramm, Robert; Epperlein, Hans-Henning

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchyme is an embryonic precursor tissue that generates a range of structures in vertebrates including cartilage, bone, muscle, kidney, and the erythropoietic system. Mesenchyme originates from both mesoderm and the neural crest, an ectodermal cell population, via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Because ectodermal and mesodermal mesenchyme can form in close proximity and give rise to similar derivatives, the embryonic origin of many mesenchyme-derived tissues is still unclear. Recent work using genetic lineage tracing methods have upended classical ideas about the contributions of mesodermal mesenchyme and neural crest to particular structures. Using similar strategies in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), and the South African clawed toad (Xenopus laevis), we traced the origins of fin mesenchyme and tail muscle in amphibians. Here we present evidence that fin mesenchyme and striated tail muscle in both animals are derived solely from mesoderm and not from neural crest. In the context of recent work in zebrafish, our experiments suggest that trunk neural crest cells in the last common ancestor of tetrapods and ray-finned fish lacked the ability to form ectomesenchyme and its derivatives. PMID:26086331

  20. Mesodermal origin of median fin mesenchyme and tail muscle in amphibian larvae

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Yuka; Kurth, Thomas; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Tazaki, Akira; Ramm, Robert; Epperlein, Hans-Henning

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchyme is an embryonic precursor tissue that generates a range of structures in vertebrates including cartilage, bone, muscle, kidney, and the erythropoietic system. Mesenchyme originates from both mesoderm and the neural crest, an ectodermal cell population, via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Because ectodermal and mesodermal mesenchyme can form in close proximity and give rise to similar derivatives, the embryonic origin of many mesenchyme-derived tissues is still unclear. Recent work using genetic lineage tracing methods have upended classical ideas about the contributions of mesodermal mesenchyme and neural crest to particular structures. Using similar strategies in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), and the South African clawed toad (Xenopus laevis), we traced the origins of fin mesenchyme and tail muscle in amphibians. Here we present evidence that fin mesenchyme and striated tail muscle in both animals are derived solely from mesoderm and not from neural crest. In the context of recent work in zebrafish, our experiments suggest that trunk neural crest cells in the last common ancestor of tetrapods and ray-finned fish lacked the ability to form ectomesenchyme and its derivatives. PMID:26086331

  1. Generation of an expandable intermediate mesoderm restricted progenitor cell line from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathan; Richter, Jenna; Cutts, Josh; Bush, Kevin T; Trujillo, Cleber; Nigam, Sanjay K; Gaasterland, Terry; Brafman, David; Willert, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering entered a new era with the development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), which are capable of unlimited expansion whilst retaining the potential to differentiate into all mature cell populations. However, these cells harbor significant risks, including tumor formation upon transplantation. One way to mitigate this risk is to develop expandable progenitor cell populations with restricted differentiation potential. Here, we used a cellular microarray technology to identify a defined and optimized culture condition that supports the derivation and propagation of a cell population with mesodermal properties. This cell population, referred to as intermediate mesodermal progenitor (IMP) cells, is capable of unlimited expansion, lacks tumor formation potential, and, upon appropriate stimulation, readily acquires properties of a sub-population of kidney cells. Interestingly, IMP cells fail to differentiate into other mesodermally-derived tissues, including blood and heart, suggesting that these cells are restricted to an intermediate mesodermal fate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08413.001 PMID:26554899

  2. Mesoderm is required for coordinated cell movements within zebrafish neural plate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis of the zebrafish neural tube requires the coordinated movement of many cells in both time and space. A good example of this is the movement of the cells in the zebrafish neural plate as they converge towards the dorsal midline before internalizing to form a neural keel. How these cells are regulated to ensure that they move together as a coherent tissue is unknown. Previous work in other systems has suggested that the underlying mesoderm may play a role in this process but this has not been shown directly in vivo. Results Here we analyze the roles of subjacent mesoderm in the coordination of neural cell movements during convergence of the zebrafish neural plate and neural keel formation. Live imaging demonstrates that the normal highly coordinated movements of neural plate cells are lost in the absence of underlying mesoderm and the movements of internalization and neural tube formation are severely disrupted. Despite this, neuroepithelial polarity develops in the abnormal neural primordium but the resulting tissue architecture is very disorganized. Conclusions We show that the movements of cells in the zebrafish neural plate are highly coordinated during the convergence and internalization movements of neurulation. Our results demonstrate that the underlying mesoderm is required for these coordinated cell movements in the zebrafish neural plate in vivo. PMID:24755297

  3. A mesoderm-derived precursor for mesenchymal stem and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanik, Maxim A.; Yu, Junying; Zhang, Xin; Tian, Shulan; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Among the three embryonic germ layers, the mesoderm is a major source of the mesenchymal precursors giving rise to skeletal and connective tissues. These precursors, however, have not been previously identified and characterized. Using human embryonic stem cells directed to mesendodermal differentiation, here we show that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) originate from a population of mesodermal cells identified by expression of the apelin receptor. In semisolid medium, these precursors form FGF2-dependent compact spheroid colonies containing mesenchymal cells with a transcriptional profile representative of mesoderm-derived embryonic mesenchyme. When transferred to the adherent cultures, individual colonies give rise to MSC lines with chondro-, osteo-, and adipogenenic differentiation potentials. Although the MSC lines lacked endothelial potential, endothelial cells could be derived from mesenchymal colonies, suggesting that, similar to hematopoietic cells, MSCs arise from precursors with angiogenic potential. Together, these studies identified a common precursor of mesenchymal and endothelial cells, mesenchymoangioblast, as the source of mesoderm-derived MSCs. PMID:21112566

  4. Changes in glycosaminoglycan structure on differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards mesoderm and endoderm lineages

    PubMed Central

    Gasimli, Leyla; Hickey, Anne M.; Yang, Bo; Li, Guoyun; Rosa, Mitche dela; Nairn, Alison V.; Kulik, Michael J.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Moremen, Kelley W.; Dalton, Stephen; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteoglycans are found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, and serve as prime sites for interaction with signaling molecules. Proteoglycans help regulate pathways that control stem cell fate, and therefore represent an excellent tool to manipulate these pathways. Despite their importance, there is a dearth of data linking glycosaminoglycan structure within proteoglycans with stem cell differentiation. Methods Human embryonic stem cell line WA09 (H9) was differentiated into early mesoderm and endoderm lineages, and the glycosaminoglycanomic changes accompanying these transitions were studied using transcript analysis, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and disaccharide analysis. Results Pluripotent H9 cell lumican had no glycosaminoglycan chains whereas in splanchnic mesoderm lumican was glycosaminoglycanated. H9 cells have primarily non-sulfated heparan sulfate chains. On differentiation towards splanchnic mesoderm and hepatic lineages N-sulfo group content increases. Differences in transcript expression of NDST1, HS6ST2 and HS6ST3, three heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes, within splanchnic mesoderm cells compared to H9 cells correlate to changes in glycosaminoglycan structure. Conclusions Differentiation of embryonic stem cells markedly change the proteoglycanome General Significance The glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathway is complex and highly regulated, and therefore, understanding the details of this pathway should enable better control with the aim of directing stem cell differentiation. PMID:24412195

  5. How the sea squirt nucleus tells mesoderm not to be endoderm.

    PubMed

    Parton, Richard M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-10-19

    Sea squirts are simple invertebrate chordates. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Takatori et al. show nuclear migration within ascidian mesendodermal cells enables polarized localization of Not mRNA, which encodes a homeobox protein that distinguishes mesoderm from endoderm fates. The link between nuclear migration and mRNA localization suggests exciting parallels with protostomes. PMID:20951340

  6. Mesodermal Tbx1 is required for patterning the proximal mandible in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Carpenter, Courtney; Freyer, Laina; Liao, Jun; Petti, Marilena; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2010-01-01

    Defects in the lower jaw, or mandible, occur commonly either as isolated malformations or in association with genetic syndromes. Understanding its formation and genetic pathways required for shaping its structure in mammalian model organisms will shed light into the pathogenesis of malformations in humans. The lower jaw is derived from the mandibular process of the first pharyngeal arch (MdPA1) during embryogenesis. Integral to the development of the mandible, is the signaling interplay between Fgf8 and Bmp4 in the rostral ectoderm and their downstream effector genes in the underlying neural crest derived mesenchyme. The non-neural crest MdPA1 core mesoderm is needed to form muscles of mastication, but its role in patterning the mandible is unknown. Here, we show that mesoderm specific deletion of Tbx1, a T- box transcription factor and gene for velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, results in defects in formation of the proximal mandible by shifting expression of Fgf8, Bmp4 and their downstream effector genes in mouse embryos at E10.5. This occurs without significant changes in cell proliferation or apoptosis at the same stage. Our results elucidate a new function for the non-neural crest core mesoderm and specifically, mesodermal Tbx1, in shaping the lower jaw. PMID:20501333

  7. Functional dissection of Pax3 in paraxial mesoderm development and myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Magli, Alessandro; Schnettler, Erin; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Bremer, Paul; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The paired box transcription factor Pax3 is well-known as a major regulator of embryonic myogenesis. Before Pax3 expression becomes restricted to the dermomyotome, this transcription factor is also expressed in the developing somites. The role of Pax3 at this early stage is unclear, in particular because of the scarce frequency of Pax3-positive cells in the early mouse embryo. Inducible gene expression in embryonic stem (ES) cells represents an excellent tool to overcome this limitation, since it can provide large quantities of otherwise rare embryonic populations expressing a factor of interest. Here we used engineered mouse ES cells to perform a functional analysis of Pax3 with the aim to identify the molecular determinants involved in the early functions of this transcription factor. We find that Pax3 induction during embryoid body (EB) differentiation results in the up-regulation of genes expressed in the presomitic and somitic mesoderm. Moreover, we show that paraxial mesoderm induced by transient expression of Pax3 is not irreversibly committed to myogenesis, rather requires sustained Pax3 expression. Using a series of deletion mutants of Pax3, which differentially affect its transcriptional activity, we map protein domains necessary for induction of paraxial mesoderm and induction of the myogenic program. The paired, homeo- and transcriptional activation domains were each required for both processes, however the paired-c-terminal RED domain showed a paraxial mesoderm-specific activity that was dispensable for myogenesis. These findings demonstrate and provide mechanistic insight into an early role for Pax3 in the generation of paraxial mesoderm. PMID:23081715

  8. Axial elongation in mouse embryos involves mediolateral cell intercalation behavior in the paraxial mesoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, WeiWei; Burdsal, Carol; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sutherland, Ann E.

    2006-02-01

    The cell mechanical and signaling pathways involved in gastrulation have been studied extensively in invertebrates and amphibians, such as Xenopus, and more recently in non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chick. However, because culturing mouse embryos extra-utero is very difficult, this fundamental process has been least characterized in the mouse. As the primary mammalian model for genetics, biochemistry, and the study of human disease and birth defects, it is important to investigate how gastrulation proceeds in murine embryos. We have developed a method of using 4D multiphoton excitation microscopy and extra-utero culture to visualize and characterize the morphogenetic movements in mouse embryos dissected at 8.5 days of gestation. Cells are labeled by expression of an X chromosome-linked enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene. This method has provided a unique approach, where, for the first time, patterns of cell behavior in the notochord and surrounding paraxial mesoderm can be visualized and traced quantitatively. Our observations of mouse embryos reveal both distinct differences as well as striking similarities in patterned cell motility relative to other vertebrate models such as Xenopus, where axial extension is driven primarily by mediolateral oriented cell behaviors in the notochord and paraxial somitic mesoderm. Unlike Xenopus, the width of the mouse notochord remains the same between 4-somite stage and 8-somite stage embryos. This implies the mouse notochord plays a lesser role in driving axial extension compared to Xenopus, although intercalation may occur where the anterior region of the node becomes notochordal plate. In contrast, the width of mouse paraxial mesoderm narrows significantly during this period and cells within the paraxial mesoderm are both elongated and aligned perpendicular to the midline. In addition, these cells are observed to intercalate, consistent with a role for paraxial mesoderm in driving convergence

  9. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Hagen, Hannah R.; Swanson, Scott A.; Stewart, Ron; Boll, Karly A.; Aho, Joy; Thomson, James A.; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM). The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+) from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+) CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population. PMID:26771351

  10. Qualitative Dynamical Modelling Can Formally Explain Mesoderm Specification and Predict Novel Developmental Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mbodj, Abibatou; Gustafson, E Hilary; Ciglar, Lucia; Junion, Guillaume; Gonzalez, Aitor; Girardot, Charles; Perrin, Laurent; Furlong, Eileen E M; Thieffry, Denis

    2016-09-01

    Given the complexity of developmental networks, it is often difficult to predict the effect of genetic perturbations, even within coding genes. Regulatory factors generally have pleiotropic effects, exhibit partially redundant roles, and regulate highly interconnected pathways with ample cross-talk. Here, we delineate a logical model encompassing 48 components and 82 regulatory interactions involved in mesoderm specification during Drosophila development, thereby providing a formal integration of all available genetic information from the literature. The four main tissues derived from mesoderm correspond to alternative stable states. We demonstrate that the model can predict known mutant phenotypes and use it to systematically predict the effects of over 300 new, often non-intuitive, loss- and gain-of-function mutations, and combinations thereof. We further validated several novel predictions experimentally, thereby demonstrating the robustness of model. Logical modelling can thus contribute to formally explain and predict regulatory outcomes underlying cell fate decisions. PMID:27599298

  11. Diversification of oral and aboral mesodermal regulatory states in pregastrular sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Materna, Stefan C; Ransick, Andrew; Li, Enhu; Davidson, Eric H

    2013-03-01

    Specification of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) in sea urchin embryos depends on Delta signaling. Signal reception leads to expression of regulatory genes that later contribute to the aboral NSM regulatory state. In oral NSM, this is replaced by a distinct oral regulatory state in consequence of Nodal signaling. Through regulome wide analysis we identify the homeobox gene not as an immediate Nodal target. not expression in NSM causes extinction of the aboral regulatory state in the oral NSM, and expression of a new suite of regulatory genes. All NSM specific regulatory genes are henceforth expressed exclusively, in oral or aboral domains, presaging the mesodermal cell types that will emerge. We have analyzed the regulatory linkages within the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. A linchpin of this network is gataE which as we show is a direct Gcm target and part of a feedback loop locking down the aboral regulatory state. PMID:23261933

  12. Identification and characterization of a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii reveals mesodermal expression of Pdu-twist.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Schaub, Christoph; Wolfstetter, Georg; Dorresteijn, Adriaan

    2013-09-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor twist plays a key role during mesoderm development in Bilateria. In this study, we identified a twist ortholog in the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii and analyze its expression during larval development, postlarval growth up to the adult stage, and caudal regeneration after amputation of posterior segments. At late larval stages, Pdu-twist is expressed in the mesodermal anlagen and in developing muscles. During adulthood and caudal regeneration, Pdu-twist is expressed in the posterior growth zone, in mesodermal cells within the newly forming segments and budding parapodia. Our results indicate that Pdu-twist is involved in mesoderm formation during larval development, posterior growth, and caudal regeneration. PMID:23817621

  13. A core transcriptional network for early mesoderm development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sandmann, Thomas; Girardot, Charles; Brehme, Marc; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Stolc, Viktor; Furlong, Eileen E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis is controlled by large gene-regulatory networks, which generate spatially and temporally refined patterns of gene expression. Here, we report the characteristics of the regulatory network orchestrating early mesodermal development in the fruitfly Drosophila, where the transcription factor Twist is both necessary and sufficient to drive development. Through the integration of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip) experiments during discrete time periods with computational approaches, we identified >2000 Twist-bound cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and almost 500 direct target genes. Unexpectedly, Twist regulates an almost complete cassette of genes required for cell proliferation in addition to genes essential for morophogenesis and cell migration. Twist targets almost 25% of all annotated Drosophila transcription factors, which may represent the entire set of regulators necessary for the early development of this system. By combining in vivo binding data from Twist, Mef2, Tinman, and Dorsal we have constructed an initial transcriptional network of early mesoderm development. The network topology reveals extensive combinatorial binding, feed-forward regulation, and complex logical outputs as prevalent features. In addition to binary activation and repression, we suggest that Twist binds to almost all mesodermal CRMs to provide the competence to integrate inputs from more specialized transcription factors. PMID:17322403

  14. Stochastic specification of primordial germ cells from mesoderm precursors in axolotl embryos.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Jodie; O'Reilly, Marie-Anne; Bachvarova, Rosemary F; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Redwood, Catherine; Walmsley, Maggie; Patient, Roger; Loose, Mathew; Johnson, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    A common feature of development in most vertebrate models is the early segregation of the germ line from the soma. For example, in Xenopus and zebrafish embryos primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified by germ plasm that is inherited from the egg; in mice, Blimp1 expression in the epiblast mediates the commitment of cells to the germ line. How these disparate mechanisms of PGC specification evolved is unknown. Here, in order to identify the ancestral mechanism of PGC specification in vertebrates, we studied PGC specification in embryos from the axolotl (Mexican salamander), a model for the tetrapod ancestor. In the axolotl, PGCs develop within mesoderm, and classic studies have reported their induction from primitive ectoderm (animal cap). We used an axolotl animal cap system to demonstrate that signalling through FGF and BMP4 induces PGCs. The role of FGF was then confirmed in vivo. We also showed PGC induction by Brachyury, in the presence of BMP4. These conditions induced pluripotent mesodermal precursors that give rise to a variety of somatic cell types, in addition to PGCs. Irreversible restriction of the germ line did not occur until the mid-tailbud stage, days after the somatic germ layers are established. Before this, germline potential was maintained by MAP kinase signalling. We propose that this stochastic mechanism of PGC specification, from mesodermal precursors, is conserved in vertebrates. PMID:24917499

  15. An NF-κB and Slug Regulatory Loop Active in Early Vertebrate Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Carl, Timothy F.; Trudeau, Evan D.; Simmet, Thomas; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    Background In both Drosophila and the mouse, the zinc finger transcription factor Snail is required for mesoderm formation; its vertebrate paralog Slug (Snai2) appears to be required for neural crest formation in the chick and the clawed frog Xenopus laevis. Both Slug and Snail act to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to suppress apoptosis. Methodology & Principle Findings Morpholino-based loss of function studies indicate that Slug is required for the normal expression of both mesodermal and neural crest markers in X. laevis. Both phenotypes are rescued by injection of RNA encoding the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL; Bcl-xL's effects are dependent upon IκB kinase-mediated activation of the bipartite transcription factor NF-κB. NF-κB, in turn, directly up-regulates levels of Slug and Snail RNAs. Slug indirectly up-regulates levels of RNAs encoding the NF-κB subunit proteins RelA, Rel2, and Rel3, and directly down-regulates levels of the pro-apopotic Caspase-9 RNA. Conclusions/Significance These studies reveal a Slug/Snail–NF-κB regulatory circuit, analogous to that present in the early Drosophila embryo, active during mesodermal formation in Xenopus. This is a regulatory interaction of significance both in development and in the course of inflammatory and metastatic disease. PMID:17205110

  16. Claudin-10 is required for relay of left-right patterning cues from Hensen's node to the lateral plate mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michelle M; Baumholtz, Amanda I; Simard, Annie; Gregory, Mary; Cyr, Daniel G; Ryan, Aimee K

    2015-05-15

    Species-specific symmetry-breaking events at the left-right organizer (LRO) drive an evolutionarily-conserved cascade of gene expression in the lateral plate mesoderm that is required for the asymmetric positioning of organs within the body cavity. The mechanisms underlying the transfer of the left and right laterality information from the LRO to the lateral plate mesoderm are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of Claudin-10, a tight junction protein, in facilitating the transfer of left-right identity from the LRO to the lateral plate mesoderm. Claudin-10 is asymmetrically expressed on the right side of the chick LRO, Hensen's node. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that right-sided expression of Claudin-10 is essential for normal rightward heart tube looping, the first morphological asymmetry during organogenesis. Manipulation of Claudin-10 expression did not perturb asymmetric gene expression at Hensen's node, but did disrupt asymmetric gene expression in the lateral plate mesoderm. Bilateral expression of Claudin-10 at Hensen's node prevented expression of Nodal, Lefty-2 and Pitx2c in the left lateral plate mesoderm, while morpholino knockdown of Claudin-10 inhibited expression of Snail1 in the right lateral plate mesoderm. We also determined that amino acids that are predicted to affect ion selectivity and protein interactions that bridge Claudin-10 to the actin cytoskeleton were essential for its left-right patterning function. Collectively, our data demonstrate a novel role for Claudin-10 during the transmission of laterality information from Hensen's node to both the left and right sides of the embryo and demonstrate that tight junctions have a critical role during the relay of left-right patterning cues from Hensen's node to the lateral plate mesoderm. PMID:25744724

  17. A critical role for the chromatin remodeller CHD7 in anterior mesoderm during cardiovascular development.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sophie; Burney, Matthew J; McCue, Karen; Popal, Nelo; Davidson, Sean M; Anderson, Robert H; Scambler, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    CHARGE syndrome is caused by spontaneous loss-of-function mutations to the ATP-dependant chromatin remodeller chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7). It is characterised by a distinct pattern of congenital anomalies, including cardiovascular malformations. Disruption to the neural crest lineage has previously been emphasised in the aetiology of this developmental disorder. We present evidence for an additional requirement for CHD7 activity in the Mesp1-expressing anterior mesoderm during heart development. Conditional ablation of Chd7 in this lineage results in major structural cardiovascular defects akin to those seen in CHARGE patients, as well as a striking loss of cardiac innervation and embryonic lethality. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis identified aberrant expression of key components of the Class 3 Semaphorin and Slit-Robo signalling pathways in Chd7(fl/fl);Mesp1-Cre mutant hearts. CHD7 localises at the Sema3c promoter in vivo, with alteration of the local chromatin structure seen following Chd7 ablation, suggestive of direct transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, we uncover a novel role for CHD7 activity upstream of critical calcium handling genes, and demonstrate an associated functional defect in the ability of cardiomyocytes to undergo excitation-contraction coupling. This work therefore reveals the importance of CHD7 in the cardiogenic mesoderm for multiple processes during cardiovascular development. PMID:26102480

  18. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M.; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggests that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent. PMID:18316179

  19. Neurotrophin receptor homolog (NRH1) proteins regulate mesoderm formation and apoptosis during early Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Dunja; Messenger, Nigel; Ahmed Rana, Amer; Smith, James C

    2006-12-15

    Recent experiments suggest that Xenopus Neurotrophin Receptor Homolog 1 (NRH1) proteins act through the planar cell polarity pathway to regulate convergent extension movements during gastrulation and neurulation. We show in this paper that NRH1 proteins are also required for the proper expression of mesodermally expressed genes such as Xbra and Chordin, and to a lesser extent, of Xwnt11. Loss of NRH1 function is followed, during gastrula and neurula stages, by a dramatic increase in apoptosis. Apoptosis is delayed by injection of Xbra RNA, suggesting that cell death is a consequence, at least in part, of the down-regulation of this gene, and it is also delayed by expression of activated forms of Rho, Rac and Cdc42. These small GTPases have previously been implicated in the planar cell polarity pathway in Xenopus and, in other systems, in the regulation of apoptosis. We conclude that the effects of NRH1 proteins include the regulation of mesodermal gene expression and that the disruption of gastrulation that is caused by their loss of function is a consequence of the down-regulation of Xbra and other genes, in addition to direct interference with the planar cell polarity pathway. The apoptosis observed in embryos lacking NRH1 function is not an indirect consequence of the disruption of gastrulation, and indeed it may contribute to the observed morphological defects. PMID:17055478

  20. Differential mesodermal expression of two amphioxus MyoD family members (AmphiMRF1 and AmphiMRF2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Michael; Meulemans, Daniel; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Holland, Linda Z.; Holland, Nicholas D.

    2003-01-01

    To explore the evolution of myogenic regulatory factors in chordates, we isolated two MyoD family genes (AmphiMRF1 and AmphiMRF2) from amphioxus. AmphiMRF1 is first expressed at the late gastrula in the paraxial mesoderm. As the first somites form, expression is restricted to their myotomal region. In the early larva, expression is strongest in the most anterior and most posterior somites. AmphiMRF2 transcription begins at mid/late gastrula in the paraxial mesoderm, but never spreads into its most anterior region. Through much of the neurula stage, AmphiMRF2 expression is strong in the myotomal region of all somites except the most anterior pair; by late neurula expression is downregulated except in the most posterior somites forming just rostral to the tail bud. These two MRF genes of amphioxus have partly overlapping patterns of mesodermal expression and evidently duplicated independent of the diversification of the vertebrate MRF family.

  1. Nodal signaling is required for mesodermal and ventral but not for dorsal fates in the indirect developing hemichordate, Ptychodera flava

    PubMed Central

    Röttinger, Eric; DuBuc, Timothy Q.; Amiel, Aldine R.; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nodal signaling plays crucial roles in vertebrate developmental processes such as endoderm and mesoderm formation, and axial patterning events along the anteroposterior, dorsoventral and left-right axes. In echinoderms, Nodal plays an essential role in the establishment of the dorsoventral axis and left-right asymmetry, but not in endoderm or mesoderm induction. In protostomes, Nodal signaling appears to be involved only in establishing left-right asymmetry. Hence, it is hypothesized that Nodal signaling has been co-opted to pattern the dorsoventral axis of deuterostomes and for endoderm, mesoderm formation as well as anteroposterior patterning in chordates. Hemichordata, together with echinoderms, represent the sister taxon to chordates. In this study, we analyze the role of Nodal signaling in the indirect developing hemichordate Ptychodera flava. In particular, we show that during gastrulation nodal transcripts are detected in a ring of cells at the vegetal pole that gives rise to endomesoderm and in the ventral ectoderm at later stages of development. Inhibition of Nodal function disrupts dorsoventral fates and also blocks formation of the larval mesoderm. Interestingly, molecular analysis reveals that only mesodermal, apical and ventral gene expression is affected while the dorsal side appears to be patterned correctly. Taken together, this study suggests that the co-option of Nodal signaling in mesoderm formation and potentially in anteroposterior patterning has occurred prior to the emergence of chordates and that Nodal signaling on the ventral side is uncoupled from BMP signaling on the dorsal side, representing a major difference from the molecular mechanisms of dorsoventral patterning events in echinoderms. PMID:25979707

  2. Nodal signaling is required for mesodermal and ventral but not for dorsal fates in the indirect developing hemichordate, Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Röttinger, Eric; DuBuc, Timothy Q; Amiel, Aldine R; Martindale, Mark Q

    2015-01-01

    Nodal signaling plays crucial roles in vertebrate developmental processes such as endoderm and mesoderm formation, and axial patterning events along the anteroposterior, dorsoventral and left-right axes. In echinoderms, Nodal plays an essential role in the establishment of the dorsoventral axis and left-right asymmetry, but not in endoderm or mesoderm induction. In protostomes, Nodal signaling appears to be involved only in establishing left-right asymmetry. Hence, it is hypothesized that Nodal signaling has been co-opted to pattern the dorsoventral axis of deuterostomes and for endoderm, mesoderm formation as well as anteroposterior patterning in chordates. Hemichordata, together with echinoderms, represent the sister taxon to chordates. In this study, we analyze the role of Nodal signaling in the indirect developing hemichordate Ptychodera flava. In particular, we show that during gastrulation nodal transcripts are detected in a ring of cells at the vegetal pole that gives rise to endomesoderm and in the ventral ectoderm at later stages of development. Inhibition of Nodal function disrupts dorsoventral fates and also blocks formation of the larval mesoderm. Interestingly, molecular analysis reveals that only mesodermal, apical and ventral gene expression is affected while the dorsal side appears to be patterned correctly. Taken together, this study suggests that the co-option of Nodal signaling in mesoderm formation and potentially in anteroposterior patterning has occurred prior to the emergence of chordates and that Nodal signaling on the ventral side is uncoupled from BMP signaling on the dorsal side, representing a major difference from the molecular mechanisms of dorsoventral patterning events in echinoderms. PMID:25979707

  3. Collinear activation of Hoxb genes during gastrulation is linked to mesoderm cell ingression.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Tadahiro; Pourquié, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    The vertebral column exhibits segmentation and regionalization along the antero-posterior axis. During embryogenesis, the rhythmic production of the precursors of the vertebrae, the somites, imposes a segmented aspect to the spine, whereas the spine's regional differentiation is controlled by Hox genes. Here we show that in the paraxial mesoderm, Hoxb genes are first activated in a temporal collinear fashion in precursors located in the epiblast lateral to the primitive streak. Our data suggest that collinear activation of Hoxb genes regulates the flux of cells from the epiblast to the streak and thus directly controls the establishment of the genes' characteristic nested expression domains in the somites. This suggests that establishment of the spatial co-linearity in the embryo is directly controlled by the Hox genes themselves. PMID:16760928

  4. Hoxd11 specifies a program of metanephric kidney development within the intermediate mesoderm of the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Joshua W; Sipilä, Petra; Kobayashi, Akio; Behringer, Richard R; McMahon, Andrew P

    2008-07-15

    The mammalian kidney consists of an array of tubules connected to a ductal system that collectively function to control water/salt balance and to remove waste from the organisms' circulatory system. During mammalian embryogenesis, three kidney structures form within the intermediate mesoderm. The two most anterior structures, the pronephros and the mesonephros, are transitory and largely non-functional, while the most posterior, the metanephros, persists as the adult kidney. We have explored the mechanisms underlying regional specific differentiation of the kidney forming mesoderm. Previous studies have shown a requirement for Hox11 paralogs (Hoxa11, Hoxc11 and Hoxd11) in metanephric development. Mice lacking all Hox11 activity fail to form metanephric kidney structures. We demonstrate that the Hox11 paralog expression is restricted in the intermediate mesoderm to the posterior, metanephric level. When Hoxd11 is ectopically activated in the anterior mesonephros, we observe a partial transformation to a metanephric program of development. Anterior Hoxd11(+) cells activate Six2, a transcription factor required for the maintenance of metanephric tubule progenitors. Additionally, Hoxd11(+) mesonephric tubules exhibit an altered morphology and activate several metanephric specific markers normally confined to distal portions of the functional nephron. Collectively, our data support a model where Hox11 paralogs specify a metanephric developmental program in responsive intermediate mesoderm. This program maintains tubule forming progenitors and instructs a metanephric specific pattern of nephron differentiation. PMID:18485340

  5. Hoxd11 specifies a program of metanephric kidney development within the intermediate mesoderm of the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Joshua W.; Sipilä, Petra; Kobayashi, Akio; Behringer, Richard R.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian kidney consists of an array of tubules connected to a ductal system that collectively function to control water/salt balance and to remove waste from the organisms’ circulatory system. During mammalian embryogenesis, three kidney structures form within the intermediate mesoderm. The two most anterior structures, the pronephros and the mesonephros, are transitory and largely non-functional, while the most posterior, the metanephros, persists as the adult kidney. We have explored the mechanisms underlying regional specific differentiation of the kidney forming mesoderm. Previous studies have shown a requirement for Hox11 paralogs (Hoxa11, Hoxc11 and Hoxd11) in metanephric development. Mice lacking all Hox11 activity fail to form metanephric kidney structures. We demonstrate that the Hox11 paralog expression is restricted in the intermediate mesoderm to the posterior, metanephric level. When Hoxd11 is ectopically activated in the anterior mesonephros, we observe a partial transformation to a metanephric program of development. Anterior Hoxd11 + cells activate Six2, a transcription factor required for the maintenance of metanephric tubule progenitors. Additionally, Hoxd11 + mesonephric tubules exhibit an altered morphology and activate several metanephric specific markers normally confined to distal portions of the functional nephron. Collectively, our data support a model where Hox11 paralogs specify a metanephric developmental program in responsive intermediate mesoderm. This program maintains tubule forming progenitors and instructs a metanephric specific pattern of nephron differentiation. PMID:18485340

  6. Commitment of the teratocarcinoma-derived mesodermal clone C1 towards terminal osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Poliard, A; Lamblin, D; Marie, P J; Buc-Caron, M H; Kellermann, O

    1993-10-01

    The mesodermal clone C1 was derived from the multipotent embryonal carcinoma 1003 cell line transformed with the plasmid pK4 carrying SV40 oncogenes under the control of the adenovirus E1A promoter. We have shown that the C1 clone becomes committed to the osteogenic pathway when cultured in aggregates in the presence of mediators of the osteogenic differentiation. To further validate C1 as a model with which to study osteogenesis in vitro the kinetics of its differentiation was studied, focusing on the histology of the aggregates and on the expression of a set of genes corresponding to representative bone matrix proteins. The presence of ascorbic acid and beta- glycerophosphate specifically leads to mineralization in almost 100% of the aggregates. Transcription of the above genes, silent in exponentially growing cells, specifically occurred with the establishment of cell-cell contacts independently of the presence of ascorbic acid and inorganic phosphate. The latter, however, were absolutely required for matrix deposition and mineralization. In their presence, one observed an overall decline in type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase transcripts while osteocalcin and osteopontin transcripts preferentially accumulated in cells lining the mineralizing foci. Concomitantly, type I collagen and osteocalcin became extracellularly deposited. The osteogenic differentiation of C1 occurred while cells were still proliferating. The C1 clone thus behaves as a mesodermal stem cell, becoming committed to the osteogenic pathway upon: firstly, establishment of cellular contacts; and secondly, addition of ascorbate and beta-glycerophosphate. It therefore appears to be a promising in vitro system for deciphering the molecular basis of osteoblast ontogeny.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8282757

  7. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Pamela S.; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M.; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated. PMID:26417042

  8. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Pamela S; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-11-15

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated. PMID:26417042

  9. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase psi is required for Delta/Notch signalling and cyclic gene expression in the presomitic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Aerne, Birgit; Ish-Horowicz, David

    2004-07-01

    Segmentation in vertebrate embryos is controlled by a biochemical oscillator ('segmentation clock') intrinsic to the cells in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm, and is manifested in cyclic transcription of genes involved in establishing somite polarity and boundaries. We show that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase psi (RPTPpsi) gene is essential for normal functioning of the somitogenesis clock in zebrafish. We show that reduction of RPTPpsi activity using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides results in severe disruption of the segmental pattern of the embryo, and loss of cyclic gene expression in the presomitic mesoderm. Analysis of cyclic genes in RPTPpsi morphant embryos indicates an important requirement for RPTPpsi in the control of the somitogenesis clock upstream of or in parallel with Delta/Notch signalling. Impairing RPTPpsi activity also interferes with convergent extension during gastrulation. We discuss this dual requirement for RPTPpsi in terms of potential functions in Notch and Wnt signalling. PMID:15226256

  10. Scl binds to primed enhancers in mesoderm to regulate hematopoietic and cardiac fate divergence.

    PubMed

    Org, Tõnis; Duan, Dan; Ferrari, Roberto; Montel-Hagen, Amelie; Van Handel, Ben; Kerényi, Marc A; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pellegrini, Matteo; Orkin, Stuart H; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Mikkola, Hanna Ka

    2015-03-12

    Scl/Tal1 confers hemogenic competence and prevents ectopic cardiomyogenesis in embryonic endothelium by unknown mechanisms. We discovered that Scl binds to hematopoietic and cardiac enhancers that become epigenetically primed in multipotent cardiovascular mesoderm, to regulate the divergence of hematopoietic and cardiac lineages. Scl does not act as a pioneer factor but rather exploits a pre-established epigenetic landscape. As the blood lineage emerges, Scl binding and active epigenetic modifications are sustained in hematopoietic enhancers, whereas cardiac enhancers are decommissioned by removal of active epigenetic marks. Our data suggest that, rather than recruiting corepressors to enhancers, Scl prevents ectopic cardiogenesis by occupying enhancers that cardiac factors, such as Gata4 and Hand1, use for gene activation. Although hematopoietic Gata factors bind with Scl to both activated and repressed genes, they are dispensable for cardiac repression, but necessary for activating genes that enable hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development. These results suggest that a unique subset of enhancers in lineage-specific genes that are accessible for regulators of opposing fates during the time of the fate decision provide a platform where the divergence of mutually exclusive fates is orchestrated. PMID:25564442

  11. A Wide Spectrum of Axial Mesodermal Dysplasia Complex With Rhombencephalic Anomaly: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Won; Seo, Jeoung-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Won, Yu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) arises in variable combinations of craniocaudal anomalies such as musculoskeletal deformities, neuroschisis, or rhombencephalic developmental disorders. To the best of our knowledge, the co-existence of AMDC with associated musculoskeletal anomalies, medullary neuroschisis with mirror movements, and cranial nerve anomalies has not yet been reported. Here, we report the case of a 4-year-old boy whose clinical features were suggestive of Goldenhar syndrome and Poland syndrome with Sprengel deformity. Moreover, he showed mirror movements in his hands suspected of rhombencephalic malformation, and infranuclear-type facial nerve palsy of the left side of his face, the opposite side to the facial anomalies of Goldenhar syndrome. After conducting radiological studies, he was diagnosed with medullary neuroschisis without pontine malformations and Klippel-Feil syndrome with rib anomalies. Based on these findings, we propose that clinical AMDC can be accompanied by a wide variety of musculoskeletal defects and variable degrees of central nervous system malformations. Therefore, in addition to detailed physical and neurological examinations, imaging studies should be considered in AMDC. PMID:26949683

  12. The mesoderm determinant snail collaborates with related zinc-finger proteins to control Drosophila neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, S I; Hu, X; Roote, J; Ip, Y T

    1999-11-15

    The Snail protein functions as a transcriptional regulator to establish early mesodermal cell fate. Later, in germ band-extended embryos, Snail is also expressed in most neuroblasts. Here we present evidence that this expression of Snail is required for central nervous system (CNS) development. The neural function of snail is masked by two closely linked genes, escargot and worniu. Both Escargot and Worniu contain zinc-finger domains that are highly homologous to that of Snail. Although not affecting expression of early neuroblast markers, the deletion of the region containing all three genes correlates with loss of expression of CNS determinants including fushi tarazu, pdm-2 and even-skipped. Transgenic expression of each of the three Snail family proteins can rescue efficiently the fushi tarazu defects, and partially the pdm-2 and even-skipped CNS patterns. These results demonstrate that the Snail family proteins have essential functions during embryonic CNS development, around the time of ganglion mother cell formation. PMID:10562554

  13. Midline-derived Shh regulates mesonephric tubule formation through the paraxial mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Akita, Hiroki; Okazawa, Mika; Kishigami, Satoshi; Nakagata, Naomi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yamada, Gen

    2014-01-01

    During organogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) possesses dual functions: Shh emanating from midline structures regulates the positioning of bilateral structures at early stages, whereas organ-specific Shh locally regulates organ morphogenesis at later stages. The mesonephros is a transient embryonic kidney in amniote, whereas it becomes definitive adult kidney in some anamniotes. Thus, elucidating the regulation of mesonephros formation has important implications for our understanding of kidney development and evolution. In Shh knockout (KO) mutant mice, the mesonephros was displaced towards the midline and ectopic mesonephric tubules (MTs) were present in the caudal mesonephros. Mesonephros-specific ablation of Shh in Hoxb7-Cre;Shhflox/− and Sall1CreERT2/+;Shhflox/− mice embryos indicated that Shh expressed in the mesonephros was not required for either the development of the mesonephros or the differentiation of the male reproductive tract. Moreover, stage-specific ablation of Shh in ShhCreERT2/flox mice showed that notochord- and/or floor plate-derived Shh were essential for the regulation of the number and position of MTs. Lineage analysis of hedgehog (Hh)-responsive cells, and analysis of gene expression in Shh KO embryos suggested that Shh regulated nephrogenic gene expression indirectly, possibly through effects on the paraxial mesoderm. These data demonstrate the essential role of midline-derived Shh in local tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. PMID:24370450

  14. Transcription factor KLF7 regulates differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cell lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Esposito, Maria T.; Parisi, Silvia; Stifani, Stefano; Ramirez, Francesco; Porzio, Umberto di

    2010-08-15

    Previous gene targeting studies in mice have implicated the nuclear protein Krueppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) in nervous system development while cell culture assays have documented its involvement in cell cycle regulation. By employing short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing, here we demonstrate that murine Klf7 gene expression is required for in vitro differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cells. Specifically, we show a correlation of Klf7 silencing with down-regulation of the neuronal marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and the nerve growth factor (NGF) tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA) using the PC12 neuronal cell line. Similarly, KLF7 inactivation in Klf7-null mice decreases the expression of the neurogenic marker brain lipid-binding protein/fatty acid-binding protein 7 (BLBP/FABP7) in neural stem cells (NSCs). We also report that Klf7 silencing is detrimental to neuronal and cardiomyocytic differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), in addition to altering the adipogenic and osteogenic potential of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Finally, our results suggest that genes that are key for self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs repress Klf7 expression in ESCs. Together with previous findings, these results provide evidence that KLF7 has a broad spectrum of regulatory functions, which reflect the discrete cellular and molecular contexts in which this transcription factor operates.

  15. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  16. Pronephric tubule morphogenesis in zebrafish depends on Mnx mediated repression of irx1b within the intermediate mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Ott, Elisabeth; Wendik, Björn; Srivastava, Monika; Pacho, Frederic; Töchterle, Sonja; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor MNX1 are the major cause of dominantly inherited sacral agenesis. Studies in model organisms revealed conserved mnx gene requirements in neuronal and pancreatic development while Mnx activities that could explain the caudal mesoderm specific agenesis phenotype remain elusive. Here we use the zebrafish pronephros as a simple yet genetically conserved model for kidney formation to uncover a novel role of Mnx factors in nephron morphogenesis. Pronephros formation can formally be divided in four stages, the specification of nephric mesoderm from the intermediate mesoderm (IM), growth and epithelialisation, segmentation and formation of the glomerular capillary tuft. Two of the three mnx genes in zebrafish are dynamically transcribed in caudal IM in a time window that proceeds segmentation. We show that expression of one mnx gene, mnx2b, is restricted to the pronephric lineage and that mnx2b knock-down causes proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired pronephric excretion. Using expression profiling of embryos transgenic for conditional activation and repression of Mnx regulated genes, we further identified irx1b as a direct target of Mnx factors. Consistent with a repression of irx1b by Mnx factors, the transcripts of irx1b and mnx genes are found in mutual exclusive regions in the IM, and blocking of Mnx functions results in a caudal expansion of the IM-specific irx1b expression. Finally, we find that knock-down of irx1b is sufficient to rescue proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired nephron function in mnx-morpholino injected embryos. Our data revealed a first caudal mesoderm specific requirement of Mnx factors in a non-human system and they demonstrate that Mnx-dependent restriction of IM-specific irx1b activation is required for the morphogenesis and function of the zebrafish pronephros. PMID:26472045

  17. Transplacental delivery of the Wnt antagonist Frzb1 inhibits development of caudal paraxial mesoderm and skeletal myogenesis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Borello, U; Coletta, M; Tajbakhsh, S; Leyns, L; De Robertis, E M; Buckingham, M; Cossu, G

    1999-10-01

    Axial structures (neural tube/notochord) and surface ectoderm activate myogenesis in the mouse embryo; their action can be reproduced, at least in part, by several molecules such as Sonic hedgehog and Wnts. Recently, soluble Wnt antagonists have been identified. Among those examined only Frzb1 was found to be expressed in the presomitic mesoderm and newly formed somites and thus its possible role in regulating myogenesis was investigated in detail. When presomitic mesoderm or newly formed somites were cultured with axial structures and surface ectoderm on a feeder layer of C3H10T1/2 cells expressing Frzb1, myogenesis was abolished or severely reduced in presomitic mesoderm and the three most recently formed somites. In contrast, no effect was observed on more mature somites. Inhibition of myogenesis did not appear to be associated with increased cell death since the final number of cells in the explants grown in the presence of Frzb1 was only slightly reduced in comparison with controls. In order to examine the possible function of Frzb1 in vivo, we developed a method based on the overexpression of the soluble antagonist by transient transfection of WOP cells with a Frzb1 expression vector and injection of transfected cells into the placenta of pregnant females before the onset of maternofoetal circulation. Frzb1, secreted by WOP cells, accumulated in the embryo and caused a marked reduction in size of caudal structures. Myogenesis was strongly reduced and, in the most severe cases, abolished. This was not due to a generalized toxic effect since only several genes downstream of the Wnt signaling pathway such as En1, Noggin and Myf5 were downregulated; in contrast, Pax3 and Mox1 expression levels were not affected even in embryos exhibiting the most severe phenotypes. Taken together, these results suggest that Wnt signals may act by regulating both myogenic commitment and expansion of committed cells in the mouse mesoderm. PMID:10477293

  18. Chordin forms a self-organizing morphogen gradient in the extracellular space between ectoderm and mesoderm in the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Zakin, Lise; Moriyama, Yuki; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan follows stereotypical dorsal–ventral (D-V) tissue differentiation controlled by bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and secreted BMP antagonists, such as Chordin. The three germ layers—ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm—are affected coordinately by the Chordin–BMP morphogen system. However, extracellular morphogen gradients of endogenous proteins have not been directly visualized in vertebrate embryos to date. In this study, we improved immunolocalization methods in Xenopus embryos and analyzed the distribution of endogenous Chordin using a specific antibody. Chordin protein secreted by the dorsal Spemann organizer was found to diffuse along a narrow region that separates the ectoderm from the anterior endoderm and mesoderm. This Fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix is called “Brachet’s cleft” in the Xenopus gastrula and is present in all vertebrate embryos. Chordin protein formed a smooth gradient that encircled the embryo, reaching the ventral-most Brachet cleft. Depletion with morpholino oligos showed that this extracellular gradient was regulated by the Chordin protease Tolloid and its inhibitor Sizzled. The Chordin gradient, as well as the BMP signaling gradient, was self-regulating and, importantly, was able to rescale in dorsal half-embryos. Transplantation of Spemann organizer tissue showed that Chordin diffused over long distances along this signaling highway between the ectoderm and mesoderm. Chordin protein must reach very high concentrations in this narrow region. We suggest that as ectoderm and mesoderm undergo morphogenetic movements during gastrulation, cells in both germ layers read their positional information coordinately from a single morphogen gradient located in Brachet’s cleft. PMID:24284174

  19. A conserved Six-Eya cassette acts downstream of Wnt signaling to direct non-myogenic versus myogenic fates in the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nirav M; Lim, Sung-Eun; Shi, Herong; Chan, Tiffany L; Liu, Jun

    2009-07-15

    The subdivision of mesodermal cells into muscle and non-muscle cells is crucial to animal development. In the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm, this subdivision is a result of an asymmetric cell division that leads to the formation of striated body wall muscles and non-muscle coelomocytes. Here we report that the Six homeodomain protein CEH-34 and its cofactor Eyes Absent, EYA-1, function synergistically to promote the non-muscle fate in cells also competent to form muscles. We further show that the asymmetric expression of ceh-34 and eya-1 is regulated by a combination of 1) mesodermal intrinsic factors MAB-5, HLH-1 and FOZI-1, 2) differential POP-1 (TCF/LEF) transcriptional activity along the anterior-posterior axis, and 3) coelomocyte competence factor(s). These factors are conserved in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting a conserved paradigm for mesoderm development in metazoans. PMID:19427847

  20. Knockout of the PKN Family of Rho Effector Kinases Reveals a Non-redundant Role for PKN2 in Developmental Mesoderm Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Quétier, Ivan; Marshall, Jacqueline J.T.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Lachmann, Sylvie; Casamassima, Adele; Franco, Claudio; Escuin, Sarah; Worrall, Joseph T.; Baskaran, Priththivika; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Howell, Michael; Copp, Andrew J.; Stamp, Gordon; Rosewell, Ian; Cutillas, Pedro; Gerhardt, Holger; Parker, Peter J.; Cameron, Angus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In animals, the protein kinase C (PKC) family has expanded into diversely regulated subgroups, including the Rho family-responsive PKN kinases. Here, we describe knockouts of all three mouse PKN isoforms and reveal that PKN2 loss results in lethality at embryonic day 10 (E10), with associated cardiovascular and morphogenetic defects. The cardiovascular phenotype was not recapitulated by conditional deletion of PKN2 in endothelial cells or the developing heart. In contrast, inducible systemic deletion of PKN2 after E7 provoked collapse of the embryonic mesoderm. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which arise from the embryonic mesoderm, depend on PKN2 for proliferation and motility. These cellular defects are reflected in vivo as dependence on PKN2 for mesoderm proliferation and neural crest migration. We conclude that failure of the mesoderm to expand in the absence of PKN2 compromises cardiovascular integrity and development, resulting in lethality. PMID:26774483

  1. Knockout of the PKN Family of Rho Effector Kinases Reveals a Non-redundant Role for PKN2 in Developmental Mesoderm Expansion.

    PubMed

    Quétier, Ivan; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Lachmann, Sylvie; Casamassima, Adele; Franco, Claudio; Escuin, Sarah; Worrall, Joseph T; Baskaran, Priththivika; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Howell, Michael; Copp, Andrew J; Stamp, Gordon; Rosewell, Ian; Cutillas, Pedro; Gerhardt, Holger; Parker, Peter J; Cameron, Angus J M

    2016-01-26

    In animals, the protein kinase C (PKC) family has expanded into diversely regulated subgroups, including the Rho family-responsive PKN kinases. Here, we describe knockouts of all three mouse PKN isoforms and reveal that PKN2 loss results in lethality at embryonic day 10 (E10), with associated cardiovascular and morphogenetic defects. The cardiovascular phenotype was not recapitulated by conditional deletion of PKN2 in endothelial cells or the developing heart. In contrast, inducible systemic deletion of PKN2 after E7 provoked collapse of the embryonic mesoderm. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which arise from the embryonic mesoderm, depend on PKN2 for proliferation and motility. These cellular defects are reflected in vivo as dependence on PKN2 for mesoderm proliferation and neural crest migration. We conclude that failure of the mesoderm to expand in the absence of PKN2 compromises cardiovascular integrity and development, resulting in lethality. PMID:26774483

  2. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  3. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  4. Hhex and Cer1 Mediate the Sox17 Pathway for Cardiac Mesoderm Formation in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Kaneda, Ruri; Leja, Thomas W; Subkhankulova, Tatiana; Tolmachov, Oleg; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Schwartz, Robert J; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac muscle differentiation in vivo is guided by sequential growth factor signals, including endoderm-derived diffusible factors, impinging on cardiogenic genes in the developing mesoderm. Previously, by RNA interference in AB2.2 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), we identified the endodermal transcription factor Sox17 as essential for Mesp1 induction in primitive mesoderm and subsequent cardiac muscle differentiation. However, downstream effectors of Sox17 remained to be proven functionally. In this study, we used genome-wide profiling of Sox17-dependent genes in AB2.2 cells, RNA interference, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase reporter genes to dissect this pathway. Sox17 was required not only for Hhex (a second endodermal transcription factor) but also for Cer1, a growth factor inhibitor from endoderm that, like Hhex, controls mesoderm patterning in Xenopus toward a cardiac fate. Suppressing Hhex or Cer1 blocked cardiac myogenesis, although at a later stage than induction of Mesp1/2. Hhex was required but not sufficient for Cer1 expression. Over-expression of Sox17 induced endogenous Cer1 and sequence-specific transcription of a Cer1 reporter gene. Forced expression of Cer1 was sufficient to rescue cardiac differentiation in Hhex-deficient cells. Thus, Hhex and Cer1 are indispensable components of the Sox17 pathway for cardiopoiesis in mESCs, acting at a stage downstream from Mesp1/2. Stem Cells 2014;32:1515–1526 PMID:24585688

  5. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  6. Mixl1 and Flk1 Are Key Players of Wnt/TGF-β Signaling During DMSO-Induced Mesodermal Specification in P19 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Cheol; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Seo, Ha-Rim; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Chi-Yeon; Joo, Hyung-Joon; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Hong, Soon-Jun; Yu, Cheol-Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used to induce multilineage differentiation of embryonic and adult progenitor cells. To date, little is known about the mechanisms underlying DMSO-induced mesodermal specification. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways and lineage-determining genes involved in DMSO-induced mesodermal specification in P19 cells. Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β superfamily signaling pathways such as BMP, TGF-β and GDF1 signaling were significantly activated during DMSO-induced mesodermal specification. In contrast, Nodal/Cripto signaling pathway molecules, required for endoderm specification, were severely downregulated. DMSO significantly upregulated the expression of cardiac mesoderm markers but inhibited the expression of endodermal and hematopoietic lineage markers. Among the DMSO-activated cell lineage markers, the expression of Mixl1 and Flk1 was dramatically upregulated at both the transcript and protein levels, and the populations of Mixl1+, Flk1+ and Mixl1+/Flk1+ cells also increased significantly. DMSO modulated cell cycle molecules and induced cell apoptosis, resulting in significant cell death during EB formation of P19 cells. An inhibitor of Flk1, SU5416 significantly blocked expressions of TGF-β superfamily members, mesodermal cell lineage markers and cell cycle molecules but it did not affect Wnt molecules. These results demonstrate that Mixl1 and Flk1 play roles as key downstream or interacting effectors of Wnt/TGF-β signaling pathway during DMSO-induced mesodermal specification in P19 cells. PMID:25521758

  7. Growth factor-mediated mesodermal cell guidance and skeletogenesis during sea urchin gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Adomako-Ankomah, Ashrifia; Ettensohn, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    Growth factor signaling pathways provide essential cues to mesoderm cells during gastrulation in many metazoans. Recent studies have implicated the VEGF and FGF pathways in providing guidance and differentiation cues to primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) during sea urchin gastrulation, although the relative contributions of these pathways and the cell behaviors they regulate are not fully understood. Here, we show that FGF and VEGF ligands are expressed in distinct domains in the embryonic ectoderm of Lytechinus variegatus. We find that PMC guidance is specifically disrupted in Lv-vegf3 morphants and these embryos fail to form skeletal elements. By contrast, PMC migration is unaffected in Lv-fgfa morphants, and well-patterned but shortened skeletal elements form. We use a VEGFR inhibitor, axitinib, to show that VEGF signaling is essential not only for the initial phase of PMC migration (subequatorial ring formation), but also for the second phase (migration towards the animal pole). VEGF signaling is not required, however, for PMC fusion. Inhibition of VEGF signaling after the completion of PMC migration causes significant defects in skeletogenesis, selectively blocking the elongation of skeletal rods that support the larval arms, but not rods that form in the dorsal region of the embryo. Nanostring nCounter analysis of ∼100 genes in the PMC gene regulatory network shows a decrease in the expression of many genes with proven or predicted roles in biomineralization in vegf3 morphants. Our studies lead to a better understanding of the roles played by growth factors in sea urchin gastrulation and skeletogenesis. PMID:24026121

  8. Visualizing Late Insect Embryogenesis: Extraembryonic and Mesodermal Enhancer Trap Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Koelzer, Stefan; Kölsch, Yvonne; Panfilio, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    The beetle Tribolium castaneum has increasingly become a powerful model for comparative research on insect development. One recent resource is a collection of piggyBac transposon-based enhancer trap lines. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of three selected lines and demonstrate their value for investigations in the second half of embryogenesis, which has thus far lagged behind research on early stages. Two lines, G12424 and KT650, show enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression throughout the extraembryonic serosal tissue and in a few discrete embryonic domains. Intriguingly, both lines show for the first time a degree of regionalization within the mature serosa. However, their expression profiles illuminate distinct aspects of serosal biology: G12424 tracks the tissue’s rapid maturation while KT650 expression likely reflects ongoing physiological processes. The third line, G04609, is stably expressed in mesodermal domains, including segmental muscles and the heart. Genomic mapping followed by in situ hybridization for genes near to the G04609 insertion site suggests that the transposon has trapped enhancer information for the Tribolium orthologue of midline (Tc-mid). Altogether, our analyses provide the first live imaging, long-term characterizations of enhancer traps from this collection. We show that EGFP expression is readily detected, including in heterozygote crosses that permit the simultaneous visualization of multiple tissue types. The tissue specificity provides live, endogenous marker gene expression at key developmental stages that are inaccessible for whole mount staining. Furthermore, the nonlocalized EGFP in these lines illuminates both the nucleus and cytoplasm, providing cellular resolution for morphogenesis research on processes such as dorsal closure and heart formation. In future work, identification of regulatory regions driving these enhancer traps will deepen our understanding of late developmental control, including in the

  9. From Dynamic Expression Patterns to Boundary Formation in the Presomitic Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Hendrik B.; Schneltzer, Elida; Zeiser, Stefan; Hoesel, Bastian; Beckers, Johannes; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2012-01-01

    The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM) precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN) for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD) as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice. PMID:22761566

  10. Non-canonical Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling regulates kidney morphogenesis by controlling intermediate mesoderm extension.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kangsun; Ajima, Rieko; Sharma, Nirmala; Costantini, Frank; Mackem, Susan; Lewandoski, Mark; Yamaguchi, Terry P; Perantoni, Alan O

    2014-12-20

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) affect about 1 in 500 births and are a major cause of morbidity in infants. Duplex collecting systems rank among the most common abnormalities of CAKUT, but the molecular basis for this defect is poorly understood. In mice, conditional deletion of Wnt5a in mesoderm results in bilateral duplex kidney and ureter formation. The ureteric buds (UBs) in mutants emerge as doublets from the intermediate mesoderm (IM)-derived nephric duct (ND) without anterior expansion of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) expression domain in the surrounding mesenchyme. Wnt5a is normally expressed in a graded manner at the posterior end of the IM, but its expression is down-regulated prior to UB outgrowth at E10.5. Furthermore, ablation of Wnt5a in the mesoderm with an inducible Cre at E7.5 results in duplex UBs, whereas ablation at E8.5 yields normal UB outgrowth, demonstrating that Wnt5a functions in IM development well before the formation of the metanephros. In mutants, the posterior ND is duplicated and surrounding Pax2-positive mesenchymal cells persist in the nephric cord, suggesting that disruption of normal ND patterning prompts the formation of duplex ureters and kidneys. Ror2 homozygous mutants, which infrequently yield duplex collecting systems, show a dramatic increase in incidence with the additional deletion of one copy of Wnt5a, implicating this receptor in non-canonical Wnt5a signaling during IM development. This work provides the first evidence of a role of Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling in IM extension and offers new insights into the etiology of CAKUT and possible involvement of Wnt5a/Ror2 mutations. PMID:25082826

  11. An amphioxus nodal gene (AmphiNodal) with early symmetrical expression in the organizer and mesoderm and later asymmetrical expression associated with left-right axis formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Linda Z.; Holland, Nicholas D.

    2002-01-01

    The full-length sequence and zygotic expression of an amphioxus nodal gene are described. Expression is first detected in the early gastrula just within the dorsal lip of the blastopore in a region of hypoblast that is probably comparable with the vertebrate Spemann's organizer. In the late gastrula and early neurula, expression remains bilaterally symmetrical, limited to paraxial mesoderm and immediately overlying regions of the neural plate. Later in the neurula stage, all neural expression disappears, and mesodermal expression disappears from the right side. All along the left side of the neurula, mesodermal expression spreads into the left side of the gut endoderm. Soon thereafter, all expression is down-regulated except near the anterior and posterior ends of the animal, where transcripts are still found in the mesoderm and endoderm on the left side. At this time, expression also begins in the ectoderm on the left side of the head, in the region where the mouth later forms. These results suggest that amphioxus and vertebrate nodal genes play evolutionarily conserved roles in establishing Spemann's organizer, patterning the mesoderm rostrocaudally and setting up the asymmetrical left-right axis of the body.

  12. BMP and retinoic acid regulate anterior–posterior patterning of the non-axial mesoderm across the dorsal–ventral axis

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Richard W.; Skvarca, Lauren Brilli; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Hukriede, Neil A.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of patterning along the dorsal–ventral (DV) and anterior–posterior (AP) axes during embryogenesis, uncertainty exists in the orientation of these axes for the mesoderm. Here we examine the origin and formation of the zebrafish kidney, a ventrolateral mesoderm derivative, and show that AP patterning of the non-axial mesoderm occurs across the classic gastrula stage DV axis while DV patterning aligns along the animal–vegetal pole. We find that BMP signalling acts early to establish broad anterior and posterior territories in the non-axial mesoderm while retinoic acid (RA) functions later, but also across the classic DV axis. Our data support a model in which RA on the dorsal side of the embryo induces anterior kidney fates while posterior kidney progenitors are protected ventrally by the RA-catabolizing enzyme Cyp26a1. This work clarifies our understanding of vertebrate axis orientation and establishes a new paradigm for how the kidney and other mesodermal derivatives arise during embryogenesis. PMID:27406002

  13. BMP and retinoic acid regulate anterior-posterior patterning of the non-axial mesoderm across the dorsal-ventral axis.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Richard W; Skvarca, Lauren Brilli; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Hukriede, Neil A; Davidson, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of patterning along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during embryogenesis, uncertainty exists in the orientation of these axes for the mesoderm. Here we examine the origin and formation of the zebrafish kidney, a ventrolateral mesoderm derivative, and show that AP patterning of the non-axial mesoderm occurs across the classic gastrula stage DV axis while DV patterning aligns along the animal-vegetal pole. We find that BMP signalling acts early to establish broad anterior and posterior territories in the non-axial mesoderm while retinoic acid (RA) functions later, but also across the classic DV axis. Our data support a model in which RA on the dorsal side of the embryo induces anterior kidney fates while posterior kidney progenitors are protected ventrally by the RA-catabolizing enzyme Cyp26a1. This work clarifies our understanding of vertebrate axis orientation and establishes a new paradigm for how the kidney and other mesodermal derivatives arise during embryogenesis. PMID:27406002

  14. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A.; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Summary The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:26771355

  15. Metabolic suppression during mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells identified by single-cell comprehensive gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanshu; Fujisawa, Ikuma; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Flk-1 (VEGF receptor 2) is a well-defined mesodermal progenitor marker and the Flk-1-positive (Flk-1(+)) cells derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been known to generate hemangioblasts and cardiovascular progenitor cells, which are formed in the early and late stages of differentiation, respectively. In this study, we separated Flk-1(+) and Flk-1(-) cells from spontaneously differentiating embryoid bodies (EBs) of mouse ESCs. We found that cell aggregates derived from late stage Flk-1(+) cells had a relatively small size and a low oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared with those derived from Flk-1(-) cells. Furthermore, using single-cell comprehensive gene expression analysis, we found that both Flk-1(+) and Flk-1(-) cells could be categorized into subgroups with either low or high glucose metabolic activity. We observed that metabolic suppression occurs in cells expressing an intermediate level of both Nanog and Pou5f1. Taken together, our data suggested that the temporary metabolic suppression is an intrinsic feature of mesodermal differentiation. PMID:26211925

  16. In vivo genetic ablation of the periotic mesoderm affects cell proliferation survival and differentiation in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huansheng; Chen, Li; Baldini, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Tbx1 is required for ear development in humans and mice. Gene manipulation in the mouse has discovered multiple consequences of loss of function on early development of the inner ear, some of which are attributable to a cell autonomous role in maintaining cell proliferation of epithelial progenitors of the cochlear and vestibular apparata. However, ablation of the mesodermal domain of the gene also results in severe but more restricted abnormalities. Here we show that Tbx1 has a dynamic expression during late development of the ear, in particular, is expressed in the sensory epithelium of the vestibular organs but not of the cochlea. Vice versa, it is expressed in the condensed mesenchyme that surrounds the cochlea but not in the one that surrounds the vestibule. Loss of Tbx1 in the mesoderm disrupts this peri-cochlear capsule by strongly reducing the proliferation of mesenchymal cells. The organogenesis of the cochlea, which normally occurs inside the capsule, was dramatically affected in terms of growth of the organ, as well as proliferation, differentiation and survival of its epithelial cells. This model provides a striking demonstration of the essential role played by the periotic mesenchyme in the organogenesis of the cochlea. PMID:17825816

  17. De novo expression of a type IV collagen gene in Drosophila embryos is restricted to mesodermal derivatives and occurs at germ band shortening.

    PubMed

    Mirre, C; Cecchini, J P; Le Parco, Y; Knibiehler, B

    1988-02-01

    We have examined directly the expression of one collagen gene (DCg1) during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis by means of in situ hybridization. Transcripts of this gene, which were demonstrated to encode a basement membrane type IV collagen chain, began to accumulate specifically in mesodermal derivatives at stages 12-13 of embryogenesis, and not before. Cells expressing this gene overlap, or are closely intermingled with, somatic and visceral mesoderm in stages 12-14. In stages 15-17, in addition to the strongly positive fat bodies, highly labelled cell spots are found scattered around all the parts of the gut and symmetrically on each side of the ventral nerve cord. They correspond to circulating mesodermal cells which we consider to be haemocytes or mesoblasts. PMID:3138101

  18. Gata4 expression in lateral mesoderm is downstream of BMP4 and isactivated directly by Forkhead and GATA transcription factors through adistal enhancer element

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Anabel; De Val, Sarah; Heidt, Analeah B.; Xu, Shan-Mei; Bristow, James; Black, Brian L.

    2005-05-20

    The GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays key roles in the specification and differentiation of multiple cell types during development. GATA4 is an early regulator of gene expression during the development of endoderm and mesoderm, and genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that GATA4 is required for embryonic development.Despite the importance of GATA4 in tissue specification and differentiation, the mechanisms by which Gata4 expression is activated and the transcription factor pathways upstream of GATA4 remain largely undefined. To identify transcriptional regulators of Gata4 in the mouse,we screened conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Gata4 gene for enhancer activity in transgenic embryos. Here, we define the regulation of a distal enhancer element from Gata4 that is sufficient to direct expression throughout the lateral mesoderm, beginning at 7.5 days of mouse embryonic development. The activity of this enhancer is initially broad but eventually becomes restricted to the mesenchyme surrounding the liver. We demonstrate that the function of this enhancer in transgenic embryos is dependent upon highly conserved Forkhead and GATA transcription factor binding sites, which are bound by FOXF1 and GATA4,respectively. Furthermore, the activity of the Gata4 lateral mesoderm enhancer is attenuated by the BMP antagonist Noggin, and the enhancer is not activated in Bmp4-null embryos. Thus, these studies establish that Gata4 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead and GATA transcription factors in the lateral mesoderm, and demonstrate that Gata4lateral mesoderm enhancer activation requires BMP4, supporting a model in which GATA4 serves as a downstream effector of BMP signaling in the lateral mesoderm.

  19. Primordial germ cells in an oligochaete annelid are specified according to the birth rank order in the mesodermal teloblast lineage.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yukie; Nakamoto, Ayaki; Shiomi, Inori; Nakao, Hajime; Shimizu, Takashi

    2013-07-15

    The primordial germ cells (PGCs) in the oligochaete annelid Tubifex tubifex are descentants of the mesodermal (M) teloblast and are located in the two midbody segments X and XI in which they serve as germline precursors forming the testicular gonad and the ovarian gonad, respectively. During embryogenesis, vasa-expressing cells (termed presumptive PGCs or pre-PGCs) emerge in a variable set of midbody segments including the genital segments (X and XI); at the end of embryogenesis, pre-PGCs are confined to the genital segments, where they become PGCs in the juvenile. Here, using live imaging of pre-PGCs, we have demonstrated that during Tubifex embryogenesis, pre-PGCs (defined by Vasa expression) stay in segments where they have emerged, suggesting that it is unlikely that pre-PGCs move intersegmentally during embryogenesis. Thus, it is apparent that pre-PGCs derived from the 10th and 11th M teloblast-derived primary m blast cells (designated m10 and m11) that give rise, respectively, to segments X and XI are specified in situ as PGCs and that those born in other segments become undetectable at the end of embryogenesis. To address the mechanisms for this segment-specific development of PGCs, we have performed a set of cell-transplantation experiments as well as cell-ablation experiments. When m10 and m11 that are normally located in the mid region of the embryo were placed in positions near the anterior end of the host embryo, these cells formed two consecutive segments, which exhibited Vasa-positive PGC-like cells at early juvenile stage. This suggests that in terms of PGC generation, the fates of m10 and m11 remain unchanged even if they are placed in ectopic positions along the anteroposterior axis. Nor was the fate of m10 and m11 changed even if mesodermal blast cell chains preceding or succeeding m10 and m11 were absent. In a previous study, it was shown that PGC development in segments X and XI occurs normally in the absence of the overlying ectoderm. All this

  20. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  1. GRP94 is essential for mesoderm induction and muscle development because it regulates insulin-like growth factor secretion.

    PubMed

    Wanderling, Sherry; Simen, Birgitte B; Ostrovsky, Olga; Ahmed, Noreen T; Vogen, Shawn M; Gidalevitz, Tali; Argon, Yair

    2007-10-01

    Because only few of its client proteins are known, the physiological roles of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) are poorly understood. Using targeted disruption of the murine GRP94 gene, we show that it has essential functions in embryonic development. grp94-/- embryos die on day 7 of gestation, fail to develop mesoderm, primitive streak, or proamniotic cavity. grp94-/- ES cells grow in culture and are capable of differentiation into cells representing all three germ layers. However, these cells do not differentiate into cardiac, smooth, or skeletal muscle. Differentiation cultures of mutant ES cells are deficient in secretion of insulin-like growth factor II and their defect can be complemented with exogenous insulin-like growth factors I or II. The data identify insulin-like growth factor II as one developmentally important protein whose production depends on the activity of GRP94. PMID:17634284

  2. Hedgehog–BMP signalling establishes dorsoventral patterning in lateral plate mesoderm to trigger gonadogenesis in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Takashi; Murai, Hidetaka; Saito, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    The gonad appears in the early embryo after several events: cells at the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) undergo ingression, begin gonadal differentiation and then retain primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here we show that in the chicken embryo, these events are triggered on the basis of dorsoventral patterning at the medial LPM. Gonadal progenitor cells (GPCs) at the ventromedial LPM initiate gonadogenesis by undergoing ingression, whereas mesonephric capsule progenitor cells (MCPCs) at the dorsomedial LPM do not. These contrasting behaviours are caused by Hedgehog signalling, which is activated in GPCs but not in MCPCs. Inhibiting Hedgehog signalling prevents GPCs from forming gonadal structures and collecting PGCs. When activated by Hedgehog signalling, MCPCs form an ectopic gonad. This Hedgehog signalling is mediated by BMP4. These findings provide insight into embryonic patterning and gonadal initiation in the chicken embryo. PMID:27558761

  3. Normal development of the tomato clownfish Amphiprion frenatus: live imaging and in situ hybridization analyses of mesodermal and neurectodermal development.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, J; Wilson, R W; Kudoh, T

    2009-12-01

    The normal embryonic development of the tomato clownfish Amphiprion frenatus was analysed using live imaging and by in situ hybridization for detection of mesodermal and neurectodermal development. Both morphology of live embryos and tissue-specific staining revealed significant differences in the gross developmental programme of A. frenatus compared with better-known teleost fish models, in particular, initiation of somitogenesis before complete epiboly, initiation of narrowing of the neurectoderm (neurulation) before somitogenesis, relatively early pigmentation of melanophores at the 10-15 somite stage and a distinctive pattern of melanophore distribution. These results suggest evolutionary adaptability of the teleost developmental programme. The ease of obtaining eggs, in vitro culture of the embryo, in situ staining analyses and these reported characteristics make A. frenatus a potentially important model marine fish species for studying embryonic development, physiology, ecology and evolution. PMID:20738687

  4. Csrp1 regulates dynamic cell movements of the mesendoderm and cardiac mesoderm through interactions with Dishevelled and Diversin

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Kota Y.; Kida, Yasuyuki S.; Sato, Takayuki; Minami, Mari; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2007-01-01

    Zebrafish Csrp1 is a member of the cysteine- and glycine-rich protein (CSRP) family and is expressed in the mesendoderm and its derivatives. Csrp1 interacts with Dishevelled 2 (Dvl2) and Diversin (Div), which control cell morphology and other dynamic cell behaviors via the noncanonical Wnt and JNK pathways. When csrp1 message is knocked down, abnormal convergent extension cell movement is induced, resulting in severe deformities in midline structures. In addition, cardiac bifida is induced as a consequence of defects in cardiac mesoderm cell migration. Our data highlight Csrp1 as a key molecule of the noncanonical Wnt pathway, which orchestrates cell behaviors during dynamic morphogenetic movements of tissues and organs. PMID:17592114

  5. The myogenic repressor gene Holes in muscles is a direct transcriptional target of Twist and Tinman in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Elwell, Jennifer A.; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Adams, Melanie M.; Baca, Erica M.; Lee, Thai; Cripps, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory circuitry controlling myogenesis is critical to understanding developmental mechanisms and developmentally-derived diseases. We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of a Drosophila myogenic repressor gene, Holes in muscles (Him). Previously, Him was shown to inhibit Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) activity, and is expressed in myoblasts but not differentiating myotubes. We demonstrate that different phases of Him embryonic expression arise through the actions of different enhancers, and we characterize the enhancer required for its early mesoderm expression. This Him early mesoderm enhancer contains two conserved binding sites for the basic helix-loop-helix regulator Twist, and one binding site for the NK homeodomain protein Tinman. The sites for both proteins are required for enhancer activity in early embryos. Twist and Tinman activate the enhancer in tissue culture assays, and ectopic expression of either factor is sufficient to direct ectopic expression of a Him-lacZ reporter, or of the endogenous Him gene. Moreover, sustained expression of twist expression in the mesoderm up-regulates mesodermal Him expression in late embryos. Our findings provide a model to define mechanistically how Twist can both promotes myogenesis through direct activation of Mef2, and can place a brake on myogenesis, through direct activation of Him. PMID:25704510

  6. Light and electron microscopic studies of the intestinal epithelium in Notoplana humilis (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida): the contribution of mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts to intestinal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke; Ishida, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    Some free-living flatworms in the phylum Platyhelminthes possess strong regenerative capability that depends on putative pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. These neoblasts are defined based on several criteria, including their proliferative capacity and the presence of cellular components known as chromatoid bodies. Polyclads, which are marine flatworms, have the potential to be a good model system for stem cell research, yet little information is available regarding neoblasts and regeneration. In this study, transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining analyses, using antibodies against phospho-histone H3 and BrdU, were used to identify two populations of neoblasts in the polyclad Notoplana humilis: mesodermal neoblasts (located in the mesenchymal space) and gastrodermal neoblasts (located within the intestine, where granular club cells and phagocytic cells are also located). Light and electron microscopic analyses also suggested that phagocytic cells and mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts, but not granular club cells, migrated into blastemas and remodeled the intestine during regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that, in polyclads, intestinal regeneration is accomplished by mechanisms underlying both morphallaxis (remodeling of pre-existing tissues) and epimorphosis (de novo tissue formation derived from mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts). Based on the assumption that gastrodermal neoblasts, which are derived from mesodermal neoblasts, are intestinal stem cells, we propose a model to study intestinal regeneration. PMID:26104134

  7. Xwnt-8 and lithium can act upon either dorsal mesodermal or neurectodermal cells to cause a loss of forebrain in Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredieu, J. R.; Cui, Y.; Maier, D.; Danilchik, M. V.; Christian, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    When Xenopus gastrulae are made to misexpress Xwnt-8, or are exposed to lithium ions, they develop with a loss of anterior structures. In the current study, we have characterized the neural defects produced by either Xwnt-8 or lithium and have examined potential cellular mechanisms underlying this anterior truncation. We find that the primary defect in embryos exposed to lithium at successively earlier stages during gastrulation is a progressive rostral to caudal deletion of the forebrain, while hindbrain and spinal regions of the CNS remain intact. Misexpression of Xwnt-8 during gastrulation produces an identical loss of forebrain. Our results demonstrate that lithium and Wnts can act upon either prospective neural ectodermal cells, or upon dorsal mesodermal cells, to cause a loss of anterior pattern. Specifically, ectodermal cells isolated from lithium- or Wnt-exposed embryos are unable to form anterior neural tissue in response to inductive signals from normal dorsal mesoderm. In addition, although dorsal mesodermal cells from lithium- or Wnt-exposed embryos are specified properly, and produce normal levels of the anterior neural inducing molecules noggin and chordin, they show a greatly reduced capacity to induce anterior neural tissue in conjugated ectoderm. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model in which Wnt- or lithium-mediated signals can induce either mesodermal or ectodermal cells to produce a dominant posteriorizing morphogen which respecifies anterior neural tissue as posterior.

  8. The control of rostrocaudal pattern in the developing spinal cord: specification of motor neuron subtype identity is initiated by signals from paraxial mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Ensini, M; Tsuchida, T N; Belting, H G; Jessell, T M

    1998-03-01

    The generation of distinct classes of motor neurons is an early step in the control of vertebrate motor behavior. To study the interactions that control the generation of motor neuron subclasses in the developing avian spinal cord we performed in vivo grafting studies in which either the neural tube or flanking mesoderm were displaced between thoracic and brachial levels. The positional identity of neural tube cells and motor neuron subtype identity was assessed by Hox and LIM homeodomain protein expression. Our results show that the rostrocaudal identity of neural cells is plastic at the time of neural tube closure and is sensitive to positionally restricted signals from the paraxial mesoderm. Such paraxial mesodermal signals appear to control the rostrocaudal identity of neural tube cells and the columnar subtype identity of motor neurons. These results suggest that the generation of motor neuron subtypes in the developing spinal cord involves the integration of distinct rostrocaudal and dorsoventral patterning signals that derive, respectively, from paraxial and axial mesodermal cell groups. PMID:9463344

  9. Dvr1 transfers left-right asymmetric signals from Kupffer's vesicle to lateral plate mesoderm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Annita G; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2013-10-01

    An early step in establishing left-right (LR) symmetry in zebrafish is the generation of asymmetric fluid flow by Kupffer's vesicle (KV). As a result of fluid flow, a signal is generated and propagated from the KV to the left lateral plate mesoderm, activating a transcriptional response of Nodal expression in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). The mechanisms and molecules that aid in this transfer of information from the KV to the left LPM are still not clear. Here we provide several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for a member of the TGFβ family member, Dvr1, a zebrafish Vg1 ortholog. Dvr1 is expressed bilaterally between the KV and the LPM. Knockdown of Dvr1 by morpholino causes dramatically reduced or absent expression of southpaw (spaw, a Nodal homolog), in LPM, and corresponding loss of downstream Lefty (lft1 and lft) expression, and aberrant brain and heart LR patterning. Dvr1 morphant embryos have normal KV morphology and function, normal expression of southpaw (spaw) and charon (cha) in the peri-KV region and normal expression of a variety of LPM markers in LPM. Additionally, Dvr1 knockdown does not alter the capability of LPM to respond to signals that initiate and propagate spaw expression. Co-injection experiments in Xenopus and zebrafish indicate that Dvr1 and Spaw can enhance each other's ability to activate the Nodal response pathway and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal differential relationships among activators and inhibitors in this pathway. These results indicate that Dvr1 is responsible for enabling the transfer of a left-right signal from KV to the LPM. PMID:23791819

  10. Loss of Abdominal Muscle in Pitx2 Mutants Associated with Altered Axial Specification of Lateral Plate Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Diana; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Xu, Jun; Shih, Hung-Ping; Gross, Michael K.; Kiouss, Chrissa

    2012-01-01

    Sequence specific transcription factors (SSTFs) combinatorially define cell types during development by forming recursively linked network kernels. Pitx2 expression begins during gastrulation, together with Hox genes, and becomes localized to the abdominal lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) before the onset of myogenesis in somites. The somatopleure of Pitx2 null embryos begins to grow abnormally outward before muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) or Pitx2 begin expression in the dermomyotome/myotome. Abdominal somites become deformed and stunted as they elongate into the mutant body wall, but maintain normal MRF expression domains. Subsequent loss of abdominal muscles is therefore not due to defects in specification, determination, or commitment of the myogenic lineage. Microarray analysis was used to identify SSTF families whose expression levels change in E10.5 interlimb body wall biopsies. All Hox9-11 paralogs had lower RNA levels in mutants, whereas genes expressed selectively in the hypaxial dermomyotome/myotome and sclerotome had higher RNA levels in mutants. In situ hybridization analyses indicate that Hox gene expression was reduced in parts of the LPM and intermediate mesoderm of mutants. Chromatin occupancy studies conducted on E10.5 interlimb body wall biopsies showed that Pitx2 protein occupied chromatin sites containing conserved bicoid core motifs in the vicinity of Hox 9-11 and MRF genes. Taken together, the data indicate that Pitx2 protein in LPM cells acts, presumably in combination with other SSTFs, to repress gene expression, that are normally expressed in physically adjoining cell types. Pitx2 thereby prevents cells in the interlimb LPM from adopting the stable network kernels that define sclerotomal, dermomyotomal, or myotomal mesenchymal cell types. This mechanism may be viewed either as lineage restriction or specification. PMID:22860089

  11. Positional identity of murine mesenchymal stem cells resident in different organs is determined in the postsegmentation mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Sági, Bernadett; Maraghechi, Pouneh; Urbán, Veronika S; Hegyi, Beáta; Szigeti, Anna; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Kudlik, Gyöngyi; Német, Katalin; Monostori, Eva; Gócza, Elen; Uher, Ferenc

    2012-03-20

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of distinct tissue origin have a large number of similarities and differences, it has not been determined so far whether tissue-resident MSCs are the progenies of one ancestor cell lineage or the results of parallel cell developmental events. Here we compared the expression levels of 177 genes in murine MSCs derived from adult and juvenile bone marrow and adult adipose tissue, as well as juvenile spleen, thymus, and aorta wall by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and the results were partially validated at protein level. All MSC lines uniformly expressed a large set of genes including well-known mesenchymal markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin, collagen type I α-chain, GATA6, Mohawk, and vimentin. In contrast, pluripotency genes and the early mesodermal marker T-gene were not expressed. On the other hand, different MSC lines consistently expressed distinct patterns of Hox genes determining the positional identity of a given cell population. Moreover, MSCs of different origin expressed a few other transcription factors also reflecting their topological identity and so the body segment or organ to which they normally contributed in vivo: (1) thymus-derived cells specifically expressed Tbx5 and Pitx2; (2) spleen-derived MSCs were characterized with Tlx1 and Nkx2.5; (3) Pitx1 designated femoral bone marrow cells and (4) En2 appeared in aorta wall-derived MSCs. Thus, MSCs exhibited topographic identity and memory even after long-term cultivation in vitro. On the basis of these results, we suggest that postnatal MSCs isolated from different anatomical sites descend from precursor cells developing in the postsegmentation mesoderm. PMID:22149974

  12. Plant Homeo Domain Finger Protein 8 Regulates Mesodermal and Cardiac Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells Through Mediating the Histone Demethylation of pmaip1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Hong, Ya-Zhen; Bai, Hua-Jun; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Charlie Degui; Lang, Jing-Yu; Boheler, Kenneth R; Yang, Huang-Tian

    2016-06-01

    Histone demethylases have emerged as key regulators of biological processes. The H3K9me2 demethylase plant homeo domain finger protein 8(PHF8), for example, is involved in neuronal differentiation, but its potential function in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to cardiomyocytes is poorly understood. Here, we explored the role of PHF8 during mesodermal and cardiac lineage commitment of mouse ESCs (mESCs). Using a phf8 knockout (ph8(-/Y) ) model, we found that deletion of phf8 in ESCs did not affect self-renewal, proliferation or early ectodermal/endodermal differentiation, but it did promote the mesodermal lineage commitment with the enhanced cardiomyocyte differentiation. The effects were accompanied by a reduction in apoptosis through a caspase 3-independent pathway during early ESC differentiation, without significant differences between differentiating wide-type (ph8(+/Y) ) and ph8(-/Y) ESCs in cell cycle progression or proliferation. Functionally, PHF8 promoted the loss of a repressive mark H3K9me2 from the transcription start site of a proapoptotic gene pmaip1 and activated its transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of pmaip1 mimicked the phenotype of ph8(-/Y) by showing the decreased apoptosis during early differentiation of ESCs and promoted mesodermal and cardiac commitment, while overexpression of pmaip1 or phf8 rescued the phenotype of ph8(-/Y) ESCs by increasing the apoptosis and weakening the mesodermal and cardiac differentiation. These results reveal that the histone demethylase PHF8 regulates mesodermal lineage and cell fate decisions in differentiating mESCs through epigenetic control of the gene critical to programmed cell death pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:1527-1540. PMID:26866517

  13. The migration of paraxial and lateral plate mesoderm cells emerging from the late primitive streak is controlled by different Wnt signals

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Dylan; Wagstaff, Laura; Cooper, Oliver; Weijer, Cornelis; Münsterberg, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Background Co-ordinated cell movement is a fundamental feature of developing embryos. Massive cell movements occur during vertebrate gastrulation and during the subsequent extension of the embryonic body axis. These are controlled by cell-cell signalling and a number of pathways have been implicated. Here we use long-term video microscopy in chicken embryos to visualize the migration routes and movement behaviour of mesoderm progenitor cells as they emerge from the primitive streak (PS) between HH stages 7 and 10. Results We observed distinct cell movement behaviours along the length of the streak and determined that this is position dependent with cells responding to environmental cues. The behaviour of cells was altered by exposing embryos or primitive streak explants to cell pellets expressing Wnt3a and Wnt5a, without affecting cell fates, thus implicating these ligands in the regulation of cell movement behaviour. Interestingly younger embryos were not responsive, suggesting that Wnt3a and Wnt5a are specifically involved in the generation of posterior mesoderm, consistent with existing mouse and zebrafish mutants. To investigate which downstream components are involved mutant forms of dishevelled (dsh) and prickle1 (pk1) were electroporated into the primitive streak. These had differential effects on the behaviour of mesoderm progenitors emerging from anterior or posterior regions of the streak, suggesting that multiple Wnt pathways are involved in controlling cell migration during extension of the body axis in amniote embryos. Conclusion We suggest that the distinct behaviours of paraxial and lateral mesoderm precursors are regulated by the opposing actions of Wnt5a and Wnt3a as they leave the primitive streak in neurula stage embryos. Our data suggests that Wnt5a acts via prickle to cause migration of cells from the posterior streak. In the anterior streak, this is antagonised by Wnt3a to generate non-migratory medial mesoderm. PMID:18541012

  14. Morphological comparison of the craniofacial phenotypes of mouse models expressing the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest- or mesoderm-derived tissues

    PubMed Central

    Heuzé, Yann; Singh, Nandini; Basilico, Claudio; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Holmes, Greg; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-01-01

    Bones of the craniofacial skeleton are derived from two distinct cell lineages, cranial neural crest and mesoderm, and articulate at sutures and synchondroses which represent major bone growth sites. Premature fusion of cranial suture(s) is associated with craniofacial dysmorphogenesis caused in part by alteration in the growth potential at sutures and can occur as an isolated birth defect or as part of a syndrome, such as Apert syndrome. Conditional expression of the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in mesoderm was previously shown to be necessary and sufficient to cause coronal craniosynostosis. Here we used micro computed tomography images of mice expressing the Apert mutation constitutively in either mesoderm or neural crest to quantify craniofacial shape variation and suture fusion patterns, and to identify shape changes in craniofacial bones derived from the lineage not expressing the mutation, referred to here as secondary shape changes. Our results show that at postnatal day 0: (i) conditional expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest-derived tissues causes a more severe craniofacial phenotype than when expressed in mesoderm-derived tissues; and (ii) both mesoderm- and neural crest-specific mouse models display secondary shape changes. We also show that premature suture fusion is not necessarily dependent on the expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in the sutural mesenchyme. More specifically, it appears that suture fusion patterns in both mouse models are suture-specific resulting from a complex combination of the influence of primary abnormalities of biogenesis or signaling within the sutures, and timing. PMID:24632501

  15. Sonic hedgehog enhances somite cell viability and formation of primary slow muscle fibers in avian segmented mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Cann, G M; Lee, J W; Stockdale, F E

    1999-09-01

    Primary skeletal muscle fibers first form in the segmented portions of paraxial mesoderm called somites. Although the neural tube and notochord are recognized as crucial in patterning myogenic cell lineages during avian and mammalian somitic myogenesis, the source, identities, and actions of the signals governing this process remain controversial. It has been shown that signals emanating from the ventral neural tube and/or notochord alone or Shh alone serve to activate MyoD expression in somites. However, beyond a role in initiating MyoD expression, little is known about the effects of Shh on primary muscle fiber formation in somites of higher vertebrates. The studies reported here investigate how the ventral neural tube promotes myogenesis and compare the effects of the ventral neural tube with those of purified Shh protein on fiber formation in somites. We show that purified Shh protein mimics actions of the ventral neural tube on somites including initiation of muscle fiber formation, enhancement of numbers of primary muscle fibers, and particularly, the formation of primary fibers that express slow myosin. There is a marked increase in slow myosin expression in fibers in response to Shh as somites mature. The effects of ventral neural tube on fiber formation can be blocked by disrupting the Shh signaling pathway by increasing the activity of somitic cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that apoptosis is a dominant fate of somite cells, but not somitic muscle fibers, when cultured in the absence of the neural tube, and that application of Shh protein to somites reduced apoptosis. The block to apoptosis by Shh is a manifestation of the maturity of the somite with a progressive increase in the block as somites are displaced rostrally from somite III forward. We conclude that purified Shh protein in mimicking the effects of the ventral neural tube on segmented mesoderm can exert pleiotropic effects during primary myogenesis

  16. Two Hox cofactors, the Meis/Hth homolog UNC-62 and the Pbx/Exd homolog CEH-20, function together during C. elegans postembryonic mesodermal development

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Liu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The TALE homeodomain-containing PBC and MEIS proteins play multiple roles during metazoan development. Mutations in these proteins can cause various disorders, including cancer. In this study, we examined the roles of MEIS proteins in mesoderm development in C. elegans using the postembryonic mesodermal M lineage as a model system. We found that the MEIS protein UNC-62 plays essential roles in regulating cell fate specification and differentiation in the M lineage. Furthermore, UNC-62 appears to function together with the PBC protein CEH-20 in regulating these processes. Both unc-62 and ceh-20 have overlapping expression patterns within and outside of the M lineage, and they share physical and regulatory interactions. In particular, we found that ceh-20 is genetically required for the promoter activity of unc-62, providing evidence for another layer of regulatory interactions between MEIS and PBC proteins. PMID:19643105

  17. Left-right asymmetry and kinesin superfamily protein KIF3A: new insights in determination of laterality and mesoderm induction by kif3A-/- mice analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Yonekawa, Y; Tanaka, Y; Okada, Y; Nonaka, S; Hirokawa, N

    1999-05-17

    KIF3A is a classical member of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), ubiquitously expressed although predominantly in neural tissues, and which forms a heterotrimeric KIF3 complex with KIF3B or KIF3C and an associated protein, KAP3. To elucidate the function of the kif3A gene in vivo, we made kif3A knockout mice. kif3A-/- embryos displayed severe developmental abnormalities characterized by neural tube degeneration and mesodermal and caudal dysgenesis and died during the midgestational period at approximately 10.5 dpc (days post coitum), possibly resulting from cardiovascular insufficiency. Whole mount in situ hybridization of Pax6 revealed a normal pattern while staining by sonic hedgehog (shh) and Brachyury (T) exhibited abnormal patterns in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction at both mesencephalic and thoracic levels. These results suggest that KIF3A might be involved in mesodermal patterning and in turn neurogenesis. PMID:10330409

  18. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-irradiation inhibits mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm but promotes ectoderm differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation on living cells have been demonstrated, such as tissue sterilization, blood coagulation, angiogenesis, wound healing, and tumor elimination. However, the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not yet been clarified. A large number of reactive species are generated by plasma-irradiation in medium, of which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the main species generated. Here, we investigated the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mESCs using an embryoid body (EB) formation assay with plasma-irradiated medium or H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium. Our findings demonstrated that plasma-irradiated medium potently inhibits the differentiation from mESCs to mesoderm and endoderm by inhibiting Wnt signaling as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In contrast, both the plasma-irradiated medium and H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium enhanced the differentiation to epiblastoid, ectodermal, and neuronal lineages by activation of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) signaling, suggesting that these effects are caused by the H2O2 generated by plasma-irradiation in medium. However, in each case, the differentiation to glial cells remained unaffected. This study is the first demonstration that plasma-irradiation affects the differentiation of mESCs by the regulation of Wnt and FGF4 signaling pathways.

  19. Organiser role of the stem cell of the mesoderm in prototroch patterning in Patella vulgata (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Damen, P; Dictus, W J

    1996-05-01

    During early development of the gastropod mollusc Patella vulgata, the stem cell of the mesoderm (3D-macromere) is induced. As a result of this induction, the embryo becomes dorsoventrally organised. At about the same time in development, ciliated cells, so-called trochoblasts, are formed. Later in development, some trochoblasts deciliate and, together with the ciliated trochoblast, form the dorsoventrally organised prototroch, the locomotory organ of the larva. In order to study the role of the 3D-macromere in the specification of trochoblasts and in the induction of the dorsoventral organisation of the prototroch, induction of 3D has been prevented in various ways. it is shown that preventing 3D-induction results in the formation of a radially symmetrical prototroch. The trochoblasts of all four quadrants developed like corresponding trochoblasts of the A-quadrant. Somewhere between 30 and 120 min after fifth cleavage the 3D-macromere induces the formation of specific trochoblasts and organises the dorsoventral pattern of the prototroch. Besides a role of the 3D-macromere, a role of other cells has been demonstrated in the conditionally specified deciliation of trochoblasts. PMID:8798146

  20. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-08-15

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1(+/+) and Tbx1(-/-) embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20-25) and E10.5 (somites 30-35). Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1(-/-) embryos. Using Tbx1(Cre) knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles. PMID:24705356

  1. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E.; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2014-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1+/+ and Tbx1−/− embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20–25) and E10.5 (somites 30–35). Basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1Cre and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1−/− embryos. Using Tbx1Cre knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1Cre and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles. PMID:24705356

  2. The meso-angioblast: a multipotent, self-renewing cell that originates from the dorsal aorta and differentiates into most mesodermal tissues.

    PubMed

    Minasi, Maria G; Riminucci, Mara; De Angelis, Luciana; Borello, Ugo; Berarducci, Barbara; Innocenzi, Anna; Caprioli, Arianna; Sirabella, Dario; Baiocchi, Marta; De Maria, Ruggero; Boratto, Renata; Jaffredo, Thierry; Broccoli, Vania; Bianco, Paolo; Cossu, Giulio

    2002-06-01

    We have previously reported the origin of a class of skeletal myogenic cells from explants of dorsal aorta. This finding disagrees with the known origin of all skeletal muscle from somites and has therefore led us to investigate the in vivo origin of these cells and, moreover, whether their fate is restricted to skeletal muscle, as observed in vitro under the experimental conditions used. To address these issues, we grafted quail or mouse embryonic aorta into host chick embryos. Donor cells, initially incorporated into the host vessels, were later integrated into mesodermal tissues, including blood, cartilage, bone, smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscle. When expanded on a feeder layer of embryonic fibroblasts, the clonal progeny of a single cell from the mouse dorsal aorta acquired unlimited lifespan, expressed hemo-angioblastic markers (CD34, Flk1 and Kit) at both early and late passages, and maintained multipotency in culture or when transplanted into a chick embryo. We conclude that these newly identified vessel-associated stem cells, the meso-angioblasts, participate in postembryonic development of the mesoderm, and we speculate that postnatal mesodermal stem cells may be derived from a vascular developmental origin. PMID:12015303

  3. FoxA4 Favours Notochord Formation by Inhibiting Contiguous Mesodermal Fates and Restricts Anterior Neural Development in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Murgan, Sabrina; Castro Colabianchi, Aitana Manuela; Monti, Renato José; Boyadjián López, Laura Elena; Aguirre, Cecilia E.; Stivala, Ernesto González; López, Silvia L.

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, the embryonic dorsal midline is a crucial signalling centre that patterns the surrounding tissues during development. Members of the FoxA subfamily of transcription factors are expressed in the structures that compose this centre. Foxa2 is essential for dorsal midline development in mammals, since knock-out mouse embryos lack a definitive node, notochord and floor plate. The related gene foxA4 is only present in amphibians. Expression begins in the blastula –chordin and –noggin expressing centre (BCNE) and is later restricted to the dorsal midline derivatives of the Spemann's organiser. It was suggested that the early functions of mammalian foxa2 are carried out by foxA4 in frogs, but functional experiments were needed to test this hypothesis. Here, we show that some important dorsal midline functions of mammalian foxa2 are exerted by foxA4 in Xenopus. We provide new evidence that the latter prevents the respecification of dorsal midline precursors towards contiguous fates, inhibiting prechordal and paraxial mesoderm development in favour of the notochord. In addition, we show that foxA4 is required for the correct regionalisation and maintenance of the central nervous system. FoxA4 participates in constraining the prospective rostral forebrain territory during neural specification and is necessary for the correct segregation of the most anterior ectodermal derivatives, such as the cement gland and the pituitary anlagen. Moreover, the early expression of foxA4 in the BCNE (which contains precursors of the whole forebrain and most of the midbrain and hindbrain) is directly required to restrict anterior neural development. PMID:25343614

  4. Functional analysis of grimp, a novel gene required for mesodermal cell proliferation at an initial stage of regeneration in Enchytraeus japonensis (Enchytraeidae, Oligochaete).

    PubMed

    Takeo, Makoto; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete species, which has a remarkable regeneration capacity. It has been proposed as a new model animal for the study of regeneration, and some histological studies of this species have been carried out. On the other hand, the molecular biological mechanism of regeneration is almost unknown in this species. To clarify the molecular biological mechanism operating at an initial stage of regeneration in E. japonensis, we isolated by the cDNA subtraction method five genes whose expression levels changed in the regeneration process occurring between growing and early regenerating worms. One of the isolated genes (a novel gene named grimp) was expressed transiently from 3 to 12 h post amputation only in neoblasts and a population of mesodermal cells (the non-neoblast grimp-expressing cells) incorporating BrdU simultaneously showed mitotic activity. We succeeded in inhibiting grimp expression by RNA interference (RNAi), thus applying this technique for the first time in Oligochaeta. In knock-down worms, the number of BrdU-positive neoblasts and the non-neoblast grimp-expressing cells in the coelom drastically decreased. Moreover, the elongation and the segmentation of blastemas were inhibited, while no statistically significant inhibitory effect was observed in epidermal and intestinal cells. These results suggest that grimp is required for initial proliferation of neoblasts and some mesodermal cells for regeneration. PMID:19876829

  5. Primary Bovine Extra-Embryonic Cultured Cells: A New Resource for the Study of In Vivo Peri-Implanting Phenotypes and Mesoderm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hue, Isabelle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Fournier, Thierry; Degrelle, Séverine A.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to nourishing the embryo, extra-embryonic tissues (EETs) contribute to early embryonic patterning, primitive hematopoiesis, and fetal health. These tissues are of major importance for human medicine, as well as for efforts to improve livestock efficiency, but they remain incompletely understood. In bovines, EETs are accessible easily, in large amounts, and prior to implantation. We took advantage of this system to describe, in vitro and in vivo, the cell types present in bovine EETs at Day 18 of development. Specifically, we characterized the gene expression patterns and phenotypes of bovine extra-embryonic ectoderm (or trophoblast; bTC), endoderm (bXEC), and mesoderm (bXMC) cells in culture and compared them to their respective in vivo micro-dissected cells. After a week of culture, certain characteristics (e.g., gene expression) of the in vitro cells were altered with respect to the in vivo cells, but we were able to identify “cores” of cell-type-specific (and substrate-independent) genes that were shared between in vitro and in vivo samples. In addition, many cellular phenotypes were cell-type-specific with regard to extracellular adhesion. We evaluated the ability of individual bXMCs to migrate and spread on micro-patterns, and observed that they easily adapted to diverse environments, similar to in vivo EE mesoderm cells, which encounter different EE epithelia to form chorion, yolk sac, and allantois. With these tissue interactions, different functions arose that were detected in silico and corroborated in vivo at D21–D25. Moreover, analysis of bXMCs allowed us to identify the EE cell ring surrounding the embryonic disc (ED) at D14-15 as mesoderm cells, which had been hypothesized but not shown prior to this study. We envision these data will serve as a major resource for the future in the analysis of peri-implanting phenotypes in response to the maternal metabolism and contribute to subsequent studies of placental/fetal development in

  6. Expression cloning of Xantivin, a Xenopus lefty/antivin-related gene, involved in the regulation of activin signaling during mesoderm induction.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, K; Yokota, C; Takahashi, S; Asashima, M

    2000-12-01

    In a screening for activin-responsive genes, we isolated a Xenopus lefty/antivin-related gene, called Xantivin (Xatv). In the animal cap assay, the expression of Xatv was induced by activin signaling, and in the embryo, by nodal-related genes. Overexpression of Xatv in the marginal zone caused suppression of mesoderm formation and gastrulation defects, and inhibited the secondary axis formation induced by Xnr1 and Xactivin, suggesting that Xatv acted as a feedback inhibitor of activin signaling. However, in the animal cap, Xatv failed to antagonize Xnr1 and Xactivin. This result suggested that Xatv has different responses in the marginal zone and in the animal region, and antagonizes to a higher degree activin signaling in the marginal zone. PMID:11091069

  7. Cytostatic Effect of Repeated Exposure to Simvastatin: A Mechanism for Chronic Myotoxicity Revealed by the Use of Mesodermal Progenitors Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Peric, Delphine; Barragan, Isabel; Giraud-Triboult, Karine; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Meyniel-Schicklin, Laurène; Cousin, Christelle; Lotteau, Vincent; Petit, Vincent; Touhami, Jawida; Battini, Jean-Luc; Sitbon, Marc; Pinset, Christian; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Laustriat, Delphine; Peschanski, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Statin treatment of hypercholesterolemia can lead to chronic myotoxicity which is, in most cases, alleviated by drug withdrawal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this adverse effect have been elusive, in particular because of the lack of in vitro models suitable for long-term exposures. We have taken advantage of the properties of human pluripotent stem cell-derived mesodermal precursors, that can be maintained unaltered in vitro for a long period of time, to develop a model of repeated exposures to simvastatin during more than 2 weeks. This approach unveiled major differences, both in functional and molecular terms, in response to single versus repeated-dose exposures to simvastatin. The main functional effect of the in vitro simvastatin-induced long-term toxicity was a loss of proliferative capacity in the absence of concomitant cell death, revealing that cytostatic effect could be a major contributor to statin-induced myotoxicity. Comparative analysis of molecular modifications induced by simvastatin short-term versus prolonged exposures demonstrated powerful adaptive cell responses, as illustrated by the dramatic decrease in the number of differentially expressed genes, distinct biological pathway enrichments, and distinct patterns of nutrient transporters expressed at the cell surface. This study underlines the potential of derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells for developing new approaches in toxicology, in particular for chronic toxicity testing. PMID:26184566

  8. Osr1 expression demarcates a multi-potent population of intermediate mesoderm that undergoes progressive restriction to an Osr1-dependent nephron progenitor compartment within the mammalian kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Joshua W.; Sipilä, Petra; McMahon, Jill A.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is derived from the intermediate mesoderm. In this report, we use molecular fate mapping to demonstrate that the majority of cell types within the metanephric kidney arise from an Osr1+ population of metanephric progenitor cells. These include the ureteric epithelium of the collecting duct network, the cap mesenchyme and its nephron epithelia derivatives, the interstitial mesenchyme, vasculature and smooth muscle. Temporal fate mapping shows a progressive restriction of Osr1+ cell fates such that at the onset of active nephrogenesis, Osr1 activity is restricted to the Six2+ cap mesenchyme nephron progenitors. However, low-level labeling of Osr1+ cells suggests that the specification of interstitial mesenchyme and cap mesenchyme progenitors occurs within the Osr1+ population prior to the onset of metanephric development. Furthermore, although Osr1+ progenitors give rise to much of the kidney, Osr1 function is only essential for the development of the nephron progenitor compartment. These studies provide new insights into the cellular origins of metanephric kidney structures and lend support to a model where Osr1 function is limited to establishing the nephron progenitor pool. PMID:18835385

  9. Osr1 expression demarcates a multi-potent population of intermediate mesoderm that undergoes progressive restriction to an Osr1-dependent nephron progenitor compartment within the mammalian kidney.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Joshua W; Sipilä, Petra; McMahon, Jill A; McMahon, Andrew P

    2008-12-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is derived from the intermediate mesoderm. In this report, we use molecular fate mapping to demonstrate that the majority of cell types within the metanephric kidney arise from an Osr1(+) population of metanephric progenitor cells. These include the ureteric epithelium of the collecting duct network, the cap mesenchyme and its nephron epithelia derivatives, the interstitial mesenchyme, vasculature and smooth muscle. Temporal fate mapping shows a progressive restriction of Osr1(+) cell fates such that at the onset of active nephrogenesis, Osr1 activity is restricted to the Six2(+) cap mesenchyme nephron progenitors. However, low-level labeling of Osr1(+) cells suggests that the specification of interstitial mesenchyme and cap mesenchyme progenitors occurs within the Osr1(+) population prior to the onset of metanephric development. Furthermore, although Osr1(+) progenitors give rise to much of the kidney, Osr1 function is only essential for the development of the nephron progenitor compartment. These studies provide new insights into the cellular origins of metanephric kidney structures and lend support to a model where Osr1 function is limited to establishing the nephron progenitor pool. PMID:18835385

  10. A comprehensive gene expression analysis at sequential stages of in vitro cardiac differentiation from isolated MESP1-expressing-mesoderm progenitors

    PubMed Central

    den Hartogh, Sabine C.; Wolstencroft, Katherine; Mummery, Christine L.; Passier, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cardiac differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) closely recapitulates in vivo embryonic heart development, and therefore, provides an excellent model to study human cardiac development. We recently generated the dual cardiac fluorescent reporter MESP1mCherry/wNKX2-5eGFP/w line in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), allowing the visualization of pre-cardiac MESP1+ mesoderm and their further commitment towards the cardiac lineage, marked by activation of the cardiac transcription factor NKX2-5. Here, we performed a comprehensive whole genome based transcriptome analysis of MESP1-mCherry derived cardiac-committed cells. In addition to previously described cardiac-inducing signalling pathways, we identified novel transcriptional and signalling networks indicated by transient activation and interactive network analysis. Furthermore, we found a highly dynamic regulation of extracellular matrix components, suggesting the importance to create a versatile niche, adjusting to various stages of cardiac differentiation. Finally, we identified cell surface markers for cardiac progenitors, such as the Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 4 (LGR4), belonging to the same subfamily of LGR5, and LGR6, established tissue/cancer stem cells markers. We provide a comprehensive gene expression analysis of cardiac derivatives from pre-cardiac MESP1-progenitors that will contribute to a better understanding of the key regulators, pathways and markers involved in human cardiac differentiation and development. PMID:26783251

  11. A comprehensive gene expression analysis at sequential stages of in vitro cardiac differentiation from isolated MESP1-expressing-mesoderm progenitors.

    PubMed

    den Hartogh, Sabine C; Wolstencroft, Katherine; Mummery, Christine L; Passier, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cardiac differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) closely recapitulates in vivo embryonic heart development, and therefore, provides an excellent model to study human cardiac development. We recently generated the dual cardiac fluorescent reporter MESP1(mCherry/w)NKX2-5(eGFP/w) line in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), allowing the visualization of pre-cardiac MESP1+ mesoderm and their further commitment towards the cardiac lineage, marked by activation of the cardiac transcription factor NKX2-5. Here, we performed a comprehensive whole genome based transcriptome analysis of MESP1-mCherry derived cardiac-committed cells. In addition to previously described cardiac-inducing signalling pathways, we identified novel transcriptional and signalling networks indicated by transient activation and interactive network analysis. Furthermore, we found a highly dynamic regulation of extracellular matrix components, suggesting the importance to create a versatile niche, adjusting to various stages of cardiac differentiation. Finally, we identified cell surface markers for cardiac progenitors, such as the Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 4 (LGR4), belonging to the same subfamily of LGR5, and LGR6, established tissue/cancer stem cells markers. We provide a comprehensive gene expression analysis of cardiac derivatives from pre-cardiac MESP1-progenitors that will contribute to a better understanding of the key regulators, pathways and markers involved in human cardiac differentiation and development. PMID:26783251

  12. Tissue Reactivity of the 14F7 Mab Raised against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside in Tumors of Neuroectodermal, Mesodermal, and Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Rancés; Quintana, Yisel; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Rengifo, Charles E.; Frómeta, Milagros; Ríos, Martha; Rengifo, Enrique; Carr, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid forming the structure of gangliosides and/or other glycoconjugates (Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) in human has been considered as a tumor-associated antigen. Specifically, some reports of 14F7 Mab (a highly specific Mab raised against N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside) reactivity in human tumors have been recently published. Nevertheless, tumors of epithelial origin have been mostly evaluated. The goal of the present paper was to evaluate the immunohistochemical recognition of 14F7 Mab in different human tumors of neuroectodermal, mesodermal, and epithelial origins using an immunoperoxidase staining method. Samples of fetal, normal, and reactive astrocytosis of the brain were also included in the study. In general, nontumoral tissues, as well as, low-grade brain tumors showed no or a limited immunoreaction with 14F7 Mab. Nevertheless, high-grade astrocytomas (III-IV) and neuroblastomas, as well as, sarcomas and thyroid carcinomas were mostly reactive with 14F7. No reaction was evidenced in medulloblastomas and ependymoblastomas. Our data suggest that the expression of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside could be related to the aggressive behavior of malignant cells, without depending on the tumor origin. Our data could also support the possible use of N-glycolyl GM3 as a target for both active and passive immunotherapies of malignancies expressing this molecule. PMID:26317019

  13. Free-form-fabricated commercially pure Ti and Ti6Al4V porous scaffolds support the growth of human embryonic stem cell-derived mesodermal progenitors.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Palmquist, A; Borchardt, P; Lennerås, M; Hyllner, J; Snis, A; Lausmaa, J; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C

    2012-01-01

    Commercially-pure titanium (cp-Ti) and the titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (Ti6Al4V) are widely used as reconstructive implants for skeletal engineering applications, due to their good mechanical properties, biocompatibility and ability to integrate with the surrounding bone. Electron beam melting technology (EBM) allows the fabrication of customized implants with tailored mechanical properties and high potential in the clinical practice. In order to augment the interaction with the biological tissue, stem cells have recently been combined with metallic scaffolds for skeletal engineering applications. We previously demonstrated that human embryonic stem cell-derived mesodermal progenitors (hES-MPs) hold a great potential to provide a homogeneous and unlimited supply of cells for bone engineering applications. This study demonstrates the effect of EBM-fabricated cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V porous scaffolds on hES-MPs behavior, in terms of cell attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation. Displaying different chemical composition but similar surface properties, EBM-fabricated cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V scaffolds supported cell attachment and growth, and did not seem to alter the expression of genes involved in osteogenic differentiation and affect the alkaline phosphatase activity. In conclusion, interfacing hES-MPs to EBM-fabricated scaffolds may represent an interesting strategy for design of third-generation biomaterials, with the potential to promote implant integration in clinical conditions characterized by poor bone quality. PMID:22262956

  14. Hidden in the crowd: primordial germ cells and somatic stem cells in the mesodermal posterior growth zone of the polychaete Platynereis dumerillii are two distinct cell populations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the polychaete Platynereis, the primordial germ cells (PGCs) emerge from the vasa, piwi, and PL10 expressing mesodermal posterior growth zone (MPGZ) at the end of larval development, suggesting a post-embryonic formation from stem cells. Methods In order to verify this hypothesis, embryos and larvae were pulse labeled with the proliferation marker 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at different stages of development. Subsequently, the PGCs were visualized in 7-day-old young worms using antibodies against the Vasa protein. Results Surprisingly, the primordial germ cells of Platynereis incorporate EdU only shortly before gastrulation (6-8 hours post fertilization (hpf)), which coincides with the emergence of four small blastomeres from the mesoblast lineage. We conclude that these so-called 'secondary mesoblast cells' constitute the definitive PGCs in Platynereis. In contrast, the cells of the MPGZ incorporate EdU only from the pre-trochophore stage onward (14 hpf). Conclusion While PGCs and the cells of the MPGZ in Platynereis are indistinguishable in morphology and both express the germline markers vasa, nanos, and piwi, a distinct cluster of PGCs is detectable anterior of the MPGZ following EdU pulse-labeling. Indeed the PGCs form independently from the stem cells of the MPGZ prior to gastrulation. Our data suggest an early PGC formation in the polychaete by preformation rather than by epigenesis. PMID:22512981

  15. Differential activation of Myf5 and MyoD by different Wnts in explants of mouse paraxial mesoderm and the later activation of myogenesis in the absence of Myf5.

    PubMed

    Tajbakhsh, S; Borello, U; Vivarelli, E; Kelly, R; Papkoff, J; Duprez, D; Buckingham, M; Cossu, G

    1998-11-01

    Activation of myogenesis in newly formed somites is dependent upon signals derived from neighboring tissues, namely axial structures (neural tube and notochord) and dorsal ectoderm. In explants of paraxial mesoderm from mouse embryos, axial structures preferentially activate myogenesis through a Myf5-dependent pathway and dorsal ectoderm preferentially through a MyoD-dependent pathway. Here we report that cells expressing Wnt1 will preferentially activate Myf5 while cells expressing Wnt7a will preferentially activate MyoD. Wnt1 is expressed in the dorsal neural tube and Wnt7a in dorsal ectoderm in the early embryo, therefore both can potentially act in vivo to activate Myf5 and MyoD, respectively. Wnt4, Wnt5a and Wnt6 exert an intermediate effect activating both Myf5 and MyoD equivalently in paraxial mesoderm. Sonic Hedgehog synergises with both Wnt1 and Wnt7a in explants from E8.5 paraxial mesoderm but not in explants from E9.5 embryos. Signaling through different myogenic pathways may explain the rescue of muscle formation in Myf5 null embryos, which do not form an early myotome but later develop both epaxial and hypaxial musculature. Explants of unsegmented paraxial mesoderm contain myogenic precursors capable of expressing MyoD in response to signaling from a neural tube isolated from E10.5 embryos, the developmental stage when MyoD is present throughout the embryo. Myogenic cells cannot activate MyoD in response to signaling from a less mature neural tube. Together these data suggest that different Wnt molecules can activate myogenesis through different pathways such that commitment of myogenic precursors is precisely regulated in space and time to achieve the correct pattern of skeletal muscle development. PMID:9753670

  16. Transcriptome profiles of Penaeus (Marsupenaeus) japonicus animal and vegetal half-embryos: identification of sex determination, germ line, mesoderm, and other developmental genes.

    PubMed

    Sellars, Melony J; Trewin, Carolyn; McWilliam, Sean M; Glaves, R S E; Hertzler, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    There is virtually no knowledge of the molecular events controlling early embryogenesis in Penaeid shrimp. A combination of controlled spawning environment, shrimp embryo micro-dissection techniques, and next-generation sequencing was used to produce transcriptome EST datasets of Penaeus japonicus animal and vegetal half-embryos. Embryos were collected immediately after spawning, and then blastomeres were separated at the two-cell stage and allowed to develop to late gastrulation, then pooled for RNA isolation and cDNA synthesis. Ion Torrent sequencing of cDNA from approximately 500 pooled animal and vegetal half-embryos from multiple spawnings resulted in 560,516 and 493,703 reads, respectively. Reads from each library were assembled and Gene Ontogeny analysis produced 3479 annotated animal contigs and 4173 annotated vegetal contigs, with 159/139 hits for developmental processes in the animal/vegetal contigs, respectively. Contigs were subject to BLAST for selected developmental toolbox genes. Some of the genes found included the sex determination genes sex-lethal and transformer; the germ line genes argonaute 1, boule, germ cell-less, gustavus, maelstrom, mex-3, par-1, pumilio, SmB, staufen, and tudor; the mesoderm genes brachyury, mef2, snail, and twist; the axis determination/segmentation genes β-catenin, deformed, distal-less, engrailed, giant, hairy, hunchback, kruppel, orthodenticle, patched, tailless, and wingless/wnt-8c; and a number of cell-cycle regulators. Animal and vegetal contigs were computationally subtracted from each other to produce sets unique to either half-embryo library. Genes expressed only in the animal half included bmp1, kruppel, maelstrom, and orthodenticle. Genes expressed only in the vegetal half included boule, brachyury, deformed, dorsal, engrailed, hunchback, spalt, twist, and wingless/wnt-8c. PMID:25634056

  17. Posterior-anterior gradient of zebrafish hes6 expression in the presomitic mesoderm is established by the combinatorial functions of the downstream enhancer and 3'UTR.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Akinori; Ovara, Hiroki; Ooka, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Hoshikawa, Miki; Nakajo, Kenji; Yokota, Daisuke; Fujino, Yuuri; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Takada, Shinji; Yamasu, Kyo

    2016-01-15

    In vertebrates, the periodic formation of somites from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) is driven by the molecular oscillator known as the segmentation clock. The hairy-related gene, hes6/her13.2, functions as a hub by dimerizing with other oscillators of the segmentation clock in zebrafish embryos. Although hes6 exhibits a posterior-anterior expression gradient in the posterior PSM with a peak at the tailbud, the detailed mechanisms underlying this unique expression pattern have not yet been clarified. By establishing several transgenic lines, we found that the transcriptional regulatory region downstream of hes6 in combination with the hes6 3'UTR recapitulates the endogenous gradient of hes6 mRNA expression. This downstream region, which we termed the PT enhancer, possessed several putative binding sites for the T-box and Ets transcription factors that were required for the regulatory activity. Indeed, the T-box transcription factor (Tbx16) and Ets transcription factor (Pea3) bound specifically to the putative binding sites and regulated the enhancer activity in zebrafish embryos. In addition, the 3'UTR of hes6 is required for recapitulation of the endogenous mRNA expression. Furthermore, the PT enhancer with the 3'UTR of hes6 responded to the inhibition of retinoic acid synthesis and fibroblast growth factor signaling in a manner similar to endogenous hes6. The results showed that transcriptional regulation by the T-box and Ets transcription factors, combined with the mRNA stability given by the 3'UTR, is responsible for the unique expression gradient of hes6 mRNA in the posterior PSM of zebrafish embryos. PMID:26596999

  18. CXCR2 Inhibition in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induces Predominant Differentiation to Mesoderm and Endoderm Through Repression of mTOR, β-Catenin, and hTERT Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Kang, Ka-Won; Kim, Jihea; Hong, Soon-Chul; Park, Yong

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of our previous report verifying that chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands in human placenta-derived cell conditioned medium (hPCCM) support human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation without exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), this study was designed to identify the effect of CXCR2 manipulation on the fate of hPSCs and the underlying mechanism, which had not been previously determined. We observed that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs induces predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm with concomitant loss of hPSC characteristics and accompanying decreased expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), β-catenin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). These phenomena are recapitulated in hPSCs propagated in conventional culture conditions, including bFGF as well as those in hPCCM without exogenous bFGF, suggesting that the action of CXCR2 on hPSCs might not be associated with a bFGF-related mechanism. In addition, the specific CXCR2 ligand growth-related oncogene α (GROα) markedly increased the expression of ectodermal markers in differentiation-committed embryoid bodies derived from hPSCs. This finding suggests that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs prohibits the propagation of hPSCs and leads to predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm owing to the blockage of ectodermal differentiation. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCR2 preferentially supports the maintenance of hPSC characteristics as well as facilitates ectodermal differentiation after the commitment to differentiation, and the mechanism might be associated with mTOR, β-catenin, and hTERT activities. PMID:27188501

  19. CXCR2 Inhibition in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induces Predominant Differentiation to Mesoderm and Endoderm Through Repression of mTOR, β-Catenin, and hTERT Activities.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Kang, Ka-Won; Kim, Jihea; Hong, Soon-Chul; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of our previous report verifying that chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands in human placenta-derived cell conditioned medium (hPCCM) support human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation without exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), this study was designed to identify the effect of CXCR2 manipulation on the fate of hPSCs and the underlying mechanism, which had not been previously determined. We observed that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs induces predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm with concomitant loss of hPSC characteristics and accompanying decreased expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), β-catenin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). These phenomena are recapitulated in hPSCs propagated in conventional culture conditions, including bFGF as well as those in hPCCM without exogenous bFGF, suggesting that the action of CXCR2 on hPSCs might not be associated with a bFGF-related mechanism. In addition, the specific CXCR2 ligand growth-related oncogene α (GROα) markedly increased the expression of ectodermal markers in differentiation-committed embryoid bodies derived from hPSCs. This finding suggests that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs prohibits the propagation of hPSCs and leads to predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm owing to the blockage of ectodermal differentiation. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCR2 preferentially supports the maintenance of hPSC characteristics as well as facilitates ectodermal differentiation after the commitment to differentiation, and the mechanism might be associated with mTOR, β-catenin, and hTERT activities. PMID:27188501

  20. Fusion of the SUMO/Sentrin-specific protease 1 gene SENP1 and the embryonic polarity-related mesoderm development gene MESDC2 in a patient with an infantile teratoma and a constitutional t(12;15)(q13;q25).

    PubMed

    Veltman, Imke M; Vreede, Lilian A; Cheng, Jinke; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Janssen, Bert; Schoenmakers, Eric F P M; Yeh, Edward T H; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2005-07-15

    Recently, we identified a patient with an infantile sacrococcygeal teratoma and a constitutional t(12;15)(q13;q25). Here, we show that, as a result of this chromosomal translocation, the SUMO/Sentrin-specific protease 1 gene (SENP1) on chromosome 12 and the embryonic polarity-related mesoderm development gene (MESDC2) on chromosome 15 are disrupted and fused. Both reciprocal SENP1-MESDC2 (SEME) and MESDC2-SENP1 (MESE) fusion genes are transcribed in tumor-derived cells and their open reading frames encode aberrant proteins. As a consequence of this, and in contrast to wild-type (WT) MESDC2, the translocation-associated SEME protein is no longer targeted to the endoplasmatic reticulum, leading to a presumed loss-of-function as a chaperone for the WNT co-receptors LRP5 and/or LRP6. Ultimately, this might lead to abnormal development and/or routing of germ cell tumor precursor cells. SUMO, a post-translational modifier, plays an important role in several cellular key processes and is cleaved from its substrates by WT SENP1. Using a PML desumoylation assay, we found that translocation-associated MESE proteins exhibit desumoylation capacities similar to those observed for WT SENP1. We speculate that spatio-temporal disturbances in desumoylating activities during critical stages of embryonic development might have predisposed the patient. Together, the constitutional t(12;15)(q13;q25) translocation revealed two novel candidate genes for neonatal/infantile GCT development: MESDC2 and SENP1. PMID:15917269

  1. Human Myocardial Pericytes: Multipotent Mesodermal Precursors Exhibiting Cardiac Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C.W.; Baily, James E.; Corselli, Mirko; Diaz, Mary; Sun, Bin; Xiang, Guosheng; Gray, Gillian A.; Huard, Johnny; Péault, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular mesenchymal precursor cells (i.e. pericytes) reside in skeletal muscle where they contribute to myofiber regeneration; however, the existence of similar microvessel-associated regenerative precursor cells in cardiac muscle has not yet been documented. We tested whether microvascular pericytes within human myocardium exhibit phenotypes and multipotency similar to their anatomically and developmentally distinct counterparts. Fetal and adult human heart pericytes (hHPs) express canonical pericyte markers in situ, including CD146, NG2, PDGFRβ, PDGFRα, αSMA, and SM-MHC, but not CD117, CD133 and desmin, nor endothelial cell (EC) markers. hHPs were prospectively purified to homogeneity from ventricular myocardium by flow cytometry, based on a combination of positive- (CD146) and negative-selection (CD34, CD45, CD56, and CD117) cell lineage markers. Purified hHPs expanded in vitro were phenotypically similar to human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes (hSkMPs). hHPs express MSC markers in situ and exhibited osteo- chondro-, and adipogenic potentials but, importantly, no ability for skeletal myogenesis, diverging from pericytes of all other origins. hHPs supported network formation with/without ECs in Matrigel cultures; hHPs further stimulated angiogenic responses under hypoxia, markedly different from hSkMPs. The cardiomyogenic potential of hHPs was examined following 5-azacytidine treatment and neonatal cardiomyocyte co-culture in vitro, and intramyocardial transplantation in vivo. Results indicated cardiomyocytic differentiation in a small fraction of hHPs. In conclusion, human myocardial pericytes share certain phenotypic and developmental similarities with their skeletal muscle homologs, yet exhibit different antigenic, myogenic, and angiogenic properties. This is the first example of an anatomical restriction in the developmental potential of pericytes as native mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25336400

  2. HOX-mediated LMO2 expression in embryonic mesoderm is recapitulated in acute leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Calero-Nieto, F J; Joshi, A; Bonadies, N; Kinston, S; Chan, W-I; Gudgin, E; Pridans, C; Landry, J-R; Kikuchi, J; Huntly, B J; Gottgens, B

    2013-11-28

    The Lim Domain Only 2 (LMO2) leukaemia oncogene encodes an LIM domain transcriptional cofactor required for early haematopoiesis. During embryogenesis, LMO2 is also expressed in developing tail and limb buds, an expression pattern we now show to be recapitulated in transgenic mice by an enhancer in LMO2 intron 4. Limb bud expression depended on a cluster of HOX binding sites, while posterior tail expression required the HOX sites and two E-boxes. Given the importance of both LMO2 and HOX genes in acute leukaemias, we further demonstrated that the regulatory hierarchy of HOX control of LMO2 is activated in leukaemia mouse models as well as in patient samples. Moreover, Lmo2 knock-down impaired the growth of leukaemic cells, and high LMO2 expression at diagnosis correlated with poor survival in cytogenetically normal AML patients. Taken together, these results establish a regulatory hierarchy of HOX control of LMO2 in normal development, which can be resurrected during leukaemia development. Redeployment of embryonic regulatory hierarchies in an aberrant context is likely to be relevant in human pathologies beyond the specific example of ectopic activation of LMO2. PMID:23708655

  3. Regulation of UNC-130/FOXD-mediated mesodermal patterning in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Rossio K; Brodigan, Thomas M; Fukushige, Tetsunari; Krause, Michael W

    2016-08-15

    Spatial polarity cues in animals are used repeatedly during development for many processes, including cell fate determination, cell migration, and axon guidance. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the body wall muscle extends the length of the animal in four distinct quadrants and generates an UNC-129/TGF-β-related signal that is much higher in the dorsal two muscle quadrants compared to their ventral counterparts. This pattern of unc-129 expression requires the activity of the proposed transcriptional repressor UNC-130/FOXD whose body wall muscle activity is restricted to the ventral two body wall muscle quadrants. To understand how these dorsal-ventral differences in UNC-130 activity are established and maintained, we have analyzed the regulation of unc-130 expression and the distribution of UNC-130 protein. We have identified widespread, cis-acting elements in the unc-130 promoter that function to positively regulate ventral body wall muscle expression and negatively regulate dorsal body wall muscle expression. We have defined the temporal distribution of UNC-130 protein in body wall muscle cells during embryogenesis, demonstrated that this pattern is required to establish the dorsal-ventral polarity of UNC-129/TGF-β, and shown that UNC-130 is not required post-embryonically to maintain the asymmetry of body wall muscle unc-129 expression. Finally, we have tested the impact of the depletion of a variety of transcription factors, repressors, and signaling molecules to identify additional regulators of body wall muscle UNC-130 polarity. Our results confirm and extend earlier studies to clarify the mechanisms by which UNC-130 is controlled and affects the pattern of unc-129 expression in body wall muscle. These results further our understanding of the transcriptional logic behind the generation of polarity cues involving this poorly understood subclass of Forkhead factors. PMID:27341757

  4. Tissue-Specific Cultured Human Pericytes: Perivascular Cells from Smooth Muscle Tissue Have Restricted Mesodermal Differentiation Ability.

    PubMed

    Pierantozzi, Enrico; Vezzani, Bianca; Badin, Margherita; Curina, Carlo; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Petraglia, Felice; Randazzo, Davide; Rossi, Daniela; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    Microvascular pericytes (PCs) are considered the adult counterpart of the embryonic mesoangioblasts, which represent a multipotent cell population that resides in the dorsal aorta of the developing embryo. Although PCs have been isolated from several adult organs and tissues, it is still controversial whether PCs from different tissues exhibit distinct differentiation potentials. To address this point, we investigated the differentiation potentials of isogenic human cultured PCs isolated from skeletal (sk-hPCs) and smooth muscle tissues (sm-hPCs). We found that both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs expressed known pericytic markers and did not express endothelial, hematopoietic, and myogenic markers. Both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were able to differentiate into smooth muscle cells. In contrast, sk-hPCs, but not sm-hPCs, differentiated in skeletal muscle cells and osteocytes. Given the reported ability of the Notch pathway to regulate skeletal muscle and osteogenic differentiation, sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were treated with N-[N-(3,5- difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), a known inhibitor of Notch signaling. DAPT treatment, as assessed by histological and molecular analysis, enhanced myogenic differentiation and abolished osteogenic potential of sk-hPCs. In contrast, DAPT treatment did not affect either myogenic or osteogenic differentiation of sm-hPCs. In summary, these results indicate that, despite being isolated from the same anatomical niche, cultured PCs from skeletal muscle and smooth muscle tissues display distinct differentiation abilities. PMID:26956507

  5. Zic3 is required in the extra-cardiac perinodal region of the lateral plate mesoderm for left-right patterning and heart development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in ZIC3 cause human X-linked heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations. A mouse model with targeted deletion of Zic3 demonstrates an early role for Zic3 in gastrulation, CNS, cardiac and left-right axial development. The observation of multiple malformations in Zic3(null) mice a...

  6. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  7. Dual embryonic origin and patterning of the pharyngeal skeleton in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Piekarski, Nadine; Hanken, James

    2015-01-01

    The impressive morphological diversification of vertebrates was achieved in part by innovation and modification of the pharyngeal skeleton. Extensive fate mapping in amniote models has revealed a primarily cranial neural crest derivation of the pharyngeal skeleton. Although comparable fate maps of amphibians produced over several decades have failed to document a neural crest derivation of ventromedial elements in these vertebrates, a recent report provides evidence of a mesodermal origin of one of these elements, basibranchial 2, in the axolotl. We used a transgenic labeling protocol and grafts of labeled cells between GFP+ and white embryos to derive a fate map that describes contributions of both cranial neural crest and mesoderm to the axolotl pharyngeal skeleton, and we conducted additional experiments that probe the mechanisms that underlie mesodermal patterning. Our fate map confirms a dual embryonic origin of the pharyngeal skeleton in urodeles, including derivation of basibranchial 2 from mesoderm closely associated with the second heart field. Additionally, heterotopic transplantation experiments reveal lineage restriction of mesodermal cells that contribute to pharyngeal cartilage. The mesoderm-derived component of the pharyngeal skeleton appears to be particularly sensitive to retinoic acid (RA): administration of exogenous RA leads to loss of the second basibranchial, but not the first. Neural crest was undoubtedly critical in the evolution of the vertebrate pharyngeal skeleton, but mesoderm may have played a central role in forming ventromedial elements, in particular. When and how many times during vertebrate phylogeny a mesodermal contribution to the pharyngeal skeleton evolved remain to be resolved. PMID:25963195

  8. Experimental analysis of blood vessel development in the avian wing bud.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, R N; Noden, D M

    1991-09-01

    Shortly after its appearance, the avian limb bud becomes populated by a rich plexus of vascular channels. Formation of this plexus occurs by angiogenesis, specifically the ingrowth of branches from the dorsal aorta or cardinal veins, and by differentiation of endogenous angioblasts within limb mesoderm. However, mesenchyme located immediately beneath the surface ectoderm of the limb is devoid of patent blood vessels. The objective of this research is to ascertain whether peripheral limb mesoderm lacks angioblasts at all stages or becomes avascular secondarily during limb development. Grafts of core or peripheral wing mesoderm, identified by the presence or absence of patent channels following systemic infusion with ink, were grafted from quail embryos at stages 16-26 into the head region of chick embryos at stages 9-10. Hosts were fixed 3-5 days later and sections treated with antibodies that recognize quail endothelial cells and their precursors. Labeled endothelial cells were found intercalated into normal craniofacial blood vessels both nearby and distant from the site of implantation following grafting of limb core mesoderm from any stage. Identical results were obtained following grafting of limb peripheral mesoderm at stages 16-21. However, peripheral mesoderm from donors older than stage 22 did not contain endothelial precursors. Thus at the onset of appendicular development angioblasts are present throughout the mesoderm of the limb bud. During the fourth day of incubation, these cells are lost from peripheral mesoderm, either through emigration or degeneration. PMID:1750708

  9. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling respecifies anterior-like endothelium into beating human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Palpant, Nathan J; Pabon, Lil; Roberts, Meredith; Hadland, Brandon; Jones, Daniel; Jones, Christina; Moon, Randall T; Ruzzo, Walter L; Bernstein, Irwin; Zheng, Ying; Murry, Charles E

    2015-09-15

    During vertebrate development, mesodermal fate choices are regulated by interactions between morphogens such as activin/nodal, BMPs and Wnt/β-catenin that define anterior-posterior patterning and specify downstream derivatives including cardiomyocyte, endothelial and hematopoietic cells. We used human embryonic stem cells to explore how these pathways control mesodermal fate choices in vitro. Varying doses of activin A and BMP4 to mimic cytokine gradient polarization in the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo led to differential activity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and specified distinct anterior-like (high activin/low BMP) and posterior-like (low activin/high BMP) mesodermal populations. Cardiogenic mesoderm was generated under conditions specifying anterior-like mesoderm, whereas blood-forming endothelium was generated from posterior-like mesoderm, and vessel-forming CD31(+) endothelial cells were generated from all mesoderm origins. Surprisingly, inhibition of β-catenin signaling led to the highly efficient respecification of anterior-like endothelium into beating cardiomyocytes. Cardiac respecification was not observed in posterior-derived endothelial cells. Thus, activin/BMP gradients specify distinct mesodermal subpopulations that generate cell derivatives with unique angiogenic, hemogenic and cardiogenic properties that should be useful for understanding embryogenesis and developing therapeutics. PMID:26153229

  10. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. PMID:27090084

  11. Antagonizing the Spemann organizer: role of the homeobox gene Xvent-1.

    PubMed Central

    Gawantka, V; Delius, H; Hirschfeld, K; Blumenstock, C; Niehrs, C

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a novel homeobox gene, Xvent-1, that is differentially expressed in the ventral marginal zone of the early Xenopus gastrula. Evidence is presented from mRNA microinjection experiments for a role for this gene in dorsoventral patterning of mesoderm. First, Xvent-1 is induced by BMP-4, a gene known to be a key regulator of ventral mesoderm development. Second, Xvent-1 and the organizer-specific gene goosecoid are able to interact, directly or indirectly, in a cross-regulatory loop suppressing each other's expression, consistent with their mutually exclusive expression in the marginal zone. Third, microinjection of Xvent-1 mRNA ventralizes dorsal mesoderm. The results suggest that Xvent-1 functions in a ventral signaling pathway that maintains the ventral mesodermal state and antagonizes the Spemann organizer. Images PMID:8557046

  12. Malignant teratoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, ...

  13. Comparative morphology and development of extra-ocular muscles in the lamprey and gnathostomes reveal the ancestral state and developmental patterns of the vertebrate head.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daichi G; Fukumoto, Yuma; Yoshimura, Miho; Yamazaki, Yuji; Kosaka, Jun; Kuratani, Shigeru; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The ancestral configuration of the vertebrate head has long been an intriguing topic in comparative morphology and evolutionary biology. One peculiar component of the vertebrate head is the presence of extra-ocular muscles (EOMs), the developmental mechanism and evolution of which remain to be determined. The head mesoderm of elasmobranchs undergoes local epithelialization into three head cavities, precursors of the EOMs. In contrast, in avians, these muscles appear to develop mainly from the mesenchymal head mesoderm. Importantly, in the basal vertebrate lamprey, the head mesoderm does not show overt head cavities or signs of segmental boundaries, and the development of the EOMs is not well described. Furthermore, the disposition of the lamprey EOMs differs from those the rest of vertebrates, in which the morphological pattern of EOMs is strongly conserved. To better understand the evolution and developmental origins of the vertebrate EOMs, we explored the development of the head mesoderm and EOMs of the lamprey in detail. We found that the disposition of lamprey EOM primordia differed from that in gnathostomes, even during the earliest period of development. We also found that three components of the paraxial head mesoderm could be distinguished genetically (premandibular mesoderm: Gsc+/TbxA-; mandibular mesoderm: Gsc-/TbxA-; hyoid mesoderm: Gsc-/TbxA+), indicating that the genetic mechanisms of EOMs are conserved in all vertebrates. We conclude that the tripartite developmental origin of the EOMs is likely to have been possessed by the latest common ancestor of the vertebrates. This ancestor's EOM developmental pattern was also suggested to have resembled more that of the lamprey, and the gnathostome EOMs' disposition is likely to have been established by a secondary modification that took place in the common ancestor of crown gnathostomes. PMID:27081572

  14. Visualizing the lateral somitic frontier in the Prx1Cre transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Durland, J Logan; Sferlazzo, Matteo; Logan, Malcolm; Burke, Ann Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the organization of the musculoskeletal system have accounted for many evolutionary adaptations in the vertebrate body plan. The musculoskeletal system develops from two mesodermal populations: somitic mesoderm gives rise to the axial skeleton and all of the skeletal muscle of the body, and lateral plate mesoderm gives rise to the appendicular skeleton. The recognition of embryonic domains resulting from the dynamics of morphogenesis has inspired new terminology based on developmental criteria. Two mesodermal domains are defined, primaxial and abaxial. The primaxial domain includes musculoskeletal structures comprising just somitic cells. The abaxial domain contains somitic myoblasts in connective tissue derived from lateral plate mesoderm, as well as lateral plate-derived skeletal structures. The boundary between these two domains is the lateral somitic frontier. Recent studies have described the developmental relationship between these two domains in the chick. In the present study, we describe the labelling pattern in the body of the Prx1/Cre/Z/AP compound transgenic mouse. The enhancer employed in this transgenic leads to reporter expression in the postcranial, somatic lateral plate mesoderm. The boundary between labelled and unlabelled cell populations is described at embryonic day (E)13.5 and E15.5. We argue that the distribution of labelled cells is consistent with the somatic lateral plate lineage, and therefore provides an estimate of the position of the lateral somitic frontier. The role of the frontier in both development and evolution is discussed. PMID:18430087

  15. The repressor function of snail is required for Drosophila gastrulation and is not replaceable by Escargot or Worniu.

    PubMed

    Hemavathy, Kirugaval; Hu, Xiaodi; Ashraf, Shovon I; Small, Stephen J; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-05-15

    Mesoderm formation in the Drosophila embryo depends on the maternal Toll signaling pathway. The Toll pathway establishes the Dorsal nuclear gradient, which regulates many zygotic genes to establish the mesodermal fate and promote the invagination of ventral cells. An important target gene of Dorsal is snail, which is required for proper mesoderm invagination. The Snail protein contains five zinc fingers and is a transcriptional repressor. However, it is not clear whether repressing target genes is a requirement for Snail to control ventral invagination. To examine such requirement, we conducted a series of genetic rescue experiments in snail mutant embryos. Snail, Worniu, and Escargot are closely related zinc-finger proteins and have equal functions during neuroblast development. However, among these three proteins, only Snail can rescue the mesoderm invagination phenotype. Moreover, the ability of various Snail mutant constructs to repress gene expression correlates with their ability to control invagination. This unique property of Snail in mesoderm formation can be attributed mostly to the CtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the N-terminus, not to the C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. Ectopic expression of Snail outside the ventral domain is not sufficient to induce cell movement even though repression of target genes still occurs. Together, the results show that the repressor function of Snail is essential for gastrulation. The repression of target genes by Snail may permit other factors in the ventral cells to positively promote mesoderm invagination. PMID:15110709

  16. Retinoic Acid Activity in Undifferentiated Neural Progenitors Is Sufficient to Fulfill Its Role in Restricting Fgf8 Expression for Somitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Brade, Thomas; Sandell, Lisa L.; Lewandoski, Mark; Trainor, Paul A.; Colas, Alexandre; Mercola, Mark; Duester, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Bipotent axial stem cells residing in the caudal epiblast during late gastrulation generate neuroectodermal and presomitic mesodermal progeny that coordinate somitogenesis with neural tube formation, but the mechanism that controls these two fates is not fully understood. Retinoic acid (RA) restricts the anterior extent of caudal fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression in both mesoderm and neural plate to control somitogenesis and neurogenesis, however it remains unclear where RA acts to control the spatial expression of caudal Fgf8. Here, we found that mouse Raldh2-/- embryos, lacking RA synthesis and displaying a consistent small somite defect, exhibited abnormal expression of key markers of axial stem cell progeny, with decreased Sox2+ and Sox1+ neuroectodermal progeny and increased Tbx6+ presomitic mesodermal progeny. The Raldh2-/- small somite defect was rescued by treatment with an FGF receptor antagonist. Rdh10 mutants, with a less severe RA synthesis defect, were found to exhibit a small somite defect and anterior expansion of caudal Fgf8 expression only for somites 1–6, with normal somite size and Fgf8 expression thereafter. Rdh10 mutants were found to lack RA activity during the early phase when somites are small, but at the 6-somite stage RA activity was detected in neural plate although not in presomitic mesoderm. Expression of a dominant-negative RA receptor in mesoderm eliminated RA activity in presomitic mesoderm but did not affect somitogenesis. Thus, RA activity in the neural plate is sufficient to prevent anterior expansion of caudal Fgf8 expression associated with a small somite defect. Our studies provide evidence that RA restriction of Fgf8 expression in undifferentiated neural progenitors stimulates neurogenesis while also restricting the anterior extent of the mesodermal Fgf8 mRNA gradient that controls somite size, providing new insight into the mechanism that coordinates somitogenesis with neurogenesis. PMID:26368825

  17. A Biomechanical Analysis of Ventral Furrow Formation in the Drosophila Melanogaster Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Vito; Ulrich, Florian; Baum, Buzz; Muñoz, Jose; Veldhuis, Jim; Brodland, Wayne; Miodownik, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The article provides a biomechanical analysis of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. Ventral furrow formation is the first large-scale morphogenetic movement in the fly embryo. It involves deformation of a uniform cellular monolayer formed following cellularisation, and has therefore long been used as a simple system in which to explore the role of mechanics in force generation. Here we use a quantitative framework to carry out a systematic perturbation analysis to determine the role of each of the active forces observed. The analysis confirms that ventral furrow invagination arises from a combination of apical constriction and apical–basal shortening forces in the mesoderm, together with a combination of ectodermal forces. We show that the mesodermal forces are crucial for invagination: the loss of apical constriction leads to a loss of the furrow, while the mesodermal radial shortening forces are the primary cause of the internalisation of the future mesoderm as the furrow rises. Ectodermal forces play a minor but significant role in furrow formation: without ectodermal forces the furrow is slower to form, does not close properly and has an aberrant morphology. Nevertheless, despite changes in the active mesodermal and ectodermal forces lead to changes in the timing and extent of furrow, invagination is eventually achieved in most cases, implying that the system is robust to perturbation and therefore over-determined. PMID:22511944

  18. BMP-SMAD signaling: From pluripotent stem cells to cardiovascular commitment.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Valeria V; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Valdimarsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can form all somatic cells of the body. They thus offer opportunities for understanding (i) the basic steps of early human development, (ii) the pathophysiology in human degenerative diseases and (iii) approaches to regenerative medicine and drug development. Methods for improving their differentiation to defined mesodermal derivatives in particular will benefit their use in all of these areas but most particularly applications that require cardiac and vascular tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate mesodermal development in humans are still poorly understood. Gene ablation studies in mice have shown that the signaling pathways activated by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily, including the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), play crucial roles in mesoderm differentiation and patterning the early embryo. Understanding their interplay and interaction with other signaling pathways, how they activate and inhibit transcription factors and epigenetic regulators during self-renewal, maintenance and exit from pluripotency and differentiation could provide vital information for a range of applications. This includes disease modeling when the hPSCs are derived from patients or drug screens for diseases of mesodermal organs. Here, we review the role of the BMP-SMAD signaling pathway in pluripotent stem cells and during mesoderm differentiation with focus on the cells that make up the cardiovascular system. PMID:26651597

  19. What are Head Cavities? - A History of Studies on Vertebrate Head Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the discovery of segmental epithelial coeloms, or "head cavities," in elasmobranch embryos toward the end of the 19th century, the debate over the presence of mesodermal segments in the vertebrate head became a central problem in comparative embryology. The classical segmental view assumed only one type of metamerism in the vertebrate head, in which each metamere was thought to contain one head somite and one pharyngeal arch, innervated by a set of cranial nerves serially homologous to dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The non-segmental view, on the other hand, rejected the somite-like properties of head cavities. A series of small mesodermal cysts in early Torpedo embryos, which were thought to represent true somite homologs, provided a third possible view on the nature of the vertebrate head. Recent molecular developmental data have shed new light on the vertebrate head problem, explaining that head mesoderm evolved, not by the modification of rostral somites of an amphioxus-like ancestor, but through the polarization of unspecified paraxial mesoderm into head mesoderm anteriorly and trunk somites posteriorly. PMID:27268975

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  1. BRACHYURY and CDX2 Mediate BMP-Induced Differentiation of Human and Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells into Embryonic and Extraembryonic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Andreia S.; Faial, Tiago; Gardner, Lucy; Niakan, Kathy K.; Ortmann, Daniel; Senner, Claire E.; Callery, Elizabeth M.; Trotter, Matthew W.; Hemberger, Myriam; Smith, James C.; Bardwell, Lee; Moffett, Ashley; Pedersen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary BMP is thought to induce hESC differentiation toward multiple lineages including mesoderm and trophoblast. The BMP-induced trophoblast phenotype is a long-standing paradox in stem cell biology. Here we readdressed BMP function in hESCs and mouse epiblast-derived cells. We found that BMP4 cooperates with FGF2 (via ERK) to induce mesoderm and to inhibit endoderm differentiation. These conditions induced cells with high levels of BRACHYURY (BRA) that coexpressed CDX2. BRA was necessary for and preceded CDX2 expression; both genes were essential for expression not only of mesodermal genes but also of trophoblast-associated genes. Maximal expression of the latter was seen in the absence of FGF but these cells coexpressed mesodermal genes and moreover they differed in cell surface and epigenetic properties from placental trophoblast. We conclude that BMP induces human and mouse pluripotent stem cells primarily to form mesoderm, rather than trophoblast, acting through BRA and CDX2. PMID:21816365

  2. MiR-24 is required for hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Lapid, Danica; Choi, Hyewon; Nguyen, Tan; Dahl, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of miRNA, miR-24, in mouse hematopoietic progenitors increases monocytic/ granulocytic differentiation and inhibits B cell development. To determine if endogenous miR-24 is required for hematopoiesis, we antagonized miR-24 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and performed in vitro differentiations. Suppression of miR-24 resulted in an inability to produce blood and hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) from ESCs. The phenotype is not a general defect in mesoderm production since we observe production of nascent mesoderm as well as mesoderm derived cardiac muscle and endothelial cells. Results from blast colony forming cell (BL-CFC) assays demonstrate that miR-24 is not required for generation of the hemangioblast, the mesoderm progenitor that gives rise to blood and endothelial cells. However, expression of the transcription factors Runx1 and Scl is greatly reduced, suggesting an impaired ability of the hemangioblast to differentiate. Lastly, we observed that known miR-24 target, Trib3, is upregulated in the miR-24 antagonized embryoid bodies (EBs). Overexpression of Trib3 alone in ESCs was able to decrease HPC production, though not as great as seen with miR-24 knockdown. These results demonstrate an essential role for miR-24 in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. Although many miRNAs have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis, this is the first miRNA observed to be required for the specification of mammalian blood progenitors from early mesoderm. PMID:25634354

  3. Regulation of Xenopus gastrulation by ErbB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shuyi; Chang, Chenbei

    2016-01-01

    During Xenopus gastrulation, mesendodermal cells are internalized and display different movements. Head mesoderm migrates along the blastocoel roof, while trunk mesoderm undergoes convergent extension (C&E). Different signals are implicated in these processes. Our previous studies reveal that signals through ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases modulate Xenopus gastrulation, but the mechanisms employed are not understood. Here we report that ErbB signals control both C&E and head mesoderm migration. Inhibition of ErbB pathway blocks elongation of dorsal marginal zone explants and activin-treated animal caps without removing mesodermal gene expression. Bipolar cell shape and cell mixing in the dorsal region are impaired. Inhibition of ErbB signaling also interferes with migration of prechordal mesoderm on fibronectin. Cell–cell and cell–matrix interaction and cell spreading are reduced when ErbB signaling is blocked. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we show that ErbB4 is involved in Xenopus gastrulation morphogenesis, and it partially regulates cell movements through modulation of cell adhesion and membrane protrusions. Our results reveal for the first time that vertebrate ErbB signaling modulates gastrulation movements, thus providing a novel pathway, in addition to non-canonical Wnt and FGF signals, that controls gastrulation. We further demonstrate that regulation of cell adhesive properties and cell morphology may underlie the functions of ErbBs in gastrulation. PMID:17134691

  4. Gastrulation EMT Is Independent of P-Cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Moly, Pricila K.; Cooley, James R.; Zeltzer, Sebastian L.; Yatskievych, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionarily conserved process during which cells lose epithelial characteristics and gain a migratory phenotype. Although downregulation of epithelial cadherins by Snail and other transcriptional repressors is generally considered a prerequisite for EMT, recent studies have challenged this view. Here we investigate the relationship between E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression and localization, Snail function and EMT during gastrulation in chicken embryos. Expression analyses show that while E-cadherin transcripts are detected in the epiblast but not in the primitive streak or mesoderm, P-cadherin mRNA and protein are present in the epiblast, primitive and mesoderm. Antibodies that specifically recognize E-cadherin are not presently available. During EMT, P-cadherin relocalizes from the lateral surfaces of epithelial epiblast cells to a circumferential distribution in emerging mesodermal cells. Cells electroporated with an E-cadherin expression construct undergo EMT and migrate into the mesoderm. An examination of Snail function showed that reduction of Slug (SNAI2) protein levels using a morpholino fails to inhibit EMT, and expression of human or chicken Snail in epiblast cells fails to induce EMT. In contrast, cells expressing the Rho inhibitor peptide C3 rapidly exit the epiblast without activating Slug or the mesoderm marker N-cadherin. Together, these experiments show that epiblast cells undergo EMT while retaining P-cadherin, and raise questions about the mechanisms of EMT regulation during avian gastrulation. PMID:27097030

  5. Early embryonic expression patterns of the mouse Flamingo and Prickle orthologues.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Lucy A; Du Roure, Camille; Rodriguez, Tristan A

    2007-11-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster proteins Flamingo and Prickle act in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is required for acquisition of epithelial polarity in the wing, eye, and epidermis. In mammals, PCP signaling has been shown to regulate cell movements and polarity in a variety of tissues. Here, we show that the murine Flamingo orthologues Celsr1-3 and the Prickle orthologues Prickle1, Prickle2, and Testin have dynamic patterns of expression during pregastrulation and gastrulation stages. Celsr1 is expressed in the anterior visceral endoderm and nascent mesoderm, Celsr2 and Celsr3 mark the prospective neuroectoderm, Prickle1 is expressed in the primitive streak and mesoderm, Prickle2 in the node, and Testin in the anterior visceral endoderm, the extraembryonic ectoderm, primitive streak, and mesoderm. Analysis of a gene-trap mutation in Testin indicates that this gene is not required for embryogenesis; therefore, other Prickle homologues may compensate for its function during development. PMID:17937400

  6. Developmental angiogenesis: quail embryonic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Poole, T J; Coffin, J D

    1988-03-01

    We have examined the segregation and early morphogenesis of the embryonic vasculature by using a monoclonal antibody for immunofluorescence and by scanning electron microscopy. This antibody labels the presumptive endothelial cells (PECs) as they segregate from mesoderm. Similar embryos prepared for SEM revealed finer details of how these segregated cells interact to form the rudiments of the major blood vessels. Here we concentrate on the development of the dorsal aortae and the posterior cardinal veins. The dorsal aortae form from single PECs which segregate from the lateral mesoderm and aggregate into a loose cord ventral to the somites. These cells become more closely associated and a lumen forms. The posterior cardinal veins form from a loose plexus of cells segregated from the lateral mesoderm on its dorsal surface. These cells become intimately associated with the Wolffian ducts. PMID:3285464

  7. Interfering with Wnt signalling alters the periodicity of the segmentation clock

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Sarah; Zagorska, Anna; Melton, Kristin; Tenin, Gennady; Vacca, Irene; Trainor, Paul; Maroto, Miguel; Dale, J. Kim

    2009-01-01

    Somites are embryonic precursors of the ribs, vertebrae and certain dermis tissue. Somite formation is a periodic process regulated by a molecular clock which drives cyclic expression of a number of clock genes in the presomitic mesoderm. To date the mechanism regulating the period of clock gene oscillations is unknown. Here we show that chick homologues of the Wnt pathway genes that oscillate in mouse do not cycle across the chick presomitic mesoderm. Strikingly we find that modifying Wnt signalling changes the period of Notch driven oscillations in both mouse and chick but these oscillations continue. We propose that the Wnt pathway is a conserved mechanism that is involved in regulating the period of cyclic gene oscillations in the presomitic mesoderm. PMID:19272372

  8. Prune belly syndrome associated with cloacal anomaly, patent urachal remnant, and omphalocele in a female infant.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Stefano; Vendryes, Christopher; Malhotra, Ajay; Shaul, Donald B; Anselmo, Dean M

    2010-11-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS), megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis (MMIH), and omphalocele-exstrophy of the bladder-imperforate anus-spine abnormalities complex (OEIS) are rare congenital malformations of the newborn that lead to incomplete formation of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract systems. To date, incomplete mesodermal development is identified as the cause for all these complex genetic syndromes even if the etiology is still unknown. We present an original case sharing characteristics common to PBS, MMIH, and OEIS complex, without a clear inclination toward any particular one. This case hints toward a common pathway in the creation of the 3 syndromes. We hypothesize that they are a spectrum of malformations based on the time frame when the mesoderm fails to create a normal interaction between infraumbilical mesoderm, urorectal septum, lumbosacral somites in the formation of the abdominal wall and the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:21034928

  9. Retinoic acid regulates size, pattern and alignment of tissues at the head-trunk transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun; Skromne, Isaac

    2014-11-01

    At the head-trunk transition, hindbrain and spinal cord alignment to occipital and vertebral bones is crucial for coherent neural and skeletal system organization. Changes in neural or mesodermal tissue configuration arising from defects in the specification, patterning or relative axial placement of territories can severely compromise their integration and function. Here, we show that coordination of neural and mesodermal tissue at the zebrafish head-trunk transition crucially depends on two novel activities of the signaling factor retinoic acid (RA): one specifying the size and the other specifying the axial position relative to mesodermal structures of the hindbrain territory. These activities are each independent but coordinated with the well-established function of RA in hindbrain patterning. Using neural and mesodermal landmarks we demonstrate that the functions of RA in aligning neural and mesodermal tissues temporally precede the specification of hindbrain and spinal cord territories and the activation of hox transcription. Using cell transplantation assays we show that RA activity in the neuroepithelium regulates hindbrain patterning directly and territory size specification indirectly. This indirect function is partially dependent on Wnts but independent of FGFs. Importantly, RA specifies and patterns the hindbrain territory by antagonizing the activity of the spinal cord specification gene cdx4; loss of Cdx4 rescues the defects associated with the loss of RA, including the reduction in hindbrain size and the loss of posterior rhombomeres. We propose that at the head-trunk transition, RA coordinates specification, patterning and alignment of neural and mesodermal tissues that are essential for the organization and function of the neural and skeletal systems. PMID:25371368

  10. Isolation of Sna, a mouse gene homologous to the Drosophila genes snail and escargot: its expression pattern suggests multiple roles during postimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Franco del Amo, F; Gridley, T

    1992-12-01

    The Drosophila gene snail encodes a zinc-finger protein that is required zygotically for mesoderm formation. Snail acts as a transcriptional repressor during the period of mesoderm formation by preventing expression of mesectodermal and ectodermal genes in the mesoderm anlage. A Xenopus homolog (xsnail) of snail has been cloned and it too is expressed early in the mesodermal germ layer. We have isolated cDNA clones of a mouse gene (termed Sna) closely related to snail and xsnail and another Drosophila gene termed escargot that also encodes a zinc-finger protein. Sna encodes a 264 amino acid protein that contains four zinc fingers. Developmental RNA blot analysis showed that Sna transcripts are expressed throughout postimplantation development. Analysis of the spatial and temporal localization of Sna transcripts by in situ hybridization to both whole-mount and sectioned embryos revealed that, in the gastrulating embryo, Sna is expressed throughout the primitive streak and in the entire mesodermal germ layer. By 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) Sna is expressed at high levels in cephalic neural crest and limb bud mesenchyme. In fact, by 10.5 dpc Sna expression is observed in most mesenchymal cells, whether of neural crest or mesodermal origin. Later in gestation, high levels of Sna expression are observed in condensing cartilage and in the mesenchymal component of several tissues (lung, kidney, teeth and vibrissae) that undergo epithelial-mesenchymal inductive interactions during development. These results suggest multiple roles for the Sna gene in gastrulation and organogenesis during murine development. PMID:1295727

  11. The outflow tract of the heart is recruited from a novel heart-forming field.

    PubMed

    Mjaatvedt, C H; Nakaoka, T; Moreno-Rodriguez, R; Norris, R A; Kern, M J; Eisenberg, C A; Turner, D; Markwald, R R

    2001-10-01

    As classically described, the precardiac mesoderm of the paired heart-forming fields migrate and fuse anteriomedially in the ventral midline to form the first segment of the straight heart tube. This segment ultimately forms the right trabeculated ventricle. Additional segments are added to the caudal end of the first in a sequential fashion from the posteriolateral heart-forming field mesoderm. In this study we report that the final major heart segment, which forms the cardiac outflow tract, does not follow this pattern of embryonic development. The cardiac outlet, consisting of the conus and truncus, does not derive from the paired heart-forming fields, but originates separately from a previously unrecognized source of mesoderm located anterior to the initial primitive heart tube segment. Fate-mapping results show that cells labeled in the mesoderm surrounding the aortic sac and anterior to the primitive right ventricle are incorporated into both the conus and the truncus. Conversely, if cells are labeled in the existing right ventricle no incorporation into the cardiac outlet is observed. Tissue explants microdissected from this anterior mesoderm region are capable of forming beating cardiac muscle in vitro when cocultured with explants of the primitive right ventricle. These findings establish the presence of another heart-forming field. This anterior heart-forming field (AHF) consists of mesoderm surrounding the aortic sac immediately anterior to the existing heart tube. This new concept of the heart outlet's embryonic origin provides a new basis for explaining a variety of gene-expression patterns and cardiac defects described in both transgenic animals and human congenital heart disease. PMID:11783996

  12. Polarization of PI3K Activity Initiated by Ooplasmic Segregation Guides Nuclear Migration in the Mesendoderm.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Naohito; Oonuma, Kouhei; Nishida, Hiroki; Saiga, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric localization of RNA is a widely observed mechanism of cell polarization. Using embryos of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, we previously showed that mesoderm and endoderm fates are separated by localization of mRNA encoding a transcription factor, Not, to the future mesoderm-side cytoplasm of the mesendoderm cell through asymmetric positioning of the nucleus. Here, we investigated the mechanism that defines the direction of the nuclear migration. We show that localization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to the future mesoderm region determines the direction of nuclear migration. Localization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 was dependent on the localization of PI3Kα to the future mesoderm region. PI3Kα was first localized at the 1-cell stage by the ooplasmic movement. Activity of localized PI3Kα at the 4-cell stage was required for the localization of PI3Kα up to the nuclear migration. Our results provide the scaffold for understanding the chain of causality leading to the separation of germ layer fates. PMID:26555053

  13. A novel gain-of-function mutation of the proneural IRX1 and IRX2 genes disrupts axis elongation in the Araucana rumpless chicken.

    PubMed

    Freese, Nowlan H; Lam, Brianna A; Staton, Meg; Scott, Allison; Chapman, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Axis elongation of the vertebrate embryo involves the generation of cell lineages from posterior progenitor populations. We investigated the molecular mechanism governing axis elongation in vertebrates using the Araucana rumpless chicken. Araucana embryos exhibit a defect in axis elongation, failing to form the terminal somites and concomitant free caudal vertebrae, pygostyle, and associated tissues of the tail. Through whole genome sequencing of six Araucana we have identified a critical 130 kb region, containing two candidate causative SNPs. Both SNPs are proximal to the IRX1 and IRX2 genes, which are required for neural specification. We show that IRX1 and IRX2 are both misexpressed within the bipotential chordoneural hinge progenitor population of Araucana embryos. Expression analysis of BRA and TBX6, required for specification of mesoderm, shows that both are downregulated, whereas SOX2, required for neural patterning, is expressed in ectopic epithelial tissue. Finally, we show downregulation of genes required for the protection and maintenance of the tailbud progenitor population from the effects of retinoic acid. Our results support a model where the disruption in balance of mesoderm and neural fate results in early depletion of the progenitor population as excess neural tissue forms at the expense of mesoderm, leading to too few mesoderm cells to form the terminal somites. Together this cascade of events leads to axis truncation. PMID:25372603

  14. A Novel Gain-Of-Function Mutation of the Proneural IRX1 and IRX2 Genes Disrupts Axis Elongation in the Araucana Rumpless Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Nowlan H.; Lam, Brianna A.; Staton, Meg; Scott, Allison; Chapman, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Axis elongation of the vertebrate embryo involves the generation of cell lineages from posterior progenitor populations. We investigated the molecular mechanism governing axis elongation in vertebrates using the Araucana rumpless chicken. Araucana embryos exhibit a defect in axis elongation, failing to form the terminal somites and concomitant free caudal vertebrae, pygostyle, and associated tissues of the tail. Through whole genome sequencing of six Araucana we have identified a critical 130 kb region, containing two candidate causative SNPs. Both SNPs are proximal to the IRX1 and IRX2 genes, which are required for neural specification. We show that IRX1 and IRX2 are both misexpressed within the bipotential chordoneural hinge progenitor population of Araucana embryos. Expression analysis of BRA and TBX6, required for specification of mesoderm, shows that both are downregulated, whereas SOX2, required for neural patterning, is expressed in ectopic epithelial tissue. Finally, we show downregulation of genes required for the protection and maintenance of the tailbud progenitor population from the effects of retinoic acid. Our results support a model where the disruption in balance of mesoderm and neural fate results in early depletion of the progenitor population as excess neural tissue forms at the expense of mesoderm, leading to too few mesoderm cells to form the terminal somites. Together this cascade of events leads to axis truncation. PMID:25372603

  15. EphrinB/EphB Signaling Controls Embryonic Germ Layer Separation by Contact-Induced Cell Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Nazanin; Canty, Laura; Luu, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    Background The primordial organization of the metazoan body is achieved during gastrulation by the establishment of the germ layers. Adhesion differences between ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm cells could in principle be sufficient to maintain germ layer integrity and prevent intermixing. However, in organisms as diverse as fly, fish, or amphibian, the ectoderm-mesoderm boundary not only keeps these germ layers separated, but the ectoderm also serves as substratum for mesoderm migration, and the boundary must be compatible with repeated cell attachment and detachment. Principal Findings We show that localized detachment resulting from contact-induced signals at the boundary is at the core of ectoderm-mesoderm segregation. Cells alternate between adhesion and detachment, and detachment requires ephrinB/EphB signaling. Multiple ephrinB ligands and EphB receptors are expressed on each side of the boundary, and tissue separation depends on forward signaling across the boundary in both directions, involving partially redundant ligands and receptors and activation of Rac and RhoA. Conclusion This mechanism differs from a simple differential adhesion process of germ layer formation. Instead, it involves localized responses to signals exchanged at the tissue boundary and an attachment/detachment cycle which allows for cell migration across a cellular substratum. PMID:21390298

  16. Expression pattern of annelid Zic in embryonic development of the oligochaete Tubifex tubifex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Takashi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Embryonic expression of a Zic homologue (Ttu-Zic) was examined in the oligochaete annelid Tubifex tubifex. The body plan of T. tubifex is characterized by obvious segmentation in the ectoderm and mesoderm. Ttu-Zic expression is detected in the mesodermal germ band and a subset of micromere descendants. Ttu-Zic is transiently expressed in primary m-blast cells (i.e., founder cells of mesodermal segments) as early as the time of their birth from M teloblasts. During its development, each mesodermal segment experiences two additional phases of Ttu-Zic expression. Ttu-Zic expression in micromere descendants is seen on the anterior surfaces of embryos undergoing teloblastogenesis; subsequently, these cells proliferate to form bilateral clusters, which then become internalized. Finally, clusters of Ttu-Zic-expressing cells are found in the center of the prostomium, corresponding to the cerebral ganglion. The Ttu-Zic expression profile in the early embryogenesis of T. tubifex may be homologous to those of evolutionarily distant animals. PMID:18810489

  17. Embryological Development: Evolutionary History, Genetic Bias, and Cellular Environment Control the Flow of Developmental Events, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1981-01-01

    Emphasizes ectodermal-mesodermal interaction but focuses on the genesis of specialized structures like feathers (ectodermal) and muscles, cartilage, and bone. The sum of these interactions and other factors which govern normal development may be important in regulating the regeneration of particular structures in postembryonic individuals.…

  18. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09972.001 PMID:27090084

  19. Red light, green light: Signals that control endothelial cell proliferation during embryonic vascular development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proper regulation of endothelial cell proliferation is critical for vascular development in the embryo. VEGF-A and bFGF, which are important in the induction of mesodermal progenitors to form a capillary plexus, are also key mitogenic signals. Disruption in VEGF-A or bFGF decreases endothelial c...

  20. Distinct modes of floor plate induction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Patten, Iain; Kulesa, Paul; Shen, Michael M; Fraser, Scott; Placzek, Marysia

    2003-10-01

    To begin to reconcile models of floor plate formation in the vertebrate neural tube, we have performed experiments aimed at understanding the development of the early floor plate in the chick embryo. Using real-time analyses of cell behaviour, we provide evidence that the principal contributor to the early neural midline, the future anterior floor plate, exists as a separate population of floor plate precursor cells in the epiblast of the gastrula stage embryo, and does not share a lineage with axial mesoderm. Analysis of the tissue interactions associated with differentiation of these cells to a floor plate fate reveals a role for the nascent prechordal mesoderm, indicating that more than one inductive event is associated with floor plate formation along the length of the neuraxis. We show that Nr1, a chick nodal homologue, is expressed in the nascent prechordal mesoderm and we provide evidence that Nodal signalling can cooperate with Shh to induce the epiblast precursors to a floor-plate fate. These results indicate that a shared lineage with axial mesoderm cells is not a pre-requisite for floor plate differentiation and suggest parallels between the development of the floor plate in amniote and anamniote embryos. PMID:12917296

  1. The thin red line: angiogenesis in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, F; Mancuso, P; Gobbi, A; Pruneri, G

    2000-09-01

    This review describes the current knowledge about cell subsets involved in vasculogenesis (i.e., differentiation of endothelial cells from mesodermal precursors) and angiogenesis (i.e., blood vessel generation from pre-existing vessels), together with recent findings about angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, and myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:11008011

  2. PAPC mediates self/non–self-distinction during Snail1-dependent tissue separation

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Olivia; Damm, Erich W.; Parent, Serge E.; Barua, Debanjan; Smith, Tamara H.L.; Wen, Jason W.H.; Lepage, Stephanie E.; Nagel, Martina; Ibrahim-Gawel, Hady; Huang, Yunyun

    2015-01-01

    Cleft-like boundaries represent a type of cell sorting boundary characterized by the presence of a physical gap between tissues. We studied the cleft-like ectoderm–mesoderm boundary in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish gastrulae. We identified the transcription factor Snail1 as being essential for tissue separation, showed that its expression in the mesoderm depends on noncanonical Wnt signaling, and demonstrated that it enables paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) to promote tissue separation through two novel functions. First, PAPC attenuates planar cell polarity signaling at the ectoderm–mesoderm boundary to lower cell adhesion and facilitate cleft formation. Second, PAPC controls formation of a distinct type of adhesive contact between mesoderm and ectoderm cells that shows properties of a cleft-like boundary at the single-cell level. It consists of short stretches of adherens junction–like contacts inserted between intermediate-sized contacts and large intercellular gaps. These roles of PAPC constitute a self/non–self-recognition mechanism that determines the site of boundary formation at the interface between PAPC-expressing and -nonexpressing cells. PMID:25778923

  3. Position-dependent plasticity of distinct progenitor types in the primitive streak

    PubMed Central

    Wymeersch, Filip J; Huang, Yali; Blin, Guillaume; Cambray, Noemí; Wilkie, Ron; Wong, Frederick CK; Wilson, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The rostrocaudal (head-to-tail) axis is supplied by populations of progenitors at the caudal end of the embryo. Despite recent advances characterising one of these populations, the neuromesodermal progenitors, their nature and relationship to other populations remains unclear. Here we show that neuromesodermal progenitors are a single Sox2lowTlow entity whose choice of neural or mesodermal fate is dictated by their position in the progenitor region. The choice of mesoderm fate is Wnt/β-catenin dependent. Wnt/β-catenin signalling is also required for a previously unrecognised phase of progenitor expansion during mid-trunk formation. Lateral/ventral mesoderm progenitors represent a distinct committed state that is unable to differentiate to neural fates, even upon overexpression of the neural transcription factor Sox2. They do not require Wnt/β-catenin signalling for mesoderm differentiation. This information aids the correct interpretation of in vivo genetic studies and the development of in vitro protocols for generating physiologically-relevant cell populations of clinical interest. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10042.001 PMID:26780186

  4. Somites in zebrafish doubly mutant for knypek and trilobite form without internal mesenchymal cells or compaction.

    PubMed

    Henry, C A; Hall, L A; Burr Hille, M; Solnica-Krezel, L; Cooper, M S

    2000-09-01

    In vertebrates, paraxial mesoderm is partitioned into repeating units called somites. It is thought that the mechanical forces arising from compaction of the presumptive internal cells of prospective somites cause them to detach from the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm [1-3]. To determine how prospective somites physically segregate from each other, we used time-lapse microscopy to analyze the mechanics underlying early somitogenesis in wild-type zebrafish and in the mutants trilobite(m209) (tri), knypek(m119) (kny), and kny;tri, which are defective in convergent extension during gastrulation. Formation of somite boundaries in all of these embryos involved segregation, local alignment, and cell-shape changes of presumptive epitheloid border cells along nascent intersomitic boundaries. Although kny;tri somites formed without convergence of the presomitic mesoderm and were composed of only two cells in their anteroposterior (AP) dimension, they still exhibited AP intrasegmental polarity. Furthermore, morphogenesis of somite boundaries in these embryos proceeded in a manner similar to that in wild-type embryos. Thus, intersomitic boundary formation in zebrafish involves short-range movements of presumptive border cells that do not require mechanical forces generated by internal cells or compaction of the presomitic mesoderm. PMID:10996075

  5. Position-dependent plasticity of distinct progenitor types in the primitive streak.

    PubMed

    Wymeersch, Filip J; Huang, Yali; Blin, Guillaume; Cambray, Noemí; Wilkie, Ron; Wong, Frederick Ck; Wilson, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The rostrocaudal (head-to-tail) axis is supplied by populations of progenitors at the caudal end of the embryo. Despite recent advances characterising one of these populations, the neuromesodermal progenitors, their nature and relationship to other populations remains unclear. Here we show that neuromesodermal progenitors are a single Sox2(low)T(low) entity whose choice of neural or mesodermal fate is dictated by their position in the progenitor region. The choice of mesoderm fate is Wnt/β-catenin dependent. Wnt/β-catenin signalling is also required for a previously unrecognised phase of progenitor expansion during mid-trunk formation. Lateral/ventral mesoderm progenitors represent a distinct committed state that is unable to differentiate to neural fates, even upon overexpression of the neural transcription factor Sox2. They do not require Wnt/β-catenin signalling for mesoderm differentiation. This information aids the correct interpretation of in vivo genetic studies and the development of in vitro protocols for generating physiologically-relevant cell populations of clinical interest. PMID:26780186

  6. Nkx3.2 AND HEDGEHOG PATHWAY INTERSECT TO PATTERN AXIAL SKELETON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: NK homeobox family members are tissue-specific transcription factors important for regulation of developmental genes. Nkx3.2 is one of the earliest markers of sclerotome and gut mesoderm. Targeted disruption of Nkx3.2 expression in mice produced severe developmental defects, including ma...

  7. The development of the action potential mechanism of amphibian neurons isolated in culture.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, N C; Lamborghini, J E

    1976-05-01

    Nerve and muscle cells differentiated morphologically, in cultures of dissociated cells prepared from amphibian neural plate and underlying mesoderm (Xenopus laevis, Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 15). Cultures were grown in a defined medium containing sterile Steinberg's salt solution and 0.1% bovine serum albumin, and maintained for periods up to 5 days. PMID:1064036

  8. The development of the action potential mechanism of amphibian neurons isolated in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, N C; Lamborghini, J E

    1976-01-01

    Nerve and muscle cells differentiated morphologically, in cultures of dissociated cells prepared from amphibian neural plate and underlying mesoderm (Xenopus laevis, Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 15). Cultures were grown in a defined medium containing sterile Steinberg's salt solution and 0.1% bovine serum albumin, and maintained for periods up to 5 days. Images PMID:1064036

  9. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  10. Cell lineage in mammalian craniofacial mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Vivatbutsiri, Philaiporn; Morriss-Kay, Gillian; Saga, Yumiko; Iseki, Sachiko

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed the contributions of neural crest and mesoderm to mammalian craniofacial mesenchyme and its derivatives by cell lineage tracing experiments in mouse embryos, using the permanent genetic markers Wnt1-cre for neural crest and Mesp1-cre for mesoderm, combined with the Rosa26 reporter. At the end of neural crest cell migration (E9.5) the two patterns are reciprocal, with a mutual boundary just posterior to the eye. Mesodermal cells expressing endothelial markers (angioblasts) are found not to respect this boundary; they are associated with the migrating neural crest from the 5-somite stage, and by E9.5 they form a pre-endothelial meshwork throughout the cranial mesenchyme. Mesodermal cells of the myogenic lineage also migrate with neural crest cells, as the branchial arches form. By E17.5 the neural crest-mesoderm boundary in the subectodermal mesenchyme becomes out of register with that of the underlying skeletogenic layer, which is between the frontal and parietal bones. At E13.5 the primordia of these bones lie basolateral to the brain, extending towards the vertex of the skull during the following 4-5 days. We used DiI labelling of the bone primordia in ex-utero E13.5 embryos to distinguish between two possibilities for the origin of the frontal and parietal bones: (1) recruitment from adjacent connective tissue or (2) proliferation of the original primordia. The results clearly demonstrated that the bone primordia extend vertically by intrinsic growth, without detectable recruitment of adjacent mesenchymal cells. PMID:18617001

  11. Small molecule-directed specification of sclerotome-like chondroprogenitors and induction of a somitic chondrogenesis program from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangang; Li, Songhui; Trilok, Suprita; Tanaka, Makoto; Jokubaitis-Jameson, Vanta; Wang, Bei; Niwa, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generate rostral paraxial mesoderm-like progeny in 5-6 days of differentiation induced by Wnt3a and Noggin (Nog). We report that canonical Wnt signaling introduced either by forced expression of activated β-catenin, or the small-molecule inhibitor of Gsk3, CHIR99021, satisfied the need for Wnt3a signaling, and that the small-molecule inhibitor of BMP type I receptors, LDN193189, was able to replace Nog. Mesodermal progeny generated using such small molecules were chondrogenic in vitro, and expressed trunk paraxial mesoderm markers such as Tcf15 and Meox1, and somite markers such as Uncx, but failed to express sclerotome markers such as Pax1. Induction of the osteochondrogenically committed sclerotome from somite requires sonic hedgehog and Nog. Consistently, Pax1 and Bapx1 expression was induced when the isolated paraxial mesodermal progeny were treated with SAG1 (a hedgehog receptor agonist) and LDN193189, then Sox9 expression was induced, leading to cartilaginous nodules and particles in the presence of BMP, indicative of chondrogenesis via sclerotome specification. By contrast, treatment with TGFβ also supported chondrogenesis and stimulated Sox9 expression, but failed to induce the expression of Pax1 and Bapx1. On ectopic transplantation to immunocompromised mice, the cartilage particles developed under either condition became similarly mineralized and formed pieces of bone with marrow. Thus, the use of small molecules led to the effective generation from ESCs of paraxial mesodermal progeny, and to their further differentiation in vitro through sclerotome specification into growth plate-like chondrocytes, a mechanism resembling in vivo somitic chondrogenesis that is not recapitulated with TGFβ. PMID:25294938

  12. Teratomas: a multimodality review.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christine M; Buckley, Celine; Holley, Susan; Menias, Christine O

    2012-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) may occur in both children and adults and include a broad array of histologic subtypes, such as teratoma, seminoma (known as dysgerminoma in the ovary and germinoma in the pineal gland), choriocarcinoma, yolk sac tumor, embryonal cell carcinoma, and mixed GCT. In adults, GCTs occur most commonly in the gonads. In children, sacrococcygeal tumors predominate. Teratomas are a common form of GCT. They are defined histologically as containing tissues derived from all 3 germ cell layers: ectoderm, mesoderm (most teratomas contain fat, an imaging hallmark, which is a mesodermal derivative), and endoderm. Teratomas are also classified as mature or immature, depending on the degree of differentiation of its components, and in adults, immature tumors are more likely to exhibit malignant behavior. PMID:23009771

  13. Dose-dependent Nodal/Smad signals pattern the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Elizabeth J

    2014-08-01

    Nodal signals in the early post-implantation stage embryo are essential to establish initial proximal-distal (P-D) polarity and generate the final anterior-posterior (A-P) body axis. Nodal signaling in the epiblast results in the phosphorylation of Smad2 in the overlying visceral endoderm necessary to induce the AVE, in part via Smad2-dependent activation of the T-box gene Eomesodermin. Slightly later following mesoderm induction a continuum of dose-dependent Nodal signaling during the process of gastrulation underlies specification of mesodermal and definitive endoderm progenitors. Dynamic Nodal expression during the critical 72 h time window immediately following implantation, accomplished by a series of feed-back and feed-forward mechanisms serves to provide key positional cues required for establishment of the body plan and controls cell fate decisions in the early mammalian embryo. PMID:24704361

  14. Planar induction of anteroposterior pattern in the developing central nervous system of Xenopus laevis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doniach, T.; Phillips, C. R.; Gerhart, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    It has long been thought that anteroposterior (A-P) pattern in the vertebrate central nervous system is induced in the embryo's dorsal ectoderm exclusively by signals passing vertically from underlying, patterned dorsal mesoderm. Explants from early gastrulae of the frog Xenopus laevis were prepared in which vertical contact between dorsal ectoderm and mesoderm was prevented but planar contact was maintained. In these, four position-specific neural markers (engrailed-2, Krox-20, XlHbox 1, and XlHbox 6) were expressed in the ectoderm in the same A-P order as in the embryo. Thus, planar signals alone, following a path available in the normal embryo, can induce A-P neural pattern.

  15. Generation of the germ layers along the animal-vegetal axis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Yasuo, H; Lemaire, P

    2001-01-01

    After completion of gastrulation, typical vertebrate embryos consist of three cell sheets, called germ layers. The outer layer, the ectoderm, which produces the cells of the epidermis and the nervous system; the inner layer, the endoderm, producing the lining of the digestive tube and its associated organs (pancreas, liver, lungs etc.) and the middle layer, the mesoderm, which gives rise to several organs (heart, kidney, gonads), connective tissues (bone, muscles, tendons, blood vessels), and blood cells. The formation of the germ layers is one of the earliest embryonic events to subdivide multicellular embryos into a few compartments. In Xenopus laevis, the spatial domains of three germ layers are largely separated along the animal-vegetal axis even before gastrulation; ectoderm in the animal pole region; mesoderm in the equatorial region and endoderm in the vegetal pole region. In this review, we summarise the recent advances in our understanding of the formation of the germ layers in Xenopus laevis. PMID:11291851

  16. SOX17 links gut endoderm morphogenesis and germ layer segregation.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Manuel; Nowotschin, Sonja; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2014-12-01

    Gastrulation leads to three germ layers--ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm--that are separated by two basement membranes. In the mouse embryo, the emergent gut endoderm results from the widespread intercalation of cells of two distinct origins: pluripotent epiblast-derived definitive endoderm (DE) and extra-embryonic visceral endoderm (VE). Here we image the trajectory of prospective DE cells before intercalating into the VE epithelium. We show that the transcription factor SOX17, which is activated in prospective DE cells before intercalation, is necessary for gut endoderm morphogenesis and the assembly of the basement membrane that separates gut endoderm from mesoderm. Our results mechanistically link gut endoderm morphogenesis and germ layer segregation, two central and conserved features of gastrulation. PMID:25419850

  17. Revisiting the involvement of signaling gradients in somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Moisés

    2016-04-01

    During embryonic development, formation of individual vertebrae requires that the paraxial mesoderm becomes divided into regular segmental units known as somites. Somites are sequentially formed at the anterior end of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) resulting from functional interactions between the oscillatory activity of signals promoting segmentation and a moving wavefront of tissue competence to those signals, eventually generating a constant flow of new somites at regular intervals. According to the current model for somitogenesis, the wavefront results from the combined activity of two opposing functional gradients in the PSM involving the Fgf, Wnt and retinoic acid (RA) signaling pathways. Here, I use published data to evaluate the wavefront model. A critical analysis of those studies seems to support a role for Wnt signaling, but raise doubts regarding the extent to which Fgf and RA signaling contribute to this process. PMID:26662366

  18. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko; Shinohara, Takashi; Nakano, Toru

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M L; Côté, S

    1993-03-30

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms involved in the pattern formation of complex internal organs are still largely unknown. However, the identity of the molecular determinants that control the development of these specific tissues is emerging from the combined use of genetic and molecular approaches. We have cloned a gene that is expressed in the mesoderm, one of the fundamental embryonic germ layers which gives rise to internal structures, such as the musculature. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of this gene, designated as g1. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of its cDNA shows an open reading frame of 852 nt, which encodes a 32-kDa protein with two putative zinc fingers, and a serine/glutamine/proline-rich region. These features indicate a functional role for g1, which remains to be elucidated, in regulating gene expression during mesoderm formation. PMID:8462875

  20. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb Apical Ectodermal Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H.; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A.; Pierro, Louis J.; Upholt, William B.; Dealy, Caroline N.

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the Zone of Polarizing Activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or AER, but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb AP, PD and DV patterning. PMID:21465622

  1. An Fgf-Shh signaling hierarchy regulates early specification of the zebrafish skull

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Neil; Sidik, Alfire; Bertrand, Julien Y.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2016-01-01

    The neurocranium generates most of the craniofacial skeleton and consists of prechordal and postchordal regions. Although development of the prechordal is well studied, little is known of the postchordal region. Here we characterize a signaling hierarchy necessary for postchordal neurocranial development involving Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling for early specification of mesodermally-derived progenitor cells. The expression of hyaluron synthetase 2 (has2) in the cephalic mesoderm requires Fgf signaling and Has2 function, in turn, is required for postchordal neurocranial development. While Hedgehog (Hh)-deficient embryos also lack a postchordal neurocranium, this appears primarily due to a later defect in chondrocyte differentiation. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that postchordal neurocranial development requires early Fgf and later Hh signaling. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic understanding of early postchordal neurocranial development and demonstrate a hierarchy of signaling between Fgf and Hh in the development of this structure. PMID:27060628

  2. An Fgf-Shh signaling hierarchy regulates early specification of the zebrafish skull.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Neil; Sidik, Alfire; Bertrand, Julien Y; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-07-15

    The neurocranium generates most of the craniofacial skeleton and consists of prechordal and postchordal regions. Although development of the prechordal is well studied, little is known of the postchordal region. Here we characterize a signaling hierarchy necessary for postchordal neurocranial development involving Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling for early specification of mesodermally-derived progenitor cells. The expression of hyaluron synthetase 2 (has2) in the cephalic mesoderm requires Fgf signaling and Has2 function, in turn, is required for postchordal neurocranial development. While Hedgehog (Hh)-deficient embryos also lack a postchordal neurocranium, this appears primarily due to a later defect in chondrocyte differentiation. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that postchordal neurocranial development requires early Fgf and later Hh signaling. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic understanding of early postchordal neurocranial development and demonstrate a hierarchy of signaling between Fgf and Hh in the development of this structure. PMID:27060628

  3. Ancestral state reconstruction by comparative analysis of a GRN kernel operating in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Erkenbrack, Eric M; Ako-Asare, Kayla; Miller, Emily; Tekelenburg, Saira; Thompson, Jeffrey R; Romano, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Diverse sampling of organisms across the five major classes in the phylum Echinodermata is beginning to reveal much about the structure and function of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in development and evolution. Sea urchins are the most studied clade within this phylum, and recent work suggests there has been dramatic rewiring at the top of the skeletogenic GRN along the lineage leading to extant members of the euechinoid sea urchins. Such rewiring likely accounts for some of the observed developmental differences between the two major subclasses of sea urchins-cidaroids and euechinoids. To address effects of topmost rewiring on downstream GRN events, we cloned four downstream regulatory genes within the skeletogenic GRN and surveyed their spatiotemporal expression patterns in the cidaroid Eucidaris tribuloides. We performed phylogenetic analyses with homologs from other non-vertebrate deuterostomes and characterized their spatiotemporal expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WMISH). Our data suggest the erg-hex-tgif subcircuit, a putative GRN kernel, exhibits a mesoderm-specific expression pattern early in Eucidaris development that is directly downstream of the initial mesodermal GRN circuitry. Comparative analysis of the expression of this subcircuit in four echinoderm taxa allowed robust ancestral state reconstruction, supporting hypotheses that its ancestral function was to stabilize the mesodermal regulatory state and that it has been co-opted and deployed as a unit in mesodermal subdomains in distantly diverged echinoderms. Importantly, our study supports the notion that GRN kernels exhibit structural and functional modularity, locking down and stabilizing clade-specific, embryonic regulatory states. PMID:26781941

  4. BMP-mediated functional cooperation between Dlx5;Dlx6 and Msx1;Msx2 during mammalian limb development.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Bouhali, Kamal; Mantero, Stefano; Garaffo, Giulia; Provero, Paolo; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Caratozzolo, Mariano F; Tullo, Apollonia; Guerrini, Luisa; Lallemand, Yvan; Robert, Benoît; Levi, Giovanni; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2013-01-01

    The Dlx and Msx homeodomain transcription factors play important roles in the control of limb development. The combined disruption of Msx1 and Msx2, as well as that of Dlx5 and Dlx6, lead to limb patterning defects with anomalies in digit number and shape. Msx1;Msx2 double mutants are characterized by the loss of derivatives of the anterior limb mesoderm which is not observed in either of the simple mutants. Dlx5;Dlx6 double mutants exhibit hindlimb ectrodactyly. While the morphogenetic action of Msx genes seems to involve the BMP molecules, the mode of action of Dlx genes still remains elusive. Here, examining the limb phenotypes of combined Dlx and Msx mutants we reveal a new Dlx-Msx regulatory loop directly involving BMPs. In Msx1;Dlx5;Dlx6 triple mutant mice (TKO), beside the expected ectrodactyly, we also observe the hallmark morphological anomalies of Msx1;Msx2 double mutants suggesting an epistatic role of Dlx5 and Dlx6 over Msx2. In Msx2;Dlx5;Dlx6 TKO mice we only observe an aggravation of the ectrodactyly defect without changes in the number of the individual components of the limb. Using a combination of qPCR, ChIP and bioinformatic analyses, we identify two Dlx/Msx regulatory pathways: 1) in the anterior limb mesoderm a non-cell autonomous Msx-Dlx regulatory loop involves BMP molecules through the AER and 2) in AER cells and, at later stages, in the limb mesoderm the regulation of Msx2 by Dlx5 and Dlx6 occurs also cell autonomously. These data bring new elements to decipher the complex AER-mesoderm dialogue that takes place during limb development and provide clues to understanding the etiology of congenital limb malformations. PMID:23382810

  5. Stem cells in asexual reproduction of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelid): proliferation and migration of neoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Mutsumi; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Ozawa, Kaname; Tochinai, Shin

    2012-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete that reproduces mainly asexually by fragmentation (autotomy) and regeneration. As sexual reproduction can also be induced, it is a good animal model for the study of both somatic and germline stem cells. To clarify the features of stem cells in regeneration, we investigated the proliferation and lineage of stem cells in E. japonensis. Neoblasts, which have the morphological characteristics of undifferentiated cells, were found to firmly adhere to the posterior surface of septa in each trunk segment. Also, smaller neoblast-like cells, which are designated as N-cells in this study, were located dorsal to the neoblasts on the septa. By conducting 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling-experiments, we have shown that neoblasts are slow-cycling (or quiescent) in intact growing worms, but proliferate rapidly in response to fragmentation. N-cells proliferate more actively than do neoblasts in intact worms. The results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that neoblast and N-cell lineage mesodermal cells that incorporated BrdU early in regeneration migrated toward the autotomized site to form the mesodermal region of the blastema, while the epidermal and intestinal cells also contributed to the blastema locally near the autotomized site. We have also shown that neoblasts have stem cell characteristics by expressing Ej-vlg2 and by the activity of telomerase during regeneration. Telomerase activity was high in the early stage of regeneration and correlated with the proliferation activity in the neoblast lineage of mesodermal stem cells. Taken together, our results indicate that neoblasts are mesodermal stem cells involved in the regeneration of E. japonensis. PMID:22417296

  6. The spatial and temporal expression of Ch-en, the engrailed gene in the polychaete Chaetopterus, does not support a role in body axis segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaver, E. C.; Paulson, D. A.; Irvine, S. Q.; Martindale, M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    We are interested in understanding whether the annelids and arthropods shared a common segmented ancestor and have approached this question by characterizing the expression pattern of the segment polarity gene engrailed (en) in a basal annelid, the polychaete Chaetopterus. We have isolated an en gene, Ch-en, from a Chaetopterus cDNA library. Genomic Southern blotting suggests that this is the only en class gene in this animal. The predicted protein sequence of the 1.2-kb cDNA clone contains all five domains characteristic of en proteins in other taxa, including the en class homeobox. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that Ch-en is expressed throughout larval life in a complex spatial and temporal pattern. The Ch-en transcript is initially detected in a small number of neurons associated with the apical organ and in the posterior portion of the prototrochophore. At later stages, Ch-en is expressed in distinct patterns in the three segmented body regions (A, B, and C) of Chaetopterus. In all segments, Ch-en is expressed in a small set of segmentally iterated cells in the CNS. In the A region, Ch-en is also expressed in a small group of mesodermal cells at the base of the chaetal sacs. In the B region, Ch-en is initially expressed broadly in the mesoderm that then resolves into one band/segment coincident with morphological segmentation. The mesodermal expression in the B region is located in the anterior region of each segment, as defined by the position of ganglia in the ventral nerve cord, and is involved in the morphogenesis of segment-specific feeding structures late in larval life. We observe banded mesodermal and ectodermal staining in an anterior-posterior sequence in the C region. We do not observe a segment polarity pattern of expression of Ch-en in the ectoderm, as is observed in arthropods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Penile agenesis: a fatal variation of an uncommon lesion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J; Clark, R D; Koyle, M A

    1990-02-01

    Two male neonates (46XY karyotype) were born with a triad of penile agenesis associated with imperforate anus and complete absence of the median raphe. Both patients died of renal dysplasia and secondary pulmonary hypoplasia shortly after birth. This triad appears to be secondary to a lack of caudal mesoderm migration during month 1 of gestation, leading to severe developmental defects in the caudal axis. In all reported cases to date this triad of findings has been incompatible with extrauterine life. PMID:2299726

  8. Male urethral sarcoma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Magno Almeida; dos Santos, Guilherme Campelo Lopes; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Dall’Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Sant’Anna, Alexandre Crippa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urethral tumors are rare and aggressive. They usually affect men (2:1) and occur more commonly in white (85% of cases). Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from embryonic mesoderm. It represents 1% of all cases of urinary tract malignancies and rarely primary affect the ureter. We report a case of male urethral sarcoma. To date, only two similar cases have been published in literature. PMID:26398363

  9. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCe008-A (RC-4).

    PubMed

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Gardner, J; Downie, J M; Bateman, M; Courtney, A

    2016-05-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCe008-A (RC-4) was derived from a blastocyst voluntarily donated as unsuitable and surplus to fertility requirements following ethics committee approved informed consent under licence from the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to ectoderm and mesoderm in vitro. It has a mixed 46XX/45X female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346193

  10. Male urethral sarcoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Magno Almeida; Santos, Guilherme Campelo Lopes Dos; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Dall'Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Sant'Anna, Alexandre Crippa

    2016-03-01

    Urethral tumors are rare and aggressive. They usually affect men (2:1) and occur more commonly in white (85% of cases). Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from embryonic mesoderm. It represents 1% of all cases of urinary tract malignancies and rarely primary affect the ureter. We report a case of male urethral sarcoma. To date, only two similar cases have been published in literature. PMID:26398363

  11. Not just inductive: a crucial mechanical role for the endoderm during heart tube assembly

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Taber, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is the first functioning organ to form during development. During gastrulation, the cardiac progenitors reside in the lateral plate mesoderm but maintain close contact with the underlying endoderm. In amniotes, these bilateral heart fields are initially organized as a pair of flat epithelia that move towards the embryonic midline and fuse above the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) to form the heart tube. This medial motion is typically attributed to active mesodermal migration over the underlying endoderm. In this model, the role of the endoderm is twofold: to serve as a mechanically passive substrate for the crawling mesoderm and to secrete various growth factors necessary for cardiac specification and differentiation. Here, using computational modeling and experiments on chick embryos, we present evidence supporting an active mechanical role for the endoderm during heart tube assembly. Label-tracking experiments suggest that active endodermal shortening around the AIP accounts for most of the heart field motion towards the midline. Results indicate that this shortening is driven by cytoskeletal contraction, as exposure to the myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin arrested any shortening and also decreased both tissue stiffness (measured by microindentation) and mechanical tension (measured by cutting experiments). In addition, blebbistatin treatment often resulted in cardia bifida and abnormal foregut morphogenesis. Moreover, finite element simulations of our cutting experiments suggest that the endoderm (not the mesoderm) is the primary contractile tissue layer during this process. Taken together, these results indicate that contraction of the endoderm actively pulls the heart fields towards the embryonic midline, where they fuse to form the heart tube. PMID:22492358

  12. Injury, nerve, and wound epidermis related electrophoretic and fluorographic protein patterns in forelimbs of adult newts

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, D.J.; Tassava, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    Polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis and (/sup 35/S)methionine fluorography were used to examine proteins in regenerating newt limbs, amputated denervated limbs, unamputated denervated limbs, and separated blastema mesodermal core and wound epidermis. A total of 27 protein electrophoretic bands were obtained from amputated limbs and 24 bands from unamputated limbs. Amputation resulted in the appearance of 4 new bands and the loss of 1 band as compared to unamputated limbs. These 5 banding differences were apparent on stained gels 3 days postamputation and were maintained through 10 weeks postamputation (complete regenerate stage). Only one band in unamputated limbs was always detectable on fluorographs, whereas virtually all of the stainable bands of amputated limbs were visible on fluorographs. Amputation clearly stimulated a marked, generalized increase in the synthesis of limb proteins. The 5 amputation induced changes were equally evident in stained gels of both innervated and denervated limbs. Amputated denervated limbs possessed a full set of fluorographic bands (including the 5 differences) through 18 days postamputation. However, denervation without amputation was not sufficient to alter the stainable banding pattern. Wound epidermis and mesodermal core both displayed the 5 banding differences and had identical banding patterns with the exception of one epidermal specific band. This band was also present in whole limb skin but was absent in unamputated mesodermal limb tissue. This was the only band of unamputated limbs that was consistently detectable by fluorography. It is concluded that amputation induces nerve independent changes in protein synthesis that are common to both mesodermal core and wound epidermis. These changes may represent preparation for cellular proliferation.

  13. Formation of the extracellular matrix during the epimorphic anterior regeneration of Owenia fusiformis: autoradiographical and in situ hybridization studies.

    PubMed

    Dupin, F; Coulon, J; Le Parco, Y; Fontes, M; Thouveny, Y

    1991-06-01

    During post-traumatic regeneration of the polychaete annelid Owenia fusiformis, the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation was studied by light and electron microscopy and by histoautoradiography after incorporation of tritiated proline as marker for collagenic proteins. Three days after amputation, a new basement membrane was reformed in the blastema between the ectoderm and the mesoderm. At the same time, the cytoskeleton and the anchoring structures (hemidesmosomes) were differentiated in the basal part of the ectodermal cells. Four days after amputation, collagen fibers appeared in the extracellular matrix newly reformed between the ectodermal and mesodermal layers. The existence of a proximo-distal gradient in the organization of the new extracellular matrix and the accumulation of molecules labeled by 3H-proline was shown. This accumulation started at the level of the injured segment of the stump. Differences in labeling intensity were seen in the regenerate. Within specific organogenetic zones, i.e. the epidermal gland analagen, the branchial buds and the stomodeal invagination, the labeling between the ectodermal and mesodermal layers was less intense than in other parts of the regenerate. In the mesodermal connective septa (dissepiments), located between consecutive segments, the labeling and the accumulation of extracellular material occurred later than the formation of the ectodermal basement membrane. In situ hybridization of a DNA molecular probe corresponding partially to the coding region of the collagen-like gene Ocg8, showed a spatio-temporal expression of this gene. Northern blot analysis showed a single transcript of 6.6 kb. Four days after amputation the accumulation of this transcript was exclusively localized at the level of the ectodermal layer during differentiation of the regenerate. The ectoderm was thus shown to play a dynamic role during the first stages of traumatic regeneration, although it did not seem to be directly involved in the

  14. A patient with Mullerian abnormalities, renal dysplasia, cervical spine fusion, cataracts and intellectual disability: MURCS-plus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Whitelaw, Charlotte; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl with features of the MURCS (Mullerian abnormalities, renal agenesis/ectopy and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association and birth defects not typically associated with MURCS. In addition to seizures and intellectual disability, she has cortical brain heterotopia, bilateral subclinical cataracts, submucous cleft palate and patent ductus arteriosus. We propose that this patient represents a more severe form of MURCS, or 'MURCS-plus', which may represent a defect of or insult to mesodermal morphogenesis. PMID:17786121

  15. ABCC5 is required for cAMP-mediated hindgut invagination in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Lauren E; Hill, Rose Z; Moy, Gary W; Gökırmak, Tufan; Hamdoun, Amro

    2015-10-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionarily conserved proteins that pump diverse substrates across membranes. Many are known to efflux signaling molecules and are extensively expressed during development. However, the role of transporters in moving extracellular signals that regulate embryogenesis is largely unexplored. Here, we show that a mesodermal ABCC (MRP) transporter is necessary for endodermal gut morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos. This transporter, Sp-ABCC5a (C5a), is expressed in pigment cells and their precursors, which are a subset of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells. C5a expression depends on Delta/Notch signaling from skeletogenic mesoderm and is downstream of Gcm in the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. Long-term imaging of development reveals that C5a knockdown embryos gastrulate, but ∼90% develop a prolapse of the hindgut by the late prism stage (∼8 h after C5a protein expression normally peaks). Since C5a orthologs efflux cyclic nucleotides, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Sp-CAPK/PKA) is expressed in pigment cells, we examined whether C5a could be involved in gastrulation through cAMP transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, membrane-permeable pCPT-cAMP rescues the prolapse phenotype in C5a knockdown embryos, and causes archenteron hyper-invagination in control embryos. In addition, the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is expressed in pigment cells, and its inhibition impairs gastrulation. Together, our data support a model in which C5a transports sAC-derived cAMP from pigment cells to control late invagination of the hindgut. Little is known about the ancestral functions of ABCC5/MRP5 transporters, and this study reveals a novel role for these proteins in mesoderm-endoderm signaling during embryogenesis. PMID:26395488

  16. FRL-1, a member of the EGF-CFC family, is essential for neural differentiation in Xenopus early development.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Shin-Ichiro; Tanegashima, Kousuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Shuji; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Kozuma, Siro; Taketani, Yuji; Asashima, Makoto

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies indicate an essential role for the EGF-CFC family in vertebrate development, particularly in the regulation of nodal signaling. Biochemical evidence suggests that EGF-CFC genes can also activate certain cellular responses independently of nodal signaling. Here, we show that FRL-1, a Xenopus EGF-CFC gene, suppresses BMP signaling to regulate an early step in neural induction. Overexpression of FRL-1 in animal caps induced the early neural markers zic3, soxD and Xngnr-1, but not the pan-mesodermal marker Xbra or the dorsal mesodermal marker chordin. Furthermore, overexpression of FRL-1 suppressed the expression of the BMP-responsive genes, Xvent-1 and Xmsx-1, which are expressed in animal caps and induced by overexpressed BMP-4. Conversely, loss of function analysis using morpholino-antisense oligonucleotides against FRL-1 (FRL-1MO) showed that FRL-1 is required for neural development. FRL-1MO-injected embryos lacked neural structures but contained mesodermal tissue. It was suggested previously that expression of early neural genes that mark the start of neuralization is activated in the presumptive neuroectoderm of gastrulae. FRL-1MO also inhibited the expression of these genes in dorsal ectoderm, but did not affect the expression of chordin, which acts as a neural inducer from dorsal mesoderm. FRL-1MO also inhibited the expression of neural markers that were induced by chordin in animal caps, suggesting that FRL-1 enables the response to neural inducing signals in ectoderm. Furthermore, we showed that the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by FRL-1 is required for neural induction and BMP inhibition. Together, these results suggest that FRL-1 is essential in the establishment of the neural induction response. PMID:12668622

  17. The spatial and temporal dynamics of Sax1 (CHox3) homeobox gene expression in the chick's spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Spann, P; Ginsburg, M; Rangini, Z; Fainsod, A; Eyal-Giladi, H; Gruenbaum, Y

    1994-07-01

    Sax1 (previously CHox3) is a chicken homeobox gene belonging to the same homeobox gene family as the Drosophila NK1 and the honeybee HHO genes. Sax1 transcripts are present from stage 2 H&H until at least 5 days of embryonic development. However, specific localization of Sax1 transcripts could not be detected by in situ hybridization prior to stage 8-, when Sax1 transcripts are specifically localized in the neural plate, posterior to the hindbrain. From stages 8- to 15 H&H, Sax1 continues to be expressed only in the spinal part of the neural plate. The anterior border of Sax1 expression was found to be always in the transverse plane separating the youngest somite from the yet unsegmented mesodermal plate and to regress with similar dynamics to that of the segregation of the somites from the mesodermal plate. The posterior border of Sax1 expression coincides with the posterior end of the neural plate. In order to study a possible regulation of Sax1 expression by its neighboring tissues, several embryonic manipulation experiments were performed. These manipulations included: removal of somites, mesodermal plate or notochord and transplantation of a young ectopic notochord in the vicinity of the neural plate or transplantation of neural plate sections into the extraembryonic area. The results of these experiments revealed that the induction of the neural plate by the mesoderm has already occurred in full primitive streak embryos, after which Sax1 is autonomously regulated within the spinal part of the neural plate. PMID:7924989

  18. Analysis of coelom development in the sea urchin Holopneustes purpurescens yielding a deuterostome body plan

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An analysis of early coelom development in the echinoid Holopneustes purpurescens yields a deuterostome body plan that explains the disparity between the pentameral plan of echinoderms and the bilateral plans of chordates and hemichordates, the three major phyla of the monophyletic deuterostomes. The analysis shows an early separation into a medial hydrocoele and lateral coelomic mesoderm with an enteric channel between them before the hydrocoele forms the pentameral plan of five primary podia. The deuterostome body plan thus has a single axial or medial coelom and a pair of lateral coeloms, all surrounding an enteric channel, the gut channel. Applied to the phyla, the medial coelom is the hydrocoele in echinoderms, the notochord in chordates and the proboscis coelom in hemichordates: the lateral coeloms are the coelomic mesoderm in echinoderms, the paraxial mesoderm in chordates and the lateral coeloms in hemichordates. The plan fits frog and chick development and the echinoderm fossil record, and predicts genes involved in coelomogenesis as the source of deuterostome macroevolution. PMID:26892238

  19. The transcription factor Vox represses endoderm development by interacting with Casanova and Pou2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jue; Lambert, Guillaume; Meijer, Annemarie H; Rosa, Frederic M

    2013-03-01

    Endoderm and mesoderm are both formed upon activation of Nodal signaling but how endoderm differentiates from mesoderm is still poorly explored. The sox-related gene casanova (sox32) acts downstream of the Nodal signal, is essential for endoderm development and requires the co-factor Pou2 (Pou5f1, Oct3, Oct4) in this process. Conversely, BMP signals have been shown to inhibit endoderm development by an as yet unexplained mechanism. In a search for Casanova regulators in zebrafish, we identified two of its binding partners as the transcription factors Pou2 and Vox, a member of the Vent group of proteins also involved in the patterning of the gastrula. In overexpression studies we show that vox and/or Vent group genes inhibit the capacity of Casanova to induce endoderm, even in the presence of its co-factor Pou2, and that Vox acts as a repressor in this process. We further show that vox, but not other members of the Vent group, is essential for defining the proper endodermal domain size at gastrulation. In this process, vox acts downstream of BMPs. Cell fate analysis further shows that Vox plays a key role downstream of BMP signals in regulating the capacity of Nodal to induce endoderm versus mesoderm by modulating the activity of the Casanova/Pou2 regulatory system. PMID:23364327

  20. Eya 1 acts as a critical regulator for specifying the metanephric mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan; Zou, Dan; Silvius, Derek; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2005-08-15

    Although it is well established that the Gdnf-Ret signal transduction pathway initiates metanephric induction, no single regulator has yet been identified to specify the metanephric mesenchyme or blastema within the intermediate mesoderm, the earliest step of metanephric kidney development and the molecular mechanisms controlling Gdnf expression are essentially unknown. Previous studies have shown that a loss of Eya 1 function leads to renal agenesis that is a likely result of failure of metanephric induction. The studies presented here demonstrate that Eya 1 specifies the metanephric blastema within the intermediate mesoderm at the caudal end of the nephrogenic cord. In contrast to its specific roles in metanephric development, Eya 1 appears dispensable for the formation of nephric duct and mesonephric tubules. Using a combination of null and hypomorphic Eya 1 mutants, we now demonstrated that approximately 20% of normal Eya 1 protein level is sufficient for establishing the metanephric blastema and inducing the ureteric bud formation but not for its normal branching. Using Eya 1, Gdnf, Six 1 and Pax 2 mutant mice, we show that Eya 1 probably functions at the top of the genetic hierarchy controlling kidney organogenesis and it acts in combination with Six 1 and Pax 2 to regulate Gdnf expression during UB outgrowth and branching. These findings uncover an essential function for Eya 1 as a critical determination factor in acquiring metanephric fate within the intermediate mesoderm and as a key regulator of Gdnf expression during ureteric induction and branching morphogenesis. PMID:16018995

  1. Pax3 and Tbx5 specify whether PDGFRα+ cells assume skeletal or cardiac muscle fate in differentiating ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Magli, Alessandro; Schnettler, Erin; Swanson, Scott A; Borges, Luciene; Hoffman, Kirsta; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Keirstead, Susan A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells represent an ideal model to study how lineage decisions are established during embryonic development. Using a doxycycline-inducible mouse ES cell line, we have previously shown that expression of the transcriptional activator Pax3 in early mesodermal cells leads to the robust generation of paraxial mesoderm progenitors that ultimately differentiate into skeletal muscle precursors. Here we show that the ability of this transcription factor to induce the skeletal myogenic cell fate occurs at the expenses of the cardiac lineage. Our results show that the PDGFRα+FLK1− sub-fraction represents the main population affected by Pax3, through down-regulation of several transcripts encoding for proteins involved in cardiac development. We demonstrate that although Nkx2-5, Tbx5 and Gata4 negatively affect Pax3 skeletal myogenic activity, the cardiac potential of embryoid body (EB)-derived cultures is restored solely by forced expression of Tbx5. Taking advantage of this model, we employed an unbiased genome wide approach to identify genes whose expression is rescued by Tbx5, and which could represent important regulators of cardiac development. These findings elucidate mechanisms regulating the commitment of mesodermal cells in the early embryo and identify the Tbx5 cardiac transcriptome. PMID:24677751

  2. Robustness and Accuracy in Sea Urchin Developmental Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tabou de-Leon, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Developmental gene regulatory networks robustly control the timely activation of regulatory and differentiation genes. The structure of these networks underlies their capacity to buffer intrinsic and extrinsic noise and maintain embryonic morphology. Here I illustrate how the use of specific architectures by the sea urchin developmental regulatory networks enables the robust control of cell fate decisions. The Wnt-βcatenin signaling pathway patterns the primary embryonic axis while the BMP signaling pathway patterns the secondary embryonic axis in the sea urchin embryo and across bilateria. Interestingly, in the sea urchin in both cases, the signaling pathway that defines the axis controls directly the expression of a set of downstream regulatory genes. I propose that this direct activation of a set of regulatory genes enables a uniform regulatory response and a clear cut cell fate decision in the endoderm and in the dorsal ectoderm. The specification of the mesodermal pigment cell lineage is activated by Delta signaling that initiates a triple positive feedback loop that locks down the pigment specification state. I propose that the use of compound positive feedback circuitry provides the endodermal cells enough time to turn off mesodermal genes and ensures correct mesoderm vs. endoderm fate decision. Thus, I argue that understanding the control properties of repeatedly used regulatory architectures illuminates their role in embryogenesis and provides possible explanations to their resistance to evolutionary change. PMID:26913048

  3. Spatiotemporal transcriptomics reveals the evolutionary history of the endoderm germ layer.

    PubMed

    Hashimshony, Tamar; Feder, Martin; Levin, Michal; Hall, Brian K; Yanai, Itai

    2015-03-12

    The concept of germ layers has been one of the foremost organizing principles in developmental biology, classification, systematics and evolution for 150 years (refs 1 - 3). Of the three germ layers, the mesoderm is found in bilaterian animals but is absent in species in the phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, which has been taken as evidence that the mesoderm was the final germ layer to evolve. The origin of the ectoderm and endoderm germ layers, however, remains unclear, with models supporting the antecedence of each as well as a simultaneous origin. Here we determine the temporal and spatial components of gene expression spanning embryonic development for all Caenorhabditis elegans genes and use it to determine the evolutionary ages of the germ layers. The gene expression program of the mesoderm is induced after those of the ectoderm and endoderm, thus making it the last germ layer both to evolve and to develop. Strikingly, the C. elegans endoderm and ectoderm expression programs do not co-induce; rather the endoderm activates earlier, and this is also observed in the expression of endoderm orthologues during the embryology of the frog Xenopus tropicalis, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis and the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Querying the phylogenetic ages of specifically expressed genes reveals that the endoderm comprises older genes. Taken together, we propose that the endoderm program dates back to the origin of multicellularity, whereas the ectoderm originated as a secondary germ layer freed from ancestral feeding functions. PMID:25487147

  4. The segmented urbilateria: a testable scenario.

    PubMed

    Balavoine, Guillaume; Adoutte, André

    2003-02-01

    The idea that the last common ancestor of bilaterian animals (Urbilateria) was segmented has been raised recently on evidence coming from comparative molecular embryology. Leaving aside the complex debate on the value of genetic evidence, the morphological and developmental evidence in favor of a segmented Urbilateria are discussed in the light of the emerging molecular phylogeny of metazoans. Applying a cladistic character optimization procedure to the question of segmentation is vastly complicated by the problem of defining without ambiguity what segmentation is and to what taxa this definition applies. An ancestral segmentation might have undergone many complex derivations in each different phylum, thus rendering the cladistics approaches problematic. Taking the most general definitions of coelom and segmentation however, some remarkably similar patterns are found across the bilaterian tree in the way segments are formed by the posterior addition of mesodermal segments or somites. Postulating that these striking similarities in mesodermal patterns are ancestral, a scenario for the diversification of bilaterians from a metameric ancestor is presented. Several types of evolutionary mechanisms (specialization, tagmosis, progenesis) operating on a segmented ancestral body plan would explain the rapid emergence of body plans during the Cambrian. We finally propose to test this hypothesis by comparing genes involved in mesodermal segmentation. PMID:21680418

  5. Development, triploblastism, physics of wetting and the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    The Cambrian explosion is characterized by the sudden outburst of organized animal plans, which occurred circa 530 M years ago. Around that time, many forms of animal life appeared, including several which have since disappeared. There is no general consensus about "why" this happened, and why it had any form of suddenness. However, all organized animal plans share a common feature: they are triploblastic, i.e., composed of 3 layers of tissue, endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. I show here that, within simple hypotheses, the formation of the mesoderm has intrinsically a physical exponential dynamics, leading rapidly to triploblastism, and eventually, to animal formation. A novel physico-mathematical framework including epithelium-mesenchyme transition, visco-elastic constitutive equations, and conservation laws, is presented which allows one to describe gastrulation as a self-wetting phenomenon of a soft solid onto itself. This phenomenon couples differentiation and migration during gastrulation, and leads in a closed form to an exponential scaling law for the formation of the mesoderm. Therefore, the Cambrian explosion might have started, actually, by a true viscoelastic "explosion": the exponential run-away of mesenchymal cells. PMID:23959076

  6. Distinct regulation of the anterior and posterior myeloperoxidase expression by Etv2 and Gata1 during primitive Granulopoiesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Nicole O; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyon J; Zhao, Emma J; Skerniskyte, Jurate; Sumanas, Saulius

    2014-09-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes are the most abundant type of myeloid cells and form an essential part of the innate immune system. In vertebrates the first neutrophils are thought to originate during primitive hematopoiesis, which precedes hematopoietic stem cell formation. In zebrafish embryos, it has been suggested that primitive neutrophils may originate in two distinct sites, the anterior (ALPM) and posterior lateral plate mesoderm (PLPM). An ETS-family transcription factor Etsrp/Etv2/ER71 has been implicated in vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis in multiple vertebrates. However, its role during neutrophil development is not well understood. Here we demonstrate using zebrafish embryos that Etv2 has a specific cell-autonomous function during primitive neutropoiesis in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM) but has little effect on erythropoiesis or the posterior lateral plate mesoderm (PLPM) expression of neutrophil marker myeloperoxidase mpo/mpx. Our results argue that ALPM-derived neutrophils originate from etv2-expressing cells which downregulate etv2 during neutropoiesis. We further show that Scl functions downstream of Etv2 in anterior neutropoiesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that mpx expression within the PLPM overlaps with gata1 expression, potentially marking the cells with a dual myelo-erythroid potential. Intriguingly, initiation of mpx expression in the PLPM is dependent on gata1 but not etv2 function. Our results demonstrate that mpx expression is controlled differently in the ALPM and PLPM regions and describe novel roles for etv2 and gata1 during primitive neutropoiesis. PMID:24956419

  7. Evolutionary origins of the vertebrate heart: Specification of the cardiac lineage in Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Brad; Levine, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Here we exploit the extensive cell lineage information and streamlined genome of the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, to investigate heart development in a basal chordate. Several cardiac genes were analyzed, including the sole Ciona ortholog of the Drosophila tinman gene, and tissue-specific enhancers were isolated for some of the genes. Conserved sequence motifs within these enhancers facilitated the isolation of a heart enhancer for the Ciona Hand-like gene. Altogether, these studies provide a regulatory framework for the differentiation of the cardiac mesoderm, beginning at the 110-cell stage, and extending through the fusion of cardiac progenitors during tail elongation. The cardiac lineage shares a common origin with the germ line, and zygotic transcription is first detected in the heart progenitors only after its separation from the germ line at the 64-cell stage. We propose that germ-line determinants influence the specification of the cardiac mesoderm, both by inhibiting inductive signals required for the development of noncardiac mesoderm lineages, and by providing a localized source of Wnt-5 and other signals required for heart development. We discuss the possibility that the germ line also influences the specification of the vertebrate heart. PMID:14500781

  8. The Hydra FGFR, Kringelchen, partially replaces the Drosophila Heartless FGFR.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Anja; Hübinger, Christine; Hüsken, Katrin; Vogt, Angelika; Rebscher, Nicole; Onel, Susanne-Filiz; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Hassel, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are highly conserved receptor tyrosine kinases, and evolved early in metazoan evolution. In order to investigate their functional conservation, we asked whether the Kringelchen FGFR in the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris, is able to functionally replace FGFR in fly embryos. In Drosophila, two endogenous FGFR, Breathless (Btl) and Heartless (Htl), ensure formation of the tracheal system and mesodermal cell migration as well as formation of the heart. Using UAS-kringelchen-5xmyc transgenic flies and targeted expression, we show that Kringelchen is integrated correctly into the cell membrane of mesodermal and tracheal cells in Drosophila. Nevertheless, Kringelchen expression driven in tracheal cells failed to rescue the btl (LG19) mutant. The Hydra FGFR was able to substitute for Heartless in the htl (AB42) null mutant; however, this occurred only during early mesodermal cell migration. Our data provide evidence for functional conservation of this early-diverged FGFR across these distantly related phyla, but also selectivity for the Htl FGFR in the Drosophila system. PMID:23111653

  9. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    PubMed Central

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  10. Human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma NTERA2 cl.D1 cells maintain their typical morphology in an angiomyogenic medium

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Pedro D; Ramos, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Background Pluripotent embryonal carcinomas are good potential models, to study, "in vitro," the mechanisms that control differentiation during embryogenesis. The NTERA2cl.D1 (NT2/D1) cell line is a well known system of ectodermal differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) induces a dorsal pattern of differentiation (essentially neurons) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) or hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) induces a more ventral (epidermal) pattern of differentiation. However, whether these human cells could give rise to mesoderm derivatives as their counterpart in mouse remained elusive. We analyzed the morphological characteristics and transcriptional activation of genes pertinent in cardiac muscle and endothelium differentiation, during the growth of NT2/D1 cells in an inductive angiomyogenic medium with or without Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2). Results Our experiments showed that NT2/D1 maintains their typical actin organization in angiomyogenic medium. Although the beta myosin heavy chain gene was never detected, all the other 15 genes analyzed maintained their expression throughout the time course of the experiment. Among them were early and late cardiac, endothelial, neuronal and teratocarcinoma genes. Conclusion Our results suggest that despite the NT2/D1 cells natural tendency to differentiate into neuroectodermal lineages, they can activate genes of mesodermal lineages. Therefore, we believe that these pluripotent cells might still be a good model to study biological development of mesodermal derivatives, provided the right culture conditions are met. PMID:17442106

  11. Analysis of coelom development in the sea urchin Holopneustes purpurescens yielding a deuterostome body plan.

    PubMed

    Morris, Valerie B

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of early coelom development in the echinoid Holopneustes purpurescens yields a deuterostome body plan that explains the disparity between the pentameral plan of echinoderms and the bilateral plans of chordates and hemichordates, the three major phyla of the monophyletic deuterostomes. The analysis shows an early separation into a medial hydrocoele and lateral coelomic mesoderm with an enteric channel between them before the hydrocoele forms the pentameral plan of five primary podia. The deuterostome body plan thus has a single axial or medial coelom and a pair of lateral coeloms, all surrounding an enteric channel, the gut channel. Applied to the phyla, the medial coelom is the hydrocoele in echinoderms, the notochord in chordates and the proboscis coelom in hemichordates: the lateral coeloms are the coelomic mesoderm in echinoderms, the paraxial mesoderm in chordates and the lateral coeloms in hemichordates. The plan fits frog and chick development and the echinoderm fossil record, and predicts genes involved in coelomogenesis as the source of deuterostome macroevolution. PMID:26892238

  12. Spatiotemporal transcriptomics reveals the evolutionary history of the endoderm germ layer

    PubMed Central

    Hashimshony, Tamar; Feder, Martin; Levin, Michal; Hall, Brian K.; Yanai, Itai

    2014-01-01

    The germ layer concept has been one of the foremost organizing principles in developmental biology, classification, systematics and evolution for 150 years1-3. Of the three germ layers, the mesoderm is found in bilaterian animals but is absent in species in the phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, which has been taken as evidence that the mesoderm was the final germ layer to evolve1,4,5. The origin of the ectoderm and endoderm germ layers, however, remains unclear with models supporting the antecedence of each as well as a simultaneous origin4,6-9. Here, we determine the temporal and spatial components of gene expression spanning embryonic development for all Caenorhabditis elegans genes and use it to determine the evolutionary ages of the germ layers. The gene expression program of the mesoderm is induced after those of the ectoderm and endoderm, thus making it the last germ layer to both evolve and develop. Strikingly, the C. elegans endoderm and ectoderm expression programs do not co-induce; rather the endoderm activates earlier, and this is observed also in the expression of endoderm orthologs during the embryology of Xenopus tropicalis, Nematostella vectensis, and the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Querying for the phylogenetic ages of specifically expressed genes revealed that the endoderm is comprised of older genes. Taken together, we propose that the endoderm program dates back to the origin of multicellularity, while the ectoderm originated as a secondary germ layer freed from ancestral feeding functions. PMID:25487147

  13. The type I activin receptor ActRIB is required for egg cylinder organization and gastrulation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenyu; Nomura, Masatoshi; Simpson, Brenda B.; Lei, Hong; Feijen, Alie; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, Janny; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Li, En

    1998-01-01

    ActRIB is a type I transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptor that has been shown to form heteromeric complexes with the type II activin receptors to mediate activin signal. To investigate the function of ActRIB in mammalian development, we generated ActRIB-deficient ES cell lines and mice by gene targeting. Analysis of the ActRIB−/− embryos showed that the epiblast and the extraembryonic ectoderm were disorganized, resulting in disruption and developmental arrest of the egg cylinder before gastrulation. To assess the function of ActRIB in mesoderm formation and gastrulation, chimera analysis was conducted. We found that ActRIB−/− ES cells injected into wild-type blastocysts were able to contribute to the mesoderm in chimeric embryos, suggesting that ActRIB is not required for mesoderm formation. Primitive streak formation, however, was impaired in chimeras when ActRIB−/− cells contributed highly to the epiblast. Further, chimeras generated by injection of wild-type ES cells into ActRIB−/− blastocysts formed relatively normal extraembryonic tissues, but the embryo proper developed poorly probably resulting from severe gastrulation defect. These results provide genetic evidence that ActRIB functions in both epiblast and extraembryonic cells to mediate signals that are required for egg cylinder organization and gastrulation. PMID:9512518

  14. GATA2 regulates Wnt signaling to promote primitive red blood cell fate.

    PubMed

    Mimoto, Mizuho S; Kwon, Sunjong; Green, Yangsook Song; Goldman, Devorah; Christian, Jan L

    2015-11-01

    Primitive erythropoiesis is regulated in a non cell-autonomous fashion across evolution from frogs to mammals. In Xenopus laevis, signals from the overlying ectoderm are required to induce the mesoderm to adopt an erythroid fate. Previous studies in our lab identified the transcription factor GATA2 as a key regulator of this ectodermal signal. To identify GATA2 target genes in the ectoderm required for red blood cell formation in the mesoderm, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression in ectoderm from GATA2 depleted and wild type embryos. Our analysis identified components of the non-canonical and canonical Wnt pathways as being reciprocally up- and down-regulated downstream of GATA2 in both mesoderm and ectoderm. We show that up-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling during gastrulation blocks commitment to a hematopoietic fate while down-regulation of non-canonical Wnt signaling impairs erythroid differentiation. Our results are consistent with a model in which GATA2 contributes to inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling, thereby permitting progenitors to exit the cell cycle and commit to a hematopoietic fate. Subsequently, activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling plays a later role in enabling these progenitors to differentiate as mature red blood cells. PMID:26365900

  15. Myoblasts and myoblast-conditioned medium attract the earliest spinal neurites from frog embryos.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, C D

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of newly segmented somites, unsegmented mesoderm and medium conditioned by each of these tissues to attract the growth of the earliest spinal neurites from the neural tube of Xenopus laevis in tissue culture. When presented with segmented somitic myoblasts or sheets of skin, spinal neurites grew selectively towards the somitic myoblasts. Neurites were not attracted specifically to somitic myoblasts from their own rostrocaudal level. A variable proportion of myoblasts from unsegmented caudal mesoderm differentiated and elongated in co-culture with neural tube and skin. These myoblasts also attracted neural outgrowths, but only if present in sufficient numbers. An agar slab containing medium conditioned by the presence of segmented myoblasts for 1 day attracted neurite outgrowths. A source of medium conditioned by the presence of undifferentiated, unsegmented myotomal mesoderm alone did not attract neurite outgrowths. Nerve growth factor (NGF) at a range of concentrations in the agar source (500-10,000 ng/ml) did not attract the earliest neurite outgrowths. It is concluded that the earliest skeletal myoblasts from Xenopus laevis embryos may attract neural outgrowths by releasing a soluble factor. Myoblasts may have to develop to the stage of somite segmentation before secretion of such an agent begins. The release of a myoblast-derived factor so early in development may assist directed nerve growth in vivo. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3795063

  16. Endoderm differentiation and inductive effect of activin-treated ectoderm in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, H; Takahashi, S; Tanegashima, K; Yokota, C; Asashima, M

    1999-08-01

    When presumptive ectoderm is treated with high concentrations of activin A, it mainly differentiates into axial mesoderm (notochord, muscle) in Xenopus and into yolk-rich endodermal cells in newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster). Xenopus ectoderm consists of multiple layers, different from the single layer of Cynops ectoderm. This multilayer structure of Xenopus ectoderm may prevent complete treatment of activin A and subsequent whole differentiation into endoderm. In the present study, therefore, Xenopus ectoderm was separated into an outer layer and an inner layer, which were individually treated with a high concentration of activin A (100 ng/mL). Then the differentiation and inductive activity of these ectodermal cells were examined in explantation and transplantation experiments. In isolation culture, ectoderm treated with activin A formed endoderm. Ectodermal and mesodermal tissues were seldom found in these explants. The activin-treated ectoderm induced axial mesoderm and neural tissues, and differentiated into endoderm when it was sandwiched between two sheets of ectoderm or was transplanted into the ventral marginal zone of other blastulae. These findings suggest that Xenopus ectoderm treated with a high concentration of activin A forms endoderm and mimics the properties of the organizer as in Cynops. PMID:10466926

  17. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1–3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  18. ENDODERMAL ORIGIN OF BLADDER TRIGONE INFERRED FROM MESENCHYMAL-EPITHELIAL INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Stacy T.; Ishii, Kenichiro; DeMarco, Romano T.; Pope, John C.; Brock, John W.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In the classic view of bladder development, the trigone originates from the mesoderm-derived Wolffian ducts while the remainder of the bladder originates from the endoderm-derived urogenital sinus. Recent molecular developmental studies have questioned the veracity of this received wisdom, suggesting an endodermal origin for the trigone. To shed further light on this issue we observed mesenchymalepithelial interactions between trigone epithelium and fetal urogenital sinus mesenchyme (UGM) to infer the germ layer of origin of the trigone. Materials and methods Mouse trigone epithelium was recombined with fetal rat UGM in tissue recombinant grafts that were placed beneath the renal capsule of athymic mouse hosts. Grafts were harvested at 4 weeks. Control grafts with bladder dome and ureteral epithelium were also examined. Tissues were evaluated with hematoxylin / eosin and Hoechst dye 33258 (to confirm cell species origin). Immunohistochemistry to androgen receptor, broad spectrum uroplakin, dorsal lateral prostate secretions and seminal vesicle secretions were used to differentiate prostatic and seminal vesicle differentiation. Results Grafts of mouse trigone epithelium with fetal rat UGM yielded epithelial tissue which stained for dorsal lateral prostate secretions but not for seminal vesicle secretions. Control grafts of bladder dome epithelium yielded the expected endodermal prostate differentiation. Control grafts of ureteral epithelium yielded the expected mesodermal seminal vesicle differentiation. Conclusions The consistent finding of prostatic epithelium in tissue recombinants of trigone epithelium and fetal UGM reinforces the hypothesis that the trigone is derived from the endoderm and not the mesoderm as commonly accepted. PMID:19914648

  19. Tailbud-derived Bmp4 drives proliferation and inhibits maturation of zebrafish chordamesoderm.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Robert; Delalande, Jean-Marie; Fritz, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    In zebrafish, BMP signaling establishes cell identity along the dorsoventral (DV) axis during gastrulation. Owing to the early requirements of BMP activity in DV patterning, it has been difficult to assign later roles in cell fate specification to specific BMP ligands. In this study, we have taken advantage of two follistatin-like genes (fstl1 and fstl2), as well as a transgenic zebrafish line carrying an inducible truncated form of the BMP-type 1 receptor to study the role of Bmp4 outside of the context of DV specification. Characterization of fstl1/2 suggests that they exert a redundant role as BMP antagonists during late gastrulation, regulating BMP activity in axial mesoderm. Maintenance of appropriate levels of BMP signaling is crucial for the proper development of chordamesoderm, a subset of axial mesoderm that gives rise to the notochord, but not prechordal mesoderm, which gives rise to the prechordal plate. Bmp4 activity in particular is required during a crucial window beginning at late gastrulation and lasting through early somitogenesis to promote chordamesoderm proliferation. In the absence of Bmp4, the notochord precursor pool is depleted, and the notochord differentiates prematurely. Our results illustrate a role for Bmp4 in the proliferation and timely differentiation of axial tissue after DV axis specification. PMID:18948415

  20. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaki; Yanagawa, Naomi; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced renal lineages from mESCs by following the in vivo developmental cues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm by stepwise addition of factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced two types of renal progenitor cells by reciprocal conditioned media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose the potential role of CD24 for the enrichment of renal lineage cells. -- Abstract: The in vitro derivation of renal lineage progenitor cells is essential for renal cell therapy and regeneration. Despite extensive studies in the past, a protocol for renal lineage induction from embryonic stem cells remains unestablished. In this study, we aimed to induce renal lineages from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) by following in vivo developmental stages, i.e., the induction of mesoderm (Stage I), intermediate mesoderm (Stage II) and renal lineages (Stage III). For stage I induction, in accordance with known signaling pathways involved in mesoderm development in vivo, i.e., Nodal, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and Wnt, we found that the sequential addition of three factors, i.e., Activin-A (A), a surrogate for Nodal signaling, during days 0-2, A plus BMP-4 (4) during days 2-4, and A4 plus lithium (L), a surrogate for Wnt signaling, during days 4-6, was most effective to induce the mesodermal marker, Brachyury. For stage II induction, the addition of retinoic acid (R) in the continuous presence of A4L during days 6-8 was most effective to induce nephrogenic intermediate mesodermal markers, such as Pax2 and Lim1. Under this condition, more than 30% of cells were stained positive for Pax2, and there was a concomitant decrease in the expression of non-mesodermal markers. For stage III induction, in resemblance to the reciprocal induction between ureteric bud (UB) and metanephric mesenchyme (MM) during kidney development, we found that the exposure to conditioned media derived from UB and MM cells was

  1. Jagged1 functions downstream of Twist1 in the specification of the coronal suture and the formation of a boundary between osteogenic and non-osteogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Hai-Yun; Ting, Man-Chun; Maxson, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    The Notch pathway is crucial for a wide variety of developmental processes including the formation of tissue boundaries. That it may function in calvarial suture development and figure in the pathophysiology of craniosynostosis was suggested by the demonstration that heterozygous loss of function of JAGGED1 in humans can cause Alagille syndrome, which has craniosynostosis as a feature. We used conditional gene targeting to examine the role of Jagged1 in the development of the skull vault. We demonstrate that Jagged1 is expressed in a layer of mesoderm-derived sutural cells that lie along the osteogenic-non-osteogenic boundary. We show that inactivation of Jagged1 in the mesodermal compartment of the coronal suture, but not in the neural crest compartment, results in craniosynostosis. Mesodermal inactivation of Jagged1 also results in changes in the identity of sutural cells prior to overt osteogenic differentiation, as well as defects in the boundary between osteogenic and non-osteogenic compartments at the coronal suture. These changes, surprisingly, are associated with increased expression of Notch2 and the Notch effector, Hes1, in the sutural mesenchyme. They are also associated with an increase in nuclear β-catenin. In Twist1 mutants, Jagged1 expression in the suture is reduced substantially, suggesting an epistatic relationship between Twist1 and Jagged1. Consistent with such a relationship, Twist1-Jagged1 double heterozygotes exhibit a substantial increase in the severity of craniosynostosis over individual heterozygotes. Our results thus suggest that Jagged1 is an effector of Twist1 in coronal suture development. PMID:20727876

  2. Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head–trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lours-Calet, Corinne; Alvares, Lucia E.; El-Hanfy, Amira S.; Gandesha, Saniel; Walters, Esther H.; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Wotton, Karl R.; Jorge, Erika C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Kelsey Lewis, A.; Tada, Masazumi; Sharpe, Colin; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate head–trunk interface (occipital region) has been heavily remodelled during evolution, and its development is still poorly understood. In extant jawed vertebrates, this region provides muscle precursors for the throat and tongue (hypopharyngeal/hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors, HMP) that take a stereotype path rostrally along the pharynx and are thought to reach their target sites via active migration. Yet, this projection pattern emerged in jawless vertebrates before the evolution of migratory muscle precursors. This suggests that a so far elusive, more basic transport mechanism must have existed and may still be traceable today. Here we show for the first time that all occipital tissues participate in well-conserved cell movements. These cell movements are spearheaded by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm that split into two streams. The rostrally directed stream projects along the floor of the pharynx and reaches as far rostrally as the floor of the mandibular arch and outflow tract of the heart. Notably, this stream leads and engulfs the later emerging HMP, neural crest cells and hypoglossal nerve. When we (i) attempted to redirect hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors towards various attractants, (ii) placed non-migratory muscle precursors into the occipital environment or (iii) molecularly or (iv) genetically rendered muscle precursors non-migratory, they still followed the trajectory set by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm. Thus, we have discovered evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements, driven by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm, that ensure cell transport and organ assembly at the head–trunk interface. PMID:24662046

  3. Expression of the pair-rule gene homologs runt, Pax3/7, even-skipped-1 and even-skipped-2 during larval and juvenile development of the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta does not support a role in segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Annelids and arthropods each possess a segmented body. Whether this similarity represents an evolutionary convergence or inheritance from a common segmented ancestor is the subject of ongoing investigation. Methods To investigate whether annelids and arthropods share molecular components that control segmentation, we isolated orthologs of the Drosophila melanogaster pair-rule genes, runt, paired (Pax3/7) and eve, from the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta and used whole mount in situ hybridization to characterize their expression patterns. Results When segments first appear, expression of the single C. teleta runt ortholog is only detected in the brain. Later, Ct-runt is expressed in the ventral nerve cord, foregut and hindgut. Analysis of Pax genes in the C. teleta genome reveals the presence of a single Pax3/7 ortholog. Ct-Pax3/7 is initially detected in the mid-body prior to segmentation, but is restricted to two longitudinal bands in the ventral ectoderm. Each of the two C. teleta eve orthologs has a unique and complex expression pattern, although there is partial overlap in several tissues. Prior to and during segment formation, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are both expressed in the bilaterial pair of mesoteloblasts, while Ct-eve1 is expressed in the descendant mesodermal band cells. At later stages, Ct-eve2 is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and in mesoderm along the dorsal midline. In late stage larvae and adults, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are expressed in the posterior growth zone. Conclusions C. teleta eve, Pax3/7 and runt homologs all have distinct expression patterns and share expression domains with homologs from other bilaterians. None of the pair-rule orthologs examined in C. teleta exhibit segmental or pair-rule stripes of expression in the ectoderm or mesoderm, consistent with an independent origin of segmentation between annelids and arthropods. PMID:22510249

  4. WNT/β-catenin signaling mediates human neural crest induction via a pre-neural border intermediate.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alan W; Murdoch, Barbara; Salem, Ahmed F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Gomez, Gustavo A; García-Castro, Martín I

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells arise early in vertebrate development, migrate extensively and contribute to a diverse array of ectodermal and mesenchymal derivatives. Previous models of NC formation suggested derivation from neuralized ectoderm, via meso-ectodermal, or neural-non-neural ectoderm interactions. Recent studies using bird and amphibian embryos suggest an earlier origin of NC, independent of neural and mesodermal tissues. Here, we set out to generate a model in which to decipher signaling and tissue interactions involved in human NC induction. Our novel human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-based model yields high proportions of multipotent NC cells (expressing SOX10, PAX7 and TFAP2A) in 5 days. We demonstrate a crucial role for WNT/β-catenin signaling in launching NC development, while blocking placodal and surface ectoderm fates. We provide evidence of the delicate temporal effects of BMP and FGF signaling, and find that NC development is separable from neural and/or mesodermal contributions. We further substantiate the notion of a neural-independent origin of NC through PAX6 expression and knockdown studies. Finally, we identify a novel pre-neural border state characterized by early WNT/β-catenin signaling targets that displays distinct responses to BMP and FGF signaling from the traditional neural border genes. In summary, our work provides a fast and efficient protocol for human NC differentiation under signaling constraints similar to those identified in vivo in model organisms, and strengthens a framework for neural crest ontogeny that is separable from neural and mesodermal fates. PMID:26839343

  5. Wnt5a and Wnt11 regulate mammalian anterior-posterior axis elongation

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Philipp; Song, Hai; Kim, Wantae; Kispert, Andreas; Yang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Mesoderm formation and subsequent anterior-posterior (A-P) axis elongation are fundamental aspects of gastrulation, which is initiated by formation of the primitive streak (PS). Convergent extension (CE) movements and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are important for A-P axis elongation in vertebrate embryos. The evolutionarily conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway regulates CE, and Wnts regulate many aspects of gastrulation including CE and EMT. However, the Wnt ligands that regulate A-P axis elongation in mammalian development remain unknown. Wnt11 and Wnt5a regulate axis elongation in lower vertebrates, but only Wnt5a, not Wnt11, regulates mammalian PCP signaling and A-P axis elongation in development. Here, by generating Wnt5a; Wnt11 compound mutants, we show that Wnt11 and Wnt5a play redundant roles during mouse A-P axis elongation. Both genes regulate trunk notochord extension through PCP-controlled CE of notochord cells, establishing a role for Wnt11 in mammalian PCP. We show that Wnt5a and Wnt11 are required for proper patterning of the neural tube and somites by regulating notochord formation, and provide evidence that both genes are required for the generation and migration of axial and paraxial mesodermal precursor cells by regulating EMT. Axial and paraxial mesodermal precursors ectopically accumulate in the PS at late gastrula stages in Wnt5a−/−; Wnt11−/− embryos and these cells ectopically express epithelial cell adhesion molecules. Our data suggest that Wnt5a and Wnt11 regulate EMT by inducing p38 (Mapk14) phosphorylation. Our findings provide new insights into the role of Wnt5a and Wnt11 in mouse early development and also in cancer metastasis, during which EMT plays a crucial role. PMID:25813538

  6. Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis: two distinct morphogenetic mechanisms establish embryonic vascular pattern.

    PubMed

    Poole, T J; Coffin, J D

    1989-08-01

    We are using a monoclonal antibody, QH-1, as a label for angioblasts in quail embryos to study vascular development. Our previous experiments showed that major embryonic blood vessels, such as the dorsal aortae and posterior cardinal veins, develop from angioblasts of mesodermal origin that appear in the body of the embryo proper (Coffin and Poole: Development, 102:735-748, '88). We theorized that there are two separate processes for blood vessel development that occur in quail embryos. One mechanism termed "vasculogenesis" forms blood vessels in place by the aggregation of angioblasts into a cord. The other mechanism, termed "angiogenesis," is the formation of new vessels by sprouting of capillaries from existing vessels. Here we report the results of microsurgical transplantation experiments designed to determine the extent of cell migration taking place during blood vessel formation. Comparison of the chimeras to normal embryos suggests that the vascular pattern develops, in part, from the normally restricted points of entry of angioblasts into the head from the ventral and dorsal aortae. Transplantations of quail mesoderm (1-15 somite stage) into the head of 5-15 somite chick hosts resulted in extensive sprouting and in migration of single and small groups of angioblasts away from the graft sites. Transplantations into the trunk resulted in incorporation of the graft into the normal vascular pattern of the host. Lateral plate mesoderm was incorporated into the dorsal aortae and individual sprouts grew between somites and along the neural tube to contribute to the intersomitic and vertebral arteries, respectively. PMID:2671254

  7. Evolution of the heart from bacteria to man.

    PubMed

    Bishopric, Nanette H

    2005-06-01

    This review provides an overview of the evolutionary path to the mammalian heart from the beginnings of life (about four billion years ago ) to the present. Essential tools for cellular homeostasis and for extracting and burning energy are still in use and essentially unchanged since the appearance of the eukaryotes. The primitive coelom, characteristic of early multicellular organisms ( approximately 800 million years ago), is lined by endoderm and is a passive receptacle for gas exchange, feeding, and sexual reproduction. The cells around this structure express genes homologous to NKX2.5/tinman, and gradual specialization of this "gastroderm" results in the appearance of mesoderm in the phylum Bilateria, which will produce the first primitive cardiac myocytes. Investment of the coelom by these mesodermal cells forms a "gastrovascular" structure. Further evolution of this structure in the bilaterian branches Ecdysoa (Drosophila) and Deuterostoma (amphioxus) culminate in a peristaltic tubular heart, without valves, without blood vessels or blood, but featuring a single layer of contracting mesoderm. The appearance of Chordata and subsequently the vertebrates is accompanied by a rapid structural diversification of this primitive linear heart: looping, unidirectional circulation, an enclosed vasculature, and the conduction system. A later innovation is the parallel circulation to the lungs, followed by the appearance of septa and the four-chambered heart in reptiles, birds, and mammals. With differentiation of the cardiac chambers, regional specialization of the proteins in the cardiac myocyte can be detected in the teleost fish and amphibians. In mammals, growth constraints are placed on the heart, presumably to accommodate the constraints of the body plan and the thoracic cavity, and adult cardiac myocytes lose the ability to re-enter the cell cycle on demand. Mammalian cardiac myocyte innervation betrays the ancient link between the heart, the gut, and

  8. Dorsal-Ventral Patterning and Neural Induction in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.; Kuroda, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    We review the current status of research in dorsal-ventral (D-V) patterning in vertebrates. Emphasis is placed on recent work on Xenopus, which provides a paradigm for vertebrate development based on a rich heritage of experimental embryology. D-V patterning starts much earlier than previously thought, under the influence of a dorsal nuclear β-Catenin signal. At mid-blastula two signaling centers are present on the dorsal side: The prospective neuroectoderm expresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists, and the future dorsal endoderm secretes Nodal-related mesoderm-inducing factors. When dorsal mesoderm is formed at gastrula, a cocktail of growth factor antagonists is secreted by the Spemann organizer and further patterns the embryo. A ventral gastrula signaling center opposes the actions of the dorsal organizer, and another set of secreted antagonists is produced ventrally under the control of BMP4. The early dorsal β-Catenin signal inhibits BMP expression at the transcriptional level and promotes expression of secreted BMP antagonists in the prospective central nervous system (CNS). In the absence of mesoderm, expression of Chordin and Noggin in ectoderm is required for anterior CNS formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and IGF (insulin-like growth factor) signals are also potent neural inducers. Neural induction by anti-BMPs such as Chordin requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation mediated by FGF and IGF. These multiple signals can be integrated at the level of Smad1. Phosphorylation by BMP receptor stimulates Smad1 transcriptional activity, whereas phosphorylation by MAPK has the opposite effect. Neural tissue is formed only at very low levels of activity of BMP-transducing Smads, which require the combination of both low BMP levels and high MAPK signals. Many of the molecular players that regulate D-V patterning via regulation of BMP signaling have been conserved between Drosophila and the vertebrates. PMID:15473842

  9. The Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 Regulates Multiple Stages of Early Hemato-Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Hélia; Gomes, Andreia C.; Saavedra, Pedro; Carvalho, Catarina C.; Duarte, António; Cidadão, António; Parreira, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    Background In mouse embryos, homozygous or heterozygous deletions of the gene encoding the Notch ligand Dll4 result in early embryonic death due to major defects in endothelial remodeling in the yolk sac and embryo. Considering the close developmental relationship between endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages, which share a common mesoderm-derived precursor, the hemangioblast, and many key regulatory molecules, we investigated whether Dll4 is also involved in the regulation of early embryonic hematopoiesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Embryoid Bodies (EBs) derived from embryonic stem cells harboring hetero- or homozygous Dll4 deletions, we observed that EBs from both genotypes exhibit an abnormal endothelial remodeling in the vascular sprouts that arise late during EB differentiation, indicating that this in vitro system recapitulates the angiogenic phenotype of Dll4 mutant embryos. However, analysis of EB development at early time points revealed that the absence of Dll4 delays the emergence of mesoderm and severely reduces the number of blast-colony forming cells (BL-CFCs), the in vitro counterpart of the hemangioblast, and of endothelial cells. Analysis of colony forming units (CFU) in EBs and yolk sacs from Dll4+/− and Dll4−/− embryos, showed that primitive erythropoiesis is specifically affected by Dll4 insufficiency. In Dll4 mutant EBs, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seemingly unaffected and cardiomyocyte differentiation was increased, indicating that SMC specification is Dll4-independent while a normal dose of this Notch ligand is essential for the quantitative regulation of cardiomyogenesis. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights a previously unnoticed role for Dll4 in the quantitative regulation of early hemato-vascular precursors, further indicating that it is also involved on the timely emergence of mesoderm in early embryogenesis. PMID:22514637

  10. Pattern formation during gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    McClay, D R; Armstrong, N A; Hardin, J

    1992-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo follows a relatively simple cell behavioral sequence in its gastrulation movements. To form the mesoderm, primary mesenchyme cells ingress from the vegetal plate and then migrate along the basal lamina lining the blastocoel. The presumptive secondary mesenchyme and endoderm then invaginate from the vegetal pole of the embryo. The archenteron elongates and extends across the blastocoel until the tip of the archenteron touches and attaches to the opposite side of the blastocoel. Secondary mesenchyme cells, originally at the tip of the archenteron, differentiate to form a variety of structures including coelomic pouches, esophageal muscles, pigment cells and other cell types. After migration of the secondary mesenchyme cells from their original position at the tip of the archenteron, the endoderm fuses with an invagination of the ventral ectoderm (the stomodaem), to form the mouth and complete the process of gastrulation. A larval skeleton is made by primary mesenchyme cells during the time of archenteron and mouth formation. A number of experiments have established that these morphogenetic movements involve a number of cell autonomous behaviors plus a series of cell interactions that provide spatial, temporal and scalar information to cells of the mesoderm and endoderm. The cell autonomous behaviors can be demonstrated by the ability of micromeres or endoderm to perform their morphogenetic functions if either is isolated and grown in culture. The requirement for cell interactions has been demonstrated by manipulative experiments where it has been shown that axial information, temporal information, spatial information and scalar information is obtained by mesoderm and endoderm from other embryonic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1299366

  11. Human adipose tissue possesses a unique population of pluripotent stem cells with nontumorigenic and low telomerase activities: potential implications in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Fumitaka; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Bagheri, Mozhdeh; Heneidi, Saleh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a small population of pluripotent stem cells, termed adipose multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (adipose-Muse) cells, exist in adult human adipose tissue and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adipose-MSCs). They can be identified as cells positive for both MSC markers (CD105 and CD90) and human pluripotent stem cell marker SSEA-3. They intrinsically retain lineage plasticity and the ability to self-renew. They spontaneously generate cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell and successfully differentiate into targeted cells by cytokine induction. Cells other than adipose-Muse cells exist in adipose-MSCs, however, do not exhibit these properties and are unable to cross the boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal lineages even under cytokine inductions. Importantly, adipose-Muse cells demonstrate low telomerase activity and transplants do not promote teratogenesis in vivo. When compared with bone marrow (BM)- and dermal-Muse cells, adipose-Muse cells have the tendency to exhibit higher expression in mesodermal lineage markers, while BM- and dermal-Muse cells were generally higher in those of ectodermal and endodermal lineages. Adipose-Muse cells distinguish themselves as both easily obtainable and versatile in their capacity for differentiation, while low telomerase activity and lack of teratoma formation make these cells a practical cell source for potential stem cell therapies. Further, they will promote the effectiveness of currently performed adipose-MSC transplantation, particularly for ectodermal and endodermal tissues where transplanted cells need to differentiate across the lineage from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal in order to replenish lost cells for tissue repair. PMID:24256547

  12. Downregulation of H19 improves the differentiation potential of mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ragina, Neli P; Schlosser, Karianne; Knott, Jason G; Senagore, Patricia K; Swiatek, Pamela J; Chang, Eun Ah; Fakhouri, Walid D; Schutte, Brian C; Kiupel, Matti; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-05-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (P-ESCs) offer an alternative source of pluripotent cells, which hold great promise for autologous transplantation and regenerative medicine. P-ESCs have been successfully derived from blastocysts of several mammalian species. However, compared with biparental embryonic stem cells (B-ESCs), P-ESCs are limited in their ability to fully differentiate into all 3 germ layers. For example, it has been observed that there is a differentiation bias toward ectoderm derivatives at the expense of endoderm and mesoderm derivatives-muscle in particular-in chimeric embryos, teratomas, and embryoid bodies. In the present study we found that H19 expression was highly upregulated in P-ESCs with more than 6-fold overexpression compared with B-ESCs. Thus, we hypothesized that manipulation of the H19 gene in P-ESCs would alleviate their limitations and allow them to function like B-ESCs. To test this hypothesis we employed a small hairpin RNA approach to reduce the amount of H19 transcripts in mouse P-ESCs. We found that downregulation of H19 led to an increase of mesoderm-derived muscle and endoderm in P-ESCs teratomas similar to that observed in B-ESCs teratomas. This phenomenon coincided with upregulation of mesoderm-specific genes such as Myf5, Myf6, and MyoD. Moreover, H19 downregulated P-ESCs differentiated into a higher percentage of beating cardiomyocytes compared with control P-ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that P-ESCs are amenable to molecular modifications that bring them functionally closer to true ESCs. PMID:21793658

  13. Downregulation of H19 Improves the Differentiation Potential of Mouse Parthenogenetic Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ragina, Neli P.; Schlosser, Karianne; Knott, Jason G.; Senagore, Patricia K.; Swiatek, Pamela J.; Chang, Eun Ah; Fakhouri, Walid D.; Schutte, Brian C.; Kiupel, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (P-ESCs) offer an alternative source of pluripotent cells, which hold great promise for autologous transplantation and regenerative medicine. P-ESCs have been successfully derived from blastocysts of several mammalian species. However, compared with biparental embryonic stem cells (B-ESCs), P-ESCs are limited in their ability to fully differentiate into all 3 germ layers. For example, it has been observed that there is a differentiation bias toward ectoderm derivatives at the expense of endoderm and mesoderm derivatives—muscle in particular—in chimeric embryos, teratomas, and embryoid bodies. In the present study we found that H19 expression was highly upregulated in P-ESCs with more than 6-fold overexpression compared with B-ESCs. Thus, we hypothesized that manipulation of the H19 gene in P-ESCs would alleviate their limitations and allow them to function like B-ESCs. To test this hypothesis we employed a small hairpin RNA approach to reduce the amount of H19 transcripts in mouse P-ESCs. We found that downregulation of H19 led to an increase of mesoderm-derived muscle and endoderm in P-ESCs teratomas similar to that observed in B-ESCs teratomas. This phenomenon coincided with upregulation of mesoderm-specific genes such as Myf5, Myf6, and MyoD. Moreover, H19 downregulated P-ESCs differentiated into a higher percentage of beating cardiomyocytes compared with control P-ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that P-ESCs are amenable to molecular modifications that bring them functionally closer to true ESCs. PMID:21793658

  14. Clarifying tetrapod embryogenesis by a dorso-ventral analysis of the tissue flows during early stages of chicken development.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    The formation of an animal body remains largely a mystery. It is still not clear whether anything like an organization plan or an "archetype" as coined by Darwin himself, actually exists, or whether animals are organized by a succession of stop-and-go genetic, non-linear, instructions with no global pattern. Nevertheless, it was recognized long ago that the early stages of amniote development consist of large scale rotatory movements over a discoidal blastula (Wetzel, 1924). Such rotatory movements reshuffle a mass inside a finite volume, and thus may have to bear physical conservation laws which contribute to establish the plan of animals in a global fashion. In this article I use dual dorso-ventral imaging of the chicken blastula, to show experimentally that the global movement of early vertebrate embryogenesis is organized with a very simple topology, around and away of a series of hyperbolic points in the vector flow of movement. At the first hyperbolic point, a layer of tissue (the mesoderm) ingresses and moves as a viscous sheet radially. It is found that the sheet flows away with a scaling law for the radius R(t)∼exp(t/τ). Also, the movement of this mesoderm changes the flow on the other layer (the ectoderm) by the principle of action and reaction. By mesoderm wetting the ectoderm, the first hyperbolic point migrates from the anal region, to the umbilical region. The final location of the hyperbolic point defines eventually the central part of the body (the umbilical region). Thus, the formation of the vertebrate body is fixed, as a global movement, by the dynamics of singular points in the visco-elastic flow, governed by mechanical forces within the tissue. PMID:22564883

  15. The hedgehog Pathway Gene shifted Functions together with the hmgcr-Dependent Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway to Orchestrate Germ Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Girish; Zhou, Keren; Wan, Joy Y.; Friedrich, Jana; Jourjine, Nicholas; Smith, Daniel; Schedl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila embryonic gonad is assembled from two distinct cell types, the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs) and the Somatic Gonadal Precursor cells (SGPs). The PGCs form at the posterior of blastoderm stage embryos and are subsequently carried inside the embryo during gastrulation. To reach the SGPs, the PGCs must traverse the midgut wall and then migrate through the mesoderm. A combination of local repulsive cues and attractive signals emanating from the SGPs guide migration. We have investigated the role of the hedgehog (hh) pathway gene shifted (shf) in directing PGC migration. shf encodes a secreted protein that facilitates the long distance transmission of Hh through the proteoglycan matrix after it is released from basolateral membranes of Hh expressing cells in the wing imaginal disc. shf is expressed in the gonadal mesoderm, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that it is required for PGC migration. Previous studies have established that the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway plays a pivotal role in generating the PGC attractant both by the SGPs and by other tissues when hmgcr is ectopically expressed. We show that production of this PGC attractant depends upon shf as well as a second hh pathway gene gγ1. Further linking the PGC attractant to Hh, we present evidence indicating that ectopic expression of hmgcr in the nervous system promotes the release/transmission of the Hh ligand from these cells into and through the underlying mesodermal cell layer, where Hh can contact migrating PGCs. Finally, potentiation of Hh by hmgcr appears to depend upon cholesterol modification. PMID:24068944

  16. Expression study of the hunchback ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Mayer, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors encoded by hunchback homologs play different roles in arthropods, including maternally mediated control, segmentation, and mesoderm and neural development. Knockdown experiments in spider and insect embryos have also revealed homeotic effects and gap phenotypes, the latter indicating a function of hunchback as a "gap gene". Although the expression pattern of hunchback has been analysed in representatives of all four major arthropod groups (chelicerates, myriapods, crustaceans and insects), nothing is known about its expression in one of the closest arthropod relatives, the Onychophora (velvet worms). We therefore examined the expression pattern of hunchback in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our transcriptomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed only one hunchback ortholog in this species. The putative Hunchback protein contains all nine zinc finger domains known from other protostomes. We found no indication of maternally contributed transcripts of hunchback in early embryos of E. rowelli. Its initial expression occurs in the ectodermal tissue of the antennal segment, followed by the jaw, slime papilla and trunk segments in an anterior-to-posterior progression. Later, hunchback expression is seen in the mesoderm of the developing limbs. A second "wave" of expression commences later in development in the antennal segment and continues posteriorly along each developing nerve cord. This expression is restricted to the neural tissues and does not show any segmental pattern. These findings are in line with the ancestral roles of hunchback in mesoderm and neural development, whereas we find no evidence for a putative function of hunchback as a "gap gene" in Onychophora. PMID:26093940

  17. Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head-trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures.

    PubMed

    Lours-Calet, Corinne; Alvares, Lucia E; El-Hanfy, Amira S; Gandesha, Saniel; Walters, Esther H; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Wotton, Karl R; Jorge, Erika C; Lawson, Jennifer A; Kelsey Lewis, A; Tada, Masazumi; Sharpe, Colin; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2014-06-15

    The vertebrate head-trunk interface (occipital region) has been heavily remodelled during evolution, and its development is still poorly understood. In extant jawed vertebrates, this region provides muscle precursors for the throat and tongue (hypopharyngeal/hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors, HMP) that take a stereotype path rostrally along the pharynx and are thought to reach their target sites via active migration. Yet, this projection pattern emerged in jawless vertebrates before the evolution of migratory muscle precursors. This suggests that a so far elusive, more basic transport mechanism must have existed and may still be traceable today. Here we show for the first time that all occipital tissues participate in well-conserved cell movements. These cell movements are spearheaded by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm that split into two streams. The rostrally directed stream projects along the floor of the pharynx and reaches as far rostrally as the floor of the mandibular arch and outflow tract of the heart. Notably, this stream leads and engulfs the later emerging HMP, neural crest cells and hypoglossal nerve. When we (i) attempted to redirect hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors towards various attractants, (ii) placed non-migratory muscle precursors into the occipital environment or (iii) molecularly or (iv) genetically rendered muscle precursors non-migratory, they still followed the trajectory set by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm. Thus, we have discovered evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements, driven by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm, that ensure cell transport and organ assembly at the head-trunk interface. PMID:24662046

  18. NFAT5 regulates the canonical Wnt pathway and is required for cardiomyogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Atsuo; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Ogata, Takehiro; Imoto-Tsubakimoto, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 protein expression is downregulated during cardiomyogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function suppresses canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function attenuates mesodermal induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 function is required for cardiomyogenesis. -- Abstract: While nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5), a transcription factor implicated in osmotic stress response, is suggested to be involved in other processes such as migration and proliferation, its role in cardiomyogenesis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of P19CL6 cells, and observed that it was abundantly expressed in undifferentiated P19CL6 cells, and its protein expression was significantly downregulated by enhanced proteasomal degradation during DMSO-induced cardiomyogenesis. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of NFAT5 markedly attenuated cardiomyogenesis, which was associated with the inhibition of mesodermal differentiation. TOPflash reporter assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of canonical Wnt signaling was activated prior to mesodermal differentiation, and this activation was markedly attenuated by NFAT5 inhibition. Pharmacological activation of canonical Wnt signaling by [2 Prime Z, 3 Prime E]-6-bromoindirubin-3 Prime -oxime (BIO) restored Brachyury expression in NFAT5DN-expressing cells. Inhibition of NFAT5 markedly attenuated Wnt3 and Wnt3a induction. Expression of Dkk1 and Cerberus1, which are secreted Wnt antagonists, was also inhibited by NFAT5 inhibition. Thus, endogenous NFAT5 regulates the coordinated expression of Wnt ligands and antagonists, which are essential for cardiomyogenesis through the canonical Wnt pathway. These results demonstrated a novel role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of stem cells.

  19. SP8 regulates signaling centers during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Kasberg, Abigail D; Brunskill, Eric W; Steven Potter, S

    2013-09-15

    Much of the bone, cartilage and smooth muscle of the vertebrate face is derived from neural crest (NC) cells. During craniofacial development, the anterior neural ridge (ANR) and olfactory pit (OP) signaling centers are responsible for driving the outgrowth, survival, and differentiation of NC populated facial prominences, primarily via FGF. While much is known about the functional importance of signaling centers, relatively little is understood of how these signaling centers are made and maintained. In this report we describe a dramatic craniofacial malformation in mice mutant for the zinc finger transcription factor gene Sp8. At E14.5 they show facial prominences that are reduced in size and underdeveloped, giving an almost faceless phenotype. At later times they show severe midline defects, excencephaly, hyperterlorism, cleft palate, and a striking loss of many NC and paraxial mesoderm derived cranial bones. Sp8 expression was primarily restricted to the ANR and OP regions during craniofacial development. Analysis of an extensive series of conditional Sp8 mutants confirmed the critical role of Sp8 in signaling centers, and not directly in the NC and paraxial mesoderm cells. The NC cells of the Sp8 mutants showed increased levels of apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation, thereby explaining the reduced sizes of the facial prominences. Perturbed gene expression in the Sp8 mutants was examined by laser capture microdissection coupled with microarrays, as well as in situ hybridization and immunostaining. The most dramatic differences included striking reductions in Fgf8 and Fgf17 expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers. We were also able to achieve genetic and pharmaceutical partial rescue of the Sp8 mutant phenotype by reducing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. These results show that Sp8 primarily functions to promote Fgf expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers that drive the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the NC and paraxial

  20. SP8 regulates signaling centers during craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Kasberg, Abigail D.; Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    Much of the bone, cartilage and smooth muscle of the vertebrate face is derived from neural crest (NC) cells. During craniofacial development, the anterior neural ridge (ANR) and olfactory pit (OP) signaling centers are responsible for driving the outgrowth, survival, and differentiation of NC populated facial prominences, primarily via FGF. While much is known about the functional importance of signaling centers, relatively little is understood of how these signaling centers are made and maintained. In this report we describe a dramatic craniofacial malformation in mice mutant for the zinc finger transcription factor gene Sp8. At E14.5 they show facial prominences that are reduced in size and underdeveloped, giving an almost faceless phenotype. At later times they show severe midline defects, excencephaly, hyperterlorism, cleft palate, and a striking loss of many NC and paraxial mesoderm derived cranial bones. Sp8 expression was primarily restricted to the ANR and OP regions during craniofacial development. Analysis of an extensive series of conditional Sp8 mutants confirmed the critical role of Sp8 in signaling centers, and not directly in the NC and paraxial mesoderm cells. The NC cells of the Sp8 mutants showed increased levels of apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation, thereby explaining the reduced sizes of the facial prominences. Perturbed gene expression in the Sp8 mutants was examined by laser capture microdissection coupled with microarrays, as well as in situ hybridization and immunostaining. The most dramatic differences included striking reductions in Fgf8 and Fgf17 expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers. We were also able to achieve genetic and pharmaceutical partial rescue of the Sp8 mutant phenotype by reducing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. These results show that Sp8 primarily functions to promote Fgf expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers that drive the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the NC and paraxial

  1. Expression and phylogenetic analysis of the zic gene family in the evolution and development of metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background zic genes are members of the gli/glis/nkl/zic super-family of C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) transcription factors. Homologs of the zic family have been implicated in patterning neural and mesodermal tissues in bilaterians. Prior to this study, the origin of the metazoan zic gene family was unknown and expression of zic gene homologs during the development of early branching metazoans had not been investigated. Results Phylogenetic analyses of novel zic candidate genes identified a definitive zic homolog in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, two gli/glis/nkl-like genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, confirmed the presence of three gli/glis/nkl-like genes in Porifera, and confirmed the five previously identified zic genes in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the cnidarian N. vectensis, zic homologs are expressed in ectoderm and the gastrodermis (a bifunctional endomesoderm), in presumptive and developing tentacles, and in oral and sensory apical tuft ectoderm. The Capitella teleta zic homolog (Ct-zic) is detectable in a subset of the developing nervous system, the foregut, and the mesoderm associated with the segmentally repeated chaetae. Lastly, expression of gli and glis homologs in Mnemiopsis. leidyi is detected exclusively in neural cells in floor of the apical organ. Conclusions Based on our analyses, we propose that the zic gene family arose in the common ancestor of the Placozoa, Cnidaria and Bilateria from a gli/glis/nkl-like gene and that both ZOC and ZF-NC domains evolved prior to cnidarian-bilaterian divergence. We also conclude that zic expression in neural ectoderm and developing neurons is pervasive throughout the Metazoa and likely evolved from neural expression of an ancestral gli/glis/nkl/zic gene. zic expression in bilaterian mesoderm may be related to the expression in the gastrodermis of a cnidarian-bilaterian common ancestor. PMID:21054859

  2. PARM-1 promotes cardiomyogenic differentiation through regulating the BMP/Smad signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Ogata, Takehiro; Adachi, Atsuo; Imoto-Tsubakimoto, Hiroko; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARM-1 expression is induced during cardiomyogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARM-1 expression precedes Nkx2.5 and Tbx5 during cardiomyogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARM-1 activates BMP/Smad signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARM-1 enhances cardiac specification, resulting in promoted cardiomyogenesis. -- Abstract: PARM-1, prostatic androgen repressed message-1, is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecule that is involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In this study, we assessed whether PARM-1 plays a role in the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes. While PARM-1 was not expressed in undifferentiated P19CL6 embryonic carcinoma cells, PARM-1 expression was induced during cardiomyogenic differentiation. This expression followed expression of mesodermal markers, and preceded expression of cardiac transcription factors. PARM-1 overexpression did not alter the expression of undifferentiated markers and the proliferative property in undifferentiated P19CL6 cells. Expression of cardiac transcription factors during cardiomyogenesis was markedly enhanced by overexpression of PARM-1, while expression of mesodermal markers was not altered, suggesting that PARM-1 is involved in the differentiation from the mesodermal lineage to cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, overexpression of PARM-1 induced BMP2 mRNA expression in undifferentiated P19CL6 cells and enhanced both BMP2 and BMP4 mRNA expression in the early phase of cardiomyogenesis. PARM-1 overexpression also enhanced phosphorylation of Smads1/5/8. Thus, PARM-1 plays an important role in the cardiomyogenic differentiation of P19CL6 cells through regulating BMP/Smad signaling pathways, demonstrating a novel role of PARM-1 in the cardiomyogenic differentiation of stem cells.

  3. Early development of chondrocranium in the tailed frog Ascaphus truei (Amphibia: Anura): implications for anuran palatoquadrate homologies.

    PubMed

    Reiss, J O

    1997-01-01

    Chondrocranial development in Ascaphus truei was studied by serial sectioning and graphical reconstruction. Nine stages (21-29; 9-18 mm TL) were examined. Mesodermal cells were distinguished from ectomesenchymal (neural crest derived) cells by retained yolk granules. Ectomesenchymal parts of the chondrocranium include the suprarostrals, pila preoptica, anterior trabecula, and palatoquadrate. Mesodermal parts of the chondrocranium include the orbital cartilage, posterior trabecula, parachordal, basiotic lamina, and otic capsule. Development of the palatoquadrate is as follows. The pterygoid process first connects with the trabecula far rostrally; their fusion progresses caudally. The ascending process connects with a mesodermal bar that extends from the orbital cartilage to the otic capsule, and forms the ventral border of the dorsal trigeminal outlet. This bar is the "ascending process" of Ascaphus adults; it is a neurocranial, not palatoquadrate structure. The basal process chondrifies in an ectomesenchymal strand running from the quadrate keel to the postpalatine commissure. Later, the postpalatine commissure and basal process extend anteromedially to contact the floor of the anterior cupula of the otic capsule, creating separate foramina for the palatine and hyomandibular branches of the facial nerve. Based on these data, and on comparison with other frogs and salamanders, the anuran anterior quadratocranial commissure is homologized with the pterygoid process of salamanders, the anuran basal process (= "pseudobasal" or "hyobasal" process) with the basal process of salamanders, and the anuran otic ledge with the basitrabecular process of salamanders. The extensive similarities in palatoquadrate structure and development between frogs and salamanders, and lacking in caecilians, are not phylogenetically informative. Available information on fossil outgroups suggests that some of these similarities are primitive for Lissamphibia, whereas for others the polarity is

  4. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  5. In Brief: Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Orlova, Valeria; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) in the onset and progression of a number of human pathologies. EndoMT involves the loss of an endothelial signature to generate unspecialized mesenchymal-like cells, susceptible to being re-differentiated into mesodermal cell types, including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, modulation of the molecular pathways controlling EndoMT can be considered as a therapeutic approach for particular human diseases. In addition, EndoMT may be harnessed for tissue engineering by producing multipotent mesenchymal cells able to differentiate into mutiple cell types. PMID:26446982

  6. Advances in early kidney specification, development and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    The kidney is a model developmental system for understanding mesodermal patterning and organogenesis, a process that requires regional specification along multiple body axes, the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells, and integration with other tissues. Recent progress in the field has highlighted the essential roles of intrinsic nuclear factors and secreted signaling molecules in specifying renal epithelial stem cells and their self-renewal, in driving the complex dynamics of epithelial cell branching morphogenesis, and in nephron patterning. How these developments influence and advance our understanding of kidney development is discussed. PMID:19906853

  7. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2002-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  8. Distinct genetic programs guide Drosophila circular and longitudinal visceral myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The visceral musculature of Drosophila larvae comprises circular visceral muscles tightly interwoven with longitudinal visceral muscles. During myogenesis, the circular muscles arise by one-to-one fusion of a circular visceral founder cell (FC) with a visceral fusion-competent myoblast (FCM) from the trunk visceral mesoderm, and longitudinal muscles arise from FCs of the caudal visceral mesoderm. Longitudinal FCs migrate anteriorly under guidance of fibroblast growth factors during embryogenesis; it is proposed that they fuse with FCMs from the trunk visceral mesoderm to give rise to syncytia containing up to six nuclei. Results Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemical analyses, we investigated whether these fusion events during migration use the same molecular repertoire and cellular components as fusion-restricted myogenic adhesive structure (FuRMAS), the adhesive signaling center that mediates myoblast fusion in the somatic mesoderm. Longitudinal muscles were formed by the fusion of one FC with Sns-positive FCMs, and defects in FCM specification led to defects in longitudinal muscle formation. At the fusion sites, Duf/Kirre and the adaptor protein Rols7 accumulated in longitudinal FCs, and Blow and F-actin accumulated in FCMs. The accumulation of these four proteins at the fusion sites argues for FuRMAS-like adhesion and signaling centers. Longitudinal fusion was disturbed in rols and blow single, and scar wip double mutants. Mutants of wasp or its interaction partner wip had no defects in longitudinal fusion. Conclusions Our results indicated that all embryonic fusion events depend on the same cell-adhesion molecules, but that the need for Rols7 and regulators of F-actin distinctly differs. Rols7 was required for longitudinal visceral and somatic myoblast fusion but not for circular visceral fusion. Importantly, longitudinal fusion depended on Kette and SCAR/Wave but was independent of WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. Thus, the

  9. A review of the role of ultrasound biomicroscopy in glaucoma associated with rare diseases of the anterior segment

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Giuseppe; Abdolrahimzadeh, Barmak; Calafiore, Silvia; Anselmi, Gianmario; Mannino, Cristina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique, which allows high-resolution evaluation of the anatomical features of the anterior segment of the eye regardless of optical media transparency. This technique provides diagnostically significant information in vivo for the cornea, anterior chamber, chamber angle, iris, posterior chamber, zonules, ciliary body, and lens, and is of great value in assessment of the mechanisms of glaucoma onset. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of ultrasound biomicroscopy in the diagnosis and management of rare diseases of the anterior segment such as mesodermal dysgenesis of the neural crest, iridocorneal endothelial syndrome, phakomatoses, and metabolic disorders. PMID:27536058

  10. Derivation of the clinical grade human embryonic stem cell line RCe020-a (RC-16).

    PubMed

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B J; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Russell, G; Collins, D M; Greenshields, A; McDonald, K; Bradburn, H; Laurie, A; Downie, J M; Bateman, M; Courtney, A

    2016-05-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCe020-A (RC-16) was derived under quality assured compliance with UK regulation, European Union Directives and International guidance for tissue procurement, processing and storage according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards. The cell line was derived from a failed to fertilise oocyte voluntarily donated as unsuitable or surplus to fertility requirements following informed consent. RCe020-A (RC-16) shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiates to mesoderm and potentially ectoderm in vitro. It has an abnormal 47XX, +14, i(20)(q10) female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346205

  11. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and cerebral haemangiopericytoma: a potential association.

    PubMed

    Mathews, M S; Kim, R C; Chang, G Y; Linskey, M E

    2008-04-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) a rare mesodermal phakomatosis consisting of capillary malformations, varicose veins, and limb hypertrophy, often associated with vascular malformations and benign tumours. A 33-year-old male presented with headaches secondary to a previously diagnosed intracranial tumour. He had a large blanching port-wine stain and hypertrophy of the left side of his body and limbs partial syndactyly of the 2(nd) and 3(rd) digits in all four extremities. The lesion was surgically resected and histology showed a Haemangiopericytoma. Thus KTS may be associated with intracranial Haemangiopericytomas, a malignant vascular tumour. PMID:18297229

  12. The radiological features of Goltz syndrome: focal dermal hypoplasia. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, A E; Hall, C M

    1988-01-01

    Two female infants with Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia) were recently investigated in the Department of Radiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street for severe feeding problems and failure to thrive. Both demonstrated severe skeletal malformations and marked gastrooesophageal reflux with laxity of the hiatus. One child (case 1) exhibited nasal regurgitation during feeding. Interestingly, both children had undergone surgery; Case 1 or a right parasagittal abdominal hernia associated with focal dermal hypoplasia of the abdominal wall and Case 2 for an exomphalos also associated with dermal hypoplasia. This observation suggests a more widespread mesodermal abnormality. PMID:3201278

  13. Goltz Syndrome and PORCN Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, D.A.; Chirpich, M.; Contreras, Y.; Hanson, H.; Dent, K.

    2014-01-01

    Goltz syndrome, also known as focal dermal hypoplasia, is characterized primarily by ectodermal and mesodermal defects. Manifestations include cutis aplasia, dermal hypoplasia, papillomas, chorioretinal colobomas, absent/dysplastic teeth, and skeletal anomalies. Goltz syndrome is an X-linked disorder due to mutations in PORCN, with a predominance of females affected. Germline mutations in PORCN are thought to result in embryonically lethality in males. We present a boy with a phenotype consistent with Goltz syndrome with low level mosaicism for a novel mutation in PORCN from peripheral blood (c.956dupA; p.Asn320GlufsX99). PMID:25040319

  14. Slug is a novel downstream target of MyoD. Temporal profiling in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Po; Iezzi, Simona; Carver, Ethan; Dressman, Devin; Gridley, Thomas; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Hoffman, Eric P

    2002-08-16

    Temporal expression profiling was utilized to define transcriptional regulatory pathways in vivo in a mouse muscle regeneration model. Potential downstream targets of MyoD were identified by temporal expression, promoter data base mining, and gel shift assays; Slug and calpain 6 were identified as novel MyoD targets. Slug, a member of the snail/slug family of zinc finger transcriptional repressors critical for mesoderm/ectoderm development, was further shown to be a downstream target by using promoter/reporter constructs and demonstration of defective muscle regeneration in Slug null mice. PMID:12023284

  15. Implantation and the placenta: Key pieces of the development puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.C.; Werb, Z.; Fisher, S.J.

    1994-12-02

    The mammalian embryo cannot develop without the placenta. Its specialized cells (trophoblast, endoderm, and extraembryonic mesoderm) form early in development. They attach the embryo to the uterus (implantation) and form vascular connections necessary for nutrient transport. In addition, the placenta redirects maternal endocrine, immune, and metabolic functions to the embryo`s advantage. These complex activities are sensitive to disruption, as shown by the high incidence of early embryonic mortality and pregnancy diseases in humans, as well as the numerous peri-implantation lethal mutations in mice. Integration of molecular and developmental approaches has recently produced insights into the molecules that control these processes.

  16. Primary extra-renal clear cell renal cell carcinoma masquerading as an adrenal mass: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Monappa, Vidya; Ayachit, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of a nonmetastasizing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as an adrenal mass, in the presence of normal bilateral native kidneys, in a young adult. The possibility of this mass developing in a supernumerary kidney was ruled out, since no identifiable renal tissue, pelvis or ureters was seen within the mass, nor was any separate systemic arterial supply to the mass seen. The diagnosis of extra-renal clear cell RCC was based on cyto-morphological features, further confirmed by immunohistochemistry findings. The origin of this extra-renal clear cell renal cell is proposed to be from the mesodermal embryonic rests. PMID:26692677

  17. Isolation of adult human pluripotent stem cells from mesenchymal cell populations and their application to liver damages.

    PubMed

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-01-01

    We have found a novel type of pluripotent stem cells, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells that can be isolated from mesenchymal cell populations. Muse cells are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single cell, demonstrating that they are pluripotent stem cells. They can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a human pluripotent stem cell marker. Here, we introduce the isolation method for Muse cells and the effect of transplantation of these cells on chronic liver diseases. PMID:22167642

  18. Neural induction: 10 years on since the 'default model'.

    PubMed

    Stern, Claudio D

    2006-12-01

    Neural induction is the process by which embryonic cells in the ectoderm make a decision to acquire a neural fate (to form the neural plate) rather than give rise to other structures such as epidermis or mesoderm. An influential model proposed a decade ago, the 'default model', postulated that ectodermal cells will become neurons if they receive no signals at all, but that this is normally inhibited in prospective epidermal cells by the action of bone morphogenetic proteins. Recent results now reveal considerable more complexity and emphasis is shifting from intercellular signalling factors to trying to understand the regulation of expression of key genes within the nucleus. PMID:17045790

  19. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  20. Maffucci syndrome with unilateral limb: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Wang, Baojun; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Fengqi

    2013-01-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a congenital, non-hereditary mesodermal dysplasia manifested by multiple enchondromas and hemangiomas. It is associated with diverse secondary musculoskeletal deformities, which is exceedingly rare. We report a case of hemangiomas and enchondromas localized in the unilateral limb in a patient with Maffucci syndrome. Treatment consists of orthopedic and surgical intervention to minimize deformities and for cosmetic purpose. Careful surveillance for malignant degeneration of both skeletal and non-skeletal tumors, especially in the brain and abdomen, is essential. PMID:23592908

  1. Cardiac Cell Lineages that Form the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Meilhac, Sigolène M.; Lescroart, Fabienne; Blanpain, Cédric; Buckingham, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial cells ensure the contractility of the heart, which also depends on other mesodermal cell types for its function. Embryological experiments had identified the sources of cardiac precursor cells. With the advent of genetic engineering, novel tools have been used to reconstruct the lineage tree of cardiac cells that contribute to different parts of the heart, map the development of cardiac regions, and characterize their genetic signature. Such knowledge is of fundamental importance for our understanding of cardiogenesis and also for the diagnosis and treatment of heart malformations. PMID:25183852

  2. Laser Resection of Fibroepithelial Polyps with Digital Ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Demetrius H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) are rare benign upper urinary-tract neoplasms originating from mesodermal components of the ureteral wall covered in normal urothelial epithelium. Historically, these lesions have been treated with endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open means depending on the size, number, and morphology of the polyps. Digital ureteroscopy (DURS) offers many advantages over fiber-optic endoscopy, including superior resolution and potential ergonomic benefits, given the absence of external cameras and light cords. We describe a case involving multiple proximal ureteral FEPs treated with flexible DURS and the holmium (Ho) laser, in which the digital ureteroscope offered exceptional visualization of the FEP stalks allowing for straightforward resection and endoscopic removal.

  3. In vitro Differentiation Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Guilak, Farshid; Nuttall, Mark E.; Sathishkumar, Solomon; Vidal, Martin; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a class of multipotent progenitor cells that have been isolated from multiple tissue sites. Of these, adipose tissue and bone marrow offer advantages in terms of access, abundance, and the extent of their documentation in the literature. This review focuses on the in vitro differentiation capability of cells derived from adult human tissue. Multiple, independent studies have demonstrated that MSCs can commit to mesodermal (adipocyte, chondrocyte, hematopoietic support, myocyte, osteoblast, tenocyte), ectodermal (epithelial, glial, neural), and endodermal (hepatocyte, islet cell) lineages. The limitations and promises of these studies in the context of tissue engineering are discussed. PMID:21547120

  4. A genomic regulatory network for development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Oliveri, Paola; Ransick, Andrew; Calestani, Cristina; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Minokawa, Takuya; Amore, Gabriele; Hinman, Veronica; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Otim, Ochan; Brown, C. Titus; Livi, Carolina B.; Lee, Pei Yun; Revilla, Roger; Rust, Alistair G.; Pan, Zheng jun; Schilstra, Maria J.; Clarke, Peter J C.; Arnone, Maria I.; Rowen, Lee; Cameron, R. Andrew; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy; Bolouri, Hamid

    2002-01-01

    Development of the body plan is controlled by large networks of regulatory genes. A gene regulatory network that controls the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in the sea urchin embryo is summarized here. The network was derived from large-scale perturbation analyses, in combination with computational methodologies, genomic data, cis-regulatory analysis, and molecular embryology. The network contains over 40 genes at present, and each node can be directly verified at the DNA sequence level by cis-regulatory analysis. Its architecture reveals specific and general aspects of development, such as how given cells generate their ordained fates in the embryo and why the process moves inexorably forward in developmental time.

  5. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or “Lobster claw” deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  6. Derivation of the mammalian skull vault

    PubMed Central

    MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the evolutionary history of the mammalian skull vault as a basis for understanding its complex structure. Current information on the developmental tissue origins of the skull vault bones (mesoderm and neural crest) is assessed for mammals and other tetrapods. This information is discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in the proportions of the skull vault bones at the sarcopterygian-tetrapod transition. The dual tissue origin of the skull vault is considered in relation to the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation in the sutural growth centres and in the proportionate contributions of different sutures to skull growth. PMID:11523816

  7. Thermoresponsive hydrogel maintains the mouse embryonic stem cell "naïve" pluripotency phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mangani, Christian; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Roy, Marcia; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2015-10-15

    A chemically defined thermoresponsive hydrogel, poly(AEtMA-Cl-co-DEAEA) cross-linked with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, which allows enzyme-free passaging, was used as a substrate to culture murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) under defined and undefined conditions. Analysis of 14 stem cell markers showed that the mESCs remained in a "naïve" state of pluripotency with differentiation potential to form endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm derived lineages. These results validate the use of a chemically defined hydrogel for standardised and inexpensive mESC culture. PMID:26372076

  8. Malformations of the vertebral bodies and the ribs associated to spinal dysraphism without spina bifida in a Pekingese dog.

    PubMed

    Ruberte, J; Añor, S; Carretero, A; Vilafranca, M; Navarro, M; Mascort, J; Pumarola, M

    1995-07-01

    A Pekingese dog with hemivertebrae, rib malformations and spinal cord dysraphism without spina bifida was presented. Two types of hemivertebrae were seen: bilateral and unilateral. Thoracic hemivertebrae were associated with fused ribs and rudimentary ribs. Spinal dysraphism consisted of polycavitary syringomyelia in the dorsal and lateral funiculi, hydromyelia and anomalies of the dorsal median septum and median fissure, associated to lumbar and sacral hemivertebrae. Cauda equina agenesia was also present. To conclude, the dog showed two malformations from different embryonic origins. Vertebral and rib malformations are of mesodermic origin and spinal dysraphism is of ectodermic origin. A possible common mechanism responsible for both anomalies is discussed. PMID:8578905

  9. Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: Cnidaria

    PubMed Central

    Technau, Ulrich; Steele, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of cnidarians (corals, sea anemones, jellyfish and hydroids) to investigate the evolution of key aspects of animal development, such as the formation of the third germ layer (mesoderm), the nervous system and the generation of bilaterality. The recent sequencing of the Nematostella and Hydra genomes, and the establishment of methods for manipulating gene expression, have inspired new research efforts using cnidarians. Here, we present the main features of cnidarian models and their advantages for research, and summarize key recent findings using these models that have informed our understanding of the evolution of the developmental processes underlying metazoan body plan formation. PMID:21389047

  10. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S.; Fa’ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M. David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K.; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it’s transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1’s transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1Cre/+; Rosa26EYFP/+ ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  11. Contribution of hedgehog signaling to the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob F; Miranda, Esther L; McClay, David R

    2016-03-15

    Most bilaterians exhibit a left-right asymmetric distribution of their internal organs. The sea urchin larva is notable in this regard since most adult structures are generated from left sided embryonic structures. The gene regulatory network governing this larval asymmetry is still a work in progress but involves several conserved signaling pathways including Nodal, and BMP. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of Hedgehog signaling and it's contribution to left-right asymmetry. We report that Hh signaling plays a conserved role to regulate late asymmetric expression of Nodal and that this regulation occurs after Nodal breaks left-right symmetry in the mesoderm. Thus, while Hh functions to maintain late Nodal expression, the molecular asymmetry of the future coelomic pouches is locked in. Furthermore we report that cilia play a role only insofar as to transduce Hh signaling and do not have an independent effect on the asymmetry of the mesoderm. From this, we are able to construct a more complete regulatory network governing the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin. PMID:26872875

  12. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  13. Logics and properties of a genetic regulatory program that drives embryonic muscle development in an echinoderm

    PubMed Central

    Andrikou, Carmen; Pai, Chih-Yu; Su, Yi-Hsien; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary origin of muscle is a central question when discussing mesoderm evolution. Developmental mechanisms underlying somatic muscle development have mostly been studied in vertebrates and fly where multiple signals and hierarchic genetic regulatory cascades selectively specify myoblasts from a pool of naive mesodermal progenitors. However, due to the increased organismic complexity and distant phylogenetic position of the two systems, a general mechanistic understanding of myogenesis is still lacking. In this study, we propose a gene regulatory network (GRN) model that promotes myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo, an early branching deuterostome. A fibroblast growth factor signaling and four Forkhead transcription factors consist the central part of our model and appear to orchestrate the myogenic process. The topological properties of the network reveal dense gene interwiring and a multilevel transcriptional regulation of conserved and novel myogenic genes. Finally, the comparison of the myogenic network architecture among different animal groups highlights the evolutionary plasticity of developmental GRNs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07343.001 PMID:26218224

  14. New developments in the second heart field.

    PubMed

    Zaffran, Stéphane; Kelly, Robert G

    2012-07-01

    During cardiac looping the heart tube elongates by addition of progenitor cells from adjacent pharyngeal mesoderm to the arterial and venous poles. This cell population, termed the second heart field, was first identified ten years ago and many studies in the intervening decade have refined our understanding of how heart tube elongation takes place and identified signaling pathways that regulate proliferation and differentiation during progressive contribution of second heart field cells to the embryonic heart. It has also become apparent that defective second heart field development results in common congenital heart anomalies affecting both the conotruncal region and venous pole of the heart, including atrial and atrioventricular septal defects. In this review we focus on a series of recent papers that have identified new regulators of second heart field development, in particular the retinoic acid signaling pathway and HOX, SIX and EYA transcription factors. We also discuss new findings concerning the regulation of fibroblast growth factor signaling during second heart field deployment and studies that have implicated FGF10 and FGF3 in outflow tract development in addition to FGF8. Second heart field derived parts of the heart share common progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm with craniofacial skeletal muscles and recent findings from xenopus, zebrafish and the protochordate Ciona intestinalis provide insights into the evolution of the second heart field during vertebrate radiation. PMID:22521611

  15. Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate cardiac progenitor specification by controlling the expression of receptors of the fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Bhattacharyya, Pritha; Jeffries, Neal; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the coordinated regulation of multiple biological processes by a finite set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we show that the Forkhead TFs Checkpoint suppressor homologue (CHES-1-like) and Jumeau (Jumu), which govern cardiac progenitor cell divisions by regulating Polo kinase activity, play an additional, mutually redundant role in specifying the cardiac mesoderm (CM) as eliminating the functions of both Forkhead genes in the same Drosophila embryo results in defective hearts with missing hemisegments. This process is mediated by the Forkhead TFs regulating the fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless (Htl) and the Wnt receptor Frizzled (Fz): CHES-1-like and jumu exhibit synergistic genetic interactions with htl and fz in CM specification, thereby implying that they function through the same genetic pathways, and transcriptionally activate the expression of both receptor-encoding genes. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of either htl or fz in the mesoderm partially rescues the defective CM specification phenotype in embryos lacking both Forkhead genes. Together, these data emphasize the functional redundancy that leads to robustness in the cardiac progenitor specification process, and illustrate the pleiotropic functions of Forkhead TFs in different aspects of cardiogenesis. PMID:26657774

  16. Lineage analysis of micromere 4d, a super-phylotypic cell for Lophotrochozoa, in the leech Helobdella and the sludgeworm Tubifex.

    PubMed

    Gline, Stephanie E; Nakamoto, Ayaki; Cho, Sung-Jin; Chi, Candace; Weisblat, David A

    2011-05-01

    The super-phylum Lophotrochozoa contains the plurality of extant animal phyla and exhibits a corresponding diversity of adult body plans. Moreover, in contrast to Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia, most lophotrochozoans exhibit a conserved pattern of stereotyped early divisions called spiral cleavage. In particular, bilateral mesoderm in most lophotrochozoan species arises from the progeny of micromere 4d, which is assumed to be homologous with a similar cell in the embryo of the ancestral lophotrochozoan, more than 650 million years ago. Thus, distinguishing the conserved and diversified features of cell fates in the 4d lineage among modern spiralians is required to understand how lophotrochozoan diversity has evolved by changes in developmental processes. Here we analyze cell fates for the early progeny of the bilateral daughters (M teloblasts) of micromere 4d in the leech Helobdella sp. Austin, a clitellate annelid. We show that the first six progeny of the M teloblasts (em1-em6) contribute five different sets of progeny to non-segmental mesoderm, mainly in the head and in the lining of the digestive tract. The latter feature, associated with cells em1 and em2 in Helobdella, is seen with the M teloblast lineage in a second clitellate species, the sludgeworm Tubifex tubifex and, on the basis of previously published work, in the initial progeny of the M teloblast homologs in molluscan species, suggesting that it may be an ancestral feature of lophotrochozoan development. PMID:21295566

  17. Multicellular Mathematical Modelling of Mesendoderm Formation in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Brown, L E; Middleton, A M; King, J R; Loose, M

    2016-03-01

    The earliest cell fate decisions in a developing embryo are those associated with establishing the germ layers. The specification of the mesoderm and endoderm is of particular interest as the mesoderm is induced from the endoderm, potentially from an underlying bipotential group of cells, the mesendoderm. Mesendoderm formation has been well studied in an amphibian model frog, Xenopus laevis, and its formation is driven by a gene regulatory network (GRN) induced by maternal factors deposited in the egg. We have recently demonstrated that the axolotl, a urodele amphibian, utilises a different topology in its GRN to specify the mesendoderm. In this paper, we develop spatially structured mathematical models of the GRNs governing mesendoderm formation in a line of cells. We explore several versions of the model of mesendoderm formation in both Xenopus and the axolotl, incorporating the key differences between these two systems. Model simulations are able to reproduce known experimental data, such as Nodal expression domains in Xenopus, and also make predictions about how the positional information derived from maternal factors may be interpreted to drive cell fate decisions. We find that whilst cell-cell signalling plays a minor role in Xenopus, it is crucial for correct patterning domains in axolotl. PMID:26934886

  18. SAMS, a Syndrome of Short Stature, Auditory-Canal Atresia, Mandibular Hypoplasia, and Skeletal Abnormalities Is a Unique Neurocristopathy Caused by Mutations in Goosecoid

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Logan, Clare V.; Stegmann, Alexander P.A.; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Calder, Alistair; Khan, Shabana; Bonthron, David T.; Clowes, Virginia; Sheridan, Eamonn; Ghali, Neeti; Chudley, Albert E.; Dobbie, Angus; Stumpel, Constance T.R.M.; Johnson, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    Short stature, auditory canal atresia, mandibular hypoplasia, and skeletal abnormalities (SAMS) has been reported previously to be a rare, autosomal-recessive developmental disorder with other, unique rhizomelic skeletal anomalies. These include bilateral humeral hypoplasia, humeroscapular synostosis, pelvic abnormalities, and proximal defects of the femora. To identify the genetic basis of SAMS, we used molecular karyotyping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) to study small, unrelated families. Filtering of variants from the WES data included segregation analysis followed by comparison of in-house exomes. We identified a homozygous 306 kb microdeletion and homozygous predicted null mutations of GSC, encoding Goosecoid homeobox protein, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor. This confirms that SAMS is a human malformation syndrome resulting from GSC mutations. Previously, Goosecoid has been shown to be a determinant at the Xenopus gastrula organizer region and a segment-polarity determinant in Drosophila. In the present report, we present data on Goosecoid protein localization in staged mouse embryos. These data and the SAMS clinical phenotype both suggest that Goosecoid is a downstream effector of the regulatory networks that define neural-crest cell-fate specification and subsequent mesoderm cell lineages in mammals, particularly during shoulder and hip formation. Our findings confirm that Goosecoid has an essential role in human craniofacial and joint development and suggest that Goosecoid is an essential regulator of mesodermal patterning in mammals and that it has specific functions in neural crest cell derivatives. PMID:24290375

  19. Dissecting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during gastrulation using RNA interference in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Lickert, Heiko; Cox, Brian; Wehrle, Christian; Taketo, Makoto M; Kemler, Rolf; Rossant, Janet

    2005-06-01

    Differential gene regulation integrated in time and space drives developmental programs during embryogenesis. To understand how the program of gastrulation is regulated by Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, we have used genome-wide expression profiling of conditional beta-catenin mutant embryos. Known Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, known components of other signaling pathways, as well as a number of uncharacterized genes were downregulated in these mutants. To further narrow down the set of differentially expressed genes, we used whole-mount in situ screening to associate gene expression with putative domains of Wnt activity. Several potential novel target genes were identified by this means and two, Grsf1 and Fragilis2, were functionally analyzed by RNA interference (RNAi) in completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived embryos. We show that the gene encoding the RNA-binding factor Grsf1 is important for axial elongation, mid/hindbrain development and axial mesoderm specification, and that Fragilis2, encoding a transmembrane protein, regulates epithelialization of the somites and paraxial mesoderm formation. Intriguingly, the knock-down phenotypes recapitulate several aspects of Wnt pathway mutants, suggesting that these genes are components of the downstream Wnt response. This functional genomic approach allows the rapid identification of functionally important components of embryonic development from large datasets of putative targets. PMID:15857914

  20. A Role for the Long Noncoding RNA SENCR in Commitment and Function of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boulberdaa, Mounia; Scott, Elizabeth; Ballantyne, Margaret; Garcia, Raquel; Descamps, Betty; Angelini, Gianni D; Brittan, Mairi; Hunter, Amanda; McBride, Martin; McClure, John; Miano, Joseph M; Emanueli, Costanza; Mills, Nicholas L; Mountford, Joanne C; Baker, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of long noncoding RNA in physiology and disease, their role in endothelial biology remains poorly understood. Growing evidence has highlighted them to be essential regulators of human embryonic stem cell differentiation. SENCR, a vascular-enriched long noncoding RNA, overlaps the Friend Leukemia Integration virus 1 (FLI1) gene, a regulator of endothelial development. Therefore, we wanted to test the hypothesis that SENCR may contribute to mesodermal and endothelial commitment as well as in endothelial function. We thus developed new differentiation protocols allowing generation of endothelial cells from human embryonic stem cells using both directed and hemogenic routes. The expression of SENCR was markedly regulated during endothelial commitment using both protocols. SENCR did not control the pluripotency of pluripotent cells; however its overexpression significantly potentiated early mesodermal and endothelial commitment. In human umbilical endothelial cell (HUVEC), SENCR induced proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. SENCR expression was altered in vascular tissue and cells derived from patients with critical limb ischemia and premature coronary artery disease compared to controls. Here, we showed that SENCR contributes to the regulation of endothelial differentiation from pluripotent cells and controls the angiogenic capacity of HUVEC. These data give novel insight into the regulatory processes involved in endothelial development and function. PMID:26898221

  1. Heterogeneity in the Segmental Development of the Aortic Tree: Impact on Management of Genetically Triggered Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hisham M.F.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive search of the medical literature examining the development of the thoracic aortic tree reveals that the thoracic aorta does not develop as one unit or in one stage: the oldest part of the thoracic aorta is the descending aorta with the aortic arch being the second oldest, developing under influence from the neural crest cell. Following in chronological order are the proximal ascending aorta and aortic root, which develop from a conotruncal origin. Different areas of the thoracic aorta develop under the influence of different gene sets. These parts develop from different cell lineages: the aortic root (the conotruncus), developing from the mesoderm; the ascending aorta and aortic arch, developing from the neural crest cells; and the descending aorta from the mesoderm. Findings illustrate that the thoracic aorta is not a single entity, in developmental terms. It develops from three or four distinct areas, at different stages of embryonic life, and under different sets of genes and signaling pathways. Genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms are not a monolithic group but rather share a multi-genetic origin. Identification of therapeutic targets should be based on the predilection of certain genes to cause aneurysmal disease in specific aortic segments. PMID:26798739

  2. Lineage analysis of micromere 4d, a super-phylotypic cell for Lophotrochozoa, in the leech Helobdella and the sludgeworm Tubifex

    PubMed Central

    Gline, Stephanie E.; Nakamoto, Ayaki; Cho, Sung-Jin; Chi, Candace; Weisblat, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The super-phylum Lophotrochozoa contains the plurality of extant animal phyla and exhibits a corresponding diversity of adult body plans. Moreover, in contrast to Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia, most lophotrochozoans exhibit a conserved pattern of stereotyped early divisions called spiral cleavage. In particular, bilateral mesoderm in most lophotrochozoan species arises from the progeny of micromere 4d, which is assumed to be homologous with a similar cell in the embryo of the ancestral lophotrochozoan, more than 650 million years ago. Thus, distinguishing the conserved and diversified features of cell fates in the 4d lineage among modern spiralians is required to understand how lophotrochozoan diversity has evolved by changes in developmental processes. Here we analyze cell fates for the early progeny of the bilateral daughters (M teloblasts) of micromere 4d in the leech Helobdella sp. Austin, a clitellate annelid. We show that the first six progeny of the M teloblasts (em1–em6) contribute five different sets of progeny to non-segmental mesoderm, mainly in the head and in the lining of the digestive tract. The latter feature, associated with cells em1 and em2 in Helobdella, is seen with the M teloblast lineage in a second clitellate species, the sludgeworm Tubifex tubifex and, on the basis of previously published work, in the initial progeny of the M teloblast homologs in molluscan species, suggesting that it may be an ancestral feature of lophotrochozoan development. PMID:21295566

  3. Resveratrol Enhances Cardiomyocyte Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells through Inhibiting Canonical WNT Signal Pathway and Enhancing Serum Response Factor-miR-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Shaoli; Zhao, Lihua; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qiuping; Chai, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yongchun

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene) (RSV) is a natural polyphenol with protective effects over cardiac tissues and can affect cell survival and differentiation in cardiac stem cells transplantation. However, whether this agent can affect cardiomyocytes (CMs) differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is not yet clear. This study explored whether RSV can affect CMs differentiation of human iPSCs. Under embryoid bodies (EBs) condition, the effect of RSV on the change of pluripotent markers, endoderm markers, mesoderm markers, and ectoderm markers was measured using qRT-PCR. Under CM differentiation culture, the effect of RSV on CM specific markers was also measured. The regulative role of RSV over canonical Wnt signal pathway and serum response factor- (SRF-) miR-1 axis and the functions of these two axes were further studied. Results showed that RSV had no effect on the self-renewal of human iPSCs but could promote mesoderm differentiation. Under CM differentiation culture, RSV could promote CM differentiation of human iPSCs through suppressing canonical Wnt signal pathway and enhancing SRF-miR-1 axis. PMID:26798354

  4. Stem cell system in asexual and sexual reproduction of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    PubMed

    Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete species that proliferates asexually via fragmentation and regeneration. As sexual reproduction can also be induced, it is a good model system for the study of both regenerative and germline stem cells. It has been shown by histological study that putative mesodermal stem cells called neoblasts, and dedifferentiated epidermal and endodermal cells are involved in blastema formation. Recently, we isolated three region-specific marker genes expressed in the digestive tract and showed by in situ hybridization that morphallactic as well as epimorphic regulation of the body patterning occurs during regeneration. We also cloned two vasa-related genes and analyzed their expression during development and in mature worms that undergo sexual reproduction. The results arising form these studies suggest that the origin and development of germline stem cells and neoblasts may be independent. Furthermore, we carried out functional analysis using RNA interference (RNAi) and showed that a novel gene termed grimp is required for mesodermal cell proliferation at the initial stages of regeneration. These findings indicate that the stem cell system in E. japonensis is regulated by both internal and external environmental factors. PMID:20039928

  5. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  6. Human primordial germ cell commitment in vitro associates with a unique PRDM14 expression profile

    PubMed Central

    Sugawa, Fumihiro; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Yoon, Juyong; Kim, Kee-Pyo; Aramaki, Shinya; Wu, Guangming; Stehling, Martin; Psathaki, Olympia E; Hübner, Karin; Schöler, Hans R

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) develop only into sperm and oocytes in vivo. The molecular mechanisms underlying human PGC specification are poorly understood due to inaccessibility of cell materials and lack of in vitro models for tracking the earliest stages of germ cell development. Here, we describe a defined and stepwise differentiation system for inducing pre-migratory PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). In response to cytokines, PSCs differentiate first into a heterogeneous mesoderm-like cell population and then into PGCLCs, which exhibit minimal PRDM14 expression. PGC specification in humans is similar to the murine process, with the sequential activation of mesodermal and PGC genes, and the suppression of neural induction and of de novo DNA methylation, suggesting that human PGC formation is induced via epigenesis, the process of germ cell specification via inductive signals from surrounding somatic cells. This study demonstrates that PGC commitment in humans shares key features with that of the mouse, but also highlights key differences, including transcriptional regulation during the early stage of human PGC development (3–6 weeks). A more comprehensive understanding of human germ cell development may lead to methodology for successfully generating PSC-derived gametes for reproductive medicine. PMID:25750208

  7. Pathological axes of wound repair: Gastrulation revisited

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Post-traumatic inflammation is formed by molecular and cellular complex mechanisms whose final goal seems to be injured tissue regeneration. In the skin -an exterior organ of the body- mechanical or thermal injury induces the expression of different inflammatory phenotypes that resemble similar phenotypes expressed during embryo development. Particularly, molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in gastrulation return. This is a developmental phase that delineates the three embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. Consequently, in the post-natal wounded skin, primitive functions related with the embryonic mesoderm, i.e. amniotic and yolk sac-derived, are expressed. Neurogenesis and hematogenesis stand out among the primitive function mechanisms involved. Interestingly, in these phases of the inflammatory response, whose molecular and cellular mechanisms are considered as traces of the early phases of the embryonic development, the mast cell, a cell that is supposedly inflammatory, plays a key role. The correlation that can be established between the embryonic and the inflammatory events suggests that the results obtained from the research regarding both great fields of knowledge must be interchangeable to obtain the maximum advantage. PMID:20840764

  8. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boraas, Liana C; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM -/- ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM -/- EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM -/- EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  9. Id expression in amphioxus and lamprey highlights the role of gene cooption during neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulemans, Daniel; McCauley, David; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Neural crest cells are unique to vertebrates and generate many of the adult structures that differentiate them from their closest invertebrate relatives, the cephalochordates. Id genes are robust markers of neural crest cells at all stages of development. We compared Id gene expression in amphioxus and lamprey to ask if cephalochordates deploy Id genes at the neural plate border and dorsal neural tube in a manner similar to vertebrates. Furthermore, we examined whether Id expression in these cells is a basal vertebrate trait or a derived feature of gnathostomes. We found that while expression of Id genes in the mesoderm and endoderm is conserved between amphioxus and vertebrates, expression in the lateral neural plate border and dorsal neural tube is a vertebrate novelty. Furthermore, expression of lamprey Id implies that recruitment of Id genes to these cells occurred very early in the vertebrate lineage. Based on expression in amphioxus we postulate that Id cooption conferred sensory cell progenitor-like properties upon the lateral neurectoderm, and pharyngeal mesoderm-like properties upon cranial neural crest. Amphioxus Id expression is also consistent with homology between the anterior neurectoderm of amphioxus and the presumptive placodal ectoderm of vertebrates. These observations support the idea that neural crest evolution was driven in large part by cooption of multipurpose transcriptional regulators from other tissues and cell types.

  10. An amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene, AmphiFoxD: insights into vertebrate neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    During amphioxus development, the neural plate is bordered by cells expressing many genes with homologs involved in vertebrate neural crest induction. However, these amphioxus cells evidently lack additional genetic programs for the cell delaminations, migrations, and differentiations characterizing definitive vertebrate neural crest. We characterize an amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene (AmphiFoxD) closely related to vertebrate FoxD genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the AmphiFoxD is basal to vertebrate FoxD1, FoxD2, FoxD3, FoxD4, and FoxD5. One of these vertebrate genes (FoxD3) consistently marks neural crest during development. Early in amphioxus development, AmphiFoxD is expressed medially in the anterior neural plate as well as in axial (notochordal) and paraxial mesoderm; later, the gene is expressed in the somites, notochord, cerebral vesicle (diencephalon), and hindgut endoderm. However, there is never any expression in cells bordering the neural plate. We speculate that an AmphiFoxD homolog in the common ancestor of amphioxus and vertebrates was involved in histogenic processes in the mesoderm (evagination and delamination of the somites and notochord); then, in the early vertebrates, descendant paralogs of this gene began functioning in the presumptive neural crest bordering the neural plate to help make possible the delaminations and cell migrations that characterize definitive vertebrate neural crest. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The Evx1/Evx1as gene locus regulates anterior-posterior patterning during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Charles C.; Amaral, Paulo P.; Kalsbeek, Anton; Magor, Graham W.; Gillinder, Kevin R.; Tangermann, Pierre; di Lisio, Lorena; Cheetham, Seth W.; Gruhl, Franziska; Frith, Jessica; Tallack, Michael R.; Ru, Ke-Lin; Crawford, Joanna; Mattick, John S.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Perkins, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of sense-antisense mRNA-lncRNA gene pairs occur in the mammalian genome. While there is usually little doubt about the function of the coding transcript, the function of the lncRNA partner is mostly untested. Here we examine the function of the homeotic Evx1-Evx1as gene locus. Expression is tightly co-regulated in posterior mesoderm of mouse embryos and in embryoid bodies. Expression of both genes is enhanced by BMP4 and WNT3A, and reduced by Activin. We generated a suite of deletions in the locus by CRISPR-Cas9 editing. We show EVX1 is a critical downstream effector of BMP4 and WNT3A with respect to patterning of posterior mesoderm. The lncRNA, Evx1as arises from alternative promoters and is difficult to fully abrogate by gene editing or siRNA approaches. Nevertheless, we were able to generate a large 2.6 kb deletion encompassing the shared promoter with Evx1 and multiple additional exons of Evx1as. This led to an identical dorsal-ventral patterning defect to that generated by micro-deletion in the DNA-binding domain of EVX1. Thus, Evx1as has no function independent of EVX1, and is therefore unlikely to act in trans. We predict many antisense lncRNAs have no specific trans function, possibly only regulating the linked coding genes in cis. PMID:27226347

  12. Adult human neural crest-derived cells for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Karoliina; Pippenger, Benjamin; Mumme, Marcus; Feliciano, Sandra; Scotti, Celeste; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Procino, Alfredo; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Schwamborn, Thomas; Jakob, Marcel; Cillo, Clemente; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2014-08-27

    In embryonic models and stem cell systems, mesenchymal cells derived from the neuroectoderm can be distinguished from mesoderm-derived cells by their Hox-negative profile--a phenotype associated with enhanced capacity of tissue regeneration. We investigated whether developmental origin and Hox negativity correlated with self-renewal and environmental plasticity also in differentiated cells from adults. Using hyaline cartilage as a model, we showed that adult human neuroectoderm-derived nasal chondrocytes (NCs) can be constitutively distinguished from mesoderm-derived articular chondrocytes (ACs) by lack of expression of specific HOX genes, including HOXC4 and HOXD8. In contrast to ACs, serially cloned NCs could be continuously reverted from differentiated to dedifferentiated states, conserving the ability to form cartilage tissue in vitro and in vivo. NCs could also be reprogrammed to stably express Hox genes typical of ACs upon implantation into goat articular cartilage defects, directly contributing to cartilage repair. Our findings identify previously unrecognized regenerative properties of HOX-negative differentiated neuroectoderm cells in adults, implying a role for NCs in the unmet clinical challenge of articular cartilage repair. An ongoing phase 1 clinical trial preliminarily indicated the safety and feasibility of autologous NC-based engineered tissues for the treatment of traumatic articular cartilage lesions. PMID:25163479

  13. Induction of primitive streak and mesendoderm formation in monolayer hESC culture by activation of TGF-β signaling pathway by Activin B.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Amer; Aldahmash, Abdullah

    2015-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the ability to differentiate into all human cells, however controlling the differentiation has always been a challenge. In the present study we have investigated the direct differentiation of hESCs on MEFs by using TGF-β signaling pathway activators Activin A and Activin B. Activation of the TGF-β pathway with Activin B in low serum highly induced primitive streak and mesendoderm formation after 24 h, which included up-regulation of SOX 17 and BRACHYURY protein and gene expression. Continuous stimulation with Activin B in 2% serum further induced mesendoderm formation by increased gene expression of Brachyury, SOX17, MEOX and FOX at the same time we found down-regulation of neuroectodermal marker genes. Further, by stimulating the mesodermal cells by BMP-2 we succeeded to induce mesenchymal like cells with high expression of mesenchymal markers including; MEOX, FOX, RUNX2, COL1 and OSTEOPONTIN. In conclusion we have directed the differentiation of hESCs as monolayer to primitive streak like cells with Activin B and further into pure mesoderm and mesenchymal like cells by BMP-2. PMID:26586995

  14. Spatiotemporal compartmentalization of key physiological processes during muscle precursor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ozbudak, Ertugrul M; Tassy, Olivier; Pourquié, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    The development of multicellular organisms is controlled by transcriptional networks. Understanding the role of these networks requires a full understanding of transcriptome regulation during embryogenesis. Several microarray studies have characterized the temporal evolution of the transcriptome during development in different organisms [Wang QT, et al. (2004) Dev Cell 6:133-144; Furlong EE, Andersen EC, Null B, White KP, Scott MP (2001) Science 293:1629-1633; Mitiku N, Baker JC (2007) Dev Cell 13:897-907]. In all cases, however, experiments were performed on whole embryos, thus averaging gene expression among many different tissues. Here, we took advantage of the local synchrony of the differentiation process in the paraxial mesoderm. This approach provides a unique opportunity to study the systems-level properties of muscle differentiation. Using high-resolution, spatiotemporal profiling of the early stages of muscle development in the zebrafish embryo, we identified a major reorganization of the transcriptome taking place in the presomitic mesoderm. We further show that the differentiation process is associated with a striking modular compartmentalization of the transcription of essential components of cellular physiological programs. Particularly, we identify a tight segregation of cell cycle/DNA metabolic processes and translation/oxidative metabolism at the tissue level, highly reminiscent of the yeast metabolic cycle. These results should expand more investigations into the developmental control of metabolism. PMID:20160088

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells: Biology, patho-physiology, translational findings, and therapeutic implications for cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a prototypic adult stem cell with capacity for self-renewal and differentiation with a broad tissue distribution. Initially described in bone marrow, MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal and non-mesodermal derived tissues. The endogenous role for MSCs is maintenance of stem cell niches (classically the hematopoietic), and as such MSCs participate in organ homeostasis, wound healing, and successful aging. From a therapeutic perspective, and facilitated by the ease of preparation and immunologic privilege, MSCs are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction (MI) demonstrate the ability of transplanted MSCs to engraft and differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vasculature cells, recruit endogenous cardiac stem cells, and secrete a wide array of paracrine factors. Together these properties can be harnessed to both prevent and reverse remodeling in the ischemically injured ventricle. In proof-of-concept and phase I clinical trials, MSC therapy improve LV function, induces reverse remodeling, and decreases scar size. This article reviews the current understanding of MSC biology, mechanism of action in cardiac repair, translational findings, and early clinical trial data of MSC therapy for cardiac disease. PMID:21960725

  16. Dose-dependent nuclear β-catenin response segregates endomesoderm along the sea star primary axis

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Brenna S.; Akyar, Eda; Saad, H. Rosa; Hinman, Veronica F.

    2015-01-01

    In many invertebrates, the nuclearization of β-catenin at one pole of the embryo initiates endomesoderm specification. An intriguing possibility is that a gradient of nuclear β-catenin (nβ-catenin), similar to that operating in vertebrate neural tube patterning, functions to distinguish cell fates in invertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we determined the function of nβ-catenin during the early development of the sea star, which undergoes a basal deuterostomal mode of embryogenesis. We show that low levels of nβ-catenin activity initiate bra, which is expressed in the future posterior endoderm-fated territory; intermediate levels are required for expression of foxa and gata4/5/6, which are later restricted to the endoderm; and activation of ets1 and erg in the mesoderm-fated territory requires the highest nβ-catenin activity. Transcription factors acting downstream of high nβ-catenin segregate the endoderm/mesoderm boundary, which is further reinforced by Delta/Notch signaling. Significantly, therefore, in sea stars, endomesoderm segregation arises through transcriptional responses to levels of nβ-catenin activity. Here, we describe the first empirical evidence of a dose-dependent response to a dynamic spatiotemporal nβ-catenin activity that patterns cell fates along the primary axis in an invertebrate. PMID:25516976

  17. Dose-dependent nuclear β-catenin response segregates endomesoderm along the sea star primary axis.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Brenna S; Akyar, Eda; Saad, H Rosa; Hinman, Veronica F

    2015-01-01

    In many invertebrates, the nuclearization of β-catenin at one pole of the embryo initiates endomesoderm specification. An intriguing possibility is that a gradient of nuclear β-catenin (nβ-catenin), similar to that operating in vertebrate neural tube patterning, functions to distinguish cell fates in invertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we determined the function of nβ-catenin during the early development of the sea star, which undergoes a basal deuterostomal mode of embryogenesis. We show that low levels of nβ-catenin activity initiate bra, which is expressed in the future posterior endoderm-fated territory; intermediate levels are required for expression of foxa and gata4/5/6, which are later restricted to the endoderm; and activation of ets1 and erg in the mesoderm-fated territory requires the highest nβ-catenin activity. Transcription factors acting downstream of high nβ-catenin segregate the endoderm/mesoderm boundary, which is further reinforced by Delta/Notch signaling. Significantly, therefore, in sea stars, endomesoderm segregation arises through transcriptional responses to levels of nβ-catenin activity. Here, we describe the first empirical evidence of a dose-dependent response to a dynamic spatiotemporal nβ-catenin activity that patterns cell fates along the primary axis in an invertebrate. PMID:25516976

  18. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells and their subpopulation, pluripotent muse cells, in basic research and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gained a great deal of attention for regenerative medicine because they can be obtained from easy accessible mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, and have trophic and immunosuppressive effects to protect tissues. The most outstanding property of MSCs is their potential for differentiation into cells of all three germ layers. MSCs belong to the mesodermal lineage, but they are known to cross boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal and endodermal lineages, and differentiate into a variety of cell types both in vitro and in vivo. Such behavior is exceptional for tissue stem cells. As observed with hematopoietic and neural stem cells, tissue stem cells usually generate cells that belong to the tissue in which they reside, and do not show triploblastic differentiation. However, the scientific basis for the broad multipotent differentiation of MSCs still remains an enigma. This review summarizes the properties of MSCs from representative mesenchymal tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Finally, we introduce a novel type of pluripotent stem cell, multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a small subpopulation of MSCs, which can explain the broad spectrum of differentiation ability in MSCs. PMID:24293378

  20. Perspectives on hyperphalangy: patterns and processes

    PubMed Central

    Fedak, Tim J; Hall, Brian K

    2004-01-01

    Hyperphalangy is a digit morphology in which increased numbers of phalanges are arranged linearly within a digit beyond the plesiomorphic condition. We analyse patterns and processes of hyperphalangy by considering previous definitions and occurrences of hyperphalangy among terrestrial and secondarily aquatic extant and fossil taxa (cetaceans, ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs and mosasaurs), and recent studies that elucidate the factors involved in terrestrial autopod joint induction. Extreme hyperphalangy, defined as exceeding a threshold condition of 4/6/6/6/6, is shown only to be found among secondarily aquatic vertebrates with a flipper limb morphology. Based on this definition, hyperphalangy occurs exclusively in digits II and III among extant cetaceans. Previous reports of cetacean embryos having more phalanges than adults is clarified and shown to be based on cartilaginous elements not ossified phalanges. Developmental prerequisites for hyperphalangy include lack of cell death in interdigital mesoderm (producing a flipper limb) and maintenance of a secondary apical ectodermal ridge (AER), which initiates digit elongation and extra joint patterning. Factors of the limb-patterning pathways located in the interdigital mesoderm, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), BMP antagonists, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5), Wnt-14 and ck-erg, are implicated in maintenance of the flipper limb, secondary AER formation, digit elongation and additional joint induction leading to hyperphalangy. PMID:15032905

  1. Sall1 transiently marks undifferentiated heart precursors and regulates their fate.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuika; Andersen, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu; Tsukahara, Yuko; Sasagawa, Noriko; Hayashida, Naoko; Koga, Chizuko; Nishikawa, Misato; Saga, Yumiko; Evans, Sylvia M; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Kwon, Chulan; Takeuchi, Jun K

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are a crucial source of cells in cardiac development and regeneration. However, reported CPCs are heterogeneous, and no gene has been identified to transiently mark undifferentiated CPCs throughout heart development. Here we show that Spalt-like gene 1 (Sall1), a zing-finger transcription factor, is expressed in undifferentiated CPCs giving rise to both left and right ventricles. Sall1 was transiently expressed in precardiac mesoderm contributing to the first heart field (left ventricle precursors) but not in the field itself. Similarly, Sall1 expression was maintained in the second heart field (outflow tract/right ventricle precursors) but not in cardiac cells. In vitro, high levels of Sall1 at mesodermal stages enhanced cardiomyogenesis, whereas its continued expression suppressed cardiac differentiation. Our study demonstrates that Sall1 marks CPCs in an undifferentiated state and regulates cardiac differentiation. These findings provide fundamental insights into CPC maintenance, which can be instrumental for CPC-based regenerative medicine. PMID:26876450

  2. Developmental expression pattern of D-ets4, the Drosophila homologue of human Pdef.

    PubMed

    Hsouna, Anita; Watson, Dennis K; Hsu, Tien

    2004-12-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first cells specified in many organisms. In Drosophila, as in mammals, PGCs are formed at the posterior end outside of the embryonic proper. They are brought into the gut during gastrulation and then actively migrate through the gut epithelium into the mesoderm. They attach to the future gonadal mesoderm and coalesce, forming the gonads. Control of this migratory process is not yet completely understood. D-ets4 and its mammalian homologue Pdef are members of the evolutionarily conserved Ets family of transcription factors. Pdef has been shown to down-regulate the invasive and migratory potential of breast tumors. Our results show that the Drosophila D-ets4 protein is specifically expressed in PGCs before the onset of migration and is lost in the migratory and post-migratory PGCs. We also show that D-ets4 is not involved in other migratory events such as border cell migration during oogenesis. It is, however, expressed strongly in the pre-stage 10 oocyte nuclei and modestly in larval tissues such as imaginal discs and salivary glands, but not in the brain. PMID:15567727

  3. Hyperglycemia impairs left-right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-09-22

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left-right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left-right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left-right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left-right axis required for heart morphogenesis. PMID:26351675

  4. Hyperglycemia impairs left–right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left–right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left–right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left–right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left–right axis required for heart morphogenesis. PMID:26351675

  5. Amphioxus FGF signaling predicts the acquisition of vertebrate morphological traits

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Stephanie; Camasses, Alain; Somorjai, Ildiko; Belgacem, Mohamed R.; Chabrol, Olivier; Escande, Marie-Line; Pontarotti, Pierre; Escriva, Hector

    2011-01-01

    FGF signaling is one of the few cell–cell signaling pathways conserved among all metazoans. The diversity of FGF gene content among different phyla suggests that evolution of FGF signaling may have participated in generating the current variety of animal forms. Vertebrates possess the greatest number of FGF genes, the functional evolution of which may have been implicated in the acquisition of vertebrate-specific morphological traits. In this study, we have investigated the roles of the FGF signal during embryogenesis of the cephalochordate amphioxus, the best proxy for the chordate ancestor. We first isolate the full FGF gene complement and determine the evolutionary relationships between amphioxus and vertebrate FGFs via phylogenetic and synteny conservation analysis. Using pharmacological treatments, we inhibit the FGF signaling pathway in amphioxus embryos in different time windows. Our results show that the requirement for FGF signaling during gastrulation is a conserved character among chordates, whereas this signal is not necessary for neural induction in amphioxus, in contrast to what is known in vertebrates. We also show that FGF signal, acting through the MAPK pathway, is necessary for the formation of the most anterior somites in amphioxus, whereas more posterior somite formation is not FGF-dependent. This result leads us to propose that modification of the FGF signal function in the anterior paraxial mesoderm in an amphioxus-like vertebrate ancestor might have contributed to the loss of segmentation in the preotic paraxial mesoderm of the vertebrate head. PMID:21571634

  6. Genome-wide identification of Tribolium dorsoventral patterning genes.

    PubMed

    Stappert, Dominik; Frey, Nadine; von Levetzow, Cornelia; Roth, Siegfried

    2016-07-01

    The gene regulatory network controlling dorsoventral axis formation in insects has undergone drastic evolutionary changes. In Drosophila, a stable long-range gradient of Toll signalling specifies ventral cell fates and restricts BMP signalling to the dorsal half of the embryo. In Tribolium, however, Toll signalling is transient and only indirectly controls BMP signalling. In order to gain unbiased insights into the Tribolium network, we performed comparative transcriptome analyses of embryos with various dorsoventral pattering defects produced by parental RNAi for Toll and BMP signalling components. We also included embryos lacking the mesoderm (produced by Tc-twist RNAi) and characterized similarities and differences between Drosophila and Tribolium twist loss-of-function phenotypes. Using stringent conditions, we identified over 750 differentially expressed genes and analysed a subset with altered expression in more than one knockdown condition. We found new genes with localized expression and showed that conserved genes frequently possess earlier and stronger phenotypes than their Drosophila orthologues. For example, the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein Tartan, which has only a minor influence on nervous system development in Drosophila, is essential for early neurogenesis in Tribolium and the Tc-zinc-finger homeodomain protein 1 (Tc-zfh1), the orthologue of which plays a minor role in Drosophila muscle development, is essential for maintaining early Tc-twist expression, indicating an important function for mesoderm specification. PMID:27287803

  7. Conserved requirement for EGF–CFC genes in vertebrate left–right axis formation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu-Ting; Gritsman, Kira; Ding, Jixiang; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Corrales, JoMichelle D.; Price, Sandy M.; Talbot, William S.; Schier, Alexander F.; Shen, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    Specification of the left–right (L-R) axis in the vertebrate embryo requires transfer of positional information from the node to the periphery, resulting in asymmetric gene expression in the lateral plate mesoderm. We show that this activation of L-R lateral asymmetry requires the evolutionarily conserved activity of members of the EGF–CFC family of extracellular factors. Targeted disruption of murine Cryptic results in L-R laterality defects including randomization of abdominal situs, hyposplenia, and pulmonary right isomerism, as well as randomized embryo turning and cardiac looping. Similarly, zebrafish one-eyed pinhead (oep) mutants that have been rescued partially by mRNA injection display heterotaxia, including randomization of heart looping and pancreas location. In both Cryptic and oep mutant embryos, L-R asymmetric expression of Nodal/cyclops, Lefty2/antivin, and Pitx2 does not occur in the lateral plate mesoderm, while in Cryptic mutants Lefty1 expression is absent from the prospective floor plate. Notably, L-R asymmetric expression of Nodal at the lateral edges of the node is still observed in Cryptic mutants, indicating that L-R specification has occurred in the node but not the lateral plate. Combined with the previous finding that oep is required for nodal signaling in zebrafish, we propose that a signaling pathway mediated by Nodal and EGF–CFC activities is essential for transfer of L-R positional information from the node. PMID:10521397

  8. [Congenital thoracic defects demonstrated by radiophotography].

    PubMed

    Jonescu, N; Ionescu, G C

    1991-01-01

    Costal congenital defects are malformations or anomalies of dimension, location or structure of the ribs, generated by disturbances of prenatal development. These anomalies appear in mesoderm which also gives rise to skeleton, muscles, serums, conjunctive tissues, circulatory system and urogenital apparatus. Of the 59,225 persons examined, 502 had costal congenital defects. The presence of azygos lobe (Wrisberg's lobe) in 158 cases (0.26%), of right aortic (arcs high dextroposition of cross) in 2 cases and (3%000) dextroposition of heart in 6 cases (10%000), out of which a situs inversus (complete cardiovascular transposition) were noticed as congenital defects with common origin in embryonic mesoderm. Medical radiophotography can be used as a method in detecting congenital costal defects. Other defects in other organs can be also detected. The congenital costal defects found in an rf examined population, representing a part of the total of congenital malformations, may be one of their indirect epidemiologic indices. Their existence may lead to the explanation of the symptomatology of the nervous compressive type on brachiocephalic vascular, etc. plexus. As some of the defects are an excess of osseous and cartilaginous matter, they may be used, when indicated, as autografts. PMID:1823198

  9. In Vitro Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Hematopoietic Lineage: Towards Erythroid Progenitor's Production.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Iliana; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation via embryoid body (EB) formation is an established method that generates the three germ layers. However, EB differentiation poses several problems including formation of heterogeneous cell populations. Herein, we described a differentiation protocol on enhancing mesoderm derivation from murine ESCs (mESCs) using conditioned medium (CM) from HepG2 cells. We used this technique to direct hematopoiesis by generating "embryoid-like" colonies (ELCs) from murine (m) ESCs without following standard formation of EBs. Our CM-mESCs group yielded an almost fivefold increase in ELC formation (p ≤ 0.05) and higher expression of mesoderm genes;-Brachyury-T, Goosecoid, and Flk-1 compared with control mESCs group. Hematopoietic colony formation from CM-mESCs was also enhanced by twofold at days 7 and 14 with earlier colony commitment compared to control mESCs (p ≤ 0.05). This early clonogenic capacity was confirmed morphologically by the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and macrophages as early as day 7 in culture using standard 14-day colony-forming assay. Early expression of hematopoietic primitive (ζ-globin) and definitive (β-globin) erythroid genes and proteins was also observed by day 7 in the CM-treated culture. These data indicate that hematopoietic cells more quickly differentiate from CM-treated, compared with those using standard EB approaches, and provide an efficient bioprocess platform for erythroid-specific differentiation of ESCs. PMID:26160454

  10. SIRT6 safeguards human mesenchymal stem cells from oxidative stress by coactivating NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Huize; Guan, Di; Liu, Xiaomeng; Li, Jingyi; Wang, Lixia; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Junzhi; Zhang, Weizhou; Ren, Ruotong; Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Hao, Ying; Yuan, Tingting; Yuan, Guohong; Wang, Hu; Ju, Zhenyu; Mao, Zhiyong; Li, Jian; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 belongs to the mammalian homologs of Sir2 histone NAD+-dependent deacylase family. In rodents, SIRT6 deficiency leads to aging-associated degeneration of mesodermal tissues. It remains unknown whether human SIRT6 has a direct role in maintaining the homeostasis of mesodermal tissues. To this end, we generated SIRT6 knockout human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by targeted gene editing. SIRT6-deficient hMSCs exhibited accelerated functional decay, a feature distinct from typical premature cellular senescence. Rather than compromised chromosomal stability, SIRT6-null hMSCs were predominately characterized by dysregulated redox metabolism and increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In addition, we found SIRT6 in a protein complex with both nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and RNA polymerase II, which was required for the transactivation of NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes, including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Overexpression of HO-1 in SIRT6-null hMSCs rescued premature cellular attrition. Our study uncovers a novel function of SIRT6 in maintaining hMSC homeostasis by serving as a NRF2 coactivator, which represents a new layer of regulation of oxidative stress-associated stem cell decay. PMID:26768768

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Binding Sites Analyses Identify Early FOX Expressions for Enhancing Cardiomyogenesis Efficiency of hESC Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hock Chuan; Ting, Sherwin; Brena, Romulo Martin; Koh, Geoffrey; Chen, Allen; Toh, Siew Qi; Lim, Yu Ming; Oh, Steve Kah Weng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation efficiency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) is highly sensitive to culture conditions. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms involved, we investigated hESCs grown on three distinct culture platforms: feeder-free Matrigel, mouse embryonic fibroblast feeders, and Matrigel replated on feeders. At the outset, we profiled and quantified their differentiation efficiency, transcriptome, transcription factor binding sites and DNA-methylation. Subsequent genome-wide analyses allowed us to reconstruct the relevant interactome, thereby forming the regulatory basis for implicating the contrasting differentiation efficiency of the culture conditions. We hypothesized that the parental expressions of FOXC1, FOXD1 and FOXQ1 transcription factors (TFs) are correlative with eventual cardiomyogenic outcome. Through WNT induction of the FOX TFs, we observed the co-activation of WNT3 and EOMES which are potent inducers of mesoderm differentiation. The result strengthened our hypothesis on the regulatory role of the FOX TFs in enhancing mesoderm differentiation capacity of hESCs. Importantly, the final proportions of cells expressing cardiac markers were directly correlated to the strength of FOX inductions within 72 hours after initiation of differentiation across different cell lines and protocols. Thus, we affirmed the relationship between early FOX TF expressions and cardiomyogenesis efficiency. PMID:27501774

  12. Aorta-derived mesoangioblasts differentiate into the oligodendrocytes by inhibition of the Rho kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kamath, Anant; Frye, Janie; Iwamoto, Gary A; Chun, Ju Lan; Berry, Suzanne E

    2012-05-01

    Mesoangioblasts are vessel-derived stem cells that differentiate into mesodermal derivatives. We have isolated postnatal aorta-derived mesoangioblasts (ADMs) that differentiate into smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle, and adipocytes, and regenerate damaged skeletal muscle in a murine model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We report that the marker profile of ADM is similar to that of mesoangioblasts isolated from embryonic dorsal aorta, postnatal bone marrow, and heart, but distinct from mesoangioblasts derived from skeletal muscle. We also demonstrate that ADM differentiate into myelinating glial cells. ADM localize to peripheral nerve bundles in regenerating muscles and exhibit morphology and marker expression of mature Schwann cells, and myelinate axons. In vitro, ADM spontaneously express markers of oligodendrocyte progenitors, including the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan NG2, nestin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α, the A2B5 antigen, thyroid hormone nuclear receptor α, and O4. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) initiated process extension by ADM, and when combined with insulin-like growth factor 1, PDGF, and thyroid hormone, enhanced ADM expression of oligodendrocyte precursor markers and maturation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. ADM injected into the right lateral ventricle of the brain migrate to the corpus callosum, and cerebellar white matter, where they express components of myelin. Because ADM differentiate or mature into cell types of both mesodermal and ectodermal origin, they may be useful for treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases, or repair and regeneration of multiple cell types in severely damaged tissue. PMID:21793703

  13. Nephric lineage specification by Pax2 and Pax8.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Maxime; Souabni, Abdallah; Mandler, Markus; Neubüser, Annette; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2002-11-15

    The mammalian kidney develops in three successive steps from the initial pronephros via the mesonephros to the adult metanephros. Although the nephric lineage is specified during pronephros induction, no single regulator, including the transcription factor Pax2 or Pax8, has yet been identified to control this initial phase of kidney development. In this paper, we demonstrate that mouse embryos lacking both Pax2 and Pax8 are unable to form the pronephros or any later nephric structures. In these double-mutant embryos, the intermediate mesoderm does not undergo the mesenchymal-epithelial transitions required for nephric duct formation, fails to initiate the kidney-specific expression of Lim1 and c-Ret, and is lost by apoptosis 1 d after failed pronephric induction. Conversely, retroviral misexpression of Pax2 was sufficient to induce ectopic nephric structures in the intermediate mesoderm and genital ridge of chick embryos. Together, these data identify Pax2 and Pax8 as critical regulators that specify the nephric lineage. PMID:12435636

  14. Paleontological and developmental evidence resolve the homology and dual embryonic origin of a mammalian skull bone, the interparietal.

    PubMed

    Koyabu, Daisuke; Maier, Wolfgang; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2012-08-28

    The homologies of mammalian skull elements are now fairly well established, except for the controversial interparietal bone. A previous experimental study reported an intriguing mixed origin of the interparietal: the medial portion being derived from the neural crest cells, whereas the lateral portion from the mesoderm. The evolutionary history of such mixed origin remains unresolved, and contradictory reports on the presence or absence and developmental patterns of the interparietal among mammals have complicated the question of its homology. Here we provide an alternative perspective on the evolutionary identity of the interparietal, based on a comprehensive study across more than 300 extinct and extant taxa, integrating embryological and paleontological data. Although the interparietal has been regarded as being lost in various lineages, our investigation on embryos demonstrates its presence in all extant mammalian "orders." The generally accepted paradigm has regarded the interparietal as consisting of two elements that are homologized to the postparietals of basal amniotes. The tabular bones have been postulated as being lost during the rise of modern mammals. However, our results demonstrate that the interparietal consists not of two but of four elements. We propose that the tabulars of basal amniotes are conserved as the lateral interparietal elements, which quickly fuse to the medial elements at the embryonic stage, and that the postparietals are homologous to the medial elements. Hence, the dual developmental origin of the mammalian interparietal can be explained as the evolutionary consequence of the fusion between the crest-derived "postparietals" and the mesoderm-derived "tabulars." PMID:22891324

  15. Analysis of the Fam181 gene family during mouse development reveals distinct strain-specific expression patterns, suggesting a role in nervous system development and function.

    PubMed

    Marks, Matthias; Pennimpede, Tracie; Lange, Lisette; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Wittler, Lars

    2016-01-10

    During somitogenesis differential gene expression can be observed for so-called cyclic genes, which display expression changes with a periodicity of 120min in the mouse. In screens to identify novel cyclic genes in murine embryos, Fam181b was predicted to be an oscillating gene in the presomitic mesoderm (psm). This gene, and its closely related paralog Fam181a, belong to the thus far uncharacterized Fam181 gene family. Here we describe the expression of Fam181b and Fam181a during murine embryonic development. In addition, we confirm oscillation of Fam181b in the psm in-phase with targets of, and regulated by, Notch signaling. Fam181b expression in the psm, as well as in the lateral plate mesoderm, was found to be affected by genetic background. We show that Fam181a and b exhibit partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns, and encode for proteins containing highly-conserved motifs, which predominantly localize to the nucleus. A Fam181b loss-of-function model was generated and found to result in no obvious phenotype. PMID:26407640

  16. Development of the Pulmonary Vein and the Systemic Venous Sinus: An Interactive 3D Overview

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Gert; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the normal formation of the heart is crucial for the understanding of cardiac pathologies and congenital malformations. The understanding of early cardiac development, however, is complicated because it is inseparably associated with other developmental processes such as embryonic folding, formation of the coelomic cavity, and vascular development. Because of this, it is necessary to integrate morphological and experimental analyses. Morphological insights, however, are limited by the difficulty in communication of complex 3D-processes. Most controversies, in consequence, result from differences in interpretation, rather than observation. An example of such a continuing debate is the development of the pulmonary vein and the systemic venous sinus, or “sinus venosus”. To facilitate understanding, we present a 3D study of the developing venous pole in the chicken embryo, showing our results in a novel interactive fashion, which permits the reader to form an independent opinion. We clarify how the pulmonary vein separates from a greater vascular plexus within the splanchnic mesoderm. The systemic venous sinus, in contrast, develops at the junction between the splanchnic and somatic mesoderm. We discuss our model with respect to normal formation of the heart, congenital cardiac malformations, and the phylogeny of the venous tributaries. PMID:21779373

  17. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1. PMID:24996922

  18. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study. PMID:26469858

  19. Heparan Sulfate Biosynthesis Enzyme, Ext1, Contributes to Outflow Tract Development of Mouse Heart via Modulation of FGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Cao, Peijuan; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Jiu-Lin; Chen, Yan; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are important regulators of multiple signaling pathways. As a major constituent of the heart extracellular matrix, glycosaminoglycans are implicated in cardiac morphogenesis through interactions with different signaling morphogens. Ext1 is a glycosyltransferase responsible for heparan sulfate synthesis. Here, we evaluate the function of Ext1 in heart development by analyzing Ext1 hypomorphic mutant and conditional knockout mice. Outflow tract alignment is sensitive to the dosage of Ext1. Deletion of Ext1 in the mesoderm induces a cardiac phenotype similar to that of a mutant with conditional deletion of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, a key enzyme responsible for synthesis of all glycosaminoglycans. The outflow tract defect in conditional Ext1 knockout(Ext1f/f:Mesp1Cre) mice is attributable to the reduced contribution of second heart field and neural crest cells. Ext1 deletion leads to downregulation of FGF signaling in the pharyngeal mesoderm. Exogenous FGF8 ameliorates the defects in the outflow tract and pharyngeal explants. In addition, Ext1 expression in second heart field and neural crest cells is required for outflow tract remodeling. Our results collectively indicate that Ext1 is crucial for outflow tract formation in distinct progenitor cells, and heparan sulfate modulates FGF signaling during early heart development. PMID:26295701

  20. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  1. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  2. Characterization of purified intraembryonic hematopoietic stem cells as a tool to define their site of origin

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Julien Y.; Giroux, Sébastien; Golub, Rachel; Klaine, Michèle; Jalil, Abdelali; Boucontet, Laurent; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development from mesoderm. To gain more information on the intraembryonic HSC site of origin, we purified multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from the aorta–gonads–mesonephros (AGM) of mice. This population, expressing c-Kit, AA4.1, CD31, and CD41, but not Flk1, and mainly negative for CD45, proved capable of long-term reconstitution in sublethally irradiated Rag2γc-/- recipients. We assigned the expression of GATA-2, GATA-3, and lmo2 to AGM-HSC, whereas erythromyeloid progenitors express only GATA-2. This unique combination of surface markers and transcription factors could be allocated in the AGM to the intraaortic clusters and the subaortic patches underlying aortic endothelial cells. Taken together, those data indicate that embryonic HSCs (i) differ from their fetal liver and adult counterpart by the low expression of CD45, (ii) do not colocalize with aortic endothelial cells as previously thought, and (iii) are localized, at 10.5 days postcoïtum, in the splanchnic mesoderm underlying aortic endothelial cells, within GATA-3+CD31+ cell clusters. PMID:15623562

  3. Selective Differentiation into Hematopoietic and Cardiac Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells Based on the Expression of Cell Surface Markers.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsumasa; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Flk1-expressing (+) mesodermal cells are useful source for the generation of hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, they have been reported as a heterogenous population that includes hematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. Therefore, to provide a method for a highly efficient production of hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes, cell surface markers are often used for separating these progenitors in Flk1(+) cells. Our recent study has shown that the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a tight junction component molecule, could divide mouse and human PSC- and mouse embryo-derived Flk1(+) cells into Flk1(+)CAR(-) and Flk1(+)CAR(+) cells. Flk1(+)CAR(-) and Flk1(+)CAR(+) cells efficiently differentiated into hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes, respectively. These results indicate that CAR is a novel cell surface marker for separating PSC-derived Flk1(+) mesodermal cells into hematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. We herein describe a differentiation method from PSCs into hematopoietic cells and cardiomyocytes based on CAR expression. PMID:26138986

  4. Sirenomelia Phenotype in Bmp7;Shh Compound Mutants: A Novel Experimental Model for Studies of Caudal Body Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Allepuz, Carlos; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Ros, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia is a severe congenital malformation of the lower body characterized by the fusion of the legs into a single lower limb. This striking external phenotype consistently associates severe visceral abnormalities, most commonly of the kidneys, intestine, and genitalia that generally make the condition lethal. Although the causes of sirenomelia remain unknown, clinical studies have yielded two major hypotheses: i) a primary defect in the generation of caudal mesoderm, ii) a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. Interestingly, Sirenomelia has been shown to have a genetic basis in mice, and although it has been considered a sporadic condition in humans, recently some possible familial cases have been reported. Here, we report that the removal of one or both functional alleles of Shh from the Bmp7-null background leads to a sirenomelia phenotype that faithfully replicates the constellation of external and internal malformations, typical of the human condition. These mutants represent an invaluable model in which we have analyzed the pathogenesis of sirenomelia. We show that the signaling defect predominantly impacts the morphogenesis of the hindgut and the development of the caudal end of the dorsal aortas. The deficient formation of ventral midline structures, including the interlimb mesoderm caudal to the umbilicus, leads to the approximation and merging of the hindlimb fields. Our study provides new insights for the understanding of the mechanisms resulting in caudal body malformations, including sirenomelia. PMID:23028704

  5. Characterization and embryonic expression of four amphioxus Frizzled genes with important functions during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guanghui; Li, Guang; Chen, Xiaoying; Wang, Yiquan

    2013-12-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays crucial roles in the embryonic patterning of all metazoans. Recent studies on Wnt genes in amphioxus have shed important insights into the evolution of the vertebrate Wnt gene family and their functions. Nevertheless, the potential roles of Wnt family receptors encoded by Frizzled (Fz) genes in amphioxus embryonic development remain to be investigated. In the present study, we identified four amphioxus Fz genes-AmphiFz1/2/7, AmphiFz4, AmphiFz5/8, and AmphiFz9/10-and analyzed their expression patterns during amphioxus embryogenesis. We found that these four Fz genes were maternally expressed and might be involved in early animal-vegetal axis establishment. The AmphiFz1/2/7 transcripts were detected in the central dorsal neural plate, mesoderm, the Hatschek's pit, and rim of the mouth, whereas those of AmphiFz4 were detected in the mesoderm, pharyngeal endoderm, and entire gut region. AmphiFz5/8 was exclusively expressed in the anterior-most region, whereas AmphiFz9/10 was expressed in the neural plate, somites, and tail bud. The dynamic and diverse expression patterns of amphioxus Fz genes suggest that these genes are not only associated with early embryonic axis establishment but also are involved in the development of several organs in amphioxus. PMID:24012522

  6. Sall1 Transiently Marks Undifferentiated Heart Precursors and Regulates their Fate

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuika; Andersen, Peter; Hotta, Akitsu; Sasagawa, Noriko; Kurokawa, Junko; Tsukahara, Yuko; Hayashida, Naoko; Koga, Chizuko; Nishikawa, Misato; Evans, Sylvia M.; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Kwon, Chulan; Takeuchi, Jun K.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are a crucial source of cells in cardiac development and regeneration. However, reported CPCs are heterogeneous, and no gene has been identified to transiently mark undifferentiated CPCs throughout heart development. Here we show that Spalt-like gene 1 (Sall1), a zing-finger transcription factor, is expressed in undifferentiated CPCs giving rise to both left and right ventricles. Sall1 was transiently expressed in precardiac mesoderm contributing to the first heart field (left ventricle precursors) but not in the field itself. Similarly, Sall1 expression was maintained in the second heart field (outflow tract/right ventricle precursors) but not in cardiac cells. In vitro, high levels of Sall1 at mesodermal stages enhanced cardiomyogenesis, whereas its continued expression suppressed cardiac differentiation. Our study demonstrates that Sall1 marks CPCs in an undifferentiated state and regulates cardiac differentiation. These findings provide fundamental insights into CPC maintenance, which can be instrumental for CPC-based regenerative medicine. PMID:26876450

  7. Enhanced hemangioblast generation and improved vascular repair and regeneration from embryonic stem cells by defined transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Bhang, Suk Ho; Arentson, Elizabeth; Sawada, Atsushi; Kim, Chan Kyu; Kang, Inyoung; Yu, Jinsheng; Sakurai, Nagisa; Kim, Suk Hyung; Yoo, Judy Ji Woon; Kim, Paul; Pahng, Seong Ho; Xia, Younan; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    The fetal liver kinase 1 (FLK-1)(+) hemangioblast can generate hematopoietic, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). ER71/ETV2, GATA2, and SCL form a core transcriptional network in hemangioblast development. Transient coexpression of these three factors during mesoderm formation stage in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) robustly enhanced hemangioblast generation by activating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and FLK-1 signaling while inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, WNT signaling, and cardiac output. Moreover, etsrp, gata2, and scl inhibition converted hematopoietic field of the zebrafish anterior lateral plate mesoderm to cardiac. FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts generated by transient coexpression of the three factors (ER71-GATA2-SCL [EGS]-induced FLK-1(+)) effectively produced hematopoietic, endothelial, and SMCs in culture and in vivo. Importantly, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts, when codelivered with mesenchymal stem cells as spheroids, were protected from apoptosis and generated functional endothelial cells and SMCs in ischemic mouse hindlimbs, resulting in improved blood perfusion and limb salvage. ESC-derived, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts could provide an attractive cell source for future hematopoietic and vascular repair and regeneration. PMID:24052951

  8. Evaluating multiple alternative hypotheses for the origin of Bilateria: An analysis of 18S rRNA molecular evidence

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Allen G.

    1998-01-01

    Six alternative hypotheses for the phylogenetic origin of Bilateria are evaluated by using complete 18S rRNA gene sequences for 52 taxa. These data suggest that there is little support for three of these hypotheses. Bilateria is not likely to be the sister group of Radiata or Ctenophora, nor is it likely that Bilateria gave rise to Cnidaria or Ctenophora. Instead, these data reveal a close relationship between bilaterians, placozoans, and cnidarians. From this, several inferences can be drawn. Morphological features that previously have been identified as synapomorphies of Bilateria and Ctenophora, e.g., mesoderm, more likely evolved independently in each clade. The endomesodermal muscles of bilaterians may be homologous to the endodermal muscles of cnidarians, implying that the original bilaterian mesodermal muscles were myoepithelial. Placozoans should have a gastrulation stage during development. Of the three hypotheses that cannot be falsified with the 18S rRNA data, one is most strongly supported. This hypothesis states that Bilateria and Placozoa share a more recent common ancestor than either does to Cnidaria. If true, the simplicity of placozoan body architecture is secondarily derived from a more complex ancestor. This simplification may have occurred in association with a planula-type larva becoming reproductive before metamorphosis. If this simplification took place during the common history that placozoans share with bilaterians, then placozoan genes that contain a homeobox, such as Trox2, should be explored, for they may include the gene or genes most closely related to Hox genes of bilaterians. PMID:9860990

  9. Worniu, a Snail family zinc-finger protein, is required for brain development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Shovon I; Ganguly, Atish; Roote, John; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-10-01

    The Snail family of zinc-finger transcriptional repressors is essential for morphogenetic cell movements, mesoderm formation, and neurogenesis during embryonic development. These proteins also control cell cycle, cell death, and cancer progression. In Drosophila, three members of this protein family, Snail, Escargot, and Worniu, have essential but redundant functions in asymmetric cell division of neuroblasts. In addition, Snail is critical for early mesoderm formation and Escargot is required for maintaining diploidy in wing imaginal disc cells. In this report, we demonstrate that Worniu plays a role in brain development. We show that alleles of the l(2)35Da complementation group are mutants of worniu. The developing larvae of these mutant alleles fail to shorten their brainstems. The brain phenotype, as well as the lethality, of these mutants can be rescued by worniu transgenes. Moreover, RNAi experiments targeting the worniu transcript show the same nonshortening phenotype in larval brains. worniu is expressed in the neuroblasts of brain hemispheres and ventral ganglions. The results suggest that the loss of Worniu function within the neuroblasts ultimately causes the larval brainstem to fail to go through shortening during development. PMID:15366015

  10. Expression of the decapentaplegic ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Treffkorn, Sandra; Mayer, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The gene decapentaplegic (dpp) and its homologs are essential for establishing the dorsoventral body axis in arthropods and vertebrates. However, the expression of dpp is not uniform among different arthropod groups. While this gene is expressed along the dorsal body region in insects, its expression occurs in a mesenchymal group of cells called cumulus in the early spider embryo. A cumulus-like structure has also been reported from centipedes, suggesting that it might be either an ancestral feature of arthropods or a derived feature (=synapomorphy) uniting the chelicerates and myriapods. To decide between these two alternatives, we analysed the expression patterns of a dpp ortholog in a representative of one of the closest arthropod relatives, the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed unique expression patterns in the early mesoderm anlagen of the antennal segment and in the dorsal and ventral extra-embryonic tissue, suggesting a divergent role of dpp in these tissues in Onychophora. In contrast, the expression of dpp in the dorsal limb portions resembles that in arthropods, except that it occurs in the mesoderm rather than in the ectoderm of the onychophoran limbs. A careful inspection of embryos of E. rowelli revealed no cumulus-like accumulation of dpp expressing cells at any developmental stage, suggesting that this feature is either a derived feature of chelicerates or a synapomorphy uniting the chelicerates and myriapods. PMID:23872340

  11. The involvement of engrailed and wingless during segmentation in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis (Peripatopsidae: Onychophora) (Reid 1996).

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Tait, Noel N; Budd, Graham E; Akam, Michael

    2009-05-01

    As the putative sister group to the arthropods, onychophorans can provide insight into ancestral developmental mechanisms in the panarthropod clade. Here, we examine the expression during segmentation of orthologues of wingless (Wnt1) and engrailed, two genes that play a key role in defining segment boundaries in Drosophila and that appear to play a role in segmentation in many other arthropods. Both are expressed in segmentally reiterated stripes in all forming segments except the first (brain) segment, which only shows an engrailed stripe. Engrailed is expressed before segments are morphologically visible and is expressed in both mesoderm and ectoderm. Segmental wingless expression is not detectable until after mesodermal somites are clearly distinct. Early engrailed expression lies in and extends to both sides of the furrow that first demarcates segments in the ectoderm, but is largely restricted to the posterior part of somites. Wingless expression lies immediately anterior to engrailed expression, as it does in many arthropods, but there is no precise cellular boundary between the two expression domains analogous to the overt parasegment boundary seen in Drosophila. Engrailed stripes extend along the posterior part of each limb bud, including the antenna, while wingless is restricted to the distal tip of the limbs and the neurectoderm basal to the limbs. PMID:19434423

  12. Developmental transition to bilaterally symmetric cell divisions is regulated by Pax-mediated transcription in embryos of the leech Helobdella austinensis.

    PubMed

    Schmerer, Matthew W; Null, Ryan W; Shankland, Marty

    2013-10-01

    The leech embryo develops by spiral cleavage, and establishes the symmetry properties of its adult body plan through the bilaterally symmetric divisions of mesodermal proteloblast DM″ and ectodermal proteloblast DNOPQ‴. We here show that transcriptional inhibitors α-amanitin and actinomycin D specifically disrupt the symmetry and orientation of these two proteloblast cell divisions while having no apparent effect on the timing or geometry of other divisions. Transcriptional inhibition had a similar effect on both proteloblasts, i.e. cytokinesis was highly asymmetric and the cleavage plane roughly orthogonal to that seen during normal development. These findings suggest that zygotic gene product(s) are required, either directly or indirectly, for the correct placement of the proteloblast cleavage furrow. The same phenotypes were also observed following in vivo expression of dominant-negative Pax gene constructs. These dominant-negative phenotypes depended on protein/DNA interaction, and could be rescued by coexpression of full length Pax proteins. However, symmetric cleavage of the mesodermal proteloblast was rescued by full length constructs of either Hau-Paxβ1 or Hau-Pax2/5/8, while only Hau-Paxβ1 rescued the symmetry of ectodermal cleavage. We conclude that both proteloblasts need Pax-mediated transcription to adopt their normally symmetric cleavage patterns, but differ in terms of the specific Pax proteins required. The implication of these findings for the evolution of spiral cleavage is discussed. PMID:23891819

  13. Oscillatory control of Delta-like1 in cell interactions regulates dynamic gene expression and tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Hiromi; Isomura, Akihiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kori, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates tissue morphogenesis through cell–cell interactions. The Notch effectors Hes1 and Hes7 are expressed in an oscillatory manner and regulate developmental processes such as neurogenesis and somitogenesis, respectively. Expression of the mRNA for the mouse Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) is also oscillatory. However, the dynamics of Dll1 protein expression are controversial, and their functional significance is unknown. Here, we developed a live-imaging system and found that Dll1 protein expression oscillated in neural progenitors and presomitic mesoderm cells. Notably, when Dll1 expression was accelerated or delayed by shortening or elongating the Dll1 gene, Dll1 oscillations became severely dampened or quenched at intermediate levels, as modeled mathematically. Under this condition, Hes1 and Hes7 oscillations were also dampened. In the presomitic mesoderm, steady Dll1 expression led to severe fusion of somites and their derivatives, such as vertebrae and ribs. In the developing brain, steady Dll1 expression inhibited proliferation of neural progenitors and accelerated neurogenesis, whereas optogenetic induction of Dll1 oscillation efficiently maintained neural progenitors. These results indicate that the appropriate timing of Dll1 expression is critical for the oscillatory networks and suggest the functional significance of oscillatory cell–cell interactions in tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26728556

  14. Retinoic Acid Specifically Enhances Embryonic Stem Cell Metastate Marked by Zscan4.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Daniela; De Angelis, Maria Teresa; Russo, Nicola Antonino; Marotta, Maria; Ceccarelli, Michele; Del Vecchio, Luigi; De Felice, Mario; Falco, Geppino

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency confers Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives, producing the majority of cell types. Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing pluripotency, it has become evident that ESCs culture consists of multiple cell populations with different degrees of potency that are spontaneously induced in regular ESC culture conditions. Zscan4, a key pluripotency factor, marks ESC subpopulation that is referred to as high-level of pluripotency metastate. Here, we report that in ESC cultures treated with retinoic acid (RA), Zscan4 ESCs metastate is strongly enhanced. In particular, we found that induction of Zscan4 metastate is mediated via RA receptors (RAR-alpha, RAR-beta, and RAR-gamma), and it is dependent on phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Remarkably, Zscan4 metastate induced by RA lacks canonical pluripotency genes Oct3/4 and Nanog but retained both self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. Finally we demonstrated that the conditional ablation of Zscan4 subpopulation is dispensable for both endoderm and mesoderm but is required for ectoderm lineage. In conclusion, our research provides new insights about the role of RA signaling during ESCs high pluripotency metastate fluctuation. PMID:26840068

  15. A conserved role for Snail as a potentiator of active transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rembold, Martina; Ciglar, Lucia; Yáñez-Cuna, J. Omar; Zinzen, Robert P.; Girardot, Charles; Jain, Ankit; Welte, Michael A.; Stark, Alexander; Leptin, Maria; Furlong, Eileen E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factors of the Snail family are key regulators of epithelial–mesenchymal transitions, cell morphogenesis, and tumor metastasis. Since its discovery in Drosophila ∼25 years ago, Snail has been extensively studied for its role as a transcriptional repressor. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Snail can positively modulate transcriptional activation. By combining information on in vivo occupancy with expression profiling of hand-selected, staged snail mutant embryos, we identified 106 genes that are potentially directly regulated by Snail during mesoderm development. In addition to the expected Snail-repressed genes, almost 50% of Snail targets showed an unanticipated activation. The majority of “Snail-activated” genes have enhancer elements cobound by Twist and are expressed in the mesoderm at the stages of Snail occupancy. Snail can potentiate Twist-mediated enhancer activation in vitro and is essential for enhancer activity in vivo. Using a machine learning approach, we show that differentially enriched motifs are sufficient to predict Snail's regulatory response. In silico mutagenesis revealed a likely causative motif, which we demonstrate is essential for enhancer activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Snail can potentiate enhancer activation by collaborating with different activators, providing a new mechanism by which Snail regulates development. PMID:24402316

  16. Ventral vs. dorsal chick dermal progenitor specification.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ingrid; Viallet, Jean P; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The dorsal and the ventral trunk integuments of the chick differ in their dermal cell lineage (originating from the somatic and somatopleural mesoderm respectively) and in the distribution of their feather fields. The dorsal macropattern has a large spinal pteryla surrounded by semi-apteria, whereas the ventral skin has a true medial apterium surrounded by the ventral pterylae. Comparison of the results of heterotopic transplantations of distal somatopleure in place of somatic mesoderm (Mauger 1972) or in place of proximal somatopleure (our data), leads to two conclusions. These are that the fate of the midventral apterium is not committed at day 2 of incubation and that the signals from the environment which specify the ventral and dorsal featherforming dermal progenitors are different. Effectively, Shh, but not Wnt -1 signalling can induce the formation of feather forming dermis from the embryonic somatopleure. Shh is not able, however, to trigger the formation of a feather forming dermis from the extra embryonic somatopleure. This brief report constitutes the first attempt, by comparing old and new preliminary results, to understand whether dermal progenitors at different sites are specified by different signalling pathways. PMID:15272375

  17. Expression of thymosin beta4 during chick development.

    PubMed

    Dathe, V; Brand-Saberi, B

    2004-04-01

    We cloned the chick homologue of Homo sapiens thymosin beta4, encoding a G-actin sequestering factor which plays an important role in angiogenesis, cell motility and tumorigenesis. The thymosin beta4 gene is highly conserved between chick and human. Its expression was analyzed during different stages of development. At early stages thymosin beta4 is expressed in the mesoderm and endoderm and in Hensen's node. Later, thymosin beta4 transcripts are found in the head mesenchyme, somites, dorsal root ganglia, neural tube, brain, blood vessels and feather buds. The pattern of thymosin beta4 expression in blood vessels indicates a function mainly in development of the blood circulatory system which closely parallels findings in vitro. The observed expression pattern shows a high similarity to expression data published for mice, mainly in the heart and in the nervous system. Important new aspects are the early onset of expression, the expression in the mesoderm preceding heart formation and the involvement in feather development. PMID:14968362

  18. One dimensional self-assembly of mouse embryonic stem cells using an array of hydrogel microstrands

    PubMed Central

    Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Padgen, Michael R.; Gracias, Alison; Bergkvist, Magnus; Xie, Yubing

    2011-01-01

    The ability of embryonic stem (ES) cells to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into multiple cell lineages hold promise for advances in modeling disease progression, screening drugs and treating diseases. To realize these potentials, it is imperative to study self-assembly in an embryonic microenvironment, as this may increase our understanding of ES cell maintenance and differentiation. In this study, we synthesized an array of one-dimensional alginate gel microstrands and aqueous microstrands through an SU-8 filter device by means of capillary action. Furthermore, we investigated self-assembly behaviors and differentiation potentials of mouse ES cells cultured in microstrands of varying diameters. We found that microstrands with an aqueous interior facilitated high density cell culture and formed compact microtissue structures, while microstrands with gelled interiors promote smaller cell-aggregate structures. In particular, we noticed that ES cells collected from one dimensional aqueous microstrands favored the differentiation towards cell lineages of endoderm and mesoderm, whereas those from gelled microstrands preferred to differentiate into ectoderm and mesoderm lineages. In addition to providing a “liquid-like” tubular microenvironment to understand one dimensional self-assembly process of ES cells, this alginate hydrogel microstrand system also offers an alternative way to manipulate the stem cell fate-decision using bioengineered microenvironments. PMID:21459438

  19. Alternatively spliced exons encode the tissue-specific 5{prime} termini of leukocyte pp52 and stromal cell S37 mRNA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.A.; May, W.; Denny, C.T.

    1996-03-05

    The pp52 gene encodes an intracellular, F-actin-binding phosphoprotein (also designated LSP1 and WP34) postulated to function in cytoskeleton dynamics and cell motility. We previously reported that different mRNA isoforms are expressed from this gene in cells of the leukocyte lineage versus mesodermally derived cells. These tissue-specific mRNA isoforms are identical except for 5{prime}-untranslated regions and sequences coding for unique N-termini of 23 and 21 amino acids, respectively. As this is a single-copy gene, we predicted that these tissue-specific mRNA isoforms would be generated by alternative RNA splicing. We report that the unique 5{prime} sequences in these mRNA isoforms are encoded in two separate exons containing ATG initiation codes. These features confirm that the pp52 and S37 mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative RNA splicing and establish that they are independently translated. Other results presented here indicate that the differential expression of these exons in leukocytes versus mesodermally derived cells is regulated at the level of transcription by tissue-specific promoters. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM −/− ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM −/− EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM −/− EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  1. Integrin alpha5beta1 function is regulated by XGIPC/kermit2 mediated endocytosis during Xenopus laevis gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Erin; Suckert, Catherine; Al-Attar, Hyder; Marsden, Mungo

    2010-01-01

    During Xenopus gastrulation alpha5beta1 integrin function is modulated in a temporally and spatially restricted manner, however, the regulatory mechanisms behind this regulation remain uncharacterized. Here we report that XGIPC/kermit2 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha5 subunit and regulates the activity of alpha5beta1 integrin. The interaction of kermit2 with alpha5beta1 is essential for fibronectin (FN) matrix assembly during the early stages of gastrulation. We further demonstrate that kermit2 regulates alpha5beta1 integrin endocytosis downstream of activin signaling. Inhibition of kermit2 function impairs cell migration but not adhesion to FN substrates indicating that integrin recycling is essential for mesoderm cell migration. Furthermore, we find that the alpha5beta1 integrin is colocalized with kermit2 and Rab 21 in embryonic and XTC cells. These data support a model where region specific mesoderm induction acts through kermit2 to regulate the temporally and spatially restricted changes in adhesive properties of the alpha5beta1 integrin through receptor endocytosis. PMID:20498857

  2. Co-expression of Foxa.a, Foxd and Fgf9/16/20 defines a transient mesendoderm regulatory state in ascidian embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Clare; Sirour, Cathy; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In many bilaterian embryos, nuclear β-catenin (nβ-catenin) promotes mesendoderm over ectoderm lineages. Although this is likely to represent an evolutionary ancient developmental process, the regulatory architecture of nβ-catenin-induced mesendoderm remains elusive in the majority of animals. Here, we show that, in ascidian embryos, three nβ-catenin transcriptional targets, Foxa.a, Foxd and Fgf9/16/20, are each required for the correct initiation of both the mesoderm and endoderm gene regulatory networks. Conversely, these three factors are sufficient, in combination, to produce a mesendoderm ground state that can be further programmed into mesoderm or endoderm lineages. Importantly, we show that the combinatorial activity of these three factors is sufficient to reprogramme developing ectoderm cells to mesendoderm. We conclude that in ascidian embryos, the transient mesendoderm regulatory state is defined by co-expression of Foxa.a, Foxd and Fgf9/16/20. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14692.001 PMID:27351101

  3. Spatial expression of Hox cluster genes in the ontogeny of a sea urchin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenas-Mena, C.; Cameron, A. R.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Hox cluster of the sea urchin Strongylocentrous purpuratus contains ten genes in a 500 kb span of the genome. Only two of these genes are expressed during embryogenesis, while all of eight genes tested are expressed during development of the adult body plan in the larval stage. We report the spatial expression during larval development of the five 'posterior' genes of the cluster: SpHox7, SpHox8, SpHox9/10, SpHox11/13a and SpHox11/13b. The five genes exhibit a dynamic, largely mesodermal program of expression. Only SpHox7 displays extensive expression within the pentameral rudiment itself. A spatially sequential and colinear arrangement of expression domains is found in the somatocoels, the paired posterior mesodermal structures that will become the adult perivisceral coeloms. No such sequential expression pattern is observed in endodermal, epidermal or neural tissues of either the larva or the presumptive juvenile sea urchin. The spatial expression patterns of the Hox genes illuminate the evolutionary process by which the pentameral echinoderm body plan emerged from a bilateral ancestor.

  4. A gene expression atlas of early craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, Andrew S; Distasio, Andrew; Dexheimer, Phillip; Plassard, Andrew; Aronow, Bruce J; Potter, S Steven

    2014-07-15

    We present a gene expression atlas of early mouse craniofacial development. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate cells from the principal critical microregions, whose development, differentiation and signaling interactions are responsible for the construction of the mammalian face. At E8.5, as migrating neural crest cells begin to exit the neural fold/epidermal ectoderm boundary, we examined the cranial mesenchyme, composed of mixed neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells, as well as cells from adjacent neuroepithelium. At E9.5 cells from the cranial mesenchyme, overlying olfactory placode/epidermal ectoderm, and underlying neuroepithelium, as well as the emerging mandibular and maxillary arches were sampled. At E10.5, as the facial prominences form, cells from the medial and lateral prominences, the olfactory pit, multiple discrete regions of underlying neuroepithelium, the mandibular and maxillary arches, including both their mesenchymal and ectodermal components, as well as Rathke's pouch, were similarly sampled and profiled using both microarray and RNA-seq technologies. Further, we performed single cell studies to better define the gene expression states of the early E8.5 pioneer neural crest cells and paraxial mesoderm. Taken together, and analyzable by a variety of biological network approaches, these data provide a complementing and cross validating resource capable of fueling discovery of novel compartment specific markers and signatures whose combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and growth factors/receptors are responsible for providing the master genetic blueprint for craniofacial development. PMID:24780627

  5. A Gene Expression Atlas of Early Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, Andrew S.; Distasio, Andrew; Dexheimer, Phillip; Plassard, Andrew; Aronow, Bruce J.; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    We present a gene expression atlas of early mouse craniofacial development. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate cells from the principal critical micro-regions, whose development, differentiation and signaling interactions are responsible for the construction of the mammalian face. At E8.5, as migrating neural crest cells begin to exit the neural fold/epidermal ectoderm boundary, we examined the cranial mesenchyme, composed of mixed neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells, as well as cells from adjacent neuroepithelium. At E9.5 cells from the cranial mesenchyme, overlying olfactory placode/epidermal ectoderm, and underlying neuroepithelium, as well as the emerging mandibular and maxillary arches were sampled. At E10.5, as the facial prominences form, cells from the medial and lateral prominences, the olfactory pit, multiple discrete regions of underlying neuroepithelium, the mandibular and maxillary arches, including both their mesenchymal and ectodermal components, as well as Rathke’s pouch, were similarly sampled and profiled using both microarray and RNA-seq technologies. Further, we performed single cell studies to better define the gene expression states of the early E8.5 pioneer neural crest cells and paraxial mesoderm. Taken together, and analyzable by a variety of biological network approaches, these data provide a complementing and cross-validating resource capable of fueling discovery of novel compartment specific markers and signatures whose combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and growth factors/receptors are responsible for providing the master genetic blueprint for craniofacial development. PMID:24780627

  6. Phosphorylation-Dependent Ubiquitination of Paraxial Protocadherin (PAPC) Controls Gastrulation Cell Movements

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Masatake; Ueno, Naoto; Kinoshita, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) has been shown to be involved in gastrulation cell movements during early embryogenesis. It is first expressed in the dorsal marginal zone at the early gastrula stage and subsequently restricted to the paraxial mesoderm in Xenopus and zebrafish. Using Xenopus embryos, we found that PAPC is also regulated at the protein level and is degraded and excluded from the plasma membrane in the axial mesoderm by the late gastrula stage. Regulation of PAPC requires poly-ubiquitination that is dependent on phosphorylation. PAPC is phosphorylated by GKS3 in the evolutionarily conserved cytoplasmic domain, and this in turn is necessary for poly-ubiquitination by an E3 ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP. We also show that precise control of PAPC by phosphorylation/ubiquitination is essential for normal Xenopus gastrulation cell movements. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of regulation of a cell adhesion protein and show that this system plays a crucial role in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:25580871

  7. FGF signaling transforms non-neural ectoderm into neural crest.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-12-15

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in response to FGF the non-neural ectoderm can ectopically express several early neural crest markers (Pax7, Msx1, Dlx5, Sox9, FoxD3, Snail2, and Sox10). Importantly this response to FGF signaling can occur without inducing ectopic mesodermal tissues. Furthermore, the non-neural ectoderm responds to FGF by expressing the prospective neural marker Sox3, but it does not express definitive markers of neural or anterior neural (Sox2 and Otx2) tissues. These results suggest that the non-neural ectoderm can launch the neural crest program in the absence of mesoderm, without acquiring definitive neural character. Finally, we report that prior to the upregulation of these neural crest markers, the non-neural ectoderm upregulates both BMP and Wnt molecules in response to FGF. Our results provide the first effort to understand the molecular events leading to neural crest development via the non-neural ectoderm in amniotes and present a distinct response to FGF signaling. PMID:23000357

  8. Distinct spatiotemporal roles of hedgehog signalling during chick and mouse cranial base and axial skeleton development

    PubMed Central

    Balczerski, B.; Zakaria, S.; Tucker, A. S.; Borycki, A.G.; Koyama, E.; Pacifici, M.; Francis-West, P.

    2012-01-01

    The cranial base exerts a supportive role for the brain and includes the occipital, sphenoid and ethmoid bones that arise from cartilaginous precursors in the early embryo. As the occipital bone and the posterior part of the sphenoid are mesoderm derivatives that arise in close proximity to the notochord and floor plate, it has been assumed that their development, like the axial skeleton, is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signalling. Here we examined the development of the cranial base in chick and mouse embryos to compare the molecular signals that are required for chondrogenic induction in the trunk and head. We found that Shh signalling is required but the molecular network controlling cranial base development is distinct from that in the trunk. In the absence of Shh, the presumptive cranial base did not undergo chondrogenic commitment as determined by the loss of Sox9 expression and there was a decrease in cell survival. In contrast, induction of the otic capsule occurred normally demonstrating that induction of the cranial base is uncoupled from formation of the sensory capsules. Lastly, we found that the early cranial mesoderm is refractory to Shh signalling, likely accounting for why development of the cranial base occurs after the axial skeleton. Our data reveal that cranial and axial skeletal induction is controlled by conserved, yet spatiotemporally distinct mechanisms that co-ordinate development of the cranial base with that of the cranial musculature and the pharyngeal arches. PMID:23009899

  9. Expression and Functional Study of Extracellular BMP Antagonists during the Morphogenesis of the Digits and Their Associated Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Montero, Juan A.; Rodriguez-Leon, Joaquin; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A.; Hurle, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the role of BMP signaling in the diversification of the embryonic limb mesodermal progenitors destined to form cartilage, joints, and tendons. Given the importance of extracellular BMP modulators in in vivo systems, we performed a systematic search of those expressed in the developing autopod during the formation of the digits. Here, we monitored the expression of extracellular BMP modulators including: Noggin, Chordin, Chordin-like 1, Chordin-like 2, Twisted gastrulation, Dan, BMPER, Sost, Sostdc1, Follistatin, Follistatin-like 1, Follistatin-like 5 and Tolloid. These factors show differential expression domains in cartilage, joints and tendons. Furthermore, they are induced in specific temporal patterns during the formation of an ectopic extra digit, preceding the appearance of changes that are identifiable by conventional histology. The analysis of gene regulation, cell proliferation and cell death that are induced by these factors in high density cultures of digit progenitors provides evidence of functional specialization in the control of mesodermal differentiation but not in cell proliferation or apoptosis. We further show that the expression of these factors is differentially controlled by the distinct signaling pathways acting in the developing limb at the stages covered by this study. In addition, our results provide evidence suggesting that TWISTED GASTRULATION cooperates with CHORDINS, BMPER, and NOGGIN in the establishment of tendons or cartilage in a fashion that is dependent on the presence or absence of TOLLOID. PMID:23573253

  10. Ca2+ signaling during vertebrate somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah E; Miller, Andrew L

    2006-07-01

    A variety of Ca2+ signals, in the form of intercellular pulses and waves, have been reported to be associated with the various sequential stages of somitogenesis: from convergent extension and the formation of the paraxial mesoderm; during the patterning of the paraxial mesoderm to establish segmental units; throughout the formation of the morphological boundaries that delineate the segmental units, and finally from within the maturing somites as they undergo subsequent development and differentiation. Due to both the technical challenges presented in imaging intact, developing embryos, and the subtle nature of the Ca2+ transients generated, they have proved to be difficult to visualize. However, a combination of cultured cell preparations and improvements in explant and whole embryo imaging techniques has begun to reveal a new and exciting class of developmental Ca2+ signals. In this chapter, we review the small, but expanding, number of reports in the literature and attempt to identify common characteristics of the somitogenic Ca2+ transients, such as their mode of generation, as well as their spatial and temporal features. This may help to elucidate the significance and function of these intriguing Ca2+ transients and thus integrate them into the complex signaling networks that orchestrate early developmental events. PMID:16787560

  11. CARMEN, a human super enhancer-associated long noncoding RNA controlling cardiac specification, differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ounzain, Samir; Micheletti, Rudi; Arnan, Carme; Plaisance, Isabelle; Cecchi, Dario; Schroen, Blanche; Reverter, Ferran; Alexanian, Michael; Gonzales, Christine; Ng, Shi Yan; Bussotti, Giovanni; Pezzuto, Iole; Notredame, Cedric; Heymans, Stephane; Guigó, Roderic; Johnson, Rory; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators of developmental pathways. However, their roles in human cardiac precursor cell (CPC) remain unexplored. To characterize the long noncoding transcriptome during human CPC cardiac differentiation, we profiled the lncRNA transcriptome in CPCs isolated from the human fetal heart and identified 570 lncRNAs that were modulated during cardiac differentiation. Many of these were associated with active cardiac enhancer and super enhancers (SE) with their expression being correlated with proximal cardiac genes. One of the most upregulated lncRNAs was a SE-associated lncRNA that was named CARMEN, (CAR)diac (M)esoderm (E)nhancer-associated (N)oncoding RNA. CARMEN exhibits RNA-dependent enhancing activity and is upstream of the cardiac mesoderm-specifying gene regulatory network. Interestingly, CARMEN interacts with SUZ12 and EZH2, two components of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). We demonstrate that CARMEN knockdown inhibits cardiac specification and differentiation in cardiac precursor cells independently of MIR-143 and -145 expression, two microRNAs located proximal to the enhancer sequences. Importantly, CARMEN expression was activated during pathological remodeling in the mouse and human hearts, and was necessary for maintaining cardiac identity in differentiated cardiomyocytes. This study demonstrates therefore that CARMEN is a crucial regulator of cardiac cell differentiation and homeostasis. PMID:26423156

  12. Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapy of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karantalis, Vasileios; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial clinical advances over the past 65 years, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in America. The past 15 years has witnessed major basic and translational interest in the use of stem and/or precursor cells as a therapeutic agent for chronically injured organs. Among the cell types under investigation, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely studied and in early stage clinical studies show promise for repair and regeneration of cardiac tissues. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into mesoderm and non-mesoderm derived tissues, their immunomodulatory effects, their availability and their key role in maintaining and replenishing endogenous stem cell niches have rendered them one of the most heavily investigated and clinically tested type of stem cell. Accumulating data from preclinical and early phase clinical trials document their safety when delivered as either autologous or allogeneic forms in a range of cardiovascular diseases, but also importantly define parameters of clinical efficacy that justify further investigation in larger clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of MSCs, their interaction with endogenous molecular and cellular pathways, and their modulation of immune responses. Additionally, we discuss factors that enhance their proliferative and regenerative ability and factors that may hinder their effectiveness in the clinical setting. PMID:25858066

  13. Discrete Levels of Twist Activity Are Required to Direct Distinct Cell Functions during Gastrulation and Somatic Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Dobi, Krista C.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Twist (Twi), a conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional regulator, directs the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and regulates changes in cell fate, cell polarity, cell division and cell migration in organisms from flies to humans. Analogous to its role in EMT, Twist has been implicated in metastasis in numerous cancer types, including breast, pancreatic and prostate. In the Drosophila embryo, Twist is essential for discrete events in gastrulation and mesodermal patterning. In this study, we derive a twi allelic series by examining the various cellular events required for gastrulation in Drosophila. By genetically manipulating the levels of Twi activity during gastrulation, we find that coordination of cell division is the most sensitive cellular event, whereas changes in cell shape are the least sensitive. Strikingly, we show that by increasing levels of Snail expression in a severe twi hypomorphic allelic background, but not a twi null background, we can reconstitute gastrulation and produce viable adult flies. Our results demonstrate that the level of Twi activity determines whether the cellular events of ventral furrow formation, EMT, cell division and mesodermal migration occur. PMID:24915423

  14. Additional enhancer copies, with intact cdx binding sites, anteriorize Hoxa-7/lacZ expression in mouse embryos: evidence in keeping with an instructional cdx gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Cockley, Adam; Drage, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Expression of a Hoxa-7/lacZ reporter construct in transgenic mouse embryos is shifted anteriorly when the upstream enhancer is multimerized. The shift occurs in spinal ganglia, neurectoderm and in both paraxial and lateral plate mesoderms. Much of the multimer effect is inhibited by destruction of a single caudal (cdx) binding motif in the additional copies of the enhancer. These observations are in agreement with earlier enhancer multimerization analyses made for Hoxb-8 (Charite et al., 1998). Our findings therefore provide further evidence that the anterior limit of a Hox gene's expression domain is normally dependent upon and is determined by, the dosage of transcription factor(s) which bind to its enhancer element(s) and that these factors may be, or must include, the cdx proteins. We consider these findings in terms of both instructional (morphogen-like) gradient and timing models for the establishment of Hox gene expression domains. Enhancer multimerization results in an earlier onset of Hoxa-7/lacZ activity in the embryo. In neurectoderm at 8.7 days and in mesoderm at 10.5 days, the anterior boundaries of expression are located posterior to those seen at some earlier stages of development. We discuss how these findings are in keeping with a model where Hox expression boundaries become set along instructional cdx gradients, formed by cdx decay in cells moving away from the primitive streak region. PMID:15470633

  15. The Evx1/Evx1as gene locus regulates anterior-posterior patterning during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Charles C; Amaral, Paulo P; Kalsbeek, Anton; Magor, Graham W; Gillinder, Kevin R; Tangermann, Pierre; di Lisio, Lorena; Cheetham, Seth W; Gruhl, Franziska; Frith, Jessica; Tallack, Michael R; Ru, Ke-Lin; Crawford, Joanna; Mattick, John S; Dinger, Marcel E; Perkins, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of sense-antisense mRNA-lncRNA gene pairs occur in the mammalian genome. While there is usually little doubt about the function of the coding transcript, the function of the lncRNA partner is mostly untested. Here we examine the function of the homeotic Evx1-Evx1as gene locus. Expression is tightly co-regulated in posterior mesoderm of mouse embryos and in embryoid bodies. Expression of both genes is enhanced by BMP4 and WNT3A, and reduced by Activin. We generated a suite of deletions in the locus by CRISPR-Cas9 editing. We show EVX1 is a critical downstream effector of BMP4 and WNT3A with respect to patterning of posterior mesoderm. The lncRNA, Evx1as arises from alternative promoters and is difficult to fully abrogate by gene editing or siRNA approaches. Nevertheless, we were able to generate a large 2.6 kb deletion encompassing the shared promoter with Evx1 and multiple additional exons of Evx1as. This led to an identical dorsal-ventral patterning defect to that generated by micro-deletion in the DNA-binding domain of EVX1. Thus, Evx1as has no function independent of EVX1, and is therefore unlikely to act in trans. We predict many antisense lncRNAs have no specific trans function, possibly only regulating the linked coding genes in cis. PMID:27226347

  16. Basic fibroblast growth factor: a potential new therapeutic tool for the treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Stephan; Ernst, Nancy; Bayat, Ardeshir; Paus, Ralf; Tronnier, Volker; Zechel, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Numerous tissue niches in the human body, such as skin, are now recognized to harbour adult stem cells. In this study, we analyze multipotent human dermis-derived progenitor cell populations, isolated and propagated from mechanically and enzymatically processed adult scalp skin. The populations encompass Nestin-positive and -negative cells, which may serve as a convenient and abundant source for various therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine. Here, we show that these cultures exhibit a strong tendency to differentiate into mesodermal derivatives, particularly myofibroblasts, when maintained in media containing serum. Since undesired and excessive myofibroblast formation is a frequent postsurgical complication, we sought culture conditions that would prevent myofibroblast formation. In particular, we analyzed the effect of growth factors, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF AB). Our results demonstrate that bFGF is a potent inhibitor of mesodermal differentiation, whereas PDFG AB favours myofibroblast formation and up-regulates expression of TGFbeta receptors I and II. This interesting discovery may help in the prevention and treatment of tissue fibrosis and in particular in the eradication of hypertrophic and keloid scars. PMID:19071002

  17. The role of Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) in the development and evolution of the axial skeleton

    PubMed Central

    LETTICE, LAURA; HECKSHER-SØRENSEN, JACOB; HILL, ROBERT

    2001-01-01

    The bagpipe-related homeobox-containing genes are members of the NK family. bagpipe (bap) was first identified in Drosophila and there are three different bagpipe-related genes in vertebrates. Only two of these are found in mammals, the Nkx3.1 and the Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) gene. The targeted mutation in the mouse Bapx1 gene shows a vertebral phenotype in which the ventromedial elements are lacking; these are the centra and the intervertebral discs. In addition, a region of gastric mesenchyme is abnormal. This mesenchyme surrounds the posterior region of the presumptive stomach and duodenum, and in the mutant fails to support normal development of the spleen. In Drosophila, bagpipe has a role in gut mesoderm and the mutant embryos have no midgut musculature. Thus bap related genes in mouse and Drosophila have roles in patterning gut mesoderm; however, neither of the mammalian genes has a discernible role in the gut musculature. In contrast, both mammalian genes have roles in developmental processes that have appeared recently in evolution. The Bapx1 gene found in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals appears to have derived vertebrate specific functions sometime after the split between the jawless fish and gnathostomes. PMID:11523821

  18. Retinoic Acid Specifically Enhances Embryonic Stem Cell Metastate Marked by Zscan4

    PubMed Central

    Tagliaferri, Daniela; De Angelis, Maria Teresa; Russo, Nicola Antonino; Marotta, Maria; Ceccarelli, Michele; Del Vecchio, Luigi; De Felice, Mario; Falco, Geppino

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency confers Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives, producing the majority of cell types. Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing pluripotency, it has become evident that ESCs culture consists of multiple cell populations with different degrees of potency that are spontaneously induced in regular ESC culture conditions. Zscan4, a key pluripotency factor, marks ESC subpopulation that is referred to as high-level of pluripotency metastate. Here, we report that in ESC cultures treated with retinoic acid (RA), Zscan4 ESCs metastate is strongly enhanced. In particular, we found that induction of Zscan4 metastate is mediated via RA receptors (RAR-alpha, RAR-beta, and RAR-gamma), and it is dependent on phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Remarkably, Zscan4 metastate induced by RA lacks canonical pluripotency genes Oct3/4 and Nanog but retained both self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. Finally we demonstrated that the conditional ablation of Zscan4 subpopulation is dispensable for both endoderm and mesoderm but is required for ectoderm lineage. In conclusion, our research provides new insights about the role of RA signaling during ESCs high pluripotency metastate fluctuation. PMID:26840068

  19. Pronephric duct extension in amphibian embryos: migration and other mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Drawbridge, Julie; Meighan, Christopher M; Lumpkins, Rebecca; Kite, Mary E

    2003-01-01

    Initiation of excretory system development in all vertebrates requires (1) delamination of the pronephric and pronephric duct rudiments from intermediate mesoderm at the ventral border of anterior somites, and (2) extension of the pronephric duct to the cloaca. Pronephric duct extension is the central event in nephric system development; the pronephric duct differentiates into the tubule that carries nephric filtrate out of the body and induces terminal differentiation of adult kidneys. Early studies concluded that pronephric ducts formed by means of in situ segregation of pronephric duct tissue from lateral mesoderm ventral to the forming somites; more recent studies highlight caudal migration of the pronephric duct as the major morphogenetic mechanism. The purpose of this review is to provide the historical background on studies of the mechanisms of amphibian pronephric duct extension, to review evidence showing that different amphibians perform pronephric duct morphogenesis in different ways, and to suggest future studies that may help illuminate the molecular basis of the mechanisms that have evolved in amphibians to extend the pronephric duct to the cloaca. PMID:12508219

  20. Analysis of nephric duct specification in the avian embryo

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Lital; Yelin, Ronit; Schultheiss, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate kidney tissue exhibits variable morphology that in general increases in complexity when moving from anterior to posterior along the body axis. The nephric duct, a simple unbranched epithelial tube, is derived in the avian embryo from a rudiment located in the anterior intermediate mesoderm (IM) adjacent to somites 8 to 10. Using quail-chick chimeric embryos, the current study finds that competence to form nephric duct is fixed when IM precursor cells are still located in the primitive streak, significantly before the onset of duct differentiation. In the primitive streak, expression of the gene HoxB4 is associated with prospective duct IM, whereas expression of the more posterior Hox gene HoxA6 is associated with more posterior, non-duct-forming IM. Misexpression of HoxA6, but not of HoxB4, in prospective duct-forming regions of the IM resulted in repression of duct formation, suggesting a mechanism for the restriction of duct formation to the anterior-most IM. The results are discussed with respect to their implications for anterior-posterior patterning of kidney tissue and of mesoderm in general, and for the loss of duct-forming ability in more posterior regions of the IM that has occurred during vertebrate evolution. PMID:23034630

  1. Notochord morphogenesis in mice: Current understanding & open questions.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Sophie; Nowotschin, Sonja; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-05-01

    The notochord is a structure common to all chordates, and the feature that the phylum Chordata has been named after. It is a rod-like mesodermal structure that runs the anterior-posterior length of the embryo, adjacent to the ventral neural tube. The notochord plays a critical role in embryonic tissue patterning, for example the dorsal-ventral patterning of the neural tube. The cells that will come to form the notochord are specified at gastrulation. Axial mesodermal cells arising at the anterior primitive streak migrate anteriorly as the precursors of the notochord and populate the notochordal plate. Yet, even though a lot of interest has centered on investigating the functional and structural roles of the notochord, we still have a very rudimentary understanding of notochord morphogenesis. The events driving the formation of the notochord are rapid, taking place over the period of approximately a day in mice. In this commentary, we provide an overview of our current understanding of mouse notochord morphogenesis, from the initial specification of axial mesendodermal cells at the primitive streak, the emergence of these cells at the midline on the surface of the embryo, to their submergence and organization of the stereotypically positioned notochord. We will also discuss some key open questions. Developmental Dynamics 245:547-557, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26845388

  2. Human Adipose Tissue Is a Source of Multipotent Stem CellsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Patricia A.; Zhu, Min; Ashjian, Peter; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Huang, Jerry I.; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Alfonso, Zeni C.; Fraser, John K.; Benhaim, Prosper; Hedrick, Marc H.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the work conducted on adult stem cells has focused on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found within the bone marrow stroma. Adipose tissue, like bone marrow, is derived from the embryonic mesenchyme and contains a stroma that is easily isolated. Preliminary studies have recently identified a putative stem cell population within the adipose stromal compartment. This cell population, termed processed lipoaspirate (PLA) cells, can be isolated from human lipoaspirates and, like MSCs, differentiate toward the osteogenic, adipogenic, myogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. To confirm whether adipose tissue contains stem cells, the PLA population and multiple clonal isolates were analyzed using several molecular and biochemical approaches. PLA cells expressed multiple CD marker antigens similar to those observed on MSCs. Mesodermal lineage induction of PLA cells and clones resulted in the expression of multiple lineage-specific genes and proteins. Furthermore, biochemical analysis also confirmed lineage-specific activity. In addition to mesodermal capacity, PLA cells and clones differentiated into putative neurogenic cells, exhibiting a neuronal-like morphology and expressing several proteins consistent with the neuronal phenotype. Finally, PLA cells exhibited unique characteristics distinct from those seen in MSCs, including differences in CD marker profile and gene expression. PMID:12475952

  3. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S; Fa'ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K; Schwartz, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it's transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1's transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1(Cre/+); Rosa26(EYFP/+) ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  4. Transcription factors ETS2 and MESP1 transdifferentiate human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jose Francisco; Liu, Yu; Weng, Kuo-Chan; Robertson, Matthew J; Zhang, Shuxing; Prejusa, Allan; Harger, John; Tikhomirova, Dariya; Chopra, Mani; Iyer, Dinakar; Mercola, Mark; Oshima, Robert G; Willerson, James T; Potaman, Vladimir N; Schwartz, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Unique insights for the reprograming of cell lineages have come from embryonic development in the ascidian Ciona, which is dependent upon the transcription factors Ci-ets1/2 and Ci-mesp to generate cardiac progenitors. We tested the idea that mammalian v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) and mesoderm posterior (MESP) homolog may be used to convert human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors. Here we show that murine ETS2 has a critical role in directing cardiac progenitors during cardiopoiesis in embryonic stem cells. We then use lentivirus-mediated forced expression of human ETS2 to convert normal human dermal fibroblasts into replicative cells expressing the cardiac mesoderm marker KDR(+). However, although neither ETS2 nor the purported cardiac master regulator MESP1 can by themselves generate cardiac progenitors de novo from fibroblasts, forced coexpression of ETS2 and MESP1 or cell treatment with purified proteins reprograms fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors, as shown by the de novo appearance of core cardiac transcription factors, Ca(2+) transients, and sarcomeres. Our data indicate that ETS2 and MESP1 play important roles in a genetic network that governs cardiopoiesis. PMID:22826236

  5. Coelomic epithelium-derived cells in visceral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Laura; Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón

    2016-03-01

    Coelomic cavities of vertebrates are lined by a mesothelium which develops from the lateral plate mesoderm. During development, the coelomic epithelium is a highly active cell layer, which locally is able to supply mesenchymal cells that contribute to the mesodermal elements of many organs and provide signals which are necessary for their development. The relevance of this process of mesenchymal cell supply to the developing organs is becoming clearer because genetic lineage tracing techniques have been developed in recent years. Body wall, heart, liver, lungs, gonads, and gastrointestinal tract are populated by cells derived from the coelomic epithelium which contribute to their connective and vascular tissues, and sometimes to specialized cell types such as the stellate cells of the liver, the Cajal interstitial cells of the gut or the Sertoli cells of the testicle. In this review we collect information about the contribution of coelomic epithelium derived cells to visceral development, their developmental fates and signaling functions. The common features displayed by all these processes suggest that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the embryonic coelomic epithelium is an underestimated but key event of vertebrate development, and probably it is shared by all the coelomate metazoans. PMID:26638186

  6. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    PubMed

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. PMID:27578182

  7. Two novel nodal-related genes initiate early inductive events in Xenopus Nieuwkoop center.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Yokota, C; Takano, K; Tanegashima, K; Onuma, Y; Goto, J; Asashima, M

    2000-12-01

    In vertebrates, Nodal-related protein plays crucial roles in mesoderm and endoderm induction. Here we describe two novel Xenopus nodal-related genes, Xnr5 and Xnr6, which are first zygotically expressed at the mid-blastula transition, in the dorsal-vegetal region including the Nieuwkoop center. Xnr5 and Xnr6 were isolated by expression screening of a library enriched with immediate-early-type transcripts, and are strong inducers of both mesoderm and endoderm. They also induce the other nodal-related genes in the animal cap. In embryos, cerberus-short (nodal-specific inhibitor) can inhibit Xnr1 and Xnr2 express to the same extent goosecoid, but not Xnr5 and Xnr6 transcription. Xnr5 and Xnr6 are regulated completely cell autonomously, differently from other Xnrs in the cell-dissociated embryos. The expression of Xnr5 and Xnr6 is regulated by maternal VegT and (beta)-catenin, but does not require TGF-(beta) signaling. Therefore, expression of Xnr5 and Xnr6 is controlled by different mechanisms from other Xnr family genes. PMID:11076754

  8. Xantivin suppresses the activity of EGF-CFC genes to regulate nodal signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kousuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yokota, Chika; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Lefty, antivin and related genes act in a feedback inhibition mechanism for nodal signaling at a number of stages of vertebrate embryogenesis. To analyze the function of the feedback inhibitor of nodal signaling, Xantivin in Xenopus embryos, we designed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (XatvMO) for this gene. XatvMO caused the expansion of mesodermal tissue and head defects. XatvMO-injected gastrulae showed up-regulated expression of the mesodermal markers Xbra, Xwnt8, Xnot, and Chordin, suggesting expansion of the trunk-tail organizer. As expected, depletion of Xantivin also up-regulated nodal signaling as confirmed by the enhanced ectopic expression of Xantivin mRNA, a known target gene of nodal signaling. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between Xantivin and the EGF-CFC gene FRL-1, which is a component of the nodal receptor. In animal cap assays, FRL-1 could not induce expression of nodal-responsive genes, but could up-regulate expression of these genes when FRL-1 was coinjected with a low dose of Xnr1; coinjection of Xantivin suppressed this up-regulation by FRL-1. We also found that Xantivin can rescue the caudalized phenotype induced by overexpression of FRL-1. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Xantivin interacted with the EGF-CFC proteins, FRL-1 and cripto. Taken together, these results suggest that Xantivin opposes the activity of EGF-CFC genes and thereby antagonizes nodal signaling. PMID:15300508

  9. Embryogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Chaudhari, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To postulate a hypothesis to explain the embryogenesis of exstrophy bladder based on our clinical observations. Materials and Methods: In 27 cases of exstrophy, we measured the distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease to the root of the penis (clitoris) (B) and the distance between the penis (clitoris) and the scrotum (labia majora) (C). These were compared with age, height and XP distance (distance between xiphisternum and symphysis pubis) matched control group of normal children. The distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease and the penis (clitoris) (A) was measured in control group. Results: The observation was A = B + C. This implies that in exstrophy bladder, the position of the penis (clitoris) has moved cephalad from the lower border of A to the junction of B and C. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we postulate that abnormal origin of genital tubercle may be the cause of exstrophy bladder. The abnormal origin of primordia of the genital tubercle in more cephalad direction than normal causes wedge effect, which will interfere with the medial migration of the mesoderm as well as the midline approximation of mesodermal structures in the lower abdominal wall, thereby resulting in the exstrophy of bladder. PMID:20011468

  10. Growth of the developing mouse heart: an interactive qualitative and quantitative 3D atlas.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Bouke A; van den Berg, Gert; de Boer, Piet A J; Moorman, Antoon F M; Ruijter, Jan M

    2012-08-15

    Analysis of experiments aimed at understanding the genetic mechanisms of differentiation and growth of the heart, calls for detailed insights into cardiac growth and proliferation rate of myocytes and their precursors. Such insights in mouse heart development are currently lacking. We quantitatively assessed the 3D patterns of proliferation in the forming mouse heart and in the adjacent splanchnic mesoderm, from the onset of heart formation till the developed heart at late gestation. These results are presented in an interactive portable document format (Suppl. PDF) to facilitate communication and understanding. We show that the mouse splanchnic mesoderm is highly proliferative, and that the proliferation rate drops upon recruitment of cells into the cardiac lineage. Concomitantly, the proliferation rate locally increases at the sites of chamber formation, generating a regionalized proliferation pattern. Quantitative analysis shows a gradual decrease in proliferation rate of the ventricular walls with progression of development, and a base-to-top decline in proliferation rate in the trabecules. Our data offers clear insights into the growth and morphogenesis of the mouse heart and shows that in early development the phases of tube formation and chamber formation overlap. The resulting interactive quantitative 3D atlas of cardiac growth and morphogenesis provides a resource for interpretation of mechanistic studies. PMID:22617458

  11. Optochemical dissection of T-box gene-dependent medial floor plate development

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; Walker, Whitney J.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their cell-autonomous roles in mesoderm development, the zebrafish T-box transcription factors no tail a (ntla) and spadetail (spt/tbx16) are required for medial floor plate (MFP) formation. Posterior MFP cells are completely absent in zebrafish embryos lacking both Ntla and Spt function, and genetic mosaic analyses have shown that the two T-box genes promote MFP development in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that Ntla/Spt-dependent mesoderm-derived signals are required for the induction of posterior but not anterior MFP cells. To investigate the mechanisms by which Ntla and Spt regulate MFP development, we have used photoactivatable caged morpholinos (cMOs) to silence these T-box genes with spatiotemporal control. We find that posterior MFP formation requires Ntla or Spt activity during early gastrulation, specifically in lateral margin-derived cells that converge toward the midline during epiboly and somitogenesis. Nodal signaling-dependent MFP specification is maintained in the absence of Ntla and Spt function; however midline cells in ntla;spt morphants exhibit aberrant morphogenetic movements, resulting in their anterior mislocalization. Our findings indicate that Ntla and Spt do not differentially regulate MFP induction along the anterior-posterior axis; rather, the T-box genes act redundantly within margin-derived cells to promote the posterior extension of MFP progenitors. PMID:25781211

  12. Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Binding Sites Analyses Identify Early FOX Expressions for Enhancing Cardiomyogenesis Efficiency of hESC Cultures.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hock Chuan; Ting, Sherwin; Brena, Romulo Martin; Koh, Geoffrey; Chen, Allen; Toh, Siew Qi; Lim, Yu Ming; Oh, Steve Kah Weng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation efficiency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) is highly sensitive to culture conditions. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms involved, we investigated hESCs grown on three distinct culture platforms: feeder-free Matrigel, mouse embryonic fibroblast feeders, and Matrigel replated on feeders. At the outset, we profiled and quantified their differentiation efficiency, transcriptome, transcription factor binding sites and DNA-methylation. Subsequent genome-wide analyses allowed us to reconstruct the relevant interactome, thereby forming the regulatory basis for implicating the contrasting differentiation efficiency of the culture conditions. We hypothesized that the parental expressions of FOXC1, FOXD1 and FOXQ1 transcription factors (TFs) are correlative with eventual cardiomyogenic outcome. Through WNT induction of the FOX TFs, we observed the co-activation of WNT3 and EOMES which are potent inducers of mesoderm differentiation. The result strengthened our hypothesis on the regulatory role of the FOX TFs in enhancing mesoderm differentiation capacity of hESCs. Importantly, the final proportions of cells expressing cardiac markers were directly correlated to the strength of FOX inductions within 72 hours after initiation of differentiation across different cell lines and protocols. Thus, we affirmed the relationship between early FOX TF expressions and cardiomyogenesis efficiency. PMID:27501774

  13. Axial patterning in snakes and caecilians: evidence for an alternative interpretation of the Hox code.

    PubMed

    Woltering, Joost M; Vonk, Freek J; Müller, Hendrik; Bardine, Nabila; Tuduce, Ioana L; de Bakker, Merijn A G; Knöchel, Walter; Sirbu, I Ovidiu; Durston, Antony J; Richardson, Michael K

    2009-08-01

    It is generally assumed that the characteristic deregionalized body plan of species with a snake-like morphology evolved through a corresponding homogenization of Hox gene expression domains along the primary axis. Here, we examine the expression of Hox genes in snake embryos and show that a collinear pattern of Hox expression is retained within the paraxial mesoderm of the trunk. Genes expressed at the anterior and most posterior, regionalized, parts of the skeleton correspond to the expected anatomical boundaries. Unexpectedly however, also the dorsal (thoracic), homogenous rib-bearing region of trunk, is regionalized by unconventional gradual anterior limits of Hox expression that are not obviously reflected in the skeletal anatomy. In the lateral plate mesoderm we also detect regionalized Hox expression yet the forelimb marker Tbx5 is not restricted to a rudimentary forelimb domain but is expressed throughout the entire flank region. Analysis of several Hox genes in a caecilian amphibian, which convergently evolved a deregionalized body plan, reveals a similar global collinear pattern of Hox expression. The differential expression of posterior, vertebra-modifying or even rib-suppressing Hox genes within the dorsal region is inconsistent with the homogeneity in vertebral identity. Our results suggest that the evolution of a deregionalized, snake-like body involved not only alterations in Hox gene cis-regulation but also a different downstream interpretation of the Hox code. PMID:19409887

  14. Integrin α5β1 Function Is Regulated by XGIPC/kermit2 Mediated Endocytosis during Xenopus laevis Gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Erin; Suckert, Catherine; Al-Attar, Hyder; Marsden, Mungo

    2010-01-01

    During Xenopus gastrulation α5β1 integrin function is modulated in a temporally and spatially restricted manner, however, the regulatory mechanisms behind this regulation remain uncharacterized. Here we report that XGIPC/kermit2 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the α5 subunit and regulates the activity of α5β1 integrin. The interaction of kermit2 with α5β1 is essential for fibronectin (FN) matrix assembly during the early stages of gastrulation. We further demonstrate that kermit2 regulates α5β1 integrin endocytosis downstream of activin signaling. Inhibition of kermit2 function impairs cell migration but not adhesion to FN substrates indicating that integrin recycling is essential for mesoderm cell migration. Furthermore, we find that the α5β1 integrin is colocalized with kermit2 and Rab 21 in embryonic and XTC cells. These data support a model where region specific mesoderm induction acts through kermit2 to regulate the temporally and spatially restricted changes in adhesive properties of the α5β1 integrin through receptor endocytosis. PMID:20498857

  15. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage), and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise later in the 4d lineage

  16. Increased cardiogenesis in P19-GFP teratocarcinoma cells expressing the propeptide IGF-1Ea

    SciTech Connect

    Poudel, Bhawana; Bilbao, Daniel; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Germack, Renee; Rosenthal, Nadia; Santini, Maria Paola

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study, we explored the function of IGF-1Ea propeptide in inducing cardiogenesis of stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-1Ea promoted cardiac mesodermal induction in uncommitted cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under differentiation condition, IGF-1Ea increased expression of cardiac differentiation markers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Furthermore, it promoted formation of finely organized sarcomeric structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-1Ea propeptide may be a good candidate to improve production of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent cells. -- Abstract: The mechanism implicated in differentiation of endogenous cardiac stem cells into cardiomyocytes to regenerate the heart tissue upon an insult remains elusive, limiting the therapeutical goals to exogenous cell injection and/or gene therapy. We have shown previously that cardiac specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 1 propeptide IGF-1Ea induces beneficial myocardial repair after infarct. Although the mechanism is still under investigation, the possibility that this propeptide may be involved in promoting stem cell differentiation into the cardiac lineage has yet to be explored. To investigate whether IGF-1Ea promote cardiogenesis, we initially modified P19 embryonal carcinoma cells to express IGF-1Ea. Taking advantage of their cardiomyogenic nature, we analyzed whether overexpression of this propeptide affected cardiac differentiation program. The data herein presented showed for the first time that constitutively overexpressed IGF-1Ea increased cardiogenic differentiation program in both undifferentiated and DMSO-differentiated cells. In details, IGF-1Ea overexpression promoted localization of alpha-actinin in finely organized sarcomeric structure compared to control cells and upregulated the cardiac mesodermal marker NKX-2.5 and the ventricular structural protein MLC2v. Furthermore, activated IGF-1 signaling promoted cardiac

  17. Neural Induction in Xenopus: Requirement for Ectodermal and Endomesodermal Signals via Chordin, Noggin, β-Catenin, and Cerberus

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Hiroki; Wessely, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    The origin of the signals that induce the differentiation of the central nervous system (CNS) is a long-standing question in vertebrate embryology. Here we show that Xenopus neural induction starts earlier than previously thought, at the blastula stage, and requires the combined activity of two distinct signaling centers. One is the well-known Nieuwkoop center, located in dorsal-vegetal cells, which expresses Nodal-related endomesodermal inducers. The other is a blastula Chordin- and Noggin-expressing (BCNE) center located in dorsal animal cells that contains both prospective neuroectoderm and Spemann organizer precursor cells. Both centers are downstream of the early β-Catenin signal. Molecular analyses demonstrated that the BCNE center was distinct from the Nieuwkoop center, and that the Nieuwkoop center expressed the secreted protein Cerberus (Cer). We found that explanted blastula dorsal animal cap cells that have not yet contacted a mesodermal substratum can, when cultured in saline solution, express definitive neural markers and differentiate histologically into CNS tissue. Transplantation experiments showed that the BCNE region was required for brain formation, even though it lacked CNS-inducing activity when transplanted ventrally. Cell-lineage studies demonstrated that BCNE cells give rise to a large part of the brain and retina and, in more posterior regions of the embryo, to floor plate and notochord. Loss-of-function experiments with antisense morpholino oligos (MO) showed that the CNS that forms in mesoderm-less Xenopus embryos (generated by injection with Cerberus-Short [CerS] mRNA) required Chordin (Chd), Noggin (Nog), and their upstream regulator β-Catenin. When mesoderm involution was prevented in dorsal marginal-zone explants, the anterior neural tissue formed in ectoderm was derived from BCNE cells and had a complete requirement for Chd. By injecting Chd morpholino oligos (Chd-MO) into prospective neuroectoderm and Cerberus morpholino oligos

  18. Building the Vertebrate Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and skeletal muscles of the body. Somite formation involves an oscillator-the segmentation clock-whose periodic signal is converted into the periodic array of somite boundaries. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Microarray studies of the mouse presomitic mesoderm transcriptome reveal that the segmentation clock drives the periodic expression of a large network of cyclic genes involved in cell signaling. Mutually exclusive activation of the Notch/FGF and Wnt pathways during each cycle suggests that coordinated regulation of these three pathways underlies the clock oscillator. In humans, mutations in the genes associated to the function of this oscillator such as Dll3 or Lunatic Fringe result in abnormal segmentation of the vertebral column such as those seen in congenital scoliosis. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves dynamic gradients of FGF and Wnt signaling. The FGF signaling gradient is established based on an unusual mechanism involving mRNA decay which provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Another striking aspect of somite production is the strict bilateral symmetry of the process. Retinoic acid was shown to control aspects of this coordination by buffering destabilizing effects from the embryonic left-right machinery. Defects in this embryonic program controlling vertebral symmetry might lead

  19. Hereditary renal adysplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hereditary renal adysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expression that is usually associated with malformative combinations (including Müllerian anomalies) affecting different mesodermal organs such as the heart, lung, and urogenital system. Case report A case showing pulmonary hypoplasia, hip dysplasia, hereditary renal adysplasia, and Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome in adulthood is reported here. The i.v. pyelography showed right renal agenesis with a normal left kidney and ureter. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging also showed right renal agenesis with multicystic embryonary remnants in the right hemipelvis probably corresponding to a dysgenetic kidney. An uretrocystoscopy showed absence of ectopic ureter and of the right hemitrigone. She was scheduled for a diagnostic laparoscopy and creation of a neovagina according to the McIndoe technique with a prosthesis and skin graft. Laparoscopy confirmed the absence of the uterus. On both sides, an elongated, solid, rudimentary uterine horn could be observed. Both ovaries were also elongated, located high in both abdominal flanks and somewhat dysgenetics. A conventional cytogenetic study revealed a normal female karyotype 46, XX at a level of 550 GTG bands. A CGH analysis was performed using a 244K oligoarray CGH detecting 11 copy number variants described as normal variants in the databases. The 17q12 and 22q11.21 microdeletions described in other MRKH patients were not present in this case. Four years after operation her evolution is normal, without symptoms and the neovagina is adequately functional. The geneticists have studied her family history and the pedigree of the family is shown. Conclusions We suggest that primary damage to the mesoderm (paraaxil, intermediate, and lateral) caused by mutations in a yet unidentified gene is responsible for: 1) skeletal dysplasia, 2) inappropriate interactions between the bronchial mesoderm and endodermal

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Adipose and Other Tissues: Basic Biological Properties and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that were initially isolated from bone marrow. However, subsequent research has shown that other adult tissues also contain MSCs. MSCs originate from mesenchyme, which is embryonic tissue derived from the mesoderm. These cells actively proliferate, giving rise to new cells in some tissues, but remain quiescent in others. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types including adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Isolation and induction of these cells could provide a new therapeutic tool for replacing damaged or lost adult tissues. However, the biological properties and use of stem cells in a clinical setting must be well established before significant clinical benefits are obtained. This paper summarizes data on the biological properties of MSCs and discusses current and potential clinical applications. PMID:22666271

  1. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  2. Mapping Human Pluripotent-to-Cardiomyocyte Differentiation: Methylomes, Transcriptomes, and Exon DNA Methylation "Memories".

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Joshua D; Jung, Marc; Chen, Chang-Yi; Lin, Ziguang; Ye, Jingjing; Godatha, Swetha; Lizhar, Elizabeth; Wu, Xiwei; Hsu, David; Couture, Larry A; Riggs, Arthur D

    2016-02-01

    The directed differentiation of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) from pluripotent cells provides an invaluable model for understanding mechanisms of cell fate determination and offers considerable promise in cardiac regenerative medicine. Here, we utilize a human embryonic stem cell suspension bank, produced according to a good manufacturing practice, to generate CMs using a fully defined and small molecule-based differentiation strategy. Primitive and cardiac mesoderm purification was used to remove non-committing and multi-lineage populations and this significantly aided the identification of key transcription factors, lncRNAs, and essential signaling pathways that define cardiomyogenesis. Global methylation profiles reflect CM development and we report on CM exon DNA methylation "memories" persisting beyond transcription repression and marking the expression history of numerous developmentally regulated genes, especially transcription factors. PMID:26981572

  3. Symmetry breakage in the vertebrate embryo: when does it happen and how does it work?

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; Schweickert, Axel; Vick, Philipp; Wright, Christopher V E; Danilchik, Michael V

    2014-09-01

    Asymmetric development of the vertebrate embryo has fascinated embryologists for over a century. Much has been learned since the asymmetric Nodal signaling cascade in the left lateral plate mesoderm was detected, and began to be unraveled over the past decade or two. When and how symmetry is initially broken, however, has remained a matter of debate. Two essentially mutually exclusive models prevail. Cilia-driven leftward flow of extracellular fluids occurs in mammalian, fish and amphibian embryos. A great deal of experimental evidence indicates that this flow is indeed required for symmetry breaking. An alternative model has argued, however, that flow simply acts as an amplification step for early asymmetric cues generated by ion flux during the first cleavage divisions. In this review we critically evaluate the experimental basis of both models. Although a number of open questions persist, the available evidence is best compatible with flow-based symmetry breakage as the archetypical mode of symmetry breakage. PMID:24972089

  4. Symmetry breakage in the vertebrate embryo: when does it happen and how does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Martin; Schweickert, Axel; Vick, Philipp; Wright, Christopher; Danilchik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric development of the vertebrate embryo has fascinated embryologists for over a century. Much has been learned since the asymmetric Nodal signaling cascade in the left lateral plate mesoderm was detected, and began to be unraveled over the past decade or two. When and how symmetry is initially broken, however, has remained a matter of debate. Two essentially mutually exclusive models prevail. Cilia-driven leftward flow of extracellular fluids occurs in mammalian, fish and amphibian embryos. A great deal of experimental evidence indicates that this flow is indeed required for symmetry breaking. An alternative model has argued, however, that flow simply acts as an amplification step for early asymmetric cues generated by ion flux during the first cleavage divisions. In this review we critically evaluate the experimental basis of both models. Although a number of open questions persist, the available evidence is best compatible with flow-based symmetry breakage as the archetypical mode of symmetry breakage. PMID:24972089

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cutaneous Wound Healing: Current Evidence and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Isakson, M.; de Blacam, C.; Whelan, D.; McArdle, A.; Clover, A. J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is a remarkable organ that sustains insult and injury throughout life. The ability of skin to expeditiously repair wounds is paramount to survival. With an aging global population, coupled with a rise in the prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, chronic wounds represent a significant biomedical burden. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), a progenitor cell population of the mesoderm lineage, have been shown to be significant mediators in inflammatory environments. Preclinical studies of MSC in various animal wound healing models point towards a putative therapy. This review examines the body of evidence suggesting that MSC accelerate wound healing in both clinical and preclinical studies and also the possible mechanisms controlling its efficacy. The delivery of a cellular therapy to the masses presents many challenges from a safety, ethical, and regulatory point of view. Some of the issues surrounding the introduction of MSC as a medicinal product are also delineated in this review. PMID:26106431

  6. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C.; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R.; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies over 80% within six days. Upon purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  7. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O'Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H C; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L; Gerszten, Robert E; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF-A or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies exceeding 80% within six days. On purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  8. Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Fujie, Masaki; Endo, Tuyoshi; Kano, Koichiro

    2008-12-19

    We have previously reported the establishment of preadipocyte cell lines, termed dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells, from mature adipocytes of various animals. DFAT cells possess long-term viability and can redifferentiate into adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, DFAT cells can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts and chondrocytes under appropriate culture conditions. However, it is unclear whether DFAT cells are capable of transdifferentiating into skeletal myocytes, which is common in the mesodermal lineage. Here, we show that DFAT cells can be induced to transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro. Myogenic induction of DFAT cells resulted in the expression of MyoD and myogenin, followed by cell fusion and formation of multinucleated cells expressing sarcomeric myosin heavy chain. These results indicate that DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro.

  9. The role of Foxi family transcription factors in otic placode and neural crest cell development

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Renée K.; Birol, Onur; Groves, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian outer, middle and inner ears have different embryonic origins and evolved at different times in the vertebrate lineage. The outer ear is derived from first and second branchial arch ectoderm and mesoderm, the middle ear ossicles are derived from neural crest mesenchymal cells that invade the first and second branchial arches, whereas the inner ear and its associated vestibule-acoustic (VIIIth) ganglion are derived from the otic placode. In this review, we discuss recent findings in the development of these structures and describe the contributions of members of a Forkhead transcription factor family, the Foxi family to their formation. Foxi transcription factors are critical for formation of the otic placode, survival of the branchial arch neural crest, and developmental remodeling of the branchial arch ectoderm. PMID:25662269

  10. Bone and Skeletal Muscle: Neighbors With Close Ties

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J; Kiel, Douglas P; Esser, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system evolved in mammals to perform diverse functions that include locomotion, facilitating breathing, protecting internal organs, and coordinating global energy expenditure. Bone and skeletal muscles involved with locomotion are both derived from somitic mesoderm and accumulate peak tissue mass synchronously, according to genetic information and environmental stimuli. Aging results in the progressive and parallel loss of bone (osteopenia) and skeletal muscle (sarcopenia) with profound consequences for quality of life. Age-associated sarcopenia results in reduced endurance, poor balance, and reduced mobility that predispose elderly individuals to falls, which more frequently result in fracture because of concomitant osteoporosis. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the parallel development and involution of these tissues is critical to developing new and more effective means to combat osteoporosis and sarcopenia in our increasingly aged population. This perspective highlights recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms coupling bone and skeletal muscle mass, and identify critical areas where further work is needed. PMID:23630111

  11. A new heart for a new head in vertebrate cardiopharyngeal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Rui; Kelly, Robert G.; Christiaen, Lionel; Levine, Michael; Ziermann, Janine M.; Molnar, Julia L.; Noden, Drew M.; Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    It has been more than 30 years since the publication of the new head hypothesis, which proposed that the vertebrate head is an evolutionary novelty resulting from the emergence of neural crest and cranial placodes. Neural crest generates the skull and associated connective tissues, whereas placodes produce sensory organs. However, neither crest nor placodes produce head muscles, which are a crucial component of the complex vertebrate head. We discuss emerging evidence for a surprising link between the evolution of head muscles and chambered hearts — both systems arise from a common pool of mesoderm progenitor cells within the cardiopharyngeal field of vertebrate embryos. We consider the origin of this field in non-vertebrate chordates and its evolution in vertebrates. PMID:25903628

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells: From stem cells to sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Lye, Kwan Liang; Nordin, Norshariza; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; Thilakavathy, Karuppiah

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have garnered vast interests in clinical settings, especially in regenerative medicine due to their unique properties-they are reliably isolated and expanded from various tissue sources; they are able to differentiate into mesodermal tissues such as bones, cartilages, adipose tissues, and muscles; and they have unique immunosuppressive properties. However, there are some concerns pertaining to the role of MSCs in the human body. On one hand, they are crucial component in the regeneration and repair of the human body. On the contrary, they are shown to transform into sarcomas. Although the exact mechanisms are still unknown, many new leads have pointed to the belief that MSCs do play a role in sarcomagenesis. This review focuses on the current updates and findings of the role of MSCs in their transformation process into sarcomas. PMID:26992453

  13. A Rare Nasopharyngeal Teratoma Arising From the Vomer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoxiao; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shi, Bing; Li, Chenghao

    2016-03-01

    Teratomas are rare germ cell neoplasms derived from the 3 germinal layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm). Nasopharyngeal teratoma is a very rare teratoma arising anywhere from the oronasal cavity, regarded as an expanding, avity filling lesion, with a high mortality rate because of severe airway obstruction, especially in the neonatal period and make up only 2% of all teratomas. The authors present a case of an infant girl with a single, finger-like, hairy teratoma arising from the vomer and protruding from the mouth with bilateral complete cleft palate, cleft lip, and cleft alveolus. Complete intraoral resection of the teratoma and cleft lip repair was conducted simultaneously. Reconstruction of the cleft palate was performed at a later stage. Recurrence occurred 9 months after surgery and extended complete surgical excision was performed after recurrence, with no recurrence observed again to date. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of congenital mature teratoma. PMID:26854776

  14. Lineage Reprogramming of Fibroblasts into Proliferative Induced Cardiac Progenitor Cells by Defined Factors.

    PubMed

    Lalit, Pratik A; Salick, Max R; Nelson, Daryl O; Squirrell, Jayne M; Shafer, Christina M; Patel, Neel G; Saeed, Imaan; Schmuck, Eric G; Markandeya, Yogananda S; Wong, Rachel; Lea, Martin R; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Hacker, Timothy A; Crone, Wendy C; Kyba, Michael; Garry, Daniel J; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Downs, Karen M; Lyons, Gary E; Kamp, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have reported reprogramming of fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes; however, reprogramming into proliferative induced cardiac progenitor cells (iCPCs) remains to be accomplished. Here we report that a combination of 11 or 5 cardiac factors along with canonical Wnt and JAK/STAT signaling reprogrammed adult mouse cardiac, lung, and tail tip fibroblasts into iCPCs. The iCPCs were cardiac mesoderm-restricted progenitors that could be expanded extensively while maintaining multipotency to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, iCPCs injected into the cardiac crescent of mouse embryos differentiated into cardiomyocytes. iCPCs transplanted into the post-myocardial infarction mouse heart improved survival and differentiated into cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lineage reprogramming of adult somatic cells into iCPCs provides a scalable cell source for drug discovery, disease modeling, and cardiac regenerative therapy. PMID:26877223

  15. The orphan G protein coupled receptor 161 is required for left-right patterning

    PubMed Central

    Leung, TinChung; Humbert, Jasper E.; Stauffer, Anna M.; Giger, Kathryn E.; Chen, Hui; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Wang, Chuan; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Robishaw, Janet D.

    2015-01-01

    Gpr161 (also known as RE2) is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed during embryonic development in zebrafish. Determining its biological function has proven difficult due to lack of knowledge regarding its natural or synthetic ligands. Here, we show that targeted knockdown of gpr161 disrupts asymmetric gene expression in the lateral plate mesoderm, resulting in aberrant looping of the heart tube. This is associated with elevated Ca2+ levels in cells lining the Kupffer's vesicle and normalization of Ca2+ levels, by over-expression of ncx1 or pmca RNA, is able to partially rescue the cardiac looping defect in gpr161 knockdown embryos. Taken together, these data support a model in which gpr161 plays an essential role in left-right (L-R) patterning by modulating Ca2+ levels in the cells surrounding the Kupffer's vesicle. PMID:18755178

  16. A Nd:YAG laser-microperforated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)-basal membrane matrix composite film as substrate for keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Fernando; López-G, Laura; Jadraque, Maria; Koper, Mariëlle; Ellis, Gary; Cano, Pilar; Martín, Margarita; Garrido, Leoncio

    2007-02-01

    Epithelia cultured for the treatment of ulcers, burns and for gene therapy applications require a flexible biomaterial for growth and transplantation that is adaptable to body contours. We tested several materials and found that a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) polyester provided support for keratinocytes, although adhesion to this material proved to be suboptimal. Since epithelia adhere to the mesoderm through basal membranes, we engineered a basal membrane surrogate by preparing composites of PHBHV with basal membrane matrix (BMM). To allow cell migration into injuried areas the polyester film was micromachined to insert high-density micropores through a Nd:YAG laser ablation process. These flexible composites provided firm attachment for keratinocytes from the outer root sheath of human hair allowing keratinocyte migration through micropores. Films of microperforated PHBHV-BMM may be of use for the replacement of diseased or injured skin epithelia. PMID:17027945

  17. Wnt and FGF mediated epithelial mesenchymal crosstalk during lung development

    PubMed Central

    Volckaert, Thomas; De Langhe, Stijn P.

    2014-01-01

    The adaptation to terrestrial life required the development of an organ capable of efficient air-blood gas exchange. To meet the metabolic load of cellular respiration, the mammalian respiratory system has evolved from a relatively simple structure, similar to the two-tube amphibian lung, to a highly complex tree-like system of branched epithelial airways connected to a vast network of gas exchanging units called alveoli. The development of such an elaborate organ in a relatively short time window is therefore an extraordinary feat and involves an intimate crosstalk between mesodermal and endodermal cell lineages. This review describes the molecular processes governing lung development with an emphasis on the current knowledge on the role of Wnt and Fgf signaling in lung epithelial differentiation. PMID:25470458

  18. Teratoma Formation: A Tool for Monitoring Pluripotency in Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Nelakanti, Raman V.; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for evaluating the pluripotency of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells by a teratoma formation assay. Cells are prepared for injection and transplanted into immunodeficient mice at the gastrocnemius muscle, a site well suited for teratoma growth and surgical access. Teratomas that form from the cell transplants are explanted, fixed in paraformaldehyde, and embedded in paraffin. These preserved samples are sectioned, stained, and analyzed. Pluripotency of a cell line is confirmed by whether the teratoma contains tissues derived from each of the embryonic germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Alternatively, explanted and fixed teratomas can be cryopreserved for immunohistochemistry. Antibody staining can allow for a more detailed identification of specific tissue types present in teratoma samples. PMID:25640819

  19. Methods to Manipulate and Monitor Wnt Signaling in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Ian J; Brafman, David; Willert, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may revolutionize medical practice by providing: (a) a renewable source of cells for tissue replacement therapies, (b) a powerful system to model human diseases in a dish, and (c) a platform for examining efficacy and safety of novel drugs. Furthermore, these cells offer a unique opportunity to study early human development in vitro, in particular, the process by which a seemingly uniform cell population interacts to give rise to the three main embryonic lineages: ectoderm, endoderm. and mesoderm. This process of lineage allocation is regulated by a number of inductive signals that are mediated by growth factors, including FGF, TGFβ, and Wnt. In this book chapter, we introduce a set of tools, methods, and protocols to specifically manipulate the Wnt signaling pathway with the intention of altering the cell fate outcome of hPSCs. PMID:27590161

  20. A strategy to discover new organizers identifies a putative heart organizer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Claire; Khan, Mohsin A. F.; Wong, Frances; Solovieva, Tatiana; Oliveira, Nidia M. M.; Baldock, Richard A.; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W.; Stern, Claudio D.

    2016-01-01

    Organizers are regions of the embryo that can both induce new fates and impart pattern on other regions. So far, surprisingly few organizers have been discovered, considering the number of patterned tissue types generated during development. This may be because their discovery has relied on transplantation and ablation experiments. Here we describe a new approach, using chick embryos, to discover organizers based on a common gene expression signature, and use it to uncover the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) endoderm as a putative heart organizer. We show that the AIP can induce cardiac identity from non-cardiac mesoderm and that it can pattern this by specifying ventricular and suppressing atrial regional identity. We also uncover some of the signals responsible. The method holds promise as a tool to discover other novel organizers acting during development. PMID:27557800

  1. Segment regeneration in the vestimentiferan tubeworm, Lamellibrachia satsuma.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Norio; Shinozaki, Ayuta; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-01

    The ability to regenerate missing body parts varies among species. To elucidate the evolution of regenerative capability, an understanding of the regeneration mechanisms of diverse organisms is required. We focus on vestimentiferan tubeworms, which have a body plan that is unique among annelids. We found that the vestimentiferan Lamellibrachia satsuma is able to regenerate its posterior body parts, but not its anterior body parts. Based on observations of live specimens, we defined five stages in the process of posterior regeneration. The morphogenesis was observed in detail by a series of sections and scanning electron microscopy. The most posterior domain of the opisthosome differentiated from the blastema, while the anterior domain of the opisthosome regenerated from the remaining trunk region. We also examined the expression pattern of the engrailed gene during regeneration, and found that engrailed was expressed in the mesodermal cells of each segment. PMID:25088595

  2. Regulative recovery in the sea urchin embryo and the stabilizing role of fail-safe gene network wiring

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Davidson, Eric H.

    2009-01-01

    Design features that ensure reproducible and invariant embryonic processes are major characteristics of current gene regulatory network models. New cis-regulatory studies on a gene regulatory network subcircuit activated early in the development of the sea urchin embryo reveal a sequence of encoded “fail-safe” regulatory devices. These ensure the maintenance of fate separation between skeletogenic and nonskeletogenic mesoderm lineages. An unexpected consequence of the network design revealed in the course of these experiments is that it enables the embryo to “recover” from regulatory interference that has catastrophic effects if this feature is disarmed. A reengineered regulatory system inserted into the embryo was used to prove how this system operates in vivo. Genomically encoded backup control circuitry thus provides the mechanism underlying a specific example of the regulative development for which the sea urchin embryo has long been famous. PMID:19822764

  3. A specific requirement for PDGF-C in palate formation and PDGFR-alpha signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Wu, Xiaoli; Boström, Hans; Kim, Injune; Wong, Nicole; Tsoi, Bonny; O'Rourke, Meredith; Koh, Gou Young; Soriano, Philippe; Betsholtz, Christer; Hart, Thomas C; Marazita, Mary L; Field, L L; Tam, Patrick P L; Nagy, Andras

    2004-10-01

    PDGF-C is a member of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family, which signals through PDGF receptor (PDGFR) alphaalpha and alphabeta dimers. Here we show that Pdgfc(-/-) mice die in the perinatal period owing to feeding and respiratory difficulties associated with a complete cleft of the secondary palate. This phenotype was less severe than that of Pdgfra(-/-) embryos. Pdgfc(-/-) Pdgfa(-/-) embryos developed a cleft face, subepidermal blistering, deficiency of renal cortex mesenchyme, spina bifida and skeletal and vascular defects. Complete loss of function of both ligands, therefore, phenocopied the loss of PDGFR-alpha function, suggesting that both PDGF-A and PDGF-C signal through PDGFR-alpha to regulate the development of craniofacial structures, the neural tube and mesodermal organs. Our results also show that PDGF-C signaling is a new pathway in palatogenesis, different from, and independent of, those previously implicated. PMID:15361870

  4. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves cell cycle-dependent regulation of developmental genes by Cyclin D.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-02-15

    Coordination of differentiation and cell cycle progression represents an essential process for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. These mechanisms ultimately determine the quantities of specific cell types that are generated. Despite their importance, the precise molecular interplays between cell cycle machinery and master regulators of cell fate choice remain to be fully uncovered. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1-3 control cell fate decisions in human pluripotent stem cells by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and coactivator complexes onto neuroectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm genes. This activity results in blocking the core transcriptional network necessary for endoderm specification while promoting neuroectoderm factors. The genomic location of Cyclin Ds is determined by their interactions with the transcription factors SP1 and E2Fs, which result in the assembly of cell cycle-controlled transcriptional complexes. These results reveal how the cell cycle orchestrates transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifiers to instruct cell fate decisions. PMID:26883361

  5. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves cell cycle-dependent regulation of developmental genes by Cyclin D

    PubMed Central

    Pauklin, Siim; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Coordination of differentiation and cell cycle progression represents an essential process for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. These mechanisms ultimately determine the quantities of specific cell types that are generated. Despite their importance, the precise molecular interplays between cell cycle machinery and master regulators of cell fate choice remain to be fully uncovered. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1–3 control cell fate decisions in human pluripotent stem cells by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and coactivator complexes onto neuroectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm genes. This activity results in blocking the core transcriptional network necessary for endoderm specification while promoting neuroectoderm factors. The genomic location of Cyclin Ds is determined by their interactions with the transcription factors SP1 and E2Fs, which result in the assembly of cell cycle-controlled transcriptional complexes. These results reveal how the cell cycle orchestrates transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifiers to instruct cell fate decisions. PMID:26883361

  6. Fibro-epithelial polyps in children: A report of two cases with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Apurva; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary A fibro-epithelial polyp is the most common epithelial benign tumor of the oral cavity. Such a polyp is of mesodermal origin and it is a pink, red, or white knob-like painless growth that is sessile or pedunculated. A fibro-epithelial polyp commonly occurs on buccal mucosa, the tongue, or the gingiva. A fibro-epithelial polyp is an inflammatory hyperplastic lesion in response to chronic irritation due to calculus, sharp tooth edges, irregular denture borders, or overhanging restorations. Such a polyp rarely occurs before the fourth decade of life and its prevalence is not sex-specific. The current paper presents two cases where an intraoral fibro-epithelial polyp was successfully managed in children. Conservative surgical excision was performed in both cases. A follow-up at 3 months revealed uneventful healing of the site without reoccurrence of the lesion. PMID:27195199

  7. Ets2 is required for trophoblast stem cell self renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Fang; Tynan, John A.; Cecena, Grace; Williams, Roy; Múnera, Jorge; Mavrothalassitis, George; Oshima, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    The Ets2 transcription factor is essential for the development of the mouse placenta and for generating signals for embryonic mesoderm and axis formation. Using a conditional targeted Ets2 allele, we show that Ets2 is essential for trophoblast stem (TS) cells self renewal. Inactivation of Ets2 results in TS cell slower growth, increased expression of a subset of differentiation associated genes and decreased expression of several genes implicated in TS self renewal. Among the direct TS targets of Ets2 is Cdx2, a key master regulator of TS cell state. Thus Ets2 contributes to the regulation of multiple genes important for maintaining the undifferentiated state of TS cells and as candidate signals for embryonic development. PMID:17977525

  8. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T A; Wong, Michael D; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2015-05-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  9. Neuronal specificity of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promoter develops during morphogenesis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Matter-Sadzinski, L; Hernandez, M C; Roztocil, T; Ballivet, M; Matter, J M

    1992-01-01

    A transient transfection assay has been developed to analyse promoter activity in neuronal cells freshly dissociated from the chick central nervous system. The assay enabled us to identify cis-acting regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking region of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene. In differentiated retina, regulatory elements direct reporter gene expression to a small subset of neurons which has been identified as ganglion cells, i.e. to the population of neurons in which alpha 7 transcripts were localized by in situ hybridization. However, these promoter elements exhibit ubiquitous activity in undifferentiated neural cells and in mesodermal stem cells. Our study supports the idea that alpha 7 regulatory elements acquire their neuronal specificity in the course of embryogenesis. Images PMID:1425587

  10. The forces that shape embryos: physical aspects of convergent extension by cell intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ray; Shook, David; Skoglund, Paul

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the physical aspects of the morphogenic process of convergence (narrowing) and extension (lengthening) of tissues by cell intercalation. These movements, often referred to as 'convergent extension', occur in both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues during embryogenesis and organogenesis of invertebrates and vertebrates, and they play large roles in shaping the body plan during development. Our focus is on the presumptive mesodermal and neural tissues of the Xenopus (frog) embryo, tissues for which some physical measurements have been made. We discuss the physical aspects of how polarized cell motility, oriented along future tissue axes, generate the forces that drive oriented cell intercalation and how this intercalation results in convergence and extension or convergence and thickening of the tissue. Our goal is to identify aspects of these morphogenic movements for further biophysical, molecular and cell biological, and modeling studies.

  11. Reorganisation of Hoxd regulatory landscapes during the evolution of a snake-like body plan.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Gitto, Sandra; Novoa, Ana; Codourey, Julien; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Gonzalez, Federico; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Mallo, Moises; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Within land vertebrate species, snakes display extreme variations in their body plan, characterized by the absence of limbs and an elongated morphology. Such a particular interpretation of the basic vertebrate body architecture has often been associated with changes in the function or regulation of Hox genes. Here, we use an interspecies comparative approach to investigate different regulatory aspects at the snake HoxD locus. We report that, unlike in other vertebrates, snake mesoderm-specific enhancers are mostly located within the HoxD cluster itself rather than outside. In addition, despite both the absence of limbs and an altered Hoxd gene regulation in external genitalia, the limb-associated bimodal HoxD chromatin structure is maintained at the snake locus. Finally, we show that snake and mouse orthologous enhancer sequences can display distinct expression specificities. These results show that vertebrate morphological evolution likely involved extensive reorganisation at Hox loci, yet within a generally conserved regulatory framework. PMID:27476854

  12. An expandable, inducible hemangioblast state regulated by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vereide, David T; Vickerman, Vernella; Swanson, Scott A; Chu, Li-Fang; McIntosh, Brian E; Thomson, James A

    2014-12-01

    During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that "trap" murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These "expandable" hemangioblasts (eHBs) are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines. PMID:25458896

  13. A Drosophila muscle-specific gene related to the mouse quaking locus.

    PubMed

    Fyrberg, C; Becker, J; Barthmaier, P; Mahaffey, J; Fyrberg, E

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a novel muscle-specific gene of Drosophila melanogaster, defined by enhancer trap strain 24B of Brand and Perrimon (1993). We show that transcripts of the gene accumulate within presumptive mesoderm and persist within developing muscles, strongly suggesting that the encoded protein is involved in muscle cell determination and differentiation. cDNA sequences reveal that the Drosophila protein is similar to quaking (64% identity over 210 amino acids), a protein essential for mouse embryogenesis, and gld-1 (53% identity over 162 amino acids) a germ-line-specific tumor suppressing protein of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that the Drosophila gene resides within the 93F chromosome subdivision, and describe its physical map. Finally, we have used the gene, which we have named quaking-related 93F (qkr93F), to identify a family of closely related KH domains. PMID:9332381

  14. Split median raphe: case series and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Enrico; Cutrone, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We describe three cases of split median raphe of the penis (SMR) from our hospital newborn records from 2004 to 2013. One case was associated with median raphe cyst, one with skin hypochromia, and one with a scar-like aspect of the region of interest. SMR is thought to be the result of defective fusion of ectodermal tissue in the urethra and scrotum area or of defective growth of the perineal mesoderm around the urethra during gestation. Although SMR associated with other major penile congenital defects (epispadias, hypospadias, penile torsion, bifid scrotum, chordee) is common, isolated SMR is probably an underdiagnosed (although not rare) malformative condition. Recognizing SMR in a newborn may be of educational value to neonatologists because it leads to the search for and exclusion of the above-mentioned pathologic conditions. PMID:25236772

  15. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  16. Control of segment number in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Ozbudak, Ertuğrul M; Wunderlich, Joshua; Baumann, Diana; Lewis, Julian; Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-07-17

    The vertebrate body axis is subdivided into repeated segments, best exemplified by the vertebrae that derive from embryonic somites. The number of somites is precisely defined for any given species but varies widely from one species to another. To determine the mechanism controlling somite number, we have compared somitogenesis in zebrafish, chicken, mouse and corn snake embryos. Here we present evidence that in all of these species a similar 'clock-and-wavefront' mechanism operates to control somitogenesis; in all of them, somitogenesis is brought to an end through a process in which the presomitic mesoderm, having first increased in size, gradually shrinks until it is exhausted, terminating somite formation. In snake embryos, however, the segmentation clock rate is much faster relative to developmental rate than in other amniotes, leading to a greatly increased number of smaller-sized somites. PMID:18563087

  17. Evolutionary plasticity of segmentation clock networks.

    PubMed

    Krol, Aurélie J; Roellig, Daniela; Dequéant, Mary-Lee; Tassy, Olivier; Glynn, Earl; Hattem, Gaye; Mushegian, Arcady; Oates, Andrew C; Pourquié, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    The vertebral column is a conserved anatomical structure that defines the vertebrate phylum. The periodic or segmental pattern of the vertebral column is established early in development when the vertebral precursors, the somites, are rhythmically produced from presomitic mesoderm (PSM). This rhythmic activity is controlled by a segmentation clock that is associated with the periodic transcription of cyclic genes in the PSM. Comparison of the mouse, chicken and zebrafish PSM oscillatory transcriptomes revealed networks of 40 to 100 cyclic genes mostly involved in Notch, Wnt and FGF signaling pathways. However, despite this conserved signaling oscillation, the identity of individual cyclic genes mostly differed between the three species, indicating a surprising evolutionary plasticity of the segmentation networks. PMID:21652651

  18. Secretion of inhibin beta A by endoderm cultured from early embryonic chicken.

    PubMed

    Kokan-Moore, N P; Bolender, D L; Lough, J

    1991-07-01

    Although several reports have indicated a role for endoderm in the regulation of heart development, the mechanism remains unknown. To begin characterization of endoderm-secreted proteins, explants from postgastrulation (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 5/6-8) chicken embryos were cultured in defined medium. Fluorography of SDS-PAGE gels revealed a pattern of synthesized, secreted proteins that was independent of time in culture or embryonic stage when explants were removed. Approximately 10 labeled bands were detected, the most prominent of which migrated at 17, 25, and 200 kDa. ELISA analysis revealed that while acidic and basic fibroblast growth factor-like antigens were barely detectable, fibronectin and inhibin beta A were very reactive. Western blot analysis verified the presence of fibronectin and, most remarkably, inhibin beta A, activin dimers of which have recently been implicated in Xenopus mesoderm induction (Smith, Price, Van Nimmen, and Huylebrock (1990). Nature 345, 729.) PMID:2060706

  19. Spontaneous endomyometrial neoplasms in aging Chinese hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, D.G.; Brooks, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-one endomyometrial neoplasms among 93 nulliparous noninbred Chinese hamsters were evaluated. The median survival time of the 93 females was 1040 days. The median age of hamsters with endomyometrial neoplasms was 1200 days. Neoplasms were classified as carcinomas or malignant mixed muellerian tumors of the endometrium and benign or malignant myometrial neoplasms. There were 13 endometrial adenocarcinomas. Three tumors were mixed adenosquamous carcinomas, which occurred in significantly older Chinese hamsters than did adenocarcinomas. Three malignant mixed muellerian tumors consisted of 2 carcinosarcomas and 1 mixed mesodermal tumor. The 2 myometrial neoplasms were a lelomyoma and a lelomyosarcoma. The classification and relative frequency of these neoplasms were similar to endomyometrial neoplasms of women, which makes Chinese hamsters useful subjects for studies of spontaneous endomyometrial cancers.

  20. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Salbaum, J. Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J.; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  1. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  2. Ghost teeth: Regional odontodysplasia of maxillary first molar associated with eruption disorders in a 10-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Anju; Dauravu, Liju Mercley; Reddy, S. N.; Kumar, K. Retna; Venkataramana, V.

    2015-01-01

    Regional odontodysplasia (RO) is an uncommon, developmental anomaly of the dental hard tissues that affects ectodermal and mesodermal dental components with characteristic clinical and radiographic findings. Clinically, RO affects a particular segment in either or both dentitions in the maxilla or mandible or both jaws. Radiographic features have consistently demonstrated thin and defective layers of enamel and dentine, resulting in a faint, fuzzy outline, creating a ghost-like appearance. The RO etiology is uncertain; numerous factors have been suggested and considered as local trauma, irradiation, hypophosphatasia, hypocalcemia, hyperpyrexia. A case of RO in a 10-year-old girl whose chief complaint were forwardly placed upper front teeth and the absence of eruption of permanent teeth. Clinical and radiographic features are described. PMID:26538974

  3. Endoderm induction by the organizer-secreted factors chordin and noggin in Xenopus animal caps.

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Y; Lu, B; Piccolo, S; De Robertis, E M

    1996-01-01

    Spemann's organizer has potent neural inducing and mesoderm dorsalizing activities in the Xenopus gastrula. A third activity, the organizer's ability to induce a secondary gut, has been difficult to analyze experimentally due to the lack of early gene markers. Here we introduce endodermin, a pan-endodermal gene marker, and use it to demonstrate that chordin (Chd), a protein secreted by the organizer region, is able to induce endodermal differentiation in Xenopus. The ability of chd, as well as that of noggin, to induce endoderm in animal cap explants is repressed by the ventralizing factor BMP-4. When FGF signaling is blocked by a dominant-negative FGF receptor in chd-injected animal caps, neural induction is inhibited and most of the explant is induced to become endoderm. The results suggest that proteins secreted by the organizer, acting together with known peptide growth factors, regulate differentiation of the endodermal germ layer. Images PMID:8887546

  4. Paraxial protocadherin coordinates cell polarity during convergent extension via Rho A and JNK

    PubMed Central

    Unterseher, Frank; Hefele, Joerg A; Giehl, Klaudia; De Robertis, Eddy M; Wedlich, Doris; Schambony, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Convergent extension movements occur ubiquitously in animal development. This special type of cell movement is controlled by the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Here we show that Xenopus paraxial protocadherin (XPAPC) functionally interacts with the Wnt/PCP pathway in the control of convergence and extension (CE) movements in Xenopus laevis. XPAPC functions as a signalling molecule that coordinates cell polarity of the involuting mesoderm in mediolateral orientation and thus selectively promotes convergence in CE movements. XPAPC signals through the small GTPases Rho A and Rac 1 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Loss of XPAPC function blocks Rho A-mediated JNK activation. Despite common downstream components, XPAPC and Wnt/PCP signalling are not redundant, and the activity of both, XPAPC and PCP signalling, is required to coordinate CE movements. PMID:15297873

  5. Hypercholesterolemia-induced ocular disorder: Ameliorating role of phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I H; Elmansi, Ahmed A; Bakr, Eman H M

    2015-01-01

    The ocular region is a complex structure that allows conscious light perception and vision. It is of ecto-mesodermal origin. Cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acids are involved in retinal cell function; however, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes impair its function. Retinal damage, neovascularization, and cataracts are the main complications of cholesterol overload. Dietary supplementation of selected plant products can lead to the scavenging of free reactive oxygen species, thereby protecting the ocular regions from the damage of hypercholesterolemia. This review illustrates the dramatic effects of increased cholesterol levels on the ocular regions. The effect of phytotherapy is discussed in relation to the different regions of the eye, including the retina, cornea, and lens. PMID:26429651

  6. Adult mesenchymal stem cells in neural regeneration and repair: Current advances and future prospects (Review).

    PubMed

    Trzaska, Katarzyna A; Castillo, Marianne D; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine as they can be easily isolated from bone marrow (BM) aspirates and expanded in culture while maintaining their 'stemness'. In addition to differentiating into mesodermal cells, MSCs have shown considerable plasticity and generate ectodermal neurons and glia, which can be used to replace cells damaged by neurological diseases and injuries. These unique stem cells also exhibit immunomodulatory functions and secrete a variety of trophic factors which support regeneration and repair. This review focuses on the therapeutic usage of MSCs for neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries to the nervous system. Animal studies demonstrate great promise for MSC transplantation in neurological disorders. In fact, a few clinical trials have already been initiated and show that MSCs are a safe cellular therapy and have great potential to become a viable treatment for neural disorders in the years to come. PMID:21479411

  7. Two case reports of an unusual association between Klippel-Feil syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Do they share same genetic defect?

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheshwar, Koneru Lakshmi; Sehrawat, Amit; Parashar, Manoj K.; Mavade, Kshitij

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is an unusual skeletal disorder characterized by congenital fusion of two or more cervical vertebrae which can be sporadic or familial. KFS emerges to be a failure of the normal segmentation and fusion of the mesodermal somites during 3rd and 8th weeks of embryonic development. The triad of low posterior hairline, short neck, and restricted neck motion is present only in 50% and often associated with scoliosis, spina bifida, Sprengel's deformity, cervical ribs, deafness, cleft palate, renal anomalies, congenital heart defects, and so on because of heterogeneous nature of the disease. The significance of KFS lies in the secondary effects produced on the nervous system, which usually presents with features of progressive cord and brain stem compression with relatively minor trauma. We here report two cases of KFS presented in association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Only two such cases have been described in the literature in 1954 and 1975. PMID:24339616

  8. The genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its implications for cell type evolution.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F; Pang, Kevin; Schnitzler, Christine E; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Moreland, R Travis; Simmons, David K; Koch, Bernard J; Francis, Warren R; Havlak, Paul; Smith, Stephen A; Putnam, Nicholas H; Haddock, Steven H D; Dunn, Casey W; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; Mullikin, James C; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2013-12-13

    An understanding of ctenophore biology is critical for reconstructing events that occurred early in animal evolution. Toward this goal, we have sequenced, assembled, and annotated the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. Our phylogenomic analyses of both amino acid positions and gene content suggest that ctenophores rather than sponges are the sister lineage to all other animals. Mnemiopsis lacks many of the genes found in bilaterian mesodermal cell types, suggesting that these cell types evolved independently. The set of neural genes in Mnemiopsis is similar to that of sponges, indicating that sponges may have lost a nervous system. These results present a newly supported view of early animal evolution that accounts for major losses and/or gains of sophisticated cell types, including nerve and muscle cells. PMID:24337300

  9. L’inducteur céphalique Cerberus est un inhibiteur multivalent extracellulaire

    PubMed Central

    Agius, Par Eric; Piccolo, Stefano; De Robertis, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The head inducer Cerberus is a multivalent extracellular inhibitor Cerberus encodes for a secreted protein which when overexpressed ventrally in a Xenopus embryo induces head differentiation without trunk (Bouwmeester et al., 1996). We have recently shown that Cerberus can bind BMP-4 (Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4), Xnr-1 (Xenopus Nodal-related 1) and Xwnt-8 in the extracellular space (Piccolo et al., 1999). We present here studies showing that Cerberus does not have a receptor nor a dedicated transduction pathway but rather acts as an extracellular inhibitor. Our results suggest that the action of Cerberus in head induction can be explained by an inhibitory activity upstream of the Nodal-related and BMP-4 receptors. In addition, using dominant negative receptor mutants which block both the Xnr-1 and BMP-4 transduction pathways, we show that this double inhibition is sufficient for head induction in ventral mesoderm explants. PMID:10689616

  10. Cardiac Repair by Embryonic Stem-Derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubart, M.

    2008-01-01

    Cell transplantation approaches offer the potential to promote regenerative growth of diseased hearts. It is well established that donor cardiomyocytes stably engraft into recipient hearts when injected directly into the myocardial wall. Moreover, the transplanted donor cardiomyocytes participate in a functional syncytium with the host myocardium. Thus, transplantation of donor cardiomyocytes resulted in at least partial restoration of lost muscle mass. It is also well established that embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into cells of ecto-, endo-, and mesodermal lineages when cultured under appropriate conditions in vitro. Robust cardiomyogenic differentiation was frequently observed in spontaneously differentiating ES cultures. Cellular, molecular and physiologic analyses indicated that ES-derived cells were bona fide cardiomyocytes, with in vitro characteristics typical for cells obtained from early stages of cardiac development. Thus, ES-derived cardiomyocytes constitute a viable source of donor cells for cell transplantation therapies. PMID:16370325

  11. Identification of chaetognaths as protostomes is supported by the analysis of their mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Daniel; Perez, Yvan; Caubit, Xavier; Le Parco, Yannick

    2004-11-01

    Determining the phylogenetic position of enigmatic phyla such as Chaetognatha is a longstanding challenge for biologists. Chaetognaths (or arrow worms) are small, bilaterally symmetrical metazoans. In the past decades, their relationships within the metazoans have been strongly debated because of embryological and morphological features shared with the two main branches of Bilateria: the deuterostomes and protostomes. Despite recent attempts based on molecular data, the Chaetognatha affinities have not yet been convincingly defined. To answer this fundamental question, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Spadella cephaloptera. We report three unique features: it is the smallest metazoan mitochondrial genome known and lacks both atp8 and atp6 and all tRNA genes. Furthermore phylogenetic reconstructions show that Chaetognatha belongs to protostomes. This implies that some embryological characters observed in chaetognaths, such as a gut with a mouth not arising from blastopore (deuterostomy) and a mesoderm derived from archenteron (enterocoely), could be ancestral features (plesiomorphies) of bilaterians. PMID:15306659

  12. Ovarian teratoma displaying a wide variety of tissue components in a broiler chicken (Gallus Domesticus): morphological heterogeneity of pluripotential germ cell during tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ohfuji, S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian teratoma was found in a seven-week-old female Chunky broiler chicken that was slaughtered for food. On post-mortem inspection, a spherical tumor mass attaching to a juvenile ovary was found in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologically, the tumor was comprised of immature mesenchymal stroma and a variety of mature tissue elements of mesodermal and ectodermal origin. In addition, there were multiple indistinguishable tissue elements, which showed no malignant cytological features but were unidentifiable as to corresponding embryological layer of origin. These heterogeneous teratoma tissues consisted of a variety of glandular, cystic, duct-like, and tubular structures, some of which exhibited a lining by a mixture of both keratinizing/non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelial cells and cuboidal/columnar epithelial cells. The ovarian tetatoma was considered a benign and congenital one. The highly diverse differentiation of the teratoma might have manifested a morphological aspect of intrinsic character of the pluripotential germ cells during tumorigenesis. PMID:27303655

  13. A strategy to discover new organizers identifies a putative heart organizer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Khan, Mohsin A F; Wong, Frances; Solovieva, Tatiana; Oliveira, Nidia M M; Baldock, Richard A; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W; Stern, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    Organizers are regions of the embryo that can both induce new fates and impart pattern on other regions. So far, surprisingly few organizers have been discovered, considering the number of patterned tissue types generated during development. This may be because their discovery has relied on transplantation and ablation experiments. Here we describe a new approach, using chick embryos, to discover organizers based on a common gene expression signature, and use it to uncover the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) endoderm as a putative heart organizer. We show that the AIP can induce cardiac identity from non-cardiac mesoderm and that it can pattern this by specifying ventricular and suppressing atrial regional identity. We also uncover some of the signals responsible. The method holds promise as a tool to discover other novel organizers acting during development. PMID:27557800

  14. HEB associates with PRC2 and SMAD2/3 to regulate developmental fates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Jin; Foley, Joseph W; Baker, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, extracellular signals are required to derepress developmental promoters to drive lineage specification, but the proteins involved in connecting extrinsic cues to relaxation of chromatin remain unknown. We demonstrate that the helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein, HEB, directly associates with the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) at a subset of developmental promoters, including at genes involved in mesoderm and endoderm specification and at the Hox and Fox gene families. While we show that depletion of HEB does not affect mouse ESCs, it does cause premature differentiation after exposure to Activin. Further, we find that HEB deposition at developmental promoters is dependent upon PRC2 and independent of Nodal, whereas HEB association with SMAD2/3 elements is dependent of Nodal, but independent of PRC2. We suggest that HEB is a fundamental link between Nodal signalling, the derepression of a specific class of poised promoters during differentiation, and lineage specification in mouse ESCs. PMID:25775035

  15. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T. A.; Wong, Michael D.; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R. Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-01-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  16. Bmp, Fgf and Wnt signalling in programmed cell death and chondrogenesis during vertebrate limb development: the role of Dickkopf-1.

    PubMed

    Grotewold, Lars; Rüther, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a potent head inducer in Xenopus. This effect can be attributed to its capability to specifically inhibit Wnt/beta-catenin signalling. Recent data point to a crucial role for Dkk-1 in the control of programmed cell death during vertebrate limb development. In this paper, we present a comparative expression analysis of Dkk-1, Bmp-4 and Sox-9 as well as data on the regulation of Dkk-1 by Wnt. Finally, we summarize the current knowledge of its potential function in the developing limb and present a model how the interplay of the Bmp, Fgf and Wnt signalling pathways might differentially regulate programmed cell death versus chondrogenic differentiation in limb mesodermal cells. PMID:12455632

  17. Developmental regulation of Tbx5 in zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Begemann, G; Ingham, P W

    2000-02-01

    T-box (tbx) genes constitute a large family of transcriptional regulators involved in developmental patterning processes. In tetrapods, tbx5 has been implicated in specifying forelimb type identity. Here, we report the cloning of the zebrafish tbx5.1 gene and characterise its expression during zebrafish embryogenesis and early larval development of wild type and mutant embryos that affect pectoral fin patterning. tbx5.1 is expressed during development of the heart, the pectoral fins and the eye. Notably, its expression in the lateral plate mesoderm defines a single and continuous region of heart and pectoral fin precursor cells, and constitutes the earliest specific marker for pectoral fin development in the zebrafish. PMID:10640716

  18. Hormonsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler-Barth, Margarethe

    Hormone werden in spezialisierten Zellen gebildet, die häufig zu Drüsen zusammengefasst sind. Sie gelangen über die Blutbahn (endokrine Sekretion) bzw. durch Diffusion (parakrine oder autokrine Sekretion) zu ihrem Wirkort. Nach ihrer chemischen Struktur unterscheidet man Peptidhormone, also von Aminosäuren abgeleitete Hormone und Steroid hormone (S. 144, Tabelle 3). In einem vielzelligen Organismus dienen Hormone der Koordination und Regulation von zahlreichen Funktionen (Homöostase, Reproduktion, Verhalten). Hormonproduzierende Drüsen (Abb. 134) gehen aus jedem der drei Keimblätter hervor, z. B. Hypothalamus und Nebennierenmark aus dem Ektoderm, Nebennierenrinde und Gonaden aus dem Mesoderm, Schilddrüse und Inselgewebe (Pankreas) aus dem Entoderm. Häufig werden die Organe aus zwei unterschiedlichen Geweben (Nerven- und Epithelzellen) gebildet. Auffallend sind ferner Abwandlungen der ursprünglich epithelialen Anteile (z. B. Nebennierenrinde, Adenohypophyse).

  19. Microgliosis in the Injured Brain: Infiltrating Cells and Reactive Microglia Both Play a Role.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-04-01

    Microgliosis is an intense reaction of CNS microglia to pathogenic insults. One of the characteristic features of microgliosis is an increase in the number of activated microglia at the site of lesion. Ontogenically, microglia are considered to be of mesodermal lineage in the adult CNS, but the origin of the accumulated microglia in pathological conditions remains controversial. Some studies indicate that circulating cells from the bloodstream can infiltrate the CNS and contribute to microglial pool, but some studies suggest that local expansion of reactive microglia is the sole source for parenchymal microglia. Recent data suggest that latent progenitors may also exist in the CNS. Available evidence suggests that multiple sources of microglia may exist under various neurological conditions. In this review, we compare the prevalent views and supporting evidence from different experimental models and provide an overview on the origins of microgliosis. PMID:25672621

  20. Expression profile of the RNA-binding protein gene hermes during chicken embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, Helen P; McClive, Peter J; Smith, Craig A; Sinclair, Andrew H

    2005-07-01

    The hermes gene encodes an RNA-binding protein containing an RNA-recognition motif. Its expression has been described previously in Xenopus and in the developing heart of very young chicken embryos. We have analyzed the expression of cHermes in later heart development, where expression is maintained in the myocardium, and also in previously undescribed sites. cHermes expression first appears in the somites in the first terminally differentiated myocytes of both the epaxial and the hypaxial myotome. Expression is also seen in the primordium of the allantois and continues in the developing allantoic sac. cHermes expression in the pronephric and mesonephric kidneys coincides temporally and spatially with the appearance of the vascular components of the glomeruli. In addition, cHermes expression was seen in the mesoderm of the gut and in the notochord. PMID:15895363

  1. Irxl1 mutant mice show reduced tendon differentiation and no patterning defects in musculoskeletal system development.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Machii, Masashi; Xue, XiaoDong; Sultana, Nishat; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sharkar, Mohammad T K; Uezato, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Masashi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Irxl1 (Iroquois-related homeobox like-1) is a newly identified three amino-acid loop extension (TALE) homeobox gene, which is expressed in various mesoderm-derived tissues, particularly in the progenitors of the musculoskeletal system. To analyze the roles of Irxl1 during embryonic development, we generated mice carrying a null allele of Irxl1. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele were viable, fertile, and showed reduced tendon differentiation. Skeletal morphology and skeletal muscle weight in Irxl1-knockout mice appeared normal. Expression patterns of several marker genes for cartilage, tendon, and muscle progenitors in homozygous mutant embryos were unchanged. These results suggest that Irxl1 is required for the tendon differentiation but dispensable for the patterning of the musculoskeletal system in development. PMID:21254332

  2. Expression of biomarker genes of differentiation in D3 mouse embryonic stem cells after exposure to different embryotoxicant and non-embryotoxicant model chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Andrea C.; del Río, Eva; Vilanova, Eugenio; Sogorb, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a necessity to develop in vitro methods for testing embryotoxicity (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. We studied the progress of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation exposed to model embryotoxicants and non-embryotoxicants chemicals through the expression of biomarker genes. We studied a set of 16 different genes biomarkers of general cellular processes (Cdk1, Myc, Jun, Mixl, Cer and Wnt3), ectoderm formation (Nrcam, Nes, Shh and Pnpla6), mesoderm formation (Mesp1, Vegfa, Myo1e and Hdac7) and endoderm formation (Flk1 and Afp). We offer dose response in order to derive the concentration causing either 50% or 200% of expression of the biomarker gene. These records revealed to be a valuable end-point to predict in vitro the embryotoxicity of chemicals (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26568980

  3. [The growth and form development of the limb buds in vertebrate animals].

    PubMed

    Borkhvardt, V G

    2000-01-01

    The development of the fin and limb buds involves a balance of centrifugal (active) and centripetal (passive) mechanical forces, the first of which acts to move the walls of these structures away from each other and the second holds them together. When the volume of the mesodermal core increases, the generated force meets with the resistance of the basal membrane, and as a result, the limb bud has a tendency to acquire cylindrical shape. Collagen fibers, individual mesenchymal cells, and their groups hold together the dorsal and the ventral wall of the limb bud, prevent the movement of these walls away from each other, and in this way direct bud growth along the proximodistal and the anteroposterior axes. The balance of the forces, which stretch the ectodermal layer, and those, which constrain it, have also been observed in the development of other body parts. PMID:10867933

  4. Wnt/Axin1/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Asymmetric Nodal Activation, Elaboration, and Concordance of CNS Asymmetries

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Matthias; Bianco, Isaac H.; Bajoghli, Baubak; Aghaallaei, Narges; Czerny, Thomas; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Nodal activity in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) is required to activate left-sided Nodal signaling in the epithalamic region of the zebrafish forebrain. Epithalamic Nodal signaling subsequently determines the laterality of neuroanatomical asymmetries. We show that overactivation of Wnt/Axin1/β-catenin signaling during late gastrulation leads to bilateral epithalamic expression of Nodal pathway genes independently of LPM Nodal signaling. This is consistent with a model whereby epithalamic Nodal signaling is normally bilaterally repressed, with Nodal signaling from the LPM unilaterally alleviating repression. We suggest that Wnt signaling regulates the establishment of the bilateral repression. We identify a second role for the Wnt pathway in the left/right regulation of LPM Nodal pathway gene expression, and finally, we show that at later stages Axin1 is required for the elaboration of concordant neuroanatomical asymmetries. PMID:17678853

  5. Early Chordate Origins of the Vertebrate Second Heart Field

    PubMed Central

    Stolfi, Alberto; Gainous, T. Blair; Young, John J.; Mori, Alessandro; Levine, Michael; Christiaen, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart is formed from diverse embryonic territories, including the first and second heart fields. The second heart field (SHF) gives rise to the right ventricle and outflow tract, yet its evolutionary origins are unclear. We found that heart progenitor cells of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis also generate precursors of the atrial siphon muscles (ASMs). These precursors express Islet and Tbx1/10, evocative of the splanchnic mesoderm that produces the lower jaw muscles and SHF of vertebrates. Evidence is presented that the transcription factor COE is a critical determinant of ASM fate. We propose that the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates possessed multipotent cardiopharyngeal muscle precursors, and that their reallocation might have contributed to the emergence of the SHF. PMID:20671188

  6. Development of the external genitalia: conserved and divergent mechanisms of appendage patterning

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the genetics of external genital development has begun to be understood. Male and female external genitalia develop from the genital tubercle. The early tubercle has a superficial resemblance to the limb bud, but an important distinction is that the limb consists only of mesoderm and ectoderm, whereas the genital tubercle also has an endodermal component, the urethral epithelium. Urethral epithelium, which expresses Sonic hedgehog, acts as a signaling region that controls outgrowth and pattern formation, and ultimately differentiates into the urethral tube. While there are intriguing parallels between limb and genital development, recent studies have identified some key differences, including the role of Fgf signaling. Our understanding of the mechanisms of genital development still lags far behind the limb, and major questions remain to be answered, including the molecular nature of the signals that initiate genital budding, sustain outgrowth, induce tissue polarity and orchestrate urethral tubulogenesis. PMID:21465625

  7. Applications of microscale technologies for regenerative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Khademhosseini, A

    2009-05-01

    While widespread advances in tissue engineering have occurred over the past decade, many challenges remain in the context of tissue engineering and regeneration of the tooth. For example, although tooth development is the result of repeated temporal and spatial interactions between cells of ectoderm and mesoderm origin, most current tooth engineering systems cannot recreate such developmental processes. In this regard, microscale approaches that spatially pattern and support the development of different cell types in close proximity can be used to regulate the cellular microenvironment and, as such, are promising approaches for tooth development. Microscale technologies also present alternatives to conventional tissue engineering approaches in terms of scaffolds and the ability to direct stem cells. Furthermore, microscale techniques can be used to miniaturize many in vitro techniques and to facilitate high-throughput experimentation. In this review, we discuss the emerging microscale technologies for the in vitro evaluation of dental cells, dental tissue engineering, and tooth regeneration. PMID:19493883

  8. Ovarian teratoma displaying a wide variety of tissue components in a broiler chicken (Gallus Domesticus): morphological heterogeneity of pluripotential germ cell during tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, S

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian teratoma was found in a seven-week-old female Chunky broiler chicken that was slaughtered for food. On post-mortem inspection, a spherical tumor mass attaching to a juvenile ovary was found in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologically, the tumor was comprised of immature mesenchymal stroma and a variety of mature tissue elements of mesodermal and ectodermal origin. In addition, there were multiple indistinguishable tissue elements, which showed no malignant cytological features but were unidentifiable as to corresponding embryological layer of origin. These heterogeneous teratoma tissues consisted of a variety of glandular, cystic, duct-like, and tubular structures, some of which exhibited a lining by a mixture of both keratinizing/non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelial cells and cuboidal/columnar epithelial cells. The ovarian tetatoma was considered a benign and congenital one. The highly diverse differentiation of the teratoma might have manifested a morphological aspect of intrinsic character of the pluripotential germ cells during tumorigenesis. PMID:27303655

  9. Cloning of murine G1RP, a novel gene related to Drosophila melanogaster g1.

    PubMed

    Baker, S J; Reddy, E P

    2000-05-01

    To study the nature of genes that are induced during the apoptotic death of myeloid precursor cells, we performed representational difference analysis (RDA) using 32Dcl3 myeloblastic cells that were deprived of IL-3 for 24h. We have isolated a novel cDNA (g1-related protein, G1RP) that is homologous to g1, a Drosophila melanogaster zinc-finger protein that is expressed in the mesoderm. Northern blot analysis using RNAs derived from 32Dcl3 cells that have been grown in the absence of IL-3 demonstrates that the G1RP message is upregulated in these cells following the removal of IL-3, suggesting that this gene may regulate growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells. PMID:10806348

  10. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A.; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L.; Carr, Logan A.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Sabeh, M. Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J.; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction. PMID:26306682

  11. Fibro-epithelial polyps in children: A report of two cases with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Apurva; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A fibro-epithelial polyp is the most common epithelial benign tumor of the oral cavity. Such a polyp is of mesodermal origin and it is a pink, red, or white knob-like painless growth that is sessile or pedunculated. A fibro-epithelial polyp commonly occurs on buccal mucosa, the tongue, or the gingiva. A fibro-epithelial polyp is an inflammatory hyperplastic lesion in response to chronic irritation due to calculus, sharp tooth edges, irregular denture borders, or overhanging restorations. Such a polyp rarely occurs before the fourth decade of life and its prevalence is not sex-specific. The current paper presents two cases where an intraoral fibro-epithelial polyp was successfully managed in children. Conservative surgical excision was performed in both cases. A follow-up at 3 months revealed uneventful healing of the site without reoccurrence of the lesion. PMID:27195199

  12. Bmp Signaling Exerts Opposite Effects on Cardiac Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    de Pater, Emma; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Priller, Florian; Veerkamp, Justus; Strate, Ina; Smith, Kelly; Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Schilling, Thomas F.; Herzog, Wiebke; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The importance for Bmp signaling during embryonic stem cell differentiation into myocardial cells has been recognized. The question when and where Bmp signaling in vivo regulates myocardial differentiation has remained largely unanswered. Objective To identify when and where Bmp signaling regulates cardiogenic differentiation. Methods and Results Here we have observed that in zebrafish embryos, Bmp signaling is active in cardiac progenitor cells prior to their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Bmp signaling is continuously required during somitogenesis within the anterior lateral plate mesoderm to induce myocardial differentiation. Surprisingly, Bmp signaling is actively repressed in differentiating myocardial cells. We identified the inhibitory Smad6a, which is expressed in the cardiac tissue, to be required to inhibit Bmp signaling and thereby promote expansion of the ventricular myocardium. Conclusion Bmp signaling exerts opposing effects on myocardial differentiation in the embryo by promoting as well as inhibiting cardiac growth. PMID:22247485

  13. The Adipose-derived Stem Cell: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, researchers at UCLA published a manuscript in Molecular Biology of the Cell describing a novel adult stem cell population isolated from adipose tissue—the adipose-derived stem cell (ASC). Since that time, the ASC has gone on to be one of the most popular adult stem cell populations currently being used in the stem cell field. With multilineage mesodermal potential and possible ectodermal and endodermal potentials also, the ASC could conceivably be an alternate to pluripotent ES cells in both the lab and in the clinic. In this retrospective article, a historical perspective on the ASC is given together with exciting new applications for the stem cell being considered today. PMID:20375149

  14. Path to the clinic: assessment of iPSC-based cell therapies in vivo in a nonhuman primate model.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Winkler, Thomas; Wu, Chuanfeng; Guo, Vicky; Pittaluga, Stefania; Nicolae, Alina; Donahue, Robert E; Metzger, Mark E; Price, Sandra D; Uchida, Naoya; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Kilts, Tina; Li, Li; Robey, Pamela G; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2014-05-22

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based cell therapies have great potential for regenerative medicine but are also potentially associated with tumorigenic risks. Current rodent models are not optimal predictors of efficiency and safety for clinical application. Therefore, we developed a clinically relevant nonhuman primate model to assess the tumorigenic potential and in vivo efficacy of both undifferentiated and differentiated iPSCs in autologous settings without immunosuppression. Undifferentiated autologous iPSCs indeed form mature teratomas in a dose-dependent manner. However, tumor formation is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction. On the other hand, iPSC-derived mesodermal stromal-like cells form new bone in vivo without any evidence of teratoma formation. We therefore show in a large animal model that closely resembles human physiology that undifferentiated autologous iPSCs form teratomas, and that iPSC-derived progenitor cells can give rise to a functional tissue in vivo. PMID:24835994

  15. Low-dose propranolol for multiple hepatic and cutaneous hemangiomas with deranged liver function.

    PubMed

    Tan, Swee Thong; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip

    2011-03-01

    We report here the case of an infant with multiple hepatic and cutaneous infantile hemangiomas (IHs) associated with deranged liver function who was treated successfully with low-dose propranolol. We also discuss our recent data that show that IH is a developmental anomaly of hemogenic endothelium derived from primitive mesoderm with a neural crest-cell phenotype. We previously presented evidence that this hemogenic endothelium is governed by the renin-angiotensin system, which we propose can account for both the action of propranolol and the process of spontaneous involution of IH. We further speculate on the possibility of using inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and that of angiotensin II receptor 2 as potential alternative therapies. PMID:21357335

  16. A Nd:YAG Laser-microperforated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)-basal Membrane Matrix Composite film as Substrate for Keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano,F.; Lopez, L.; Jadraque, M.; Koper, M.; Ellis, G.; Cano, P.; Martin, M.; Garrido, L.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelia cultured for the treatment of ulcers, burns and for gene therapy applications require a flexible biomaterial for growth and transplantation that is adaptable to body contours. We tested several materials and found that a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) polyester provided support for keratinocytes, although adhesion to this material proved to be suboptimal. Since epithelia adhere to the mesoderm through basal membranes, we engineered a basal membrane surrogate by preparing composites of PHBHV with basal membrane matrix (BMM). To allow cell migration into injuried areas the polyester film was micromachined to insert high-density micropores through a Nd:YAG laser ablation process. These flexible composites provided firm attachment for keratinocytes from the outer root sheath of human hair allowing keratinocyte migration through micropores. Films of microperforated PHBHV-BMM may be of use for the replacement of diseased or injured skin epithelia.

  17. An Optogenetic Method to Modulate Cell Contractility during Tissue Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, Giorgia; Barry, Joseph D; Huber, Wolfgang; De Renzis, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Morphogenesis of multicellular organisms is driven by localized cell shape changes. How, and to what extent, changes in behavior in single cells or groups of cells influence neighboring cells and large-scale tissue remodeling remains an open question. Indeed, our understanding of multicellular dynamics is limited by the lack of methods allowing the modulation of cell behavior with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we developed an optogenetic approach to achieve local modulation of cell contractility and used it to control morphogenetic movements during Drosophila embryogenesis. We show that local inhibition of apical constriction is sufficient to cause a global arrest of mesoderm invagination. By varying the spatial pattern of inhibition during invagination, we further demonstrate that coordinated contractile behavior responds to local tissue geometrical constraints. Together, these results show the efficacy of this optogenetic approach to dissect the interplay between cell-cell interaction, force transmission, and tissue geometry during complex morphogenetic processes. PMID:26777292

  18. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  19. Pbx Homeodomain Proteins: TALEnted regulators of Limb Patterning and Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Terence D.; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. PMID:21416555

  20. Molecular and Cellular Regulatory Mechanisms of Tongue Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parada, C.; Han, D.; Chai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The tongue exerts crucial functions in our daily life. However, we know very little about the regulatory mechanisms of mammalian tongue development. In this review, we summarize recent findings of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control tissue-tissue interactions during tongue morphogenesis. Specifically, cranial neural crest cells (CNCC) lead the initiation of tongue bud formation and contribute to the interstitial connective tissue, which ultimately compartmentalizes tongue muscles and serves as their attachments. Occipital somite-derived cells migrate into the tongue primordium and give rise to muscle cells in the tongue. The intimate relationship between CNCC- and mesoderm-derived cells, as well as growth and transcription factors that have been shown to be crucial for tongue myogenesis, clearly indicate that tissue-tissue interactions play an important role in regulating tongue morphogenesis. PMID:22219210

  1. The generation of vertebral segmental patterning in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Senthinathan, Biruntha; Sousa, Cátia; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experimental manipulations in the chick embryo to assess whether the notochord, neural tube and spinal nerves influence segmental patterning of the vertebral column. Using Pax1 expression in the somite-derived sclerotomes as a marker for segmentation of the developing intervertebral disc, our results exclude such an influence. In contrast to certain teleost species, where the notochord has been shown to generate segmentation of the vertebral bodies (chordacentra), these experiments indicate that segmental patterning of the avian vertebral column arises autonomously in the somite mesoderm. We suggest that in amniotes, the subdivision of each sclerotome into non-miscible anterior and posterior halves plays a critical role in establishing vertebral segmentation, and in maintaining left/right alignment of the developing vertebral elements at the body midline. PMID:22458512

  2. Development of the carapacial ridge: implications for the evolution of genetic networks in turtle shell development.

    PubMed

    Moustakas, Jacqueline E

    2008-01-01

    Paleontologists and neontologists have long looked to development to understand the homologies of the dermal bones that form the "armor" of turtles, crocodiles, armadillos, and other vertebrates. This study shows molecular evidence supporting a dermomyotomal identity for the mesenchyme of the turtle carapacial ridge. The mesenchyme of the carapace primordium expresses Pax3, Twist1, Dermo1, En1, Sim1, and Gremlin at early stages and before overt ossification expresses Pax1. A hypothesis is proposed that this mesenchyme forms dermal bone in the turtle carapace. A comparison of regulatory gene expression in the primordia of the turtle carapace, the vertebrate limb, and the vertebral column implies the exaptation of key genetic networks in the development of the turtle shell. This work establishes a new role for this mesodermal compartment and highlights the importance of changes in genetic regulation in the evolution of morphology. PMID:18184355

  3. Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL): neuroradiological findings in three patients and a new association with fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Luciana Nogueira; Fariello, Giuseppe; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Aiello, Costanza; Menchini, Laura; Devito, Rita; Zama, Mario; Claps, Dianella; Vigevano, Federico; Longo, Daniela

    2011-07-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by involvement of tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin such as skin, eye, adipose tissue, and brain. Since 1970, when Haberland and Perou had described the first patient, 54 cases of ECCL have been reported in literature. We report on three new boys with ECCL. In addition to their typical dermal, ocular and central nervous system anomalies, one of them had a spheno-ethmoidal osseous lesion. Histopathological evaluation confirmed the benign nature of the lesion and was consistent with fibrous dysplasia. The aim of our study is to review clinical records and brain imaging studies of these three new patients with ECCL and compare these findings with those reported in literature to better define the phenotypic spectrum and radiological findings in ECCL. PMID:21626669

  4. The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). A multifaceted experimental model.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    During avian development the mesodermal layers of the allantois and chorion fuse to form the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). This structure rapidly expands generating a rich vascular network that provides an interface for gas and waste exchange. The CAM allows to study tissue grafts, tumor growth and metastasis, wound healing, drugs delivery and toxicologic analysis, and angiogenic and anti-angiogenic molecules. The CAM is relatively simple, quick, and low-cost model that allows screening of a large number of pharmacological samples in a short time; does not require administrative procedures for obtaining ethics committee approval for animal experimentation. Moreover, being naturally immunodeficient, the chick embryo may receive transplantations from different tissues and species, without immune responses. PMID:27178379

  5. Neuromesodermal progenitors and the making of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Henrique, Domingos; Abranches, Elsa; Verrier, Laure; Storey, Kate G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuromesodermal progenitors (NMps) contribute to both the elongating spinal cord and the adjacent paraxial mesoderm. It has been assumed that these cells arise as a result of patterning of the anterior neural plate. However, as the molecular mechanisms that specify NMps in vivo are uncovered, and as protocols for generating these bipotent cells from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells in vitro are established, the emerging data suggest that this view needs to be revised. Here, we review the characteristics, regulation, in vitro derivation and in vivo induction of NMps. We propose that these cells arise within primitive streak-associated epiblast via a mechanism that is separable from that which establishes neural fate in the anterior epiblast. We thus argue for the existence of two distinct routes for making central nervous system progenitors. PMID:26329597

  6. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors: Phenotypic consequences during eukaryotic development

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.J.; Bellus, G.A.; Jabs, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    Recently, a tremendous amount of excitement and interest has been generated by the rapid succession of discoveries in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) field. In less than a year, mutations in three FGFRs (FGFR1-FGFR3) have been associated with three skeletal dysplasias and four craniosynostotic syndromes. FGFRs are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that bind fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). The FGF family consists of structurally related polypeptides that play a key role in numerous aspects of embryogenesis, growth, and homeostasis. FGFs have a potent growth stimulatory and/or differentiation-inducing effect on cells such as those derived from the early-embryonic mesoderm or ectoderm. In addition to mitogenesis and differentiation, FGFs also stimulate chemotaxis, cell survival, and angiogenesis. FGFs mediate cellular responses on binding to and activation of FGFRs. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Growing kidney in the frog.

    PubMed

    Chan, Techuan; Asashima, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of the regulation of kidney development has increased dramatically in the past decade. The pronephros, mesonephros, and metanephros represent three distinct renal organs that function, in succession, as the vertebrate excretory system during development of the kidney. These three organ systems are derived from the intermediate mesoderm and develop in a well-defined temporal and spatial sequence. The pronephros, which consists of a tubule, duct and glomus, is established first and is the simplest of the excretory organs in vertebrates. Xenopus pronephros serves as an ideal model for investigating organogenesis and development of renal function in vertebrates. In this article, we highlight the advantages of Xenopus for analyzing kidney organogenesis and the latest research in pronephros development. PMID:16554664

  8. GATA factors efficiently direct cardiac fate from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Turbendian, Harma K; Gordillo, Miriam; Tsai, Su-Yi; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; Liu, Ting-Chun; Tang, Alice; Liu, Susanna; Fishman, Glenn I; Evans, Todd

    2013-04-01

    The GATA4 transcription factor is implicated in promoting cardiogenesis in combination with other factors, including TBX5, MEF2C and BAF60C. However, when expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), GATA4 was shown to promote endoderm, not cardiac mesoderm. The capacity of related GATA factors to promote cardiogenesis is untested. We found that expression of the highly related gene, Gata5, very efficiently promotes cardiomyocyte fate from murine ESCs. Gata5 directs development of beating sheets of cells that express cardiac troponin T and show a full range of action potential morphologies that are responsive to pharmacological stimulation. We discovered that by removing serum from the culture conditions, GATA4 and GATA6 are each also able to efficiently promote cardiogenesis in ESC derivatives, with some distinctions. Thus, GATA factors can function in ESC derivatives upstream of other cardiac transcription factors to direct the efficient generation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:23487308

  9. Mapping Human Pluripotent-to-Cardiomyocyte Differentiation: Methylomes, Transcriptomes, and Exon DNA Methylation “Memories”

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Joshua D.; Jung, Marc; Chen, Chang-yi; Lin, Ziguang; Ye, Jingjing; Godatha, Swetha; Lizhar, Elizabeth; Wu, Xiwei; Hsu, David; Couture, Larry A.; Riggs, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    The directed differentiation of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) from pluripotent cells provides an invaluable model for understanding mechanisms of cell fate determination and offers considerable promise in cardiac regenerative medicine. Here, we utilize a human embryonic stem cell suspension bank, produced according to a good manufacturing practice, to generate CMs using a fully defined and small molecule-based differentiation strategy. Primitive and cardiac mesoderm purification was used to remove non-committing and multi-lineage populations and this significantly aided the identification of key transcription factors, lncRNAs, and essential signaling pathways that define cardiomyogenesis. Global methylation profiles reflect CM development and we report on CM exon DNA methylation “memories” persisting beyond transcription repression and marking the expression history of numerous developmentally regulated genes, especially transcription factors. PMID:26981572

  10. Unusual Cortical Bone Features in a Patient with Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Klara Kiss, Katalin; Bata, Pal; Karlinger, Kinga; Banvolgyi, Andras; Wikonkal, Norbert; Berczi, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) consists of ectodermal and mesodermal abnormalities. In this case report we will investigate lower extremity lesions of GGS. A 52-year-old man with GGS underwent skull and lower extremity computer tomography. Radiographic findings included cervical spondylosis, transparent areas with slurred margins, and cerebral falx calcification. Tibial and fibular specific cortical lesions (thin cortical and subcortical cystic lesions) were seen on the radiography, which was confirmed by computer tomography. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a long lesion of the tibia and fibula. Specific lower extremity cortical lesions (thin cortical and subcortical cystic lesions) may occur and these abnormalities can be found on radiography or CT, which are most probably attributed to retinoid treatment. PMID:25780550

  11. Tbx15 controls skeletal muscle fibre-type determination and muscle metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin Y.; Singh, Manvendra K.; Ussar, Siegfried; Wetzel, Petra; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Kispert, Andreas; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of both slow-twitch oxidative myofibers and fast-twitch glycolytic myofibers that differentially impact muscle metabolism, function and eventually whole-body physiology. Here we show that the mesodermal transcription factor T-box 15 (Tbx15) is highly and specifically expressed in glycolytic myofibers. Ablation of Tbx15 in vivo leads to a decrease in muscle size due to a decrease in the number of glycolytic fibres, associated with a small increase in the number of oxidative fibres. This shift in fibre composition results in muscles with slower myofiber contraction and relaxation, and also decreases whole-body oxygen consumption, reduces spontaneous activity, increases adiposity and glucose intolerance. Mechanistically, ablation of Tbx15 leads to activation of AMPK signalling and a decrease in Igf2 expression. Thus, Tbx15 is one of a limited number of transcription factors to be identified with a critical role in regulating glycolytic fibre identity and muscle metabolism. PMID:26299309

  12. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  13. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  14. Noise regulation and symmetry breaking during vertebrate body elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonet, Thierry; Das, Dipjyoti; Holley, Scott A.

    Elongation of the vertebrate body axis is driven by collective cell migration and cell proliferation at the posteriorly advancing embryonic tailbud. Within the Zebrafish tailbud an ordered stream of cells symmetrically bifurcates to form the left and right halves of the presomitic mesoderm. Maintaining bilateral symmetry during this process is critical to avoid catastrophic spine deformation. Using direct comparison between experimental data and a simple model of cell migration we identified the dynamic regulation of the noise in the direction of motion of individual cells as a critical factor in maintaining symmetric cell flow. Genetic perturbations that reduced noise led to body axis deformation whereas an increase in noise led to retarded elongation as predicted by our model.

  15. Core issues in craniofacial myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Robert G.

    2010-11-01

    Branchiomeric craniofacial muscles control feeding, breathing and facial expression. These muscles differ on multiple counts from all other skeletal muscles and originate in a progenitor cell population in pharyngeal mesoderm characterized by a common genetic program with an adjacent population of cardiac progenitor cells, the second heart field, that gives rise to much of the heart. The transcription factors and signaling molecules that trigger the myogenic program at sites of branchiomeric muscle formation are correspondingly distinct from those in somite-derived muscle progenitor cells. Here new insights into the regulatory hierarchies controlling branchiomeric myogenesis are discussed. Differences in embryological origin are reflected in the lineage, transcriptional program and proliferative and differentiation properties of branchiomeric muscle satellite cells. These recent findings have important implications for our understanding of the diverse myogenic strategies operative both in the embryo and adult and are of direct biomedical relevance to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the cause and progression of muscle restricted myopathies.

  16. Tbx15 controls skeletal muscle fibre-type determination and muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin Y; Singh, Manvendra K; Ussar, Siegfried; Wetzel, Petra; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J; Kispert, Andreas; Kahn, C Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of both slow-twitch oxidative myofibers and fast-twitch glycolytic myofibers that differentially impact muscle metabolism, function and eventually whole-body physiology. Here we show that the mesodermal transcription factor T-box 15 (Tbx15) is highly and specifically expressed in glycolytic myofibers. Ablation of Tbx15 in vivo leads to a decrease in muscle size due to a decrease in the number of glycolytic fibres, associated with a small increase in the number of oxidative fibres. This shift in fibre composition results in muscles with slower myofiber contraction and relaxation, and also decreases whole-body oxygen consumption, reduces spontaneous activity, increases adiposity and glucose intolerance. Mechanistically, ablation of Tbx15 leads to activation of AMPK signalling and a decrease in Igf2 expression. Thus, Tbx15 is one of a limited number of transcription factors to be identified with a critical role in regulating glycolytic fibre identity and muscle metabolism. PMID:26299309

  17. Myelomeningocele associated with split cord malformation type I -three case reports-.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Sasano, Mari; Sato, Hironobu; Sekido, Ken'ichi; Ito, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Three neonates presented with split cord malformation (SCM) associated with myelomeningocele (MMC), complicated with various coexisting anomalies. All patients were female and classified as SCM type I. All patients had a syrinx located rostral to the SCM. One patient had hydrocephalus and Chiari malformation causing serious respiratory problems. Two patients had partial hypertrichosis located close to the MMC, suggesting association with SCM. One patient had sacral hypoplasty and right kidney agenesis, suggesting that some embryologic errors may affect not only neural but also mesodermal development. All patients underwent surgical treatment for SCM after detailed evaluation and management of concomitant anomalies, and developed no new neurological deficits. Delayed surgery is an alternative treatment strategy for SCM in patients with both SCM and MMC with similar complications. PMID:20505305

  18. Role of the ABC transporter Mdr49 in Hedgehog signaling and germ cell migration.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Girish; Manry, Diane; Jourjine, Nicholas; Mogila, Vladic; Mozes, Henny; Bialistoky, Tzofia; Gerlitz, Offer; Schedl, Paul

    2016-06-15

    Coalescence of the embryonic gonad in Drosophila melanogaster requires directed migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) towards somatic gonadal precursor cells (SGPs). It was recently proposed that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Mdr49 functions in the embryonic mesoderm to facilitate the transmission of the PGC attractant from the SGPs; however, the precise molecular identity of the Mdr49-dependent guidance signal remained elusive. Employing the loss- and gain-of-function strategies, we show that Mdr49 is a component of the Hedgehog (hh) pathway and it potentiates the signaling activity. This function is direct because in Mdr49 mutant embryos the Hh ligand is inappropriately sequestered in the hh-expressing cells. Our data also suggest that the role of Mdr49 is to provide cholesterol for the correct processing of the Hh precursor protein. Supporting this conclusion, PGC migration defects in Mdr49 embryos are substantially ameliorated by a cholesterol-rich diet. PMID:27122170

  19. Examination of the Lunatic fringe and Uncx4.1 expression by whole-mount in situ hybridization in the embryo of the CKH-Jsr (jumbled spine and ribs) mouse.

    PubMed

    Okano, Shinya; Asano, Atsushi; Sasaki, Nobuya; Kon, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa; Agui, Takashi

    2005-02-01

    The CKH-Jsr (jumbled spine and ribs) mouse was found as a spontaneous mutant with malformation of vertebrae, that is, a short trunk and kinky tail. We examined Lunatic Fringe (Lfng) and Uncx4.1 expression in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) and somites of Jsr-mutant (CKH-Jsr/+) embryos to elucidate pathogenesis of the Jsr mutation. Expression pattern of Lfng in the PSM of Jsr-mutant embryos was similar to that of the normal (C57BL/6) embryos. However, expression pattern of Uncx4.1 in the somites of Jsr-mutant embryos was impaired to be irregular and mosaic, suggesting that the anterior-posterior (A-P) polarity is disordered in the Jsr mutant. These results indicate that the Jsr mutation disrupts the A-P polarity of somites during the somitogenesis without altering Lfng expression pattern in the PSM. PMID:15822856

  20. Determination, diversification and multipotency of mammalian myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Cossu, G; De Angelis, L; Borello, U; Berarducci, B; Buffa, V; Sonnino, C; Coletta, M; Vivarelli, E; Bouche, M; Lattanzi, L; Tosoni, D; Di Donna, S; Berghella, L; Salvatori, G; Murphy, P; Cusella-De Angelis, M G; Molinaro, M

    2000-01-01

    In amniotes, myogenic commitment appears to be dependent upon signaling from neural tube and dorsal ectoderm, that can be replaced by members of the Wnt family and by Sonic hedgehog. Once committed, myoblasts undergo different fates, in that they can differentiate immediately to form the myotome, or later to give rise to primary and secondary muscle fibers. With fiber maturation, satellite cells are first detected; these cells contribute to fiber growth and regeneration during post-natal life. We will describe recent data, mainly from our laboratory, that suggest a different origin for some of the cells that are incorporated into the muscle fibers during late development. We propose the possibility that these myogenic cells are derived from the vasculature, are multi-potent and become committed to myogenesis by local signaling, when ingressing a differentiating muscle tissue. The implications for fetal and perinatal development of the whole mesoderm will also be discussed. PMID:11061434