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Sample records for mesoscale convective system

  1. Deep convection in mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the evolution of radar echoes and lightning attending the convective storms in mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and the relationships between the spatial and temporal evolution of deep convection and the storm environment, precipitation, severe weather, and lightning. The total number of ground discharges ranges from 10,000 to 30,000 over the life cycle of the MCS with peak sustained rates (for up to 10 consecutive hours) in excess of 2000 per hour. The peak lightning activity occurs from 5 to 20 hours after the first storms and anywhere from 7 hours prior to 7 hours after the time of the maximum areal extent of the MCS for very similar synoptic environments. Thus, it appears that mesoscale and sub-synoptic scale mechanisms are responsible for these large temporal variation in lightning activity. In addition, we have found that the lightning rates in MCS's are not related to either the size or the duration of the MCS. Preliminary results suggest that the MCA's with embedded squall lines produce the greatest flash rates.

  2. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4--5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5--2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges of their actively raining regions, indicating that anvils are generated in and spread out from the primary raining regions of the MCSs. Thicker anvils are nearly absent over continental regions.

  3. Numerical Archetypal Parameterization for Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical shear tends to organize atmospheric moist convection into multiscale coherent structures. Especially, the counter-gradient vertical transport of horizontal momentum by organized convection can enhance the wind shear and transport kinetic energy upscale. However, this process is not represented by traditional parameterizations. The present paper sets the archetypal dynamical models, originally formulated by the second author, into a parameterization context by utilizing a nonhydrostatic anelastic model with segmentally-constant approximation (NAM-SCA). Using a two-dimensional framework as a starting point, NAM-SCA spontaneously generates propagating tropical squall-lines in a sheared environment. A high numerical efficiency is achieved through a novel compression methodology. The numerically-generated archetypes produce vertical profiles of convective momentum transport that are consistent with the analytic archetype.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  5. Kinematics and thermodynamics of a midlatitude, continental mesoscale convective system and its mesoscale vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    The author examines a mesoscale convective system (MCS) and the mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) it generated. The MCS, which comprised a leading convective line and trailing stratiform region, traversed Kansas and Oklahoma on 1 August 1996, passing through the NOAA Wind Profiler Network, as well as four sites from which soundings were being taken every three hours during a field project. The unusually rich data set permitted study of the MCS and MCV over nine hours on scales between those of operational rawinsondes and Doppler radars. The author used a spatial bandpass filter to divide observed wind into synoptic and mesoscale components. The environment-relative, mesoscale wind contained an up- and downdraft and divergent outflows in the lower and upper troposphere. The mesoscale wind was asymmetric about the MCS, consistent with studies of gravity waves generated by heating typical of that in many MCSs. According to a scale-discriminating vorticity budget, both the synoptic and mesoscale winds contributed to the prominent resolved sources of vorticity in the MCV: tilting and convergence. Unresolved sources were also large. The author speculates that an abrupt change in the main source of vorticity in an MCV may appear as an abrupt change in its altitude of maximum vorticity. Distributions of temperature and humidity in the MCS were consistent with its mesoscale circulations. In the terminus of the mesoscale downdraft, advection of drier, potentially warmer air exceeded humidifying and cooling from rain, so profiles of temperature and dew point exhibit onion and double-onion patterns. The mesoscale updraft was approximately saturated with a moist adiabatic lapse rate. Mesoscale drafts and convective drafts vertically mixed the troposphere, partially homogenizing equivalent potential temperature. The MCV contained a column of high potential vorticity in the middle troposphere, with a cold core below the freezing level and a warm core above---a pattern

  6. Genesis of Typhoon Nari (2001) from a mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Lin; Tian, Liqing; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the origin and genesis of Typhoon Nari (2001) as well as its erratic looping track, are examined using large-scale analysis, satellite observations, and a 4 day nested, cloud-resolving simulation with the finest grid size of 1.33 km. Observational analysis reveals that Nari could be traced 5 days back to a diurnally varying mesoscale convective system with growing cyclonic vorticity and relative humidity in the lower troposphere and that it evolved from a mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) as moving over a warm ocean under the influence of a subtropical high, a weak westerly baroclinic disturbance, an approaching-and-departing Typhoon Danas to the east, and the Kuroshio Current. Results show that the model reproduces the genesis, final intensity, looping track, and the general convective activity of Nari during the 4 day period. It also captures two deep subvortices at the eye-eyewall interface that are similar to those previously observed, a few spiral rainbands, and a midget storm size associated with Nari's relatively dry and stable environment. We find that (1) continuous convective overturning within the MCV stretches the low-level vorticity and moistens a deep mesoscale column that are both favorable for genesis; (2) Nari's genesis does not occur until after the passage of the baroclinic disturbance; (3) convective asymmetry induces a smaller-sized vortex circulation from the preexisting MCV; (4) the vortex-vortex interaction with Danas leads to Nari's looping track and temporal weakening; and (5) midlevel convergence associated with the subtropical high and Danas accounts for the generation of a nearly upright eyewall.

  7. Lightning characteristics of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Franks, John R.; Suranovic, Katelyn R.; Barbachem, Brent; Cannon, Declan; Cooper, Stonie R.

    2015-11-01

    Derechos, or widespread, convectively induced wind storms, are a common warm season phenomenon in the Central and Eastern United States. These damaging and severe weather events are known to sweep quickly across large spatial regions of more than 400 km and produce wind speeds exceeding 121 km h-1. Although extensive research concerning derechos and their parent mesoscale convective systems already exists, there have been few investigations of the spatial and temporal distribution of associated cloud-to-ground lightning with these events. This study analyzes twenty warm season (May through August) derecho events between 2003 and 2013 in an effort to discern their lightning characteristics. Data used in the study included cloud-to-ground flash data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network, WSR-88D imagery from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and damaging wind report data obtained from the Storm Prediction Center. A spatial and temporal analysis was conducted by incorporating these data into a geographic information system to determine the distribution and lightning characteristics of the environments of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems. Primary foci of this research include: (1) finding the approximate size of the lightning activity region for individual and combined event(s); (2) determining the intensity of each event by examining the density and polarity of lightning flashes; (3) locating areas of highest lightning flash density; and (4) to provide a lightning spatial analysis that outlines the temporal and spatial distribution of flash activity for particularly strong derecho producing thunderstorm episodes.

  8. Lightning characteristics of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Franks, John R.; Suranovic, Katelyn R.; Barbachem, Brent; Cannon, Declan; Cooper, Stonie R.

    2016-06-01

    Derechos, or widespread, convectively induced wind storms, are a common warm season phenomenon in the Central and Eastern United States. These damaging and severe weather events are known to sweep quickly across large spatial regions of more than 400 km and produce wind speeds exceeding 121 km h-1. Although extensive research concerning derechos and their parent mesoscale convective systems already exists, there have been few investigations of the spatial and temporal distribution of associated cloud-to-ground lightning with these events. This study analyzes twenty warm season (May through August) derecho events between 2003 and 2013 in an effort to discern their lightning characteristics. Data used in the study included cloud-to-ground flash data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network, WSR-88D imagery from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and damaging wind report data obtained from the Storm Prediction Center. A spatial and temporal analysis was conducted by incorporating these data into a geographic information system to determine the distribution and lightning characteristics of the environments of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems. Primary foci of this research include: (1) finding the approximate size of the lightning activity region for individual and combined event(s); (2) determining the intensity of each event by examining the density and polarity of lightning flashes; (3) locating areas of highest lightning flash density; and (4) to provide a lightning spatial analysis that outlines the temporal and spatial distribution of flash activity for particularly strong derecho producing thunderstorm episodes.

  9. Multicloud parametrization of mesoscale convective systems for the ITCZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, B.; Moncrieff, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCS), aligned approximately parallel to the background low-level wind shear, are ubiquitous in the Eastern Pacific intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). They are believed to control the local Hadley circulation and have a nontrivial momentum feedback on the ambient shear. They also play a central role in the two-way interactions between convection and the synoptic and planetary scale waves. They do so by serving as both the building block for organized convection, which involves congestus cloud decks that moisten and precondition the environment for deep convection which in turn is lagged by stratiform anvils, and as a conveyer belt for convective momentum transport (CMT). Here, we propose an extension of the multicloud model of Khouider and Majda (2006) to make the stratiform anvils more sensitive to the background wind shear profile. We do so by invoking two layers of moisture in the free troposphere instead of one, in addition to the boundary layer. Linear stability, in a wind shear background consisting of both mid-level and low-level easterly jets, representing, simultaneously, the Tropical Easterly and African Easterly jets, features the usual synoptic scale instability of the multicloud model plus two new instability bands at the meso-alpha and meso-beta scales, respectively. The meso-alpha and meso-beta modes constitute a paradigm for the dynamics of shear parallel convective systems with the meso-alpha waves being the quasi-stationary systems. In this talk we will present limited domain 3D simulations, without rotation, of realistic shear parallel lines of convection with parallel stratifrom anvils moving eastward, with a steering level in the upper troposphere, as a mesoscale envelope of the individual convective cells moving inwards, with a steering level in the lower troposphere. This provides, among other things, an excellent example of nontrivial CMT effect on the background low-level wind. It results in a narrow channel

  10. Budget study of a mesoscale convective system - Model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A tropical squall-type cloud cluster is examined as an example of a mesoscale convective complex. The precipitation growth processes and air circulations that develop in the convective and stratiform regions are studied using a data set generated from a time-dependent numerical cloud model. The relationship of the stratiform region of the mesoscale convective complex is discussed. The vertical profiles of heating and drying are calculated. Comparisons are made between simulations with and without ice-phase microphysical processes and a simulation with forcing by weaker lifting at middle and upper levels.

  11. Explicit simulation of a midlatitude Mesoscale Convective System

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G.D.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    We have explicitly simulated the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 23-24 June 1985 during PRE-STORM, the Preliminary Regional Experiment for the Stormscale Operational and Research and Meterology Program. Stensrud and Maddox (1988), Johnson and Bartels (1992), and Bernstein and Johnson (1994) are among the researchers who have investigated various aspects of this MCS event. We have performed this MCS simulation (and a similar one of a tropical MCS; Alexander and Cotton 1994) in the spirit of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), in which cloud-resolving models are used to assist in the formulation and testing of cloud parameterization schemes for larger-scale models. In this paper, we describe (1) the nature of our 23-24 June MCS dimulation and (2) our efforts to date in using our explicit MCS simulations to assist in the development of a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches. The paper is organized as follows. First, we discuss the synoptic situation surrounding the 23-24 June PRE-STORM MCS followed by a discussion of the model setup and results of our simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulations in developing a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches and summarize our results.

  12. Mobile Disdrometer Observations of Nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems During PECAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, D. J.; Rasmussen, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding microphysical processes in nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is an important objective of the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) experiment, which occurred from 1 June - 15 July 2015 in the central Great Plains region of the United States. Observations of MCSs were collected using a large array of mobile and fixed instrumentation, including ground-based radars, soundings, PECAN Integrated Sounding Arrays (PISAs), and aircraft. In addition to these observations, three mobile Parsivel disdrometers were deployed to obtain drop-size distribution (DSD) measurements to further explore microphysical processes in convective and stratiform regions of nocturnal MCSs. Disdrometers were deployed within close range of a multiple frequency network of mobile and fixed dual-polarization radars (5 - 30 km range), and near mobile sounding units and PISAs. Using mobile disdrometer and multiple-wavelength, dual-polarization radar data, microphysical properties of convective and stratiform regions of MCSs are investigated. The analysis will also examine coordinated Range-Height Indicator (RHI) scans over the disdrometers to elucidate vertical DSD structure. Analysis of dense observations obtained during PECAN in combination with mobile disdrometer DSD measurements contributes to a greater understanding of the structural characteristics and evolution of nocturnal MCSs.

  13. The impact of mesoscale data on the simulation of a mesoscale convective weather system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. M.; Zhang, D.-L.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) to demonstrate the sensitivity of a numerical simulation of a mesoscale convective weather system to the initial conditions; and (2) to provide further evidence of the need for a high resolution observing system that is compatible with numerical-model initial data requirements. To this end, a series of nine numerical-model sensitivity experiments were conducted in which one or more variables from one or more observations (soundings) were omitted and/or adjusted in the model initialization. Two types of surroundings were available for manipulation in the sensitivity experiments. Specifically, for the particular event being simulated (the 1977 Johnstown flash flood), an independent mesoanalysis was available from Bosart and Sanders (1981). In his analysis, Bosart produced a fine-resolution three-dimensional array of data from which soundings that helped to define mesoscale features could be extracted. These 'nonconventional' soundings were added to the conventional sounding data routinely available for model initialization.

  14. Defining Mesoscale Convective Systems by Their 85-GHz Ice-Scattering Signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Zipser, Edward J.

    1996-06-01

    Mesoseale Convective systems are composed of numerous deep convective cells with varying amounts of large, convectively produced ice particles aloft. The magnitude of the 85-GHz brightness temperature depression resulting from scattering by large ice is believed to be related to the convective intensity and to the magnitude of the convective fluxes through a deep layer. The 85-GHz ice-scattering signature can be used to map the distribution of organized mesoscale regions of convectively produced large ice particles. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the usefulness of the 85-GHz ice-scattering signature for describing the frequency, convective intensity, and geographic distribution of mesoscale convective systems.Objective criteria were developed to identify mesoscale convective systems from raw data from January, April, July, and October 1993. To minimize the effects of background contamination and to ensure that bounded areas contained convective elements, a "mesoscale convective system" was defined as an area bounded by 250 K of at least 2000 km2 of 85 GHz, with a minimum brightness temperature 225 K. Mesoscale convective systems extracted from the raw data were sorted and plotted by their areas and by their minimum brightness temperatures. Four area and brightness temperature classes were used to account for a spectrum of organized convection ranging from small to very large and from less organized to highly organized. The populations of mesoscale convective systems by this study's definition were consistent with infrared-based climatologies and large-scale seasonal dynamics. Land/water differences were high-lighted by the plots of minimum brightness temperature. Most of the intense mesoscale convective systems were located on or near land and seemed to occur most frequently in particular areas in North America, South America, Africa, and India.

  15. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  16. Cloud-to-ground lightning and Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.

    2011-03-01

    This work analyzes some physical and microphysical properties of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) and cloud-to-ground lightning. Satellite data from the GOES-10 infrared and NOAA-18 and TRMM microwave channels and lightning information from the Brazilian lightning detection network (BrasilDAT) were utilized for the period from 2007 to 2009. Based on an automatic MCSs detection method, 720 MCSs life cycles were identified during the period and in the region of study, with a lightning detection efficiency of over 90%. During the diurnal cycle, maximum electrical activity occurred close to the time of maximum convective cloud fraction (18 UTC), and 3 h after the maximum normalized area expansion rate. Diurnal cycles of both properties were modulated by diurnal heating, and thus could be used to monitor diurnal variability of lightning occurrence. The electrical activity was more intense for the widest (Pearson's correlation of 0.96) and deeper (Pearson's correlation of 0.84) clouds, which reached 390 km size and 17 km maximum cloud top height. Area growth during the initial phase of MCSs exerted a strong influence on their size and duration, and thus also showed a potential for defining the possibility of electrical activity during their life cycle. The average lightning life cycle exhibited a maximum close to MCSs maturation, while the maximum average lightning density occurred in the MCSs initial life cycle stage. The growth rate of electrical activity during the early stages can indicate the strength of convection and the possible duration of systems with lightning occurrence. Strong condensation processes and mass flux during the growth phase of the systems can provide favorable conditions for cloud electrification and lightning occurrence. A comparison of high microwave frequencies with lightning data showed a strong relationship of vertically integrated ice content and particle size with lightning occurrence, with Pearson's correlation of 0.86 and 0

  17. Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Timothy; Rutledge, Steve; Lyons, Walt; Cummer, Steve; Li, Jingbo; Macgorman, Don

    2010-05-01

    Two warm-season mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were analyzed with respect to production of transient luminous events (TLEs), mainly sprites. Sprites were documented over the lightning mapping array (LMA) network in Oklahoma, USA, using highly sensitive optical cameras operated at Yucca Ridge in Ft. Collins, Colorado, as part of our Sprites 2007 field campaign. Information about charge moment changes in lightning flashes was obtained by the National Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN). Cloud-to-ground lightning data were obtained from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The 20 June 2007 symmetric MCS produced 282 observed TLEs over a 4-h period, during which time the storm's intense convection weakened and its stratiform region strengthened. In contrast to previous sprite studies, the stratiform charge layer involved in producing the TLE-parent positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning flash was situated at upper levels as opposed to near the melting level. This layer was physically connected to an even higher upper-level convective positive charge region via a downward-sloping pathway. The average altitude discharged by TLE-parent flashes during TLE activity was 8.2 km above mean sea level (MSL; -25 °C). The 9 May 2007 asymmetric MCS produced 25 observed TLEs over a 2-h period, during which the storm's convection rapidly weakened before recovering later. The 9 May storm best fit the conventional model of low-altitude positive charge playing the dominant role in sprite production; however, the average altitude discharged during the TLE phase of flashes still was higher than the melting level: 6.1 km MSL (-15 °C). The average TLE-parent +CG flash in the symmetric 20 June case initiated at higher altitude, discharged a substantially larger area, had a larger peak current, and tapped positive charge at higher altitude compared to the asymmetric 9 May case. Analysis of full charge moment change (CMC) data from TLE-parent +CGs in these two cases

  18. Numerical simulations and analyses of mesoscale convective systems during MC3E with data assimilation at a convective permitting scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Lin, C.; Wei, L.

    2012-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate that assimilation of surface mesonet observations and atmospheric profiles results in improved numerical simulations and predictability of mesoscale convective systems and their related atmospheric boundary layer conditions. In this study, numerical simulations of mesoscale convective systems observed during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign are conducted with the mesoscale community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a convective permitting scale. First, five time periods, with convective systems evolved are identified over the Oklahoma-Kansas area. High-resolution numerical simulations are conducted with the WRF model for those five periods. A multiple-level nested domain technique is used to achieve the cloud-permitting scale simulation. Specifically, the model domains are set up for 3 nested domains with horizontal resolutions at 12 km, 4 km and 1.33 km, respectively. The model initial and boundary conditions are derived from the NCEP Northern American Mesoscale model (NAM) analysis. Results show that the WRF model reproduces the convective initiations and relatively reasonable evolution of those convective systems during most of the simulation periods, although errors are present in all numerical simulations when compared the model simulated convective initiation time, location and quantitative precipitation with observations. As an early investigation, sensitivity of numerical simulations of mesoscale convective systems to WRF model physical parameterization schemes is examined. For the cases during 12 UTC 19 May to 12 UTC 21 May 2011, it is found that the numerical simulation results are very sensitive to the choice of microphysical schemes in the WRF model. However, even with the best numerical simulation, errors are still found in terms of the prediction of convective initiation time, location and quantitative precipitation, indicating the need for data assimilation

  19. FURTHER CASE STUDIES ON THE IMPACT OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS ON REGIONAL OZONE AND HAZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a continuation of an earlier effort to study the impact of mesoscale convective precipitation systems upon distributions of aerosol and photochemical oxidant pollutants in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Analyses of surface visibility and ozone data revealed a d...

  20. Characteristics of mesoscale-convective-system-produced extreme rainfall over southeastern South Korea: 7 July 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Dong-In; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Han, In-Seong

    2016-04-01

    An extreme-rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) associated with the Changma front in southeastern South Korea was investigated using observational data. This event recorded historic rainfall and led to devastating flash floods and landslides in the Busan metropolitan area on 7 July 2009. The aim of the present study is to analyse the influences for the synoptic and mesoscale environment, and the reasons that the quasi-stationary MCS causes extreme rainfall. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses indicate that the MCS and heavy rainfall occurred in association with a stationary front which resembled a warm front in structure. A strong southwesterly low-level jet (LLJ) transported warm and humid air and supplied the moisture toward the front, and the air rose upwards above the frontal surface. As the moist air was conditionally unstable, repeated upstream initiation of deep convection by back-building occurred at the coastline, while old cells moved downstream parallel to the convective line with training effect. Because the motion of convective cells nearly opposed the backward propagation, the system as a whole moved slowly. The back-building behaviour was linked to the convectively generated cold pool and its outflow boundary, which played a role in the propagation and maintenance of the rainfall system. As a result, the quasi-stationary MCS caused a prolonged duration of heavy rainfall, leading to extreme rainfall over the Busan metropolitan area.

  1. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and Their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael (Principal Investigator); Kain, John S.

    1995-01-01

    Research efforts during the first year focused on numerical simulations of two convective systems with the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model. The first of these systems was tropical cyclone Irma, which occurred in 1987 in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria during the AMEX field program. Comparison simulations of this system were done with two different convective parameterization schemes (CPS's), the Kain-Fritsch (1993 - KF) and the Betts-Miller (Betts 1986- BM) schemes. The second system was the June 10-11 1985 squall line simulation, which occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. Simulations of this system using the KF scheme were examined in detail.

  2. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and Their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael; Kain, John S.

    1996-01-01

    Research efforts focused on numerical simulations of two convective systems with the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model. The first of these systems was tropical cyclone Irma, which occurred in 1987 in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria during the AMEX field program. Comparison simulations of this system were done with two different convective parameterization schemes (CPS's), the Kain-Fritsch (KF) and the Betts-Miller (BM) schemes. The second system was the June 10-11, 1985 squall line simulation, which occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. Simulations of this system using the KF scheme were examined in detail.

  3. Explicit simulation and parameterization of mesoscale convective systems. Final report, November 1, 1993--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W.R.

    1997-08-12

    This research has focused on the development of a parameterization scheme for mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), to be used in numerical weather prediction models with grid spacing too coarse to explicitly simulate such systems. This is an extension to cumulus parameterization schemes, which have long been used to account for the unresolved effects of convection in numerical models. Although MCSs generally require an extended sequence of numerous deep convective cells in order to develop into their characteristic sizes and to persist for their typical durations, their effects on the large scale environment are significantly different than that due to the collective effects of numerous ordinary deep convective cells. These differences are largely due to a large stratiform cloud that develops fairly early in the MCS life-cycle, where mesoscale circulations and dynamics interact with the environment in ways that call for a distinct MCS parameterization. Comparing an MCS and a collection of deep convection that ingests the same amount of boundary layer air and moisture over an extended several hour period, the MCS will generally generates more stratiform rainfall, produce longer-lasting and optically thicker cirrus, and result in different vertical distributions of large-scale tendencies due to latent heating and moistening, momentum transfers, and radiational heating.

  4. Convectively induced mesoscale weather systems in the tropical and warm-season midlatitude atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smull, Bradley F.

    1995-07-01

    As anticipated by Nelson [1991] in the last U.S. National Report, mesoscale meteorology has continued to be an area of vigorous research activity. Progress is evinced by a growing number of process-oriented studies capitalizing on expanded observational capabilities, as well as more theoretical treatments employing numerical simulations of increasing sophistication. While the majority of papers within the scope of this review fall into the category of basic research, the field's maturation is evident in the emergence of a growing number of applications to operational weather forecasting. Even as our ability to anticipate shifts in synoptic scale upper-air patterns and associated baroclinic developments has steadily improved, lagging skill with regard to quantitative forecasts of precipitation—particularly in situations where deep moist convection is prevalent—has sustained research in warm-season mesoscale meteorology. Each spring and summer midlatitude populations are exposed to life-threatening natural weather phenomena in the form of lightning, tornadoes, straight-line winds, hail, and flash floods. This point was driven home during the summer of 1993, when an extraordinarily persistent series of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) led to unusually severe and widespread flooding throughout the Mississippi and Missouri river basins. In addition to this obvious impact on regional climate, the 1990's have brought an increased appreciation for the less direct yet potentially significant role that tropical convection may play in shaping global climate through phenomena such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  5. The Impact of Microphysics on Intensity and Structure of Hurricanes and Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn J.; Jou, Ben Jong-Dao; Lee, Wen-Chau; Lin, Pay-Liam; Chang, Mei-Yu

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models, e.g. Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with a 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. WRF is a next-generation mesoscale forecast model and assimilation system that has incorporated modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numeric and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. WRF model can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options such as Purdue Lin et al. (1983), WSM 6-class and Thompson microphysics schemes. We have recently implemented three sophisticated cloud microphysics schemes into WRF. The cloud microphysics schemes have been extensively tested and applied for different mesoscale systems in different geographical locations. The performances of these schemes have been compared to those from other WRF microphysics options. We are performing sensitivity tests in using WRF to examine the impact of six different cloud microphysical schemes on precipitation processes associated hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems developed at different geographic locations [Oklahoma (IHOP), Louisiana (Hurricane Katrina), Canada (C3VP - snow events), Washington (fire storm), India (Monsoon), Taiwan (TiMREX - terrain)]. We will determine the microphysical schemes for good simulated convective systems in these geographic locations. We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  6. Numerical Simulation and Analysis of a Series of Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresch, James Francis

    A case in which a series of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) traversed across Kansas and Oklahoma (3 -4 June 1985) was examined using observations and the MM4 model. The first MCS in the series (MCS1) began north of a stationary front in a region of strong low-level warm advection and moisture convergence near the terminus of a low-level jet (LLJ). Simulations of this system evolved realistically and show that the elevated convection fed on air riding over the frontal inversion. This source air originated in the heated boundary layer over Texas and Oklahoma the previous afternoon. The system-relative circulation of the mature system did not exhibit a front -to-rear upper-level flow nor extensive trailing stratiform region as has been observed with other systems. The second MCS (MCS2) was linked to an upper-level jet streak throughout its lifetime. In agreement with observations, the simulation produced the two precipitation bands within MCS2 that gave it the appearance of a miniature occluded cyclone. The north-south band, located in the southern half of the system, consisted of surface-based convection forced by low-level convergence of convective downdrafts with the environmental flow, while the northeast -southwest band in the northern part of the system was comprised of elevated convection occurring in a frontogenetic zone. Convection in this region was initially triggered by a LLJ induced by transverse ageostrophic circulations about an approaching upper-level jet streak. The strong LLJ was decoupled from the surface by the frontal inversion and was able to advect high-theta_ E air northwestward, destabilizing the airmass. The simulation of MCS1 was found to be sensitive to the initial low-level moisture distribution, suggesting that accurate prediction of elevated convection requires initial conditions that include mesoscale details aloft. In agreement with a previous study, the simulation was found to be quite sensitive to the convective trigger function

  7. The Contribution of Mesoscale Motions to the Mass and Heat Fluxes of an Intense Tropical Convective System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, Colleen A.; Houze, Robert A., Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The existence of extensive precipitating anvil clouds in intense tropical convection suggests that vertical air motions associated with the anvil clouds play a significant role in the mass and heat budgets of these systems. This paper uses three different sets of assumptions about the water budget of an idealized mesoscale convective system to test the sensitivity of diagnostic calculations of vertical transports of mass and heat to the inclusion or exclusion of anvil clouds and their associated mesoscale vertical air motions. The properties of the mesoscale updraft and downdraft are evaluated using observations and the results of modeling studies. When a mesoscale updraft and downdraft are included in the diagnostic calculations, the profiles of vertical transports of mass and moist static energy are both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the results when mesoscale vertical air motions are excluded. Inclusion of mesoscale vertical motions in the diagnostic calculations leads to smaller upward mass transports below 4 km, larger upward mass sports above 4 km, less cooling below 4 km, and more cooling between 4.5 and 6.5 km than are obtained when mesoscale motions are not included in the calculations. These results imply that the effect of mesoscale vertical air motions on cloud mass flux and net beating profiles should be considered when parameterizing the effects of tropical convection on the larger scale environment.

  8. Characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes in the stratiform regions of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Hengyi; Yao, Wen; Meng, Qing

    2016-09-01

    To better understand the characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning (CG) strikes in the stratiform regions of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), radar and CG data from 10 MCS cases in China were comprehensively analyzed. Results show that stratiform CGs have characteristics distinct from those of convective CGs. A significant polarity bias appears in convective CGs, but the polarity bias in stratiform CGs is either undetectable or opposite that of the bias of convective CGs. The medians of the first return stroke current for positive and negative stratiform CGs have mean values of 59.7 kA and - 37.3 kA, respectively; these values are 26% and 24% higher than the corresponding mean values for positive and negative convective CGs, respectively. In contrast to stratiform CGs, the first return strokes of convective CGs have polarized currents. Most convective CGs have relatively low currents, but most CGs with maximum currents in MCSs also fall within convective CGs. In the 10 MCSs studied, most stratiform CGs strike the ground at or near the edge of a region whose maximum reflectivity (≥ 30 dBZ) occurs at 3-6 km height. The characteristics of reflectivity across this region are consistent with the reflectivity characteristics of the brightband; thus, this study provides important evidence for the relationship between the brightband and stratiform CGs. A charging mechanism based on the melting of ice particles is speculated to be the key to initiating stratiform lightning. This mechanism could induce the propagation of lightning from the convective region to the stratiform region, thereby explaining the observed strikes on the ground nearby.

  9. Transient Luminous Events and the 9 May 2007 Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lyons, W.; Cummer, S.; Meyer, J.; Holzworth, R.; Macgorman, D.

    2008-12-01

    On 9 May 2007 an asymmetric mesoscale convective system (MCS) passed through the domain of the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array while producing 26 transient luminous events (TLEs) in a 2-hour period, which were observed at the Yucca Ridge Field Station in northeastern Colorado. During the observation period (03-05 UTC), the MCS consisted of a short NW-SE-oriented line with a stratiform region to its north. This stratiform region also contained intense embedded convection, and rotated cyclonically as a mesoscale convective vortex. The MCS was dominated by negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, with 95% of the 3037 detected National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) strokes being negative, and total flash rate sometimes exceeded 100 flashes per minute. Twenty-four of the 26 TLEs observed in this case coincided with parent positive CG strokes detected by the NLDN (the other two likely were associated with undetected positive CGs). Eighteen of these events had valid impulse charge moment change (iCMC) retrievals by the National Charge Moment Change Network. Thirteen of these had iCMC values in excess of 100 C km, roughly consistent with past studies that suggest iCMC values ~100 C km or greater are favorable for generating TLEs. Fifty-eight percent of the TLE- producing positive CG strokes also were detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network, which suggests that this global network may have promising utility in TLE research studies. Both convective regions (southern convective line, and embedded convection in the stratiform region) produced TLE parent flashes, although most TLE producers initiated in the stratiform-embedded convection. TLE parent flashes initiated around 5.7 km MSL in the embedded convection, but slightly higher (7.5 km) in the southern convective line. Both sets of TLE parent flashes tended to propagate near 6 km MSL in the stratiform region while producing their TLEs. In general, TLE flash altitudes were lower (by ~2 km or more) and

  10. Analysis of the initiation of a mesoscale convective system based on heat and moisture budget calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalthoff, Norbert; Adler, Bianca; Gantner, Leonhard

    2010-05-01

    COSMO runs were performed to simulate a mesoscale convective system (MCS), which was observed on 11 June, 2006 (pre-onset phase of the monsoon, SOP 1). Different simulation scenarios were investigated including a realistic soil moisture distribution (i), a simulation with increased soil moisture (ii) and a homogeneous soil moisture and soil texture in the whole investigation area (iii). The simulations showed that convection was initiated in all experiments. However, the amount of cells and its origin differed. While in experiment (i) and (iii) several cells were initiated and merged into an organized convective system, in experiment (ii) only a small, short-lived cell was simulated. In order to study the conditions which led to the different evolution, heat and moisture budgets were calculated. The boxes for which budgets were calculated included the whole area, where convective cells were initiated, as well as isolated cells only. The different contributions of the components of the budgets and its differences between the three scenarios were discussed. Special attention was laid on the impact of the components of the budgets (e.g. heat flux convergence, horizontal advection) on the evolution of convection-related parameters (CAPE, CIN) and thermally induced circulation systems.

  11. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael; Kain, John S.

    1997-01-01

    Research efforts during the second year have centered on improving the manner in which convective stabilization is achieved in the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model MM5. Ways of improving this stabilization have been investigated by (1) refining the partitioning between the Kain-Fritsch convective parameterization scheme and the grid scale by introducing a form of moist convective adjustment; (2) using radar data to define locations of subgrid-scale convection during a dynamic initialization period; and (3) parameterizing deep-convective feedbacks as subgrid-scale sources and sinks of mass. These investigations were conducted by simulating a long-lived convectively-generated mesoscale vortex that occurred during 14-18 Jul. 1982 and the 10-11 Jun. 1985 squall line that occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. The long-lived vortex tracked across the central Plains states and was responsible for multiple convective outbreaks during its lifetime.

  12. Transport and chemistry of formaldehyde by mesoscale convective systems in West Africa during AMMA 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, AgnèS.; Ruiz, M.; Bechara, J.; Aumont, B.; Chong, M.; Huntrieser, H.; Mari, C.; Reeves, C. E.; Scialom, Georges; Hamburger, T.; Stark, H.; Afif, C.; Jambert, C.; Mills, G.; Schlager, H.; Perros, P. E.

    2012-06-01

    In situ measurements of formaldehyde (CH2O) onboard four European research aircraft in August 2006 as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) experiment in West Africa are used (1) to examine the redistribution of CH2O by mesoscale convective systems (MCS) in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), (2) to evaluate the scavenging efficiency (SE) of CH2O by MCS and (3) to quantify the impact of CH2O on UT photooxidant production downwind of MCS. The intercomparison of CH2O measurements is first tested, providing a unique and consistent 3-D-spatially resolved CH2O database in background and convective conditions. While carbon monoxide (CO) is vertically uplifted by deep convection up to 12 km, CH2O is also affected by cloud processing as seen from its ratio relative to CO with altitude. A new observation-based model is established to quantify the SE of CH2O. This model shows that convective entrainment of free tropospheric air cannot be neglected since it contributes to 40% of the convective UT air. For the 4 studied MCS, SE shows a large variability within a 4% to 39% range at a relative standard deviation of 30%, which is consistent with MCS features. A time-dependent photochemical box model is applied to convective UT air. After convection, 60% of CH2O is due to its photochemical production rather than to its direct transport. Model results indicate that CH2O directly injected by convection does not impact ozone and HOx production in the tropical UT of West Africa. NOx and anthropogenic hydrocarbon precursors dominate the secondary production of CH2O, ozone and HOx.

  13. Thermodynamic sensitivities in observed and simulated extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, R. S.; Peters, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are responsible for a large fraction of warm-season extreme rainfall events over the continental United States, as well as other midlatitude regions globally. The rainfall production in these MCSs is determined by numerous factors, including the large-scale forcing for ascent, the organization of the convection, cloud microphysical processes, and the surrounding thermodynamic and kinematic environment. Furthermore, heavy-rain-producing MCSs are most common at night, which means that well-studied mechanisms for MCS maintenance and organization such as cold pools (gravity currents) are not always at work. In this study, we use numerical model simulations and recent field observations to investigate the sensitivity of low-level MCS structures, and their influences on rainfall, to the details of the thermodynamic environment. In particular, small alterations to the initial conditions in idealized and semi-idealized simulations result in comparatively large precipitation changes, both in terms of the intensity and the spatial distribution. The uncertainties in the thermodynamic enviroments in the model simulations will be compared with high-resolution observations from the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment in 2015. The results have implications for the paradigms of "surface-based" versus "elevated" convection, as well as for the predictability of warm-season convective rainfall.

  14. Characterization of mesoscale convective systems over the eastern Pacific during boreal summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Sarah; Rouquié, Bastien; Roca, Rémy

    2015-04-01

    The eastern Pacific Ocean is one of the most active tropical disturbances formation regions on earth. This preliminary study is part of a broader project that aims to investigate how mesoscale convective systems (MCS) may be related to these synoptic disturbances with emphasis on local initiation of tropical depressions. As a first step, the main characteristics of the MCS over the eastern Pacific are documented with the help of the recently developed TOOCAN tracking algorithm (Fiolleau and Roca, 2013) applied to the infrared satellite imagery data from GOES-W and -E for the period JJAS 2012-2014. More specifically, the spatial distribution of the MCS population, the statistics of their spatial extensions and durations, as well as their trajectories and propagation speeds are summarized. In addition the environment of the MCS will be investigated using various Global Precipitation Mission datasets and the Megha-Tropiques/SAPHIR humidity microwave sounder derived products. Reference: Fiolleau T. and R. Roca, (2013), An Algorithm For The Detection And Tracking Of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Using Infrared Images From Geostationary Satellite, Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2012.2227762.

  15. Sensitivity of a mesoscale convective system to soil moisture perturbations in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantner, L.; Adler, B.; Kalthoff, N.

    2010-09-01

    The response of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) to soil moisture inhomogeneities in West Africa is investigated in a sensitivity study. Convection permitting simulations with the COSMO-Model driven by ECMWF analyses were performed. Several scenarios were investigated, including homogeneous soil type and soil moisture, and homogeneous soil type with a north-south oriented band in which the soil moisture is either reduced or increased. Precipitation related to the MCS was continuously strong in the homogeneous case. When the MCS approached the band with reduced soil moisture precipitation decreased because of higher convective inhibition (CIN) ahead of the band. Over the drier band precipitation increased again. The moist band caused an increase of precipitation before the MCS reached the band and a decrease in the area with higher soil moisture caused by very high CIN values. Soil moisture inhomogeneities induced thermal circulations which led to modified conditions in the lower troposphere and to changes in CIN and accounted for the modification of precipitation of an MCS. In the dry band case, a precipitating cell already developed in the western part of band in the late afternoon, where convergence, generated by thermal circulations and supported by downward mixing of momentum from the African Easterly Jet, triggered convection.

  16. Response of mesoscale convective system (MCS) and cold pool formation to dust-radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waylonis, M. T.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the role of dust in the development of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) over the central-west Sahara, and how cold pools from the MCS feedback to dust emissions. Few studies have simulated the direct-radiative effects of dust on cloud development. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectrometer (MISR) Retrieved aerosol optical depth and Meteosat Second Generation dust enhancement product were used to examine a dust outbreak that occurred between 13 and 15 August 2005 and revealed that an moist intrusion into the Sahara caused a MCS to form and resulted in dust emission due to cold pool outflow from the MCS. A dust model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model was developed to include dust emissions, transport, dry and moist deposition, and radiation interactions and was used to simulate the case. Dust-radiation interactions were found to enhance convective strength through low-level heating, which increased convective available potential energy and low-level convergence. The increased intensity of the convection led to stronger and more widespread cold pool formation, which in turn emitted more dust into the atmosphere.

  17. Mesoscale convective complexes in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, A.G.; Fritsch, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Digitized full-disk infrared satellite imagery from the European geostationary satellite (Meteosat) for 1986 and 1987 was used to construct a climatology of mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) in Africa. One hundred ninety-five systems formed over Africa and its near vicinity during the two-year study period. From this database, characteristics of Africa MCCs were calculated. The results indicate that these MCCs display many of the same characteristics as those found in the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region. The systems are predominantly nocturnal and tend to form over or in the immediate vicinity of land. The average lifetime of African MCCs is about 11.5 h. The size distributions of the African systems are also extremely similar to those of the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region with most systems exhibiting areas between 2 [times] 10[sup 5] and 3 [times] 10[sup 5] km[sup 2]. The monthly frequency distribution of African systems indicates that peak activity tends to occur during the period of most intense insolation. Like the MCCs in the western Pacific region and the Americas, the African MCCs tend to propagate toward the low-level high-[theta][sub e] air that feeds the convective systems. Systems over northern Africa moved toward the west-southwest, with a few developing into tropical cyclones over the Atlantic. Systems over southeastern Africa generally moved toward the northeast and east. It is concluded that the satellite-observed systems over Africa are essentially the same phenomena as the MCC populations observed over the Americas, the Indian monsoon region, and the western Pacific region. In addition, the large number of MCCs found worldwide (approximately 300-400 per year) indicate that they may be significant contributors to the global tropospheric energy budget and hydrological cycle. 46 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Propagation of Mesoscale Convective Systems over India in the Boreal Summer Monsoon Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadtare, J. A.; Bhat, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    With an automated cloud tracking algorithm, we have analysed the propagation of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over Indian region in the boreal summer monsoon season (June-September). We used half hourly infrared images of a geostationary satellite KALPANA-I for the study. The data covers four monsoon seasons (2010,12,13,and 14). Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the Indian land show a prominent westward propagation, which is opposite to the lower tropospheric monsoonal westerlies. The mechanism associated with these propagations seems robust, i.e. it appears in all the events. The propagation seems to be a result of internal dynamics of MCS, and not forced by any external agent. The mechanism is prevalent through out the monsoon season, but absent in pre- and post-monsoon season. The zonal convective streaks associated with the large MCSs have a spatial and temporal scales of 1000 km and 1 day respectively, with a westward speed of 18 m/s. These streaks resemble the westward propagating inertial-gravity (WIG) type of wave propagation. Thus, we speculate that, the MCSs over India in the summer monsoon season trigger WIG waves. And the subsequent propagation of MCS is coupled to this wave signal. Most of the large MCSs are associated with the synoptic scale monsoon depressions. Mean propagation of MCSs over Bay of Bengal (BoB) is of more complex nature. There seems to be more than one propagation mechanism which are active over BoB in the summer monsoon season. The selection of propagation mechanism by the BoB MCSs might depend on the phase of diurnal cycle or intra-seasonal oscillation, MCS size, and its location over the bay.

  19. Assessment of mesoscale convective systems using IR brightness temperature in the southwest of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafati, Somayeh; Karimi, Mostafa

    2016-04-01

    In this research, the spatial and temporal distribution of Mesoscale Convective Systems was assessed in the southwest of Iran using Global merged satellite IR brightness temperature (acquired from Meteosat, GOES, and GMS geostationary satellites) and synoptic station data. Event days were selected using a set of storm reports and precipitation criteria. The following criteria are used to determine the days with occurrence of convective systems: (1) at least one station reported 6-h precipitation exceeding 10 mm and (2) at least three stations reported phenomena related to convection (thunderstorm, lightning, and shower). MCSs were detected based on brightness temperature, maximum areal extent, and duration thresholds (228 K, 10,000 km2, and 3 h, respectively). An MCS occurrence classification system is developed based on mean sea level, 850 and 500 hPa pressure patterns. The results indicated that the highest frequency of MCSs occurred in December and April. Assessment of MCSs spatial frequency showed that MCS occurrence is strongly correlated with topography in April and May unlike the cold months. In other words, the role of Zagros Mountains in developing MCSs varies based on the season so that its impact increases with enhancement of mean monthly temperature. In addition, the occurrence of MCSs depends closely on the configuration of the Sudan Low in the southwest of Iran.

  20. A synoptic climatology of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems in the North-Central Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Mote, Thomas L.; Byrd, Stephen F.

    2000-09-01

    Synoptic-scale environments favourable for producing derechos, or widespread convectively induced windstorms, in the North-Central Plains are examined with the goal of providing pattern-recognition/diagnosis techniques. Fifteen derechos were identified across the North-Central Plains region during 1986-1995. The synoptic environment at the initiation, mid-point and decay of each derecho was then evaluated using surface, upper-air and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis datasets.Results suggest that the synoptic environment is critical in maintaining derecho producing mesoscale convective systems (DMCSs). The synoptic environment in place downstream of the MCS initiation region determines the movement and potential strength of the system. Circulation around surface low pressure increased the instability gradient and maximized leading edge convergence in the initiation region of nearly all events regardless of DMCS location or movement. Other commonalities in the environments of these events include the presence of a weak thermal boundary, high convective instability and a layer of dry low-to-mid-tropospheric air. Of the two corridors sampled, northeastward moving derechos tend to initiate east of synoptic-scale troughs, while southeastward moving derechos form on the northeast periphery of a synoptic-scale ridge. Other differences between these two DMCS events are also discussed.

  1. Contrasting a non-developing African mesoscale convective system with the precursor to Hurricane Helene (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, G.; Fuentes, J. D.; Evans, J. L.; Hamilton, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in West Africa traverse strong thermodynamic gradients during their westward propagation from land to ocean. Some of the systems continue to develop after crossing the coastline and may ultimately develop into tropical cyclones, while others do not. Understanding the lifecycle behavior of these convective systems and the factors that contribute to their continuous development as they transition from a continental environment to a marine environment poses a challenge. We examine the difference between two MCSs, one that continued to develop when it crossed the West African coast and one that did not, using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA Interim) and Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 data. The non-developing MCS that intensified briefly while over land, weakened as soon as it crossed the coast. Preliminary results show that the developing MCS interacted with two cyclonic vortices, one associated with an African Easterly Wave that was propagating towards the coast and the other vortex generated by the topography near the coast.

  2. Dominant processes of extreme rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system over southeastern Korea: 7 July 2009 case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.-H.; Lee, D.-I.; Wang, C.-C.; Han, I.-S.

    2015-10-01

    An extreme rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) associated with the Changma front in southeastern Korea was investigated using observational data. This event recorded historic rainfall and led to devastating flash floods and landslides in the Busan metropolitan area on 7 July 2009. The aim of the present study is to analyze and better understand the synoptic and mesoscale environment, and the behavior of quasi-stationary MCS causing extreme rainfall. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses indicate that the MCS and heavy rainfall occurred association with a stationary front which resembled a warm front in structure. A strong southwesterly low-level jet (LLJ) transported warm and humid air and supplied the moisture toward the front, and the air rose upwards above the frontal surface. As the moist air was conditionally unstable, repeated upstream initiation of deep convection by back-building occurred at the coastline, while old cells moved downstream parallel to the convective line with training effect. Because the motion of convective cells nearly opposed the backward propagation, the system as a whole moved slowly. The back-building behavior was linked to the convectively produced cold pool and its outflow boundary, which played an essential role in the propagation and maintenance of the rainfall system. As a result, the quasi-stationary MCS caused a prolonged duration of heavy rainfall, leading to extreme rainfall over the Busan metropolitan area.

  3. Investigations of The Structure of Mesoscale Convective Systems Over The Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrin, M. Yu.; Starokoltsev, E. V.; Fujiyoshi, Yasushi

    Under the Joint Research Agreement between the Central Aerological Observatory of the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring, Russia (CAO) and Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Japan (JST), investigations of the structure and formation/development mechanisms of mesoscale convective systems in the Sea of Japan area were carried out in January- February 2001 from board a Russian research aircraft IL-18. The aircraft was equipped with navigation and research instruments to investigate diverse atmospheric and cloud parameters, including instrumentation to study turbulent transport of moisture, heat, etc. The meteorological situation was characterized by a surge of cold, dry continental air to the rear of a cold front (i.e., from Siberia to the open surface of the Sea of Japan). Horizontal measurements were made during flights at altitudes of 100, 500, 1500, and 3000 m, between Vladivistok, Russia, and Sado Island of Japan. As a result of the investigations of turbulent moisture transport at a 100-m level, mesostructure features of the transport were observed having a horizontal scale of about 30 km and an amplitude of about 0.100 g/m2s. The shape and magnitude of such features repeated at a 500-m level, their position shifting windward with time. This phenomenon was evidently caused by cylindrical convection, whose spatial structure showed in the arrangement of cloud streets formed at a 1500-m level. Satellite pictures of the cloud streets were used.

  4. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Beasley, William; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 75 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs - charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large- CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large- CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of polarimetric data from individual radars, national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 100 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs; charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large-CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large-CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  6. Analysis of ice crystals occuring in the upper high levels of tropical mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delplanque, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    In 2010 several test flights were performed in tropical marine meso-scale convective systems at flight levels between 10.5 and 10.8 km. Ice crystals were observed with a high speed CDD camera (image pixel resolution: 15 μ m, time resolution 0.007 s) hereafter called the Airbus nephelometer. In-cloud observations were not restricted to the stratiform regions of the MCS but also convective cores were intensely sampled. High number concentrations of ice crystals (N > 1000 L-1) and IWC of more than 4 g.m-3 could be observed. The main objective of our study is the retrieval of the ice water mass from ice particle number distribution and crystal habits, both observed by the Airbus nephelometer. The shape of ice particles was supposed to correspond to the form of oblate spheroids. A statistical study of the aspect ratio of crystal images was performed comparing two different geometrical approaches for the aspect ratio of their semi axis. One uses the ratio of minimum to maximum length, the other is based on the aspect ratio which best fits the crystal image. Different regions of the MCS present different mean aspect ratios measured at small scale (200 m). Variations of the aspect ratio seem to be associated with different nucleation and growth histories for the crystals. For regions with 'young' ice crystals, an anti-correlation between the aspect ratio and ice number concentration was observed. This observation is compared with the results obtained from simple diffusional growth modeling. To better quantify the characteristics of high concentrations of small ice crystal MCS regions, we propose to use the size distribution of the mean aspect ratio (from 100 μ m to 1 mm), to distinguish quite different behaviors for 'young' and 'mature' convective regions.

  7. Relative influence of meteorological conditions and aerosols on the lifetime of mesoscale convective systems.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Fu, Rong; Massie, Steven T; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-07-01

    Using collocated measurements from geostationary and polar-orbital satellites over tropical continents, we provide a large-scale statistical assessment of the relative influence of aerosols and meteorological conditions on the lifetime of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Our results show that MCSs' lifetime increases by 3-24 h when vertical wind shear (VWS) and convective available potential energy (CAPE) are moderate to high and ambient aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases by 1 SD (1σ). However, this influence is not as strong as that of CAPE, relative humidity, and VWS, which increase MCSs' lifetime by 3-30 h, 3-27 h, and 3-30 h per 1σ of these variables and explain up to 36%, 45%, and 34%, respectively, of the variance of the MCSs' lifetime. AOD explains up to 24% of the total variance of MCSs' lifetime during the decay phase. This result is physically consistent with that of the variation of the MCSs' ice water content (IWC) with aerosols, which accounts for 35% and 27% of the total variance of the IWC in convective cores and anvil, respectively, during the decay phase. The effect of aerosols on MCSs' lifetime varies between different continents. AOD appears to explain up to 20-22% of the total variance of MCSs' lifetime over equatorial South America compared with 8% over equatorial Africa. Aerosols over the Indian Ocean can explain 20% of total variance of MCSs' lifetime over South Asia because such MCSs form and develop over the ocean. These regional differences of aerosol impacts may be linked to different meteorological conditions. PMID:27313203

  8. Relative influence of meteorological conditions and aerosols on the lifetime of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Fu, Rong; Massie, Steven T.; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-07-01

    Using collocated measurements from geostationary and polar-orbital satellites over tropical continents, we provide a large-scale statistical assessment of the relative influence of aerosols and meteorological conditions on the lifetime of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Our results show that MCSs’ lifetime increases by 3–24 h when vertical wind shear (VWS) and convective available potential energy (CAPE) are moderate to high and ambient aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases by 1 SD (1σ). However, this influence is not as strong as that of CAPE, relative humidity, and VWS, which increase MCSs’ lifetime by 3–30 h, 3–27 h, and 3–30 h per 1σ of these variables and explain up to 36%, 45%, and 34%, respectively, of the variance of the MCSs’ lifetime. AOD explains up to 24% of the total variance of MCSs’ lifetime during the decay phase. This result is physically consistent with that of the variation of the MCSs’ ice water content (IWC) with aerosols, which accounts for 35% and 27% of the total variance of the IWC in convective cores and anvil, respectively, during the decay phase. The effect of aerosols on MCSs’ lifetime varies between different continents. AOD appears to explain up to 20–22% of the total variance of MCSs’ lifetime over equatorial South America compared with 8% over equatorial Africa. Aerosols over the Indian Ocean can explain 20% of total variance of MCSs’ lifetime over South Asia because such MCSs form and develop over the ocean. These regional differences of aerosol impacts may be linked to different meteorological conditions.

  9. A Modeling Study of Heating and Drying Effects of Convective Clouds in an Extratropical Mesoscale Convective System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Yoshi; Jiang, Jih-Yih

    1985-12-01

    The two-dimensional version of the cumulus ensemble model developed by Soong and Ogura is applied both to a prestorm situation and to the mature stage of the extratropical mesoscale convective system (MCS) that developed on 10-11 April 1979 (AVE-SESAME-79 I) over the central United States. The objective is to investigate the statistical properties of convection, developing in response to an imposed large-scale forcing, and the thermodynamic feedback effect of clouds on the large-scale environment in midlatitudes. The result is compared to that recently obtained by Tao for a tropical rainband.The outstanding result of the model integration for 17 h of physical time is that statistical properties of clouds averaged horizontally over 128 km of the model domain undergo temporal variations for a given time-independent large-scale forcing, rather than settling down into a steady state. When applied to a prestorm situation, the model predicts heavy precipitation that continues to fall for the first 5 h, followed by a 4 h period without precipitation. A second burst of deep convection then occurs. An analysis of the result reveals that the pause of precipitation occurs when the subcloud layer is dried up primarily due to the net vertical transport of moisture associated with clouds. Convection again starts developing when the moisture in the subcloud layer is replenished by the imposed large-scale forcing. The precipitation rate averaged over the precipitation period is found to exceed the supply of moisture by the large-scale forcing. The result implies that the fraction of moisture convergence in a vertical air column that contributes to moisten the environmental atmosphere in Kuo's cumulus parameterization scheme can be negative.Further, the result indicates the following: 1) The updraft mass flux increases with height until it reaches the local maximum at 350 mb, indicating that the cloud population is dominated by deep clouds, in contrast to the bimodal or broad

  10. Nonhydrostatic effects in numerical modeling of mesoscale convective systems and baroclinic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the role of convection upon mesoscale modeling results, particularly when the grid resolution becomes small enough that there is not a clear scale separation between the explicitly resolved circulations and the parameterized clouds. In those situations, the vertical accelerations in explicitly resolved circulations become strong enough that the hydrostatic assumption may no longer be valid. These concerns arise from interests in improving mesoscale modeling per se and in improving the subgrid-scale parameterizations in global models. The hydrostatic and the nonhydrostatic options of the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System were used to simulate dry gravity currents in two dimensions, using several different horizontal grid sizes. With horizontal grid intervals of 10 km or less, nonhydrostatic simulations produce wider and colder heads and weaker but wider forced updrafts than do the hydrostatic simulations. Comparing the hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic models show that the difference between the vertical mass fluxes is much less than the difference between the vertical velocities. When the grid is fine enough to resolve the head of the gravity current, horizontal convergence at the gust front extends upwards almost to the head of the cold air. Vertical mass flux in the forced updraft at the front varies with horizontal grid size mainly as a function of the height of the simulated head. For coarser grids, which do not resolve the head, vertical mass flux at all heights decreases with increasing horizontal grid size. A comparison on nonhydrostatic simulations with horizontal grid intervals of 1 km and 2 km illustrates how decreasing the grid size does not necessarily increase the intensity of the resolved circulation. The smaller grid enables the simulated gravity current to entrain a bubble of warm air behind the head, which results in a weaker circulation with a shorter head and weaker updraft.

  11. Simulation of quasi-linear mesoscale convective systems in northern China: Lightning activities and storm structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanli; Qie, Xiushu; Fu, Shenming; Su, Debin; Shen, Yonghai

    2016-01-01

    Two intense quasi-linear mesoscale convective systems (QLMCSs) in northern China were simulated using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model and the 3D-Var (three-dimensional variational) analysis system of the ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) model. A new method in which the lightning density is calculated using both the precipitation and non-precipitation ice mass was developed to reveal the relationship between the lightning activities and QLMCS structures. Results indicate that, compared with calculating the results using two previous methods, the lightning density calculated using the new method presented in this study is in better accordance with observations. Based on the calculated lightning densities using the new method, it was found that most lightning activity was initiated on the right side and at the front of the QLMCSs, where the surface wind field converged intensely. The CAPE was much stronger ahead of the southeastward progressing QLMCS than to the back it, and their lightning events mainly occurred in regions with a large gradient of CAPE. Comparisons between lightning and non-lightning regions indicated that lightning regions featured more intense ascending motion than non-lightning regions; the vertical ranges of maximum reflectivity between lightning and non-lightning regions were very different; and the ice mixing ratio featured no significant differences between the lightning and non-lightning regions.

  12. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Jian; Houze, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4-5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5-2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges

  13. Mean state and kinematic properties of mesoscale convective systems over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogungbenro, Stephen B.; Ajayi, V. O.; Adefolalu, D. O.

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year (1984 to 2000) dataset of brightness temperature (T b) was employed to study the spatial and temporal scales of mesoscale convective systems (MCS) over West Africa. The kinematic properties of MCS were tested using wind products. A threshold brightness temperature (T b) of ≤213 K and spatial coverage specifications of more than 5000 km2 were used as two set criteria for initiating MCS tracking. MCS occurrences vary in seasons and locations over West Africa, and their activities vary with different weather zones. They can appear at any time of the day, but this study revealed a significant preference for early morning hours and night hours over continental West Africa. The well-organized systems occur between July and September in the Sahel, and between May and September in the Savanna band. MCS activities in the Gulf of Guinea peak between March and April, while the Savanna and Sahel zones peak between June and August. The produced annual atlas gives a spatial account of areas of MCS dominance in West Africa. The presence of African Easterly Jet (AEJ) and Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ), and deep monsoon depth all characterize an environment where MCS thrive. Kinematic study of a typical MCS reveals that the monsoon depth increases at the passage of MCS, with cyclonic vorticity dominating from the surface to 300 hpa while anticyclonic vorticity was observed around 200 hpa, and this confirms the importance of low level convergence and upper level divergence as the major requirements for storm mobilization and maintenance.

  14. Mesoscale convective systems in Spain: instability conditions and moisture sources involved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, S.; Hernandez, E.; Gallego, D.; Lorente, P.

    2008-04-01

    Source-receptor water vapor content areas are analyzed for a particular case of deep mesoscale convective system (MCS) developed over the Mediterranean margin of Spain in October 1982. The aim of this work is to study simultaneously the atmospheric instability conditions and water vapour fluxes which finally resulted in very severe precipitation rates, reaching up to 600 mm in a single day. Humidity amounts and transport are quantified along the trajectories computed from a lagrangian particle simulation model (FLEXPART6.2). To evaluate the precipitation probability, the water vapor content and both thermodynamic and dynamic atmospheric instability components were assessed. The October 1982 Iberian MCS occurred as a consequence of a deep cutoff low detected between 500 and 200 hPa levels. The dynamical instability was measured through potential vorticity anomalies and Q vector divergence, which presented their maximum and minimum centers respectively over south-eastern Iberia. Synoptic and dynamic instability conditions were obtained from the ERA-40 reanalysis dataset. It is observed that during this severe weather episode, the specific humidity increased along the lowest and easternmost trajectories, which are mainly spread over the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Development of a regional rain retrieval algorithm for exclusive mesoscale convective systems over peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Devajyoti; Sharma, Sanjay; Das, Jyotirmay; Gairola, R. M.

    2012-06-01

    The present study emphasize the development of a region specific rain retrieval algorithm by taking into accounts the cloud features. Brightness temperatures (Tbs) from various TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) channels are calibrated with near surface rain intensity as observed from the TRMM - Precipitation Radar. It shows that Tb-R relations during exclusive-Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) events have greater dynamical range compared to combined events of non-MCS and MCS. Increased dynamical range of Tb-R relations for exclusive-MCS events have led to the development of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based regional algorithm for rain intensity estimation. By using the exclusive MCSs algorithm, reasonably good improvement in the accuracy of rain intensity estimation is observed. A case study of a comparison of rain intensity estimation by the exclusive-MCS regional algorithm and the global TRMM 2A12 rain product with a Doppler Weather Radar shows significant improvement in rain intensity estimation by the developed regional algorithm.

  16. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. II - Interactions between mesoscale convective systems and the antecedent waves. [Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.; Dorian, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions between preexisting gravity waves and convective systems were investigated using data obtained by the Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment observational network in Montana on July 11-12, 1981. The results indicate that strong convection substantially affects gravity waves locally by augmenting the wave amplitude, reducing its wavelength, distorting the wave shape, altering the wave phase velocity, and greatly weakening the in-phase covariance between the perturbation wind and pressure fields. These convective effects upon gravity waves are explained in terms of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressure forces and gust front processes associated with thunderstorms.

  17. Investigation into a displacement bias in numerical weather prediction models' forecasts of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Charles

    Although often hard to correctly forecast, mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are responsible for a majority of warm-season, localized extreme rain events. This study investigates displacement errors often observed by forecasters and researchers in the Global Forecast System (GFS) and the North American Mesoscale (NAM) models, in addition to the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the 4-km convection allowing NSSL-WRF models. Using archived radar data and Stage IV precipitation data from April to August of 2009 to 2011, MCSs were recorded and sorted into unique six-hour intervals. The locations of these MCSs were compared to the associated predicted precipitation field in all models using the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) tool, produced by the Developmental Testbed Center and verified through manual analysis. A northward bias exists in the location of the forecasts in all lead times of the GFS, NAM, and ECMWF models. The MODE tool found that 74%, 68%, and 65% of the forecasts were too far to the north of the observed rainfall in the GFS, NAM and ECMWF models respectively. The higher-resolution NSSL-WRF model produced a near neutral location forecast error with 52% of the cases too far to the south. The GFS model consistently moved the MCSs too quickly with 65% of the cases located to the east of the observed MCS. The mean forecast displacement error from the GFS and NAM were on average 266 km and 249 km, respectively, while the ECMWF and NSSL-WRF produced a much lower average of 179 km and 158 km. A case study of the Dubuque, IA MCS on 28 July 2011 was analyzed to identify the root cause of this bias. This MCS shattered several rainfall records and required over 50 people to be rescued from mobile home parks from around the area. This devastating MCS, which was a classic Training Line/Adjoining Stratiform archetype, had numerous northward-biased forecasts from all models, which are examined here. As common with

  18. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.; Heymsfield, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6--8 and 1--3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  19. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hence, Deanna A.; Houze, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6 8 and 1 3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  20. Evolution of Mesoscale Convective System over the South Western Peninsular India: Observations from Microwave Radiometer and Simulations using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Sijikumar, S.; Renju, R.; Tinu, K. A.; Raju, Suresh C.

    2012-07-01

    Meso-scale Convective Systems (MCS) are important in view of their large cumulous build-up, vertical extent, short horizontal extent and associated thundershowers. The Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) over the equatorial coastal station Thiruvanathapuram (Trivandrum, 8.55oN, 76.9oE), has been utilized to understand the genesis of Mesoscale convective system (MCS), that occur frequently during the pre-monsoon season. Examination of the measurement of relative humidity, temperature and cloud liquid water measurements, over the zenith and two scanning elevation angles (15o) viewing both over the land and the sea respectively revealed that the MCS generally originate over the land during early afternoon hours, propagate seawards over the observational site and finally dissipate over the sea, with accompanying rainfall and latent heat release. The simulations obtained using Advanced Research-Weather Research and Forecast (WRF-ARW) model effectively reproduces the thermodynamical and microphysical properties of the MCS. The time duration and quantity of rainfall obtained by the simulations also well compared with the observations. Analysis also suggests that wind shear in the upper troposphere is responsible for the growth and the shape of the convective cloud.

  1. Mesoscale Convective Systems Which Do and Do Not Produce Sprites: Results From STEPS 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, W. A.; Andersen, L. M.; Nelson, T. E.; Cummer, S. A.; Jauget, N. C.; Huffines, G. R.

    2005-12-01

    During the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) conducted during the summer of 2000 over the High Plains, we addressed two basic questions. First, what are the characteristics of those positive cloud-to-ground strokes (+CGs) which produce transient luminous events (TLEs), especially sprites, halos and elves? It was found the vast majority TLEs optically confirmed over High Plains storms were associated with large charge moment change events (DMq), exceeding thresholds of several hundred C km, substantially larger than the DMq for "normal" lightning. This finding is entirely consistent with present theoretical models of sprite ignition at ~75 km due to conventional breakdown. The second question addressed concerned what types of storms produced these unusual CG discharges. Not all mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) produce TLEs, or if they do, do so only for certain stages in their life cycle. Why? Meteorological analyses of TLE-producing systems had determined that the TLE parent +CGs were concentrated mostly in the stratiform region of their parent storms. Initial and updated analyses for Lightning Mapping Array data from the New Mexico Tech system suggested that the majority of the charge in the parent +CGs was removed from relatively low altitudes in the storm, typically 3 to 5 km AGL. After summarizing the characteristics of over 1500 TLEs and their parent MCSs, some clear criteria have become evident. First the cloud top canopy must be larger than 20,000 sq. km at the 50C level, and the coldest temperature must be at least -55C. Second, the peak reflectivity somewhere in the parent storm must exceed 55 dBZ. This requirement for a very tall and also intense storm initially seems at odds with the known environment of TLE parent CGs (low in the startiform region). Yet, as will be discussed, the emerging conceptual models of TLEs within trailing stratiform regions suggests the overall picture is indeed consistent with what is known

  2. Charge transfer and in-cloud structure of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng; Cummer, Steven A.; Li, Jingbo; Han, Feng; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    2009-08-01

    Lightning observations in the very high frequency band and measurements of ultra low frequency magnetic fields are analyzed to investigate the charge transfer and in-cloud structure of eight positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) strokes in a mesoscale convective system. Although no high altitude images were recorded, these strokes contained large charge moment changes (1500-3200 C·km) capable of producing nighttime sprites. Even though the convective region of the storm was where the flashes originated and where the CG strokes could occur, the charge transferred to ground was mainly from the stratiform region. The post-stroke long continuing currents were connected to highly branched negative leader extension into the stratiform region. While the storm dissipated, the altitude of negative leader propagation in the stratiform area dropped gradually from 8 to 5 km, indicating that in some and perhaps all of these strokes, it was the upper positive charge in the stratiform region that was transferred.

  3. Impact of a Stochastic Parameterization of Cumulus Convection Using Cellular Automata in a Meso-Scale Ensemble Prediction System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, L.

    2014-12-01

    A common way of addressing forecast uncertainty in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models is to use ensemble prediction. The idea behind ensemble predictionis to simulate the sensitivity of the forecast to the initial and boundary conditions, as well as model construction error, such as sub-grid physical parameterizations. Existing methods used in order to account for such model consturction uncertainty include; multi-model ensembles, adding random perturbations to the tendencies produced by the parameterizations, or perturbing parameters within the parameterizations. Although such methods are successful in a probabilistic sense, individual ensemble members can be degraded in a deterministic sense by adding random non-physical perturbations. Furthermore, different ensemble members can have different bias (and skill) since they are based on separate models and/or parameters. Another way of accounting for model uncertainty (due to sub-grid variability) is to introduce random variability in the convection parameterization itself. Here we will present the impact of the stochastic deep convection parameterization using cellular automata described in Bengtsson et. al. 2013, as implemented in the high resolution meso-scale ensemble prediction system HarmonEPS. The questions we would like to answer are; can we improve the forecast skill both in a deterministic and probabilistic sense using the stochastic convection scheme? Can the stochastic parameterization in terms of the spread/skill relationship compete with the multi-model approach? Furthermore, the stochastic parameterization proposed in Bengtsson et. al. 2013 addresses lateral communication between model grid-boxes by using a cellular automaton. It was demonstrated that the scheme in a deterministic model is capable of contributing to the organization of convective squall-lines and meso-scale convective systems. We study if and how uncertainties with origin on the sub-grid scale transfer to the larger atmospheric

  4. Controls on phase composition and ice water content in a convection-permitting model simulation of a tropical mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Charmaine N.; Protat, Alain; Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Simulations of tropical convection from an operational numerical weather prediction model are evaluated with the focus on the model's ability to simulate the observed high ice water contents associated with the outflow of deep convection and to investigate the modelled processes that control the phase composition of tropical convective clouds. The 1 km horizontal grid length model that uses a single-moment microphysics scheme simulates the intensification and decay of convective strength across the mesoscale convective system. However, deep convection is produced too early, the OLR (outgoing longwave radiation) is underestimated and the areas with reflectivities > 30 dBZ are overestimated due to too much rain above the freezing level, stronger updraughts and larger particle sizes in the model. The inclusion of a heterogeneous rain-freezing parameterisation and the use of different ice size distributions show better agreement with the observed reflectivity distributions; however, this simulation still produces a broader profile with many high-reflectivity outliers demonstrating the greater occurrence of convective cells in the simulations. Examining the phase composition shows that the amount of liquid and ice in the modelled convective updraughts is controlled by the following: the size of the ice particles, with larger particles growing more efficiently through riming and producing larger IWC (ice water content); the efficiency of the warm rain process, with greater cloud water contents being available to support larger ice growth rates; and exclusion or limitation of graupel growth, with more mass contained in slower falling snow particles resulting in an increase of in-cloud residence times and more efficient removal of LWC (liquid water content). In this simulated case using a 1 km grid length model, horizontal mass divergence in the mixed-phase regions of convective updraughts is most sensitive to the turbulence formulation. Greater mixing of environmental air

  5. The impact of soil moisture inhomogeneities on modification of a mesoscale convective system: a budget-based model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Bianca; Gantner, Leonhard; Kalthoff, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In order to investigate the sensitivity of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) to soil moisture inhomogeneities in West Africa cloud-resolving simulations with the COSMO-Model initialized with European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analyses data were performed. Three scenarios were investigated: homogeneous soil type and soil moisture (HOM) and homogeneous soil type with a north-south oriented band of two degrees width with reduced soil moisture (BANDT) and with increased soil moisture (BANDM). In all experiments an MCS developed east of the band in the late afternoon. Precipitation related to the MCS was continuously strong in HOM. When the MCS approached the band with reduced soil moisture in BANDT precipitation decreased because of higher convective inhibition (CIN) ahead of the band. Reaching the drier band precipitation increased again. The moist band in BANDM caused an increase of precipitation ahead of the band and a decrease in the area with higher soil moisture caused by very high CIN values. Soil moisture inhomogeneities induced thermal circulations which led to modified conditions in the lower troposphere and to changes in CIN and accounted for the modification of precipitation of an MCS. In BANDT, precipitating cells already developed in the western part of the dry band in the late afternoon, where convergence, generated by thermal circulations and supported by downward mixing of momentum from the African Easterly Jet, triggered convection.

  6. Attributes of mesoscale convective systems at the land-ocean transition in Senegal during NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delonge, Marcia S.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Chan, Stephen; Kucera, Paul A.; Joseph, Everette; Gaye, Amadou T.; Daouda, Badiane

    2010-05-01

    In this study we investigate the development of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) as it moved from West Africa to the Atlantic Ocean on 31 August 2006. We document surface and atmospheric conditions preceding and following the MCS, particularly near the coast. These analyses are used to evaluate how thermodynamic and microphysical gradients influence storms as they move from continental to maritime environments. To achieve these goals, we employ observations from NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) from the NASA S band polarimetric Doppler radar, a meteorological flux tower, upper-air soundings, and rain gauges. We show that the MCS maintained a convective leading edge and trailing stratiform region as it propagated from land to ocean. The initial strength and organization of the MCS were associated with favorable antecedent conditions in the continental lower atmosphere, including high specific humidity (18 g kg-1), temperatures (300 K), and wind shear. While transitioning, the convective and stratiform regions became weaker and disorganized. Such storm changes were linked to less favorable thermodynamic, dynamic, and microphysical conditions over ocean. To address whether storms in different life-cycle phases exhibited similar features, a composite analysis of major NAMMA events was performed. This analysis revealed an even stronger shift to lower reflectivity values over ocean. These findings support the hypothesis that favorable thermodynamic conditions over the coast are a prerequisite to ensuring that MCSs do not dissipate at the continental-maritime transition, particularly due to strong gradients that can weaken West African storms moving from land to ocean.

  7. The impact of soil moisture inhomogeneities on the modification of a mesoscale convective system: An idealised model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Bianca; Kalthoff, Norbert; Gantner, Leonhard

    2011-07-01

    In order to investigate the sensitivity of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) to soil moisture inhomogeneities in West Africa, convection-permitting simulations with the COSMO model are performed. Three scenarios are investigated in detail: a homogeneous soil texture and soil moisture distribution and a homogeneous soil texture field with a north-south oriented band of two degrees width with reduced and increased soil moisture, respectively. In all experiments an MCS develops in the late afternoon some hundred kilometres east of the band with modified soil moisture. About 100 km east of the band, significant differences in precipitation occur: when the MCS approaches the band with lower soil moisture, precipitation decreases because of higher convective inhibition (CIN) and higher saturation deficit above the lifting condensation level ahead of the band. Reaching the dry band, precipitation restarts. The moist band causes an increase of precipitation ahead of the band and a decrease over it due to very high CIN and saturation deficit values above the boundary layer. In both cases, the soil moisture patterns induce a secondary circulation which modifies the conditions in the lower troposphere. These altered conditions are responsible for the changes of the convection-related parameters and for the modification of the MCS. Additionally, the dry band causes the evolution of precipitating cells over its western part in the late afternoon. The cells are triggered by superimposed convergences, one generated by the thermally-forced circulation of the dry band and the other one caused by different boundary-layer depths over the dry band and its surroundings. The very deep boundary layer over the dry band is accompanied by downward mixing of momentum from the African Easterly Jet, resulting in a reduced westerly monsoon flow so that convergence and divergence zones develop at the transitions from the deeper to the lower boundary layers.

  8. The effect of the United States Great Lakes on the maintenance of derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M.; Sparks, J.; Graham, R.

    2003-04-01

    The primary aim of this research is to investigate the influence of the United States Great Lakes on the intensity of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). One of the greatest nowcast challenges during the warm season is anticipating the impact of the Great Lakes on severe convection, particularly MCSs capable of producing damaging widespread windstorms known as derechos. Since a major derecho activity corridor lies over the Great Lakes region, it is important to understand the effects of the Lakes on the intensity and propagation of severe wind producing MCSs. Specific objectives of the research include: 1) The development of a short-term climatology of MCS events that have impacted the Great Lakes region over the past seven years; 2) An analysis of radar, satellite, surface (including buoy and lighthouse observations), and lake surface temperature data to determine the environmental conditions impacting the evolution of MCSs passing over a Great Lake; 3) An examination of MCS initiation times and seasonal frequencies of occurrence to delineate temporal consistencies in MCS evolution due to changing lake surface temperatures; and 4) The development of conceptual and forecast models to help anticipate MCS intensity and morphology as these systems interact with the Great Lakes environment.

  9. Evolution of the total lightning activity in a leading-line and trailing stratiform mesoscale convective system over Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongxia; Qie, Xiushu; Xiong, Yajun; Feng, Guili

    2011-07-01

    Data from the Beijing SAFIR 3000 lightning detection system and Doppler radar provided some insights into the three-dimensional lightning structure and evolution of a leading-line and trailing-stratiform (LLTS) mesoscale convective system (MCS) over Beijing on 31 July 2007. Most of the lightning in the LLTS-MCS was intracloud (IC) lightning, while the mean ratio of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning to -CG lightning was 1:4, which was higher than the average value from previous studies. The majority of CG lightning occurred in the convective region of the radar echo, particularly at the leading edge of the front. Little IC lightning and little +CG lightning occurred in the stratiform region. The distribution of the CG lightning indicated that the storm had a tilted dipole structure given the wind shear or the tripole charge structure. During the storm's development, most of the IC lightning occurred at an altitude of ˜9.5 km; the lightning rate reached its maximum at 10.5 km, the altitude of IC lightning in the mature stage of the storm. When the thunderstorm began to dissipate, the altitude of the IC lightning decreased gradually. The spatial distribution of lightning was well correlated with the rainfall on the ground, although the peak value of rainfall appeared 75 min later than the peak lightning rate.

  10. A comparison of cloud radiation fields obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and a numerical simulation of a tropical mesoscale convective system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Takmeng; Stackhouse, Paul; Stephens, Graeme; Valero, Francisco

    1990-01-01

    The radiation budget of a tropical mesoscale convective system (MCS) is investigated by comparing in situ aircraft measurements obtained in a tropical MCS during the Equatorial Mesoscale Experiment (EMEX), and coordinated aircraft radiation measurements, with radiation profiles calculated using cloud properties obtained from a cloud model simulation of a tropical MCS. Preliminary results indicate that the stratiform region of the tropical System B simulation represents the gross properties of the observed stratiform system between 4.5 to 15 km. The flux profiles predicted by the model are consistent with observed fluxes.

  11. Contribution of a mesoscale analysis to convection nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, C.; Ducrocq, V.; Sénési, S.

    We study the contribution of surface data to convection nowcasting outside mountainous areas and under weak synoptic forcing. The CANARI optimal interpolation mesoscale analysis scheme is used, which combines guess-fields from the fine-mesh (10 km) ALADIN model with hourly routine observations arising from a mesonet of automated ground stations. A tuning of this scheme is realized in order to fit convective systems scales (meso-β scale) as well as the mesonet scale. Then, these grid point analyses allow the computation of diagnostic fields such as Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and MOisture CONvergence (MOCON), which are relevant in convection nowcasting. These diagnostic fields are compared with radar reflectivities observed from 1 to 5 hours later, so as to estimate their skill in predicting convection triggering. First results on six case studies show that convection generally occurs over areas where high CAPE values and persisting convergence were analyzed 4 to 1 hour before.

  12. Sensitivity of summer ensembles of super-parameterized US mesoscale convective systems to cloud resolving model microphysics and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, E.; Yu, S.; Kooperman, G. J.; Morrison, H.; Wang, M.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Microphysical and resolution sensitivities of explicitly resolved convection within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the central United States are well documented in the context of single case studies simulated by cloud resolving models (CRMs) under tight boundary and initial condition constraints. While such an experimental design allows researchers to causatively isolate the effects of CRM microphysical and resolution parameterizations on modeled MCSs, it is still challenging to produce conclusions generalizable to multiple storms. The uncertainty associated with the results of such experiments comes both from the necessary physical constraints imposed by the limited CRM domain as well as the inability to evaluate or control model internal variability. A computationally practical method to minimize these uncertainties is the use of super-parameterized (SP) global climate models (GCMs), in which CRMs are embedded within GCMs to allow their free interaction with one another as orchestrated by large-scale global dynamics. This study uses NCAR's SP Community Atmosphere Model 5 (SP-CAM5) to evaluate microphysical and horizontal resolution sensitivities in summer ensembles of nocturnal MCSs in the central United States. Storm events within each run were identified using an objective empirical orthogonal function (EOF) algorithm, then further calibrated to harmonize individual storm signals and account for the temporal and spatial heterogeneity between them. Three summers of control data from a baseline simulation are used to assess model internal interannual variability to measure its magnitude relative to sensitivities in a number of distinct experimental runs with varying CRM parameters. Results comparing sensitivities of convective intensity to changes in fall speed assumptions about dense rimed species, one- vs. two-moment microphysics, and CRM horizontal resolution will be discussed.

  13. Mesoscale Convective Systems in SCSMEX: Simulated by a Regional Climate Model and a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Qian, I.; Lau, W.; Shie, C.-L.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A Regional Land-Atmosphere Climate Simulation (RELACS) System is being developed and implemented at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. One of the major goals of RELACS is to use a regional scale model with improved physical processes, in particular land-related processes, to understand the role of the land surface and its interaction with convection and radiation as well as the water and energy cycles in Indo-China/ South China Sea (SCS)/China, N. America and S. America. The Penn State/NCAR MM5 atmospheric modeling system, a state of the art atmospheric numerical model designed to simulate regional weather and climate, has been successfully coupled to the Goddard Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-C loud Exchange (PLACE) land surface model. PLACE allows for the effects of vegetation, and thus important physical processes such as evapotranspiration and interception are included. The PLACE model incorporates vegetation type and has been shown in international comparisons to accurately predict evapotranspiration and runoff over a wide variety of land surfaces. The coupling of MM5 and PLACE creates a numerical modeling system with the potential to more realistically simulate the atmosphere and land surface processes including land-sea interaction, regional circulations such as monsoons, and flash flood events. RELACS has been used to simulate the onset of the South China Sea Monsoon in 1986, 1997 and 1998. Sensitivity tests on various land surface models, cumulus parameterization schemes (CPSs), sea surface temperature (SST) variations and midlatitude influences have been performed. These tests have indicated that the land surface model has a major impact on the circulation over the S. China Sea. CPSs can effect the precipitation pattern while SST variation can effect the precipitation amounts over both land and ocean. RELACS has also been used to understand the soil-precipitation interaction and feedback associated with a flood event that occurred in and around China

  14. Mesoscale Convective Systems in SCSMEX: Simulated by a Regional Climate Model and a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Lau, W.; Jia, Y.; Johnson, D.; Shie, C.-L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Regional Land-Atmosphere Climate Simulation (RELACS) System is being developed and implemented at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. One of the major goals of RELACS is to use a regional scale model with improved physical processes, in particular land-related processes, to understand the role of the land surface and its interaction with convection and radiation as well as the water and energy cycles in Indo-China/South China Sea (SCS)/China, North America and South America. The Penn State/NCAR MM5 atmospheric modeling system, a state of the art atmospheric numerical model designed to simulate regional weather and climate, has been successfully coupled to the Goddard Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE) land surface model, PLACE allows for the effect A vegetation, and thus important physical processes such as evapotranspiration and interception are included. The PLACE model incorporates vegetation type and has been shown in international comparisons to accurately predict evapotranspiration and runoff over a wide variety of land surfaces. The coupling of MM5 and PLACE creates a numerical modeling system with the potential to more realistically simulate the atmosphere and land surface processes including land-sea interaction, regional circulations such as monsoons, and flash flood events. RELACS has been used to simulate the onset of the South China Sea Monsoon in 1986, 1991 and 1998. Sensitivity tests on various land surface models, cumulus parameterization schemes (CPSs), sea surface temperature (SST) variations and midlatitude influences have been performed. These tests have indicated that the land surface model has a major impact on the circulation over the South China Sea. CPSs can effect the precipitation pattern while SST variation can effect the precipitation amounts over both land and ocean. RELACS has also been used to understand the soil-precipitation interaction and feedback associated with a flood event that occurred in and around

  15. Chemical composition in mesoscale convective systems during AMMA and its impact on the NOx and O3 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Roiger, A.; Stock, P.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.

    2010-05-01

    Deep convection is responsible for a rapid redistribution of trace gases between the boundary layer (BL) and the upper troposphere (UT). Large convective systems as mesoscale convective systems (MCS) very effectively contribute to this redistribution and change the oxidizing capacity in the UT over a wide area. Especially ozone (O3) plays an essential role in determining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and contributes largely to the global greenhouse effect. The production of ozone is driven by the oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in presence of nitrogen oxide (NO) and sunlight. During the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Special Observation Period carried out in West Africa in July and August 2006, the DLR research aircraft Falcon probed several MCS originating over different vegetation types both north and south of the ITCZ. The outflow of the MCS was penetrated close to the convective core but also further away (~500 km). In the fresh outflow, mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios between 0.3-0.4 nmol mol-1 were observed. A rapid entrainment of ambient air in the UT was observed and both CO and O3 mixing ratios soon reached ambient conditions. However, in the aged outflow NOx mixing ratios were still clearly enhanced above the background. The potential for ozone production in the UT was very different depending on the chemical composition in the BL and two different cases are presented. Mainly pollution from the BL (transported upward) but also some production by lightning contributed to enhance the NOx mixing ratios in the fresh outflow. The nitrogen mass flux in the MCS outflow was determined and combined with measurements from a smaller lightning location network (LINET) and with global lightning observations from LIS. A global contribution of ~1-2 Tg(N) a-1 was estimated to be produced by lightning if we assume that MCS over West Africa are typical global thunderstorms. Compared to results from

  16. Synoptic controls of outer mesoscale convective systems with high impact rainfall in western north pacific tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buo-Fu; Elsberry, Russell L.; Lee, Cheng-Shang

    2016-02-01

    The generality of our conceptual model of Outer Mesoscale Convective System (OMCS) formation in western North Pacific Tropical Cyclones (TCs) that was based on a case study of Typhoon Fengshen (2008) is examined with a data base of 80 OMCSs during 1999-2009. Formations of 41 "Intersection type (Itype)" OMCSs are similar to our conceptual model in that the key feature is an elongated moisture band in the northerly TC circulation that interacts with the southwest monsoon flow. Two subtypes of these I-type OMCSs are defined based on different formation locations relative to the TC center, and relative to the monsoon flow, that lead to either outward or more cyclonic propagation of the OMCSs. Twenty-five "Upstream type (U-type)" OMCSs form in a similar moisture band, but upstream of the intersection of the outer TC circulation with the monsoon flow. Another 12 "Monsoon type (Mtype)" OMCSs are different from our conceptual model as the formation locations are within the monsoon flow south to the confluence region of TC northerly circulation with the monsoon flow. In all of these OMCSs, the monsoon flow is an important contributor to their climatology and synoptic environment. Expanded conceptual models of where the threat of heavy rainfall associated with the four types of OMCSs may be expected are provided based on different OMCS formation locations relative to the TC center and different propagation vectors in a storm-relative coordinate system.

  17. Interaction between moist physics, cumulus parameterization and GCM grid spacing in simulations of midlatitude mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. J.; Posselt, D. J.; Arritt, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    We have examined the representation of MCSs in the NASA GEOS-5 GCM via simulations of the 1993 Midwest flood period. The 1993 Midwest flood period is well suited for evaluating the ability of climate models to simulate aggregate characteristics of midlatitude mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). During June-July 1993, MCSs were unusually frequent and unusually coherent in space. As a consequence, time average quantities have MCS signatures, and composites of MCSs can be constructed from a relatively brief data record. A suite of numerical experiments is conducted for the purpose of examining the relative importance of interactions between cumulus and moist physical parameterizations at different model horizontal grid spacings. We examine composites of simulated MCSs, and find that it is necessary, particularly as grid spacing is reduced from 1.0 to 0.25-degree, to properly represent the heating profiles created by the interaction between cumulus and moist physics parameterization. Reconfiguration of the cumulus parameterization results in an increase in the availability of cloud material to the grid scale moist physics parameterization, resulting in increased grid scale precipitation and less precipitation generated in the cumulus parameterization. This modification leads to improvement in the precipitation spatial autocorrelation and more realistic treatment of the distribution of midlatitude MCSs.

  18. Convective cell development and propagation in a mesoscale convective complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Yoo-Shin; Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    A case study was made of the mesoscale convective complex (MCC) which occurred over southern Oklahoma and northern Texas on 27 May 1981. This storm moved in an eastsoutheasterly direction and during much of its lifetime was observable by radars at Oklahoma City, Ok. and Stephenville, Tx. It was found that the direction of cell (VIP level 3 or more reflectivity) propagation was somewhat erratic but approximately the same as the system (VIP level 1 reflectivity) movement and the ambient wind. New cells developed along and behind the gust front make it appear that once the MCC is initiated, a synergistic relationship exists between the gust front and the MCC. The relationship between rainfall patterns and amounts and the infrared (IR) temperature field in the satellite imagery were examined. The 210 K isotherm of GOES IR imagery was found to encompass the rain area of the storm. The heaviest rainfall was in the vicinity of the VIP level 3 cells and mostly contained within the 205 K isotherm of GOES IR imagery.

  19. The climatology of lightning producing large impulse charge moment changes with an emphasis on mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, Nicholas

    The use of both total charge moment change (CMC) and impulse charge moment change (iCMC) magnitudes to assess the potential of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke to induce a mesospheric sprite has been well described in literature. However, this work has primarily been carried out on a case study basis. To complement these previous case studies, climatologies of regional, seasonal, and diurnal observations of large-iCMC discharges are presented. In this study, large-iCMC discharges for thresholds > 100 and > 300 C km in both positive and negative polarities are analyzed on a seasonal basis using density maps of 2o by 2o resolution across the conterminous U.S. using data from the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN). Also produced were local solar time diurnal distributions in eight different regions covering the lower 48 states as well as the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf Stream. In addition, National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) cloud-to-ground (CG) flash diurnal distributions were included. The seasonal maps show the predisposition of large positive iCMCs to dominate across the Northern Great Plains, with large negative iCMCs favored in the Southeastern U.S. year-round. During summer, the highest frequency of large positive iCMCs across the Upper Midwest aligns closely with the preferred tracks of nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). As iCMC values increase above 300 C km, the maximum shifts eastward of the 100 C km maximum in the Central Plains. The Southwestern U.S. also experiences significant numbers of large-iCMC discharges in summer, presumably due to convection associated with the North American Monsoon (NAM). The Gulf Stream is active year round, with a bias towards more large positive iCMCs in winter. Diurnal distributions in the eight regions support these conclusions, with a nocturnal peak in large-iCMC discharges in the Northern Great Plains and Great Lakes, an early- to mid-afternoon peak in the Intermountain West and the

  20. Mesoscale analyses and diagnostic parameters for deep convection nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, C.; Ducrocq, V.; Sénési, S.

    2000-06-01

    We study the contribution of surface data to convection nowcasting over regions of modest orography and under weak synoptic forcing. Hourly mesoscale analyses are performed using the CANARI optimal interpolation analysis scheme, which combines first-guess fields from the fine mesh (10 km) ALADIN model with hourly routine observations arising from a mesonet of automated ground stations. These analyses then allow the computation of diagnostic parameters that quantify convective instability, low-level lifting processes and moisture supply: these are the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the moisture convergence (MOCON). A tuning of the analysis scheme is needed first for it to fit the meso-?-scale. Then, the skill of the computed diagnostics for convection nowcasting is evaluated by comparing their fields with radar reflectivities observed between one and four hours after the analysis time. This is done for four selected convective situations. With regard to thunderstorm triggering, results show that this usually happens over areas of persistently high values of CAPE which undergo convergence continuously from four to one hour before the event; on the other hand, areas of persistent divergence are never associated with convective developments. In addition, the proposed criteria allow a significant reduction in the areal extent of predicted thunderstorms (i.e. decreasing the false-alarm rate) compared with what can be currently done on an operational basis, while maintaining a low non-detection rate. As to convection monitoring, we find that the organization of convective systems into a reflectivity line is preceded by a similar organization in the MOCON field from one to three hours ahead.

  1. HAIC/HIWC field campaign - investigating ice microphysics in high ice water content regions of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter; Lilie, Lyle; Dezitter, Fabien; Grandin, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Despite existing research programs focusing on tropical convection, high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) - potentially encountered by commercial aircraft and related to reported in-service events - remain poorly documented either because investigation of such high IWC regions was not of highest priority or because utilized instrumentation was not capable of providing accurate cloud microphysical measurements. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The French Falcon 20 research aircraft had been equipped among others with a state-of-the-art in situ microphysics package including the IKP (isokinetic evaporator probe which provides a reference measurement of IWC and TWC), the CDP (cloud droplet spectrometer probe measuring particles in the range 2-50 µm), the 2D-S (2D-Stereo, 10-1280 µm) and PIP (precipitation imaging probe, 100-6400 µm) optical array probes. Microphysical data collection has been performed mainly at -40°C and -30°C levels, whereas little data could be sampled at -50°C and at -15C/-10°C. The study presented here focuses on ice crystal size properties, thereby analyzing in detail the 2D image data from 2D-S and PIP optical array imaging probes. 2D images recorded with 2D-S and PIP were processed in order to extract a large variety of geometrical parameters, such as maximum diameter (Dmax), 2D surface equivalent diameter (Deq), and the corresponding number particle size distribution (PSD). Using the PSD information from both probes, a composite size distribution was then built, with sizes ranging from few tens of µm to roughly 10 mm. Finally, mass-size relationships for ice crystals in tropical convection were established in terms of power laws in order to compute median mass diameters MMDmax and

  2. A mesoscale numerical forecast of an intense convective snowburst along the East Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocin, P. J.; Uccellini, L. W.; Zack, J. W.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Mesoscale numerical forecasts utilizing the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) are documented for a convective snowburst in the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore, Maryland, region on March 8, 1984 that was associated with secondary cyclogenesis along the East Coast. The forecasts are presented to demonstrate the ability of a mesoscale model to simulate dynamical interactions and diabatic process for a wintertime convective event that was inadequately predicted by local forecasters and to note some of the possible benefits of using mesoscale models for day-to-day forecasting. The results from this and other recent mesoscale modeling studies indicate that three-hourly output of key model fields, when combined with other data sources, can be a valuable aid to forecasters concerned with predicting weather events that are mesoscale in character.

  3. The formation and dust lifting processes associated with a large Saharan meso-scale convective system (MCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Alex; Knippertz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    This work focusses on the meteorology that produced a large Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) and the dynamics of its associated cold pool. The case occurred between 8th-10th June 2010 and was initiated over the Hoggar and Aïr Mountains in southern Algeria and northern Niger respectively. The dust plume created covered parts of Algeria, Mali and Mauritania and was later deformed the by background flow and transported over the Atlantic and Mediterranean. This study is based on: standard surface observations (where available), ERA-Interim reanalysis, Meteosat imagery, MODIS imagery, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall estimates, Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat and a high resolution (3.3km) limited area simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. A variety of different processes appear to be important for the generation of this MCS and the spreading of the associated dusty cold pool. These include: the presence of a trough on the subtropical jet, the production of a tropical cloud plume, disruption to the structure of the Saharan heat low and the production of a Libyan high. These features produced moistening of the boundary layer and a convergence zone over the region of MCS initiation. Another important factor appears to have been the production of a smaller MCS and cold pool on the evening of the 7th June. This elevated low-level moisture and encouraged convective initiation the following day. Once triggered on the 8th June some cells grew and merged into a single large system that propagated south westward and produced a large cold pool that emanated from its northern edge. The cells on the northern edge of the system over the Hoggar grew and collapsed producing a haboob that spread over a large area. Cells further south continued to develop into the MCS and actively produce a cold pool over the system's lifetime. This undercut the dusty air from the earlier cold pool and

  4. A Climatology of Derecho-Producing Mesoscale Convective Systems in the Central and Eastern United States, 1986-95. Part I: Temporal and Spatial Distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    1998-11-01

    In 1888, Iowa weather researcher Gustavus Hinrichs gave widespread convectively induced windstorms the name "derecho". Refinements to this definition have evolved after numerous investigations of these systems; however, to date, a derecho climatology has not been conducted.This investigation examines spatial and temporal aspects of derechos and their associated mesoscale convective systems that occurred from 1986 to 1995. The spatial distribution of derechos revealed four activity corridors during the summer, five during the spring, and two during the cool season. Evidence suggests that the primary warm season derecho corridor is located in the southern Great Plains. During the cool season, derecho activity was found to occur in the southeast states and along the Atlantic seaboard. Temporally, derechos are primarily late evening or overnight events during the warm season and are more evenly distributed throughout the day during the cool season.

  5. The radiative budgets of a tropical mesoscale convective system during the EMEX-STEP-AMEX experiment. I - Observations. II - Model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Takmeng; Stephens, Graeme L.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1993-01-01

    The spatial radiation heating budget associated with tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is studied and the change of this heating/budget throughout the life cycle of such a cloud system is investigated. The movements of an EMEX 9 cloud cluster are described. The vertical structure of the cluster contains two types of imbedded convection: an upright vertical structure and a pronounced rearward slope with vertical extent of 14.5 km or more and a horizontal scale of about 40 km. The cloud base and cloud top altitude in the stratiform region are of the order of 4.8 km and 15-16 km, respectively. The upward and downward solar flux profiles suggest very little solar heating in these regions. A tropical MCS that occurred during the EMEX Mission 9 is simulated, and the simulation is shown to broadly agree with the observations. The simulation results, which are reported in detail, show how tropical mesoscale cloud systems provide an effective radiative heat source for the tropical atmosphere.

  6. Investigation of the predictability and physical mechanisms of an extreme-rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system along the Meiyu front in East China: An ensemble approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yali; Chen, Yangruixue

    2015-10-01

    Forecast uncertainties and physical mechanisms of a quasi-linear extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) along the Meiyu front in East China, during the midnight-to-morning hours on 8 July 2007, are studied using ensembles of 24 h convection-permitting simulations with a nested grid spacing of 1.11 km. The simulations reveal a strong sensitivity to uncertainties in the initial state despite the synoptic environment being favorable for heavy rainfall production. Linear changes of a less skillful member's initial state toward that of a skillful member lead to a monotonic improvement in the precipitation simulation, with the most significant contribution arising from changes in the moisture field. Sensitivity to physics parameterizations representing subgrid-scale processes fail to account for the larger simulation errors (missing the MCS) with the physics variation examined but could result in a large spread in the location and amount of accumulative rainfall. A robust feature of the best-performing members that reasonably simulate the MCS-associated heavy rainfall is the presence of a cold dome ahead of the Meiyu front generated by previous convection. The cold dome promotes nocturnal convective initiation by lifting high equivalent potential temperature air in the southwesterly flow to its level of free convection. The skillful members reproduce the convective backbuilding and echo-band training processes that are observed during this event and many other heavy rainfall events over China. In contrast, the less skillful members that miss the development of the MCS either do not simulate the previous convection or produce a cold dome that is too shallow to initiate the MCS.

  7. Structural Characteristics of Nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems in the U.S. Great Plains as Observed During the PECAN Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, D. J.; Dougherty, E.; Rasmussen, K. L.; Torres, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer in the U.S. Great Plains, some of the heaviest precipitation falls from large thunderstorm complexes known as Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). These frequently occurring MCSs are often nocturnal in nature, so the dynamics associated with these systems are more elusive than those in the daytime. The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field campaign was launched over a 7-week period as an endeavor to better understand nocturnal MCSs occurring in the Great Plains. PECAN featured a dense array of ground-based and airborne instruments to observe nocturnal MCS, including dual-polarization radars at multiple frequencies, mobile mesonets, and sounding units. Our role in PECAN involved deploying Ott Parsivel disdrometers to gain information on drop size distributions (DSDs) and fall speeds. Analysis of disdrometer data in conjunction with radar data presented using Contour Frequency by Altitude Diagrams (CFADs) and high-resolution radiosonde data allows for a structural comparison of PECAN MCS cases to previously identified MCS archetypes. Novel insights into the structural evolution of nocturnal MCSs in relation to their synoptic, mesoscale, and thermodynamic environments are presented, using data collected from dense and numerous observation platforms. Understanding the environmental conditions that result in different nocturnal MCS configurations is useful for gaining insight into precipitation distributions and potential severe weather and flooding hazards in the Great Plains.

  8. Modeling the impact of tropical mesoscale convective systems on Sahelian mineral dust budget: a case study during AMMA SOPs 1-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, C.; Cautenet, G.; Marticorena, B.; Bergametti, G.; Chatenet, B.; Rajot, J.-L.; Descroix, L.

    2009-04-01

    Tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are a prominent feature of the African meteorology. A continuous monitoring of the aeolian activity in an experimental site located in Niger showed that such events are responsible for the major part of the annual local wind erosion, i.e. for most of the Sahelian dust emission [Rajot, 2001]. However, the net effect of these MCSs on mineral dust budget has to be estimated: on the one hand, these systems produce extremely high surface wind velocities leading to intense dust uptake, but on the other hand, rainfalls associated with these systems can efficiently remove the emitted dust from the atmosphere. High resolution modeling of MCSs appears as the most relevant approach to assess the budget between dust emission and deposition in such local meteorological systems. As a first step, in order to properly estimate dust emissions, it is necessary to accurately describe the surface wind fields at the local scale. Indeed, dust emission is a threshold phenomenon that depends on the third power of surface wind velocity. This study focuses on a case study of dust emission associated with the passage of a MCS observed during one of the intensive observation period of the international African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA - SOPs 1-2) program. The simulations were made using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) coupled online with the dust production model (DPM) developed by Marticorena and Bergametti [1995] and recently improved by Laurent et al. [2008] for Africa. Two horizontal resolutions were tested (5 km and 2.5 km) as well as two microphysical schemes (a 1-moment scheme [Walko et al., 1995] and a 2-moment scheme [Meyers et al., 1997]). The use of the two convective parameterizations now available in the version 6 of RAMS (Kuo [1995] modified by Molinari [1985] and Molinari and Corsetti [1985], and Kain and Fritsch [1992; 1993]) to simulate cloud convection was also tested. Sensitivity tests have been

  9. An approach for parameterizing mesoscale precipitating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A cumulus parameterization laboratory has been described which uses a reference numerical model to fabricate, calibrate and verify a cumulus parameterization scheme suitable for use in mesoscale models. Key features of this scheme include resolution independence and the ability to provide hydrometeor source functions to the host model. Thus far, only convective scale drafts have been parameterized, limiting the use of the scheme to those models which can resolve the mesoscale circulations. As it stands, the scheme could probably be incorporated into models having a grid resolution greater than 50 km with results comparable to the existing schemes for the large-scale models. We propose, however, to quantify the mesoscale circulations through the use of the cumulus parameterization laboratory. The inclusion of these mesoscale drafts in the existing scheme will hopefully allow the correct parameterization of the organized mesoscale precipitating systems.

  10. An approach for parameterizing mesoscale precipitating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A cumulus parameterization laboratory has been described which uses a reference numerical model to fabricate, calibrate and verify a cumulus parameterization scheme suitable for use in mesoscale models. Key features of this scheme include resolution independence and the ability to provide hydrometeor source functions to the host model. Thus far, only convective scale drafts have been parameterized, limiting the use of the scheme to those models which can resolve the mesoscale circulations. As it stands, the scheme could probably be incorporated into models having a grid resolution greater than 50 km with results comparable to the existing schemes for the large-scale models. We propose, however, to quantify the mesoscale circulations through the use of the cumulus parameterization laboratory. The inclusion of these mesoscale drafts in the existing scheme will hopefully allow the correct parameterization of the organized mesoscale precipitating systems.

  11. Formation of African Easterly Waves and Mesoscale Convective Systems over Eastern Africa and its Implication to Tropical Cyclogenesis over Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang

    2009-07-01

    The formation of African easterly waves and mesoscale convective systems in eastern North Africa and its impacts on the tropical cyclogenesis over the eastern Atlantic Ocean is studied. Based on numerical simulations, AEWs can be produced by vortex shedding from the EH. The lee vortex is generated mainly by the blocking of the EH and helped by the horizontal shear associated with the northeasterly wind and the jet passing through the Turkana channel. The MCS was originated from the moist convection over the EH triggered by diurnal sensible heating. When the MCS moved to the lee of the mountain, it merged with the lee vortex of the AEW train and formed the coupled AEW-MCS system. Numerical simulations of a regional climate model indicate that the simulated fields do possess the AEW characteristics and the convection was generated over the EH, and the pre-Alberto AEW-MCS system was generated near the lee of the EH. Finer-resolution numerical simulations demonstrate that the vortex generated on the lee and MCS over the mountain eventually merge and become an AEW-MCS system which might serve as a precursor of tropical cyclone.

  12. Formation and evolution of mesoscale convective systems that brought the heavy rainfall over Seoul on September 21, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woomi; Lee, Tae-Young

    2013-11-01

    An investigation has been carried out using observational data and a numerical model to explain the formation and development of heavy precipitation systems on September 21, 2010. These systems were responsible for heavy rainfall over the middle Korean peninsula, with a maximum 24-h rainfall amount greater than 290 mm in the Seoul metropolitan area. Both observational analysis and a numerical simulation indicate that an important starting condition for this heavy rainfall event is the presence of a pressure trough over the Shandong peninsula and the Yellow Sea. Convective cells formed in the early morning over this trough area, grew into larger systems as they moved eastward, and induced the formation of a meso low over the Yellow Sea around 0000 UTC on September 21, 2010. A stationary front with significant vertical circulation developed in response to the deformation of flow associated with the meso low. In the meantime, multicell-type convective systems continuously developed and moved along the front. These storms developed further and produced heavy rainfall over the middle Korean peninsula, which includes the Seoul metropolitan area. According to observations, the band structure appeared to change after 0700 UTC as a narrow convection band developed over the sea, upstream of the existing band of multicell storms. Numerical simulation showed a similar transition. However, it failed to reproduce the stationary behavior of the observed band.

  13. Tropical cyclogenesis in Eastern Atlantique: Impact of earlier passage of African Easterly Wave trough on the evolution of Mesoscale Convective Systems and air-sea interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahat Dieng, Abdou; Eymard, Laurence; Moustapha Sall, Saidou; Lazar, Alban; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion

    2014-05-01

    A large part of Atlantic tropical depressions is generated in the Eastern basin in relation with the African Easterly Waves and the Mesoscale Convective Systems coming from the African continent. But initial surface oceanic and atmosphere conditions favoring such evolution are largely unknown. This study analyzes the structures of strengthening and dissipating MCSs evolving near the West African coast and evaluates the role of the surface oceanic condition on their evolutions. Satellite brightness temperature from Meteosat Second Generation over the summer season of 2006 and radar data for the same season between 1993 and 1999 are used to subjectively select fourteen cases of strengthening (dissipating) MCSs when they cross the Senegalese coast. With these observed MCSs locations, a lagged composite analysis is then performed using Era interim and CFSR reanalyses. Results show that the strengthening MCS composite is preceded by prior passage of an AEW near the West African coast. This first trough wave was associated with a cyclonic circulation in the low and middle troposphere and has enhanced southwest wind flow behind him feeding humidly to the strengthening MCS composite which was located in the vicinity of the second AEW trough. The contraction of the wave length associated with the two troughs was probably facilitated this supply in humidity. The Sea Surface Temperature seem contribute to the MCS enhancement through surface evaporation flux but this contribution is less important than humidity advection by the fist system. These conditions were not found in the dissipating MCS case which dissipated in a drying environment air dominated by subsidence and anticyclonic circulation. Key words: Mesoscale Convective System, African Easterly Wave, Sea Surface Temperature, tropical depression.

  14. Mesoscale disturbances in the tropical stratosphere excited by convection - Observations and effects on the stratospheric momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Scott, Stanley; Loewenstein, Max; Bowen, Stuart; Legg, Marion

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft temperature and pressure measurements as well as satellite imagery are used to establish the amplitudes and the space and time scale of potential temperature disturbances over convective systems. A conceptual model is proposed for the generation of mesoscale gravity waves by convection. The momentum forcing that a reasonable distribution of convection might exert on the tropical stratosphere through convectively excited mesoscale gravity waves of the observed amplitudes is estimated. Aircraft measurements show that presence of mesoscale disturbances in the lower stratospheric temperature, disturbances that appear to be associated with underlying convection. If the disturbances are convectively excited mesoscale gravity waves, their amplitude is sufficient that their breakdown in the upper stratosphere will exert a zonal force comparable to but probably smaller than the planetary-scale Kelvin waves.

  15. Mesoscale convective system surface pressure anomalies responsible for meteotsunamis along the U.S. East Coast on June 13th, 2013.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Christina A; Yablonsky, Richard M; Shen, Yang; Merrill, John; Kincaid, Christopher R; Pockalny, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Two destructive high-frequency sea level oscillation events occurred on June 13th, 2013 along the U.S. East Coast. Seafloor processes can be dismissed as the sources, as no concurrent offshore earthquakes or landslides were detected. Here, we present evidence that these tsunami-like events were generated by atmospheric mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) propagating from inland to offshore. The USArray Transportable Array inland and NOAA tide gauges along the coast recorded the pressure anomalies associated with the MCSs. Once offshore, the pressure anomalies generated shallow water waves, which were amplified by the resonance between the water column and atmospheric forcing. Analysis of the tidal data reveals that these waves reflected off the continental shelf break and reached the coast, where bathymetry and coastal geometry contributed to their hazard potential. This study demonstrates that monitoring MCS pressure anomalies in the interior of the U.S. provides important observations for early warnings of MCS-generated tsunamis. PMID:25420958

  16. Mesoscale convective system surface pressure anomalies responsible for meteotsunamis along the U.S. East Coast on June 13th, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wertman, Christina A.; Yablonsky, Richard M.; Shen, Yang; Merrill, John; Kincaid, Christopher R.; Pockalny, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Two destructive high-frequency sea level oscillation events occurred on June 13th, 2013 along the U.S. East Coast. Seafloor processes can be dismissed as the sources, as no concurrent offshore earthquakes or landslides were detected. Here, we present evidence that these tsunami-like events were generated by atmospheric mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) propagating from inland to offshore. The USArray Transportable Array inland and NOAA tide gauges along the coast recorded the pressure anomalies associated with the MCSs. Once offshore, the pressure anomalies generated shallow water waves, which were amplified by the resonance between the water column and atmospheric forcing. Analysis of the tidal data reveals that these waves reflected off the continental shelf break and reached the coast, where bathymetry and coastal geometry contributed to their hazard potential. This study demonstrates that monitoring MCS pressure anomalies in the interior of the U.S. provides important observations for early warnings of MCS-generated tsunamis. PMID:25420958

  17. Investigating an Automated Method to Explore Mesoscale Convective Complexes in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehall, Kim Dionne

    Mesoscale convective complexes are convectively driven, high impact weather systems with durations of approximately 10-12 hours, and are large contributors to daily and monthly rainfall totals. In West Africa, approximately 40 mesoscale convective complexes contribute an estimated one-quarter of the total rainfall amounts between July and September annually. As such, an understanding of the lifecycle, characteristics, frequency, and seasonality of these weather features is important for climate studies, agricultural and hydrological studies, and disaster management. Identification criteria of mesoscale convective complexes exist for infrared satellite data, but the spatial expanse and the spatio-temporal variability of the convective characteristics of these mesoscale convective complexes make rainfall characterization difficult, even in dense networks of radars and / or surface gauges. Hence, fully automated methods are required to explore mesoscale convective complexes in long-term infrared satellite data, and to determine their characteristics from other datasets, such as precipitation rate satellite datasets. Automated identification methods of mesoscale convective complexes are based on forward- and / or backward-in-time spatial-temporal analyses of infrared satellite data, and usually incorporate a manual component to verify the features and / or characterize the associated precipitation. These existing identification and precipitation characterization methods are not readily transferable to voluminous data or other satellite-derived datasets, thus hindering comprehensive studies of these features, both at weather and climate timescales. In recognizing these limitations and the growing volume of satellite data, this study explores the applicability of graph theory to creating a fully automated method for identifying mesoscale convective systems in satellite datasets. The framework for such a method is provided in this work. The results indicate that applying

  18. Predictability and Mechanism of an Extreme-Rainfall-Producing Mesoscale Convective System along a Mei-Yu Front in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yali; Ruixue Chen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Forecast uncertainties of a quasi-linear extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) along a mei-yu front in east China during the midnight-to-morning hours of 8 July 2007 are studied using several 24-h convection-permitting ensembles of simulation with the nested grid spacing of 1.11 km. There is considerable spread in the ensembles' precipitation forecast despite of the synoptic environment known conducive to heavy local rainfall. Forty simulations with perturbed initial condition reveal a very strong sensitivity to uncertainties in the initial fields. A robust feature of the best-performing members that reasonably simulated the MCS and associated heavy rainfall was the presence of a cold dome before the mei-yu front, which was generated by previous convection. The cold dome helped the nocturnal convective initiation (CI) by lifting the moist air in the low-level southwesterly flow to its level of free convection. In contrast, the bad members that missed the MCS' development could not simulate the previous convection or produced a cold dome that was not deep enough to initiate the MCS. At the initial time, the bad members had less atmospheric moisture over and upstream of the CI region than the good members. This resulted in the frontal-lifting-induced CI being delayed by about 4 hours and too weak convection to form the MCS in the bad members. Extra experiments were performed to test the sensitivity of precipitation simulation to the initial condition differences between a good and a bad member. Linear changing of the bad member's initial condition toward the good member's led to monotonic improvement of the precipitation simulation, with the most significant contribution from the moisture field. Sensitivity of the precipitation forecast to the model physical process parameterization schemes is examined by conducting three groups of experiment, each consisting of 9 members using different physics schemes and using the same initial condition as two

  19. Sensitivity of summer ensembles of fledgling superparameterized U.S. mesoscale convective systems to cloud resolving model microphysics and grid configuration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elliott, Elizabeth J.; Yu, Sungduk; Kooperman, Gabriel J.; Morrison, Hugh; Wang, Minghuai; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivities of simulated mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the central U.S. to microphysics and grid configuration are evaluated here in a global climate model (GCM) that also permits global-scale feedbacks and variability. Since conventional GCMs do not simulate MCSs, studying their sensitivities in a global framework useful for climate change simulations has not previously been possible. To date, MCS sensitivity experiments have relied on controlled cloud resolving model (CRM) studies with limited domains, which avoid internal variability and neglect feedbacks between local convection and larger-scale dynamics. However, recent work with superparameterized (SP) GCMs has shown that eastward propagating MCS-likemore » events are captured when embedded CRMs replace convective parameterizations. This study uses a SP version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SP-CAM5) to evaluate MCS sensitivities, applying an objective empirical orthogonal function algorithm to identify MCS-like events, and harmonizing composite storms to account for seasonal and spatial heterogeneity. A five-summer control simulation is used to assess the magnitude of internal and interannual variability relative to 10 sensitivity experiments with varied CRM parameters, including ice fall speed, one-moment and two-moment microphysics, and grid spacing. MCS sensitivities were found to be subtle with respect to internal variability, and indicate that ensembles of over 100 storms may be necessary to detect robust differences in SP-GCMs. Furthermore, these results emphasize that the properties of MCSs can vary widely across individual events, and improving their representation in global simulations with significant internal variability may require comparison to long (multidecadal) time series of observed events rather than single season field campaigns.« less

  20. The mesoscale forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by a simulated convective system. 1: Mass circulation and ageostrophic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Bart J.; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    The mutual forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized mesoscale adiabatic and diabatic processes within a simulated convective system (SCS) is investigated. Using isentropic diagnostics, results from a three-dimensional numerical simulation of an SCS are examined to study the isallobaric flow field, modes of dominant ageostrophic motion, and stability changes in relation to the mutual interdependence of adiabatic processes and latent heat release. Isentropic analysis affords an explicit isolation of a component of isallobaric flow associated with diabatic processes within the SCS. Prior to convective development within the simulations, atmospheric destabilization occurs through adiabatic ageostrophic mass adjustment and low-level convergence in association with the preexisting synoptic-scale upper-tropospheric jet streak. The SCS develops in a baroclinic zone and quickly initiates a vigorous mass circulation. By the mature stage, a pronounced vertical couplet of low-level convergence and upper-level mass divergence is established, linked by intense midtropospoheric diabatic heating. Significant divergence persists aloft for several hours subsequent to SCS decay. The dominant role of ageostrophic motion within which the low-level mass convergence develops is the adiabatic isallobaric component, while the mass divergence aloft develops principally through the diabatic isallobaric component. Both compnents are intrinsically linked to the convectively forced vertical mass transport. The inertial diabatic ageostrophic component is largest near the level of maximum heating and is responsible for the development of inertial instability to the north of SCS, resulting in this quadrant being preferred for outflow. The inertial advective component, the dominant term that produces the new downstream wind maximum, rapidly develops north of the SCS and through mutual adjustment creates the baroclinic support for the new jet streak.

  1. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  2. WRF forecast skill of the Great Plains low level jet and its correlation to forecast skill of mesoscale convective system precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squitieri, Brian Joseph

    One of the primary mechanisms for supporting summer nocturnal precipitation across the central United States is the Great Plains low-level Jet (LLJ). Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are organized storm complexes that can be supported from the upward vertical motion supplied at the terminus of the LLJ, which bring beneficial rains to farmers. As such, a need for forecasting these storm complexes exists. Correlating forecast skills of the LLJ and MCS precipitation in high spatial resolution modeling was the main goal of this research. STAGE IV data was used as observations for MCS precipitation and the 00-hr 13 km RUC analysis was employed for evaluation of the LLJ. The 4 km WRF was used for high resolution forecast simulations, with 2 microphysics and 3 planetary boundary layer schemes selected for a sensitivity study to see which model run best simulated reality. It was found that the forecast skill of the potential temperature and directional components of the geostrophic and ageostrophic winds within the LLJ correlated well with MCS precipitation, especially early during LLJ evolution. Since the 20 real cases sampled consisted of three LLJ types (synoptic, inertial oscillation and transition), forecast skill in other parameters such as deep layer and low level shear, convergence, frontogenesis and stability parameters were compared to MCS forecast skill to see if consistent signals outside of the LLJ influenced MCS evolution in forecasts. No correlations were found among these additional parameters. Given the variety of synoptic setups present, the lack of forecast skill correlations between several variables and MCSs resulted as different synoptic or mesoscale mechanisms played varying roles if importance in different cases.

  3. Mesoscale Convective Systems During SCSMEX: Simulations with a Regional Climate Model and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W. K.; Wang, Y.; Qian, J.; Shie, C. -L.; Lau, W. K. -M.; Kakar, R.; Starr, David O' C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) was conducted in May-June 1998. One of its major objectives is to better understand the key physical processes for the onset and evolution of the summer monsoon over Southeast Asia and southern China (Lau et al. 2000). Multiple observation platforms (e.g., soundings, Doppler radar, ships, wind seafarers, radiometers, etc.) during SCSMEX provided a first attempt at investigating the detailed characteristics of convection and circulation changes, associated with monsoons over the South China Sea region. SCSMEX also provided precipitation derived from atmospheric budgets (Johnson and Ciesielski 2002) and comparison to those obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). In this paper, a regional climate model and a cloud-resolving model are used to perform multi-day integrations to understand the precipitation processes associated with the summer monsoon over Southeast Asia and southern China. The regional climate model is used to understand the soil - precipitation interaction and feedback associated with a flood event that occurred in and around China's Atlantic River during SCSMEX. Sensitivity tests on various land surface models, cumulus parameterization schemes (CASE), sea surface temperature (SST) variations and midlatitude influences are also performed to understand the processes associated with the onset of the monsoon over the S. China Sea during SCSMEX. Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes with very fine spatial and temporal resolution. One of the major characteristics of CRMs is an explicit interaction between clouds, radiation and the land/ocean surface. It is for this reason that GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) has formed the GCSS (GEWEX Cloud System Study) expressly for the purpose of improving the representation of the moist processes in large-scale models using CRMs. The Goddard

  4. The mesoscale forcing of a midlatitude upper-tropospheric jet streak by a simulated convective system. 2: Kinetic energy and resolution analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Bart J.; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic energy (KE) analysis of the forcing of a mesoscale upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized diabatic processes within the simulated convective system (SCS) that was discussed in Part 1 is presented in this study. The relative contributions of the ageostrophic components of motion to the generation of KE of the convectively generated jet streak are compared, along with the KE generation by the rotational (nondivergent) and irrotational (divergent) mass transport. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations of SCS development to resolution is also briefly examined. Analysis within isentropic coordinates provides for an explicit determination of the influence of the diabatic processes on the generation of KE. The upper-level production of specific KE is due predominatly to the inertial advective ageostrophic component (IAD), and as such represents the primary process through which the KE of the convectively generated jet streak is realized. A secondary contribution by the inertial diabatic (IDI) term is observed. Partitioning the KE generation into its rotational and irrotational components reveals that the latter, which is directly linked to the diabatic heating within the SCS through isentropic continuity requirements, is the ultimate source of KE generation as the global area integral of generation by the rotational component vanishes. Comparison with an identical dry simulation reveals that the net generation of KE must be attributed to latent heating. Both the IAD and IDI ageostrophic components play important roles in this regard. Examination of results from simulations conducted at several resolutions supports the previous findings in that the effects of diabatic processes and ageostrophic motion on KE generation remain consistent. Resolution does impact the location and timing of SCS development, a result that has important implications in forecasting the onset of convection that develops from evolution of the large-scale flow and moisture

  5. The impact of reflectivity correction and conversion methods to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands. For most of the country this led to over 15 hours of near-continuous precipitation, which resulted in total event accumulations exceeding 150 mm in the eastern part of the Netherlands. Such accumulations belong to the largest sums ever recorded in this country and gave rise to local flooding. Measuring precipitation by weather radar within such mesoscale convective systems is known to be a challenge, since measurements are affected by multiple sources of error. For the current event the operational weather radar rainfall product only estimated about 30% of the actual amount of precipitation as measured by rain gauges. In the current presentation we will try to identify what gave rise to such large underestimations. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two different groups: 1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements taken, and 2) errors related to the conversion of reflectivity values in rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates. To correct for the first group of errors, the quality of the weather radar reflectivity data was improved by successively correcting for 1) clutter and anomalous propagation, 2) radar calibration, 3) wet radome attenuation, 4) signal attenuation and 5) the vertical profile of reflectivity. Such consistent corrections are generally not performed by operational meteorological services. Results show a large improvement in the quality of the precipitation data, however still only ~65% of the actual observed accumulations was estimated. To further improve the quality of the precipitation estimates, the second group of errors are corrected for by making use of disdrometer measurements taken in close vicinity of the radar. Based on these data the parameters of a normalized drop size distribution are estimated for the total event as well as for each precipitation type separately (convective

  6. Cloud-scale simulation study on the evolution of latent heat processes of mesoscale convective system accompanying heavy rainfall: The Hainan case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Wu, Kailu; Li, Fangzhou; Chen, Youlong; Huang, Yanbin

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the structure of latent heat budgets and dynamical structure of mesoscale convective systems (MCS) accompanying heavy rain using a cloud-scale model WRF simulation for the Hainan case. Results show that: (1) according to the fractions skill score and HK scores, the WDM6 scheme is more suitable to predict the rainfall than other microphysical schemes. (2) During the lifetime of MCSs, the top two heating microphysical processes are water vapor condensed into cloud water and water vapor condensed into rainwater. The total latent heat is closely related to the top two heating processes. However, the change of latent heat released by some microphysical processes is not identical with the different rainfall processes. (3) The total latent heat of MCS1 increases during the short life, while the total latent heat of MCS2 and MCS3 reach maximum during the mature stage. The difference is mainly caused by the latent heat of water vapor condensed into cloud water and rainwater. The total latent heat released by cond and rcond of MCS1 is smallest during the mature stage, while it is largest during the mature stage of MCS2 and MCS3. (4) The vertical motions are different with different MCSs. The descending motion of the short-lived process (MCS1) is strongest during the mature stage. It caused the smallest latent heat released by water vapor condensed into cloud water and rainwater at the same period. Besides, there are some differences in the change of latent heat released by microphysical processes of MCS2 and MCS3, which are closely related to the drag force of the vertical motion.

  7. Systematic multiscale models for deep convection on mesoscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Rupert; Majda, Andrew J.

    2006-11-01

    This paper builds on recent developments of a unified asymptotic approach to meteorological modeling [ZAMM, 80: 765 777, 2000, SIAM Proc. App. Math. 116, 227 289, 2004], which was used successfully in the development of Systematic multiscale models for the tropics in Majda and Klein [J. Atmosph. Sci. 60: 393 408, 2003] and Majda and Biello [PNAS, 101: 4736 4741, 2004]. Biello and Majda [J. Atmosph. Sci. 62: 1694 1720, 2005]. Here we account for typical bulk microphysics parameterizations of moist processes within this framework. The key steps are careful nondimensionalization of the bulk microphysics equations and the choice of appropriate distinguished limits for the various nondimensional small parameters that appear. We are then in a position to study scale interactions in the atmosphere involving moist physics. We demonstrate this by developing two systematic multiscale models that are motivated by our interest in mesoscale organized convection. The emphasis here is on multiple length scales but common time scales. The first of these models describes the short-time evolution of slender, deep convective hot towers with horizontal scale ~ 1 km interacting with the linearized momentum balance on length and time scales of (10 km/3 min). We expect this model to describe how convective inhibition may be overcome near the surface, how the onset of deep convection triggers convective-scale gravity waves, and that it will also yield new insight into how such local convective events may conspire to create larger-scale strong storms. The second model addresses the next larger range of length and time scales (10 km, 100 km, and 20 min) and exhibits mathematical features that are strongly reminiscent of mesoscale organized convection. In both cases, the asymptotic analysis reveals how the stiffness of condensation/evaporation processes induces highly nonlinear dynamics. Besides providing new theoretical insights, the derived models may also serve as a theoretical devices

  8. Mesoscale Convective Systems During SCSMEX: Simulations with a Regional Climate Model and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Qian, J.-H.; Shie, C.-L.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Kakar, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) was conducted in May-June 1998. One of its major objectives is to better understand the key physical processes for the onset and evolution of the summer monsoon over Southeast Asia and southern China. Multiple observation platforms (e.g., upper-air soundings, Doppler radar, ships, wind profilers, radiometers, etc.) during SCSMEX provided a first attempt at investigating the detailed characteristics of convection and circulation changes associated with monsoons over the South China Sea region. SCSMEX also provided precipitation derived from atmospheric budgets and comparison to those obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). In this paper, a regional scale model (with grid size of 20 km) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model (with 1 km grid size) are used to perform multi-day integration to understand the precipitation processes associated with the summer monsoon over Southeast Asia and southern China. The regional climate model is used to understand the soil-precipitation interaction and feedback associated with a flood event that occurred in and around China's Yantz River during SCSMEX Sensitivity tests on various land surface models, sea surface temperature (SST) variations, and cloud processes are performed to understand the precipitation processes associated with the onset of the monsoon over the S. China Sea during SCSMEX. These tests have indicated that the land surface model has a major impact on the circulation over the S. China Sea. Cloud processes can effect the precipitation pattern while SST variation can effect the precipitation amounts over both land and ocean. The exact location (region) of the flooding can be effected by the soil-rainfall feedback. The GCE-model results captured many observed precipitation characteristics because it used a fine grid size. For example, the model simulated rainfall temporal variation compared quite well to the sounding-estimated rainfall. The

  9. A long-lived mesoscale convective complex. I - The mountain-generated component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; George, R. L.; Wetzel, P. J.; Mcanelly, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The South Park Area Cumulus Experiment (SPACE) was conducted during the summer of 1977, and takes into account meteorological developments in a broad, elevated basin called South Park, which is located northeast of Colorado Springs, Colorado. The experiment was designed to investigate the organization of the mesoscale and storm-scale systems in detail over South Park. Many of the convective storms which were observed in the developing stages over South Park participated in the genesis of mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) on the meso-alpha-scale. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of the second MCC of this episode, which matured on the evening of August 4, 1977. Attention is given to the events from the preconvective stage early on August 4 to the incipient MCC stage in the early evening.

  10. Impact of the ice phase on a mesoscale convective system: Implication of cloud parameterization and cloud radiative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.N.S.; Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.; Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.

    1991-08-01

    This study attempts to provide further understanding of the effect of the ice phase on cloud ensemble features which are useful for improving GCM cumulus parameterization. In addition, cloud model results are used to diagnose the radiative properties of anvils in order to assess cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate for the future work. The heat, moisture and mass budget analyses of a simulated squall line system indicate that, at least for this type of system, the inclusion of the ice phase in the microphysics does not considerably change the net cloud heating and drying effects and the feedback on the large-scale motion. Nonetheless, its impact on the radiative properties of clouds significantly influences not only the squall line system itself, but also the larger-scale circulation due to the favorable stratification for long-lasting anvil clouds. The water budget suggests a simple methodology to parameterize the microphysical effect without considering it as a model physics module. Further application of the water budget might also be used to parameterize the cloud transport of condensates in the anvil cloud region, which allows the GCM columns to interact with each other. The findings of this study suggest that the ice phase could be ignored in the cloud parameterization in order to save significant amounts of computational resources and to simplify the model physics. More scientific effort should, however, be focused on the effect of the ice phase to further explore cloud feedback on the large-scale climate through the radiative process. The cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate will be addressed in a companion study by coupling the radiative transfer model with the cloud model. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Backscatter-to-Extinction Ratios in the Top Layers of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems and in Isolated Cirrus from LITE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Miller, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Cloud-integrated attenuated backscatter from observations with the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) was studied over a range of cirrus clouds capping some extensive mesoscale convective systems (MCSS) in the Tropical West Pacific. The integrated backscatter when the cloud is completely attenuating, and when corrected for multiple scattering, is a measure of the cloud particle backscatter phase function. Four different cases of MCS were studied. The first was very large, very intense, and fully attenuating, with cloud tops extending to 17 km and a maximum lidar pulse penetration of about 3 km. It also exhibited the highest integrated attenuated isotropic backscatter, with values in the 532-nm channel of up to 2.5 near the center of the system, falling to 0.6 near the edges. The second MCS had cloud tops that extended to 14.8 km. Although MCS2 was almost fully attenuating, the pulse penetration into the cloud was up to 7 km and the MCS2 had a more diffuse appearance than MCS1. The integrated backscatter values were much lower in this system but with some systematic variations between 0.44 and 0.75. The third MCS was Typhoon Melissa. Values of integrated backscatter in tt-ds case varied from 1.64 near the eye of the typhoon to between 0.44 and 1.0 in the areas of typhoon outflow and in the 532-nm channel. Mean pulse penetration through the cloud top was 2-3 km, the lowest penetration of any of the systems. The fourth MCS consisted of a region of outflow from Typhoon Melissa. The cloud was semitransparent for more than half of the image time. During that time, maximum cloud depth was about 7 km. The integrated backscatter varied from about 0.38 to 0.63 in the 532-nm channel when the cloud was fully attenuating. In some isolated cirrus between the main systems, a plot of integrated backscatter against one minus the two-way transmittance gave a linear dependence with a maximum value of 0.35 when the clouds were fully attenuating. The effective backscatter

  12. Lightning-produced NOx over Brazil during TROCCINOX: airborne measurements in tropical and subtropical thunderstorms and the importance of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Roiger, A.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schumann, U.; Kurz, C.; Brunner, D.; Schwierz, C.; Richter, A.; Stohl, A.

    2007-06-01

    During the TROCCINOX field experiments in February-March 2004 and February 2005, airborne in situ measurements of NO, NOy, CO, and O3 mixing ratios and the J(NO2) photolysis rate were carried out in the anvil outflow of thunderstorms over southern Brazil. Both tropical and subtropical thunderstorms were investigated, depending on the location of the South Atlantic convergence zone. Tropical air masses were discriminated from subtropical ones according to the higher equivalent potential temperature (Θe) in the lower and mid troposphere, the higher CO mixing ratio in the mid troposphere, and the lower wind velocity in the upper troposphere within the Bolivian High (north of the subtropical jet stream). During thunderstorm anvil penetrations, typically at 20-40 km horizontal scales, NOx mixing ratios were distinctly enhanced and the absolute mixing ratios varied between 0.2-1.6 nmol mol-1 on average. This enhancement was mainly attributed to NOx production by lightning and partly due to upward transport from the NOx-richer boundary layer. In addition, CO mixing ratios were occasionally enhanced, indicating upward transport from the boundary layer. For the first time, the composition of the anvil outflow from a large, long-lived mesoscale convective system (MCS) advected from northern Argentina and Uruguay was investigated in more detail. Over a horizontal scale of about 400 km, NOx, CO and O3 absolute mixing ratios were significantly enhanced in these air masses in the range of 0.6-1.1, 110-140 and 60-70 nmol mol-1, respectively. Analyses from trace gas correlations and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model indicate that polluted air masses, probably from the Buenos Aires urban area and from biomass burning regions, were uplifted by the MCS. Ozone was distinctly enhanced in the aged MCS outflow, due to photochemical production and entrainment of O3-rich air masses from the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere region. The aged MCS outflow was transported to the

  13. Lightning-produced NOx over Brazil during TROCCINOX: Airborne measurements in tropical and subtropical thunderstorms and the importance of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Roiger, A.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schumann, U.; Kurz, C.; Brunner, D.; Schwierz, C.; Richter, A.; Stohl, A.

    2007-02-01

    During the TROCCINOX field experiments in February-March 2004 and February 2005, airborne in situ measurements of NO, NOy, CO, and O3 mixing ratios and the J(NO2) photolysis rate were carried out in the anvil outflow of thunderstorms over southern Brazil. Both tropical and subtropical thunderstorms were investigated, depending on the location of the South Atlantic convergence zone. Tropical air masses were discriminated from subtropical ones according to the higher equivalent potential temperature (Θe) in the lower and mid troposphere, the higher CO mixing ratio in the mid troposphere, and the lower wind velocity and proper wind direction in the upper troposphere. During thunderstorm anvil penetrations, typically at 20-40 km horizontal scales, NOx mixing ratios were on average enhanced by 0.2-1.6 nmol mol-1. This enhancement was mainly attributed to NOx production by lightning and partly due to upward transport from the NOx-richer boundary layer. In addition, CO mixing ratios were occasionally enhanced, indicating upward transport from the boundary layer. For the first time, the composition of the anvil outflow from a large, long-lived mesoscale convective system (MCS) advected from northern Argentina and Uruguay was investigated in more detail. Over a horizontal scale of about 400 km, NOx, CO and O3 mixing ratios were significantly enhanced in these air masses in the range of 0.6-1.1, 110-140 and 60-70 nmol mol-1, respectively. Analyses from trace gas correlations and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model indicate that polluted air masses, probably from the Buenos Aires urban area and from biomass burning regions, were uplifted by the MCS. Ozone was distinctly enhanced in the aged MCS outflow, due to photochemical production and entrainment of O3-rich air masses from the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere region. The aged MCS outflow was transported to the north, ascended and circulated, driven by the Bolivian High over the Amazon basin. In the observed

  14. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar

  15. Automated Identification of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection and Impact of Resolution on Related Mesoscale Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Gustafson, W. I.; Yang, Q.; Xiao, H.

    2013-12-01

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. Cloud resolving models begin to resolve some, but not all, of these processes with less of the mesoscale dynamics resolved as one progresses from <1 km to 10 km grid spacing. While limited domain cloud resolving models can use high resolution to simulate MCC, global cloud resolving models must resort to using grid spacings closer to 5 to 10 km. This effectively truncates the scales through which the dynamics can act and impacts the MCC characteristics, potentially altering the climate impact of these clouds in climate models. To understand the impact of this truncation, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the Southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 1-, 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have lower liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. When compared to observed liquid water paths from GOES and MODIS, the 3-km simulation has better agreement over the coastal regions while the 9-km simulation better agrees over remote regions. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we developed a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This has the advantage of ensuring that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC and helps minimize false detections from secondary circulations. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between

  16. A shallow convection parameterization for the non-hydrostatic MM5 mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, N.L.; Kain, J.S.; Deng, A.

    1996-04-01

    A shallow convection parameterization suitable for the Pennsylvannia State University (PSU)/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) is being developed at PSU. The parameterization is based on parcel perturbation theory developed in conjunction with a 1-D Mellor Yamada 1.5-order planetary boundary layer scheme and the Kain-Fritsch deep convection model.

  17. The mesoscale convection life cycle: Building block or prototype for large-scale tropical waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapes, Brian; Tulich, Stefan; Lin, Jialin; Zuidema, Paquita

    2006-12-01

    A cumulonimbus cloud may ascend and spawn its anvil cloud, precipitation, and downdrafts within an hour or so. This paper inquires why a similar progression of events (life cycle) is observed for tropical weather fluctuations with time scales of hours, days, and even weeks. Regressions using point data illustrate the characteristic unit of rain production: the mesoscale convective system (MCS), covering tens of kilometers and lasting several hours, with embedded convective rain cells. Meanwhile, averages over larger spatial areas indicate a self-similar progression from shallow to deep convection to stratiform anvils on many time scales. Synthetic data exercises indicate that simple superpositions of fixed-structure MCS life cycles (the Building Block hypothesis) cannot explain why longer period life cycles are similar. Rather, it appears that an MCS may be a small analogue or prototype of larger scale waves. Multiscale structure is hypothesized to occur via a Stretched Building Block conceptual model, in which the widths (durations) of zones of shallow, deep, and stratiform anvil clouds in MCSs are modulated by larger scale waves. Temperature ( T) and humidity ( q) data are examined and fed into an entraining plume model, in an attempt to elucidate their relative roles in these large-scale convection zone variations. T profile variations, with wavelengths shorter than troposphere depth, appear important for high-frequency ( ˜ 2-5-day period) convectively coupled waves, as density directly links convection (via buoyancy) and large-scale wave dynamics (via restoring force). Still, the associated q anomalies are several times greater than adiabatic, suggesting a strong amplification by shallow convective feedbacks. For lower frequency (intraseasonal) variability, q anomalies are considerably larger compared to T, and may be dominant.

  18. Radar and satellite studies of the impact of mesoscale convective precipitation and wind systems on visibility, sulfates, and oxidants during persistent elevated pollution episodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.A.; Calby, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    The results are consistent and supportive, but certainly not conclusive, of a hypothesis suggesting that PBL sulfate mass removal into the free troposphere are on the order of several times that deposited on the surface during convective rainfalls. Thus, given the highly episodic nature of wet deposition and the potential major contribution of a single event to a season's total, a need exists to better understand the contributions of the various MCPS types to visibility improvement and sulfate removal, both to the surface and especially into the free atmosphere. Few projects are cited in the literature in which the precipitation chemistry data were even crudely stratified into major storm types though Raynor and Hayes did find significantly higher surface deposition during frontal thunderstorms and squall lines. Hales and Dana suggest the importance of designing an experiment to achieve an accurate closure of species mass balance within the entire domain of a convective storm. In noting the extreme variability in species washout over a region, they speculate that the bulk of the variability within and between storms must occur by superposition of the effects of inhomogeneous storm features, as well as source characteristics. Grant stated that a definitive characterization of individual storm dynamics and trajectories must be performed before long-term trends can be established with certainty. From the viewpoint of a severe storms meteorologist, much of the effort ongoing to understand regional wet deposition, sulfate, ozone, and visibility patterns, is subject to large errors of interpretation unless an attempt is made to better understand the highly different ways in which various precipitation systems, convective and stratiform, impact the PBL.

  19. A Study of the Response of Deep Tropical Clouds to Mesoscale Processes. Part 1; Modeling Strategies and Simulations of TOGA-COARE Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Daniel E.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between deep tropical clouds over the western Pacific warm pool and the larger-scale environment are key to understanding climate change. Cloud models are an extremely useful tool in simulating and providing statistical information on heat and moisture transfer processes between cloud systems and the environment, and can therefore be utilized to substantially improve cloud parameterizations in climate models. In this paper, the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model is used in multi-day simulations of deep tropical convective activity over the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Large-scale temperature and moisture advective tendencies, and horizontal momentum from the TOGA-COARE Intensive Flux Array (IFA) region, are applied to the GCE version which incorporates cyclical boundary conditions. Sensitivity experiments show that grid domain size produces the largest response to domain-mean temperature and moisture deviations, as well as cloudiness, when compared to grid horizontal or vertical resolution, and advection scheme. It is found that a minimum grid-domain size of 500 km is needed to adequately resolve the convective cloud features. The control experiment shows that the atmospheric heating and moistening is primarily a response to cloud latent processes of condensation/evaporation, and deposition/sublimation, and to a lesser extent, melting of ice particles. Air-sea exchange of heat and moisture is found to be significant, but of secondary importance, while the radiational response is small. The simulated rainfall and atmospheric heating and moistening, agrees well with observations, and performs favorably to other models simulating this case.

  20. Characteristics of Mesoscale Organization in WRF Simulations of Convection during TWP-ICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Wu, Jingbo; Chen, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    Compared to satellite-derived heating profiles, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model (GCM) convective heating is too deep and its stratiform upper-level heating is too weak. This deficiency highlights the need for GCMs to parameterize the mesoscale organization of convection. Cloud-resolving model simulations of convection near Darwin, Australia, in weak wind shear environments of different humidities are used to characterize mesoscale organization processes and to provide parameterization guidance. Downdraft cold pools appear to stimulate further deep convection both through their effect on eddy size and vertical velocity. Anomalously humid air surrounds updrafts, reducing the efficacy of entrainment. Recovery of cold pool properties to ambient conditions over 5-6 h proceeds differently over land and ocean. Over ocean increased surface fluxes restore the cold pool to prestorm conditions. Over land surface fluxes are suppressed in the cold pool region; temperature decreases and humidity increases, and both then remain nearly constant, while the undisturbed environment cools diurnally. The upper-troposphere stratiform rain region area lags convection by 5-6 h under humid active monsoon conditions but by only 1-2 h during drier break periods, suggesting that mesoscale organization is more readily sustained in a humid environment. Stratiform region hydrometeor mixing ratio lags convection by 0-2 h, suggesting that it is strongly influenced by detrainment from convective updrafts. Small stratiform region temperature anomalies suggest that a mesoscale updraft parameterization initialized with properties of buoyant detrained air and evolving to a balance between diabatic heating and adiabatic cooling might be a plausible approach for GCMs.

  1. Model studies on the role of moist convection as a mechanism for interaction between the mesoscales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waight, Kenneth T., III; Song, J. Aaron; Zack, John W.; Price, Pamela E.

    1991-01-01

    A three year research effort is described which had as its goal the development of techniques to improve the numerical prediction of cumulus convection on the meso-beta and meso-gamma scales. Two MESO models are used, the MASS (mesoscale) and TASS (cloud scale) models. The primary meteorological situation studied is the 28-29 Jun. 1986 Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX) study area on a day with relatively weak large scale forcing. The problem of determining where and when convection should be initiated is considered to be a major problem of current approaches. Assimilation of moisture data from satellite, radar, and surface data is shown to significantly improve mesoscale simulations. The TASS model is shown to reproduce some observed mesoscale features when initialized with 3-D observational data. Convection evolution studies center on comparison of the Kuo and Fritsch-Chappell cumulus parameterization schemes to each other, and to cloud model results. The Fritsch-Chappell scheme is found to be superior at about 30 km resolution, while the Kuo scheme does surprisingly well in simulating convection down to 10 km in cases where convergence features are well-resolved by the model grid. Results from MASS-TASS interaction experiments are presented and discussed. A discussion of the future of convective simulation is given, with the conclusion that significant progress is possible on several fronts in the next few years.

  2. Sea breeze: Induced mesoscale systems and severe weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, M. E.; Pielke, R. A.; Cotton, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Sea-breeze-deep convective interactions over the Florida peninsula were investigated using a cloud/mesoscale numerical model. The objective was to gain a better understanding of sea-breeze and deep convective interactions over the Florida peninsula using a high resolution convectively explicit model and to use these results to evaluate convective parameterization schemes. A 3-D numerical investigation of Florida convection was completed. The Kuo and Fritsch-Chappell parameterization schemes are summarized and evaluated.

  3. Changes in Stratiform Clouds of Mesoscale Convective Complex Introduced by Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, B.; Min, Q.-L.; Li, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols influence the earth s climate through direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects. There are large uncertainties in quantifying these effects due to limited measurements and observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. As a major terrestrial source of atmospheric aerosols, dusts may serve as a significant climate forcing for the changing climate because of its effect on solar and thermal radiation as well as on clouds and precipitation processes. Latest satellites measurements enable us to determine dust aerosol loadings and cloud distributions and can potentially be used to reduce the uncertainties in the estimations of aerosol effects on climate. This study uses sensors on various satellites to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective complex (MCC). A trans-Atlantic dust outbreak of Saharan origin occurring in early March 2004 is considered. For the observed MCCs under a given convective strength, small hydrometeors were found more prevalent in the dusty stratiform regions than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust regions, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of clouds and precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the size spectrum of precipitation-sized hydrometeors from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately to suppress precipitation and increase the lifecycle of cloud systems, especially over stratiform areas.

  4. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Houze, Jr.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  5. Overshooting convection during TRO-pico: mesoscale modelling of two cases hydrating the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Emmanuel; Marécal, Virginie; Khaykin, Sergey; Amarouche, Nadir; Ghysels, Mélanie; Mappe-Fogaing, Irène; Behera, Abhinna; Held, Gerhard; França, Hermes

    2016-04-01

    One of the main aims of the TRO-pico project (2010-2015) was to study the variability of overshooting convection at the local scale to try to deduce a typical impact on the TTL water at the global scale. In this study, we've identified local maximum in the water vapour profiles gathered by the balloon-borne hygrometers Pico-SDLA and Flash above Bauru, Brazil (22.3 S) during the TRO-pico campaign. We tried to link them to overshooting cells in the surrounding of Bauru with a trajectory analysis. In this study we select a couple of cases of overshooting convection both sampled by the Bauru S-Band radar and by one of the balloon-borne instruments of the TRO-pico campaign in 2012 and 2013. The selected cases are the case of March 13, 2012 (hereafter M12), sounded by both hygrometers Pico-SDLA and FLASH, and the case of January 26, 2013 (hereafter J13), sounded by Pico-SDLA. For the M12 case, local water vapour enhancements at two different altitudes due to two different cells were reported, with local enhancement of about 0.65 ppmv. For the J26 case, the water enhancement was about 1 ppmv. The corresponding mesoscale simulations with the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (BRAMS) using 3 nested grids with horizontal resolution down to 800 m were carried out. Simulation results are compared to Bauru's radar echo tops and and water vapour in situ measurements. As for the M12 simulation, the model is doing a rather good job in reproducing several overshooting cells, both in severity and timing. Associated stratospheric water budget are computed for each cases.

  6. An Automated Method to Identify Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) Implementing Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Waliser, D. E.; Rwebangira, R.; Demoz, B.; Kim, J.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Joyce, M. J.; Loikith, P.; Lee, H.; Khudikyan, S.; Boustani, M.; Goodman, A.; Zimdars, P. A.; Whittell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) are convectively-driven weather systems with a duration of ~10 - 12 hours and contributions of large amounts to the rainfall daily and monthly totals. More than 400 MCCs occur annually over various locations on the globe. In West Africa, ~170 MCCs occur annually during the 180 days representing the summer months (June - November), and contribute ~75% of the annual wet season rainfall. The main objective of this study is to improve automatic identification of MCC over West Africa. The spatial expanse of MCCs and the spatio-temporal variability in their convective characteristics make them difficult to characterize even in dense networks of radars and/or surface gauges. As such there exist criteria for identifying MCCs with satellite images - mostly using infrared (IR) data. Automated MCC identification methods are based on forward and/or backward in time spatial-temporal analysis of the IR satellite data and characteristically incorporate a manual component as these algorithms routinely falter with merging and splitting cloud systems between satellite images. However, these algorithms are not readily transferable to voluminous data or other satellite-derived datasets (e.g. TRMM), thus hindering comprehensive studies of these features both at weather and climate timescales. Recognizing the existing limitations of automated methods, this study explores the applicability of graph theory to creating a fully automated method for deriving a West African MCC dataset from hourly infrared satellite images between 2001- 2012. Graph theory, though not heavily implemented in the atmospheric sciences, has been used for the predicting (nowcasting) of thunderstorms from radar and satellite data by considering the relationship between atmospheric variables at a given time, or for the spatial-temporal analysis of cloud volumes. From these few studies, graph theory appears to be innately applicable to the complexity, non-linearity and inherent

  7. Regional analysis of convective systems during the West African monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Bradley Nicholas

    The West African monsoon (WAM) occurs during the boreal summer and is responsible for a majority of precipitation in the northern portion of West Africa. A distinct shift of precipitation, often driven by large propagating mesoscale convective systems, is indicated from satellite observations. Excepting the coarser satellite observations, sparse data across the continent has prevented understanding of mesoscale variability of these important systems. The interaction between synoptic and mesoscale features appears to be an important part of the WAM system. Without an understanding of the mesoscale properties of precipitating systems, improved understanding of the feedback mechanism between spatial scales cannot be attained. Convective and microphysical characteristics of West African convective systems are explored using various observational data sets. Focus is directed toward meso -alpha and -beta scale convective systems to improve our understanding of characteristics at this spatial scale and contextualize their interaction with the larger-scale. Ground-based radar observations at three distinct geographical locations in West Africa along a common latitudinal band (Niamey, Niger [continental], Kawsara, Senegal [coastal], and Praia, Republic of Cape Verde [maritime]) are analyzed to determine convective system characteristics in each domain during a 29 day period in 2006. Ancillary datasets provided by the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) and NASA-AMMA (NAMMA) field campaigns are also used to place the radar observations in context. Results show that the total precipitation is dominated by propagating mesoscale convective systems. Convective characteristics vary according to environmental properties, such as vertical shear, CAPE, and the degree of synoptic forcing. Data are bifurcated based on the presence or absence of African easterly waves. In general, African easterly waves appear to enhance mesoscale convective system strength

  8. Convectively Generated Meso-Scale Gravity Waves in ER-2 Observations During CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Alexander, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The MMS and MTP data from ER-2 observations during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign are analyzed to retrieve meso-scale gravity wave information at the aircraft flight level. For a given flight segment, the S-transform is used to locate small-scale (10-25 km) gravity wave events. The Stokes method and the MTP method are then used to determine the horizontal propagation directions, and the vertical scales of the wave events, respectively. Other wave parameters, such as horizontal scales, group velocities, can also be derived. From the estimated propagation directions, group velocities, and the ground-based radar reflectivity observations, some wave events are traced back to convectively active regions, suggesting convection as the source of the waves.

  9. Experiments with the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) using the synthetic relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chia-Bo

    1994-01-01

    This study is intended to examine the impact of the synthetic relative humidity on the model simulation of mesoscale convective storm environment. The synthetic relative humidity is derived from the National Weather Services surface observations, and non-conventional sources including aircraft, radar, and satellite observations. The latter sources provide the mesoscale data of very high spatial and temporal resolution. The synthetic humidity data is used to complement the National Weather Services rawinsonde observations. It is believed that a realistic representation of initial moisture field in a mesoscale model is critical for the model simulation of thunderstorm development, and the formation of non-convective clouds as well as their effects on the surface energy budget. The impact will be investigated based on a real-data case study using the mesoscale atmospheric simulation system developed by Mesoscale Environmental Simulations Operations, Inc. The mesoscale atmospheric simulation system consists of objective analysis and initialization codes, and the coarse-mesh and fine-mesh dynamic prediction models. Both models are a three dimensional, primitive equation model containing the essential moist physics for simulating and forecasting mesoscale convective processes in the atmosphere. The modeling system is currently implemented at the Applied Meteorology Unit, Kennedy Space Center. Two procedures involving the synthetic relative humidity to define the model initial moisture fields are considered. It is proposed to perform several short-range (approximately 6 hours) comparative coarse-mesh simulation experiments with and without the synthetic data. They are aimed at revealing the model sensitivities should allow us both to refine the specification of the observational requirements, and to develop more accurate and efficient objective analysis schemes. The goal is to advance the MASS (Mesoscal Atmospheric Simulation System) modeling expertise so that the model

  10. Sensitivity and dependence of mesoscale downscaled prediction results on different parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesan, R.; Bellerby, T.

    2012-04-01

    These days as operational real-time flood forecasting and warning systems rely more on high resolution mesoscale models employed with coupling system of hydrological models. So it is inevitable to assess prediction sensitivity or disparity in collection with selection of different cumulus and microphysical parameterization schemes, to assess the possible uncertainties associated with mesoscale downscaling. This study investigates the role of physical parameterization in mesoscale model simulations on simulation of unprecedented heavy rainfall over Yorkshire-Humberside in United Kingdom during 1-14th March, 1999. The study has used a popular mesoscale numerical weather prediction model named Advanced Research Weather Research Forecast model (version 3.3) which was developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in the USA. This study has performed a comprehensive evaluation of four cumulus parameterization schemes (CPSs) [Kian-Fritsch (KF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) and Grell-Devenyi ensemble (GD)] and five microphysical schemes Lin et al scheme, older Thompson scheme, new Thompson scheme, WRF Single Moment - 6 class scheme, and WRF Single Moment - 5 class scheme] to identify how their inclusion influences the mesoscale model's meteorological parameter estimation capabilities and related uncertainties in prediction. The case study was carried out at the Upper River Derwent catchment in Northern Yorkshire, England using both the ERA-40 reanalysis data and the land based observation data.

  11. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Matus N.; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-18

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  12. Evaluation of the synoptic and mesoscale predictive capabilities of a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, S. E.; Skillman, W. C.; Kocin, P. J.; Wetzel, P. J.; Brill, K.; Keyser, D. A.; Mccumber, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The overall performance characteristics of a limited area, hydrostatic, fine (52 km) mesh, primitive equation, numerical weather prediction model are determined in anticipation of satellite data assimilations with the model. The synoptic and mesoscale predictive capabilities of version 2.0 of this model, the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS 2.0), were evaluated. The two part study is based on a sample of approximately thirty 12h and 24h forecasts of atmospheric flow patterns during spring and early summer. The synoptic scale evaluation results benchmark the performance of MASS 2.0 against that of an operational, synoptic scale weather prediction model, the Limited area Fine Mesh (LFM). The large sample allows for the calculation of statistically significant measures of forecast accuracy and the determination of systematic model errors. The synoptic scale benchmark is required before unsmoothed mesoscale forecast fields can be seriously considered.

  13. a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System for Simulations of Topographically Induced Atmospheric Flow and Air Pollution Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boybeyi, Zafer

    A mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system has been developed to investigate mesoscale circulations and associated air pollution dispersion, including effects of terrain topography, large water bodies and urban areas. The system is based on a three-dimensional mesoscale meteorological model coupled with two dispersion models (an Eulerian dispersion model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model). The mesoscale model is hydrostatic and based on primitive equations formulated in a terrain-following coordinate system with a E-varepsilon turbulence closure scheme. The Eulerian dispersion model is based on numerical solution of the advection-diffusion equation to allow one to simulate releases of non-buoyant pollutants (especially from area and volume sources). The Lagrangian particle dispersion model allows one to simulate releases of buoyant pollutants from arbitrary sources (particularly from point and line sources). The air pollution dispersion models included in the system are driven by the meteorological information provided by the mesoscale model. Mesoscale atmospheric circulations associated with sea and lake breezes have been examined using the mesoscale model. A series of model sensitivity studies were performed to investigate the effects of different environmental parameters on these circulations. It was found that the spatial and temporal variation of the sea and lake breeze convergence zones and the associated convective activities depend to a large extent on the direction and the magnitude of the ambient wind. Dispersion of methyl isocyanate gas from the Bhopal accident was investigated using the mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system. A series of numerical experiments were performed to investigate the possible role of the mesoscale circulations on this industrial gas episode. The temporal and spatial variations of the wind and turbulence fields were simulated with the mesoscale model. The dispersion characteristics of the accidental

  14. The structure and dynamics of mesoscale systems influencing severe thunderstorm development during AVE/SESAME 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Relationships between meso-beta scale systems and thunderstorm formation were examined as part of the NASA atmospheric variability experiment/severe environmental storms and mesoscale experiment 1979. The McIdas program was employed for meso-beta scale analyses of atmospheric structure and dynamics in kinematic computations of the Abilene Triangle on a grid mesh of 100 km for station spacing of 275 km. Mesoscale short wave systems were detected imbedded and propagating cyclonically around upper-level vortex circulation and creating environmental conditions conducive to thunderstorm development. TIROS-N and GOES satellite data served to connect the systems with two convective storms which developed. The necessity to use spaceborne instrumentation carried on the Shuttle or on free-flying satellites for enhancing the data-base on storm development is noted.

  15. Mesoscale modeling of lake effect snow over Lake Erie - sensitivity to convection, microphysics and the water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theeuwes, N. E.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Krikken, F.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2010-03-01

    Lake effect snow is a shallow convection phenomenon during cold air advection over a relatively warm lake. A severe case of lake effect snow over Lake Erie on 24 December 2001 was studied with the MM5 and WRF mesoscale models. This particular case provided over 200 cm of snow in Buffalo (NY), caused three casualties and 10 million of material damage. Hence, the need for a reliable forecast of the lake effect snow phenomenon is evident. MM5 and WRF simulate lake effect snow successfully, although the intensity of the snowbelt is underestimated. It appears that significant differences occur between using a simple and a complex microphysics scheme. In MM5, the use of the simple-ice microphysics scheme results in the triggering of the convection much earlier in time than with the more sophisticated Reisner-Graupel-scheme. Furthermore, we find a large difference in the maximum precipitation between the different nested domains: Reisner-Graupel produces larger differences in precipitation between the domains than "simple ice". In WRF, the sophisticated Thompson microphysics scheme simulates less precipitation than the simple WSM3 scheme. Increased temperature of Lake Erie results in an exponential growth in the 24-h precipitation. Regarding the convection scheme, the updated Kain-Fritsch scheme (especially designed for shallow convection during lake effect snow), gives only slight differences in precipitation between the updated and the original scheme.

  16. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Feedbacks in Boundary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    The focus of this dissertation is on studying ocean-atmosphere (OA) interactions in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) and Kuroshio Extension (KE) region using satellite observations and the Scripps Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model. Within SCOAR, a new technique is introduced by implementing an interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the SST-flux coupler to remove the mesoscale SST field felt by the atmosphere. This procedure allows large-scale SST coupling to be preserved while extinguishing the mesoscale eddy impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This technique provides insights to spatial-scale dependence of OA coupling, and the impact of mesoscale features on both the ABL and the surface ocean. For the HCS, the use of downscaled forcing from SCOAR, as compared to NCEP Reanalysis 2, proves to be more appropriate in quantifying wind-driven upwelling indices along the coast of Peru and Chile. The difference in their wind stress distribution has significant impact on the wind-driven upwelling processes and total upwelling transport along the coast. Although upwelling induced by coastal Ekman transport dominates the wind-driven upwelling along coastal areas, Ekman pumping can account for 30% of the wind-driven upwelling in several coastal locations. Control SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while Smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. The SST-wind stress coupling however, did not produce any rectified response on the ocean eddies. Coupling between SST, wind speed and latent heat flux is insignificant on large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. On the other hand, coupling between these three variables are significant on the mesoscale for most of the model run, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat through direct flux anomalies as well as indirectly through stability changes on the

  17. Telescoping views of planetary, synoptic, mesoscale and explicit-convection structure in a nonhydrostatic global GCM with 7km mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapes, B. E.; Putman, W.

    2014-12-01

    Visualizations and statistics from a 2-year 7km nonhydrostatic Nature Run of the NASA-Goddard GEOS-5 model will be shown, to illustrate how the crude but explicit convective cells and their mesoscale processes function as coherent entities withing the synoptic and planetary-scale general circulation. Comparisons with coarse-grained data and output from lower-resolution simulations illustrate how parameterizations can carry the same fluxes necessary for general circulation balances, but only as the mean state is distorted in order to cause the parameterizations to produce those fluxes. From these considerations, and from related considerations of outputds of a more homogeneous (cyclic) Giga-LES, we will attempt to draw conclusions about the geophysical importance of coherent cross-scale spatial organization vs. simply having a rich spectrum of scales.

  18. Sea breeze-induced mesoscale systems and severe weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between thunderstorm activity during the summer months along coastal regions of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and the dry sea breeze circulation was investigated. Satellite composites of thunderstorm activity for synoptically undisturbed conditions have been obtained for south Florida for a series of days in the summer of 1983. These data were catalogued into different low level synoptic flow regimes. Five synoptic flow regimes were found from the data. A three-dimensional mesoscale numerical model was used for each sysnoptic flow regime to quantitatively predict the location of enhanced thunderstorm activity. This model includes a parameterization of vegetation and soil moisture feedbacks as well as a sophisticated planetary boundary layer representation. Using the results of the satellite image composites, spatial and temporal characteristics of deep convective cloud patterns and their variation with synoptic flow are described. The results from the numerical model have provided explanations for the observed patterns.

  19. Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Convection has long been coupled with electrochemistry, and the name hydrodynamic voltammetry has become standard. In electroanalytical chemistry we mainly seek reproducible conditions. These are almost always attained by systems in which a steady convective state is achieved, although not always. Thus, the once popular dropping mercury electrode (see texts such as [74, 257]) has convection around it, but is never in steady state; it might be called a reproducible periodic dynamic state.

  20. Transitional dispersive scenarios driven by mesoscale flows on complex terrain under strong dry convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, J. L.; Pérez-Landa, G.; Millán, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    By experimentation and modelling, this paper analyses the atmospheric dispersion of the SO2 emissions from a power plant on complex terrain under strong convective conditions, describing the main dispersion features as an ensemble of "stationary dispersive scenarios" and reformulating some "classical" dispersive concepts to deal with the systematically monitored summer dispersive scenarios in inland Spain. The results and discussions presented arise from a statistically representative study of the physical processes associated with the multimodal distribution of pollutants aloft and around a 343-m-tall chimney under strong dry convective conditions in the Iberian Peninsula. This paper analyses the importance of the identification and physical implications of transitional periods for air quality applications. The indetermination of a transversal plume to the preferred transport direction during these transitional periods implies a small (or null) physical significance of the classical definition of horizontal standard deviation of the concentration distribution.

  1. Scaling Laws for Mesoscale and Microscale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry

    1999-08-23

    The set of laws developed and presented here is by no means exhaustive. Techniques have been present to aid in the development of additional scaling laws and to combine these and other laws to produce additional useful relationships. Some of the relationships produced here have yielded perhaps surprising results. Examples include the fifth order scaling law for electromagnetic motor torque and the zero order scaling law for capacitive motor power. These laws demonstrate important facts about actuators in small-scale systems. The primary intent of this introduction into scaling law analysis is to provide needed tools to examine possible areas of the research in small-scale systems and direct research toward more fruitful areas. Numerous examples have been included to show the validity of developing scaling laws based on first principles and how real world systems tend to obey these laws even when many other variables may potentially come into play. Development of further laws may well serve to provide important high-level direction to the continued development of small-scale systems.

  2. Lightning characteristics related to radar morphology in linear convective systems over North China plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Qie, X.; Su, D.

    2015-12-01

    Based on SAFIR3000 Lightning Location Network and radar information, 89 linear mesoscale convective systems occurred in Beijing area are analyzed from the year of 2007 to 2011. All the linear convective systems are classified to six categories by radar morphologies, including leading convective lines with trailing stratiform region (TS), leading stratiform region trailing convective region (LS), leading convective lines with no stratiform region (NS), bow echo of leading line (BE), leading convective lines with parallel stratiform region (PS). The results show that linear convective systems occurred frequently in summer time over Beijing area, particularly the TS and LS mode, accounted for 61% of the linear MCSs. According to synoptic chart, the 89 linear convective systems are mainly influenced by cold vortex, wind shear, moving trough and western Pacific subtropical high. The lightning activities of linear MCSs including TS MCSs, LS MCSs and PS MCSs which are most frequent of three categories are discussed. On average, lightning mainly located in the linear convective region, and less or no lightning located in the trailing stratiform region. The lightning are mainly located in the strong radar echo of TS, LS and PS mode in the mature stage, but lightning activities present apparent different in the dissipating stage. At the dissipating stage, the lightning occurred gradually increased in the stratiform region of TS mode, whereas there is no lightning occurred in the stratiform region of LS mode, and +CG lightning take account for large percentage in PS MCSs.

  3. Debris Flows and Record Floods from Extreme Mesoscale Convective Thunderstorms over the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Shoemaker, Craig; Webb, Robert H.; Schaffner, Mike; Griffiths, Peter G.; Pytlak, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Ample geologic evidence indicates early Holocene and Pleistocene debris flows from the south side of the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, Arizona, but few records document historical events. On July 31, 2006, an unusual set of atmospheric conditions aligned to produce record floods and an unprecedented number of debris flows in the Santa Catalinas. During the week prior to the event, an upper-level area of low pressure centered near Albuquerque, New Mexico generated widespread heavy rainfall in southern Arizona. After midnight on July 31, a strong complex of thunderstorms developed over central Arizona in a deformation zone that formed on the back side of the upper-level low. High atmospheric moisture (2.00' of precipitable water) coupled with cooling aloft spawned a mesoscale thunderstorm complex that moved southeast into the Tucson basin. A 15-20 knot low-level southwesterly wind developed with a significant upslope component over the south face of the Santa Catalina Mountains advecting moist and unstable air into the merging storms. National Weather Service radar indicated that a swath of 3-6' of rainfall occurred over the lower and middle elevations of the southern Santa Catalina Mountains. This intense rain falling on saturated soil triggered over 250 hillslope failures and debris flows throughout the mountain range. Sabino Canyon, a heavily used recreation area administered by the U.S. Forest Service, was the epicenter of mass wasting, where at least 18 debris flows removed structures, destroyed the roadway in multiple locations, and closed public access for months. The debris flows were followed by streamflow floods which eclipsed the record discharge in the 75-year gaging record of Sabino Creek. In five canyons adjacent to Sabino Canyon, debris flows approached or excited the mountain front, compromising floow conveyance structures and flooding some homes.

  4. On the synoptic and mesoscale organization of mid-latitude, continental convective snow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melick, Christopher J.

    An ingredients-based methodology was pursued in order to evaluate the likelihood of thunderstorms occurring in the presence of snowfall (i.e. thundersnow; TSSN) by validating the collective presence of forcing, moisture, and instability in the atmosphere. Since the latter factor has been cited as crucial in distinguishing from typical snowstorms (i.e. non-TSSN), the detailed examination focused on stability characteristics of wintertime convection across the central United States immediately leading up to the onset of the event. Although results from several commonly employed techniques performed successfully, the research primarily analyzed the value of the seldom applied growth rate parameter through initial output fields of the 40-km Rapid Update Cycle model. The current work substantiated the premise that atmospheres were more unstable in episodes of convective snow. The analyses revealed pronounced forcing mechanisms and greater susceptibility to the produced upward vertical motions, thus, illustrating the positive feedback and strong, crucial connection between the two ingredients. The development of TSSN and any associated banding was correctly and most accurately predicted from trends in plots of the growth rate parameter analyzed at the level at which the highest significant growth rates occurred. An outlook for elevated, cold-season thunderstorms can be more accurately issued by identifying regions where reduced values of equivalent potential vorticity (i.e. small symmetric stability or instability) are collocated with estimates of high growth rates (i.e. where small-scale slantwise perturbations will grow). Given the overall success, it is hoped that some of the conclusions established will be implemented routinely in an operational environment and provide forecasters an additional, essential tool in dealing with nowcasting situations of hazardous winter weather events.

  5. Debris flows and Record Floods from Extreme Mesoscale Convective Thunderstorms over the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magirl, C. S.; Shoemaker, C.; Webb, R. H.; Schaffner, M.; Griffiths, P. G.; Pytlak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Ample geologic evidence indicates early Holocene and Pleistocene debris flows from the south side of the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, Arizona, but few records document historical events. On July 31, 2006, an unusual set of atmospheric conditions aligned to produce record floods and an unprecedented number of debris flows in the Santa Catalinas. During the week prior to the event, an upper-level area of low pressure centered near Albuquerque, New Mexico generated widespread heavy rainfall in southern Arizona. After midnight on July 31, a strong and widespread complex of thunderstorms developed over the Mogollon Rim in central Arizona in a deformation zone that formed on the back side of the upper-level low. High atmospheric moisture (50 mm of precipitable water) coupled with cooling aloft spawned a mesoscale thunderstorm complex that moved southeast into the Tucson basin. These thunderstorms interacted with a low- to mid-level zone of atmospheric instability to create an initial wave of rainfall across the Tucson metropolitan area in the early morning hours. A second wave of thunderstorms and heavy rain developed over the Santa Catalina Mountain near dawn. A 15-20 knot low-level southwesterly wind developed with a significant upslope component over the south face of the Santa Catalina Mountains advecting moist and unstable air into the merging storms. NEXRAD radar indicates that a swath of 75-150 mm of rainfall occurred over the lower and middle elevations of the southern Santa Catalina Mountains in three increments: (1) from 2-6 AM, moderate intensity rainfall up to 65 mm; (2) from 6-7 AM, intensities up to 75 mm in 45 minutes; and (3) a final burst approaching 50 mm in 45 minutes from 8-9 AM. This intense rain falling on saturated soil triggered multiple debris flows in four adjacent canyons. Sabino Canyon, a heavily used recreation area administered by the U.S. Forest Service, was the epicenter of mass wasting where at least 18 debris flows removed

  6. Mesoscale Modeling of Impact Compaction of Primitive Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Thomas M.; Collins, Gareth S.; Bland, Philip A.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a method for simulating the mesoscale compaction of early solar system solids in low-velocity impact events using the iSALE shock physics code. Chondrules are represented by non-porous disks, placed within a porous matrix. By simulating impacts into bimodal mixtures over a wide range of parameter space (including the chondrule-to-matrix ratio, the matrix porosity and composition, and the impact velocity), we have shown how each of these parameters influences the shock processing of heterogeneous materials. The temperature after shock processing shows a strong dichotomy: matrix temperatures are elevated much higher than the chondrules, which remain largely cold. Chondrules can protect some matrix from shock compaction, with shadow regions in the lee side of chondrules exhibiting higher porosity that elsewhere in the matrix. Using the results from this mesoscale modeling, we show how the ɛ - α porous-compaction model parameters depend on initial bulk porosity. We also show that the timescale for the temperature dichotomy to equilibrate is highly dependent on the porosity of the matrix after the shock, and will be on the order of seconds for matrix porosities of less than 0.1, and on the order of tens to hundreds of seconds for matrix porosities of ˜0.3-0.5. Finally, we have shown that the composition of the post-shock material is able to match the bulk porosity and chondrule-to-matrix ratios of meteorite groups such as carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  7. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for mesoscale fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Robin R.; Schumann, Daniel L.

    1999-06-01

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors form the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  8. Surface mesoscale features associated with leading convective line-trailing stratiform squall lines over the Gangetic West Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawn, S.; Mandal, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper an attempt is made to identify the mesoscale features in surface pressure pattern, if any, associated with thunderstorm over the Gangetic West Bengal region in India. The study was conducted over Kharagpur and the adjoining area in the Gangetic West Bengal, frequently affected by thunderstorms during the pre-monsoon seasons of April-May. Observations recorded at 50 m instrumented micro-meteorological tower and upper air sounding at Kharagpur under nationally coordinated Severe Thunderstorm Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) Programme are used to study the variation in surface pressure, wind speed and direction, temperature and relative humidity associated with the squall lines with trailing stratiform precipitation region. In the surface pressure variation, pre-squall mesolow, mesohigh and wake low are identified with the passage of the squall line at Kharagpur. It is observed that in the squall line with trailing stratiform precipitation shield, the mesohigh is associated with convective line and wake low exists at the rear of the storms. The position of the mesohigh is typically found in the vicinity of the heavy rain directly beneath the downdraft. The mesohigh seems to be initiated by the cooling due to evaporation of precipitation in the downdraft and intensified due to the non-hydrostatic effect because of the rainfall directly beneath the downdraft. It is also observed that the passage of trailing edges of the stratiform precipitation coincided with the wake low. Upper air sounding shows mid-tropospheric cooling and lower tropospheric warming. It may be possible due to the dominance of evaporative cooling in the mid-levels and dynamically forced descending motion leading to adiabatic warming in the low levels which may lead to the formation of the wake low.

  9. Studying the impact of overshooting convection on the tropopause tropical layer (TTL) water vapor budget at the continental scale using a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Abhinna; Rivière, Emmanuel; Marécal, Virginie; Claud, Chantal; Rysman, Jean-François; Geneviève, Seze

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour budget is a key component in the earth climate system. In the tropical upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS), it plays a central role both on the radiative and the chemical budget. Its abundance is mostly driven by slow ascent above the net zero radiative heating level followed by ice crystals' formation and sedimentation, so called the cold trap. In contrast to this large scale temperature driven process, overshooting convection penetrating the stratosphere could be one piece of the puzzle. It has been proven to hydrate the lower stratosphere at the local scale. Satellite-borne H2O instruments can not measure with a fine enough resolution the water vapour enhancements caused by overshooting convection. The consequence is that it is difficult to estimate the role of overshooting deep convection at the global scale. Using a mesoscale model i.e., Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (BRAMS), past atmospheric conditions have been simulated for the full wet season i.e., Nov 2012 to Mar 2013 having a single grid with horizontal resolution of 20 km × 20km over a large part of Brazil and South America. This resolution is too coarse to reproduce overshooting convection in the model, so that this simulation should be used as a reference (REF) simulation, without the impact of overshooting convection in the TTL water budget. For initialisation, as well as nudging the grid boundary in every 6 hours, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses has been used. The size distribution of hydrometeors and number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are fitted in order to best reproduce accumulated precipitations derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Similarly, GOES and MSG IR mages have been thoroughly compared with model's outputs, using image correlation statistics for the position of the clouds. The model H2O variability during the wet season, is compared with the in situ balloon-borne measurements during

  10. Mesoscale Modeling of Impact Compaction of Primitive Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Thomas M.; Collins, Gareth S.; Bland, Philip A.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a method for simulating the mesoscale compaction of early solar system solids in low-velocity impact events using the iSALE shock physics code. Chondrules are represented by non-porous disks, placed within a porous matrix. By simulating impacts into bimodal mixtures over a wide range of parameter space (including the chondrule-to-matrix ratio, the matrix porosity and composition, and the impact velocity), we have shown how each of these parameters influences the shock processing of heterogeneous materials. The temperature after shock processing shows a strong dichotomy: matrix temperatures are elevated much higher than the chondrules, which remain largely cold. Chondrules can protect some matrix from shock compaction, with shadow regions in the lee side of chondrules exhibiting higher porosity that elsewhere in the matrix. Using the results from this mesoscale modeling, we show how the ε ‑ α porous-compaction model parameters depend on initial bulk porosity. We also show that the timescale for the temperature dichotomy to equilibrate is highly dependent on the porosity of the matrix after the shock, and will be on the order of seconds for matrix porosities of less than 0.1, and on the order of tens to hundreds of seconds for matrix porosities of ∼0.3–0.5. Finally, we have shown that the composition of the post-shock material is able to match the bulk porosity and chondrule-to-matrix ratios of meteorite groups such as carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  11. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  12. Analysis of mesoscale factors at the onset of deep convection on hailstorm days in Southern France and their relation to the synoptic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Jose Luis; Wu, Xueke; Gascón, Estibaliz; López, Laura; Melcón, Pablo; García-Ortega, Eduardo; Berthet, Claude; Dessens, Jean; Merino, Andrés

    2013-04-01

    Storms and the weather phenomena associated to intense precipitation, lightning, strong winds or hail, are among the most common and dangerous weather risks in many European countries. To get a reliable forecast of their occurrence is remaining an open problem. The question is: how is possible to improve the reliability of forecast? Southwestern France is frequently affected by hailstorms, producing severe damages on crops and properties. Considerable efforts were made to improve the forecast of hailfall in this area. First of all, if we want to improve this type of forecast, it is necessary to have a good "ground truth" of the hail days and zones affected by hailfall. Fortunately, ANELFA has deployed thousands of hailpad stations in Southern France. The ANELFA processed the point hailfall data recorded during each hail season at these stations. The focus of this paper presents a methodology to improve the forecast of the occurrence of hailfall according to the synoptic environment and mesoscale factors in the study area. One hundred of hail days were selected, following spatial and severity criteria, occurred in the period 2000-2010. The mesoscale model WRF was applied for all cases to study the synoptic environment of mean geopotential and temperature fields at 500 hPa. Three nested domains have been defined following a two-way nesting strategy, with a horizontal spatial resolution of 36, 12 and 4 km, and 30 vertical terrains— following σ-levels. Then, using the Principal Component Analysis in T-Mode, 4 mesoscale configurations were defined for the fields of convective instability (CI), water vapor flux divergence and wind flow and humidity at low layer (850hPa), and several clusters were classified followed by using the K-means Clustering. Finally, we calculated several characteristic values of four hail forecast parameters: Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Storm Relative Helicity between 0 and 3 km (SRH0-3), Energy-Helicity Index (EHI) and

  13. Release of potential instability by mesoscale triggering - An objective model simulation. [in precipitation numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of mesoscale triggering on organized nonsevere convective cloud systems in the High Plains are considered. Two experiments were conducted to determine if a one-dimensional quasi-time dependent model could (1) detect soundings which were sensitive to mesoscale triggering, and (2) discriminate between cases which had mesoscale organized convection and those with no organized convection. The MESOCU model was used to analyze the available potential instability and thermodynamic potential for cloud growth. It is noted that lifting is a key factor in the release of available potential instability on the High Plains.

  14. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  15. How the Structure of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems Affects their Production of Transient Luminous Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Lyons, W.; Rutledge, S. A.; Cummer, S. A.; MacGorman, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, Lang et al. (2010) analyzed the parent lightning of transient luminous events (TLEs) in the context of the structure and evolution of two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). These two MCSs were very different - one a giant symmetric leading-line/trailing stratiform storm, and one a small asymmetric MCS that contained a mesoscale convective vortex. These structural differences were associated with substantially different TLE-parent lightning structure as well as TLE production. The results suggested that TLE (especially sprite) production, and TLE-parent positive charge altitude, depend on MCS morphology. Current work is focused on analyzing the structure, evolution, lightning behavior, and TLE production of additional MCSs over various regions of the United States. Several additional TLE-producing MCS cases already have been identified for the years 2008-2010, featuring a variety of organizational modes (symmetric, asymmetric, and other more exotic varieties) in different meteorological regimes (including some cold-season cases). More cases will be incorporated as they occur and are observed. Data sources include geostationary satellite imagery, Doppler radar, three-dimensional lightning mapping networks, ground-strike detection networks, charge moment change measurements, and low-light video observations. The ultimate goal is to further test the hypothesis that MCS structure affects TLE production, and if so to quantify its impact. Research on two Oklahoma case studies, a multicellular system that occurred on 24 March 2009 and a classic bow-echo MCS that occurred on 19 August 2009, is ongoing. Over a 2.5-h period, the March case produced 23 observed TLEs (all sprites) whose parent flashes occurred within 175 km of the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA). The median altitude of LMA sources during the TLEs was 5.9 km above Mean Sea Level (MSL), or -19.2 °C. The August storm produced, in 2.5 hours, 34 TLEs (all sprites) with 32 of those having parent

  16. Quantifying the effects of resolution on convective organisation in cloud-system resolving simulations of West Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bethan; Stier, Philip; Birch, Cathryn

    2016-04-01

    Convection transports moisture, momentum, heat and aerosols through the troposphere, and so the variability of convection is a major driver of global weather and climate. Convection in the tropics is organised across a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, from the few kilometres and hours associated with individual cloud systems, through the mesoscale of squall lines and cloud clusters, to the synoptic scale of tropical cyclones. Global and limited area models often fail to represent many of these scales of organisation, and the interaction between the scales remains poorly understood. In this work we devise a new metric to quantify the degree of convective organisation. We apply this metric to data from simulations of the West African Monsoon region from the CASCADE project, where simulations were performed using the Met Office Unified Model at 12 km horizontal grid length with parameterised convection, and at 12, 4 and 1.5 km horizontal grid lengths with permitted convection. This allows us to perform quantitative analysis of convective organisation across model configurations that experience the same large-scale state and differ only in horizontal grid length and representation of deep convection. We show that our analysis technique can be usefully applied to high-resolution, cloud-system resolving, large-domain simulations of tropical convection. We use our technique to quantify the effects of horizontal grid length and of convective parameterisation on the degree of organisation in the simulated convection, and investigate the spatiotemporal variability of the convective organisation in the different model configurations. We then determine relationships between the degree of convective organisation and precipitation. Further, we compare our results against equivalent parameters derived from satellite data to identify how well each of the model configurations performs against observations. Through the use of this new metric, this work provides a quantitative

  17. Transitions to broad cells in a nonlinear thermal convection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brian H.

    This paper explores the properties of a two-dimensional, Boussinesq convection model with an ad hoc term in the buoyancy tendency equation that represents a positive external feedback process acting on the buoyancy fluctuations. Linear stability analyses and nonlinear integrations are presented for the case of constant heat flux boundary conditions. Although the large wavenumber modes grow the fastest from a state of rest, the nonlinear solutions progressively evolve to cells of small wavenumber. Applications to mesoscale cellular convection in the atmosphere are discussed.

  18. How does the Redi parameter for mesoscale mixing impact global climate in an Earth System Model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradal, Marie-Aude; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2014-09-01

    A coupled climate model is used to examine the impact of an increase in the mixing due to mesoscale eddies on the global climate system. A sixfold increase in the Redi mixing coefficient ARedi, which is within the admissible range of variation, has the overall effect of warming the global-mean surface air and sea surface temperatures by more than 1°C. Locally, sea surface temperatures increase by up to 7°C in the North Pacific and by up to 4°C in the Southern Ocean, with corresponding impacts on the ice concentration and ice extent in polar regions. However, it is not clear that the changes in heat transport from tropics to poles associated with changing this coefficient are primarily responsible for these changes. We found that the changes in the transport of heat are often much smaller than changes in long-wave trapping and short-wave absorption. Additionally, changes in the advective and diffusive transport of heat toward the poles often oppose each other. However, we note that the poleward transport of salt increases near the surface as ARedi increases. We suggest a causal chain in which enhanced eddy stirring leads to increased high-latitude surface salinity reducing salt stratification and water column stability and enhancing convection, triggering two feedback loops. In one, deeper convection prevents sea ice formation, which decreases albedo, which increases SW absorption, further increasing SST and decreasing sea ice formation. In the other, increased SST and reduced sea ice allow for more water vapor in the atmosphere, trapping long-wave radiation. Destratifying the polar regions is thus a potential way in which changes in ocean circulation might warm the planet.

  19. Investigation of mesoscale meteorological phenomena as observed by geostationary satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brundidge, K. C.

    1982-01-01

    Satellite imagery plus conventional synoptic observations were used to examine three mesoscale systems recently observed by the GOES-EAST satellite. The three systems are an arc cloud complex (ACC), mountain lee wave clouds and cloud streets parallel to the wind shear. Possible gravity-wave activity is apparent in all three cases. Of particular interest is the ACC because of its ability to interact with other mesoscale phenomena to produce or enhance convection.

  20. Idealized Cloud-System Resolving Modeling for Tropical Convection Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Usama M.

    A three-dimensional limited-domain Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) is used in idealized settings to study the interaction between tropical convection and the large scale dynamics. The model domain is doubly periodic and the large-scale circulation is parameterized using the Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG) Approximation and Damped Gravity Wave (DGW) methods. The model simulations fall into two main categories: simulations with a prescribed radiative cooling profile, and others in which radiative cooling profile interacts with clouds and water vapor. For experiments with a prescribed radiative cooling profile, radiative heating is taken constant in the vertical in the troposphere. First, the effect of turbulent surface fluxes and radiative cooling on tropical deep convection is studied. In the precipitating equilibria, an increment in surface fluxes produces a greater increase in precipitation than an equal increment in column-integrated radiative heating. The gross moist stability remains close to constant over a wide range of forcings. With dry initial conditions, the system exhibits hysteresis, and maintains a dry state with for a wide range of net energy inputs to the atmospheric column under WTG. However, for the same forcings the system admits a rainy state when initialized with moist conditions, and thus multiple equilibria exist under WTG. When the net forcing is increased enough that simulations, which begin dry, eventually develop precipitation. DGW, on the other hand, does not have the tendency to develop multiple equilibria under the same conditions. The effect of vertical wind shear on tropical deep convection is also studied. The strength and depth of the shear layer are varied as control parameters. Surface fluxes are prescribed. For weak wind shear, time-averaged rainfall decreases with shear and convection remains disorganized. For larger wind shear, rainfall increases with shear, as convection becomes organized into linear mesoscale systems. This non

  1. The Dependence on Grid Resolution of Numerically Simulated Convective Cloud Systems Using Ice Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Ferrier, Bradley S.

    1999-01-01

    Mesoscale research and forecast models are increasingly being used at horizontal resolutions of 1-8 km to simulate a variety of precipitating systems. When the model is used to simulate convective systems, it is uncertain to what extent the dynamics and microphysics of convective updrafts can be resolved with grids larger than 1 km. In this study, two- and three-dimensional versions of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model are used to determine the impact of horizontal grid resolution on the behavior of the simulated storms and on the characteristics of the cloud microphysical fields. It will be shown that as resolution decreases from about 1 km to greater than 3 km, there is a fairly rapid degradation of the storm structure in the form of reduced convective mass fluxes, updraft tilts, and cloud microphysics. A high-resolution simulation of hurricane outer rainbands using the MM5 mesoscale model shows also that there can be a substantial modification of the key microphysical processes that contribute to rainfall as a result of reducing the horizontal resolution.

  2. Analysis of Summertime Convective Initiation in Central Alabama Using the Land Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Robert S.; Case, Jonathan L.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    During the summer months in the southeastern United States, convective initiation presents a frequent challenge to operational forecasters. Thunderstorm development has traditionally been referred to as random due to their disorganized, sporadic appearance and lack of atmospheric forcing. Horizontal variations in land surface characteristics such as soil moisture, soil type, land and vegetation cover could possibly be a focus mechanism for afternoon convection during the summer months. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) provides a stand-alone land surface modeling framework that incorporates these varying soil and vegetation properties, antecedent precipitation, and atmospheric forcing to represent the soil state at high resolution. The use of LIS as a diagnostic tool may help forecasters to identify boundaries in land surface characteristics that could correlate to favored regions of convection initiation. The NASA Shortterm Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) team has been collaborating with the National Weather Service Office in Birmingham, AL to help incorporate LIS products into their operational forecasting methods. This paper highlights selected convective case dates from summer 2009 when synoptic forcing was weak, and identifies any boundaries in land surface characteristics that may have contributed to convective initiation. The LIS output depicts the effects of increased sensible heat flux from urban areas on the development of convection, as well as convection along gradients in land surface characteristics and surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. These features may promote mesoscale circulations and/or feedback processes that can either enhance or inhibit convection. With this output previously unavailable to operational forecasters, LIS provides a new tool to forecasters in order to help eliminate the randomness of summertime convective initiation.

  3. The Spring 2014 Mesoscale Ensemble Prediction System "Dust Offensive"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. D.; Adams-Selin, R.; Sartan, J.; Creighton, G.; Kuchera, E.; Keane, J.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Mesoscale Ensemble Prediction System (MEPS) at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) is a 10-member ensemble run on a 20-km hemispheric domain and 4-km domains in regions of interest. In the Southwest Asia (SWA) regional domain, dust forecast products from MEPS are of particular interest. Over the past few years, subject matter experts at AFWA have acquired and implemented datasets and developed a soil moisture algorithm that have improved skill scores of dust forecasts in the AFWA GOddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module within the Weather Research and Forecast with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model. The aforementioned datasets include, but are not limited to, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) dust source region and a dynamic 8-day Leaf Area Index (LAI) vegetation mask. We then tested these individual datasets as ensemble perturbations in all ten MEPS test members during a three-week "dust offensive" test over SWA in spring 2014. Remote sensing specialists at AFWA meticulously documented the locations, duration, and intensity of numerous dust events over the SWA domain during the three weeks. These data were then used for subjective verification of each individual MEPS member and of the individual perturbations within members. Results from the subjective verification showed that individual MEPS members with the DRI dust source region significantly outperformed members that used the standard Ginoux dust source region. The other individual perturbations tested were determined to have a neutral effect (i.e., neither degrading nor improving skill) on individual members during the three-week period. Thus, the DRI dust source region is now used in the majority of MEPS members in both the 4-km SWA domain and the 20-km hemispheric domain. The other individual perturbations are now utilized in a minority of MEPS members. However, additional testing is still needed over other domains to determine if the improved dust forecasting skill has spatial

  4. The Mesoscale Heavy Rainfall Observing System (MHROS) over the middle region of the Yangtze River in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chunguang; Wan, Rong; Wang, Bin; Dong, Xiquan; Li, Hongli; Wang, Xiaokang; Xu, Guirong; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yehong; Xiao, Yanjiao; Zhou, Zhimin; Fu, Zhikang; Wan, Xia; Zhang, Wengang; Peng, Tao; Leng, Liang; Stenz, Ronald; Wang, Junchao

    2015-10-01

    The Mesoscale Heavy Rainfall Observing System (MHROS), supported by the Institute of Heavy Rain (IHR), Chinese Meteorology Administration, is one of the major systems to observe mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the middle region of the Yangtze River in China. The IHR MHROS consists of mobile C-POL and X-POL precipitation radars, millimeter wavelength cloud radar, fixed S-band precipitation radars, GPS network, microwave radiometers, radio soundings, wind profiler radars, and disdrometers. The atmospheric variables observed or retrieved by these instruments include the profiles of atmospheric temperature, moisture, wind speed and direction, vertical structures of MCS clouds and precipitation, atmospheric water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These quality-controlled observations and retrievals have been used in mesoscale numerical weather prediction to improve the accuracy of weather forecasting and MCS research since 2007. These long-term observations have provided the most comprehensive data sets for researchers to investigate the formation-dissipation processes of MCSs and for modelers to improve their simulations of MCSs. As the first paper of a series, we briefly introduce the IHR MHROS and describe the specifications of its major instruments. Then, we provide an integrative analysis of the IHR MHROS observations for a heavy rain case on 3-5 July 2014 as well as the application of IHR MHROS observations in improving the model simulations. In a series of papers, we will tentatively answer several key scientific questions related to the MCS and Meiyu frontal systems over the middle region of the Yangtze River using the IHR MHROS observations.

  5. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  6. Chemistry on the mesoscale: Modeling and measurement issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne; Pleim, John; Walcek, Christopher; Ching, Jason; Binkowski, Frank; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Dickerson, Russell; Pickering, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) -- a coupled chemistry/mesoscale model; convection in RADM; unresolved issues for mesoscale modeling with chemistry -- nonprecipitating clouds; unresolved issues for mesoscale modeling with chemistry -- aerosols; tracer studies with Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCEM); field observations of trace gas transport in convection; and photochemical consequences of convection.

  7. Evaluation of a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System with Observations from the 1980 Great Plains Mesoscale Tracer Field Experiment. Part I: Datasets and Meteorological Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.; Pielke, Roger A.

    1996-03-01

    The Colorado State University mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, which consists of a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model, has been used to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon tracer-gas cloud for one afternoon surface release during the July 1980 Great Plains mesoscale tracer field experiment. Ground-level concentration (GLC) measurements taken along arcs of samplers 100 and 600 km downwind of the release site at Norman, Oklahoma, up to three days after the tracer release were available for comparison. Quantitative measures of a number of significant dispersion characteristics obtained from analysis of the observed tracer cloud's moving GLC `footprint' have been used to evaluate the modeling system's skill in simulating this MAD case.MAD is more dependent upon the spatial and temporal structure of the transport wind field than is short-range atmospheric dispersion. For the Great Plains mesoscale tracer experiment, the observations suggest that the Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in transporting and deforming the tracer cloud. A suite of ten two- and three-dimensional numerical meteorological experiments was devised to investigate the relative contributions of topography, other surface inhomogeneities, atmospheric baroclinicity, synoptic-scale flow evolution, and meteorological model initialization time to the structure and evolution of the low-level mesoscale flow field and thus to MAD. Results from the ten mesoscale meteorological simulations are compared in this part of the paper. The predicted wind fields display significant differences, which give rise in turn to significant differences in predicted low-level transport. The presence of an oscillatory ageostrophic component in the observed synoptic low-level winds for this case is shown to complicate initialization of the meteorological model considerably and is the

  8. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-17

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimes to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too little heavy

  9. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-17

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimesmore » to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too

  10. A 7-km Non-Hydrostatic Global Mesoscale Simulation with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5) for Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, W.; Suarez, M.; Gelaro, R.; daSilva, A.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Darmenov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has used the Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5) to produce a 2-year non-hydrostatic global mesoscale simulation for the period of June 2005-2007. This 7-km GEOS-5 Nature Run (7km-G5NR) product will provide synthetic observations for observing system simulation experiments (OSSE)s at NASA and NOAA through the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation and the NASA Center for Climate Simulation. While GEOS-5 is regularly applied in seasonal-to-decadal climate simulations, and medium range weather prediction and data assimilation, GEOS-5 is also readily adaptable for application as a global mesoscale model in pursuit of global cloud resolving applications. Recent computing advances have permitted experimentation with global atmospheric models at these scales, although production applications like the 7km-G5NR have remained limited. By incorporating a non-hydrostatic finite-volume dynamical core with scale aware physics parameterizations, the 7km-G5NR produces organized convective systems and robust weather systems ideal for producing observations for existing and new remote sensing instruments. In addition to standard meteorological parameters, the 7km-G5NR includes 15 aerosol tracers (including dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon), O3, CO and CO2. The 7km-G5NR is driven by prescribed sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice, daily volcanic and biomass burning emissions, as well as high-resolution inventories of anthropogenic sources. We will discuss the technical challenges of producing the 7km-G5NR including the nearly 5 petabytes of full resolution output at 30-minute intervals as required by the OSSE developers, and modifications to the standard GEOS-5 physics to permit convective organization at the 'grey-zone' resolution of 7km. Highlights of the 7km-G5NR validation will focus on the representation of clouds and organized convection including tropical cyclones

  11. A satellite-based perspective of convective systems over the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, A.; Houze, R.; Virts, K.; Zuluaga, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Data from TRMM, the A-Train satellites, and the Worldwide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) have been used to study extreme weather throughout low latitudes, from deep convection over the Himalayas to oceanic mesoscale systems associated with the MJO. This study presents a more in-depth examination of convection over the Maritime Continent (Indonesia and Malaysia). During November to February, this area is the rainiest regional climate on Earth, thus constituting one of the atmosphere's primary heat sources. On multiple temporal and spatial scales, it is a complex region with clouds and precipitation having both oceanic and orographic influence. The November-February season encompasses both the eastward propagation of the MJO through this region and rainfall associated with the Asian-Australian monsoon. More specifically, the precipitation in this region is strongly modulated by MJO phases, pulsations of the monsoon, and the powerful diurnal effects of the islands and ocean. Through a feature-based analysis of convective and stratiform components of storms, the evolution of precipitating clouds in this region will be described using data from the November-February time period over multiple years. This analysis leads to an increased understanding of the characteristics of convection associated with the intraseasonal and diurnal variability during these months over the Maritime Continent. Previous work using A-Train data noted the prevalence of smaller separated MCSs over the region during the locally active phase of the MJO, and WWLLN data have shown a peak in lightning density as convection becomes deeper and more numerous leading up to this active period. By applying the analysis of the TRMM data in addition to the A-Train and WWLLN datasets, the relative roles of convective and stratiform components of MCSs to the behavior of convection can be determined during the MJO and monsoonal maxima of rainfall over the Maritime Continent.

  12. Soil Moisture and Mesoscale Convective Complex Development During the 1993 US Midwest Flood: Results from the MM5-PLACE Atmosphere/Land-Surface Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. David; Wang, Yansen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wetzel, Peter; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 1993 US Midwest Flood produced record levels of flooding, in the Mississippi River Basin. This flooding resulted from repeated frontal passages and mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) during the months of June and July. A better understanding of processes that influenced MCC development during the 1993 Flood may lead to improved forecasts of heavy precipitation and flooding. Here, we consider the impact of soil moisture on MCC development during a two-day period (June 23-24) of the 1993 US Midwest Flood. The purpose of this study is to assess the importance of soil moisture distribution on the timing, intensity, and location of heavy precipitation. In this study, the MM5-PLACE Atmosphere/Land-Surface Model is utilized. The atmospheric component consists of the Penn State/NCAR MM5 mesoscale model, and the land-surface component consists of the Goddard Parameterization for Land Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE). Initial soil moisture is provided from two sources: 1) NCEP reanalysis, and 2) Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) using NOAA rain gauge measurements as a proxy for soil moisture. NCEP reanalysis provides coarse resolution initial soil moisture (2.5 degree), while API provides high resolution initial soil moisture (10-200 km depending on NOAA rain gauge spacing). Initial results indicate that the distribution of soil moisture has a significant impact on the timing and location of heavy precipitation during this two-day flood event. Precipitation in simulations with high resolution initial soil moisture agrees more closely with observed precipitation. These results suggest that high resolution soil moisture observations are necessary to accurately predict severe storm development, heavy precipitation, and subsequent flooding.

  13. Accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets using SESAME-79 field data as revealed by observing system simulation experiments. [Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Y.-H.; Anthes, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observing system simulation experiments are used to investigate the accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets which employ the AVE-SESAME 1979 data. The time-including, four-dimensional data set of a mesoscale model is used to simulate rawinsonde observations from AVE-SESAME 1979. The 5 C/day (heat budget) and 2 g/kg per day (moisture budget) magnitudes of error obtained indicate difficulties in the diagnosis of the heating rate in weak convective systems. The influences exerted by observational frequency, objective analysis, observational density, vertical interpolation, and observational errors on the budget are also studied, and it is found that the temporal and spatial resolution of the SESAME regional network is marginal for diagnosing convective effects on a horizontal time scale of 550 x 550 km.

  14. Initialization of a mesoscale model for April 10, 1979, using alternative data sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A 35 km grid limited area mesoscale model was initialized with high density SESAME radiosonde data and high density TIROS-N satellite temperature profiles for April 10, 1979. These data sources were used individually and with low level wind fields constructed from surface wind observations. The primary objective was to examine the use of satellite temperature data for initializing a mesoscale model by comparing the forecast results with similar experiments employing radiosonde data. The impact of observed low level winds on the model forecasts was also investigated with experiments varying the method of insertion. All forecasts were compared with each other and with mesoscale observations for precipitation, mass and wind structure. Several forecasts produced convective precipitation systems with characteristics satisfying criteria for a mesoscale convective complex. High density satellite temperature data and balanced winds can be used in a mesoscale model to produce forecasts which verify favorably with observations.

  15. Chemistry of rain events in West Africa: evidence of dust and biogenic influence in convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, K.; Journet, E.; Rajot, J.-L.; Chevaillier, S.; Triquet, S.; Formenti, P.; Zakou, A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper documents the chemical composition of 7 rain events associated with mesoscale convective systems sampled at the supersite of Banizoumbou, Niger, during the first special observation periods (June-July 2006) of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) experiment. Time-resolved rain sampling was performed in order to discriminate the local dust scavenged at the beginning of rain event from the aerosol particles incorporated in the cloud at the end of the rain. The total elemental composition is dominated by Al, Si, Fe and Ca, indicating a high influence of dust and limited marine or anthropogenic contribution. After the aerosol wash-out, the elemental concentrations normalized to Al and the microscopic observations of diatoms, a tracer of the Bodélé depression, both indicate that the total elemental composition of rainwater is controlled by dust originating from North-eastern Saharan sources and probably incorporated in the convective cloud from the Harmattan layer. The low variability of the rain composition over the measurement period indicates a regional and temporal homogeneity of dust composition in the Harmattan layer. In the dissolved phase, the dominant anions are nitrate (NO3-), sulphate (SO42-) and chloride (Cl-). However, between June and July we observe an increasing contribution of the organic anions (formate, acetate, oxalate) associated with biogenic emissions to the total ion composition. These results confirm the large influence of biogenic emissions on the rain composition over Sahel during the wet season. The paper concludes on the capacity of mesoscale convective systems to carry simultaneously dust and biogenic compounds originating from different locations and depose them jointly. It also discusses the potential biogeochemical impact of such a phenomenon.

  16. Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Tilted Convective Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Ye; Haferman, Jeffrey L.; Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft and ground-based radar data from the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) show that convective systems are not always vertical. Instead, many are tilted from vertical. Satellite passive microwave radiometers observe the atmosphere at a viewing angle. For example, the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) on the TRMM satellite have an incident angle of about 50deg. Thus, the brightness temperature measured from one direction of tilt may be different than that viewed from the opposite direction due to the different optical depth. This paper presents the investigation of passive microwave brightness temperatures of tilted convective systems. To account for the effect of tilt, a 3-D backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been applied to a simple tilted cloud model and a dynamically evolving cloud model to derive the brightness temperature. The radiative transfer results indicate that brightness temperature varies when the viewing angle changes because of the different optical depth. The tilt increases the displacements between high 19 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 19)) due to liquid emission from lower level of cloud and the low 85 GHz brightness temperature (Tb(sub 85)) due to ice scattering from upper level of cloud. As the resolution degrades, the difference of brightness temperature due to the change of viewing angle decreases dramatically. The dislocation between Tb(sub 19) and Tb(sub 85), however, remains prominent.

  17. Evaluation of a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System with Observations from the 1980 Great Plains Mesoscale Tracer Field Experiment. Part II: Dispersion Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.; Piekle, Roger A.

    1996-03-01

    The Colorado State University mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, which consists of a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model (MLPDM), has been used to simulate the emission, transport, and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon tracer-gas cloud for one afternoon surface release during the July 1980 Great Plains mesoscale tracer field experiment. The MLPDM was run for a baseline simulation and seven sensitivity experiments. The baseline simulation showed considerable skill in predicting such quantitative whole-could characteristics as peak ground-level concentration (GLC), maximum cloud width, cloud arrival and transit times, and crosswind integrated exposure at downwind distances of both 100 and 60 km. The baseline simulation also compared very favorably to simulations made by seven other MAD models for this same case in an earlier study. The sensitivity experiments explored the impact of various factors on MAD, especially the diurnal heating cycle and physiographic and atmospheric inhomogeneities, by including or excluding them in different combinations. The GLC `footprints' predicted in the sensitivity experiments were sensitive to differences in the simulated meteorological fields.The observations and the numerical simulations both suggest that the Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in transporting and deforming the perfluorocarbon tracer cloud during this MAD experiment: the mean transport speed was supergeostrophic and both crosswind and alongwind cloud spreads were larger than can be explained by turbulent diffusion alone. The contributions of differential horizontal advection and mesoscale deformation to MAD dominate those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for this case, and Pasquill's delayed-shear enhancement mechanism for horizontal diffusion appears to have played a significant role during nighttime transport. These results demonstrate the

  18. Evaluation of a mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system with observations from the 1980 Great Plains mesoscale tracer field experiment. Part I: Datasets and meterological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.D.; Pielke, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    A mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, consisting of a mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model, was used to simulate transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon tracer-gas cloud for a surface release during the July 1980 Great Plains mesoscale tracer field experiment. Ground-level concentration (GLC) measurements taken downwind of the release site up to three days after the tracer release were available for comparison. Quantitative measures of significant dispersion characteristics obtained from analysis of the tracer cloud`s moving GLC {open_quotes}footprint{close_quotes} were used to evaluate the simulation of the MAD case. MAD is more dependent on the spatial and temporal structure of the transport wind field than is short-range atmospheric dispersion. For the tracer experiment, the observations suggest that the nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in transporting and deforming the tracer cloud. Ten two- and three-dimensional numerical meteorological experiments were devised to investigate the relative contributions of topography, other surface inhomogeneities, atmospheric baroclinicity, synoptic-scale flow evolution, and meteorological model initialization time to the structure and evolution of the low-level mesoscale flow field and thus to MAD. Results from the meteorological simulations are compared in this paper. The predicted wind fields display significant differences, which give rise in turn to significant differences in predicted low-level transport. The presence of an oscillatory ageostrophic component in the observed synoptic low-level winds for this case is shown to complicate initialization of the meteorological model considerably and is the likely cause of directional errors in the predicted mean tracer transport. A companion paper describes the results from the associated dispersion simulations. 76 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. System enhancements of Mesoscale Analysis and Space Sensor (MASS) computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.; Karitani, S.

    1985-01-01

    The interactive information processing for the mesoscale analysis and space sensor (MASS) program is reported. The development and implementation of new spaceborne remote sensing technology to observe and measure atmospheric processes is described. The space measurements and conventional observational data are processed together to gain an improved understanding of the mesoscale structure and dynamical evolution of the atmosphere relative to cloud development and precipitation processes. A Research Computer System consisting of three primary computers was developed (HP-1000F, Perkin-Elmer 3250, and Harris/6) which provides a wide range of capabilities for processing and displaying interactively large volumes of remote sensing data. The development of a MASS data base management and analysis system on the HP-1000F computer and extending these capabilities by integration with the Perkin-Elmer and Harris/6 computers using the MSFC's Apple III microcomputer workstations is described. The objectives are: to design hardware enhancements for computer integration and to provide data conversion and transfer between machines.

  20. Impact of environmental conditions on the mesoscale characteristics of squall-line systems: Toward the development of anvil cirrus parameterization for GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Hung-Neng S.; Bradley, M.M.

    1996-05-01

    Our earlier studies indicated that a strong coupling exists in the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) between deep convection and its related anvil cloud through the interaction among dynamical, thermodynamical and radiative processes. They also showed that the tilting structure of MCSs makes an important contribution to the water budget of anvil clouds, particularly the tropical anvil due to the jetlike wind profile. However, most earlier GCMs did not include a direct and physically consistent representation of this coupling. To this end, Randall et al. suggested a more realistic anvil parameterization by adding prognostic cloud water (or ice) variables to account for the formation of anvil clouds from cumulus detrainment. In addition to this effort, our recent studies further suggest the need to parameterize the tilting structure of MCSs in GCMs. The objective of this work is to parameterize the large-scale effects of this tilting structure. Our primary interest focuses on MCSs in an environment with substantial wind shear, such as squall-line systems, since they have longer lifetimes and wider coverage to affect the earth-atmosphere radiation budget and climate. Using varied convective available potential energy (CAPE), wind shear intensity, shear depth, and the pattern of shear profile over a wide range of bulk Richardson number (Ri), a sensitivity study is performed in a cloud resolving model to link its resulting mesoscale ascent/descent with GCM-resolvable variables. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an anvil cirrus parameterization (ACP), that will couple with cumulus parameterizations in GCMs to improve the cloud-radiation feedback on large-scale climate.

  1. AS sensitivity study of the mesoscale characteristics of squall-line systems to environmental conditions: Implication of anvil cirrus parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.-N.S.

    1996-04-01

    Cloud-radiation feedback has been identified as the single most important effect limiting general circulation models (GCMs) to further progress in climate change research, and regarded as major uncertainties in estimating the impact of increasing concentrations of green house gases on climate simulations. Therefore, it is crucially important to further understand the physical processes involved in order to improve the representation of cloud processes in GCMs. To this end, a cloud resolving model with enhanced model physics was used to study the impact of microphysics, long-and shortwave radiation on mediated and tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The objective of this work is to parameters the large- scale effects of an important sub-GCM-grid-scale process associated with the titling structure of MCSs. The objective of this work is to parameters the large-scale effects of an important sub- GCM-grid- scale process associated with the titling structure of MCSs. To this end, our primary interest focuses on MCSs in an environment with substantial wind shear, such as squall-line systems, since they have longer lifetimes and wider coverage to affect the earth- atmosphere radiation budget and climate.

  2. Evaluation of a mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system with observations from the 1980 Great Plains mesoscale tracer field experiment. Part II: Dispersion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.D.; Pielke, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    A mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, consisting of a mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model (MLPDM), was used to simulate the emission, transport, and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon tracer-gas cloud for a surface release during a tracer field experiment. The MLPDM was run for a baseline simulation and seven sensitivity experiments. The baseline simulation showed considerable skill in predicting peak ground-level concentration (GLC), maximum cloud width, cloud arrival and transit times, and crosswind integrated exposure at downwind distances of 100 and 600 km. The baseline simulation also compared very well to simulations made by seven other MAD models for the same case in an earlier study. The sensitivity experiments explored the impact of various factors on MAD, especially the diurnal heating cycle and physiographic and atmospheric inhomogeneities, by including or excluding them in different combinations. The GLC footprints predicted in sensitivity experiments were sensitive to differences in simulated meteorological fields. The observations and numerical simulations suggest that the nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in transporting and deforming the tracer cloud during this MAD experiment: the mean transport speed was supergeostrophic and both crosswind and alongwind cloud spreads were larger than can be explained by turbulent diffusion alone. The contributions of differential horizontal advection and mesoscale deformation to MAD dominate those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for this case, and Pasquill`s delayed-shear enhancement mechanism for horizontal diffusion appears to have played a significant role during nighttime transport. These results demonstrate the need in some flow regimes for better temporal resolution of boundary layer vertical shear in MAD models than is available from the conventional twice-daily rawinsonde network. 34 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. On the episodic nature of derecho-producing convective systems in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Walker S.; Mote, Thomas L.; Bentley, Mace L.

    2005-11-01

    Convectively generated windstorms occur over broad temporal and spatial scales; however, one of the larger-scale and most intense of these windstorms has been given the name derecho. This study illustrates the tendency for derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems to group together across the United States - forming a derecho series. The derecho series is recognized as any succession of derechos that develop within a similar synoptic environment with no more than 72 h separating individual events. A derecho dataset for the period 1994-2003 was assembled to investigate the groupings of these extremely damaging convective wind events. Results indicate that over 62% of the derechos in the dataset were members of a derecho series. On average, nearly six series affected the United States annually. Most derecho series consisted of two or three events; though, 14 series during the period of record contained four or more events. Two separate series involved nine derechos within a period of nine days. Analyses reveal that derecho series largely frequent regions of the Midwest, Ohio Valley, and the south-central Great Plains during May, June, and July. Results suggest that once a derecho occurred during May, June, or July, there was a 58% chance that this event was the first of a series of two or more, and about a 46% chance that this was the first of a derecho series consisting of three or more events. The derecho series climatology reveals that forecasters in regions frequented by derechos should be prepared for the probable regeneration of a derecho-producing convective system after an initial event occurs. Copyright

  4. A System for Measurement of Convection Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogatyrev, Gennady P.; Gorbunov, Aleksei V; Putin, Gennady F.; Ivanov, Alexander I.; Nikitin, Sergei A.; Polezhaev, Vadim I.

    1996-01-01

    A simple device for direct measurement of buoyancy driven fluid flows in a low-gravity environment is proposed. A system connecting spacecraft accelerometers data and results of thermal convection in enclosure measurements and numerical simulations is developed. This system will permit also to evaluate the low frequency microacceleration component. The goal of the paper is to present objectives and current results of ground-based experimental and numerical modeling of this convection detector.

  5. Walker-Type Mean Circulations and Convectively Coupled Tropical Waves as an Interacting System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.; Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2002-05-01

    Interactions between convectively coupled tropical waves and Walker-type mean circulations are examined using a two-dimensional analytic model wherein drying and cooling of the boundary layer by convective and mesoscale downdrafts are in equilibrium with the wind-induced perturbations of surface fluxes. The moist thermodynamic state directly affects the stability of the large-scale circulation by controlling the wind perturbation on surface fluxes and the strength of the convective downdrafts. Stability analyses yield two major conclusions.(i) The mean Walker circulation is linearly unstable, suggesting that it may only exist in a quasi-steady sense through the spontaneous generation of transient waves. The instability is a manifestation of positive feedback: enhanced low-level convergence increases the surface wind speed, which increases the surface flux. As a result, convective heating is increased, which further enhances the low-level convergence. The mean circulation is more unstable when its horizontal extent is small and its depth large. Hence, when the horizontal extent of the mean circulation is a few thousand kilometers, as in the authors' recent cloud-resolving simulations, the deep first-baroclinic mode circulation is too unstable to be maintained even in a quasi-steady sense, realizing a shallow double-cell structure.(ii) The convectively coupled large-scale wave differs from traditional tropical large-scale instabilities of a homogeneous mean state in an important way: the longest waves are the most unstable rather than the shortest. Linear coupling of the waves with the mean state, through wind-induced surface flux perturbations, induces monotonically growing instabilities when the ascent of the mean circulation occupies more than half of the total domain. These instabilities occur only with the odd-wavenumber modes, which have parity with the mean circulation. Otherwise, the system supports linear neutral waves that propagate slower than the dry

  6. Convection in a two-layer fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, A.; Peltier, L. J.; Fujita, D.; Koster, J.; Biringen, S.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented, and preliminary computations are performed on a system of two immiscible liquid layers with a temperature gradient applied parallel to the interface. The experiments reflect the combined contribution of buoyancy and surface-tension-induced (Marangoni) convection. It is concluded that buoyancy effects appear to be dominant and mask any surface-tension-induced convection present. Numerical computations show significant modification of pure buoyant convection by surface-tension gradients. The results are of interest in connection with the liquid encapsulation of GaAs melts in a microgravity environment.

  7. Mesoscale simulations of two model systems in biophysics: from red blood cells to DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Chen, Yeng-Long; Lu, Huijie; Pan, Zehao; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2015-12-01

    Computational modeling has become increasingly important in biophysics, but the great challenge in numerical simulations due to the multiscale feature of biological systems limits the capability of modeling in making discoveries in biology. Innovative multiscale modeling approaches are desired to bridge different scales from nucleic acids and proteins to cells and tissues. Although all-atom molecular dynamics has been successfully applied in many microscale biological processes such as protein folding, it is still prohibitively expensive for studying macroscale problems such as biophysics of cells and tissues. On the other hand, continuum-based modeling has become a mature procedure for analysis and design in many engineering fields, but new insights for biological systems in the microscale are limited when molecular details are missing in continuum-based modeling. In this context, mesoscale modeling approaches such as Langevin dynamics, lattice Boltzmann method, and dissipative particle dynamics have become popular by simultaneously incorporating molecular interactions and long-range hydrodynamic interactions, providing insights to properties on longer time and length scales than molecular dynamics. In this review, we summarized several mesoscale simulation approaches for studying two model systems in biophysics: red blood cells (RBCs) and deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs). The RBC is a model system for cell mechanics and biological membranes, while the DNA represents a model system for biopolymers. We introduced the motivations of studying these problems and presented the key features of different mesoscale methods. Furthermore, we described the latest progresses in these methods and highlighted the major findings for modeling RBCs and DNAs. Finally, we also discussed the challenges and potential issues of different approaches.

  8. Environmental Characteristics of Convective Systems During TRMM-LBA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Rickenbach, Thomas; Roy, Biswadev; Pierce, Harold; Williams, Earle; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, data collected from 51 days of continual upper atmospheric soundings and TOGA radar at ABRACOS Hill during the TRMM-LBA experiment are used to describe the mean thermodynamic and kinematic airmass properties of wet season convection over Rondonia, Brazil. Distinct multi-day easterly and westerly lower tropospheric wind regimes occurred during the campaign with contrasting airmass characteristics. Westerly wind periods featured modest CAPE (1000 J/kg), moist conditions (>90% RH) extending through 700 mb and shallow (900 mb) speed shear on the order of 10(exp -4)/s. This combination of characteristics promoted convective systems that featured a relatively large fraction of stratiform rainfall and weak convection nearly devoid of lightning. The environment is very similar to the general airmass conditions experienced during the Darwin, Australia monsoon convective regime. In contrast, easterly regime convective systems were more strongly electrified and featured larger convective rain rates and reduced stratiform rainfall fraction. These systems formed in an environment with significantly larger CAPE (1500 J/kg), drier lower and middle level humidities (< 80% RH) and a wind shear layer that was both stronger (10(exp -3)/s) and deeper (700 mb). The larger CAPE resulted from strong insolation under relatively cloud-free skies (owing to reduced column humidity) and was also weakly capped in the lowest 1-2 km, thus contributing to a more explosive growth of convection. The time series of low- and mid-level averaged humidity exhibited marked variability between westerly and easterly regimes and was characterized by low frequency (i.e., multi-day to weekly) oscillations. The synoptic scale origins of these moisture fluctuations are examined, which include the effects of variable low-level airmass trajectories and upper-level, westward migrating cyclonic vortices. The results reported herein provide an environmental context for ongoing dual Doppler analyses

  9. Convective Systems Over the Japan Sea: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Yoshizaki, Masanori; Shie, Chung-Lin; Kato, Teryuki

    2002-01-01

    Wintertime observations of MCSs (Mesoscale Convective Systems) over the Sea of Japan - 2001 (WMO-01) were collected from January 12 to February 1, 2001. One of the major objectives is to better understand and forecast snow systems and accompanying disturbances and the associated key physical processes involved in the formation and development of these disturbances. Multiple observation platforms (e.g., upper-air soundings, Doppler radar, wind profilers, radiometers, etc.) during WMO-01 provided a first attempt at investigating the detailed characteristics of convective storms and air pattern changes associated with winter storms over the Sea of Japan region. WMO-01 also provided estimates of the apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). The vertical integrals of Q1 and Q2 are equal to the surface precipitation rates. The horizontal and vertical adjective components of Q1 and Q2 can be used as large-scale forcing for the Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a CRM (typically run with a 1-km grid size). The GCE model has sophisticated microphysics and allows explicit interactions between clouds, radiation, and surface processes. It will be used to understand and quantify precipitation processes associated with wintertime convective systems over the Sea of Japan (using data collected during the WMO-01). This is the first cloud-resolving model used to simulate precipitation processes in this particular region. The GCE model-simulated WMO-01 results will also be compared to other GCE model-simulated weather systems that developed during other field campaigns (i.e., South China Sea, west Pacific warm pool region, eastern Atlantic region and central USA).

  10. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Convection as a Compound System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    2007-12-01

    Convection is the most fundamental process in understanding the structure of geospace and disturbances observed in the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) system. In this paper, a self-consistent configuration of the global convection system is considered under the real topology as a compound system. Investigations are made based on the M-I coupling scheme by analyzing numerical results obtained from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations which guarantee the self-consistency in the whole system under the Bv (magnetic field and velocity) paradigm. It is emphasized in the M-I coupling scheme that convection and field-aligned current (FAC) are different aspects of same physical process characterizing the open magnetosphere. Special attention is given in this paper to the energy supplying (dynamo) process that drives the FAC system. In the convection system, the dynamo must be constructed from shear motion together with plasma population regimes to steadily drive the convection. Convection patterns observed in the ionosphere are also the manifestation of achievement in global self-consistency. A primary approach to apply these concepts to the study of geospace is to consider how the M-I system adjusts the relative motion between the compressible magnetosphere and the incompressible ionosphere when responding to given solar-wind conditions. The above principle is also applicable for the study of disturbance phenomena such as the substorm as well as for the study of apparently unique processes such as the flux transfer event (FTE), the sudden commencement (SC), and the theta aurora. Finally, an attempt is made to understand the substorm as the extension of enhanced convection under the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) condition.

  11. Observation and numerical simulation of a convective initiation during COHMEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J. Aaron; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Under a synoptically undisturbed condition, a dual-peak convective lifecycle was observed with the COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment (COHMEX) observational network over a 24-hour period. The lifecycle included a multicell storm, which lasted about 6 hours, produced a peak rainrate exceeding 100 mm/hr, and initiated a downstream mesoscale convective system. The 24-hour accumulated rainfall of this event was the largest during the entire COHMEX. The downstream mesoscale convective system, unfortunately, was difficult to investigate quantitatively due to the lack of mesoscale observations. The dataset collected near the time of the multicell storm evolution, including its initiation, was one of the best datasets of COHMEX. In this study, the initiation of this multicell storm is chosen as the target of the numerical simulations.

  12. Radar Observations of Convective Systems from a High-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    Reflectivity data collected by the precipitation radar on board the tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, orbiting at 350 km altitude, are compared to reflectivity data collected nearly simultaneously by a doppler radar aboard the NASA ER-2 flying at 19-20 km altitude, i.e. above even the deepest convection. The TRMM precipitation radar is a scanning device with a ground swath width of 215 km, and has a resolution of about a4.4 km in the horizontal and 250 m in the vertical (125 m in the core swath 48 km wide). The TRMM radar has a wavelength of 217 cm (13.8 GHz) and the Nadir mirror echo below the surface is used to correct reflectivity for loss by attenuation. The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has two antennas, one pointing to the nadir, 34 degrees forward. The forward pointing beam receives both the normal and the cross-polarized echos, so the linear polarization ratio field can be monitored. EDOP has a wavelength of 3.12 cm (9.6 GHz), a vertical resolution of 37.5 m and a horizontal along-track resolution of about 100 m. The 2-D along track airflow field can be synthesized from the radial velocities of both beams, if a reflectivity-based hydrometer fall speed relation can be assumed. It is primarily the superb vertical resolution that distinguishes EDOP from other ground-based or airborne radars. Two experiments were conducted during 1998 into validate TRMM reflectivity data over convection and convectively-generated stratiform precipitation regions. The Teflun-A (TEXAS-Florida Underflight) experiment, was conducted in April and May and focused on mesoscale convective systems mainly in southeast Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in August-September in central Florida, in coordination with CAMEX-3 (Convection and Moisture Experiment). The latter was focused on hurricanes, especially during landfall, whereas TEFLUN-B concentrated on central; Florida convection, which is largely driven and organized by surface heating and ensuing sea breeze circulations

  13. Characterizing convection in geophysical dynamo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jonathan Shuo

    The Earth's magnetic field is produced by a fluid dynamo in the molten iron outer core. This geodynamo is driven by fluid motions induced by thermal and chemical convection and strongly influenced by rotational and magnetic field effects. While frequent observations are made of the morphology and time-dependent field behavior, flow dynamics in the core are all but inaccessible to direct measurement. Thus, forward models are essential for exploring the relationship between the geomagnetic field and its underlying fluid physics. The goal of my PhD is to further our understanding of the fluid physics driving the geodynamo. In order to do this, I have performed a suite of nonrotating and rotating convection laboratory experiments and developed a new experimental device that reaches more extreme values of the governing parameters than previously possible. In addition, I conduct a theoretical analysis of well-established results from a suite of dynamo simulations by Christensen and Aubert (2006). These studies are conducted at moderate values of the Ekman number (ratio between viscosity and Coriolis forces, ˜ 10-4), as opposed to the the extremely small Ekman numbers in planetary cores (˜ 10 -15). At such moderate Ekman values, flows tend to take the form of large-scale, quasi-laminar axial columns. These columnar structures give the induced magnetic field a dipolar morphology, similar to what is seen on planets. However, I find that some results derived from these simulations are fully dependent on the fluid viscosity, and therefore are unlikely to reflect the fluid physics driving dynamo action in the core. My findings reinforce the need to understand the turbulent processes that arise as the governing parameters approach planetary values. Indeed, my rotating convection experiments show that, as the Ekman number is decreased beyond ranges currently accessible to dynamo simulations, the regime characterized by laminar columns is found to dwindle. We instead find a

  14. Does mesoscale matters in decadal changes observed in the northern Canary upwelling system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relvas, P.; Luís, J.; Santos, A. M. P.

    2009-04-01

    The Western Iberia constitutes the northern limb of the Canary Current Upwelling System, one of the four Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems of the world ocean. The strong dynamic link between the atmosphere and the ocean makes these systems highly sensitive to global change, ideal to monitor and investigate its effects. In order to investigate decadal changes of the mesoscale patterns in the Northern Canary upwelling system (off Western Iberia), the field of the satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) trends was built at the pixel scale (4x4 km) for the period 1985-2007, based on the monthly mean data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board NOAA series satellites, provided by the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The time series were limited to the nighttime passes to avoid the solar heating effect and a suite of procedures were followed to guarantee that the temperature trends were not biased towards the seasonally more abundant summer data, when the sky is considerably clear. A robust linear fit was applied to each individual pixel, crossing along the time the same pixel in all the processed monthly mean AVHRR SST images from 1985 until 2007. The field of the SST trends was created upon the slopes of the linear fits applied to each pixel. Monthly mean SST time series from the one degree enhanced International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) and from near-shore measurements collected on a daily basis by the Portuguese Meteorological Office (IM) are also used to compare the results and extend the analysis back until 1960. A generalized warming trend is detected in the coastal waters off Western Iberia during the last decades, no matter which data set we analyse. However, significant spatial differences in the warming rates are observed in the satellite-derived SST trends. Remarkably, off the southern part of the Western Iberia the known

  15. Numerical simulations of mesoscale precipitation systems. Final progress report, 1 April-30 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dingle, A.N.

    1982-05-12

    A numerical model designed for the study of mesoscale weather phenomena is presented. It is a three-dimensional, time-dependent model based upon a mesoscale primitive-equation system, and it includes parameterizations of cloud and precipitation processes, boundary-layer transfers, and ground surface energy and moisture budgets. This model was used to simulate the lake-effect convergence over and in the lee of Lake Michigan in late fall and early winter. The lake-effect convergence is created in advected cold air as it moves first from cold land to the warm constant-temperature lake surface, and then on to cold land. A numerical experiment with a prevailing northwesterly wind is conducted for a period of twelve hours. Two local maxima of the total precipitation are observed along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. The results in this hypothetical case correspond quite well to the observed precipitation produced by a real event in which the hypothetical conditions are approximately fulfilled.

  16. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Schumann, D L

    1998-12-29

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors from the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  17. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  18. Chemical properties of rain events during the AMMA campaign: an evidence of dust and biogenic influence in the convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, K.; Journet, E.; Rajot, J.-L.; Chevaillier, S.; Triquet, S.; Formenti, P.; Zakou, A.

    2010-06-01

    This paper documents the chemical composition of 7 rain events associated with mesoscale convective systems sampled at the supersite of Banizoumbou, Niger, during the first special observation periods (June-July 2006) of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) experiment. Time-resolved rain sampling was performed in order to discriminate the local dust scavenged at the beginning of rain event from the aerosol particles incorporated in the cloud at the end of the rain. The total elemental composition is dominated by Al, Si, Fe and Ca, indicating a high influence of dust and limited marine or anthropogenic contribution. After the aerosol wash-out, the elemental concentrations normalized to Al and the microscopic observations of diatoms, a tracer of the Bodélé depression, both indicate that the total elemental composition of rainwater is controlled by dust originating from North-Eastern Saharan sources and probably incorporated in the convective cloud from the Harmattan layer. The low variability of the rain composition over the measurement period indicates a regional and temporal homogeneity of dust composition in the Harmattan layer. In the dissolved phase, the dominant anions are nitrate (NO3-), sulphate (SO42-) and chloride (Cl-). However, between June and July we observe an increasing contribution of the organic anions (formate, acetate, oxalate) associated with biogenic emissions to the total ion composition. These results confirm the large influence of biogenic emissions on the rain composition over Sahel during the wet season. The paper concludes on the capacity of mesoscale convective systems to carry simultaneously dust and biogenic compounds originating from different locations and depose them jointly. It also discusses the potential biogeochemical impact of such a phenomenon.

  19. Mesoscale Modeling of Heterogeneous Materials Systems: From Solid Oxide Fuel Cells to Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi F.

    Heterogeneous materials systems hold the key to the future development of a broad range of increasingly complex technological applications. For example, multi-phase and/or multi-component materials are at the forefront research on the development of efficient energy devices, and the future generation of structural materials with optimal mechanical properties. In this dissertation, we focus on two materials systems, namely, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), where we investigate, through theoretical and mesoscale computational models, the role of microstructure on the properties of these heterogeneous systems. For the solid oxide fuel cell project, a computational framework is developed to investigate the topological evolution of Ni phase in SOFC porous anodes, and the accompanying changes to a wide range of microstructural attributes that affect electrochemical performance. Additionally, with the aid of this framework, we study the reduction-oxidation instability, mechanical deformation and damage accumulation in SOFC anodes. In particular, the SOFC project is focused on the role of anode microstructure, characterized by particle size and ratio, on the microstructural stability and mechanical durability of SOFC anodes. For the bulk metallic glass project, a mesoscale model is introduced that accounts for the structural heterogeneity of monolithic BMGs and BMG composites, and captures the fundamental aspects of plastic deformation in such systems. We examine the effect of internal structure, characterized by rigid/soft short range order (SRO), on the deformation behavior of monolithic BMGs, while for BMG composites, we study the role of ductile phase microstructure, particle size, morphology and area fraction, on the mechanical properties and overall ductility of these systems.

  20. Satellite contributions to convective scale weather analysis and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Severe weather phenomena which are amenable to remote sensing by satellite instruments and having resolution fine enough to discern mesoscale features are described. GOES satellites acquire imagery with 1 km resolution in the visible band and 8 km at IR wavelengths. Animation of the images allows tracking the evolution and motions of clouds, which are the prime indicators of convective activity. Sample satellite imagery of sea, lake and river breezes which reveal differential heating processes, the effect of early morning cloud cover, thunderstorm outflow processes, and mesoscale convective systems are provided. Techniques for analyzing the satellite data to predict the onset of severe weather are discussed.

  1. Intraseasonal variability of organized convective systems in the Central Andes: Relationship to Regional Dynamical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, K. I.; Slayback, D. A.; Nicholls, S.; Yager, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes extend from the west coast of Colombia (10N) to the southern tip of Chile (53S). In southern Peru and Bolivia, the Central Andes is split into separate eastern and western cordilleras, with a high plateau (≥ 3000 m), the Altiplano, between them. Because 90% of the Earth's tropical mountain glaciers are located in the Central Andes, our study focuses on this region, defining its zonal extent as 7S-21S and the meridional extent as the terrain 1000 m and greater. Although intense convection occurs during the wet season in the Altiplano, it is not included in the lists of regions with frequent or the most intense convection. The scarcity of in-situ observations with sufficient density and temporal resolution to resolve individual storms or even mesoscale-organized cloud systems and documented biases in microwave-based rainfall products in poorly gauged mountainous regions have impeded the development of an extensive literature on convection and convective systems in this region. With the tropical glaciers receding at unprecedented rates, leaving seasonal precipitation as an increasingly important input to the water balance in alpine valley ecosystems and streams, understanding the nature and characteristics of the seasonal precipitation becomes increasingly important for the rural economies in this region. Previous work in analyzing precipitation in the Central Andes has emphasized interannual variability with respect to ENSO, this is the first study to focus on shorter scale variability with respect to organized convection. The present study took advantage of the University of Utah's Precipitation Features database compiled from 14 years of TRMM observations (1998-2012), supplemented by field observations of rainfall and streamflow, historical gauge data, and long-term WRF-simulations, to analyze the intraseasonal variability of precipitating systems and their relationship regional dynamical features such as the Bolivian High. Through time series and

  2. Wall-Enhanced Convection in Vibrofluidized Granular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, J.; Viot, P.

    2002-07-01

    An event-driven molecular dynamics simulation of inelastic hard spheres contained in a cylinder and subject to strong vibration reproduces accurately experimental results [R. D. Wildman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3304 (2001)] for a system of vibrofluidized glass beads. In particular, we are able to obtain the velocity field and the density and temperature profiles observed experimentally. In addition, we show that the appearance of convection rolls is strongly influenced by the value of the sidewall-particle restitution coefficient. Suggestions for observing more complex convection patterns are proposed.

  3. Use of observational and model-derived fields and regime model output statistics in mesoscale forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.; Pielke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Various empirical and statistical weather-forecasting studies which utilize stratification by weather regime are described. Objective classification was used to determine weather regime in some studies. In other cases the weather pattern was determined on the basis of a parameter representing the physical and dynamical processes relevant to the anticipated mesoscale phenomena, such as low level moisture convergence and convective precipitation, or the Froude number and the occurrence of cold-air damming. For mesoscale phenomena already in existence, new forecasting techniques were developed. The use of cloud models in operational forecasting is discussed. Models to calculate the spatial scales of forcings and resultant response for mesoscale systems are presented. The use of these models to represent the climatologically most prevalent systems, and to perform case-by-case simulations is reviewed. Operational implementation of mesoscale data into weather forecasts, using both actual simulation output and method-output statistics is discussed.

  4. Impact of intensified Indian Ocean winds on mesoscale variability in the Agulhas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Björn C.; Penven, Pierrick; Rouault, Mathieu

    2012-08-01

    South of Africa, the Agulhas Current retroflects and a portion of its waters flows into the South Atlantic Ocean, typically in the form of Agulhas rings. This flux of warm and salty water from the Indian to the Atlantic Ocean (the Agulhas leakage) is now recognized as a key element in global climate. An Agulhas leakage shutdown has been associated with extreme glacial periods, whereas a vigorous increase has preceded shifts towards interglacials. In the absence of a coherent observing system, studies of the Agulhas have relied heavily on ocean models, which have revealed a possible recent increase in Agulhas leakage. However, owing to the high levels of oceanic turbulence, model solutions of the region are highly sensitive to their numerical choices, stressing the need for observations to confirm these important model results. Here, using satellite altimetry observations from 1993 to 2009, we show that the mesoscale variability of the Agulhas system, in particular in the Mozambique Channel and south of Madagascar, has intensified. This seems to result from an increased South Equatorial Current driven by enhanced trade winds over the tropical Indian Ocean. Overall, the intensified mesoscale variability of the Agulhas system is reflected in accelerated eddy propagation, in its source regions as well as the retroflection from which eddies propagate into the South Atlantic Ocean. This suggests that the Agulhas leakage may have increased from 1993 to 2009, confirming previous modelling studies that have further implied an increased Agulhas leakage may compensate a deceleration of meridional overturning circulation associated with a freshening of the North Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Preliminary design of mesoscale turbocompressor and rotordynamics tests of rotor bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Saddam

    2011-12-01

    A mesoscale turbocompressor spinning above 500,000 RPM is evolutionary technology for micro turbochargers, turbo blowers, turbo compressors, micro-gas turbines, auxiliary power units, etc for automotive, aerospace, and fuel cell industries. Objectives of this work are: (1) to evaluate different air foil bearings designed for the intended applications, and (2) to design & perform CFD analysis of a micro-compressor. CFD analysis of shrouded 3-D micro compressor was conducted using Ansys Bladegen as blade generation tool, ICEM CFD as mesh generation tool, and CFX as main solver for different design and off design cases and also for different number of blades. Comprehensive experimental facilities for testing the turbocompressor system have been also designed and proposed for future work.

  6. Reactor with natural convection backup cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Koutz, S.L.; Cavallaro, L.; Kapich, D.D.

    1988-07-26

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a closed vessel containing a pool of secondary coolant; a reactor core located within the pool; an inlet conduit system for directing primary coolant to the lower end of the core; pumping means for effecting flow of the primary coolant into the inlet conduit system; an outlet conduit system located above the core for receiving coolant from the upper end of the core and carrying it to an exterior outlet pipe; and pressure reduction means for reducing fluid pressure in the inlet conduit system adjacent all of the one or more opening therein by locally increasing fluid velocity adjacent all of the one or more openings.

  7. The hydrothermal-convection systems of kilauea: an historical perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Kilauea is one of only two basaltic volcanoes in the world where geothermal power has been produced commercially. Little is known about the origin, size and longevity of its hydrothermal-convection systems. We review the history of scientific studies aimed at understanding these systems and describe their commercial development. Geothermal energy is a controversial issue in Hawai'i, partly because of hydrogen sulfide emissions and concerns about protection of rain forests. ?? 1993.

  8. Thermally-sustained structure in convectively unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a thermal noise term is studied under conditions when the system is convectively unstable. Under these conditions, the noise is selectively and spatially amplified giving rise to a noise-sustained structure. Analytical results, applicable to a wide range of physical systems, are derived for the variance, and the coefficients and thermal noise term are determined for Taylor-Couette flow with an axial through-flow. Comparison is made to recent experiments.

  9. The Prediction of Predominant Convection in Sedimentary Basin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musuuza, J. L.; Radu, F. A.; Attinger, S.

    2012-12-01

    We study a thermohaline system in which the density gradients arise from salinity and temperature differences. Such systems arise in practical applications e.g. geological waste storage and geothermal energy exploitation. A sedimentary-basin set-up is investigated where salinity and temperature increase with depth. In such systems, the buoyancy forces caused by salinity and temperature gradients give rise to counter-acting convection cells. The homogenization theory ideas from Held, Attinnger and Kinzelbach (2005) are applied to the solute and heat transport equations and the two resulting cell problems solved with the coupling between the heat and solute transport preserved. A dimensionless number whose sign changes to negative when thermal-convection is predominant is derived from the solutions to the cell problems in terms of physical variables. The number is tested against numerical simulations performed with the software package d3f on sufficiently refined grids that deliver stable numerical solutions without upwind techniques.

  10. Diagnosis of the secondary circulation of tropical storm Bilis (2006) and the effects of convective systems on its track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinhua; Fu, Hao; Tang, Sheng; Sheng, Siwei

    2014-02-01

    We diagnose characteristics of the quasi-balanced flow and secondary circulation (SC) of tropical storm Bilis (2006) using the potential vorticity (PV)- ω inversion method. We further analyze how secondary steering flows associated with mesoscale convective systems affected the track of tropical storm Bilis after it made landfall. The quasi-balanced asymmetric and axisymmetric circulation structures of tropical storm Bilis are represented well by the PV- ω inversion. The magnitude of the nonlinear quasi-balanced vertical velocity is approximately 75% of the magnitude simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The SC of Bilis (2006) contained two strong regions of ascending motion, both of which were located in the southwest quadrant of the storm. The first (150-200 km southwest of the storm center) corresponded to the eyewall region, while the second (approximately 400 km southwest of the storm center) corresponded to latent heat release associated with strong precipitation in major spiral rainbands. The SC was very weak in the northeast quadrant (the upshear direction). Dynamical processes related to the environmental vertical wind shear produced an SC that partially offset the destructive effects of the environmental vertical wind shear (by 20%-25%). This SC consisted of upward motion in the southwest quadrant and subsidence in the northeast quadrant, with airflow oriented from southwest to northeast at high altitudes and from northeast to southwest at lower levels. The inverted secondary zonal and meridional steering flows associated with continuous asymmetric mesoscale convective systems were about -2.14 and -0.7 m s-1, respectively. These steering flows contributed substantially to the zonal (66.15%) and meridional (33.98%) motion of the storm at 0000 UTC 15 July 2006. The secondary steering flow had a significant influence on changing the track of Bilis from southward to northward. The direction of the large-scale meridional steering

  11. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  12. Role of upper-level wind shear on the structure and maintenance of derecho-producing convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglio, Michael Charles

    strong, linear mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) and may provide a conceptual model for the persistence of strong MCSs above a surface nocturnal inversion in situations that are not forced by a low-level jet.

  13. Equilibrium Structure of a Triblock Copolymer System Revealed by Mesoscale Simulation and Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory Scott

    2013-01-01

    We have performed both mesoscale simulations and neutron scattering experiments on Pluronic L62, a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer system in aqueous solution. The influence of simulation variables such PEO/PPO block ratio, interaction parameters, and coarse-graining methods is extensively investigated by covering all permutations of parameters found in the literatures. Upon increasing the polymer weight fraction from 50 wt% to 90 wt%, the equilibrium structure of the isotropic, reverse micellar, bicontinuous, worm-like micelle network, and lamellar phases are respectively predicted from the simulation depending on the choices of simulation parameters. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show that the same polymer systems exhibit the spherical micellar, lamellar, and reverse micellar phases with the increase of the copolymer concentration at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis and comparison with simulations suggest that one of the simulation parameter sets can provide reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed structures.

  14. Equilibrium structure of a triblock copolymer system revealed by mesoscale simulation and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed both mesoscale simulations and neutron scattering experiments on Pluronic L62, a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer system in aqueous solution. The influence of simulation variables such PEO/PPO block ratio, interaction parameters, and coarse-graining methods is extensively investigated by covering all permutations of parameters found in the literatures. Upon increasing the polymer weight fraction from 50 wt% to 90 wt%, the equilibrium structure of the isotropic, reverse micellar, bicontinuous, worm-like micelle network, and lamellar phases are respectively predicted from the simulation depending on the choices of simulation parameters. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show that the same polymer systems exhibit the spherical micellar, lamellar, and reverse micellar phases with the increase of the copolymer concentration at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis and comparison with simulations suggest that one of the simulation parameter sets can provide reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed structures.

  15. Mesoscale Simulations of CRYSTAL-FACE 23 July 2002 Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Lare, Andrew; Demoz, Belay; Rickenbach, Thomas; Wang, Dong-Hai; Li, Li-Hua; Arnold, G. Thomas; Wang, Yan-Sen

    2004-01-01

    A key objective of the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) is to understand the relationships between properties of tropical convective cloud systems and the lifecycle of the extended cirrus anvils they produce. We report here on a case study of 23 July 2002 where a line of land-based convective storms was generated between Lake Okeechobee and the Florida east coast as a result of complex interactions between lake and sea breeze fronts and outflow boundaries. A central goal of this study is to develop a description of convective input to the anvil system and to quantify the ongoing dynamical forcing of anvil processes by mesoscale and large-scale dynamics. This information is then used to force high-resolution cloud simulations with a model that explicitly resolves cloud microphysical processes (bin model) for study of cirrus anvil microphysical development.

  16. Combined flatland ST radar and digital-barometer network observations of mesoscale processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Gage, K. S.; Einaudi, F. E.; Rottman, J. W.; Hollinger, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a six-station digital-barometer network centered on the Flatland ST radar to support observational studies of gravity waves and other mesoscale features at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory in central Illinois. The network's current mode of operation is examined, and a preliminary example of an apparent group of waves evident throughout the network as well as throughout the troposphere is presented. Preliminary results demonstrate the capabilities of the current operational system to study wave convection, wave-front, and other coherent mesoscale interactions and processes throughout the troposphere. Unfiltered traces for the pressure and horizontal zonal wind, for days 351 to 353 UT, 1990, are illustrated.

  17. Convective Systems Observed and Simulated During TRMM Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently completed TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN1998, SCSMEX-1998, TRMM.LBA-1999, and KWAJEX 1999) have obtained direct measurements of microphysical data associated with convective systems from various geographical locations. These TRMM field experiments were designed to contribute to fundamental understanding of cloud dynamics and microphysics, as well as for validation,, testing assumptions and error estimates of cloud-resolving models, forward radiative transfer models, algorithms used to estimate rainfall statistics and vertical structure of precipitation and latent heating from both surface-based radar and satellites.

  18. Using Homogenization Theory to Study Convection in Thermohaline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musuuza, J. L.; Radu, F. A.; Attinger, S.

    2012-04-01

    We study a density-driven system in which the density gradients arise from salinity and temperature differences. Since the solute and heat diffuse at different rates, such systems are also called double-diffusive and arise in many practical applications like carbon dioxide sequestration, geothermal energy exploitation and the storage of nuclear and normal waste in geological formations. A typical sedimentary-basin set-up is adopted where both salinity and temperature increase with depth. In such systems, the buoyancy forces caused by salinity and temperature gradients give rise to counter-acting convection cells. The homogenization theory ideas originally developed in Held et al. (2005) are applied to the solute and heat transport equations and the two resulting cell problems solved coupled. A dimensionless number is derived from the solutions to the cell problems in terms of the physical variables temperature, viscosity and density contrasts; gravity-driven velocity, domain size and formation hydro-geological properties. The sign of the number changes to negative when the thermal-convection predominates over solutal-convection. The derived dimensionless number is tested against numerical simulations performed with the software package d3 f on sufficiently refined grids that deliver stable numerical solutions without upwind techniques (Frolkovic and De Schepper, 2001). We also investigate the possibility of groundwater intrusion into a geological formation by applying a horizontal drift at the top of the domain. The evolution of fingers in haline density-driven systems was studied e.g. in Musuuza et al. (2009) and such a velocity aligned orthogonal to the direction of finger propagation was found to retard finger growth. Frolkovic, P. and De Schepper, H. (2001), 'Numerical modelling of convection dominated transport coupled with density-driven flow in porous media', Ad. Wat. Resour. 24, 63-72. Held, R, S. Attinger and Kinzelbach, W. (2005), 'Homogenization and

  19. Capturing Nonlinearities with the Naval Research Laboratory's Global and Mesoscale 4DVar Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. L.; Xu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical weather prediction models and observation (forward) operators are important components of modern data assimilation systems. They are inherently nonlinear or even highly nonlinear at times. These nonlinearities can be handled through an iterative procedure, often referred to as the "outer loop" / "inner loop" formulation in 3D/4DVar data assimilation. In the "inner loop", one typically minimizes a cost-function around a previous 3D/4D state that is already a good approximation of the true nonlinear state. Additional "outer loops" are then used to account for the missing nonlinearity in both the NWP model and the observation operator. There is no formal proof of convergence in the aforementioned iterative procedure in general. However, it can be formally shown that the procedure can converge under certain condition (e.g. the Gauss-Newton algorithm). In practice, the iterative procedure works quite well due to the fact that the NWP model and the observation operators are generally quite good in capturing majority of the nonlinearity in dynamical process. The NRL global and mesoscale 4DVar systems use the Accelerated Representer (AR) formulation to solve the analysis equations in observation space. The dual formulation has several strategic advantages, but also present additional challenges unique to this formulation. This presentation will describe various methods used within the NRL Accelerated Representer 4DVar formulations to extend the solution methods to weakly nonlinear problems. These include ocean surface wind speed assimilation, assimilation of water vapor sensitive radiances, the multiple outer loop formulation, and the inclusion of linearized physics in the tangent linear and adjoint models.

  20. Spatial and seasonal patterns of fine-scale to mesoscale upper ocean dynamics in an Eastern Boundary Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grados, Daniel; Bertrand, Arnaud; Colas, François; Echevin, Vincent; Chaigneau, Alexis; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Vargas, Gary; Fablet, Ronan

    2016-03-01

    The physical forcing of the ocean surface includes a variety of energetic processes, ranging from internal wave (IW) to submesoscale and mesoscale, associated with characteristic horizontal scales. While the description of mesoscale ocean dynamics has greatly benefited from the availability of satellite data, observations of finer scale patterns remain scarce. Recent studies showed that the vertical displacements of the oxycline depth, which separates the well-mixed oxygenated surface layer from the less oxygenated deeper ocean, estimated by acoustics, provide a robust proxy of isopycnal displacements over a wide range of horizontal scales. Using a high-resolution and wide-range acoustic data set in the Northern Humboldt Current System (NHCS) off Peru, the spatial and temporal patterns of fine-scale-to-mesoscale upper ocean dynamics are investigated. The spectral content of oxycline/pycnocline profiles presents patterns characteristic of turbulent flows, from the mesoscale to the fine scale, and an energization at the IW scale (2 km-200 m). On the basis of a typology performed on 35,000 structures we characterized six classes of physical structures according to their shape and scale range. The analysis reveals the existence of distinct features for the fine-scale range below ∼2-3 km, and clearly indicates the existence of intense IW and submesoscale activity over the entire NHCS region. Structures at scales smaller than ∼2 km were more numerous and energetic in spring than in summer. Their spatiotemporal variability supports the interpretation that these processes likely relate to IW generation by interactions between tidal flows, stratification and the continental slope. Given the impact of the physical forcing on the biogeochemical and ecological dynamics in EBUS, these processes should be further considered in future ecosystem studies based on observations and models. The intensification of upper ocean stratification resulting from climate change makes such

  1. Tracing troposphere-to-stratosphere transport above a mid-latitude deep convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Wernli, H.; Schwierz, C.; Martius, O.; Hoor, P.; Fischer, H.; Parchatka, U.; Spelten, N.; Schiller, C.; Krebsbach, M.; Weers, U.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, Th.

    2004-05-01

    Within the project SPURT (trace gas measurements in the tropopause region) a variety of trace gases have been measured in situ in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes in the extra-tropical tropopause region. In this paper we report on a flight on 10 November 2001 leading from Hohn, Germany (52ºN) to Faro, Portugal (37ºN) through a strongly developed deep stratospheric intrusion. This streamer was associated with a large convective system over the western Mediterranean with potentially significant troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Along major parts of the flight we measured unexpectedly high NOy mixing ratios. Also H2O mixing ratios were significantly higher than stratospheric background levels confirming the extraordinary chemical signature of the probed air masses in the interior of the streamer. Backward trajectories encompassing the streamer enable to analyze the origin and physical characteristics of the air masses and to trace troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Near the western flank of the intrusion features caused by long range transport, such as tropospheric filaments characterized by sudden drops in the O3 and NOy mixing ratios and enhanced CO and H2O can be reconstructed in great detail using the reverse domain filling technique. These filaments indicate a high potential for subsequent mixing with the stratospheric air. At the south-western edge of the streamer a strong gradient in the NOy and the O3 mixing ratios coincides very well with a sharp gradient in potential vorticity in the ECMWF fields. In contrast, in the interior of the streamer the observed highly elevated NOy and H2O mixing ratios up to a potential temperature level of 365 K and potential vorticity values of maximum 10 PVU cannot be explained in terms of resolved troposphere-to-stratosphere transport along the backward trajectories. Also mesoscale simulations with a High Resolution Model reveal no direct evidence for convective H2O injection up to

  2. Tracing troposphere-to-stratosphere transport above a mid-latitude deep convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Brunner, D.; Wernli, H.; Schwierz, C.; Martius, O.; Hoor, P.; Fischer, H.; Spelten, N.; Schiller, C.; Krebsbach, M.; Parchatka, U.; Weers, U.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Within the project SPURT (trace gas measurements in the tropopause region) a variety of trace gases have been measured in situ in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes in the extra-tropical tropopause region. In this paper we report on a flight on 10 November 2001 leading from Hohn, Germany (52° N) to Faro, Portugal (37° N) through a strongly developed deep stratospheric intrusion. This streamer was associated with a large convective system over the western Mediterranean with potentially significant troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Along major parts of the flight we measured unexpectedly high NOy mixing ratios. Also H2O mixing ratios were significantly higher than stratospheric background levels confirming the extraordinary chemical signature of the probed air masses in the interior of the streamer. Backward trajectories encompassing the streamer enable to analyze the origin and physical characteristics of the air masses and to trace troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Near the western flank of the intrusion features caused by long range transport, such as tropospheric filaments characterized by sudden drops in the O3 and NOy mixing ratios and enhanced CO and H2O can be reconstructed in great detail using the reverse domain filling technique. These filaments indicate a high potential for subsequent mixing with the stratospheric air. At the south-western edge of the streamer a strong gradient in the NOy and the O3 mixing ratios coincides very well with a sharp gradient in potential vorticity in the ECMWF fields. In contrast, in the interior of the streamer the observed highly elevated NOy and H2O mixing ratios up to a potential temperature level of 365 K and potential vorticity values of maximum 10 PVU cannot be explained in terms of resolved troposphere-to-stratosphere transport along the backward trajectories. Also mesoscale simulations with a High Resolution Model reveal no direct evidence for convective H2O injection up to

  3. The impact of polar mesoscale storms on northeast Atlantic ocean circulation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condron, A.; Renfrew, I.

    2013-12-01

    Every year thousands of mesoscale (<1000 km) storms cross the climatically sensitive sub-polar regions of the world's oceans. These storms are frequently too small, or short-lived, to be captured in meteorological reanalyses or numerical climate prediction models. As a result, the magnitude of the near-surface wind speeds and heat fluxes are considerably under-represented over the world's oceans where the atmosphere influences mixing, deep convection, upwelling, and deep water mass formation. Numerical models must, however, realistically simulate these processes in order to accurately predict future changes in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and the climate system. Implementing a parameterization to simulate mesoscale cyclones in the atmospheric fields driving an ocean model produced air-sea fluxes in remarkable agreement with observations. Over the Nordic Seas we found that mesoscale cyclones increased the depth, frequency and area of open ocean deep convection. At Denmark Strait we found a significant increase in the southward transport of Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW); the deep water mass that plays a major role in driving the Atlantic MOC. Further south there was an increase in the cyclonic rotation of the sub-polar gyres and an increase in the northward transport of heat into the region. We conclude that polar mesoscale cyclones play an important role in driving the large-scale ocean circulation and so must be simulated globally in order to make accurate short-term climate predictions. An illustration of the effectiveness of our polar mesoscale parameterization. Panels show a 6-hourly snapshot of 10-m wind speed for (left) ECMWF ERA-40, (middle) ERA-40 with a polar mesoscale cyclone parameterized (right) satellite derived wind speed. The satellite data reveal a polar mesoscale cyclone over the Norwegian Sea with a diameter of ~400 km. The standard ERA-40 reanalysis (~1 deg.) does not capture this vortex

  4. A coarse grained stochastic particle interacting system for tropical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, B.

    2012-12-01

    Climate models (GCMs) fail to represent adequately the variability associated with organized convection in the tropics. This deficiency is believed to hinder medium and long range weather forecasts, over weeks to months. GCMs use very complex sub-grid models, known as cumulus parameterizations, to represent the effects of clouds and convection as well as other unresolved processes. Cumulus parameterizations are intrinsically deterministic and are typically based on the quasi-equilibrium theory, which assumes that convection instantaneously consumes the atmospheric instability produced by radiation. In this talk, I will discuss a stochastic model for organized tropical convection based on a particle interacting system defined on a microscopic lattice. An order parameter is assumed to take the values 0,1,2,3 at a any given lattice site according to whether it is a clear site or it is occupied by a cloud of a one of the three types: congestus, deep, or stratiform, following intuitive rules motivated by recent satellite observations and various field campaigns conducted over the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific. The microscopic Markov process is coarse-grained systematically to obtain a multidimensional birth-death process with immigration, following earlier work done by Katsoulakis, Majda, and Vlachos (JCP 2003) for the case of the Ising model where the order parameter takes the values 0 and 1. The coarse grained birth-death process is a stochastic model, intermediate between the microscopic lattice model and the deterministic mean field limit, that is used to represent the sub-grid scale variability of the underlying physical process (here the cloud cover) with a negligible computational overhead and yet permits both local interactions between lattice sites and two-way interactions between the cloud cover and the large-scale climate dynamics. The new systematic coarse-graining, developed here for the multivalued order parameter, provides a unifying framework

  5. Convective initiation in the vicinity of the subtropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme convection tends to form in the vicinity of mountain ranges, and the Andes in subtropical South America help spawn some of the most intense convection in the world. An investigation of the most intense storms for 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data shows a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop in this region with the canonical leading convective line/trailing stratiform structure. The synoptic environment and structures of the extreme convection and MCSs in subtropical South America are similar to those found in other regions of the world, especially the United States. In subtropical South America, however, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the MCSs is unique. A capping inversion in the lee of the Andes is important in preventing premature triggering. The Andes and other mountainous terrain of Argentina focus deep convective initiation in a narrow region. Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating mesoscale convective systems similar to those seen over the Great Plains of the U. S. and produces damaging tornadoes, hail, and floods across a wide agricultural region. Numerical simulations conducted with the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model extend the observational analysis and provide an objective evaluation of storm initiation, terrain effects, and development mechanisms. The simulated mesoscale systems closely resemble the storm structures seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar as well as the overall shape and character of the storms shown in GOES satellite data. A sensitivity experiment with different configurations of topography, including both decreasing and increasing the height of the Andes Mountains, provides insight into the significant influence of orography in focusing convective initiation in this region. Lee cyclogenesis and a strong low-level jet are modulated by the height of the Andes Mountains and directly affect the character

  6. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  7. Convection pattern and stress system under the African plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on tectonic forces from satellite-derived gravity data have revealed a subcrustal stress system which provides a unifying mechanism for uplift, depression, rifting, plate motion and ore formation in Africa. The subcrustal stresses are due to mantle convection. Seismicity, volcanicity and kimberlite magmatism in Africa and the development of the African tectonic and magnetic features are explained in terms of this single stress system. The tensional stress fields in the crust exerted by the upwelling mantle flows are shown to be regions of structural kinship characterized by major concentration of mineral deposits. It is probable that the space techniques are capable of detecting and determining the tectonic forces in the crust of Africa.

  8. Mesoscale acid deposition modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, John W.; Karyampudi, V. Mohan; Price, P. E.; Bousquet, M. D.; Coats, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed in support of the EPA/DOE MADS (Mesoscale Acid Deposition) Project included the development of meteorological data bases for the initialization of chemistry models, the testing and implementation of new planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes in the MASS model, the simulation of transport and precipitation for MADS case studies employing the MASS model, and the use of the TASS model in the simulation of cloud statistics and the complex transport of conservative tracers within simulated cumuloform clouds. The work performed in support of the NASA/FAA Wind Shear Program included the use of the TASS model in the simulation of the dynamical processes within convective cloud systems, the analyses of the sensitivity of microburst intensity and general characteristics as a function of the atmospheric environment within which they are formed, comparisons of TASS model microburst simulation results to observed data sets, and the generation of simulated wind shear data bases for use by the aviation meteorological community in the evaluation of flight hazards caused by microbursts.

  9. Vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents above complex terrain - Influence of a mesoscale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Florian; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Meixner, Franz; Weigel, Ralf; Sprenger, Michael; Lelieveld, Jos

    2014-05-01

    Measurements in and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are essential to fully understand the exchange and transport processes between the PBL and the free troposphere (FT). Here we discuss the impact of a mesoscale system on the local trace gas and particle distribution above the PBL over hilly terrain. During the field campaign PARADE (PArticles and RAdicals: Diel observations of the impact of urban and biogenic Emissions) in August and September 2011 measurements were conducted at the Taunus Observatory on Mount "Kleiner Feldberg (KF)" (825 m asl.), about 20 km northwest of Frankfurt am Main in Germany. For the vertical composition of the lowest 3000 m, high-resolution measurements were performed using 174 radio soundings. The measurements are complemented by continuous boundary layer observations of a ceilometer and a variety of reactive tracers (CO, NOx, O3, VOCs) on the mountain top. In addition, aircraft measurements of CO2, CO, O3, temperature, humidity and aerosol number concentration and size distribution were performed during the first week of September. The PBL height varied during the measurement campaign between 1 and 2.5 km. The variations are due to very changeable weather, synoptic fronts as well as local phenomena such as low clouds and fog. The analysis of the data from different instruments shows good agreement in determining the boundary layer height under windless high pressure conditions, as well as with certain restrictions on cloudy and windy days. Based on the PBL investigation, the aircraft-based trace gas measurements were used to identify transport and exchange processes between the free atmosphere and the boundary layer, additionally supported with high-resolution backward-trajectories initialized every 10 seconds along the flight track, based on the wind fields from the COSMO-EU model. On 2 September 2011 we observed an enhanced particle number concentration and low ozone in the free troposphere at two flights around KF. Local

  10. Equations for Nonlinear MHD Convection in Shearless Magnetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.

    2005-07-15

    A closed set of reduced dynamic equations is derived that describe nonlinear low-frequency flute MHD convection and resulting nondiffusive transport processes in weakly dissipative plasmas with closed or open magnetic field lines. The equations obtained make it possible to self-consistently simulate transport processes and the establishment of the self-consistent plasma temperature and density profiles for a large class of axisymmetric nonparaxial shearless magnetic devices: levitated dipole configurations, mirror systems, compact tori, etc. Reduced equations that are suitable for modeling the long-term evolution of the plasma on time scales comparable to the plasma lifetime are derived by the method of the adiabatic separation of fast and slow motions.

  11. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P.; Levermore, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  12. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaesser, G.

    2015-12-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs/lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 - 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (~10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  13. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship Between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs-lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  14. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  15. Optimization of convective fin systems: a holistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, M.; Balaji, C.

    A numerical analysis of natural convection heat transfer and entropy generation from an array of vertical fins, standing on a horizontal duct, with turbulent fluid flow inside, has been carried out. The analysis takes into account the variation of base temperature along the duct, traditionally ignored by most studies on such problems. One-dimensional fin equation is solved using a second order finite difference scheme for each of the fins in the system and this, in conjunction with the use of turbulent flow correlations for duct, is used to obtain the temperature distribution along the duct. The influence of the geometric and thermal parameters, which are normally employed in the design of a thermal system, has been studied. Correlations are developed for (i) the total heat transfer rate per unit mass of the fin system (ii) total entropy generation rate and (iii) fin height, as a function of the geometric parameters of the fin system. Optimal dimensions of the fin system for (i) maximum heat transfer rate per unit mass and (ii) minimum total entropy generation rate are obtained using Genetic Algorithm. As expected, these optima do not match. An approach to a `holistic' design that takes into account both these criteria has also been presented.

  16. A review of major progresses in mesoscale dynamic research in China since 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoping; Lu, Hancheng; Ni, Yunqi; Tan, Zhemin

    2004-06-01

    Mesoscale research conducted by Chinese meteorologists during the past four years is reviewed. Advances in theoretical studies include (a) mesoscale quasi-balanced and semi-balanced dynamics, derived through scale analysis and the perturbation method which are suitable for describing mesoscale vortices; (b) subcritical instability and vortex-sheet instability; (c) frontal adjustment mechanism and the effect of topography on frontgenesis; and (d) slantwise vorticity development theories, the slantwise vortex equation, and moist potential vorticity (MPV) anomalies with precipitation-related heat and mass sinks and MPV impermeability theorem. From the MPV conservation viewpoint, the transformation mechanism between different scale weather systems is analyzed. Based on the data analysis, a new dew-point front near the periphery of the West Pacific subtropical high is identified. In the light of MPV theory and Q-vector theory, some events associated with torrential rain systems and severe storms are analyzed and diagnosed. Progress in mesoscale numerical simulation has been made in the development of meso-α, meso-β vortices, meso-γ-scale downbursts and precipitation produced by deep convective systems with MM5 and other mesoscale models.

  17. First satellite measurements of chemical changes in coincidence with sprite activity: characteristics of the TLE-producing convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sao Sabbas, Fernanda; Arnone, Enrico; Soula, Serge; Azambuja, Rodrigo; Charion, Olivier; Castelli, Elisa; Carlotti, Massimo; Santiago, Jeison; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Sprites are some of the Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above thunderstorms as a direct consequence of thunderstorm electrical activity. Sprites are formed by mesospheric streamer plasma channels, inside which chemical reactions take place altering the local composition of the atmosphere. Among the gases that may be produced by sprites are the nitric oxides that take part of the ozone destruction cycle, therefore understanding the characteristics and distribution of TLE-producing thunderstorms is necessary to quantify their overall impact on the upper atmosphere. On August 25th, 2003, 20 sprites were observed above a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) over Corsica, the Mediterranean Sea and Northern Italy, by a camera located at Pic du Midi as part of the Eurosprite campaign. The MCS lasted for 16 h and reached a maximum extent of about 222,000 km2 about 6 h after it initiated. Sprite activity was only detected about 2 h later and, during this phase, MIPAS spectrometer onboard the Envisat satellite detected substantial enhancement of ambient NO2 directly above the sprite producing MCS (see companion paper by Arnone et al. for details on chemical changes). In this paper we present the characteristics of the convective system for which, for the first time, TLE-induced chemical changes were observed. The peculiarities of these systems are discussed in comparison with previously observed systems. On the basis of these observations, we present the prospects of adopting a similar strategy in Brazil and South America, as well as future observation scenarios in this continent.

  18. A numerical study of a TOGA-COARE squall-line using a coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Shaowu; Xie, Lian; Raman, Sethu

    2004-10-01

    An atmosphere-ocean coupled mesoscale modeling system is developed and used to investigate the interactions between a squall line and the upper ocean observed over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean/Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean and Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE). The modeling system is developed by coupling the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) to the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) through precipitation and two-way exchanges of momentum, heat, and moisture across the air-sea interface. The results indicate that the interaction between the squall-line and the upper ocean produced noticeable differences in the sensible and latent heat fluxes, as compared to the uncoupled cases. Precipitation, which is often ignored in air-sea heat flux estimates, played a major role in the coupling between the mesoscale convective system and the ocean. Precipitation affected the air-sea interaction through both freshwater flux and sensible heat flux. The former led to the formation of a thin stable ocean layer underneath and behind the precipitating atmospheric convection. The presence of this stable layer resulted in a more significant convection-induced sea surface temperature (SST) change in and behind the precipitation zone. However, convection-induced SST changes do not seem to play an important role in the intsensification of the existing convective system that resulted in the SST change, as the convection quickly moved away from the region of original SST response.

  19. Mesoscale SST-wind stress coupling in the Peru-Chile current system: Which mechanisms drive its seasonal variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerder, Vera; Colas, François; Echevin, Vincent; Masson, Sebastien; Hourdin, Christophe; Jullien, Swen; Madec, Gurvan; Lemarié, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and a high-resolution regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model are used to study the air/sea interactions at the oceanic mesoscale in the Peru-Chile upwelling current system. Coupling between mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress (WS) intensity is evidenced and characterized by correlations and regression coefficients. Both the model and the observations display similar spatial and seasonal variability of the coupling characteristics that are stronger off Peru than off Northern Chile, in relation with stronger wind mean speed and steadiness. The coupling is also more intense during winter than during summer in both regions. It is shown that WS intensity anomalies due to SST anomalies are mainly forced by mixing coefficient anomalies and partially compensated by wind shear anomalies. A momentum balance analysis shows that wind speed anomalies are created by stress shear anomalies. Near-surface pressure gradient anomalies have a negligible contribution because of the back-pressure effect related to the air temperature inversion. As mixing coefficients are mainly unchanged between summer and winter, the stronger coupling in winter is due to the enhanced large-scale wind shear that enables a more efficient action of the turbulent stress perturbations. This mechanism is robust as it does not depend on the choice of planetary boundary layer parameterization.

  20. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris D,

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from TRMM data as a cluster of pixels with an 85 GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area at least 64 km 2. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May Sep for 1998-2007 and in the western Pacific from May Nov 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences among the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Sub-setting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, length of sample period, and climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is wetter or drier than normal.

  1. Effects of Moist Froude Number and CAPE on a Conditionally Unstable Flow over a Mesoscale Mountain Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Lin, Yuh-Lang

    2005-02-01

    In this study, idealized simulations are performed for a conditionally unstable flow over a two-dimensional mountain ridge in order to investigate the propagation and types of cloud precipitation systems controlled by the unsaturated moist Froude number (Fw) and the convective available potential energy (CAPE). A two-dimensional moist flow regime diagram, based on Fw and CAPE, is proposed for a conditionally unstable flow passing over a two-dimensional mesoscale mountain ridge. The characteristics of these flow regimes are 1) regime I: flow with an upstream-propagating convective system and an early, slowly moving convective system over the mountain; 2) regime II: flow with a long-lasting orographic convective system over the mountain peak, upslope, or lee slope; 3) regime III: flow with an orographic convective or mixed convective and stratiform precipitation system over the mountain and a downstream-propagating convective system; and 4) regime IV: flow with an orographic stratiform precipitation system over the mountain and possibly a downstream-propagating cloud system. Note that the fourth regime was not included in the flow regimes proposed by Chu and Lin and Chen and Lin. The propagation of the convective systems is explained by the orographic blocking and density current forcing associated with the cold-air outflow produced by evaporative cooling acting against the basic flow, which then determines the propagation and cloud types of the simulated precipitation systems.

  2. Convecting particle diffusion in a binary particle system under vertical vibration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaiwei; Xie, Zi-Ang; Wu, Ping; Sun, Jing; Li, Li; Jia, Chao; Zhang, Shiping; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Li

    2014-06-28

    We studied the separation behaviour of binary granular particles in a vertically vibrated container. The final separation of the binary particle system exhibited the Brazil-Nut (BN) effect, though it was not complete. Particle convection occurred, and four different typical convection modes were observed when the frequency f changed from 20 Hz to 80 Hz at constant dimensionless acceleration Γ = 4πAf(2)/g. However, when Γ changed from 2 to 4 at constant f, the system's convection mode stayed almost the same. In our experiments, one type of particle generally moved much faster than the other, so the former was termed the 'convecting' particle, and the latter was termed the 'non-convecting' particle. To study the separation results qualitatively, we divided the system into vertical layers and calculated the mass distribution of the binary particles along the z axis. The results showed that when f increased at constant Γ or Γ decreased at constant f, the convecting particles, usually the smaller and lighter ones, distributed less to the top side and more to the bottom side of the container. Finally, to explain the experimental results, we derived a mass conservation equation for the convecting particles considering simultaneous convection and diffusion. The equation described the experimental results well. We also analysed the effects of f, Γ, diameter ratio, density ratio, etc., on the final separation results. PMID:24796705

  3. Comprehensive comparison of precipitation measurement systems for convective and non-convective events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, N.; Steinacker, R.; Dorninger, M.; Tüchler, L.

    2012-04-01

    During the field phase of Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS) the supersite "S" was equipped with several collocated precipitation measuring devices including rainfall weighing gauge, tipping bucket gauge, optical disdrometer, and vertically pointing micro rain radar. Precipitation measurements from two scanning C-band radars covering the area of the eastern Black Forest were available for comparison with the surface-based measurements, as well as data of a wind-temperature radar collocated with above mentioned rainfall instruments at the supersite "S". In this study we present a comprehensive comparison of precipitation measurements for selected IOP-days during the COPS field phase. One issue of this study was to compare the rainfall amount estimated by several measurement devices during defined rainfall episodes under consideration of the differences in sampling strategy of the different instruments. Another goal was to test the rainfall sensors for their ability to catch the temporal variability of rainfall. We investigate time correlation of the rainfall and the autocorrelation of the measurements stratified after convective and non-convective events. Dependence of the observed measurement differences on the rainfall intensity was also investigated. Since the sampling characteristics (sample volume, sampling time) varies notably between the instruments used for comparison appropriate matching of the temporal and spatial scale of the different observations was done with a particular attention given to the differences in the height of the measurements. Due to the simultaneous observations of the two scanning C-band radars over the area of the supersite "S" it is possible to estimate the specific measurement error of the radars, relative to the precipitation amount observed on the ground. Using disdrometer and vertically pointing micro rain radar in conjunction with scanning radar data above, reflectivity factor of a scanned

  4. Deep convection in the Sahel : a focus on gust fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dione, Cheikh; Lothon, Marie; Campistron, Bernard; Sall, Saidou M.; Guichard, Françoise; Badiane, Daouda; Couvreux, Fleur

    2014-05-01

    Convection in the Sahel presents a diurnal variability that is influenced by deep convection systems like the Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) and isolated storms or smaller convective systems. These smaller systems have drew less attention than the MCSs, even though they also play a role in the water cycle of this region, contribute to the monsoon dynamics, and to set the scales of the surface heterogeneities. During the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) intensive observation period in 2006, many of these smaller systems have been observed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) radar that was installed in Niamey, Niger. A systematic study of daytime convection observed during the month of July 2006 is carried out based on the MIT radar data and on the complementary observations given by the ARM mobile facility, in order to analyse the processes and mechanisms involved of deep convection initiation. The results highlight a large frequency of occurrence of the density currents, and their importance in the initiation of new convective cells. Based on this observational analysis and on results from Large Eddy Simulation (LES), density currents are specifically studied, with the aim at : (1) evaluating their frequency of occurrence, (2) assessing their ability to trigger new convective cells, (3) analysing the sensitivity of density currents velocity to land surface contrasts, (4) testing a simple model for their parametrization, (5) evaluating the ability of the LES to represent density currents.

  5. Biogeochemical Response to Mesoscale Physical Forcing in the California Current System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niiler, Pearn P.; Letelier, Ricardo; Moisan, John R.; Marra, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the first part of the project, we investigated the local response of the coastal ocean ecosystems (changes in chlorophyll, concentration and chlorophyll, fluorescence quantum yield) to physical forcing by developing and deploying Autonomous Drifting Ocean Stations (ADOS) within several mesoscale features along the U.S. west coast. Also, we compared the temporal and spatial variability registered by sensors mounted in the drifters to that registered by the sensors mounted in the satellites in order to assess the scales of variability that are not resolved by the ocean color satellite. The second part of the project used the existing WOCE SVP Surface Lagrangian drifters to track individual water parcels through time. The individual drifter tracks were used to generate multivariate time series by interpolating/extracting the biological and physical data fields retrieved by remote sensors (ocean color, SST, wind speed and direction, wind stress curl, and sea level topography). The individual time series of the physical data (AVHRR, TOPEX, NCEP) were analyzed against the ocean color (SeaWiFS) time-series to determine the time scale of biological response to the physical forcing. The results from this part of the research is being used to compare the decorrelation scales of chlorophyll from a Lagrangian and Eulerian framework. The results from both parts of this research augmented the necessary time series data needed to investigate the interactions between the ocean mesoscale features, wind, and the biogeochemical processes. Using the historical Lagrangian data sets, we have completed a comparison of the decorrelation scales in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frame for the SeaWiFS data set. We are continuing to investigate how these results might be used in objective mapping efforts.

  6. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  7. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  8. Validation of mesoscale models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Bill; Warner, Tom; Benjamin, Stan; Koch, Steve; Staniforth, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: verification of cloud prediction from the PSU/NCAR mesoscale model; results form MAPS/NGM verification comparisons and MAPS observation sensitivity tests to ACARS and profiler data; systematic errors and mesoscale verification for a mesoscale model; and the COMPARE Project and the CME.

  9. Parameterization of sub-grid scale convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, William; Molinari, John; Kain, Jack; Moncrieff, Mitch; Karyampudi, Mohan; Grell, Georg

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: an overview of the cumulus parameterization problem; interactions between explicit and implicit processes in mesoscale models; effects of model grid size on the cumulus parameterization problem; parameterizing convective effects on momentum fields in mesoscale models; differences between slantwise and vertical cumulus parameterization; experiments with different closure hypotheses; and coupling cumulus parameterizations to boundary layer, stable cloud, and radiation schemes.

  10. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  11. A Simple Demonstration of Convective Effects on Reaction-Diffusion Systems: A Burning Cigarette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pojman, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration that provides an introduction to nonequilibrium reaction-diffusion systems and the coupling of hydrodynamics to chemical reactions. Experiments that demonstrate autocatalytic behavior that are effected by gravity and convection are included. (KR)

  12. Development of a Meso-Scale Material Model for Ballistic Fabric and Its Use in Flexible-Armor Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Arakere, G.; He, T.; Xie, X.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2010-02-01

    A meso-scale ballistic material model for a prototypical plain-woven single-ply flexible armor is developed and implemented in a material user subroutine for the use in commercial explicit finite element programs. The main intent of the model is to attain computational efficiency when calculating the mechanical response of the multi-ply fabric-based flexible-armor material during its impact with various projectiles without significantly sacrificing the key physical aspects of the fabric microstructure, architecture, and behavior. To validate the new model, a comparative finite element method analysis is carried out in which: (a) the plain-woven single-ply fabric is modeled using conventional shell elements and weaving is done in an explicit manner by snaking the yarns through the fabric and (b) the fabric is treated as a planar continuum surface composed of conventional shell elements to which the new meso-scale unit-cell based material model is assigned. The results obtained show that the material model provides a reasonably good description for the fabric deformation and fracture behavior under different combinations of fixed and free boundary conditions. Finally, the model is used in an investigation of the ability of a multi-ply soft-body armor vest to protect the wearer from impact by a 9-mm round nose projectile. The effects of inter-ply friction, projectile/yarn friction, and the far-field boundary conditions are revealed and the results explained using simple wave mechanics principles, high-deformation rate material behavior, and the role of various energy-absorbing mechanisms in the fabric-based armor systems.

  13. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOEpatents

    Pelton, Bruce A.; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  14. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOEpatents

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  15. The development and implementation of a mesoscale modeling system for simulating the meteorology and air quality situation in the Mae Moh Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewsky, Karen Jean

    2001-08-01

    The Mae Moh Valley region of northern Thailand experiences frequent pollutant fumigation events during the annual cool season. The onset and magnitude of these events are driven by the synoptic scale and mesoscale conditions that develop over the Valley during the cool season. A conclusion from previous studies conducted in the Valley was that to properly predict the onset and magnitude of the fumigation events, a three dimensional wind field generated using a mesoscale meteorological model needed to be used in a mesoscale transport and dispersion model. The results of the previous studies led to the modeling analysis presented in this dissertation. The research hypothesis was that it would be possible to develop a mesoscale dispersion modeling system that could simulate the Valley fumigation events. The null hypothesis was that the air dispersion modeling system could not simulate the fumigation events. The Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Meteorological Model, Version 5 (MM5) was used to generate the mesoscale meteorological parameters used as input to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) CALMET/CALPUFF mesoscale dispersion and transport model. These models were used to forecast one fumigation event observed in 1997. Three model scenarios were considered for the fumigation event. The differences in the model scenarios were a function of modifications to terrain and horizontal and vertical grid resolutions used by MM5. Output from the combined MM5/CALMET/CALPUFF was compared with observations to document the modeling system's strengths and limitations. The results from this study indicated that MM5 appeared to be capable of simulating the temperature profile required to produce a fumigation event in the Valley. However, due to errors in the input meteorological data, MM5 was not capable of forecasting the light and variable wind conditions present within the Valley prior to and during the fumigation events. These wind field errors contributed to

  16. Development of a severe local storm prediction system: A 60-day test of a mesoscale primitive equation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, D. A.; Zack, J. W.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The progress and problems associated with the dynamical forecast system which was developed to predict severe storms are examined. The meteorological problem of severe convective storm forecasting is reviewed. The cascade hypothesis which forms the theoretical core of the nested grid dynamical numerical modelling system is described. The dynamical and numerical structure of the model used during the 1978 test period is presented and a preliminary description of a proposed multigrid system for future experiments and tests is provided. Six cases from the spring of 1978 are discussed to illustrate the model's performance and its problems. Potential solutions to the problems are examined.

  17. Effects of microphysics and radiation on mesoscale processes of a midlatitude squall line

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Hung-Neng Steve

    1994-04-01

    The understanding of the essential dynamics of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) was well addressed in the literature. Effects of different physics on mesoscale processes of MCSs are, however, not well understood at some particular aspects, such as the origins of the rear inflow and the transition zone in the radar reflectivity. The objective of this research is focused on these two aspects for a midlatitude broken-line squall system. The existence of the rear inflow in MCSs has been identified in many observational and modeling studies. Although convincing evidence has shown that physical internal to the mesoscale system and pressure gradient effects in the convective and trailing stratiform regions are undoubtedly important in developing the rear inflow, it remains unclear bow these internal processes interact with pressure effects to trigger the rear inflow. Moreover, many modeling studies have replicated the bright melting ban, but the transition zone has not been successfully simulated. With the enhanced model physics, such as radiation, in a cloud model, we can simulate these features and provide some supplemental evidences, at least in part, to explain them. The modulation of the rear inflow by microphysics, long- (LW) and shortwave (SW) radiation, and its related cloud-radiative feedback to the modeled squall line system are also discussed in this study.

  18. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  19. Impact of Lake Okeechobee Sea Surface Temperatures on Numerical Predictions of Summertime Convective Systems over South Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Splitt, Michael E.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Santos, Pablo; Lazarus, Steven M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, the Florida Institute of Technology, and the NOAA/NWS Weather Forecast Office at Miami, FL (MFL) are collaborating on a project to investigate the impact of using high-resolution, 2-km Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sea surface temperature (SST) composites within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) prediction system. The NWS MFL is currently running WRF in real-time to support daily forecast operations, using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical core within the NWS Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) software. Twenty-seven hour forecasts are run daily initialized at 0300, 0900, 1500, and 2100 UTC on a domain with 4-km grid spacing covering the southern half of Florida and adjacent waters of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean. The SSTs are initialized with the NCEP Real-Time Global (RTG) analyses at 1/12deg resolution. The project objective is to determine whether more accurate specification of the lower-boundary forcing over water using the MODIS SST composites within the 4-km WRF runs will result in improved sea fluxes and hence, more accurate e\\olutiono f coastal mesoscale circulations and the associated sensible weather elements. SPoRT conducted parallel WRF EMS runs from February to August 2007 identical to the operational runs at NWS MFL except for the use of MODIS SST composites in place of the RTG product as the initial and boundary conditions over water. During the course of this evaluation, an intriguing case was examined from 6 May 2007, in which lake breezes and convection around Lake Okeechobee evolved quite differently when using the high-resolution SPoRT MODIS SST composites versus the lower-resolution RTG SSTs. This paper will analyze the differences in the 6 May simulations, as well as examine other cases from the summer 2007 in which the WRF

  20. A numerical investigation of a slow-moving convective line in a weakly sheared environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changhai

    2005-09-01

    A series of three-dimensional, cloud-resolving numerical simulations are performed to examine a slowpropagating, quasi-two-dimensional convective system in a weakly sheared environment during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (TRMM-LBA) field campaign. The focus is on the kinematics and thermodynamics, organization mechanisms, and dynamical effects of low-level shear, ice microphysics and tropospheric humidity. The control simulation, which is initialized with the observed sounding and includes full microphysics, successfully replicates many observed features of the convective system, such as the linear structure, spatial orientation, life cycle, and sluggish translation. The system at the mature stage displays a line-normal structure similar to that associated with squalltype convective systems, but the corresponding mesoscale circulation and thermodynamic modification are much weaker. Ice-phase microphysical processes are not necessary to the formation of the convective system, but they play a non-trivial role in the late evolution stage. In contrast, the low-level shear, albeit shallow and weak, is critical to the realistic realization of the convective line. The tropospheric moisture above the planetary boundary layer has an important impact on the behavior of convective organization. In particular, a dry layer in the lower troposphere significantly suppresses convective development and inhibits the generation of organized convection even though the convective available potential energy is substantial. The free-atmosphere humidity has received little attention in previous studies of organized convection and warrants further investigation.

  1. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  2. Initiation, maintenance, and properties of convection in an extreme rainfall event during SCMREX: Observational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Yali; Jou, Ben Jong-Dao

    2014-12-01

    A long-lived mesoscale convective system (MCS) with extreme rainfall over the western coastal region of Guangdong on 10 May 2013 during the Southern China Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (SCMREX) is studied. The environmental conditions are characterized by little convective inhibition, low-lifting condensation level, moderate convective available potential energy and precipitable water, and lack of low-level jets from the tropical ocean. Repeated convective back building and subsequent northeastward "echo training" of convective cells are found during the MCS's development stages. However, the initiation/maintenance factors and organization of convection differ significantly during the earlier and later stages. From midnight to early morning, convection is continuously initiated as southeasterly flows near the surface impinge on the east side of mesoscale mountains near the coastal lines and then moves northeastward, leading to formation of two quasi-stationary rainbands. From early morning to early afternoon, new convection is repeatedly triggered along a mesoscale boundary between precipitation-induced cold outflows and warm air from South China Sea and Gulf of Tokin, resulting in the formation of "band training" of several parallel rainbands that move eastward in a later time, i.e., two scales of "training" of convective elements are found. As the MCS dissipates, a stronger squall line moves into the region from the west and passes over within about 3.5 h, contributing about 10%-15% to the total rainfall amount. It is concluded that terrain, near-surface winds, warm advection from the upstream ocean in the boundary layer, and precipitation-generated cold outflows play important roles in initiating and maintaining the extreme rain-producing MCS.

  3. Verification and intercomparison of mesoscale ensemble prediction systems in the Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Masaru; Saito, Kazuo; Seko, Hiromu; Hara, Masahiro; Hara, Tabito; Yamaguchi, Munehiko; Gong, Jiandong; Charron, Martin; Du, Jun; Wang, Yong; Chen, Dehui

    2011-05-01

    During the period around the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, the Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project (B08RDP) was conducted as part of the World Weather Research Program short-range weather forecasting research project. Mesoscale ensemble prediction (MEP) experiments were carried out by six organizations in near-real time, in order to share their experiences in the development of MEP systems. The purpose of this study is to objectively verify these experiments and to clarify the problems associated with the current MEP systems through the same experiences. Verification was performed using the MEP outputs interpolated into a common verification domain with a horizontal resolution of 15 km. For all systems, the ensemble spreads grew as the forecast time increased, and the ensemble mean improved the forecast errors compared with individual control forecasts in the verification against the analysis fields. However, each system exhibited individual characteristics according to the MEP method. Some participants used physical perturbation methods. The significance of these methods was confirmed by the verification. However, the mean error (ME) of the ensemble forecast in some systems was worse than that of the individual control forecast. This result suggests that it is necessary to pay careful attention to physical perturbations.

  4. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Barthold, W.P.

    1984-08-01

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  5. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop.

  6. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data as a cluster of pixels with an 85-GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area of at least 64 square kilometers. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May to September 1998-2007, and in the western Pacific from May to November 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences between the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Subsetting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, the length of the sample period, and the climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is either wetter or drier than normal.

  7. Investigating the Complex Chemistry of Functional Energy Storage Systems: The Need for an Integrative, Multiscale (Molecular to Mesoscale) Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electric energy storage systems such as batteries can significantly impact society in a variety of ways, including facilitating the widespread deployment of portable electronic devices, enabling the use of renewable energy generation for local off grid situations and providing the basis of highly efficient power grids integrated with energy production, large stationary batteries, and the excess capacity from electric vehicles. A critical challenge for electric energy storage is understanding the basic science associated with the gap between the usable output of energy storage systems and their theoretical energy contents. The goal of overcoming this inefficiency is to achieve more useful work (w) and minimize the generation of waste heat (q). Minimization of inefficiency can be approached at the macro level, where bulk parameters are identified and manipulated, with optimization as an ultimate goal. However, such a strategy may not provide insight toward the complexities of electric energy storage, especially the inherent heterogeneity of ion and electron flux contributing to the local resistances at numerous interfaces found at several scale lengths within a battery. Thus, the ability to predict and ultimately tune these complex systems to specific applications, both current and future, demands not just parametrization at the bulk scale but rather specific experimentation and understanding over multiple length scales within the same battery system, from the molecular scale to the mesoscale. Herein, we provide a case study examining the insights and implications from multiscale investigations of a prospective battery material, Fe3O4. PMID:27413781

  8. Investigating the Complex Chemistry of Functional Energy Storage Systems: The Need for an Integrative, Multiscale (Molecular to Mesoscale) Perspective.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Alyson; Housel, Lisa M; Lininger, Christianna N; Bock, David C; Jou, Jeffrey; Wang, Feng; West, Alan C; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2016-06-22

    Electric energy storage systems such as batteries can significantly impact society in a variety of ways, including facilitating the widespread deployment of portable electronic devices, enabling the use of renewable energy generation for local off grid situations and providing the basis of highly efficient power grids integrated with energy production, large stationary batteries, and the excess capacity from electric vehicles. A critical challenge for electric energy storage is understanding the basic science associated with the gap between the usable output of energy storage systems and their theoretical energy contents. The goal of overcoming this inefficiency is to achieve more useful work (w) and minimize the generation of waste heat (q). Minimization of inefficiency can be approached at the macro level, where bulk parameters are identified and manipulated, with optimization as an ultimate goal. However, such a strategy may not provide insight toward the complexities of electric energy storage, especially the inherent heterogeneity of ion and electron flux contributing to the local resistances at numerous interfaces found at several scale lengths within a battery. Thus, the ability to predict and ultimately tune these complex systems to specific applications, both current and future, demands not just parametrization at the bulk scale but rather specific experimentation and understanding over multiple length scales within the same battery system, from the molecular scale to the mesoscale. Herein, we provide a case study examining the insights and implications from multiscale investigations of a prospective battery material, Fe3O4. PMID:27413781

  9. Development of a portable power system with meso-scale vortex combustor and thermo-electric device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokuri, D.; Hara, T.; Ishizuka, S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a small scale power generation system with a meso-scale vortex combustor has been developed. The system was consisted of a couple of thermo-electric device and a heat medium. The medium was made of duralumin, 40 × 40 × 20 mm and 52 g weight, and the vortex combustion chamber of 7 mm inner diameter was embedded in it. It was found that a stable flame could be established in the narrow 7 mm channel even the mean axial velocity reached 1.2 m/s. And furthermore, the vortex flow significantly enhanced the heat transfer from the burned gas to combustion chamber, and as a result, the medium was heated to 300°C quickly (within 5 minutes) by the combustion of propane / air mixture for 145W input energy. The system could successfully generate 1.98 W (4.3 V and 0.46 A), which corresponded to the energy conversion rate of 0.7 % per unit thermo-electric device.

  10. Design of a convective cooling system for a Mach 6 hypersonic transport airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. G.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Results of analytical and design studies are presented for a water-glycol convective cooling system for the airframe structure of a hypersonic transport. System configurations and weights are compared. The influences of system pressure drop and flow control schedules on system weight are defined.

  11. Effects of Moist Convection on Hurricane Predictability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Fuqing; Sippel, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    This study exemplifies inherent uncertainties in deterministic prediction of hurricane formation and intensity. Such uncertainties could ultimately limit the predictability of hurricanes at all time scales. In particular, this study highlights the predictability limit due to the effects on moist convection of initial-condition errors with amplitudes far smaller than those of any observation or analysis system. Not only can small and arguably unobservable differences in the initial conditions result in different routes to tropical cyclogenesis, but they can also determine whether or not a tropical disturbance will significantly develop. The details of how the initial vortex is built can depend on chaotic interactions of mesoscale features, such as cold pools from moist convection, whose timing and placement may significantly vary with minute initial differences. Inherent uncertainties in hurricane forecasts illustrate the need for developing advanced ensemble prediction systems to provide event-dependent probabilistic forecasts and risk assessment.

  12. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, QI; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Although eastward propagation has long been considered one of the essential features of the Madden-Julian waves, recent observations have revealed a stationary or quasi-stationary component in the oscillations, particularly in measures of the diabatic heating rate. Wave-CISK theories of the low-frequency oscillations have struggled to explain the observed period and vertical structure of the waves. On the other hand, theoretical and numerical studies have shown that low-frequency waves strongly resembling the observed oscillations can be excited by specified low-frequency oscillations of the convective heating. A problem with the latter set of theories is that the cause of the oscillatory heating has not been satisfactorily explained. It is proposed here that the observed low-frequency wave motions are the response to forcing by an essentially stationary, self-excited oscillating heat source that is produced by nonlinear interactions among radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture. Feedback of the large-scale motions on the latent heating is not required. Results from two very different one-dimensional models are presented to support this hypothesis. The physical processes included in the models are essentially the same, that is, radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture; the first model is highly simplified, however, while the second includes relatively sophisticated parameterizations of all the relevant physical processes. Results from both models show low-frequency oscillations of the latent heating, temperature, and moisture. Experiments show that the oscillations are favored by a warm sea surface and weak surface wind speeds, consistent with the observed conditions over the Indian Ocean and the tropical western Pacific Ocean.

  13. Mesoscale and synoptic scale transport of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of mesoscale and synoptic-scale (macroscale) aerosol transport as observed in recent air pollution field studies. Examples of mesoscale transport systems are discussed, including urban plumes, sea breezes, the mountain-valley wind cycle, and the urban-heat-island circulation. The synoptic-scale systems considered are migrating high- and low-pressure systems. Documented cases are reviewed of aerosol transport in the various mesoscale systems, aerosol accumulation and transport in high-pressure systems, and acid precipitation in low-pressure systems. The characteristics of the transported aerosols are identified, along with the chemical species that occur primarily in aerosols in the accumulation mode (particle diameters of 0.1-3 microns). It is shown that aerosol particles in the accumulation mode are the most important in terms of synoptic-scale and mesoscale transport and that such particles are primarily responsible for visible haze.

  14. Mesoscale monsters in the Martian atmosphere: conio-cumulonimbi, katabatic jumps, and wave-induced exotic clouds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shed light on the key role of mesoscale phenomena in driving the Martian climate. At the mesoscale, Mars appears as an intense and exotic counterpart to the Earth, and studying small-scale atmospheric processes offers fascinating perspectives for a comparative planetology approach. Here the most prominent and powerful mesoscale phenomena on Mars are described through a combination of dedicated high-resolution atmospheric modeling, and recent remote-sensing observations. Deep convective motions could occur in Martian local and regional dust storms. This phenomenon is proposed to be named "rocket dust storm", or "conio-cumulonimbus", given the implied fast and powerful vertical transport. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth and other environments. Dust-driven deep convection on Mars has potentially strong implications for the Martian atmospheric physics and dynamics, including the formation of high-altitude detached layers of aerosols. It also offers perspectives to study the onset, variability, and dynamics of larger (and sometimes planet-encircling) regional storms that might behave like Mesoscale Convective Systems on the Earth. While observations of clear-cut katabatic events are difficult on Earth, except over vast ice sheets, those intense downslope circulations are widespread on Mars owing to near-surface radiative cooling and uneven topography. Their intensity and regularity can be witnessed through numerous aeolian signatures on the surface, and distinctive thermal signatures in the steepest craters and volcanoes. Furthermore, similarly to the Loewe phenomena in terrestrial polar regions, local katabatic jumps could form within the regional katabatic flow over the Martian polar troughs. Mesoscale modeling helps to explore the transport of water vapor, the formation of water ice clouds, and the stability and

  15. Two-Layer Rayleigh-Bénard Convection: The Role of System Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, Jesse; Biedermann, Grant; Andereck, C. David

    1999-11-01

    Flow patterns in Rayleigh-Bénard convection can be sensitive to the geometry of the system. Both the critical Rayleigh number Rc and the details of the flow patterns may change when the dominant pattern wavelength is not much smaller than the size of the system. We investigate these effects in the Rayleigh-Bénard convection of two immiscible fluid layers(M.M. Degen, P.W. Colovas, C.D. Andereck, Phys. Rev. E57), 6647 (1998)., using two systems with distinct geometries. In the first system, a narrow rectangular cell in which the convection rolls are forced to align parallel to the shortest side of the cell, the length of the test cell is varied to force small changes in the roll wavelength at onset. Comparison will be made with stability calculations(Y.Y. Renardy, C.G. Stoltz, Preprint (1999).) showing that time dependent states at onset of convection are possible within narrow wavelength bands. In the second system, a wide rectangular cell that allows for 3D instabilities, we compare observed behavior with predictions of novel states that are not possible in single-layer convection^3.

  16. Convective dynamics - Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbone, Richard; Foote, G. Brant; Moncrieff, Mitch; Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Cotton, William; Heymsfield, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of highly organized forms of deep convection at midlatitudes are reviewed. Past emphasis in field work and cloud modeling has been directed toward severe weather as evidenced by research on tornadoes, hail, and strong surface winds. A number of specific issues concerning future thrusts, tactics, and techniques in convective dynamics are presented. These subjects include; convective modes and parameterization, global structure and scale interaction, convective energetics, transport studies, anvils and scale interaction, and scale selection. Also discussed are analysis workshops, four-dimensional data assimilation, matching models with observations, network Doppler analyses, mesoscale variability, and high-resolution/high-performance Doppler. It is also noted, that, classical surface measurements and soundings, flight-level research aircraft data, passive satellite data, and traditional photogrammetric studies are examples of datasets that require assimilation and integration.

  17. Oscillatory instability of Rayleigh-Marangoni-Bénard convection in two-layer liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. S.; Zhou, B. H.; Tang, Z. M.

    2005-09-01

    The oscillatory behaviour of the Rayleigh-Marangoni-Bénard convective instability (R-M-B instability) regarding two combinations of two-layer fluid systems has been investigated theoretically and numerically. For the two-layer system of Silicone oil (10cSt) over Fluorinert (FC70), both linear instability analysis and 2D numerical simulation show that the instability of the system depends strongly on the depth ratio Hr = H 1/H 2 of the two-layer liquid. The oscillatory regime at the onset of R-M-B convection enlarges with reducing Γ = Ra /Ma values. In the two-layer system of Silicone oil (2cSt) over water, it loses its stability and onsets to steady convection at first, then the steady convection bifurcates to oscillatory convection with increasing Rayleigh number Ra. This behaviour was found through numerical simulation above the onset of steady convection in the case of Γ = 2.9, ɛ = (Ra - Rac ) / Rac = 1.0, and Hr = 0.5. Our findings are different from the previous study of the Rayleigh-Bénard instability and show the strong effects of the thermocapillary force at the interface on the time-dependent oscillations at or after the onset of convection. We propose a secondary oscillatory instability mechanism to explain the experimental observation of Degen et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 57 (1998), 6647-6659].

  18. A 'Boscastle-type' quasi-stationary convective system over the UK Southwest Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert; Kirshbaum, Daniel; Plant, Robert; Lean, Humphrey

    2013-04-01

    Quasi-stationary convective systems (QSCSs) can produce extreme rainfall accumulations and have been responsible for many devastating flash floods worldwide. An oft-cited case from the UK is the 'Boscastle storm' which occurred on 16 August 2004 over the southwest peninsula of England. This system produced over 200 mm of precipitation in just four hours, leading to severe flooding in several coastal settlements. This presentation will focus on a QSCS from July 2010 which showed remarkable similarity to the Boscastle storm in terms of its location and structure, but produced much smaller rainfall accumulations and no flooding. First, observational data from the two cases will be compared to highlight three factors which made the Boscastle case more extreme: (1) higher rain rates, associated with a warmer and moister tropospheric column and deeper convective clouds; (2) a more stationary system, due to slower evolution of the large-scale flow; and (3) distribution of the heaviest precipitation over fewer river catchments. Results from numerical simulations of the July 2010 case (performed with convection-permitting configurations of the Met Office Unified Model) will then be presented. A control simulation, using 1.5-km grid spacing, reveals that convection was repeatedly initiated through lifting of low-level air parcels along a quasi-stationary coastal convergence line. Sensitivity tests suggest that this convergence line was a sea breeze front which temporarily stalled along the coastline due to the retarding influence of an offshore-direction background wind component. Several deficiencies are apparent in the 1.5-km model's representation of the storm system, including delayed convective initiation; however, significant improvements are observed when the grid length is reduced to 500 m. These result in part from an improved representation of the convergence line, which enhances the associated low-level ascent allowing air parcels to more readily reach their level

  19. Measurements of the isotopic composition of ice and vapor above a tropical convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, A.; Hanisco, T. F.; Sayres, D. S.; St Clair, J.; Smith, J. B.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present observations of the isotopic composition of condensed and vapor water in the lower tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above a large summertime tropical convective system obtained by the Hoxotope and ICOS isotope instruments flown on the NASA WB-57 during TC4. A simple ice isotopic physics model is used in conjunction with our observational data to determine the origin of the condensed phase encountered above the cloud top. Regions of ice that are characteristic of both convective lofting, where the ice is isotopically heavier than the surroundings, and in situ condensation, where the ice shows little difference in isotopic composition with respect to the vapor, are encountered above the convective cell with convective lofting being the dominant mechanism by which water is transported to this altitude. While ice lofting is an important component of water transport models in the TTL, the isotopic composition of ice has been a relatively unconstrained parameter. Observations of condensed isotopes coupled with the vertical profile of vapor in the summertime TTL suggests that there is a seasonal variation in convective timescales that needs to be accounted for in convectively-influenced trajectory models describing the transport of water in the TTL.

  20. Natural Convection in a rotating multilayer spherical shell system with self gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira Rangel, Francisco Javier; Avila Rodriguez, Ruben; Cabello Gonzalez, Ares

    2015-11-01

    The onset of thermal convection in rotating multilayer spherical shells is investigated. Similar to the the terrestrial planets structure (core-mantle-ocean/atmosphere), the system is composed of three concentric shells. The first spherical gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.35, the middle gap has an aspect ratio of 0.44 and the third gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.8.The inner and the outer spherical gaps confine Boussinesq fluids while the middle spherical gap is treated as a thermal conductor solid. The investigation shows the Taylor and Rayleigh numbers that allows the onset of thermal convection in the two fluid gaps. Additionally the convective patterns, the temperature fields and the heat fluxes are presented in the most inner and outer spherical gaps. Convection is driven by the temperature difference between the most inner and outer spheres and a gravitational field which varies like 1 / r and 1 /r3 . The fluid equations are solved by using the spectral element method (SEM) and the mesh is generated by using the cubed-sphere algorithm to avoid the singularity at the poles. To the knowledge of the authors the convection-conduction-convection problem presented in this paper has not been investigated previously. This project is sponsored by PAPIIT DGAPA UNAM.

  1. Numerical study of a mesoscale vortex in the planetary boundary layer of the meiyu front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hangfeng; Zhai, Guoqing; Zhu, Ye; Xu, Yaqin

    2012-12-01

    It was found that the heavy rainfall event along the Meiyu front in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River on 23 June 2009 was connected with a mesoscale disturbance vortex, which originated from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and developed upward later and was discovered by using the Shuman-Shapiro filtering method. The mesoscale disturbance vortex in the PBL (PMDV) in this process corresponded well to the short-time rainstorm in the Doppler radar echo. Analysis of the high-resolution simulation results from the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) showed that there were several surface disturbances along the southern warm section of the Meiyu front prior to the generation of the PMDV. The PMDV interacted with the mesoscale convective system (MCS) and intensified the local convective precipitation. The north and southwest flows in the PBL converged at the time of the PMDV formation. Meanwhile, a southwesterly jet on the top of the PBL to the south side of the vortex reinforced the ascending motion and convergence. Hence, it is concluded that the PMDV was generated when the strong cold air flows north of the shear line encountered the southwest flow south of the shear line. The convergence line in the PBL, the intensification of the southwest wind, and the southward aggression of the north wind were critical for the development of the PMDV. The release of latent heat was found crucial for the formation of the PMDV as it facilitated the convergence at low levels.

  2. Impact of mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic changes in sea ice on the development of low pressure systems in the Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungert, U.; Schlünzen, K. H.; Ries, H.

    2009-09-01

    In polar regions the exchange of heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere depends on the sea ice distribution. Sea ice acts as an insulating layer between the relatively warm ocean water and the mostly cold air. The sea ice concentration can change on time scales from several hours to a few days due to dynamic processes like ice drift or breaking of the ice sheet and thermodynamic processes like melting and freezing. The influence of these mesoscale changes of the ice distribution on the heat exchange at the surface and on atmospheric processes is investigated by numerical simulations for the Fram Strait region. The studies are performed with the model system METRAS/MESIM (Dierer et al., 2005). It consists of the mesoscale atmospheric model METRAS (Lüpkes and Schlünzen, 1996; Schlünzen, 1990) that is interactively coupled with the mesoscale sea ice model MESIM (Birnbaum, 1998). The sea ice model is able to simulate dynamic and thermodynamic processes in the ice jointly and separately. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate the influence of these processes on the ice concentration and the resulting impact on low pressure systems in detail. Two periods are simulated: The first one from 05 to 07 March 2002, and the second one from 12 to 15 March 2002. During the first phase, a trough was passing from East to West through the Fram Strait region. During the second phase, three cyclones were passing in series over Fram Strait (Brümmer et al., 2008). In March 2002, the field experiment FRAMZY 2002 took place in the region of Svalbard and Fram Strait including ship measurements, aircraft measurements and drift buoys (Brümmer et al., 2005). The model results are compared with these measurements and the influence of changes in the sea ice cover on the exchange of heat and momentum at the surface and on the development of the trough (first phase) and the "cyclone family" (second phase) are investigated. For this development dynamically caused changes of the

  3. Short-term meso-scale variability of mesozooplankton communities in a coastal upwelling system (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura, Álvaro; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé A.; González, Ángel F.; Gregori, María; Rosón, Gabriel; Guerra, Ángel

    2013-02-01

    The short-term, meso-scale variability of the mesozooplankton community present in the coastal upwelling system of the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain) has been analysed. Three well-defined communities were identified: coastal, frontal and oceanic, according to their holoplankton-meroplankton ratio, richness, and total abundance. These communities changed from summer to autumn due to a shift from downwelling to upwelling-favourable conditions coupled with taxa dependent changes in life strategies. Relationships between the resemblance matrix of mesozooplankton and the resemblance matrices of meteorologic, hydrographic and community-derived biotic variables were determined with distance-based linear models (DistLM, 18 variables), showing an increasing amount of explained variability of 6%, 16.1% and 54.5%, respectively. A simplified model revealed that the variability found in the resemblance matrix of mesozooplankton was mainly described by the holoplankton-meroplankton ratio, the total abundance, the influence of lunar cycles, the upwelling index and the richness; altogether accounting for 64% of the total variability. The largest variability of the mesozooplankton resemblance matrix (39.6%) is accounted by the holoplankton-meroplankton ratio, a simple index that describes appropriately the coastal-ocean gradient. The communities described herein kept their integrity in the studied upwelling and downwelling episodes in spite of the highly advective environment off the Ría de Vigo, presumably due to behavioural changes in the vertical position of the zooplankton.

  4. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kottmeier, C.; Kalthoff, N.; Barthlott, C.; Corsmeier, U.; Van Baelen, J.; Coulter, R.; Environmental Science Division; Inst. for Meteorology and Climate Research; Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Inst. of Physics and Meteorology

    2008-12-01

    Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study) that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i) surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii) surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii) mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analyzed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data) are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line, and the flow

  5. The Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Time-Dependent Convection-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear, time-dependent convection-diffusion systems. These methods are an extension of the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin methods for purely hyperbolic systems to convection-diffusion systems and share with those methods their high parallelizability, their high-order formal accuracy, and their easy handling of complicated geometries, for convection dominated problems. It is proven that for scalar equations, the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods are L(sup 2)-stable in the nonlinear case. Moreover, in the linear case, it is shown that if polynomials of degree k are used, the methods are k-th order accurate for general triangulations; although this order of convergence is suboptimal, it is sharp for the LDG methods. Preliminary numerical examples displaying the performance of the method are shown.

  6. Double-diffusive convection in geothermal systems: the salton sea, California, geothermal system as a likely candidate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Much has been published about double-diffusive convection as a mechanism for explaining variations in composition and temperature within all-liquid natural systems. However, relatively little is known about the applicability of this phenomenon within the heterogeneous rocks of currently active geothermal systems where primary porosity may control fluid flow in some places and fractures may control it in others. The main appeal of double-diffusive convection within hydrothermal systems is-that it is a mechanism that may allow efficient transfer of heat mainly by convection, while at the same time maintaining vertical and lateral salinity gradients. The Salton Sea geothermal system exhibits the following reservoir characteristics: (1) decreasing salinity and temperature from bottom to top and center toward the sides, (2) a very high heat flow from the top of the system that seems to require a major component of convective transfer of heat within the chemically stratified main reservoir, and (3) a relatively uniform density of the reservoir fluid throughout the system at all combinations of subsurface temperature, pressure, and salinity. Double-diffusive convection can account for these characteristics very nicely whereas other previously suggested models appear to account either for the thermal structure or for the salinity variations, but not both. Hydrologists, reservoir engineers, and particularly geochemists should consider the possibility and consequences of double-diffusive convection when formulating models of hydrothermal processes, and of the response of reservoirs to testing and production. ?? 1990.

  7. Life Cycle of Midlatitude Deep Convective Systems in a Lagrangian Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Zhe; Dong, Xiquan; Xie, Baike; McFarlane, Sally A.; Kennedy, Aaron; Lin, Bing; Minnis, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) consist of intense convective cores (CC), large stratiform rain (SR) regions, and extensive non-precipitating anvil clouds (AC). This study focuses on the evolution of these three components and the factors that affect convective AC production. An automated satellite tracking method is used in conjunction with a recently developed multi-sensor hybrid classification to analyze the evolution of DCS structure in a Lagrangian framework over the central United States. Composite analysis from 4221 tracked DCSs during two warm seasons (May-August, 2010-2011) shows that maximum system size correlates with lifetime, and longer-lived DCSs have more extensive SR and AC. Maximum SR and AC area lag behind peak convective intensity and the lag increases linearly from approximately 1-hour for short-lived systems to more than 3-hours for long-lived ones. The increased lag, which depends on the convective environment, suggests that changes in the overall diabatic heating structure associated with the transition from CC to SR and AC could prolong the system lifetime by sustaining stratiform cloud development. Longer-lasting systems are associated with up to 60% higher mid-tropospheric relative humidity and up to 40% stronger middle to upper tropospheric wind shear. Regression analysis shows that the areal coverage of thick AC is strongly correlated with the size of CC, updraft strength, and SR area. Ambient upper tropospheric wind speed and wind shear also play an important role for convective AC production where for systems with large AC (radius greater than 120-km) they are 24% and 20% higher, respectively, than those with small AC (radius=20 km).

  8. Life Cycle of Midlatitude Deep Convective Systems in a Lagrangian Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhe; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; McFarlane, Sally A.; Kennedy, Aaron; Lin, B.; Minnis, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) consist of intense convective cores (CC), large stratiform rain (SR) regions, and extensive non-precipitating anvil clouds (AC). This study focuses on the evolution of these three components and the factors that affect convective AC production. An automated satellite tracking method is used in conjunction with a recently developed multi-sensor hybrid classification to analyze the evolution of DCS structure in a Lagrangian framework over the central United States. Composite analysis from 4221 tracked DCSs during two warm seasons (May-August, 2010-2011) shows that maximum system size correlates with lifetime, and longer-lived DCSs have more extensive SR and AC. Maximum SR and AC area lag behind peak convective intensity and the lag increases linearly from ~1-hour for short-lived systems to more than 3-hours for long-lived ones. The increased lag, which depends on the convective environment, suggests that changes in the overall diabatic heating structure associated with the transition from CC to SR and AC could prolong the system lifetime by sustaining stratiform cloud development. Longer-lasting systems are associated with up to 60% higher mid-tropospheric relative humidity and up to 40% stronger mid-to-upper tropospheric wind shear. Regression analysis shows that the areal coverage of thick AC is strongly correlated with the size of CC, updraft strength, and SR area. Ambient upper tropospheric wind speed and wind shear also play an important role for convective AC production where for systems with large AC (radius>120-km) they are 24% and 20% higher, respectively, than those with small AC (radius=20 km).

  9. High-Resolution NU-WRF Simulations of a Deep Convective-Precipitation System During MC3E. Part 1; Comparisons Between Goddard Microphysics Schemes and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Lang, Stephen; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Fridlind, Ann; Matsui, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard microphysics scheme was recently improved by adding a 4th ice class (frozen dropshail). This new 4ICE scheme was implemented and tested in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) for an intense continental squall line and a moderate,less-organized continental case. Simulated peak radar reflectivity profiles were improved both in intensity and shape for both cases as were the overall reflectivity probability distributions versus observations. In this study, the new Goddard 4ICE scheme is implemented into the regional-scale NASA Unified - Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF) and tested on an intense mesoscale convective system that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The NU42WRF simulated radar reflectivities, rainfall intensities, and vertical and horizontal structure using the new 4ICE scheme agree as well as or significantly better with observations than when using previous versions of the Goddard 3ICE (graupel or hail) schemes. In the 4ICE scheme, the bin microphysics-based rain evaporation correction produces more erect convective cores, while modification of the unrealistic collection of ice by dry hail produces narrow and intense cores, allowing more slow-falling snow to be transported rearward. Together with a revised snow size mapping, the 4ICE scheme produces a more horizontally stratified trailing stratiform region with a broad, more coherent light rain area. In addition, the NU-WRF 4ICE simulated radar reflectivity distributions are consistent with and generally superior to those using the GCE due to the less restrictive open lateral boundaries

  10. Parameterizing mesoscale and large-scale ice clouds in general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Leo J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses GCM parameterizations for two types of ice clouds: (1) ice clouds formed by large-scale lifting, often of limited vertical extent but usually of large-scale horizontal extent; and (2) ice clouds formed as anvils in convective systems, often of moderate vertical extent but of mesoscale size horizontally. It is shown that the former type of clouds can be parameterized with reference to an equilibrium between ice generation by deposition from vapor, and ice removal by crystal settling. The same mechanisms operate in the mesoscale clouds, but the ice content in these cases is considered to be more closely linked to the moisture supplied to the anvil by cumulus towers. It is shown that a GCM can simulate widespread ice clouds of both types.

  11. Automated mesoscale winds derived from GOES multispectral imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.; Atkinson, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    An automated technique for extracting mesoscale winds from sequences of GOES VISSR image pairs was developed, tested and configured for quasi-real time/research applications on a computing system which gives mesoscale wind estimates at the highest spatial/temporal resolution possible from the VISSR imagery down to a wind vector separation of 10 km. Preprocessing of imagery using IR resampling, VIS edge preserving filtering, and reduced VIS resolution averaging improved height assignments and vector extraction for 10, 15, and 30 min imagery. An objective quality control system provides much greater than 99% accuracy in eliminating questionable wind estimates. Automated winds generally have better spatial coverage and density, and have random error estimates half as large as the manual winds. Dynamical analysis of cloud wind divergence revealed temporally consistent convergence centers on the meso beta scale that are highly correlated with on going and future developing convective storms. The entire system of computer codes was successfully vectorized for execution on an array processor resulting in job turnaround in less than one hour.

  12. Thermodynamic Environments Supporting Extreme Convection in Subtropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Trier, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme convection tends to form in the vicinity of mountain ranges, and the Andes in subtropical South America help spawn some of the most intense convection in the world. Subsequent to initiation, the convection often evolves into propagating mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) similar to those seen over the U.S. Great Plains and produces damaging tornadoes, hail, and floods across a wide agricultural region. In recent years, studies on the nature of convection in subtropical South America using spaceborne radar data have elucidated key processes responsible for their extreme characteristics, including a strong relationship between the Andes topography and convective initiation. Building on previous work, an investigation of the thermodynamic environment supporting some of the deepest convection in the world will be presented. In particular, an analysis of the thermodynamic destabilization in subtropical South America, which considers the parcel buoyancy minimum for conditionally unstable air parcels, will be presented. Additional comparisons between the nocturnal nature and related diurnal cycle of MCSs in subtropical South America the U.S. Great Plains will provide insights into the processes controlling MCS initiation and upscale growth.

  13. Pilot project of measuring and computing system for mesoscale monitoring of atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, V. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Telminov, A. E.; Komarov, A. I.; Kobzev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Conception of design of measuring and computing system for monitoring atmospheric boundary layer is proposed. The system includes: stationary measuring complex consisting of four multiple-elevation ultrasonic weather stations and mobile measuring complex consisting of transportable weather station, touch probing system of weather data profile based on unmanned aerial vehicle and also Raman scattering gas analyzer, and new modification mercury gas analyzer.

  14. Chemical control of dissolution-driven convection in partially miscible systems: theoretical classification.

    PubMed

    Loodts, V; Rongy, L; De Wit, A

    2015-11-28

    Dissolution-driven convection occurs in the host phase of a partially miscible system when a buoyantly unstable density stratification develops upon dissolution. Reactions can impact such convection by changing the composition and thus the density of the host phase. Here we study the influence of A + B → C reactions on such convective dissolution when A is the dissolving species and B a reactant initially in solution in the host phase. We perform a linear stability analysis of related reaction-diffusion density profiles to compare the growth rate of the instability in the reactive case to its non reactive counterpart when all species diffuse at the same rate. We classify the stabilizing or destabilizing influence of reactions on the buoyancy-driven convection in a parameter space spanned by the solutal Rayleigh numbers RA,B,C of chemical species A, B, C and by the ratio β of initial concentrations of the reactants. For RA > 0, the non reactive dissolution of A in the host phase is buoyantly unstable. In that case, we show that the reaction is enhancing convection provided C is sufficiently denser than B. Increasing the ratio β of initial reactant concentrations increases the effect of chemistry but does not significantly impact the stabilizing/destabilizing classification. When the non reactive case is buoyantly stable (RA≤ 0), reactions can create in time an unstable density stratification and trigger convection if RC > RB. Our theoretical approach allows classifying previous results in a unifying picture and developing strategies for the chemical control of convective dissolution. PMID:26486608

  15. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  16. Benchmarking Velocity and Vorticity Measurement Systems on the UCLA Large-Scale Rotating Convection Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, E. K.; Aurnou, J. M.; Pilegard, T.; Grannan, A. M.; Ribeiro, A.; Cheng, J. S.; May, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to simulate the turbulent, rapidly-rotating convection processes that occur in Earth's core and other planetary cores, we have designed and fabricated a large-scale experimental device at UCLA. Capable of accessing a broad range of parameters (e.g., Ekman numbers between E ≃ 10-2 to 10-8 and Rayleigh numbers between Ra ≃ 104 to 1013), this device is ideal for identifying new regimes of core-style convection and for determining scaling trends that can be extrapolated to planetary conditions. In particular, this device provides the opportunity to characterize the heat transfer and velocity field behaviors needed to build and test next-generation, asymptotically accurate models of rotating convection. Two experimental measurement systems, a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system, have been implemented on the UCLA rotating convection device. LDV allows for the acquisition of high resolution point velocity profiles while PIV allows for the measurement of planar velocity fields using a light sheet through the fluid layer. We present results showing the strong agreement between LDV and PIV measurements. In addition, we present results of the spin up process of a homogeneous fluid that show agreement between experimental measurements, obtained through LDV, with established theory. Our present results validate the use of the LDV and PIV systems on the UCLA rotating convection device. Thus, these two systems are now calibrated to measure the velocity and vorticity fields that characterize the turbulent, rotating core-style convection that underlies dynamo generation in planetary bodies.

  17. Using WRF to understand how topographically-driven mesoscale features influence rainfall variability in Tigris-Euphrates System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezfuli, Amin; Zaitchik, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The Headwaters of the Tigris-Euphrates System (HWTES) is a critical region for the regional hydropolitics in the Middle East, particularly after the recent growing conflicts that have been partly attributed to water resource scarcity. However, lack of the in-situ data has made it difficult to study the hydrometeorology of the region with full rigor. Regional climate models are a pivotal resource to tackle this issue by providing a complete spatio-temporal coverage for the hydroclimate variables. In this study, we have implemented the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model, driven by the NCEP/DOE Reanalysis 2 (R2), for a domain spanning 30-55E and 22-45N. Several sensitivity analyses were performed in order to find a set of physics parameters that appropriately captures the interannual variability and annual cycle of rainfall over the HWTES. The simulations were conducted at 27km spatial resolution and for the period 1983-2013. Results showed that the annual cycle of precipitation produced by WRF agrees much more closely with the observations than that of the original R2 product. This was particularly evident during the transition months of April and October, which were further examined to study mechanism. The WRF model significantly outperforms the R2 in simulating the interannual variability of rainfall for these two months over the HWTES. Our diagnostic analysis suggests that the main reason for this is WRF's capability to resolve topographically-driven low-level moisture transport from two directions. These two mesoscale features that are missed or significantly weak in the coarse-resolution R2 data are a southeasterly barrier jet along the Zagros Mountains that originates over the Persian Gulf and a low-level westerly flow along the East Turkey Highlands. The latter, imposed by the synoptic-scale systems that are reasonably well-resolved in the R2 data, carries moist, warm air from the Mediterranean toward the HWTES.

  18. Analysis and modeling of summertime convective cloud and precipitation structure over the Southeastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knupp, Kevin R.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of an investigation of deep convective cloud systems that typify the summertime subtropical environment of northern Alabama is presented. The major portion of the research effort included analysis of data acquired during the 1986 Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX), which consisted of the joint programs Satellite Precipitation and Cloud Experiment (SPACE) under NASA direction, the Microburst and Service Thunderstorm (MIST) Program under NSF sponsorship, and the FAA-Lincoln Laboratory Weather Study (FLOWS). This work relates closely to the SPACE component of COHMEX, one of the general goals of which was to further the understanding of kinematic and precipitation structure of convective cloud systems. The special observational plateforms that were available under the SPACE/COHMEX Program are shown. The original objectives included studies of both isolated deep convection and of (small) mesoscale convection systems that are observed in the Southeast environment. In addition, it was proposed to include both observational and comparative numerical modeling studies of these characteristic cloud systems. Changes in scope were made during the course of this investigation to better accommodate both the manpower available and the data that was acquired. A greater emphasis was placed on determination of the internal structure of small mesoscale convective systems, and the relationship of internal dynamical and microphysical processes to the observed cloud top behavior as inferred from GOES IR (30 min) data. The major accomplishments of this investigation are presented.

  19. A nested-grid mesoscale numerical weather prediction model modified for Space Shuttle operational requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Coats, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    A nested-grid mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is tested over Florida for the case of intense seabreeze-induced convection. The goal of this modeling system is to provide real-time aviation weather support which is designed to fit local terminal operations such as those supporting NASA's STS. Results from a 58 km and a 14.5 km nested-grid simulation show that this version of the MASS is capable of simulating many of the basic characteristics of convective complexes during periods of relatively weak synoptic scale flow regimes. However, it is noted that extensive development work is required with nested-grid cumulus and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes before many of the meso-beta scale features such as thunderstorm downdraft-produced bubble high pressure centers can be accurately simulated. After these schemes are properly tuned, MASS can be utilized to initialize microscale modeling systems.

  20. Performance comparison of meso-scale ensemble wave forecasting systems for Mediterranean sea states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzutto, Paolo; Saulter, Andrew; Cavaleri, Luigi; Bunney, Christopher; Marcucci, Francesca; Torrisi, Lucio; Sebastianelli, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    This paper compares the performance of two wind and wave short range ensemble forecast systems for the Mediterranean Sea. In particular, it describes a six month verification experiment carried out by the U.K. Met Office and Italian Air Force Meteorological Service, based on their respective systems: the Met Office Global-Regional Ensemble Prediction System and the Nettuno Ensemble Prediction System. The latter is the ensemble version of the operational Nettuno forecast system. Attention is focused on the differences between the two implementations (e.g. grid resolution and initial ensemble members sampling) and their effects on the prediction skill. The cross-verification of the two ensemble systems shows that from a macroscopic point of view the differences cancel out, suggesting similar skill. More in-depth analysis indicates that the Nettuno wave forecast is better resolved but, on average, slightly less reliable than the Met Office product. Assessment of the added value of the ensemble techniques at short range in comparison with the deterministic forecast from Nettuno, reveals that adopting the ensemble approach has small, but substantive, advantages.

  1. Turbulent traveling-wave convection in a two-layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamp, Andrew P.; Griffiths, Ross W.

    1997-04-01

    When layers of salt and sugar solution are separated by a "diffusive" interface, interfacial waves are spontaneously generated by the turbulent convection once the system evolves to a critical value of the density-anomaly ratio Rρ≡βΔS/αΔT (Stamp et al., to appear in J. Fluid Mech). The waves modulate the interfacial fluxes by modifying the interface thickness and thereby organize the otherwise random convective motions into coherent large-scale circulations. In narrow rectangular channels a wide range of conditions give rise to a single wave which propagates back-and-forth, resulting in quasi-periodic reversals of tank-scale circulations. Here it is shown that in annular and equant rectangular cavities this same coupling phenomenon produces turbulent convection cells of a traveling-wave nature, coupled to large-amplitude solitary waves on the interface.

  2. Front waves and complex spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion-convection system with thermokinetic autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Trávnícková, Tereza; Kohout, Martin; Schreiber, Igor; Kubícek, Milan

    2009-12-01

    We analyze dynamics of stationary nonuniform patterns, traveling waves, and spatiotemporal chaos in a simple model of a tubular cross-flow reactor. The reactant is supplied continuously via convective flow and/or by diffusion through permeable walls of the reactor. First order exothermic reaction kinetics is assumed and the system is described by mass and energy balances forming coupled reaction-diffusion-convection equations. Dynamical regimes of the reaction-diffusion subsystem range from pulses and fronts to periodic waves and complex chaotic behavior. Two distinct types of chaotic patterns are identified and characterized by Lyapunov dimension. Next we examine the effects of convection on various types of the reaction-diffusion regimes. Remarkable zigzag fronts and steady state patterns are found despite the absence of differential flow. We employ continuation techniques to elucidate the existence and form of these patterns. PMID:20059221

  3. Front waves and complex spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion-convection system with thermokinetic autocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Kohout, Martin; Schreiber, Igor; Kubíček, Milan

    2009-12-01

    We analyze dynamics of stationary nonuniform patterns, traveling waves, and spatiotemporal chaos in a simple model of a tubular cross-flow reactor. The reactant is supplied continuously via convective flow and/or by diffusion through permeable walls of the reactor. First order exothermic reaction kinetics is assumed and the system is described by mass and energy balances forming coupled reaction-diffusion-convection equations. Dynamical regimes of the reaction-diffusion subsystem range from pulses and fronts to periodic waves and complex chaotic behavior. Two distinct types of chaotic patterns are identified and characterized by Lyapunov dimension. Next we examine the effects of convection on various types of the reaction-diffusion regimes. Remarkable zigzag fronts and steady state patterns are found despite the absence of differential flow. We employ continuation techniques to elucidate the existence and form of these patterns.

  4. Surface deformation and geoid anomalies over single and double-layered convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, M.; Yuen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a primitive variable formulation of the finite-element method, the differences in the surface observables, such as topography and geoid, produced by single- and double-layered thermal convection, were compared. Both constant and depth-dependent viscosities have been considered. For the same Rayleigh number, larger surface perturbations are produced by single-cell convection. For the same Nusselt number, the magnitudes of the surface observables are greater for double-layered convection. For the same surface heat-flux, surface topographies have similar magnitudes, but the relative amplitudes of geoid anomalies depend greatly on the style of viscosity stratification. This difference in the geoid between the two systems increases with greater surface heat-flow, regardless of viscosity structure.

  5. Convective and Stratiform Components of the Precipitation-Water Vapor Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, F.; Schumacher, C.

    2015-12-01

    The empirical relationship between tropical oceanic precipitation in a grid and the moisture content in the column atop the grid is well established. There exists a critical value of column moisture below which the mean precipitation is negligible, and above which it rises rapidly or "picks-up". We re-examine this relationship with a closer look at its convective and stratiform aspects, using data from the DYNAMO field campaign, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA). On daily and hourly time scales, and across all tropical ocean basins, we find that the pick-up is pronounced for stratiform rainfall, while convective rainfall, in contrast only displays a weak pick-up above column moisture. The non-linearity of the precipitation-column moisture curves and the differences between convective and stratiform curves relax at the monthly timescale. We conclude that the environmental moisture content is a stronger constraint on stratiform than convective rain. We also speculate that mesoscale dynamics are responsible for producing the strong non-linearity of the stratiform precipitation curve. These findings suggest that to accurate capture sub-grid scale convection in Global Climate Models (GCMs), we must make strides towards parameterizing mesoscale convective systems (MCSs).

  6. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Iron-Sulfur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results on the liquidus curve of the Fe-S system at the pressures of the lunar core provide constraints on the Moon’s thermal and chemical states and the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo.

  7. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  8. Theoretical and experimental results of a mesoscale electric power generation system from pressurized gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krähenbühl, D.; Zwyssig, C.; Weser, H.; Kolar, J. W.

    2009-09-01

    In many process applications where throttling is used to reduce pressure, the potential to obtain net work output is sacrificed to the throttling process. Examples are throttling valves of gas pipelines and conventional throttles in automotive applications or turbo expanders as used in cryogenic plants. With a new pressure reduction system that produces electricity while expanding the gas, the lost potential to obtain work output can be recovered. To achieve a high power density, this energy generation system requires an increased operating speed of the electrical machine and the turbomachinery. This paper presents a miniature compressed-air-to-electric-power system, based on a radial turbine with a rated rotational speed of 490 000 rpm and a rated electric power output of 150 W. A comprehensive description including turbine, diffuser and permanent magnet (PM) generator is given. Finally, measurements of the compressed-air-to-electric-power system with a maximum rotational speed of over 600 000 rpm, a maximum electric output power of 170 W, a maximum torque of 5.2 mN m and a turbine efficiency of 52% are presented.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a more important role on the mesoscale, and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing over one or two diurnal periods. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modelling system has been used in this study to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two North American mesoscale dispersion field experiments, the 1980 Great Plains tracer experiment and the 1983 Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX). Ground -level and elevated tracer concentrations were measured out to distances of 600 km from the source in the first experiment and 1100 km in the second. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in the first case while temporal changes in the synoptic -scale flow were very significant in the second case. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquill's (1962) delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. This study was also the first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modelling system with

  10. Short and Medium Range Hydrometeorological Ensemble Prediction System: A mesoscale case study in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucatero, D.; Madsen, H.; Refsgaard, J.; Kidmose, J.; Jensen, K.; Feddersen, H.; Sass, B.

    2013-12-01

    Recent floods in Europe have increased the need to improve flood prediction systems that will allow, firstly, for proper analysis of the uncertainties in the hydrological predictions and, secondly, for the generation of probabilistic forecasts. The use of Meteorological Ensemble Prediction Systems (MEPS) to propagate climate input uncertainty throughout the hydrological modeling process is a state-of-the-art methodology for issuing probabilistic forecasts. MEPS have been made operational at meteorological centers around the globe for both short and medium range forecasting. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) issues probabilistic forecasts with a resolution of approximately 25 kilometers using 50 ensemble members. The forecasts are issued twice per day with a lead time up to 15 days. Likewise, the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) issues probabilistic forecasts for a limited area covering Northern Europe with 25 ensemble members. DMI's MEPS has a spatial resolution of 5 kilometers, a lead time of 48 hours and is issued four times per day. Our research focuses on the implementation of both MEPS as input variables in a hydrological forecast model. We are aiming at generating seamless probabilistic forecasts of hydrological variables such as streamflow and groundwater levels for Silkeborg city in Denmark. A MIKE SHE coupled surface-groundwater hydrological model set up for the Silkeborg catchment is used for the hydrological forecast. Short and medium range forecasts for streamflows and groundwater levels of past events are analyzed in order to study the feasibility and skills of the flood forecasting system. Several measures of skill are described and analyzed in order to detect biases and lack of accuracy in our forecast system. A study of the reliability, skill over climatology/persistence forecasting, resolution, discrimination, etc., was made by means of the analysis of the joint distribution of the forecasts and observations of

  11. The mesoscale stability of entrainment into cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Lilly-type models for stratocumulus-capped mixed layers are shown to allow for a mesoscale instability in which mesoscale fluctuations of buoyancy and humidity are reinforced in phase by entrainment. In a model of an AMTEX mixed layer, this mesoscale instability has a maximum growth rate of about 0.00002 per sec at wavelengths 30 times the depth of the mixed layer. The instability is able to account for the existence and broad scale of the stratiform cloud patterns known as mesoscale cellular convection.

  12. Introduction to Mesoscale Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, John; Crabtree, George

    2012-02-01

    BESAC seeks community input for a forthcoming report on Mesoscale Materials and Chemistry, where classical, microscale and nanoscale science meet. The report, to be released in Fall 2012, will identify the most promising research opportunities in two areas: *new mesoscale materials, phenomena and functionality *facilities, instruments and tools needed to make, characterize and describe mesoscale materials, phenomena and functionality. You may contribute to the Town Hall through oral comments or by completing and uploading a Priority Research Direction quad chart through the Meso website, meso2012.com. If you upload a Priority Research Direction quad chart in advance, it can be projected at the Town Hall to illustrate your oral comments. Please see the Mesoscale Materials and Chemistry website for additional background and details: meso2012.com

  13. Mesoscale cloud phenomena observed by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of certain mesoscale cloud features - jet cirrus, eddies/vortices, cloud banding, and wave clouds - were collected from LANDSAT imagery and placed into Mason's four groups of causes of cloud formation based on the mechanism of vertical motion which produces condensation. These groups are as follows: (1) layer clouds formed by widespread regular ascent; (2) layer clouds caused by irregular stirring motions; (3) convective clouds; and (4) clouds formed by orographic disturbances. These mechanisms explain general cloud formation. Once formed, other forces may play a role in the deformation of a cloud or cloud mass into unusual and unique meso- and microscale patterns. Each example presented is followed by a brief discussion describing the synoptic situation, and some inference into the formation and occurrence of the more salient features. No major attempt was made to discuss in detail the meteorological and topographic interplay producing these mesoscale features.

  14. Multifunctional Mesoscale Observing Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabberdt, Walter F.; Schlatter, Thomas W.; Carr, Frederick H.; Friday, Elbert W. Joe; Jorgensen, David; Koch, Steven; Pirone, Maria; Ralph, F. Martin; Sun, Juanzhen; Welsh, Patrick; Wilson, James W.; Zou, Xiaolei

    2005-07-01

    More than 120 scientists, engineers, administrators, and users met on 8 10 December 2003 in a workshop format to discuss the needs for enhanced three-dimensional mesoscale observing networks. Improved networks are seen as being critical to advancing numerical and empirical modeling for a variety of mesoscale applications, including severe weather warnings and forecasts, hydrology, air-quality forecasting, chemical emergency response, transportation safety, energy management, and others. The participants shared a clear and common vision for the observing requirements: existing two-dimensional mesoscale measurement networks do not provide observations of the type, frequency, and density that are required to optimize mesoscale prediction and nowcasts. To be viable, mesoscale observing networks must serve multiple applications, and the public, private, and academic sectors must all actively participate in their design and implementation, as well as in the creation and delivery of value-added products. The mesoscale measurement challenge can best be met by an integrated approach that considers all elements of an end-to-end solution—identifying end users and their needs, designing an optimal mix of observations, defining the balance between static and dynamic (targeted or adaptive) sampling strategies, establishing long-term test beds, and developing effective implementation strategies. Detailed recommendations are provided pertaining to nowcasting, numerical prediction and data assimilation, test beds, and implementation strategies.


  15. The assimilation of satellite soundings, winds and satellite products in a mesoscale analysis/forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, G. R.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations in FY-85 were centered on three case study days in 1982. Two of these, March 6 and April 24, were Atmospheric Variability Experiment/Verical Atmospheric Sounder (AVE/VAS) days for which high spatial and temporal resolution RAOB and Vertical Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) data sets were available. The third investigation day, April 26, was a day of interesting severe weather. In the last part of FY-84 and early FY-85 we were able to demonstrate most importantly the complimentary nature of satellite soundings and winds in a forecast/analysis system. In our variational analysis scheme, cloud drift and water vapor winds enter into the height field as gradient information. The cloud drift winds especially, have the character of supplying information in cloudy areas where satellite soundings are not possible. In the April 26 experiments, analyses and forecasts using the combination satellite winds and soundings were superior to those using only soundings. Good consistency was shown between independent satellite forecasts from different initialization times run to the same verification time. A significant accomplishment in FY-85 was expanding experiments on April 26 to include quasi-continuous initialization inserting satellite soundings and winds from several different times into an analysis/forecast. Contrary to the first set of experiments on April 26, here forecast initialization fields were not independent, but contained satellite information from two data times.

  16. Application of GRACE Data for Quantifying Mesoscale Groundwater Stress - Urucuia Aquifer System, Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollberg, R.; Gonçalves, R. D.; Weiss, H.; Chang, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission provides a couple of applications in hydrology research such as total water storage (TWS) changes monitoring, quantitative water cycle components estimation, drought monitoring and hydrological modelling. Limited spatial resolutions of gravity measurements and noise contamination can cause errors and uncertainty of the study objective. Therefore, several GRACE studies recommend application of GRACE data retrievals to areas of interests only larger 200,000 km². The Urucuia Aquifer System (UAS) represents a major strategic water resource for Brazil. UAS is located in the drought-stricken northeast of Brazil and its discharge covers about 30% of the São Francisco River water (4th largest river in South America). Hydrological monitoring of the UAS is of increased importance to guarantee future river water supply and related ecosystem services for the territories crossed. A pre-processed GRACE three-model-ensemble was used to account for TWS changes and a negative balance was revealed for the UAS territory indicating potential water stress. Individual water cycle components needed to be excluded from the total GRACE signal using supplemental data sets to characterize the remaining storage term equivalent to 'water stress'. Comprehensive hydrological ground measurements of precipitation, river discharge, hydraulic heads plus further climate remote-sensing data sources were taken into account trying to distinguish natural from anthropogenic groundwater stress. Consideration of climate data from global hydrological models showed an insufficient accuracy which is related to spatial scaling issues whereas the inclusion of available ground data could increase the overall significance of the GRACE signal for this study. GRACE-based TWS retrievals were applied successfully in combination with comprehensive hydrological monitoring data to quantify potential groundwater storage changes of the 120,000 km² large UAS.

  17. On the evolution of a long-lived mesoscale vortex over the Yangtze River Basin: Geometric features and interactions among systems of different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shen-Ming; Li, Wan-Li; Ling, Jian

    2015-12-01

    A long-lived mesoscale vortex that caused extremely heavy rainfall events over the Yangtze River Basin was reproduced reasonably by the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. Using simulations, the three-dimensional geometric features of the vortex, as well as the interactions between the vortex and its background circulations (BCs), were investigated. Results indicated that the geometry features of the vortex were closely related to vortex evolution, vortex-related convection processes and precipitation, and vortex-BC interactions. Growth in the horizontal size of the vortex favored its sustainment. The vortex tended to produce stronger convection processes and precipitation as its orientation became closer to the west-east direction. The circulation budget revealed that the convergence-related shrinking, the BC transport, and the effects caused by vortex movement were the dominant factors for vortex development. Divergence-related stretching dominated vortex dissipation, and the transport effects associated with the BC and the eddy flows also accelerated this attenuation. The energy budget indicated that the vortex intensely interacted with its BCs during its lifetime. The BCs affected the vortex through downscaled energy cascade and mean transport; the eddy flow reacted to its BCs via upscaled energy cascade and eddy transport. Generally, the vortex had more dynamic than thermodynamic interactions with its BCs. BC effects were vital to the vortex evolution, whereas the variation in the BCs was predominantly determined by their own effects, although the reaction of the vortex-related eddy flow cannot be ignored in the variation of the BC dynamical fields.

  18. Extreme convection in subtropical South America: TRMM observations and high-resolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.; Kumar, A.

    2012-12-01

    Extreme convection tends to form in the vicinity of mountain ranges, and the Andes in subtropical South America help spawn some of the most intense convection in the world. Measurements from the TRMM satellite have allowed for detailed analysis of extreme weather patterns in remote regions of the world, such as subtropical South America. An investigation of the most intense storms for 11 years of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data has shown a tendency for squall lines to initiate and develop in this region. The synoptic environment and mechanisms leading to extreme convection and MCSs in subtropical South America are similar to those found in other regions of the world, including the United States. The mesoscale organizational structure of storms in subtropical South America and the U.S. are markedly similar. However, the topographical influence on the convective initiation and maintenance of the MCSs is unique to South America, where the Andes and related topography focus deep convection initiation in a narrow region. In a previous study, we examined the storm evolution by making use of the time continuity of the GOES infrared satellite data and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. However, information about the underlying dynamics could not be determined from the data alone. Therefore, we have conducted numerical simulations with the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to extend the analysis and provide an objective dynamical evaluation of storm initiation mechanisms, which include a capping inversion in the lee of the Andes, orographic triggering of the convection, and downstream organization into mesoscale storm systems. We simulated two representative cases with triple-nested domains. The simulated mesoscale systems closely resemble the storm structures seen by the TRMM satellite as well as the overall shape and character of the storms shown in the GOES satellite data. Results from these simulations will be presented at the conference including the role of

  19. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of LBA Convective Systems: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Stephen E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2002-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate convection that occurred during the TRMM LBA field experiment in Brazil. Convection in this region can be categorized into two different regimes. Low-level easterly flow results in moderate to high CAPE and a drier environment. Convection is more intense like that seen over continents. Low-level westerly flow results in low CAPE and a moist environment. Convection is weaker and more widespread characteristic of oceanic or monsoon-like systems. The GCE model has been used to study both regimes in order to provide cloud data sets that are representative of both environments in support of TRMM rainfall and heating algorithm development. Two different case are presented: Jan 26,1999, an easterly regime case, and Feb 23,1999, a westerly regime case. The Jan 26 case is an organized squall line and is initialized with a standard cold pool. The sensitivity to mid-level sounding moisture and wind shear will also be shown. The Feb 23 case is less-organized with only transient lines and is initialized with either warm bubbles or prescribed surface fluxes. Heating profiles, rainfall statistics and storm characteristics are compared and validated for the two cases against observations collected during the experiment.

  20. The breakdown of the anelastic approximation in rotating compressible convection: implications for astrophysical systems

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Michael A.; Julien, Keith; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The linear theory for rotating compressible convection in a plane layer geometry is presented for the astrophysically relevant case of low Prandtl number gases. When the rotation rate of the system is large, the flow remains geostrophically balanced for all stratification levels investigated and the classical (i.e. incompressible) asymptotic scaling laws for the critical parameters are recovered. For sufficiently small Prandtl numbers, increasing stratification tends to further destabilize the fluid layer, decrease the critical wavenumber and increase the oscillation frequency of the convective instability. In combination, these effects increase the relative magnitude of the time derivative of the density perturbation contained in the conservation of mass equation to non-negligible levels; the resulting convective instabilities occur in the form of compressional quasi-geostrophic oscillations. We find that the anelastic equations, which neglect this term, cannot capture these instabilities and possess spuriously growing eigenmodes in the rapidly rotating, low Prandtl number regime. It is shown that the Mach number for rapidly rotating compressible convection is intrinsically small for all background states, regardless of the departure from adiabaticity. PMID:25792951

  1. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  2. Simulated Radar Characteristics of LBA Convective Systems: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Stephen E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate convection that occurred during the TRMM LBA field experiment in Brazil. Convection in this region can be categorized into two different regimes. Low-level easterly flow results in moderate to high CAPE and a drier environment. Convection is more intense like that seen over continents. Low-level westerly flow results in low CAPE and a moist environment. Convection is weaker and more widespread characteristic of oceanic or monsoon-like systems. The GCE model has been used to study both regimes n order to provide cloud datasets that are representative of both environments in support of TRMM rainfall and heating algorithm development. Two different cases are analyzed: Jan 26, 1999, an eastely regime case, and Feb 23, 1999, a westerly regime case. The Jan 26 case is an organized squall line, while the Feb 23 case is less organized with only transient lines. Radar signatures, including CFADs, from the two simulated cases are compared to each other and with observations. The microphysical processes simulated in the model are also compared between the two cases.

  3. A study of the 21 March 2012 tornadic quasi linear convective system in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Arús, Joan; Castán, Salvador; Pineda, Nicolau; Rigo, Tomeu; Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    This study presents a description of a quasi linear convective system that took place in Catalonia (NE Spain) on 21 March 2012 producing heavy rainfall, moderate lightning activity and a weak tornado in the village of Ivars d'Urgell around 19 UTC after local sunset. A post-event survey indicated EF0 and EF1 damage in houses of the village - roofs and ceilings, broken windows, fences and walls and trees knocked down - along a track approximately 4 km long and about 20 m wide. Doppler radar observations show that the parent thunderstorm that spawned the tornado was one of a series that developed along a convective line that moved from S to N, initiating convective activity in terms of precipitation and lightning in the Mediterranean Sea and moving inland in S Catalonia (Tarragona and Salou coastal areas, producing local flash floods). Convective activity remained several hours with series of thunderstorms developing along the same paths. The synoptic situation was dominated by a high pressure ridge extending from northern Africa to central Europe, with a closed maximum sea level pressure area around 1036 hPa over northern France, southern Germany and Austria. On the other hand a relative low pressure area seen on 850 hPa and upper levels was present over the Iberian Peninsula, favouring a southern maritime flow from the Mediterranean between the forward part of the low pressure area and the high pressure system which blocked the advance of the low to the east. In the study we examine both the synoptic environment and storm scale observations with Doppler radar and total lightning data (cloud to ground and intracloud flashes) that lead to this cool-season severe convective event which is remarkable given the fact that, unlike in this case, most reported tornadoes in the region occur during the warm season (with peaks in August and September) and during daylight hours (6 to 18 UTC).

  4. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Huntrieser, H.; Homeyer, C. R.; Nault, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Pan, L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012 and had the objectives of characterizing the effect of thunderstorms on the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere and determining the chemical aging of upper troposphere (UT) convective outflow plumes. DC3 employed ground-based radars, lightning mapping arrays, and weather balloon soundings in conjunction with aircraft measurements sampling the composition of the inflow and outflow of a variety of thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, West Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the UT convective plume. The DC3 data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, and chemistry in the UT that is affected by the convection. In this presentation, we give an overview of the DC3 field campaign and highlight results from the campaign that are relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. These highlights include stratosphere-troposphere exchange in connection with thunderstorms, the 0-12 hour chemical aging and new particle formation in the UT outflow of a dissipating mesoscale convective system observed on June 21, 2012, and UT chemical aging in convective outflow as sampled the day after convection occurred and modeled in the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry model.

  5. A mesoscale vortex over Halley Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lachlan-Cope, T.A.; Warren, D.E. ); Duncan, C.N. )

    1993-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the evolution and structure of a mesoscale vortex and associated cloud comma that developed at the eastern edge of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the early part of January 1986 is presented. The system remained quasi-stationary for over three days close to the British research station Halley (75[degrees]36'S, 26'42[degrees]W) and gave severe weather with gale-force winds and prolonged snow. The formation and development of the system were investigated using conventional surface and upper-air meteorological observations taken at Halley, analyses from the U.K. Meteorological Office 15-level model, and satellite imagery and sounder data from the TIROS-N-NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites. The thermal structure of the vortex was examined using atmospheric profiles derived from radiance measurements from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder. Details of the wind field were examined using cloud motion vectors derived from a sequence of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer images. The vortex developed inland of the Brunt Ice Shelf in a strong baroclinic zone separating warm air, which had been advected polewards down the eastern Weddell Sea, and cold air descending from the Antarctic Plateau. The system intensified when cold, continental air associated with an upper-level short-wave trough was advected into the vortex. A frontal cloud band developed when slantwise ascent of warm air took place at the leading edge of the cold-air outbreak. Most of the precipitation associated with the low occurred on this cloud band. The small sea surface-atmospheric temperature differences gave only limited heat fluxes and there was no indication of deep convection associated with the system. The vortex was driven by baroclinic forcing and had some features in common with the baroclinic type of polar lows that occur in the Northern Hemisphere. 25 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Towards evaluating the intensity of convective systems by using GPS radio occultation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Deep convective systems, also more casually often just called storms, are destructive weather phenomena causing every year many deaths, injuries and damages and accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe, including Europe. Damages are mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain and these parameters are strongly connected to the structure of the storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes which are still mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in-situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or not reliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage. With this study we propose a new method for detecting the convection intensity in terms of rain rate and surface wind speed by using meteorological surface measurements in combination with atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation observations, which are available in essentially all weather conditions and with global coverage. The analysis of models indicated a relationship between the cloud top altitude and the intensity of a storm. We thus use GPS radio occultation bending angle profiles for detecting the storm's cloud top altitude and we correlate this value to the rain rate and wind speed measured by meteorological station networks in two different regions, the WegenerNet climate station network (South-Eastern Styria, Austria) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site (ARM, Southern Great Plains, USA), respectively. The results show a good correlation between the cloud top altitude and the maximum rain rate in the monitored areas, while this is not found for maximum wind speed. We conclude from this

  7. Microwave and infrared simulations of an intense convective system and comparison with aircraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, N.; Yeh, Hwa-Young M.; Adler, Robert F.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model, radiative transfer model-based simulation system is tested and validated against the aircraft-based radiance observations of an intense convective system in southeastern Virginia on 29 June 1986 during the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment. NASA's ER-2, a high-altitude research aircraft with a complement of radiometers operating at 11-micrometer infrared channel and 18-, 37-, 92-, and 183-GHz microwave channels provided data for this study. The cloud model successfully simulated the cloud system with regard to aircraft- and radar-observed cloud-top heights and diameters and with regard to radar-observed reflectivity structure. For the simulation time found to correspond best with the aircraft- and radar-observed structure, brightness temperatures T(sub b) are simulated and compared with observations for all the microwave frequencies along with the 11-micrometer infrared channel. Radiance calculations at the various frequencies correspond well with the aircraft observations in the areas of deep convection. The clustering of 37-147-GHz T(sub b) observations and the isolation of the 18-GHz values over the convective cores are well simulated by the model. The radiative transfer model, in general, is able to simulate the observations reasonably well from 18 GHz through 174 GHz within all convective areas of the cloud system. When the aircraft-observed 18- and 37-GHz, and 90- and 174-GHz T(sub b) are plotted against each other, the relationships have a gradual difference in the slope due to the differences in the ice particle size in the convective and more stratiform areas of the cloud. The model is able to capture these differences observed by the aircraft. Brightness temperature-rain rate relationships compare reasonably well with the aircraft observations in terms of the slope of the relationship. The model calculations are also extended to select high-frequency channels at 220, 340, and 400 GHz to simulate the

  8. METEOR - an artificial intelligence system for convective storm forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Elio, R.; De haan, J.; Strong, G.S.

    1987-03-01

    An AI system called METEOR, which uses the meteorologist's heuristics, strategies, and statistical tools to forecast severe hailstorms in Alberta, is described, emphasizing the information and knowledge that METEOR uses to mimic the forecasting procedure of an expert meteorologist. METEOR is then discussed as an AI system, emphasizing the ways in which it is qualitatively different from algorithmic or statistical approaches to prediction. Some features of METEOR's design and the AI techniques for representing meteorological knowledge and for reasoning and inference are presented. Finally, some observations on designing and implementing intelligent consultants for meteorological applications are made. 7 references.

  9. An Automated System to Quantify Convectively induced Aircraft encounters with Turbulence over Europe and North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneguz, Elena; Turp, Debi; Wells, Helen

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that encounters with moderate or severe turbulence can lead to passenger injuries and incur high costs for airlines from compensation and litigation. As one of two World Area Forecast Centres (WAFCs), the Met Office has responsibility for forecasting en-route weather hazards worldwide for aviation above a height of 10,000 ft. Observations from commercial aircraft provide a basis for gaining a better understanding of turbulence and for improving turbulence forecasts through verification. However there is currently a lack of information regarding the possible cause of the observed turbulence, or whether the turbulence occurred within cloud. Such information would be invaluable for the development of forecasting techniques for particular types of turbulence and for forecast verification. Of all the possible sources of turbulence, convective activity is believed to be a major cause of turbulence. Its relative importance over the Europe and North Atlantic area has not been yet quantified in a systematic way: in this study, a new approach is developed to automate identification of turbulent encounters in the proximity of convective clouds. Observations of convection are provided from two independent sources: a surface based lightning network and satellite imagery. Lightning observations are taken from the Met Office Arrival Time Detections network (ATDnet). ATDnet has been designed to identify cloud-to-ground flashes over Europe but also detects (a smaller fraction of) strikes over the North Atlantic. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite products are used to identify convective clouds by applying a brightness temperature filtering technique. The morphological features of cold cloud tops are also investigated. The system is run for all in situ turbulence reports received from airlines for a total of 12 months during summer 2013 and 2014 for the domain of interest. Results of this preliminary short term climatological study show significant intra

  10. Characteristics of Extreme Summer Convection over equatorial America and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, M. D.; Houze, R.

    2013-12-01

    Fourteen years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) version 7 data for June-August show the temporal and spatial characteristics of extreme convection over equatorial regions of the American and African continents. We identify three types of extreme systems: storms with deep convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes extending ≥10 km in height), storms with wide convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes with areas >1,000 km2) and storms with broad stratiform regions (stratiform echo >50,000 km2). European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis is used to describe the environmental conditions around these forms of extreme convection. Storms with deep convective cores occur mainly over land: in the equatorial Americas, maximum occurrence is in western Mexico, Northern Colombia and Venezuela; in Africa, the region of maximum occurrence is a broad zone enclosing the central and west Sudanian Savanna, south of the Sahel region. Storms with wide convective radar echoes occur in these same general locations. In the American sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation regions (typifying robust mesoscale convective systems) occur mainly over the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the Colombia-Panama bight. In the African sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation areas occur primarily over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean near the coast of West Africa. ECMWF reanalyses show how the regions of extreme deep convection associated with both continents are located mainly in regions affected by diurnal heating and influenced by atmospheric jets in regions with strong humidity gradients. Composite analysis of the synoptic conditions leading to the three forms of extreme convection provides insights into the forcing mechanisms in which these systems occur. These analyses show how the monsoonal flow directed towards the Andes slopes is mainly what concentrates the occurrence of extreme

  11. An Analysis of the Environments of Intense Convective Systems in West Africa in 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the local- and regional-scale thermodynamical and dynamical environments associated with intense convective systems in West Africa during 2003. We identified convective system cases from TRMM microwave imagery, classifying each case by the system minimum 85-GHz brightness temperature and by the estimated elapsed time of propagation from high terrain. The speed of the mid-level jet, the magnitude of the low-level shear, and the surface equivalent potential temperature (theta(sub e)) were greater for the intense cases compared to the non-intense cases, although the differences between the means tended to be small, less than 3K for surface theta(sub e). Hypothesis testing of a series of commonly used intensity prediction metrics resulted in significant results only for low-level metrics such as convective available potential energy and not for any of the mid- or upper-level metrics such as 700-hPa theta(sub e). None of the environmental variables or intensity metrics by themselves or in combination appeared to be reliable direct predictors of intensity. In the regional scale analysis, the majority of intense convective systems occurred in the surface baroclinic zone where surface theta(sub e) exceeded 344 K and the 700-hPa zonal wind speeds were less than -6/ms. Fewer intense cases compared to non-intense cases were associated with African easterly wave troughs. Fewer than 25% of our cases occurred in environments with detectable Saharan dust loads, and the results for intense and non-intense cases were similar. Our results for the regional analysis were consistent with the seasonal movement of the WAM and the intertropical front, regional differences in topography, and AEW energetics.

  12. Providing operational guidance for the development of sea breeze thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center - An experiment using a mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Moon, Dennis A.; Keen, Cecil S.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Pielke, Roger A.

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of a mesoscale numerical model to provide improved local forecast guidance is evaluated with respect to sea breeze convection storms at the Kennedy Space Center. The model and operational forecast guidance production are described. A case study is presented for sea breeze convection storms and lightning events on July 1, 1986. It is found that the mesoscale numerical model outperforms purely subjective predictions of sea breeze convection. The range of applications for the model are considered.

  13. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power

  14. Mesoscale variability in marine winds at mid-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James E.; Wilson, Judith G.

    1984-11-01

    Wind data were collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft on low-level (50 and 90 m) crosswind and along-mean-wind tracks of approximately 350 km during the Storm Transfer and Response Experiment in November and December 1980. Observed mesoscale variations in the marine wind fields are characterized by the velocity correlation tensor for three atmospheric regimes: cloud streets, open and closed cellular convection, and prefrontal warm air advection. The dominant scale of mesoscale variation in the offshore wind field normal to the mean wind direction in the case of old continental air flowing over a warmer ocean, producing cloud streets, was 27 km. For this case, the standard deviation in momentum transfer, which was calculated from 2-km subsets of the flight track by the bulk aerodynamic method assuming a constant drag coefficient, was 13% of the synoptic scale (330km) mean. The dominant scale of mesoscale variation for open cellular convection was 62km, and the dominant scale for closed cellular convection was 90 km. The standard deviation of mesoscale momentum transfer (scales greater than 2 km; constant drag coefficient) for a 345-km flight track containing both cell types was 26% of the synoptic scale mean. The warm air advection case had no measurable mesoscale variability. For each regime a model of the horizontal velocity correlation tensor, which can be used to estimate a mesoscale variability, is fitted to the observed velocity correlation tensor with velocity component and weather regime dependent coefficients. This general model is consistent with an interpretation of the mesoscale wind field as an ensemble of coherent structures, associated with cloud type, in which the spatial variability of the wind field in each weather regime is associated with physically determined dominant length scales (i.e., cells or rolls), as contrasted with a continuum interpretation of two-dimensional turbulence. To accurately describe

  15. Salinity variations in submarine hydrothermal systems by layered double-diffusive convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, J.L.; Rosenbauer, R.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the salinity variations in vent fluids of sea floor geothermal systems. New experiments reacting diabase and evolved seawater were carried out to reproduce earlier published observations of Cl depletions attributed to formation of an ephemeral Cl-bearing mineral. The absence of any Cl depletions in the present study suggests that the formation of Cl-bearing minerals is not sufficiently widespread to account for the observed salinity variations in the vent fluids. A re-evaluation of both field and laboratory evidence has led to a new model for subseafloor circulation that accounts for salinity variations as well as other chemical and mineralogic observations. In place of a simple single-pass convection system, the authors propose that the sea floor systems consist of two vertically nested convection cells in which a brine layer at depth heats and drives an overlying seawater cell. Such layering of salinities, a process known in fluid mechanics as double-diffusive convection, is an expected result when convection is induced in saline fluids. The process provides for stable high-temperature heat transfer upward from the cracking front adjacent to the magma, and for limited chemical exchange of the brine with the overlying seawater to explain salinity variations and high metal contents in the vent fluids. The brine also provides an effective medium to produce the secondary mineral assemblages observed in rocks from the mid-ocean ridges and ophiolites unsuccessfully produced in laboratory studies using seawater. The brine originates from the two-phase separation of seawater during magmatic/tectonic events and accumulates and remains relatively stable in the region immediately above the magma chamber.

  16. Coupled interactions of organized deep convection over the tropical western pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and deep convection is complex. In general, deep convection occurs more frequently and with more intensity as SSTs become higher. This theory assumes that the atmospheric stability is sufficiently reduced to allow the onset of moist convection. However, the amount and intensity of convection observed tends to decrease with increasing SST because very warm SSTs. A reason for such decrease is the enhancements to surface fluxes of heat and moisture out of the ocean surface because of the vertical overturning associated with deep convection. Early studies used the radiative-convective models of the atmosphere to examine the role of the convective exchange of heat and moisture in maintaining the vertical temperature profile. In this paper we use a Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to simulate a squall line over a tropical ocean global atmosphere/coupled ocean atmosphere response experiment (TOGA/COARE) area and to investigate how the ocean cooling mechanisms associated with organized deep convection act to limit tropical SSTs.

  17. Diabatic Initialization of Mesoscale Models in the Southeastern United States: Can 0 to 12h Warm Season QPF be Improved?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Bradshaw, Tom; Burks, Jason; Darden, Chris; Dembek, Scott

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that numerical warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts lack significant skill for numerous reasons. Some are related to the model--it may lack physical processes required to realistically simulate convection or the numerical algorithms and dynamics employed may not be adequate. Others are related to initialization-mesoscale features play an important role in convective initialization and atmospheric observation systems are incapable of properly depicting the three-dimensional stability structure at the mesoscale. The purpose of this study is to determine if a mesoscale model initialized with a diabatic initialization scheme can improve short-term (0 to 12h) warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts in the Southeastern United States. The Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory is used to diabatically initialize the Pennsylvania State University/National center for Atmospheric Research (PSUNCAR) Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5). The SPORT Center runs LAPS operationally on an hourly cycle to produce analyses on a 15 km covering the eastern 2/3 of the United States. The 20 km National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Rapid Update Cycle analyses are used for the background fields. Standard observational data are acquired from MADIS with GOES/CRAFT Nexrad data acquired from in-house feeds. The MM5 is configured on a 140 x 140 12 km grid centered on Huntsville Alabama. Preliminary results indicate that MM5 runs initialized with LAPS produce improved 6 and 12h QPF threat scores compared with those initialized with the NCEP RUC.

  18. Convection and segregation in fluidised granular systems exposed to two-dimensional vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windows-Yule, C. R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Convection and segregation in granular systems not only provide a rich phenomenology of scientifically interesting behaviours but are also crucial to numerous ‘real-world’ processes ranging from important and widely used industrial procedures to potentially cataclysmic geophysical phenomena. Simple, small-scale experimental or simulated test systems are often employed by researchers in order to gain an understanding of the fundamental physics underlying the behaviours of granular media. Such systems have been the subject of extensive research over several decades, with numerous system geometries and manners of producing excitation explored. Energy is commonly provided to granular assemblies through the application of vibration—the simplicity of the dynamical systems produced and the high degree of control afforded over their behaviour make vibrated granular beds a valuable canonical system by which to explore a diverse range of phenomena. Although a wide variety of vibrated systems have been explored in the existing literature, the vast majority are exposed to vibration along only a single spatial direction. In this paper, we study highly fluidised systems subjected to strong, multi-directional driving, providing a first insight into the dynamics and behaviours of these systems which may potentially hold valuable new information relevant to important industrial and natural processes. With a particular focus on the processes of convection and segregation, we analyse the various states and phase transitions exhibited by our system, detailing a number of previously unobserved dynamical phenomena and system states.

  19. Numerical modeling of solidification and convection in a viscous pure binary eutectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Spera, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    The solidification and convection of the pure binary eutectic silicate system diopside-anorthite (Di-An) is numerically modeled. A mass-weighted enthalpy of fusion is used to account for the second solid phase (An) which crystallizes at the solidus temperature. Variable under-relaxation is used to aid convergence of the momentum equations in the implementation of the SIMPLER algorithm used to solve the two-dimensional continuum conservation equations. Numerical experiments of the solidification of Di80 melt show that a large temperature drop occurs across the solid and mush regions which decreases convective vigor in the liquid. Interesting compositional segregation patterns are produced during the solidification of Di80.

  20. Effect of solutal Marangoni convection on motion, coarsening, and coalescence of droplets in a monotectic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Choudhury, A.; Selzer, M.; Mukherjee, R.; Nestler, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of solutal Marangoni convection (SMC) on the microstructure evolution in a monotectic system, using the convective Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations with a capillary tensor contributed by the chemical concentration gradient. At first, we simulate the spontaneous motion of two distant droplets induced by SMC and compare our results with an analytical solution. We then compute the coalescence of two droplets in contact and coarsening of two distant droplets considering different sizes. We further study the influence of SMC on the evolution of phase separation processes inside the spinodal region for Fe-50 at %Sn and Fe-40 at %Sn alloys. In the former case, we rationalize our results using Fourier spectra and in the latter case, we compare the size distribution of droplets with the LSW theory.

  1. Effect of solutal Marangoni convection on motion, coarsening, and coalescence of droplets in a monotectic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Choudhury, A; Selzer, M; Mukherjee, R; Nestler, B

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of solutal Marangoni convection (SMC) on the microstructure evolution in a monotectic system, using the convective Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations with a capillary tensor contributed by the chemical concentration gradient. At first, we simulate the spontaneous motion of two distant droplets induced by SMC and compare our results with an analytical solution. We then compute the coalescence of two droplets in contact and coarsening of two distant droplets considering different sizes. We further study the influence of SMC on the evolution of phase separation processes inside the spinodal region for Fe-50 at %Sn and Fe-40 at %Sn alloys. In the former case, we rationalize our results using Fourier spectra and in the latter case, we compare the size distribution of droplets with the LSW theory. PMID:23368049

  2. Prediction of convective activity using a system of parasitic-nested numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A limited area, three dimensional, moist, primitive equation (PE) model is developed to test the sensitivity of quantitative precipitation forecasts to the initial relative humidity distribution. Special emphasis is placed on the squall-line region. To accomplish the desired goal, time dependent lateral boundaries and a general convective parameterization scheme suitable for mid-latitude systems were developed. The sequential plume convective parameterization scheme presented is designed to have the versatility necessary in mid-latitudes and to be applicable for short-range forecasts. The results indicate that the scheme is able to function in the frontally forced squallline region, in the gently rising altostratus region ahead of the approaching low center, and in the over-riding region ahead of the warm front. Three experiments are discussed.

  3. A parameterized model for the evolution of isotopic heterogeneities in a convecting system. [for earth mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, F. M.; Daly, S. F.; Nataf, H.-C.

    1982-01-01

    It is experimentally shown that, although steady convective flows are efficient means to heterogeneity within a single cell, they do not produce a dispersal of heterogeneous material over scales that are large by comparison to their depth, which requires that the flow be time-dependent on a time scale comparable to the overturn time. Convection in an internally heated layer does possess this property, and numerical solutions are presently used to study the way in which it disperses a set of neutrally bouyant particles initially confined to a small space. The derived concept of effective diffusivity is applied to the isotopic evolution of the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systems, with spatial variations generated by horizontal variations in degree of melting 1.8 billion years ago.

  4. Impact of Activation Treatment and CCN/IN Concentrations on Simulations of A Continental Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, D. A.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol play an important role in mediating cloud microphysics by serving as both cloud condensation and ice nuclei (CCN and IN). In mixed-phase, deep convective clouds, these CCN and IN can alter physical processes related to droplet activation and heterogeneous freezing, affecting the dynamics, microphysics, and ultimately evolution of the cloud. However, modifying the CCN and IN budget entrained into a cloud eventually leads to many simultaneous, competing microphysical processes which make it difficult to precisely predict how cloud properties will change. Here, we study the sensitivity of a continental convective system observed during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) in 2011 to changes in CCN and IN burden with the help of 2D and 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We explore how the potential for convective invigoration is sensitive to the treatment of droplet activation at the cloud base by adopting an emulator of an adiabatic parcel model to parameterize the activation calculation. Furthermore, we study how changes in the IN budget can enhance the role of heterogeneous freezing and diminish the efficacy of homogeneous freezing above the -40C isotherm within the cloud. Since anvil ice is typically produced homogeneously, we also study how this shift in freezing mechanisms affects the size distributions and properties of the system's anvil cirrus. The in situ observations of anvil ice obtained during MACPEX and the ice nuclei residuals are used as a reference to constrain the simulations.

  5. A New Approach for Examining Water Vapor and Deep Convection Interactions in the Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The complex interactions/feedbacks between water vapor fields and deep atmospheric convection remains one of the outstanding problems in Tropical Meteorology. The lack of high spatial/temporal resolution, all-weather observations in the Tropics has hampered progress. Numerical models have difficulties, for example, in representing the shallow-to-deep convective transition and the diurnal cycle of precipitation. GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) meteorology, which provides all-weather, high frequency (5 minutes), precipitable water vapor, can help. From 3.5 years of GNSS meteorological data in Manaus, (Central Amazonia), 320 convective events were analyzed. Results reveal two characteristic time scales of water vapor convergence; an 8 h time scale of weak convergence and 4 h timescale of intense water vapor convergence associated with the shallow-to-deep convection transition. The 4 h shallow-to-deep transition time scale is particularly robust, regardless of convective intensity, seasonality, or nocturnal versus daytime convection. We also present a summary of the Amazon Dense GNSS Meteorological Network experiment, the first ever in the Tropics, was created with the explicit aim of examining the wv/deep convection relationships at the mesoscale. This innovative, international experiment, consisted of two mesoscale (100km x100km) networks: (1) a one-year (April 2011 to April 2012) campaign (20 GNSS meteorological sites) in and around Manaus , and (2) a 6 week (June 2011) intensive campaign (15 GNSS meteorological sites) in and around Belem, this latter in collaboration with the CHUVA GPM in Brazil. Results presented here from both networks focus on the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor: for sea breeze convection in Belem and, for assessing the influence seasonal and topographic influences for Manaus. Ultimately, these unique observations may serve to initialize, constrain, or validate precipitable water vapor spatial and temporal evolution in high

  6. A history of mesoscale model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2014-01-01

    The development of atmospheric mesoscale models from their early origins in the 1970's until the present day is described. Evolution has occurred in dynamical and physics representations in these models. The dynamics has had to change from hydrostatic to fully nonhydrostatic equations to handle the finer scales that have become possible in the last few decades with advancing computer power, which has enabled real-time forecasting to go to finer grid sizes. Meanwhile the physics has also become more sophisticated than the initial representations of the major processes associated with the surface, boundary layer, radiation, clouds and convection. As resolutions have become finer, mesoscale models have had to change paradigms associated with assumptions related to what is considered sub-grid scale needing parameterization, and what is resolved well enough to be explicitly handled by the dynamics. This first occurred with cumulus parameterization as real-time forecast models became able to represent individual updrafts, and is now starting to occur in the boundary layer as future forecast models may be able resolve individual thermals. Beyond that, scientific research has provided a greater understanding of detailed microphysical and land-surface processes that are important to aspects of weather prediction, and these parameterizations have been developing complexity at a steady rate. This paper can just give a perspective of these developments in the broad field of research associated with mesoscale atmospheric model development.

  7. Characterization of convection-related parameters by Raman lidar: Selected case studies from the convective and orographically-induced precipitation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Stelitano, Dario

    2013-05-01

    An approach to determine the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN) based on the use of data from a Raman lidar system is illustrated in this work. The use of Raman lidar data allows to provide high temporal resolution measurements (5 min) of CAPE and CIN and follow their evolution over extended time periods covering the full cycle of convective activity. Lidar-based measurements of CAPE and CIN are obtained from Raman lidar measurements of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio profiles and the surface measurements of temperature, pressure and dew point temperature provided by a surface weather station. The approach is applied to the data collected by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the frame of COPS. Attention was focused on 15 July and 25-26 July 2007. Lidar-based measurements are in good agreement with simultaneous measurements from radiosondes and with estimates from different mesoscale models.

  8. Numerical modelling of mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays an important role on the mesoscale, and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modelling system has been used in this study to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two mesoscale dispersion field experiments. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquill's (1962) delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. This study was also the first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modelling system with episodic mesoscale dispersion field data. The modelling system showed considerable skill in predicting quantitative tracer-cloud characteristics such as peak concentration, maximum cloud width, arrival time, transit time, and crosswind integrated exposure. Model predictions also compared favorably with predictions made by a number of other mesoscale dispersion models for the same two case studies.

  9. Mesoscale fabrication and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Gregory R.

    A strong link between mechanical engineering design and materials science and engineering fabrication can facilitate an effective and adaptable prototyping process. In this dissertation, new developments in the lost mold-rapid infiltration forming (LM-RIF) process is presented which demonstrates the relationship between these two fields of engineering in the context of two device applications. Within the LM-RIF process, changes in materials processing and mechanical design are updated iteratively, often aided by statistical design of experiments (DOE). The LM-RIF process was originally developed by Antolino and Hayes et al to fabricate mesoscale components. In this dissertation the focus is on advancements in the process and underlying science. The presented advancements to the LM-RIF process include an augmented lithography procedure, the incorporation of engineered aqueous and non-aqueous colloidal suspensions, an assessment of constrained drying forces during LM-RIF processing, mechanical property evaluation, and finally prototype testing and validation. Specifically, the molding procedure within the LM-RIF process is capable of producing molds with thickness upwards of 1mm, as well as multi-layering to create three dimensional structures. Increasing the mold thickness leads to an increase in the smallest feature resolvable; however, the increase in mold thickness and three dimensional capability has expanded the mechanical design space. Tetragonally stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) is an ideal material for mesoscale instruments, as it is biocompatible, exhibits high strength, and is chemically stable. In this work, aqueous colloidal suspensions were formulated with two new gel-binder systems, increasing final natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) instrument yield from 0% to upwards of 40% in the best case scenario. The effects of the gel-binder system on the rheological behavior of the suspension along with the thermal characteristics of the gel

  10. Pattern dynamics associated with on-off convection in a one-dimensional system.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hidenori; Fujisaka, Hirokazu; Ouchi, Katsuya

    2003-04-01

    A numerical and theoretical analysis of the phenomenologically constructed nonlinear stochastic model of on-off intermittency experimentally observed by John et al. in the electrohydrodynamic convection in nematic liquid crystal under applied dichotomous electric field is carried out. The model has the structure of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation with a fluctuating threshold which represents an applied electric field and either with or without additive noise which corresponds to thermal noise. It is found that the fundamental statistics of pattern dynamics without additive noise agree with those experimentally observed, and also with those reported previously in two-dimensional system. In contrast to that the presence of multiplicative noise generates an intermittent evolution of pattern intensity, whose statistics are in agreement with those of on-off intermittency so far known, the additive noise gives rise to the change of position of the convective pattern. It is found that the temporal evolution of the phase suitably introduced to describe the global convective pattern also shows an intermittent evolution. Its statistics are studied in a detailed way with numerical simulation and stochastic analysis. The comparison of these results turn out to be in good agreement with each other. PMID:12786476

  11. Various Numerical Applications on Tropical Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been given to cloud resolving models (CRMs or cloud ensemble models-CEMs) for their ability to simulate the radiative-convective system, which plays a significant role in determining the regional heat and moisture budgets in the Tropics. The growing popularity of CRM usage can be credited to its inclusion of crucial and physically relatively realistic features such as explicit cloud-scale dynamics, sophisticated microphysical processes, and explicit cloud-radiation interaction. On the other hand, impacts of the environmental conditions (for example, the large-scale wind fields, heat and moisture advections as well as sea surface temperature) on the convective system can also be plausibly investigated using the CRMs with imposed explicit forcing. In this paper, by basically using a Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model, three different studies on tropical convective systems are briefly presented. Each of these studies serves a different goal as well as uses a different approach. In the first study, which uses more of an idealized approach, the respective impacts of the large-scale horizontal wind shear and surface fluxes on the modeled tropical quasi-equilibrium states of temperature and water vapor are examined. In this 2-D study, the imposed large-scale horizontal wind shear is ideally either nudged (wind shear maintained strong) or mixed (wind shear weakened), while the minimum surface wind speed used for computing surface fluxes varies among various numerical experiments. For the second study, a handful of real tropical episodes (TRMM Kwajalein Experiment - KWAJEX, 1999; TRMM South China Sea Monsoon Experiment - SCSMEX, 1998) have been simulated such that several major atmospheric characteristics such as the rainfall amount and its associated stratiform contribution, the Qlheat and Q2/moisture budgets are investigated. In this study, the observed large-scale heat and moisture advections are continuously applied to the 2-D

  12. Modelling the interannual variability (1979-2012) of the Mediterranean open-sea deep convection using a coupled regional climate system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somot, Samuel; Testor, Pierre; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loic; Herrmann, Marine; Dubois, Clotilde; Sevault, Florence

    2013-04-01

    The North-Western Mediterranean Sea is known as one of the only place in the world where open-sea deep convection occurs (often up to more than 2000m) with the formation of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW). This phenomena is mostly driven by local preconditioning of the water column and strong buoyancy losses during Winter. At the event scale, the WMDW formation is characterized by different phases (preconditioning, strong mixing, restratification and spreading), intense air-sea interaction and strong meso-scale activity but, on a longer time scale, it also shows a large interannual variability and may be strongly affected by climate change with impact on the regional biogeochemistry. Therefore simulating and understanding the temporal variability of the North-Western Mediterranean open-sea deep convection is considered as quite a challenging task for the ocean and climate modelling community. Achieving such a goal requires to work with high resolution models for the ocean and the atmosphere interacting freely and to run long-term and temporally homogeneous simulations with a realistic chronology. In agreement with this statement, we developed at Meteo-France / CNRM a Mediterranean Regional Climate System Model (RCSM) that includes high-resolution representation of the regional atmosphere, land surface, rivers and ocean. The various components are respectively ALADIN (50 km), ISBA (50 km), TRIP (50 km) and NEMO-MED8 (10 km). All the components are interactively coupled daily and a simulation over the period 1979-2012 has been performed using the atmosphere ERA-Interim reanalysis and the ocean NEMOVAR1° reanalysis as 3D lateral-boundary conditions. Spectral nudging technique is applied in the atmosphere. We first evaluate the ability of this model to simulate some of the observed WMDW formation events (air-sea flux, timing, water mass characteristics, deep water formation rate) thanks to the large observational efforts recently carried out to better

  13. Early-stage hypogene karstification in a mountain hydrologic system: A coupled thermohydrochemical model incorporating buoyant convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Rajaram, H.; Viswanathan, H.

    2013-09-01

    The early stage of hypogene karstification is investigated using a coupled thermohydrochemical model of a mountain hydrologic system, in which water enters along a water table and descends to significant depth (˜1 km) before ascending through a central high-permeability fracture. The model incorporates reactive alteration driven by dissolution/precipitation of limestone in a carbonic acid system, due to both temperature- and pressure-dependent solubility, and kinetics. Simulations were carried out for homogeneous and heterogeneous initial fracture aperture fields, using the FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer) code. Initially, retrograde solubility is the dominant mechanism of fracture aperture growth. As the fracture transmissivity increases, a critical Rayleigh number value is exceeded at some stage. Buoyant convection is then initiated and controls the evolution of the system thereafter. For an initially homogeneous fracture aperture field, deep well-organized buoyant convection rolls form. For initially heterogeneous aperture fields, preferential flow suppresses large buoyant convection rolls, although a large number of smaller rolls form. Even after the onset of buoyant convection, dissolution in the fracture is sustained along upward flow paths by retrograde solubility and by additional "mixing corrosion" effects closer to the surface. Aperture growth patterns in the fracture are very different from those observed in simulations of epigenic karst systems, and retain imprints of both buoyant convection and preferential flow. Both retrograde solubility and buoyant convection contribute to these differences. The paper demonstrates the potential value of coupled models as tools for understanding the evolution and behavior of hypogene karst systems.

  14. On Verifying Currents and Other Features in the Hawaiian Islands Region Using Fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System Compared to Global Ocean Model and Ocean Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, P. G.; Chen, S.

    2014-12-01

    This poster introduces and evaluates features concerning the Hawaii, USA region using the U.S. Navy's fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS-OS™) coupled to the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). It also outlines some challenges in verifying ocean currents in the open ocean. The system is evaluated using in situ ocean data and initial forcing fields from the operational global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Verification shows difficulties in modelling downstream currents off the Hawaiian islands (Hawaii's wake). Comparing HYCOM to NCOM current fields show some displacement of small features such as eddies. Generally, there is fair agreement from HYCOM to NCOM in salinity and temperature fields. There is good agreement in SSH fields.

  15. Gravity Fields Generation In The Universe By The Large Range of Scales Convection Systems In Planets, Stars, Black Holes and Galaxies Based On The "Convection Bang Hypothesis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, H.; Amirshahkarami, A.; Gholibeigian, K.

    2015-12-01

    In our vision it is believed that the Big Bang was Convection Bang (CB). When CB occurred, a gigantic large-scale forced convection system (LFCS) began to create space-time including gravitons and gluons in more than light speed. Then, simultaneously by a swirling wild wind, created inflation process including many quantum convection loops (QCL) in locations which had more density of temperature and energetic particles like gravitons. QCL including fundamental particles, grew and formed black holes (BHs) as the core of galaxies. LFCSs of heat and mass in planets, stars, BHs and galaxies generate gravity and electromagnetic fields and change the properties of matter and space-time around the systems. Mechanism: Samples: 1- Due to gravity fields of Sun and Moon, Earth's inner core is dislocated toward them and rotates around the Earth's center per day and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [AGU, 2012]. 2- Dislocated Sun's core due to gravity fields of planets/ Jupiter, rotates around the Sun's center per 25-35 days and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [EGU, 2014]. 3- If a planet/star falls into a BH, what happens? It means, its dislocated core rotates around its center in less than light speed and generates very fast LFCS and friction, while it is rotating/melting around/inward the center of BH. Observable Factors: 1- There is not logical relation between surface gravity fields of planets/Sun and their masses (general relativity); see Planetary Fact Sheet/Ratio to Earth Values-NASA: Earth: mass/gravity =1/1, Jupiter=317.8/2.36, Neptune=17.1/1.12, Saturn=95.2/0.916, Moon=0.0128/0.166, Sun=333000/28. 2- Convective systems in thunderstorms help bring ozone down to Earth [Brian-Kahn]. 3- In 12 surveyed BHs, produced gravity force & magnetic field strength were matched (unique LFCS source) [PhysOrg - June 4, 2014]. Justification: After BB/CB, gravitons were created without any other masses and curvature of space-time (general relativity), but by primary gigantic convection

  16. The Effect of Environmental Conditions on Tropical Deep Convective Systems Observed from the TRMM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Minnis, Patrick; Chambers, Lin H.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Hu, Yongxiang; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2005-01-01

    This study uses measurements of radiation and cloud properties taken between January and August 1998 by three Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) instruments, the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanner, the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and the Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS), to evaluate the variations of tropical deep convective systems (DCS) with sea surface temperature (SST) and precipitation. This study finds that DCS precipitation efficiency increases with SST at a rate of approx. 2%/K. Despite increasing rainfall efficiency, the cloud areal coverage rises with SST at a rate of about 7%/K in the warm tropical seas. There, the boundary layer moisture supply for deep convection and the moisture transported to the upper troposphere for cirrus-anvil cloud formation increase by approx. 6.3%/K and approx. 4.0%/K, respectively. The changes in cloud formation efficiency, along with the increased transport of moisture available for cloud formation, likely contribute to the large rate of increasing DCS areal coverage. Although no direct observations are available, the increase of cloud formation efficiency with rising SST is deduced indirectly from measurements of changes in the ratio of DCS ice water path and boundary layer water vapor amount with SST. Besides the cloud areal coverage, DCS cluster effective sizes also increase with precipitation. Furthermore, other cloud properties, such as cloud total water and ice water paths, increase with SST. These changes in DCS properties will produce a negative radiative feedback for the earth's climate system due to strong reflection of shortwave radiation by the DCS. These results significantly differ from some previous hypothesized dehydration scenarios for warmer climates, and have great potential in testing current cloud-system resolving models and convective parameterizations of general circulation models.

  17. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  18. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence.

    PubMed

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-07-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  19. Classification and Analysis of Four Types of Elevated Nocturnal Convective Initiation During Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, S. A.; Gallus, W. A., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    A large portion of precipitation seen in the Great Plains region of the United States falls from nocturnal convection. Quite often, nocturnally initiated convection may grow upscale into a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) that in turn may cause high impact weather events such as severe wind, flooding, and even tornadoes. Thus, correctly predicting nocturnal convective initiation is an integral part of forecasting for the Great Plains. Unfortunately, it is also one of the most challenging aspects of forecasting for this region. Many forecasters familiar with the Great Plains region have noted that elevated nocturnal convective initiation seems to favor a few distinct and rather diverse modes, which pose varying degrees of forecasting difficulties. This study investigates four of these modes, including initiation caused by the interaction of the low level jet and a frontal feature, initiation at the nose of the low level jet without the presence of a frontal feature, linear features ahead of and perpendicular to a forward propagating MCS, and initiation occurring with no discernible large scale forcing mechanism. Improving elevated nocturnal convective initiation forecasts was one of the primary goals of the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field campaign that took place from June 1 to July 15, 2015, which collected a wealth of convective initiation data. To coincide with these data sets, nocturnal convective initiation episodes from the 2015 summer season were classified into each of the aforementioned groups. This allowed for a thorough investigation of the frequency of each type of initiation event, as well as identification of typical characteristics of the atmosphere (forcing mechanisms present, available instability, strength/location of low level jet, etc.) during each event type. Then, using archived model data and the vast data sets collected during the PECAN field campaign, model performance during PECAN for each convective initiation mode was

  20. The Aeroclipper, a new device to explore tropical convective systems and cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Duvel Jean

    The Aeroclipper is a new balloon device designed to perform relatively long flights (up to 30 days) in the surface layer (under 50 m) over remote ocean regions. The balloon carries a guide rope floating at the surface of the ocean. The Aeroclipper moves on quasi-Lagrangian trajectories, performing in situ measurements in the atmospheric surface layer and at the surface of the ocean. The Aeroclipper is able to measure low level dynamics and surface turbulent fluxes for several weeks over remote regions of the tropical oceans. Like superpressure balloons in the boundary layer, an Aeroclipper is attracted toward convective regions by the low-level wind convergence generated by the associated low surface pressure. Compared to Eulerian platforms (moored buoys) or to oceanographic ships, these balloons are thus expected to increase atmospheric boundary layer sampling in active convective systems. During the Validation of the Aeroclipper System under Convective Occurrences (VASCO) test experiment (Indian Ocean in January and February 2007), two Aeroclippers survived in tropical cyclone Dora, enduring wind speed larger than 40 ms-1 and giving continuous estimates of tangential and radial winds as a function of the distance from the eye during the convergence phase. The two Aeroclippers then stayed in the eye of Dora for more than a week and remained captured in the low-pressure center when Dora became an extra-tropical depression. Due to this success in mechanical design, and despite some deficiencies of the present system that require new developments, we think that such a device has a good potential for further use, especially for cyclone nowcasting. The scientific objectives of the Aeroclipper; its current design and instrumentation; some preliminary results of the VASCO test experiment; and future experiments will be presented.

  1. Activities relating to understanding the initiation, organization and structure of moist convection in the Southeast environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnider, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 1986, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) will sponsor the Satellite Precipitation And Cloud Experiment (SPACE) to be conducted in the Central Tennessee, Northern Alabama, and Northeastern Mississippi area. The field program will incorporate high altitude flight experiments associated with meteorological remote sensor development for future space flight, and an investigation of precipitation processes associated with mesoscale and small convective systems. In addition to SPACE, the MIcroburst and Severe Thunderstorm (MIST) program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the FAA-Lincoln Laboratory Operational Weather Study (FLOWS), sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), will take place concurrently within the SPACE experiment area. All three programs (under the joint acronym COHMEX (COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment)) will provide a data base for detailed analysis of mesoscale convective systems while providing ground truth comparisons for remote sensor evaluation. The purpose of this document is to outline the experiment design criteria for SPACE, and describe the special observing facilities and data sets that will be available under the COHMEX joint program. In addition to the planning of SPACE-COHMEX, this document covers three other parts of the program. The field program observations' main activity was the operation of an upper air rawinsonde network to provide ground truth for aircraft and spacecraft observations. Another part of the COHMEX program involved using boundary layer mesoscale models to study and simulate the initiation and organization of moist convection due to mesoscale thermal and mechanical circulations. The last part of the program was the collection, archival and distribution of the resulting COHMEX-SPACE data sets.

  2. An analysis of natural convection film boiling from spheres using the spherical coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, C.P.; Leong, K.C.; Tan, H.S.

    1995-11-01

    The problem of natural convection film boiling on a sphere was analyzed by solving the momentum and energy equations in spherical coordinates. These solutions were compared to the analytical model of Frederking and Clark based on the Cartesian coordinate system, empirical correlation of Frederking and Clark and recent experimental data of Tso et al. for boiling in various refrigerants and liquid nitrogen. For the average Nusselt number, good agreement with Frederking and Clark`s model was obtained. Results using spherical coordinates yield a limiting value of 2 for the average Nusselt number near a modified Rayleigh number of 1 which could not be extracted from Frederking and Clark`s model.

  3. Methodology of determining the uncertainty in the accessible geothermal resource base of identified hydrothermal convection systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1978-01-01

    In order to quantify the uncertainty of estimates of the geothermal resource base in identified hydrothermal convection systems, a methodology is presented for combining estimates with uncertainties for temperature, area, and thickness of a geothermal reservoir into an estimate of the stored energy with uncertainty. Probability density functions for temperature, area, and thickness are assumed to be triangular in form. In order to calculate the probability distribution function for the stored energy in a single system or in many systems, a computer program for aggregating the input distribution functions using the Monte-Carlo method has been developed. To calculate the probability distribution of stored energy in a single system, an analytical expression is also obtained that is useful for calibrating the Monte Carlo approximation. For the probability distributions of stored energy in a single and in many systems, the central limit approximation is shown to give results ranging from good to poor.

  4. Acid rain: Mesoscale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A mesoscale numerical model of the Florida peninsula was formulated and applied to a dry, neutral atmosphere. The prospective use of the STAR-100 computer for the submesoscale model is discussed. The numerical model presented is tested under synoptically undisturbed conditions. Two cases, differing only in the direction of the prevailing geostrophic wind, are examined: a prevailing southwest wind and a prevailing southeast wind, both 6 m/sec at all levels initially.

  5. Mesoscale roughness of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, James J.

    1994-01-01

    The global distribution of multi-kilometer (approx. 9 km) length scale 'roughness' (hereafter mesoscale roughness or MR) on Venus can be estimated from the Magellan global altimetry dataset (GxDR) and then compared with MR data derived for Earth from 5' ETOP5 data and for Mars (from USGS Mars DTM dataset). The mesoscale roughness parameter (MR) represents the RMS variance in meters of the actual planetary surface topography relative to the best fitting tangent plane defined on the basis of a 3x3 pixel sliding window. The best-fit plane was computed using a least-squares solution which minimizes delta H, the sum of the squares of the differences between the 9 local elevation values (H(sub i)), and the elevation of best-fit plane at the same grid location. Using the best-fit plane and delta H, we have computed the RMS 'roughness' var(delta R), where this parameter is always minimized on the basis of its calculation using least squares. We have called this 'ruggedness' parameter the Mesoscale Roughness (MR) because it is directly related to the high-frequency variance of topography after mesoscale slopes and tilts (i.e., for Venus, the baseline over which MR is computed (dx) is approx. 8.8 km and dx for Earth is approx. 9.3 km) are removed. As such, MR represents the degree to which a planetary surface is more rugged than approximately 10 km scale facets or tilts. It should not be confused with the radar 'RMS Roughness' parameter computed at 0.1 to 10 m length scales on the basis of the Magellan radar altimeter echo. We will use our MR parameter to investigate the global ruggedness properties of Venus as they relate to geological provinces and in comparison with the spatial pattern of MR for Earth and Mars.

  6. The Use of Ensemble-Based Sensitivity with Observations to Improve Predictability of Severe Convective Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancell, B. C.; Hill, A. J.; Burghardt, B.

    2014-12-01

    Ensemble sensitivity can reveal important weather features early in a forecast window relevant to the predictability of high-impact events later in time. Sensitivity has been shown on synoptic scales with simulated observations to be useful in identifying ensemble subsets that are more likely than the full ensemble mean, which may potentially add value to operational guidance of high-impact events. On convective scales, with highly nonlinear ensemble perturbation evolution and very non-Gaussian distributions of severe weather responses (e.g., simulated reflectivity above some threshold), it becomes more difficult to apply linear-based ensemble sensitivity to improve predictability of severe events. Here we test the ability of ensemble sensitivity to improve predictability of a severe convective event through identifying errors in sensitive regions of different members early in a forecast period using radar and surface-based observations. In this case, through the inspection of a number of operational models, an overnight mesoscale convective system (MCS) and its associated cold pool appeared to strongly influence whether or not severe convection would occur the following afternoon. Since both the overnight MCS and next-day convection are associated with strong nonlinearity and non-Gaussian distributions in the ensemble, this case allows a rigid test of using ensemble sensitivity and related techniques with observations for convective events. The performance of the sensitivity-based technique will be presented, and integration into an operational tool for severe convection will be discussed.

  7. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Fe-Ni-S System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y.; Jing, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, J.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal and chemical states of the lunar interior are directly related to the origin and evolution of the Moon. Recent seismic study suggested the lunar core is partially molten, consisting of a liquid outer shell and a solid inner sphere (Weber et al., 2011). The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, which is much higher than that for the Earth (~ 4%). This volume fraction can be used to establish the relation between the bulk composition of the lunar core and its temperature profile if the liquidi of relevant compositions at lunar inner core boundary (ICB) pressure (~ 5.1 GPa) are known. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of compositional convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo (Stegman et al., 2003). We have conducted melting experiments at 5.1 GPa and 900-1600 °C for the Fe-rich portion of Fe-Ni-S system, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our data show that in the iron-rich portion of the Fe-S binary system, the liquidus curve reflects nearly ideal mixing between iron and FeS end-members. In contrast, the liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary contains two inflection points with a turning point at a sulfur content of 10 wt.%, resulting from a departure from ideal solution behavior. Given that the compositional buoyancy force scales with the slope of the liquidus curve at the ICB pressure and temperature, the contribution of compositional convection to sustain the early lunar dynamo can be estimated from our data: for a simplified model of Fe-S binary core, the role of chemical convection was probably negligible in the early history of the Moon and would have remained nearly constant since the inception of the inner core. The lunar core, however, likely contains nickel, the turning points in liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary system may lead to dynamo initiation if the sulfur content of the bulk lunar core is less than 10 wt

  8. Comparison of initial perturbation methods for the mesoscale ensemble prediction system of the Meteorological Research Institute for the WWRP Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project (B08RDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kazuo; Hara, Masahiro; Kunii, Masaru; Seko, Hiromu; Yamaguchi, Munehiko

    2011-05-01

    Different initial perturbation methods for the mesoscale ensemble prediction were compared by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) as a part of the intercomparison of mesoscale ensemble prediction systems (EPSs) of the World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project (B08RDP). Five initial perturbation methods for mesoscale ensemble prediction were developed for B08RDP and compared at MRI: (1) a downscaling method of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)'s operational one-week EPS (WEP), (2) a targeted global model singular vector (GSV) method, (3) a mesoscale model singular vector (MSV) method based on the adjoint model of the JMA non-hydrostatic model (NHM), (4) a mesoscale breeding growing mode (MBD) method based on the NHM forecast and (5) a local ensemble transform (LET) method based on the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) using NHM. These perturbation methods were applied to the preliminary experiments of the B08RDP Tier-1 mesoscale ensemble prediction with a horizontal resolution of 15 km. To make the comparison easier, the same horizontal resolution (40 km) was employed for the three mesoscale model-based initial perturbation methods (MSV, MBD and LET). The GSV method completely outperformed the WEP method, confirming the advantage of targeting in mesoscale EPS. The GSV method generally performed well with regard to root mean square errors of the ensemble mean, large growth rates of ensemble spreads throughout the 36-h forecast period, and high detection rates and high Brier skill scores (BSSs) for weak rains. On the other hand, the mesoscale model-based initial perturbation methods showed good detection rates and BSSs for intense rains. The MSV method showed a rapid growth in the ensemble spread of precipitation up to a forecast time of 6 h, which suggests suitability of the mesoscale SV for short-range EPSs, but the initial large growth of the perturbation did not last long. The

  9. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using this type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and the specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system on orbit are also discussed.

  10. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using the type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system in orbit are also discussed.

  11. A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective/Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Hong, Ye; Kummerow, Christian D.; Turk, Joseph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have described the relationships between convective/stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote sensing techniques which can quantify the relative areal proportion of convective and stratiform, rainfall can provide useful information regarding the dynamic and thermodynamic processes in these systems. In the present study, two methods for deducing the convective/stratiform areal extent of precipitation from satellite passive microwave radiometer measurements are combined to yield an improved method. If sufficient microwave scattering by ice-phase precipitating hydrometeors is detected, the method relies mainly on the degree of polarization in oblique-view, 85.5 GHz radiances to estimate the area fraction of convective rain within the radiometer footprint. In situations where ice scattering is minimal, the method draws mostly on texture information in radiometer imagery at lower microwave frequencies to estimate the convective area fraction. Based upon observations of ten convective systems over ocean and nine systems over land, instantaneous 0.5 degree resolution estimates of convective area fraction from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM TMI) are compared to nearly coincident estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). The TMI convective area fraction estimates are slightly low-biased with respect to the PR, with TMI-PR correlations of 0.78 and 0.84 over ocean and land backgrounds, respectively. TMI monthly-average convective area percentages in the tropics and subtropics from February 1998 exhibit the greatest values along the ITCZ and in continental regions of the summer (southern) hemisphere. Although convective area percentages. from the TMI are systematically lower than those from the PR, monthly rain patterns derived from the TMI and PR rain algorithms are very similar

  12. An overview of mesoscale prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    A development history is presented for techniques used in mesoscale weather prediction over the course of the last 40 years, in which they have undergone a major transition from low-tech to high-tech. Remote sensing satellites and weather radars are now extremely refined tools for mesoscale atmospheric studies. Attention is given to mesocyclones and tornadoes, the statistical prediction of tornadoes, and the status of mesoscale prediction for aviation and space vehicles.

  13. Propagating convective system as a rainfall connection between southwestern Tibetan Plateau and Indian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Lin, Y.; Xie, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is called "Asia's Water Tower" because it is the headwaters of many major rivers in Asia, upon which the production and living of nearly 1/6 world population strongly depends. Precipitation and its future change over the TP pose a large socio-economic impact on the surrounding nations. Using multiple precipitation datasets and CMIP5 model simulations, summer (June to September) precipitation over the TP and Indian continent is investigated. We note a close linkage of rainfall over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau (SWTP) and central-eastern India. Such a linkage is maintained by frequent propagation of convective systems from northern Indian lower lands over the high mountain range into SWTP. An objective propagation identification method suggests such propagation contributes nearly half of the total summer rainfall in SWTP. The propagation is prominent from late June to mid-September. Its occurrence is rather stable and appears not to be strongly modulated by Indian monsoon strength. The propagation also modifies the rainfall diurnal cycle with a second peak near midnight in addition to the late afternoon peak induced by localized convective systems. Favorable environmental conditions for propagations are also explored.

  14. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  15. Using observational retrievals to expose precipitation and convective dynamics biases in simulations of a tropical MCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varble, A.; Zipser, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Realistically simulating convective and stratiform structures of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) requires proper representation of the large-scale environment and adequate representation of convective dynamics and parameterized microphysics in the simulation. The partitioning and areal coverage of such structures determine the heating distribution of any given system, thus affecting the large-scale dynamic response to the system. This issue is becoming evermore relevant with increasing computing power that will allow numerical weather prediction and global climate models to approach 1-10 km horizontal grid spacing in the coming decades. To test whether mesoscale simulations using 1-km grid spacing properly simulate a large tropical monsoonal MCS, several cloud-resolving model (CRM) and limited area model (LAM) simulations of a Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) MCS are compared with several observational retrievals. These comparisons expose a high bias in convective radar reflectivity aloft and a low bias in stratiform rainfall. Combined with errors due to large-scale environmental biases, model setup, and bulk microphysics parameterization assumptions, these biases appear related to overly intense deep convection in the simulations based on comparisons with dual-Doppler retrieved vertical velocity. The difference between simulated and dual-Doppler retrieved vertical velocity is especially large in the upper troposphere. This upper tropospheric difference is partially due to lofting and freezing of large rain water contents in simulations, which leads to large increases in buoyancy through latent heating. Possible reasons for overly intense simulated convective updrafts with large condensate loadings at mid and upper levels are explored.

  16. The impact of non-local buoyancy flux on the convective boundary layer development as simulated by a 3-D TKE-based subgrid mixing scheme in a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bao, Jian-Wen; Chen, Baode

    2016-04-01

    This presentation highlights a study in which a series of dry convective boundary layer (CBL) simulations are carried out using a generalized 3-dimensional (3-D) TKE-based parameterization scheme of sub-grid turbulent mixing in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulated characteristics of dry CBL are analyzed for the purpose of evaluating this scheme in comparison with a commonly-used scheme for sub-grid turbulent mixing in NWP models (i.e., the Mellor-Yamada 1.5-order TKE scheme). The same surface layer scheme is used in all the simulations so that only the sensitivity of the WRF model to different parameterizations of the sub-grid turbulent mixing above the surface layer is examined. The effect of horizontal grid resolution on the simulated CBL is also examined by running the model with grid sizes of 200, 400 m, 600 m, 1 km and 3 km. We will first compare the characteristics of the simulated CBL using the two schemes with the WRF LES dataset. We will then illustrate the importance of including the non-local component in the vertical buoyancy specification in the 3-D TKE-based scheme. Finally, comparing the results from the simulations against coarse-grained WRF LES dataset, we will show the feasibility and advantage of replacing conventional planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes with a scale-aware 3-D TKE-based scheme in the WRF model.

  17. A mesoscale analysis of the pre-storm environment on the 17 June 1986 COHMEX day. [Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Schudalla, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    The study presented utilized special mesoscale Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX) data to understand the evolution of the preconvective environment on June 17, 1986. Using the special mesoscale COHMEX data, several mechanisms for triggering the convection are investigated. Afternoon heating probably was a major factor as observed noontime temperatures were near the sounding-derived convection temperatures. The special surface network revealed a quasi-stationary area of convergence not aligned with the front that may be associated with the orography of the area. This study demonstrates that rapid, small scale atmospheric variations preceded convective development on June 17, 1986.

  18. An infrared thermography imaging system for convective heat transfer measurements in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, S. R.; Hedlund, C. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1998-12-01

    An infrared thermography imaging system is described for spatially resolved convective heat transfer measurements when used in conjunction with thermocouples, energy balances, digital image processing, zinc-selenide windows, and unique in situ calibration procedures. The usefulness of the system and the techniques developed are demonstrated by measurements made in two different environments with complex, three-dimensional flow features. First, spatial variations of surface Nusselt numbers are measured along the concave surfaces of a swirl chamber whose geometry models an internal passage used to cool the leading edge of a turbine blade. Second, spatially resolved distributions of the adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness are measured downstream of film-cooling holes on a symmetric turbine blade in transonic flow.

  19. Mesoscale eddies transport deep-sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanwei; Liu, Zhifei; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Wenguang; Li, Jianru; Xu, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies, which contribute to long-distance water mass transport and biogeochemical budget in the upper ocean, have recently been taken into assessment of the deep-sea hydrodynamic variability. However, how such eddies influence sediment movement in the deepwater environment has not been explored. Here for the first time we observed deep-sea sediment transport processes driven by mesoscale eddies in the northern South China Sea via a full-water column mooring system located at 2100 m water depth. Two southwestward propagating, deep-reaching anticyclonic eddies passed by the study site during January to March 2012 and November 2012 to January 2013, respectively. Our multiple moored instruments recorded simultaneous or lagging enhancement of suspended sediment concentration with full-water column velocity and temperature anomalies. We interpret these suspended sediments to have been trapped and transported from the southwest of Taiwan by the mesoscale eddies. The net near-bottom southwestward sediment transport by the two events is estimated up to one million tons. Our study highlights the significance of surface-generated mesoscale eddies on the deepwater sedimentary dynamic process. PMID:25089558

  20. From Quanta to the Continuum: Opportunities for Mesoscale Science

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George; Sarrao, John; Alivisatos, Paul; Barletta, William; Bates, Frank; Brown, Gordon; French, Roger; Greene, Laura; Hemminger, John; Kastner, Marc; Kay, Bruce; Lewis, Jennifer; Ratner, Mark; Anthony, Rollett; Rubloff, Gary; Spence, John; Tobias, Douglas; Tranquada, John

    2012-09-01

    This report explores the opportunity and defines the research agenda for mesoscale science—discovering, understanding, and controlling interactions among disparate systems and phenomena to reach the full potential of materials complexity and functionality. The ability to predict and control mesoscale phenomena and architectures is essential if atomic and molecular knowledge is to blossom into a next generation of technology opportunities, societal benefits, and scientific advances.. The body of this report outlines the need, the opportunities, the challenges, and the benefits of mastering mesoscale science.

  1. Coast-ocean-atmosphere-ocean mesoscale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D.; Chou, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    In the case of cold air outbreaks, the combination of the coastal shape and the sea surface temperature (SST) pattern have a profound effect in establishing a low level mesoscale atmospheric circulation as a result of differential heating due to both variations in overwater path length and the SST. A convergence (or divergence) line then forms along a line exactly downwind of the major bend in the coastline. All this is consistent with the structure of the cloud patterns seen in a high resolution Landsat picture of the cloud streets and the major features are simulated well with a boundary layer model. The dominant convergence line is marked by notably larger clouds. To its east the convective roll clouds grow downstream in accord with the deepening of the boundary layer. To its west (i.e., coastal side) where the induced pressure field forces a strong westerly component in the boundary layer, the wind shear across the inversion gives rise to Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and billow clouds whose orientation is perpendicular to the shear vector and to the major convergence line. The induced mesoscale circulation will feedback on the ocean by intensifying the wind generated ocean wave growth and altering their orientation. Coastal cyclogenesis is due in large part not only to the fluxes of heat and moisture from the ocean, but particularly to the differential heating and moistening of the boundary layer air when the air trajectories pass over a well defined pattern of SST.

  2. A storm modeling system as an advanced tool in prediction of well organized slowly moving convective cloud system and early warning of severe weather risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vlado; Curic, Mladjen

    2015-02-01

    Short-range prediction of precipitation is a critical input to flood prediction and hence the accuracy of flood warnings. Since most of the intensive processes come from convective clouds-the primary aim is to forecast these small-scale atmospheric processes. One characteristic pattern of organized group of convective clouds consist of a line of deep convection resulted in the repeated passage of heavy-rain-producing convective cells over NW part of Macedonia along the line. This slowly moving convective system produced extreme local rainfall and hailfall in urban Skopje city. A 3-d cloud model is used to simulate the main storm characteristic (e.g., structure, intensity, evolution) and the main physical processes responsible for initiation of heavy rainfall and hailfall. The model showed a good performance in producing significantly more realistic and spatially accurate forecasts of convective rainfall event than is possible with current operational system. The output results give a good initial input for developing appropriate tools such as flooding indices and potential risk mapping for interpreting and presenting the predictions so that they enhance operational flood prediction capabilities and warnings of severe weather risk of weather services. Convective scale model-even for a single case used has proved significant benefits in several aspects (initiation of convection, storm structure and evolution and precipitation). The storm-scale model (grid spacing-1 km) is capable of producing significantly more realistic and spatially accurate forecasts of convective rainfall events than is possible with current operational systems based on model with grid spacing 15 km.

  3. Analysis of Surface Heterogeneity Effects with Mesoscale Terrestrial Modeling Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of the full variability in the weather and climate system is crucial for reducing the uncertainty in weather forecasting and climate prediction, and to aid policy makers to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. A yet unknown part of uncertainty in the predictions from the numerical models is caused by the negligence of non-resolved land surface heterogeneity and the sub-surface dynamics and their potential impact on the state of the atmosphere. At the same time, mesoscale numerical models using finer horizontal grid resolution [O(1)km] can suffer from inconsistencies and neglected scale-dependencies in ABL parameterizations and non-resolved effects of integrated surface-subsurface lateral flow at this scale. Our present knowledge suggests large-eddy-simulation (LES) as an eventual solution to overcome the inadequacy of the physical parameterizations in the atmosphere in this transition scale, yet we are constrained by the computational resources, memory management, big-data, when using LES for regional domains. For the present, there is a need for scale-aware parameterizations not only in the atmosphere but also in the land surface and subsurface model components. In this study, we use the recently developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) as a numerical tool to analyze the uncertainty in the simulation of surface exchange fluxes and boundary layer circulations at grid resolutions of the order of 1km, and explore the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer evolution and convective rainfall processes on land surface heterogeneity.

  4. Hidden attractor and homoclinic orbit in Lorenz-like system describing convective fluid motion in rotating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, G. A.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Mokaev, T. N.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a Lorenz-like system, describing convective fluid motion in rotating cavity, is considered. It is shown numerically that this system, like the classical Lorenz system, possesses a homoclinic trajectory and a chaotic self-excited attractor. However, for the considered system, unlike the classical Lorenz system, along with self-excited attractor a hidden attractor can be localized. Analytical-numerical localization of hidden attractor is demonstrated.

  5. Land-surface-atmosphere interactions associated with deep convection in Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael E.; Arnold, David L.

    1998-12-01

    Geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES East) imagery are used to investigate a possible spatial clustering of free convective cloud masses along land-cover-type boundaries in the state of Illinois on days with weak synoptic-scale flow. Soil moisture data and a surface cover-type classification system are employed to identify likely cloud formation zones (as a function of non-classical mesoscale circulations (NCMCs)) forced by heterogeneous surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat. The emphasis of this research is on documenting the existence of convective cloud clusters and determining locations where they would be expected to occur if land-surface-atmosphere forcing were involved.This research shows that a statistically significant spatial clustering of free convective cloud masses does exist, and that these clusters occur along land-cover-type and soil-order boundaries. The three most conspicuous locations for both the initiation and vertical enhancement of convective clouds are along: (i) the agricultural and mixed forest-agricultural boundary that extends west-east from near St. Louis, Missouri, to Terre Haute, Indiana; (ii) along the urban/suburban Chicago metropolitan area and agricultural boundary in northeast Illinois; and (iii) along the agricultural and agricultural-mixed forest boundary along the Illinois River in east-central Illinois.It is also apparent from composite rawinsonde soundings that a majority of free convective cloud masses develop along land-cover-type boundaries on weak synoptic-scale flow days when planetary boundary layer moisture levels are large. This provides further support for the proposal that non-classical mesoscale circulations (NCMCs) provide the mass convergence necessary to force moist air parcels to the level of free convection along land-cover-type boundaries. These results also suggest that human-modification of the Earth'rsquo;s surface may play a significant role in local-scale climate change.

  6. High-resolution modelling of interactions between soil moisture and convection development in mountain enclosed Tibetan basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Babel, W.; Herzog, M.; Fuchs, K.; Sun, F.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Graf, H.-F.

    2015-05-01

    The Tibetan Plateau plays a significant role in the atmospheric circulation and the Asian monsoon system. Turbulent surface fluxes and the evolution of boundary layer clouds to deep and moist convection provide a feedback system that modifies the Plateau's surface energy balance on scales that are currently unresolved in mesoscale models. This work analyses the land surface's role and specifically the influence of soil moisture on the triggering of convection at a cross-section of the Nam Co Lake basin, 150 km north of Lhasa using a cloud resolving atmospheric model with a fully coupled surface. The modelled turbulent fluxes and development of convection compare reasonably well with the observed weather. The simulations span Bowen-ratios of 0.5 to 2.5. It is found that convection development is strongest at intermediate soil moistures. Dry cases with soils close to the permanent wilting point are moisture limited in the convection development, while convection in wet soil moisture cases is limited by cloud cover reducing incoming solar radiation and sensible heat fluxes. This has a strong impact on the surface energy balance. This study also shows that local development of convection is an important mechanism for the upward transport of water vapour that originates from the lake basin that can then be transported to dryer regions of the plateau. Both processes demonstrate the importance of soil moisture and surface-atmosphere interactions on the energy and hydrological cycles of the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. High-resolution modelling of interactions between soil moisture and convective development in a mountain enclosed Tibetan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Babel, W.; Herzog, M.; Fuchs, K.; Sun, F.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Graf, H.-F.

    2015-09-01

    The Tibetan Plateau plays a significant role in atmospheric circulation and the Asian monsoon system. Turbulent surface fluxes and the evolution of boundary-layer clouds to deep and moist convection provide a feedback system that modifies the plateau's surface energy balance on scales that are currently unresolved in mesoscale models. This work analyses the land surface's role and specifically the influence of soil moisture on the triggering of convection at a cross section of the Nam Co Lake basin, 150 km north of Lhasa using a cloud-resolving atmospheric model with a fully coupled surface. The modelled turbulent fluxes and development of convection compare reasonably well with the observed weather. The simulations span Bowen ratios of 0.5 to 2.5. It is found that convective development is the strongest at intermediate soil moisture. Dry cases with soils close to the permanent wilting point are moisture limited in convective development, while convection in wet soil moisture cases is limited by cloud cover reducing incoming solar radiation and sensible heat fluxes, which has a strong impact on the surface energy balance. This study also shows that local development of convection is an important mechanism for the upward transport of water vapour, which originates from the lake basin that can then be transported to dryer regions of the plateau. Both processes demonstrate the importance of soil moisture and surface-atmosphere interactions on the energy and hydrological cycles of the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. Thermal buoyancy and Marangoni convection in a two fluid layered system - A numerical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal buoyancy and surface tension driven convection is numerically investigated in a system with two, immiscible fluids. The geometry investigated, has an open cavity configuration with the lighter fluid situated on top of the heavier fluid, forming a stable layered system. The upper fluid meniscus and the interface are assumed to be flat and undeformable in the calculations. The governing equations and boundary/interface conditions are solved by a control volume based finite difference scheme for two pairs of immiscible fluids; the water-hexadecane system and a so called generic system. The steady state calculations show, that dramatically different flows are predicted when the interfacial tension effects are included or excluded from the system model. These differences are particularly appreciable in surface tension dominated flows, that are typical of microgravity situations. Complex flow patterns, with induced secondary flows are noticed in both the fluids. In general, the overall system heat transfer is found to increase with increases in the thermal buoyancy and surface tension effects, but the behavior of the system flow and thermal fields is not easy to characterize, when different combinations of these forces are considered.

  9. Data and results from a study of internal convective cooling systems for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, F. M.; Dukes, W. H.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    An extensive survey of current and future airframe construction materials and coolants was conducted, so that the most promising candidates could be examined for cooled-panel, cooling-system and airframe concepts. Consideration was given to over 100 structural materials, 50 coolants, 6 classes of structural panel concepts, 4 classes of thermal panel concepts with numerous variations, and 3 overall cooled airframe design approaches, including unshielded, shielded, and dual temperature types. The concept identification and parametric comparison phase examined all major elements of the convectively cooled airframe, including the differing requirements at various locations on the aircraft. The parametric results were used for the investigation to two separate vehicles, a hypersonic transport with a length of 96 meters (314 feet) and a weight of 24,000 kg (528,600 lb) and a hypersonic research airplane, with a length of 25m (80 ft) and a weight of 20,300 kg (447,000 lb).

  10. Clouding tracing: Visualization of the mixing of fluid elements in convection-diffusion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Philip J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a highly interactive method for computer visualization of the basic physical process of dispersion and mixing of fluid elements in convection-diffusion systems. It is based on transforming the vector field from a traditionally Eulerian reference frame into a Lagrangian reference frame. Fluid elements are traced through the vector field for the mean path as well as the statistical dispersion of the fluid elements about the mean position by using added scalar information about the root mean square value of the vector field and its Lagrangian time scale. In this way, clouds of fluid elements are traced and are not just mean paths. We have used this method to visualize the simulation of an industrial incinerator to help identify mechanisms for poor mixing.

  11. Kinematic and Moisture Environments of Convective Systems During TRMM-LBA: Preliminary Sounding Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, J. B.; Rickenbach, T.; Pierce, H.; Roy, B.; Ferreira, R. N.; Fisch, G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary radiosonde data are analyzed from a four station observation network that operated during TRMM-LBA. These data, which are undergoing quality control, are used to construct mean vertical profiles and time-height sections of u- and v- wind components, and also filtered time series analyses of layer mean relative humidity. Trends are identified in the humidity data which appear similar at all sites, and correlate well with multi-week changes in wind regime identified by Rickenbach et al. Higher-frequency modes of variation (3-5 day) also occur in the humidity and upper tropospheric winds and are spatially coherent among the four locations. The causes of these variations are explored, including interactions among upper tropospheric synoptic features. Finally, an attempt is made to relate the general morphology of convective systems to the vertical shear structure and thermodynamic changes that accompany contrasting wind regimes.

  12. Coincident occurrences of tropical individual cirrus clouds and deep convective systems derived from TRMM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Chambers, Lin; Fan, Tai-Fang; Sun, Wenbo

    2007-07-01

    Satellite measurements of cloud properties and atmospheric radiation were used to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal scales on the coincident occurrences of tropical individual cirrus clouds (ICCs) and deep convective systems (DCSs). There is little or even negative correlation between instantaneous occurrences of ICC and DCS in small areas. When spatial and temporal domains are increased, ICCs become more dependent on DCSs due to the origination of many ICCs from DCSs and moisture supply from the DCS in the upper troposphere for the ICCs to grow, resulting in significant positive correlation between the two types of clouds. The estimated radiative feedback due to the change in tropical high cloud area coverage with sea surface temperature appears small and about -0.14 Wm-2K-1, which would not cancel out the estimated anthropogenic forcing of doubled atmospheric CO2.

  13. Mixed convection and solidification in a simplified metal pool of an ESR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Chiou, Kuo-Chang

    1991-10-01

    The mixed convection induced by buoyancy and free-surface velocity and the associated solidification phenomena of molten metal in a cylindrical container, which is employed to simulate the metal pool of ESR system, are numerically studied. When the buoyancy effect and the effect due to free-surface velocity augment each other, the unicellular fluid motion is strengthened, which makes the molten metal solidify most slowly in the upper corner near the side wall. When they are opposing each other, a double-cell flow structure exists, with the cooling effect confined within the right lower region which is mainly driven by buoyancy. The molten metal in the left upper region, which is mainly driven by the free-surface velocity, then assumes a rather high temperature.

  14. Natural Convection in a rotating multilayer spherical shell system with self gravity: A simplified global circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira Rangel, Francisco Javier; Avila Rodriguez, Ruben; Cabello, Ares

    2014-11-01

    The onset of thermal convection in rotating multilayer spherical shells is investigated. The system consist of six concentric shells. The first spherical gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.35, the following four spherical gaps have different aspect ratio and the sixth gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.8. The inner and the outer spherical gaps confine Boussinesq fluids while the middle spherical gaps are treated as a thermal conductor solid. The investigation is performed for Taylor numbers between 7.E4 and 1.E6 and Rayleigh numbers between 3.E3 and 1.E6. The convective patterns and the temperature fields are presented in the most inner and outer spherical gaps. Convection is driven by the temperature difference between the inner and outer spheres and a gravitational field wich varies like r and 1 /r2 . The fluid equations are solved by using the spectral element method (SEM). The mesh is generated by using the cubed-sphere algorithm to avoid the singularity at the poles. To the knowledge of the autors the convection-conduction-convection problem presented in this paper has not been investigated previously. Acknowledgment: DGAPA-PAPIIT Project: IN117314-3.

  15. Analysis and modeling of summertime convective cloud and precipitation structure over the Southeastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knupp, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    Data analysis and numerical modeling efforts that are related to the 1986 Satellite Precipitation and Cloud Experiment (SPACE) are discussed. Progress during this period includes the following: further testing and development of the RAMS numerical modeling system on the Alabama CRAY X-MP/24; a continuation of the observational analysis of the 13 July 1986 mesoscale convective system (MCS); and an initial investigation of a small MCS that formed over the COHMEX region on 15 July 1986. Details for each of these individual tasks are given.

  16. Convective and stratiform rain: Multichannel microwave sensing over oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Nucciarone, J. J.; Dalu, G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements made by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiometer over the oceans, at 19, 37, and 85 GHz in dual polarization, are used to develop a model to classify rain into light-stratiform, moderately convective, and heavy convective types in the mesoscale convective systems (MCS). It is observed that the bulk of the 19- and 37-GHz data are linearly correlated with respect to one another, and generally increase together in brightness as the mean rain rate in the field of view (FOV) of the radiometer increases. However, a significant fraction of the data from these channels departs from this linear relationship, reflecting the nonuniform rain that is convective vs. the relatively light stratiform rain. It is inferred from the SSM/I data, in a MCS, when the slope dT sub 3/dT sub 19 is greater than unity there are optically thin clouds which produce light uniform rain. On the other hand, when dT sub 3/dT sub 19 is close to unity, the rain cells have an open structure and correspond to the convective type of rain. The openings between the cells are apparently a result of the downdrafts and/or entrainment. Relatively low values of 85-GHz brightness temperatures that are present when dT sub 37/dT sub 19 is close to unity support these views and, in addition, leads us to conclude that when the convection is heavy this brightness temperature decreases due to scattering by hydrometeors. On the basis of this explanation of the SSM/I data, an empirical rain retrieval algorithm is developed. Radar backscatter observations over the Atlantic Ocean next to Florida are used to demonstrate the applicability of this method. Three monthly mean maps of rainfall over the oceans from 50 degrees N to 50 degrees S, are presented to illustrate the ability of this method to sense seasonal and interannual variations of rain.

  17. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  18. The formation of a large summertime Saharan dust plume: Convective and synoptic-scale analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A J; Knippertz, P

    2014-01-01

    Haboobs are dust storms produced by the spreading of evaporatively cooled air from thunderstorms over dusty surfaces and are a major dust uplift process in the Sahara. In this study observations, reanalysis, and a high-resolution simulation using the Weather Research and Forecasting model are used to analyze the multiscale dynamics which produced a long-lived (over 2 days) Saharan mesoscale convective system (MCS) and an unusually large haboob in June 2010. An upper level trough and wave on the subtropical jet 5 days prior to MCS initiation produce a precipitating tropical cloud plume associated with a disruption of the Saharan heat low and moistening of the central Sahara. The restrengthening Saharan heat low and a Mediterranean cold surge produce a convergent region over the Hoggar and Aïr Mountains, where small convective systems help further increase boundary layer moisture. Emerging from this region the MCS has intermittent triggering of new cells, but later favorable deep layer shear produces a mesoscale convective complex. The unusually large size of the resulting dust plume (over 1000 km long) is linked to the longevity and vigor of the MCS, an enhanced pressure gradient due to lee cyclogenesis near the Atlas Mountains, and shallow precipitating clouds along the northern edge of the cold pool. Dust uplift processes identified are (1) strong winds near the cold pool front, (2) enhanced nocturnal low-level jet within the aged cold pool, and (3) a bore formed by the cold pool front on the nocturnal boundary layer. PMID:25844277

  19. Cirrus clouds in convective outflow during the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Cairo, F.; Zampieri, M.; Orlandi, E.

    2007-05-01

    Light-weight microlidar measurements were taken on-board a stratospheric balloon during the HIBISCUS 2004 campaign, held in Bauru, Brazil (22 S, 49 W). Tropical cirrus observations showed high mesoscale variability in optical and microphysical properties. The cirrus clouds were observed throughout the flight between 12 and 15 km height. It was found that the clouds were composed of different layers, characterized by a marked variability in height, thickness and optical properties. Trajectory analysis and mesoscale transport simulations clearly revealed that the clouds had formed in the outflow of a large and persistent convective region, while the observed optical properties and cloud structure variability could be linked to different residence times of convective-processed air in the upper troposphere. Mesoscale simulations were able to reproduce the supersaturation due to recent outflow, while it was necessary to consider the presence of other formation processes than convective hydration for cirrus forming in aged detrained anvils.

  20. The Next Version of the Canadian Operational GEM Regional Mesoscale Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, J.; Belair, S.; Tremblay, A.; Lefaivre, L.; Bilodeau, B.; Glazer, A.; Patoine, A.; Talbot, D.

    2003-04-01

    A new mesoscale version of the GEM regional model in operation in Canada for numerical weather prediction has been under development for some time. The main changes to the modeling system comprise an increased resolution both in the horizontal (15 km instead of 24 km) and the vertical (43 levels instead of 28) and improvements to almost every aspects of the physics package. These include an improved formulation of the boundary layer to represent clouds with an unified moist turbulence approach, the Kain-Fritsch deep convection scheme, and the Tremblay mixed-phase condensation scheme with explicit microphysics, together with revisions to the cloud radiative optical properties. The effect of low-level blocking due to subgrid-scale orography based on the Lott-Miller scheme has also been included. The performance of the new mesoscale modeling system has been compared against the current operational model for two 6-week cycles during winter and summer 2002. Based on the North American radiosondes, significant improvements are found in the bias and RMS errors of winds and temperatures. Objective precipitation scores also show significant improvements in winter for the bias and threat scores in almost all precipitation categories, while the scores are more similar during summer.

  1. Melting Behavior of the Iron-Sulfur System and Chemical Convection in Iron-rich Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-01

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores.

  2. Monsoon Convective During the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment: Observations from Ground-Based Radar and the TRMM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cifelli, Rob; Rickenbach, Tom; Halverson, Jeff; Keenan, Tom; Kucera, Paul; Atkinson, Lester; Fisher, Brad; Gerlach, John; Harris, Kathy; Kaufman, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    A main goal of the recent South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) was to study convective processes associated with the onset of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon. The NASA TOGA C-band scanning radar was deployed on the Chinese research vessel Shi Yan #3 for two 20 day cruises, collecting dual-Doppler measurements in conjunction with the BMRC C-Pol dual-polarimetric radar on Dongsha Island. Soundings and surface meteorological data were also collected with an NCAR Integrated Sounding System (ISS). This experiment was the first major tropical field campaign following the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. These observations of tropical oceanic convection provided an opportunity to make comparisons between surface radar measurements and the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite in an oceanic environment. Nearly continuous radar operations were conducted during two Intensive Observing Periods (IOPS) straddling the onset of the monsoon (5-25 May 1998 and 5-25 June 1998). Mesoscale lines of convection with widespread regions of both trailing and forward stratiform precipitation were observed following the onset of the active monsoon in the northern South China Sea region. The vertical structure of the convection during periods of strong westerly flow and relatively moist environmental conditions in the lower to mid-troposphere contrasted sharply with convection observed during periods of low level easterlies, weak shear, and relatively dry conditions in the mid to upper troposphere. Several examples of mesoscale convection will be shown from the ground (ship)-based and spaceborne radar data during times of TRMM satellite overpasses. Examples of pre-monsoon convection, characterized by isolated cumulonimbus and shallow, precipitating congestus clouds, will also be discussed.

  3. CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds(C3Winds) A New Wind Observing System to Study Mesoscale Cloud Dynamics and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Kelly, M.A.; Yee, J.-H.; Boldt, J.; Demajistre, R.; Reynolds, E. L.; Tripoli, G. J.; Oman, L. D.; Prive, N.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wanzong, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds (C3Winds) is a NASA Earth Venture Instrument (EV-I) concept with the primary objective to better understand mesoscale dynamics and their structures in severe weather systems. With potential catastrophic damage and loss of life, strong extratropical and tropical cyclones (ETCs and TCs) have profound three-dimensional impacts on the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic structures, producing complex cloud precipitation patterns, strong low-level winds, extensive tropopause folds, and intense stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Employing a compact, stereo IR-visible imaging technique from two formation-flying CubeSats, C3Winds seeks to measure and map high-resolution (2 km) cloud motion vectors (CMVs) and cloud geometric height (CGH) accurately by tracking cloud features within 5-15 min. Complementary to lidar wind observations from space, the high-resolution wind fields from C3Winds will allow detailed investigations on strong low-level wind formation in an occluded ETC development, structural variations of TC inner-core rotation, and impacts of tropopause folding events on tropospheric ozone and air quality. Together with scatterometer ocean surface winds, C3Winds will provide a more comprehensive depiction of atmosphere-boundary-layer dynamics and interactive processes. Built upon mature imaging technologies and long history of stereoscopic remote sensing, C3Winds provides an innovative, cost-effective solution to global wind observations with potential of increased diurnal sampling via CubeSat constellation.

  4. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  5. Numerical Hindcast Experiments for Study Tropical Convections and MJO Events during Year of Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J.; Tao, W.; Shen, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant component of intraseasonal variability in the tropic. It interacts and influences a wide range of weather and climate phenomena across different temporal and spatial scales. Despite the important role the MJO plays in the weather and climate system, past multi-model MJO intercomparison studies have shown that current global general circulation models (GCMs) still have considerable shortcomings in representing and forecasting this phenomenon. To improve representation of MJO and tropical convective cloud systems in global model, an Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in which a cloud-resolving model takes the place of the sing-column cumulus parameterization used in convectional GCMs has been successfully developed at NAAS Goddard (Tao et al. 2009). To evaluate and improve the ability of this modeling system in representation and prediction of the MJO, several numerical hindcast experiments of a few selected MJO events during YOTC have been carried out. The ability of the model to simulate the MJO events is examined using diagnostic and skill metrics developed by the CLIVAR MJO Working Group Project as well as comparisons with a high-resolution global mesoscale model simulations, satellite observations, and analysis dataset. Several key variables associated with the MJO are investigated, including precipitation, outgoing longwave radiation, large-scale circulation, surface latent heat flux, low-level moisture convergence, vertical structure of moisture and hydrometers, and vertical diabatic heating profiles to gain insight of cloud processes associated with the MJO events.

  6. The role of convective geothermal systems in the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.

    1995-06-01

    Modern convective geothermal systems (for example, at Yellowstone National Park) and their fossil equivalents, epithermal mineral deposits (like McLaughlin, California) have traditionally been considered poor petroleum prospects. The concentrated heat which drives these systems is commonly viewed as a negative influence: in other words, any oil initially present in or generated by these systems is quickly degraded to a useless carbonaceous residue. This is true in extreme cases, but numerous examples from the Great Basin, the northern California Coast Ranges, and elsewhere suggest that under certain circumstances, geothermal systems can efficiently generate, transport, and entrap significant quantities of producible petroleum. B.R.T. Simoneit has shown that oil can be hydrothermally generated in an {open_quotes} instant{close_quotes} of geologic time. It follows, then, that away from geothermal systems` high-temperature centers (or in wholly moderate-temperature systems), the encompassing shallow thermal anomalies can distill large volumes of oil from otherwise immature hydrocarbon source rocks. Transport of this newly-generated oil is enhanced by the buoyant upwelling of heated aqueous fluid. Porosity for oil transport and storage is created or increased by hydrothermal dissolution of rock-forming or secondary silicates and carbonates. Finally, geothermal {open_quotes}self-sealing{close_quotes} -- the deposition of secondary minerals (especially silica and clay) at the margins of a system -- can provide a very effective hydrocarbon seal. Lee Allison has noted the coincidence of igneous intrusions and oil reservoirs in Nevada. It is suggested that here and elsewhere, both igneous-related and amagmatic geothermal systems in otherwise favorable settings should be viewed as prime petroleum exploration targets.

  7. Numerical modelling of mesoscale atmospheric dispersion, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a more important role on the mesoscale and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing over one or two diurnal periods. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system was used to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two North American mesoscale dispersion field experiments, the 1980 Great Plains tracer experiment and the 1983 Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX). Ground-level and elevated tracer concentrations were measured out to distances of 600 km from the source in the first experiment and 1100 km in the second. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in the first case while temporal changes in the synoptic-scale flow were very significant in the second case. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquills delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. The first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modeling system with episodic mesoscale dispersion field data was presented

  8. A summary of research on mesoscale energetics of severe storm environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The goals of this research were to better understand interactions between areas of intense convection and their surrounding mesoscale environments by using diagnostic budgets of kinetic (KE) and available potential energy (APE). Three cases of intense convection were examined in detail. 1) Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE) carried out on 24 to 25 April 1975 were studied. Synoptic scale data at 3 to 6 hour intervals, contained two mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs). Analyses included total KE budgets and budgets of divergent and rotational components of KE. 2) AVE-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiments (SESAME)-4 carried out on 10 to 11 April 1979 were studied. Synotpic and meso alpha-scale data (250 km spacing, 3 hour intervals), contained the Red River Valley tornado outbreak. Analyses included total KE budgets (separate synoptic and mesoscale version), budgets for the divergent and rotational components, and the generation of APE by diabatic processes. 3) AVE-SESAME 5 studies were carried out on 20 to 31 May 1979. Synoptic and meso beta-scale data (75 km spacing, 1 1/2 to 3 hour intervals), contained a small MCC. Analyses include separate KE budgets for the synotic and meso beta-scales and a water vapor budget. Major findings of these investigations are: (1) The synoptic scale storm environment contains energy conversions and transports that are comparable to those of mature midlatitude cyclones. (2) Energetic in the mesoscale storm environment are often an order of magnitude larger than those in an undisturbed region. (3) Mesoscale wind maxima form in the upper troposphere on the poleward sides of convective areas, whereas speeds decrease south of storm regions.

  9. Investigation of mesoscale cloud features viewed by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherr, P. E. (Principal Investigator); Feteris, P. J.; Lisa, A. S.; Bowley, C. J.; Fowler, M. G.; Barnes, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Some 50 LANDSAT images displaying mesoscale cloud features were analyzed. This analysis was based on the Rayleigh-Kuettner model describing the formation of that type of mesoscale cloud feature. This model lends itself to computation of the average wind speed in northerly flow from the dimensions of the cloud band configurations measured from a LANDSAT image. In nearly every case, necessary conditions of a curved wind profile and orientation of the cloud streets within 20 degrees of the direction of the mean wind in the convective layer were met. Verification of the results by direct observation was hampered, however, by the incompatibility of the resolution of conventional rawinsonde observations with the scale of the banded cloud patterns measured from LANDSAT data. Comparison seems to be somewhat better in northerly flows than in southerly flows, with the largest discrepancies in wind speed being within 8m/sec, or a factor of two.

  10. Canine spontaneous glioma: A translational model system for convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Peter J.; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Higgins, Robert J.; Bringas, John R.; Larson, Richard F.; Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T.; Forsayeth, John; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Park, John W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2010-01-01

    Canine spontaneous intracranial tumors bear striking similarities to their human tumor counterparts and have the potential to provide a large animal model system for more realistic validation of novel therapies typically developed in small rodent models. We used spontaneously occurring canine gliomas to investigate the use of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liposomal nanoparticles, containing topoisomerase inhibitor CPT-11. To facilitate visualization of intratumoral infusions by real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we included identically formulated liposomes loaded with Gadoteridol. Real-time MRI defined distribution of infusate within both tumor and normal brain tissues. The most important limiting factor for volume of distribution within tumor tissue was the leakage of infusate into ventricular or subarachnoid spaces. Decreased tumor volume, tumor necrosis, and modulation of tumor phenotype correlated with volume of distribution of infusate (Vd), infusion location, and leakage as determined by real-time MRI and histopathology. This study demonstrates the potential for canine spontaneous gliomas as a model system for the validation and development of novel therapeutic strategies for human brain tumors. Data obtained from infusions monitored in real time in a large, spontaneous tumor may provide information, allowing more accurate prediction and optimization of infusion parameters. Variability in Vd between tumors strongly suggests that real-time imaging should be an essential component of CED therapeutic trials to allow minimization of inappropriate infusions and accurate assessment of clinical outcomes. PMID:20488958

  11. Theoretical analysis of solar-driven natural convection energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.W.; Lasier, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical study of solar-powered natural convection tower (chimney) performance. Both heated and cooled towers are analyzed; the latter uses evaporating water as the cooling mechanism. The results, which are applicable to any open-cycle configuration, show that the ideal conversion efficiencies of both heated and cooled natural convection towers are linear functions of height. The performance of a heated tower in an adiabatic atmosphere ideally approaches the Carnot efficiency limit of approx. = 3.4%/km (1.0%/1000 ft). Including water pumping requirements, the ideal limit to cooled tower performance is approx. = 2.75%/km (0.85%/1000 ft). Ambient atmospheric conditions such as vertical temperature gradient (lapse rate) and relative humidity can have significantly adverse effects on natural convection tower performance. The combined effects of lapse rate and ambient relative humidity are especially important to cooled natural convection towers.

  12. Diagnosing the average spatio-temporal impact of convective systems - Part 1: A methodology for evaluating climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. S.; Eliasson, S.; Eriksson, P.; Forbes, R. M.; Wyser, K.; Zelinka, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    An earlier method to determine the mean response of upper-tropospheric water to localised deep convective systems (DC systems) is improved and applied to the EC-Earth climate model. Following Zelinka and Hartmann (2009), several fields related to moist processes and radiation from various satellites are composited with respect to the local maxima in rain rate to determine their spatio-temporal evolution with deep convection in the central Pacific Ocean. Major improvements to the earlier study are the isolation of DC systems in time so as to prevent multiple sampling of the same event, and a revised definition of the mean background state that allows for better characterisation of the DC-system-induced anomalies. The observed DC systems in this study propagate westward at ~4 m s-1. Both the upper-tropospheric relative humidity and the outgoing longwave radiation are substantially perturbed over a broad horizontal extent and for periods >30 h. The cloud fraction anomaly is fairly constant with height but small maximum can be seen around 200 hPa. The cloud ice water content anomaly is mostly confined to pressures greater than 150 hPa and reaches its maximum around 450 hPa, a few hours after the peak convection. Consistent with the large increase in upper-tropospheric cloud ice water content, albedo increases dramatically and persists about 30 h after peak convection. Applying the compositing technique to EC-Earth allows an assessment of the model representation of DC systems. The model captures the large-scale responses, most notably for outgoing longwave radiation, but there are a number of important differences. DC systems appear to propagate eastward in the model, suggesting a strong link to Kelvin waves instead of equatorial Rossby waves. The diurnal cycle in the model is more pronounced and appears to trigger new convection further to the west each time. Finally, the modelled ice water content anomaly peaks at pressures greater than 500 hPa and in the upper

  13. High-Resolution Mesoscale Simulations of the 6-7 May 2000 Missouri Flash Flood: Impact of Model Initialization and Land Surface Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. David; Wang, Yansen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wetzel, Peter; Belcher, Larry R.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution mesoscale model simulations of the 6-7 May 2000 Missouri flash flood event were performed to test the impact of model initialization and land surface treatment on timing, intensity, and location of extreme precipitation. In this flash flood event, a mesoscale convective system (MCS) produced over 340 mm of rain in roughly 9 hours in some locations. Two different types of model initialization were employed: 1) NCEP global reanalysis with 2.5-degree grid spacing and 12-hour temporal resolution, and 2) Eta reanalysis with 40- km grid spacing and $hour temporal resolution. In addition, two different land surface treatments were considered. A simple land scheme. (SLAB) keeps soil moisture fixed at initial values throughout the simulation, while a more sophisticated land model (PLACE) allows for r interactive feedback. Simulations with high-resolution Eta model initialization show considerable improvement in the intensity of precipitation due to the presence in the initialization of a residual mesoscale convective vortex (hlCV) from a previous MCS. Simulations with the PLACE land model show improved location of heavy precipitation. Since soil moisture can vary over time in the PLACE model, surface energy fluxes exhibit strong spatial gradients. These surface energy flux gradients help produce a strong low-level jet (LLJ) in the correct location. The LLJ then interacts with the cold outflow boundary of the MCS to produce new convective cells. The simulation with both high-resolution model initialization and time-varying soil moisture test reproduces the intensity and location of observed rainfall.

  14. From Quanta to the Continuum: Opportunities for Mesoscale Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hemminger, John; Crabtree, George; Sarrao, John

    2012-09-01

    We are at a time of unprecedented challenge and opportunity. Our economy is in need of a jump start, and our supply of clean energy needs to dramatically increase. Innovation through basic research is a key means for addressing both of these challenges. The great scientific advances of the last decade and more, especially at the nanoscale, are ripe for exploitation. Seizing this key opportunity requires mastering the mesoscale, where classical, quantum, and nanoscale science meet. It has become clear that—in many important areas—the functionality that is critical to macroscopic behavior begins to manifest itself not at the atomic or nanoscale but at the mesoscale, where defects, interfaces, and non-equilibrium structures are the norm. With our recently acquired knowledge of the rules of nature that govern the atomic and nanoscales, we are well positioned to unravel and control the complexity that determines functionality at the mesoscale. The reward for breakthroughs in our understanding at the mesoscale is the emergence of previously unrealized functionality. The present report explores the opportunity and defines the research agenda for mesoscale science—discovering, understanding, and controlling interactions among disparate systems and phenomena to reach the full potential of materials complexity and functionality. The ability to predict and control mesoscale phenomena and architectures is essential if atomic and molecular knowledge is to blossom into a next generation of technology opportunities, societal benefits, and scientific advances. Imagine the ability to manufacture at the mesoscale: that is, the directed assembly of mesoscale structures that possess unique functionality that yields faster, cheaper, higher performing, and longer lasting products, as well as products that have functionality that we have not yet imagined. Imagine the realization of biologically inspired complexity and functionality with inorganic earth-abundant materials to

  15. Meso-scale on-road vehicle emission inventory approach: a study on Dhaka City of Bangladesh supporting the 'cause-effect' analysis of the transport system.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Asif; Allan, Andrew; Zito, Rocco

    2016-03-01

    The study aims to develop an emission inventory (EI) approach and conduct an inventory for vehicular sources in Dhaka City, Bangladesh. A meso-scale modelling approach was adopted for the inventory; the factors that influence the emissions and the magnitude of emission variation were identified and reported on, which was an innovative approach to account emissions unlike the conventional inventory approaches. Two techniques for the emission inventory were applied, viz. (i) a combined top-down and bottom-up approach that considered the total vehicle population and the average diurnal on-road vehicle speed profile in the city and (ii) a bottom-up approach that accounted for road link-specific emissions of the city considering diurnal traffic volume and speed profiles of the respective roads. For the bottom-up approach, road link-specific detailed data were obtained through field survey in 2012, where mid-block traffic count of the day, vehicle speed profile, road network and congestion data were collected principally. The emission variances for the change in transport system characteristics (like change in fuel type, AC usage pattern, increased speed and reduced congestion/stopping) were predicted and analysed in this study; congestion influenced average speed of the vehicles, and fuel types in the vehicles were identified as the major stressors. The study performance was considered reasonable when comparing with the limited number of similar studies conducted earlier. Given the increasing trend of private vehicles each year coupled with increasing traffic congestion, the city is under threat of increased vehicular emissions unless a good management strategy is implemented. Although the inventory is conducted for Dhaka and the result may be important locally, the approach adopted in this research is innovative in nature to be followed for conducting research on other urban transport systems. PMID:26857254

  16. Coincident Occurrences of Tropical Individual Cirrus Clouds and Deep Convective Systems Derived from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Chambers, Lin; Fan, Alice; Sun, Wenbo

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cloud properties and atmospheric radiation taken between January and August 1998 by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite were used to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal scales on the coincident occurrences of tropical individual cirrus clouds (ICCs) and deep convective systems (DCSs). It is found that there is little or even negative correlation between instantaneous occurrences of ICC and DCS in small areas, in which both types of clouds cannot grow and expand simultaneously. When spatial and temporal domains are increased, ICCs become more dependent on DCSs due to the origination of many ICCs from DCSs and moisture supply from the DCS in the upper troposphere for the ICCs to grow, resulting in significant positive correlation between the two types of tropical high clouds in large spatial and long temporal scales. This result may suggest that the decrease of tropical high clouds with SST from model simulations is likely caused by restricted spatial domains and limited temporal periods. Finally, the radiative feedback due to the change in tropical high cloud area coverage with sea surface temperature appears small and about -0.14 W/sq m per degree Kelvin.

  17. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  18. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  19. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  20. Using Satellite Observation for Early Warning of Convective Storm in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owlad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Severe convective storms are responsible for large amount of damage each year around the world. They form an important part of the climate system by redistributing heat, moisture, and trace gases, as well as producing large quantities of precipitation. As these extreme and rare events are in mesoscale there is many uncertainty in predicting them and we can't rely on just models. On the other hand, remote sensing has a large application in Meteorology and near real time weather forecasting, especially in rare and extreme events like convective storms that might be difficult to predict with atmospheric models. On second of June 2014, near 12UTC a sudden and strong convective storm occurred in Tehran province that was not predicted, and caused economic and human losses. In This research we used satellite observations along with synoptic station measurements to predict and monitor this storm. Results from MODIS data show an increase in the amount of cloudiness and also aerosol optical depth and sudden decrease in cloud top temperature few hours before the storm occurs. EUMETSAT images show the governing of convection before the storm occurs. With combining the observation data that shows Lake of humidity and high temperature in low levels with satellite data that reveals instability in high levels that together caused this convective, we could track the storm and decrease the large amount of damage.

  1. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  2. Convection activity over the Guinean coast and Central Africa during northern spring from synoptic to intra-seasonal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamsu-Tamo, P. H.; Janicot, S.; Monkam, D.; Lenouo, A.

    2014-12-01

    This study proposes an overview of the main synoptic, medium-range and intraseasonal modes of convection and precipitation in northern spring (March-June 1979-2010) over West and Central Africa, and to understand their atmospheric dynamics. It is based on daily National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outgoing longwave radiation and Cloud Archive User Service Tb convection data, daily TRMM and Global Precipitation Climatology Project rainfall products and daily ERA-Interim reanalysis atmospheric fields. It is first shown that mesoscale convective systems can be modulated in terms of occurrences number and intensity at such time scales. Based on empirical orthogonal function analyses on the 2-90-day filtered data it is shown that the main mode of convective and rainfall variability is located along the Guinean coast with a moderate to weak extension over Central Africa. Corresponding regressed deseasonalised atmospheric fields highlight an eastward propagation of patterns consistent with convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin wave dynamics. Then a singular spectrum analysis combined with a Hierarchical Ascendant Classification enable to define objectively the main spectral bands of variability within the 2-90-day band, and highlight three main bands, 2-8-, 8-22- and 20-90-day. Within these three bands, space-time spectral decomposition is used to identify the relative impacts of convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin, Rossby and inertia-gravity waves, as well as Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal. It confirms that eastward propagating signals (convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin wave and MJO) are highly dominant in these convection and precipitation variability modes over the Guinean coast during northern spring. So, while rain-producing individual systems are moving westward, their activity are highly modulated by sub-regional and regional scales envelops moving to the east. This is a burning issue for operational forecasting centers to be able to

  3. Physical factors determining the fraction of stored energy recoverable from hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1975-01-01

    This report contains background analyses for the estimates of Nathenson and Muffler (1975) of geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas. The first section discusses heat and fluid recharge potential of geothermal reservoirs. The second section analyzes the physical factors that determine the fraction of stored energy obtainable at the surface from a geothermal reservoir. Conversion of heat to electricity and the use of geothermal energy for direct-heating applications are discussed in the last two sections. Nathenson, Manuel, and Muffler, L.J.P., 1975, Geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction dominated areas, in White, D.E., and Williams, D.L., eds., Assessment of the Geothermal Resources of the United States--1975: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 726, p. 104-121, available at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/cir/cir726

  4. HIBISCUS and SCOUT-AMMA: Water Vapor And Ice Particles In The Tropical Lower Stratosphere Above Overshooting Continental Convective Systems. Part A. Evidence Of Water Injection Above The Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, S.; Korshunov, L.; Pommereau, J.; Nielsen, J.; Christensen, T.; Larsen, N.

    2006-12-01

    The possible impact of meso-scale convective systems (MCS) on water vapor in the lower stratosphere has been explored by a series of six backscatter / ozone / H2O soundings in August 2006 from Niamey (13N, 2E) in West Africa using the backscatter instrument of the University of Wyoming, an ECC ozone cell and a FLASH Lyman alpha hygrometer, all flown on the same balloon. All profiles downwind or next to MCS show saturation, sometimes supersaturation (5-6 ppm H2O), and cirrus clouds at the tropopause at 16-16.5 km around 78°C, surmounted by highly variable H2O layers up to 19 km, a broad minimum between of 4.2 ppm 19-21 km and then almost constant mixing ratio (5.5-6 ppm) from 22 to 31 km. The frequent moist layers between the tropopause and 19 km suggest that water could penetrate the stratosphere up to at least 450 K potential temperature levels. The locations of the MCS potentially responsible for water injection upwind are explored from satellite pictures combined with backward trajectories.

  5. Measuring the vertical electrical field above an oceanic convection system using a meteorological sounding balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B.; Chiu, C.; Lai, S.; Chen, C.; Kuo, C.; Su, H.; Hsu, R.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical electric field above thundercloud plays an important role in the generation and modeling of transient luminous events. For example, Pasko [1995] proposed that the high quasi-static E-field following the positive cloud-to-ground lightning could accelerate and input energy to ambient electrons; as they collide and excite nitrogen and oxygen molecules in upper atmosphere, sprites may be induced. A series of balloon experiments led by Holzworth have investigated the temporal and spatial fluctuations of the electric field and conductivity in the upper atmosphere at different sites [Holzworth 2005, and references in]. But the strength and variation of the vertical electric field above thundercloud, especially oceanic ones, are not well documented so far. A lightweight, low-cost measurement system including an electric field meter and the associated aviation electronics are developed to carry out the in-situ measurement of the vertical electric field and the inter-cloud charge distribution. Our measuring system was first deployed using a meteorological sounding balloon from Taitung, Taiwan in May 2012. The measured electric field below 3km height shows an exponential decay and it is consistent with the expected potential gradient variation between ionosphere and the Earth surface. But the background strength of the measured E-field grows up exponentially and a violent fluctuations is also observed when the balloon flew over a developing oceanic convection cell. The preliminary results from this flight will be reported and discussed. This low-cost electric field meter is developed within one year. In the coming months, more flights will be performed with the aim to measure the rapid variation of the electric field above thundercloud as well as the E-field that may induce transient luminous events. Our ground campaigns show that the occurrence rates of blue and gigantic jet are relatively high in the vicinity of Taiwan. Our experiment can be used to diagnose

  6. Synoptic scale forecast skill and systematic errors in the MASS 2.0 model. [Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, S. E.; Skillman, W. C.; Kocin, P. J.; Wetzel, P. J.; Brill, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    The synoptic scale performance characteristics of MASS 2.0 are determined by comparing filtered 12-24 hr model forecasts to same-case forecasts made by the National Meteorological Center's synoptic-scale Limited-area Fine Mesh model. Characteristics of the two systems are contrasted, and the analysis methodology used to determine statistical skill scores and systematic errors is described. The overall relative performance of the two models in the sample is documented, and important systematic errors uncovered are presented.

  7. Development of a small-scale power system with meso-scale vortex combustor and thermo-electric device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokuri, D.; Hara, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-10-01

    A small-scale vortex combustion power system has been developed using a thermo-electric device (TED). The system consisted of a heat medium, TED, and cooling plates. A vortex combustion chamber (7 mm inner diameter and 27 mm long) was fabricated inside the heat medium (40  ×  40  ×  20 mm and 52 g of duralumin). It was found that a stable propane/air flame could be established in the narrow 7 mm channel even for the large heat input conditions of 213 ~ 355 W. With a couple of TEDs, the maximum of 8.1 W (9.8 V  ×  0.83 A) could be successfully obtained for 355 W heat input, which corresponded to the energy conversion rate of 2.4%. The results of the gas and the combustor wall temperature measurements showed that the heat transfer from the burned gas to combustor wall was significantly enhanced by the vortex flow, which contributed to the relatively high efficiency energy conversion on the vortex combustion power system.

  8. Long- range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Gheddou, Abdelhakim

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). The aim of this study is to investigate the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions. For that purpose a series of 14 days forward simulations was conducted using the Lagrangian Particle Diffusion Model FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The geographical localization to some extent justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe-133 observed at the neighbouring stations, comes from the ANSTO facility. In the simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. Studies have been performed to link Xe-133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM, and to assess the impact of atmospheric convection on non-detections at the IMS stations. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  9. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  10. A Parameterization for the Triggering of Landscape Generated Moist Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Barry H.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Abramopoulos, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A set of relatively high resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations were produced to investigate the triggering of moist convection by landscape generated mesoscale circulations. The local accumulated rainfall varied monotonically (linearly) with the size of individual landscape patches, demonstrating the need to develop a trigger function that is sensitive to the size of individual patches. A new triggering function that includes the effect of landscapes generated mesoscale circulations over patches of different sizes consists of a parcel's perturbation in vertical velocity (nu(sub 0)), temperature (theta(sub 0)), and moisture (q(sub 0)). Each variable in the triggering function was also sensitive to soil moisture gradients, atmospheric initial conditions, and moist processes. The parcel's vertical velocity, temperature, and moisture perturbation were partitioned into mesoscale and turbulent components. Budget equations were derived for theta(sub 0) and q(sub 0). Of the many terms in this set of budget equations, the turbulent, vertical flux of the mesoscale temperature and moisture contributed most to the triggering of moist convection through the impact of these fluxes on the parcel's temperature and moisture profile. These fluxes needed to be parameterized to obtain theta(sub 0) and q(sub 0). The mesoscale vertical velocity also affected the profile of nu(sub 0). We used similarity theory to parameterize these fluxes as well as the parcel's mesoscale vertical velocity.

  11. A diagnostic study of heavy rainfall in Karachi due to merging of a mesoscale low and a diffused tropical depression during South Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Ghulam; Chaudhry, Qamar-Uz-Zaman; Sixiong, Zhao; Qingcun, Zeng; Linlin, Qi; Gaoying, Zhang

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a diagnostic study of a typical case of very heavy rainfall during the South Asian summer monsoon when a mesoscale low in a desert climate merged with a diffused tropical depression. The former low was located over Pakistan’s desert region and the latter depression originated over the Bay of Bengal. Surface and NCEP reanalysis data supported by satellite and radar images were incorporated in the diagnosis. The relationship between the heavy precipitation process and large-scale circulations such as monsoon trough, subtropical high, westerly jet, low level jet and water vapor transport were investigated to further understand the mechanism of this peculiar interaction. It was found that: (1) the mesoscale low developed as a result of cold air advection aloft from northern latitudes and strong convection over the region of humidity convergence on 24 July 2003 over the Indian Rajistan area. (2) On the same day, a low that formed over the Bay of Bengal was transformed into a monsoon depression and moved westward to the mesoscale low which existed over southwest India and the adjoining southeastern parts of Pakistan. (3) Initially, the mesoscale low received moisture supply from both the Bay of Bengal as well as the Arabian Sea, whereas the Bay of Bengal maintained the continuous supply of moisture to the monsoon depression. (4) After the depression crossed central India, the Bay’s moisture supply was cut off and the Arabian Sea became the only source of moisture to both the closely located systems. On 27 July, both of the systems merged together and the merger resulted in a heavy downpour in the Karachi metropolitan and in its surroundings. (5) With the intensification as well as the southeastward extension of the subtropical high and the shift of the monsoon trough axis from southwest-west to northeast-east, the monsoon depression moved southwestward. In this situation, there existed a very favourable condition for a merger of the

  12. Multiscale Cloud System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.

    2009-01-01

    The central theme of this paper is to describe how cloud system resolving models (CRMs) of grid spacing approximately 1 km have been applied to various important problems in atmospheric science across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and how these applications relate to other modeling approaches. A long-standing problem concerns the representation of organized precipitating convective cloud systems in weather and climate models. Since CRMs resolve the mesoscale to large scales of motion (i.e., 10 km to global) they explicitly address the cloud system problem. By explicitly representing organized convection, CRMs bypass restrictive assumptions associated with convective parameterization such as the scale gap between cumulus and large-scale motion. Dynamical models provide insight into the physical mechanisms involved with scale interaction and convective organization. Multiscale CRMs simulate convective cloud systems in computational domains up to global and have been applied in place of contemporary convective parameterizations in global models. Multiscale CRMs pose a new challenge for model validation, which is met in an integrated approach involving CRMs, operational prediction systems, observational measurements, and dynamical models in a new international project: the Year of Tropical Convection, which has an emphasis on organized tropical convection and its global effects.

  13. Characterization of convection-related parameters by Raman lidar: Analysis of selected case studies from the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Stelitano, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper illustrates an approach to determine the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN) based on the use of data from a Raman lidar system. The use of Raman lidar data allows to provide high temporal resolution (5 min) measurements of CAPE and CIN and follow their evolution over extended time period covering the full cycle of convective activity. Lidar-based measurements of CAPE and CIN are obtained from Raman lidar measurements of the temperature profile and the surface measurements of temperature, pressure and dew point temperature provided from a surface weather station. The approach is tested and applied to the data collected by the Raman lidar system BASIL, which was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64 ° N, Long: 8.06 ° E, Elev.: 140 m) in the period 01 June - 31 August 2007 in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS), held in Southern Germany and Eastern France. Reported measurements are found to be in good agreement with simultaneous measurements obtained from the radiosondes launched in Achern and with estimates from different mesoscale models. An estimate of the different random error sources affecting the measurements of CAPE and CIN has also been performed, together with a detail sensitivity study to quantify the different systematic error sources. Preliminary results from this study will be illustrated and discussed at the Conference.

  14. Finite element procedures for time-dependent convection-diffusion-reaction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Park, Y. J.; Deans, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    New finite element procedures based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin formulations are developed for time-dependent convection-diffusion-reaction equations. These procedures minimize spurious oscillations for convection-dominated and reaction-dominated problems. The results obtained for representative numerical examples are accurate with minimal oscillations. As a special application problem, the single-well chemical tracer test (a procedure for measuring oil remaining in a depleted field) is simulated numerically. The results show the importance of temperature effects on the interpreted value of residual oil saturation from such tests.

  15. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity Comparisons for Warm Season Convective Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Hoeth, Brian; Blottman, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    configuration options are best to address this specific forecast concern, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which has two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) was employed. In addition to the two dynamical cores, there are also two options for a "hot-start" initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS; McGinley 1995) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS; Brewster 1996). Both LAPS and ADAS are 3- dimensional weather analysis systems that integrate multiple meteorological data sources into one consistent analysis over the user's domain of interest. This allows mesoscale models to benefit from the addition of highresolution data sources. Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, provides SMG and MLB with considerable flexibility as well as challenges. It is the goal of this study to assess the different configurations available and to determine which configuration will best predict warm season convective initiation.

  16. Molecular and mesoscale mechanism for hierarchical self-assembly of dipeptide and porphyrin light-harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Kang, Yu; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-06-22

    A multi-scale theoretical investigation of dipeptide-porphyrin co-assembly systems has been carried out to establish such understanding, where two different types of the dipeptides, dilysine (KK(3+)) and diphenylalanine (FF(+)) are compared on tuning the porphyrin organization. Density functional theory results reveal that the electrostatic attraction between different functional groups has significantly strengthened the hydrogen bonds between them, which are considered as the driving force of the self-assembly at the molecular level. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation further indicates that the formation of the core-shell nanorods is driven and stabilized by the hydrophobic interaction between dipeptides and negatively charged porphyrin (H2TPPS(2-)), where the packed porphyrins stay inside as the core of the nanorods and the hydrophilic groups (amino- and carboxyl-groups) as the shell. With stronger hydrophobicity, FF(+) is more likely to insert into the porphyrin aggregates and build crosslinks than KK(3+). Moreover, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation suggests equilibrium morphologies with different dipeptides, where KK(3+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled in fiber bundles, whereas FF(+)-H2TPPS(2-) assembled as microspheres, corresponding to the different packing behavior in MD simulations. The consistency of these results at different scales is discussed. The method used in this work could be extended for studying similar issues in hierarchical self-assembly of building blocks such biomaterials. PMID:27270974

  17. Melting behavior of the iron-sulfur system and chemical convection in iron-rich planetary cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-26

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores. At present, Earth, Mercury and Ganymede are the only three solid bodies in the Solar System that possess intrinsic global magnetic fields. Dynamo simulation reveal that chemical buoyancy force associated with the formation of a solid inner core is critical for sustaining the Earth's magnetic field. Fluid motions in Mercury and Ganymede may be partially driven by chemical buoyancy force as well. The style of chemical convection and its influence on the thermal and chemical state and evolution of iron-rich cores are determined in part by the melting behavior of potential core-forming materials. Sulfur is widely accepted as a candidate light element in iron-rich planetary cores. In order to understand the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing cores, we studied the high-pressure melting behavior of Fe-S mixtures containing 9 wt% sulfur using the synchrotron x-ray radiographic method in a large volume press.

  18. Numerical simulations of convection in crystal-bearing magmas: A case study of the magmatic system at Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Indira; Burgisser, Alain; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2012-07-01

    The sustained heat and gas output from Erebus volcano reflects a regime of magma convection that we investigate here using a bi-phase (melt and crystals), fluid dynamical model. Following validity and verification tests of the model, we carried out four single-phase and three bi-phase numerical 30-year- simulations, in an idealized 2D geometry representing a lava lake cooled from above and a reservoir heated from below that are linked by a 4-to-10-m-diameter conduit. We tested the effects of crystals on convection while changing conduit size and the system boundaries from closed to open. Neglecting crystal settling yields only a limited number of features, i.e., (i) the formation of a central instability, (ii) the average temperature evolution, and (iii) the average velocity range of the surface flow motion. Bi-phase simulations show that while crystals are quite efficiently transported by the liquid phase a small decoupling reflecting their large size (5 cm) results in settling. This leads to more complex circulation patterns and enhances the vigor of fluid motion. A sufficiently large conduit sustains convection and retains 6 and 20% of crystals in suspension, for a closed and open system, respectively. Model outputs do not yet correspond well with field observations of Erebus lava lake (e.g., real surface velocities are much faster than those modeled), suggesting that exsolved volatiles are an important source of buoyancy.

  19. Heat Transfer of Thermocapillary Convection in a Two-Layered Fluid System Under the Influence of Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Ludovisis, D.; Cha, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat transfer of a two-layer fluid system has been of great importance in a variety of industrial applications. For example, the phenomena of immiscible fluids can be found in materials processing and heat exchangers. Typically in solidification from a melt, the convective motion is the dominant factor that affects the uniformity of material properties. In the layered flow, thermocapillary forces can come into an important play, which was first emphasized by a previous investigator in 1958. Under extraterrestrial environments without gravity, thermocapillary effects can be a more dominant factor, which alters material properties in processing. Control and optimization of heat transfer in an immiscible fluid system need complete understanding of the flow phenomena that can be induced by surface tension at a fluid interface. The present work is focused on understanding of the magnetic field effects on thermocapillary convection, in order to optimize material processing. That is, it involves the study of the complicated phenomena to alter the flow motion in crystal growth. In this effort, the Marangoni convection in a cavity with differentially heated sidewalls is investigated with and without the influence of a magnetic field. As a first step, numerical analyses are performed, by thoroughly investigating influences of all pertinent physical parameters. Experiments are then conducted, with preliminary results, for comparison with the numerical analyses.

  20. In vitro calibration of a system for measurement of in vivo convective heat transfer coefficient in animals

    PubMed Central

    Tangwongsan, Chanchana; Chachati, Louay; Webster, John G; Farrell, Patrick V

    2006-01-01

    Background We need a sensor to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient during ablation of the heart or liver. Methods We built a minimally invasive instrument to measure the in vivo convective heat transfer coefficient, h in animals, using a Wheatstone-bridge circuit, similar to a hot-wire anemometer circuit. One arm is connected to a steerable catheter sensor whose tip is a 1.9 mm × 3.2 mm thin film resistive temperature detector (RTD) sensor. We used a circulation system to simulate different flow rates at 39°C for in vitro experiments using distilled water, tap water and saline. We heated the sensor approximately 5°C above the fluid temperature. We measured the power consumed by the sensor and the resistance of the sensor during the experiments and analyzed these data to determine the value of the convective heat transfer coefficient at various flow rates. Results From 0 to 5 L/min, experimental values of h in W/(m2·K) were for distilled water 5100 to 13000, for tap water 5500 to 12300, and for saline 5400 to 13600. Theoretical values were 1900 to 10700. Conclusion We believe this system is the smallest, most accurate method of minimally invasive measurement of in vivo h in animals and provides the least disturbance of flow. PMID:17067386

  1. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Thermogravitational Convection in a Closed System with a Radiant Energy Source in Conditions of Convective-Radiative Heat Exchange at the External Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nee, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Mathematical modeling of conjugate natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity with a radiant energy source in conditions of convective-radiative heat exchange at the external boundary was conducted. The radiant energy distribution was set by the Lambert's law. Conduction and convection processes analysis showed that the air masses flow pattern is modified slightly over the time. The temperature increases in the gas cavity, despite the heat removal from the one of the external boundary. According to the results of the integral heat transfer analysis were established that the average Nusselt number (Nuav) increasing occurs up to τ = 200 (dimensionless time). Further Nuav has changed insignificantly due to the temperature field equalization near the interfaces "gas - wall".

  2. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. I - Multiscale statistical analysis of wave characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the characteristics of the wavelike activity that occurred over the north-central United States on July 11-12, 1981, using data from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in Montana. In particular, two distinct wave episodes of about 8-h duration within a longer (33 h) period of wave activity were studied in detail. It is demonstrated that the observed phenomena display features consistent with those of mesoscale gravity waves. The principles of statistical methods used to detect and track mesoscale gravity waves are discussed together with their limitations.

  3. Forecast skill of a high-resolution real-time mesoscale model designed for weather support of operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gregory E.; Zack, John W.; Manobianco, John

    1994-01-01

    NASA funded Mesoscale Environmental Simulations and Operations (MESO), Inc. to develop a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS). The model has been modified specifically for short-range forecasting in the vicinity of KSC/CCAS. To accomplish this, the model domain has been limited to increase the number of horizontal grid points (and therefore grid resolution) and the model' s treatment of precipitation, radiation, and surface hydrology physics has been enhanced to predict convection forced by local variations in surface heat, moisture fluxes, and cloud shading. The objective of this paper is to (1) provide an overview of MASS including the real-time initialization and configuration for running the data pre-processor and model, and (2) to summarize the preliminary evaluation of the model's forecasts of temperature, moisture, and wind at selected rawinsonde station locations during February 1994 and July 1994. MASS is a hydrostatic, three-dimensional modeling system which includes schemes to represent planetary boundary layer processes, surface energy and moisture budgets, free atmospheric long and short wave radiation, cloud microphysics, and sub-grid scale moist convection.

  4. Doppler RAdar Observations of Convection from the NASA/TOGA C-band Radar During TRMM-LBA in Rondonia, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickenbach, T. M.; Amitai, Eyal; Atkinson, Lester; Boccippio, Dennis; Bowie, Robert; Cifelli, Robert; Dunnemann, Neil; Frostram, Gregg; Gears, Nathan; Gerlach, John

    1999-01-01

    The Tropcial RAinfall Measuring Mission-Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (TRMM-LBA) was conducted near Ji Parana, Rondonia, Brazil during the 1999 Amazonian wet season (Jan-Feb). TRMM-LBA provided detailed observations of precipitating systems from surface and aircraft instrumentation which may be compared to measurements from the TRMM satellite. The surface-based platforms included two scanning Doppler radars (the NASA TOGA C-band radar and the NCAR SPOL S-band dual polarization radar) which collected continuous dual-Doppler measurements of precipitating convection.This paper focuses on data from the TOGA radar to provide a preliminary overview of general properties of convective organization observed during TRMM-LBA. These include squall line evolution and morphology, diurnal variation of precipitation, and the vertical intensity of convection. Mesoscale squall lines were most commonly observed in the afternoon, with associated regions of stratiform precipitation persisting into the evening. Nocturnal widespread stratiform rain often formed before sunrise, with no apparent source region of deep convection and very weak radar bright band. Reflectivity values in deep convective cells typically decreased rapidly above the melting level, reminiscent of tropical oceanic convection, and consistent with the relative scarcity of lightning (with respect to other tropical continental regions). Vertically developed electrified convection, though infrequent, did occur regularly.

  5. Effects of vertically ribbed surface roughness on the forced convective heat losses in central receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Ralf; Frantz, Cathy; Fritsch, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    External receiver configurations are directly exposed to ambient wind. Therefore, a precise determination of the convective losses is a key factor in the prediction and evaluation of the efficiency of the solar absorbers. Based on several studies, the forced convective losses of external receivers are modeled using correlations for a roughened cylinder in a cross-flow of air. However at high wind velocities, the thermal efficiency measured during the Solar Two experiment was considerably lower than the efficiency predicted by these correlations. A detailed review of the available literature on the convective losses of external receivers has been made. Three CFD models of different level of detail have been developed to analyze the influence of the actual shape of the receiver and tower configuration, of the receiver shape and of the absorber panels on the forced convective heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer coefficients deduced from the correlations have been compared to the results of the CFD simulations. In a final step the influence of both modeling approaches on the thermal efficiency of an external tubular receiver has been studied in a thermal FE model of the Solar Two receiver.

  6. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity Comparisons for Warm Season Convective Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Hoeth, Brian; Blottman, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    Mesoscale weather conditions can significantly affect the space launch and landing operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). During the summer months, land-sea interactions that occur across KSC and CCAFS lead to the formation of a sea breeze, which can then spawn deep convection. These convective processes often last 60 minutes or less and pose a significant challenge to the forecasters at the National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG). The main challenge is that a "GO" forecast for thunderstorms and precipitation is required at the 90 minute deorbit decision for End Of Mission (EOM) and at the 30 minute Return To Launch Site (RTLS) decision at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Convective initiation, timing, and mode also present a forecast challenge for the NWS in Melbourne, FL (MLB). The NWS MLB issues such tactical forecast information as Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts (TAFs), Spot Forecasts for fire weather and hazardous materials incident support, and severe/hazardous weather Watches, Warnings, a