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Sample records for mesothermal gold mineralisation

  1. Conflicting evidence on the timing of mesothermal and paleoplacer gold mineralisation in early Proterozoic rocks from Southwest Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    Rocks of early Proterozoic age (ca. 2100 Ma) host the major gold deposits in Ghana. The deposits are either located in mesothermal quartz vein systems or hosted in a quartz pebble conglomerate that represents a paleoplacer. Both types of mineralisation are largely confined to the Ashanti Belt, one of four parallel northeast-trending volcanic belts. While the stratigraphy and structure of the belts are similar, the Ashanti belt is characterised by a more tectonised northwest margin where most of the epigenetic gold deposits are located. In these deposits, gold mineralisation is located in faults that parallel the regional trend of the belts and were active late in the deformation history of the terrane. The auriferous quartz pebble conglomerate is part of a clastic sequence that is largely derived from the adjacent volcanic and plutonic rocks with the gold widely regarded as having originated from eroded vein deposits. Structural data, however, show that both the volcanic rocks and clastic sequence were deformed jointly prior to epigenetic gold mineralisation. Thus, the quartz vein deposits could not have been the source of the paleoplacer mineralisation. The paleoplacer gold could have originated from one of several possible sources but none has been unequivocally identified.

  2. High-angle reverse faults, fluid-pressure cycling, and mesothermal gold-quartz deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.; Robert, Francois; Poulsen, K. Howard

    1988-06-01

    Many mesothermal gold-quartz deposits are localized along high-angle reverse or reverse-oblique shear zones within greenstone belt terrains. Characteristically, these fault-hosted vein deposits exhibit a mixed "brittle-ductile" style of deformation (discrete shears and vein fractures as well as a schistose shear-zone fabric) developed under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Many of the vein systems are of considerable vertical extent (>2 km); they include steeply dipping fault veins (lenticular veins subparallel to the shear-zone schistosity) and, in some cases, associated flats (subhorizontal extensional veins). Textures of both vein sets record histories of incremental deposition. We infer that the vein sets developed near the roofs of active metamorphic/magmatic systems and represent the roots of brittle, high-angle reverse fault systems extending upward through the seismogenic regime. Friction theory and field relations suggest that the high-angle reverse faults acted as valves, promoting cyclic fluctuations in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to hydrostatic values. Because of their unfavorable orientation in the prevailing stress field, reactivation of the faults could only occur when fluid pressure exceeded the lithostatic load. Seismogenic fault failure then created fracture permeability within the rupture zone, allowing sudden draining of the geopressured reservoir at depth. Incremental opening of flats is attributed to the prefailure stage of supralithostatic fluid pressures; deposition within fault veins is attributed to the immediate postfailure discharge phase. Hydrothermal self-sealing leads to reaccumulation of fluid pressure and a repetition of the cycle. Mutual crosscutting relations between the two vein sets are a natural consequence of the cyclicity of the process. Abrupt fluid-pressure fluctuations from this fault-valve behavior of reverse faults seem likely to be integral to the mineralizing process at this

  3. Rear polymineral zone of near-veined metasomatic aureole in mesothermal Zun-Holba gold deposit (Eastern Sayan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, T.; Kucherenko, I.; Abramova, R.

    2015-11-01

    Unique data of the mineralogical and petrochemical zoning of near- veined metasomatic aureole of mesothermal Zun-Holba gold deposit are presented and discussed. It was established that mineralogical and petrochemical zoning order is based on Korzhinsky theory describing the differential component mobility. However, the internal polymineral zone structure of metasomatic column in Zun-Holba deposit does not comply with Korzhinsky concept describing the mono-mineral composition of axial (ore-bearing quartz veins) and binary-mineral rear (quartz-sericite) zones. Mineral zoning complication is governed by component diffusion (from fractured fluid to pores) and pulsation mode of metalliferous fluid input into the mineralization area.

  4. Young orogenic gold mineralisation in active collisional mountains, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, Dave; Upton, Phaedra; Yu, Bing-Sheng; Horton, Travis; Chen, Yue-Gau

    2010-10-01

    Gold-bearing vein systems in the high mountains of Taiwan are part of the youngest tectonic-hydrothermal system on Earth. Tectonic collision initiated in the Pliocene has stacked Eocene-Miocene marine sedimentary rocks to form steep mountains nearly 4 km high. Thinner portions of the sedimentary pile (˜5 km) are currently producing hydrocarbons in a fold and thrust belt, and orogenic gold occurs in quartz veins in thicker parts of the pile (˜10 km) in the Slate Belt that underlies the mountains. Metamorphic fluids (2-5 wt.% NaCl equivalent) are rising from the active greenschist facies metamorphic zone and transporting gold released during rock recrystallisation. Metamorphic fluid flow at the Pingfengshan historic gold mine was focussed in well-defined (4 km3) fracture zones with networks of quartz veins, whereas large surrounding volumes of rock are largely unveined. Gold and arsenopyrite occur in several superimposed vein generations, with ankeritic alteration of host rocks superimposed on chlorite-calcite alteration zones as fluids cooled and became out of equilibrium with the host rocks. Mineralising fluids had δ18O near +10‰, δ13C was between -1‰ and -6‰ and these fluids were in isotopic equilibrium with host rocks at ˜350°C. Ankeritic veins were emplaced in extensional sites in kink fold axial surfaces, formed as the rock mass was transported laterally from compressional to extensional regimes in the orogen. Rapid exhumation (>2 mm/year) of the Slate Belt is causing a widespread shallow conductive thermal anomaly without igneous intrusions. Meteoric water is penetrating into the conductive thermal anomaly to contribute to crustal fluid flow and generate shallow boiling fluids (˜250°C) with fluid temperature greater than rock temperature. The meteoric-hydrothermal system impinges on, but causes only minor dilution of, the gold mineralisation system at depth.

  5. The Modi Taung-Nankwe gold district, Slate belt, central Myanmar: mesothermal veins in a Mesozoic orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. H. G.; Ausa, C. A.; Deiparine, L.; Hlaing, T.; Htay, N.; Khine, A.

    2004-07-01

    The recently discovered quartz-gold veins comprising the Modi Taung-Nankwe gold district in central Myanmar are largely hosted by mudstones of the late Palaeozoic Slate belt. Mesozoic rocks of the Paunglaung-Mawchi zone separate the Slate belt from the Shan Scarp and Shan Plateau to the east. At Modi Taung 5 km of exploration adits indicate that the veins, within steeply dipping oblique reverse-slip shear zones, are displaced by movements along the shears, intruded by late Jurassic calc-alkaline dykes, and offset on conjugate cross-faults. Drill intercepts show that mineralization extends vertically for more than 500 m. Coarse visible gold, book-and-ribbon texture and stylolitic laminations, and trace metal values are consistent with mineralization at mesothermal depths of several kilometres in the brittle-ductile regime. Our field observations suggest that mineralization took place in the early Jurassic following collision of Myanmar on the passive western margin of a Greater Shan-Thai continental block with an oceanic arc on the overriding plate to the west. Collision generated intra-continental thrusting in and east of the Paunglaung-Mawchi zone, metamorphism of Plateau rocks thrust west beneath the Slate belt to form the Mogok Metamorphics, and ascent of mineralizing fluids expelled from dehydrating underthrust rocks. Reversal in orogenic polarity initiated late Jurassic eastward subduction of oceanic crust beneath Myanmar, and generation of a magmatic arc with dykes cutting the quartz-gold veins. Renewed east-directed thrusting translated the Slate belt over arc clastics, and probably resulted in exhumation of the Mogok Metamorphics and offsets of the veins on conjugate faults. Young K/Ar, Rb 87/Sr 86 and Ar 40/Ar 39 ages on the Mogok Metamorphic belt imply renewed Tertiary uplift and possibly intrusion of mid-Tertiary or Palaeogene granites.

  6. Age constraints of the Wassa and Benso mesothermal gold deposits, Ashanti Belt, Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Avila, Luis A.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Perrouty, Stéphane; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti Belt in Ghana hosts numerous multi-million ounce gold deposits and is one of the most richly gold endowed Paleoproterozoic belts of the West African Craton. This work shows that the Wassa mineralized intrusion is part of the Sefwi Group. This unit at Wassa is strongly magnetic and show a distinctly high response in regional magnetic data sets compared to other units of equivalent age within the belt. The unit is inferred to be a lateral extension of an exposed fragment of what defines the substrate to the Tarkwa Basin sediments. The Wassa deposit, located in the eastern limb of the belt, is hosted within mafic to intermediate volcanic flows that are interbedded with minor horizons of volcaniclastics, clastic sediments. The clastic sediments include wackes and magnetite rich sedimentary layers, presumably derived from banded iron formations. The previously described sequence is intruded by syn-volcanic mafic intrusives and felsic porphyries rocks that are all part of the Birimian stratigraphy. Two new key SHRIMP II U-Pb ages were determined as part of this study: a new age of 2191 ± 6 Ma was determined on magmatic zircon grains of the Wassa porphyry host rock, which now represents the oldest known felsic intrusion hosting gold mineralization in the Ashanti Belt region. The Benso gold deposit system, which is located in the eastern limb of the Ashanti Belt approximately 38 km southwest of Wassa is hosted within a series of volcanic units intruded by mafic to intermediate units. A SHRIMP II U-Pb age of 2157 ± 5 Ma was determined from magmatic zircons obtained from a granodiorite of the G-Zone of the Benso deposit. This granodiorite is the main host rock for gold mineralization and thus the age provides an upper constraint for mineral emplacement. The newly determined ages provide an upper constraint for the gold mineralization within this region of the Ashanti Belt. They also support recent structural studies that have interpreted that the Wassa

  7. Gold mineralisation at the Lady Bountiful Mine, Western Australia: An example of a granitoid-hosted Archaean lode gold deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, K. F.; Bennett, J. M.

    1993-12-01

    The Lady Bountiful granitoid-hosted lode gold deposit, located in the mid-greenschist facies metamorphosed Ora Banda greenstone sequence, is hosted predominantly by the late-tectonic Liberty Granodiorite. Gold mineralisation is localised along quartz-veined, sinistral, brittle fault-zone(s) that transect the boundary between the Liberty Granodiorite and Mt Pleasant sill. Quartz vein textures indicate two stages of a single gold-related vein-development event, with high-grade gold mineralisation restricted to the second stage. Ore minerals include pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, sphalerite, Au-Ag-Bi-Pb-tellurides, and native gold. Fluid infitration has resulted in narrow (<1 m) bleached wallrock alteration envelopes to the fault zones comprising albite-K-mica ±chlorite±calcite±rutile assemblages. Temperature-pressure conditions varied from Stage I (300°±50°C, ≈2 kbar) to Stage II (250°±50°C, ≈0.5 to 2 kbar), with the hydrothermal fluid in both stages characterised by X(CO2)≤0.15 and moderate salinity (≈1.28 m NaCl). Intermittent phase separation of Stage II mineralising fluids, initiated by pressure fluctuations in dilational sites, and/or fluid-dominated fluid: wallrock interaction, are invoked as the dominant depositional mechanisms. The granitoid-hosted Lady Bountiful lode gold deposit shares many features with other granitoid-hosted lode gold deposits in the Yilgarn Craton and the Superior Province. Granitoid-hosted lode gold deposits, such as the Lady Bountiful deposit, provide additional evidence that the dominant control on the localisation of gold mineralisation within a granitoid host is structure, with competency contrasts playing a significant role. Furthermore, the hydrothermal wallrock alteraction and orefluid chemistry characteristics of the granitoid-hosted lode gold deposits are comparable to those established for greenstone-hosted lode gold mineralisation.

  8. The geology and mineralisation at the Golden Pride gold deposit, Nzega Greenstone Belt, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, I. M. A.; Bierlein, F. P.; Standing, J. S.; Davidson, G.

    2009-10-01

    The Golden Pride gold deposit (˜3 Moz) is located in the central part of the Nzega Greenstone Belt at the southern margin of the Lake Victoria Goldfields in Tanzania. It represents an inferred Late Archaean, orogenic gold deposit and is hosted in intensely deformed meta-sedimentary rocks in the hanging wall of the approximately E-W striking Golden Pride Shear Zone. The hanging-wall sequence also includes felsic (quartz porphyritic) to mafic (lamprophyric) intrusions, as well as banded iron formations. Hydrothermal alteration phases associated with mineralisation are dominated by sericite and chlorite. Two main ore types can be distinguished, chlorite and silica ore, both occupying dilational sites and structural intersections in the hanging wall of the main shear zone. Sulphide minerals in both ore types include pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, pyrite and accessory sphalerite, galena, sulphosalts and Ni-Co-Bi sulphides. Gold and tellurides are late in the paragenetic sequence and associated with a secondary phase of pyrrhotite deposition. Sulphur isotope compositions range from -6 to 7 per mil and are interpreted to reflect contributions from two distinct sources to the mineralising fluids in the Golden Pride gold deposit. A redox change, potentially induced by the intrusion of mafic melts, together with structural elements in the hanging wall of the Golden Pride Shear Zone, are interpreted to be the main controls on gold mineralisation in this deposit.

  9. Deposition conditions and distribution features of native gold individuals in the veins of the Tokur mesothermal deposit, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, N. S.; Neroda, O. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper discusses factors in the deposition and concentration of native gold and the spatial distribution of its individuals within the sufide-poor gold-quartz veins at the mesoabyssal Tokur deposit. The major factors in deposition of gold were sealing of the hydrothermal system, a sudden drop in fluid pressure, and repeated immiscibility in the fluid. Native gold was deposited in relation to initial acts of prolonged and discrete opening and preopening of cavities in three mineral assemblages of the productive association II. Most native gold individuals with a visible size of 0.1-1.5 mm were together with the early generation of quartz 2 on cavity walls adjacent to altered rocks. This is caused by the high content of Au complexes in initial hydrothermal solutions favoring rapid oversaturation during cavity formation. Gold fills interstices between grains of quartz 2 throughout the deposit and mineral assemblages. The vertical-flow distribution of gold has been established in economic veins; the upper and middle levels are enriched in gold, and samples with the greatest gold grade of 100-500 g/t or higher are concentrated there. This is caused both by the predominance of mineral association II at these levels and probable natural flotation of gold grains contained in the gold-gas associate for immiscibility of the hydrothermal fluid at the second stage of the ore-forming process.

  10. Geological and geochemical implications of the genesis of the Qolqoleh orogenic gold mineralisation, Kurdistan Province (Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghipour, Batoul; Ahmadnejad, Farhad

    2015-03-01

    The Qolqoleh gold deposit is located in the northwestern part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ), within the NE-SW trending Qolqoleh shear zone. Oligocene granitoids, Cretaceous meta-limestones, schists and metavolcanics are the main lithological units. Chondrite-normalised REE patterns of the ore-hosting metavolcanics indicate REE enrichment relative to hanging wall (chlorite-sericite schist) and footwall (meta-limestone) rocks. The pattern also reflects an enrichment in LREE relative to HREE. It seems that the LREE enrichment is related to the circulation of SO42- and CO2-bearing fluids and regional metamorphism in the Qolqoleh shear zone. Both positive and negative Eu anomalies are observed in shear-zone metavolcanics. These anomalies are related to the degree of plagioclase alteration during gold mineralisation and hydrothermal alteration. In progressing from a metavolcanic protomylonite to an ultramylonite, significant changes occurred in the major/trace element and REE concentration. Utilising an Al-Fe-Ti isocon for the ore-hosting metavolcanics shows that Sc, Y, K, U, P, and M-HREE (except Eu) are relatively unchanged; S, As, Ag, Au, Ca, LOI, Rb and LREE are enriched, and Sr, Ba, Eu, Cr, Co and Ni decrease with an increasing degree of deformation. Based on geochemical features and comparison with other well-known shear zones in the world, the study area is best classified as an Isovolume-Gain (IVG) type shear zone and orogenic type gold mineralisation. Based on the number of phases observed at room temperature and their microthermometric behaviour, three fluid inclusion types have been recognised in quartz-sulphide and quartz-calcite veins: Type I monophase aqueous inclusions, Type II two-phase liquid-vapour (L-V) inclusions which are subdivided into two groups based on the homogenisation temperature (Th): a) L-V inclusions with Th from 205 to 255°C and melting temperature of last ice (Tm) from -3 to -9°C. b) L-V inclusions with higher Th from 335 to 385

  11. Controls on mineralisation in the Sierra Foothills gold province, central California, USA: A GIS-based reconnaissance prospectivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bierlein, F.P.; Northover, H.J.; Groves, D.I.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Marsh, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of spatial relationships between the location, abundance and size of orogenic-gold deposits in the highly endowed Sierra Foothills gold province in California, via the combination of field studies and a GIS-based analysis, illustrates the power of such an approach to the characterisation of important parameters of mineral systems, and the prediction of districts likely to host economic mineralisation. Regional- to deposit-scale reconnaissance mapping suggests that deposition of gold-bearing quartz veins occurred in second- and third-order, east-over-west thrusts during regional east - west compression and right-lateral transpression. At the district-scale, significant zones of mineralisation correspond with such transpressional reactivation zones and dilational jogs that developed during the Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous along the misaligned segments of first-order faults throughout the Sierra Nevada Foothills Metamorphic Belt. Field-based observations and interpretation of GIS data (including solid geology, structural elements, deposit locations, magnetics, gravity) also highlight the importance of structural permeability contrasts, rheological gradients, and variations in fault orientation for localising mineralisation. Although this approach confirms empirical findings and produces promising results at the province scale, enhanced geological, structural, geophysical and geochronological data density is required to generate regionally consistent, high-quality input layers that improve predictive targeting at the goldfield to deposit-scale.

  12. The structural controls of gold mineralisation within the Bardoc Tectonic Zone, Eastern Goldfields Province, Western Australia: implications for gold endowment in shear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, Anthony A.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Bierlein, Frank P.

    2007-08-01

    The Bardoc Tectonic Zone (BTZ) of the late Archaean Eastern Goldfields Province, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, is physically linked along strike to the Boulder-Lefroy Shear Zone (BLSZ), one of the richest orogenic gold shear systems in the world. However, gold production in the BTZ has only been one order of magnitude smaller than that of the BLSZ (˜100 t Au vs >1,500 t Au). The reasons for this difference can be found in the relative timing, distribution and style(s) of deformation that controlled gold deposition in the two shear systems. Deformation within the BTZ was relatively simple and is associated with tight to iso-clinal folding and reverse to transpressive shear zones over a <12-km-wide area of high straining, where lithological contacts have been rotated towards the plane of maximum shortening. These structures control gold mineralisation and also correspond to the second major shortening phase of the province (D2). In contrast, shearing within the BLSZ is concentrated to narrow shear zones (<2 km wide) cutting through rocks at a range of orientations that underwent more complex dip- and strike-slip deformation, possibly developed throughout the different deformation phases recorded in the region (D1-D4). Independent of other physico-chemical factors, these differences provided for effective fluid localisation to host units with greater competency contrasts during a prolonged mineralisation process in the BLSZ as compared to the more simple structural history of the BTZ.

  13. The Sarylakh and Sentachan gold-antimony deposits, Sakha-Yakutia: A case of combined mesothermal gold-quartz and epithermal stibnite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Gamynin, G. N.; Vikent'eva, O. V.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Prokop'ev, A. V.

    2010-10-01

    New mineralogical, thermobarometric, isotopic, and geochemical data provide evidence for long and complex formation history of the Sarylakh and Sentachan Au-Sb deposits conditioned by regional geodynamics and various types of ore mineralization, differing in age and source of ore matter combined in the same ore-localizing structural units. The deposits are situated in the Taryn metallogenic zone of the East Yakutian metallogenic belt in the central Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Region. They are controlled by the regional Adycha-Taryn Fault Zone that separates the Kular-Nera Terrane and the western part of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The fault extends along the strike of the northwest-trending linear folds and is deep-rooted and repeatedly reactivated. The orebodies are mineralized crush zones accompanied by sulfidated (up to 100 m wide) quartz-sericite metasomatic rocks and replacing dickite-pyrophyllite alteration near stibnite veinlets. Two stages of low-sulfide gold-quartz and stibnite mineralization are distinguished. The formation conditions of the early milk white quartz in orebodies with stibnite mineralization at the Sarylakh and Sentachan deposits are similar: temperature interval 340-280°C, salt concentration in fluids 6.8-1.6 wt % NaCl equiv, fluid pressure 3430-1050 bar, and sodic bicarbonate fluid composition. The ranges of fluid salinity overlapped at both deposits. In the late regenerated quartz that attends stibnite mineralization, fluid inclusions contain an aqueous solution with salinity of 3.2 wt % NaCl equiv and are homogenized into liquid at 304-189°C. Syngenetic gas inclusions contain nitrogen 0.19 g/cm3 in density. The pressure of 300 bar is estimated at 189°C. The composition of the captured fluid is characterized as K-Ca bicarbonatesulfate. The sulfur isotopic composition has been analyzed in pyrite and arsenopyrite from ore and metasomatic zones, as well as in coarse-, medium-, and fine-grained stibnite varieties subjected to

  14. Age constraints on felsic intrusions, metamorphism and gold mineralisation in the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, NE Bahia State, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mello, E.F.; Xavier, R.P.; McNaughton, N.J.; Hagemann, S.G.; Fletcher, I.; Snee, L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe mass spectrometer (SHRIMP) ages of zircon, monazite and xenotime crystals from felsic intrusive rocks from the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt show two development stages between 2,152 and 2,130 Ma, and between 2,130 and 2,080 Ma. The older intrusions yielded ages of 2,152??6 Ma in monazite crystals and 2,155??9 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Trilhado granodiorite, and ages of 2,130??7 Ma and 2,128??8 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Teofila??ndia tonalite. The emplacement age of the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome as indicated by a 2,080??2-Ma xenotime age for a granite dyke probably marks the end of the felsic magmatism. This age shows good agreement with the Ar-Ar plateau age of 2,080??5 Ma obtained in hornblendes from an amphibolite and with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2,076??10 Ma in detrital zircon crystals from a quartzite, interpreted as the age of the peak of the metamorphism. The predominance of inherited zircons in the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome suggests that the basement of the supracrustal rocks was composed of Archaean continental crust with components of 2,937??16, 3,111??13 and 3,162??13 Ma. Ar-Ar plateau ages of 2,050??4 Ma and 2,054??2 Ma on hydrothermal muscovite samples from the Fazenda Brasileiro gold deposit are interpreted as minimum ages for gold mineralisation and close to the true age of gold deposition. The Ar-Ar data indicate that the mineralisation must have occurred less than 30 million years after the peak of the metamorphism, or episodically between 2,080 Ma and 2,050 Ma, during uplift and exhumation of the orogen. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  15. Metal fractionation of cadmium, lead and arsenic of geogenic origin in topsoils from the Marrancos gold mineralisation, northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Reis, A P; Patinha, C; Ferreira da Silva, E; Sousa, A J

    2012-04-01

    The Marrancos gold mineralisation has a chemical assemblage of Fe-As-Se-Bi-Au-Ag-Te-(Cu-Pb-Zn-Sn-W). The -200 mesh of 144 topsoil samples was analysed by ICP-MS to determine total contents of 53 elements that include potentially harmful elements like Cd, As and Pb. The soil geochemistry shows that some trace elements occur in considerably high concentrations. On the basis of data for total metal concentrations, 10 topsoil samples were selected to carry out a metal fractionation study using a selective extraction method. A set of four leaches of increasing strength was used sequentially in the soil samples. Across the study area, there is some evidence of past mining and exploration activity, indicating that these soils may be locally disturbed. The shallow mineralised quartz veins were exploited for gold by the Romans. Several galleries were constructed during the 2nd World War, probably for the exploration of quartz-cassiterite-wolframite veins. However, the main mineralised body in depth was never explored. The results of metal fractionation show different partitions for the three elements. Total Cd concentrations in these soils are low, with a median value of 0.1 mg/kg. In average, 12% of total Cd is adsorbed by clays and/or co-precipitated with carbonates, and 19% is bounded to Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides. However, the low concentrations indicate that the metal does not represent an immediate risk to human health. For Pb, metal fractionation shows that, on average, 22% of Pb is adsorbed by amorphous Fe and Mn oxides, but the samples from the northern part of the area have the major fractions of Pb in soluble forms. The low probability of exposure in this part of the study area decreases the risk posed by this heavy metal. Total As concentrations in the Marrancos soils are extremely high. A large area has As concentrations above 1,000 mg/kg. For As, metal fractions in the sulphide phase vary between 84 and 98% in the studied samples. But one sample has 20% of total As

  16. Zonation of primary haloes of Atud auriferous quartz vein deposit, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: A potential exploration model targeting for hidden mesothermal gold deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, Hassan Z.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The Atud gold mine located in the Neoproterozoic diorite and metagabbro of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt has been initially excavated during Pharaonic times. Between 1953 and 1969, the Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority performed underground prospection in the auriferous quartz vein and metasomatic alteration zones in the main Atud area, estimating a principal gold lode of 19,000 tones (16.28 g/ton), and 1600 tons of damp (1.24 g/ton). Yet the potentiality of the deposit has not been exhausted. However, for exploration of hidden ore, quantitative characterization using trace elements zoning of mineralization haloes with 280 samples from surface and three underground mining levels is applied. This was through multivariate statistical analysis (Factor analysis) of 11 selected trace elements. Axial (vertical) extents of primary haloes above and beneath gently dipping orebody are also visualized to interpret the level of erosion, determine the direction of mineralizing solutions as well as to examine whether the hidden orebody is promising at the Atud mine. Axial zones of primary dispersion aureoles of trace elements are: Ag, As, S and U around the auriferous quartz veins; Cu, and Pb in the surface horizons; and Zn, Ni, Co, and U along the lower margin of mineralization zone. Gold contents in bedrock and quartz vein samples from level-42M are the highest (5.7 and 40.3 ppm, respectively). In the transverse (lateral) direction, the maximum relative accumulation of Au and Zn occurs at the Northern Shaft; Pb, Cu, As, and U at the Main Shaft; and Ag, S, Co, and Ni at the Southern Shaft. The estimated axial zonation sequence of indicator elements using the variability index is Pb → Cu → Ag → Au → As → S → Ni → Co → U → Zn. According to this zonation, an index such as (Pb × Cu)D/(U × Zn)D can be a significant for predicting the Au potentiality at a particular depth. In addition, the Pb/U zonality index is an appropriate indicator for the

  17. Synmetamorphic carbon mobility and graphite enrichment in metaturbidites as a precursor to orogenic gold mineralisation, Otago Schist, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henne, Anicia; Craw, Dave

    2012-10-01

    The Macraes orogenic gold deposit is hosted by a graphitic micaceous schist containing auriferous porphyroblastic sulphides. The host rock resembles zones of unmineralised micaceous graphitic pyritic schists, derived from argillaceous protoliths, that occur locally in background pelitic Otago Schist metasediments. This study was aimed at determining the relationship between these similar rock types, and whether the relationship had implications for ore formation. Argillites in the protolith turbidites of the Otago Schist metamorphic belt contain minor amounts of detrital organic matter (<0.1 wt.%) and diagenetic pyrite (<0.3 wt.% S). The detrital organic carbon was mobilised by metamorphic-hydrothermal fluids and redeposited as graphite in low-grade metaturbidites (pumpellyite-actinolite and greenschist facies). This carbon mobility occurred through >50 million years of evolution of the metamorphic belt, from development of sheared argillite in the Jurassic, to postmetamorphic ductile extension in the Cretaceous. Introduced graphite is structurally controlled and occurs with metamorphic muscovite and chlorite as veins and slicken-sided shears, with some veins having >50% noncarbonate carbon. Graphitic foliation seams in low-grade micaceous schist and metamorphic quartz veins contain equant graphite porphyroblasts up to 2 mm across that are composed of crystallographically homogeneous graphite crystals. Graphite reflectance is anisotropic and ranges from ~1% to ~8% (green light). Texturally similar porphyroblastic pyrite has grown in micaceous schist (up to 10 wt.% S), metamorphic quartz veins and associated muscovite-rich shears. These pyritic schists are weakly enriched in arsenic (up to 60 ppm). The low-grade metamorphic mobility and concentration of graphite in micaceous schists is interpreted to be a precursor process that structurally and geochemically prepared parts of the Otago Schist belt for later (more restricted) gold mineralisation. Economic amounts of

  18. Evaluation of structural and geological factors in orogenic gold type mineralisation in the Kervian area, north-west Iran, using airborne geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasi, Alireza; Jafarirad, Alireza; Kheyrollahi, Hasan; Rahimi, Mana; Afzal, Peyman

    2014-03-01

    The Piranshahr-Sardasht-Saqqez Zone (PSSZ) in the north-west of the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone (SSZ) hosts some major Iranian gold deposits. In the south-east of PSSZ, there is a north-east trending orogenic gold belt which contains three gold deposits/occurrences (Qolqoleh, Kervian and Ghabaghloujeh). In this research, studies are focused on processing and analysing airborne magnetic and radiometric data in order to find applicable indicators for prospecting gold in this area. Former studies on the gold deposits/occurrences in the study area suggest three essential factors in local orogenic gold mineralisation: (1) intersecting deep bending structures/shear zones, (2) Fe-rich mafic meta-volcanic lithologies (primary source and host rocks) and (3) altered mylonitic granites (secondary host rock). Geological structures and lithological contacts can be mapped based on locating edges in the magnetic field at different depths. In this study, we extracted the structure from aeromagnetic data by reduction to the pole, upward continuation and applying a tilt derivative filter to the horizontal derivative of the upward continued data. Upward continuation was to several levels from 500 to 4000 m. Afterwards, a 3D architecture was built based on extracted subsurface lineaments in different levels. This 3D model can assist in the visualisation of the underground shape of structures that may influence gold mineralisation. Moreover, mafic meta-volcanic rocks in the study area, which contain magnetic minerals such as magnetite, titanomagnetite and ilmenite, can be mapped using aeromagnetic data. Mylonitic granites, which are the other host rock in the deposits, were mapped using airborne radiometric data.

  19. Association of gold with uraninite and pyrobitumen in the metavolcanic rock hosted hydrothermal Au-U mineralisation at Rompas, Peräpohja Schist Belt, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Ferenc; Oduro, Harry; Cook, Nick D. J.; Pohjolainen, Esa; Takács, Ágnes; O'Brien, Hugh; Pakkanen, Lassi; Johanson, Bo; Wirth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Peräpohja Schist Belt comprises a supracrustal sequence of quartzites, mafic volcanics and volcaniclastics, carbonate rocks, black shales, mica schists and greywackes which were deposited from ca. 2.44 to ~1.91 Ga, during the rifting of the Archaean basement in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian shield. Metamorphism and multiple folding of the basin fill took place during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) followed by intrusions of late-orogenic (1.84-1.80 Ga) and post-orogenic granitoids (1.79-1.76 Ga). The Rompas Au-U mineralisation is hosted by deformed calcsilicate veins in mafic volcanic rocks and locally contains very high grade (>10,000 g/t Au) gold pockets with strict spatial association of gold minerals to uraninite and pyrobitumen. Chemical ages from the unaltered domains in the structure of uraninite indicate a 1.95-1.90 Ga age for the deposition of the primary, high temperature (e.g. U/Th < 100 in uraninite) hydrothermal uranium mineralisation. These data are in agreement with the results of previous U-Pb dating of uraninite by SIMS. Textural evidence suggests that metamorphic recrystallisation of the uraninite-bearing quartz-dolomite veins into calcsilicate mineral assemblages during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) was followed by a hydrocarbon-bearing fluid flow event and radiolytic polymerisation of hydrocarbons around grains of uraninite. Gold precipitated during a subsequent hydrothermal process in the fractures of uraninite, as well as in the cracks and on the botryoidal surfaces of uraninite-pyrobitumen nodules. Remobilisation and redeposition of uranium by these hydrothermal events produced secondary uraninite grains with chemical ages between 1.85 and 1.65 Ga. Native gold is associated with galena, altaite, hunchunite, nickeline and rare cobaltite, Pb-bearing maldonite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and titanite. Raman spectra show disordered structure of undeformed pyrobitumen nodules in contrast with the well

  20. Association of gold with uraninite and pyrobitumen in the metavolcanic rock hosted hydrothermal Au-U mineralisation at Rompas, Peräpohja Schist Belt, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Ferenc; Oduro, Harry; Cook, Nick D. J.; Pohjolainen, Esa; Takács, Ágnes; O'Brien, Hugh; Pakkanen, Lassi; Johanson, Bo; Wirth, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Peräpohja Schist Belt comprises a supracrustal sequence of quartzites, mafic volcanics and volcaniclastics, carbonate rocks, black shales, mica schists and greywackes which were deposited from ca. 2.44 to ~1.91 Ga, during the rifting of the Archaean basement in the eastern part of the Fennoscandian shield. Metamorphism and multiple folding of the basin fill took place during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) followed by intrusions of late-orogenic (1.84-1.80 Ga) and post-orogenic granitoids (1.79-1.76 Ga). The Rompas Au-U mineralisation is hosted by deformed calcsilicate veins in mafic volcanic rocks and locally contains very high grade (>10,000 g/t Au) gold pockets with strict spatial association of gold minerals to uraninite and pyrobitumen. Chemical ages from the unaltered domains in the structure of uraninite indicate a 1.95-1.90 Ga age for the deposition of the primary, high temperature (e.g. U/Th < 100 in uraninite) hydrothermal uranium mineralisation. These data are in agreement with the results of previous U-Pb dating of uraninite by SIMS. Textural evidence suggests that metamorphic recrystallisation of the uraninite-bearing quartz-dolomite veins into calcsilicate mineral assemblages during the Svecofennian orogeny (1.9-1.8 Ga) was followed by a hydrocarbon-bearing fluid flow event and radiolytic polymerisation of hydrocarbons around grains of uraninite. Gold precipitated during a subsequent hydrothermal process in the fractures of uraninite, as well as in the cracks and on the botryoidal surfaces of uraninite-pyrobitumen nodules. Remobilisation and redeposition of uranium by these hydrothermal events produced secondary uraninite grains with chemical ages between 1.85 and 1.65 Ga. Native gold is associated with galena, altaite, hunchunite, nickeline and rare cobaltite, Pb-bearing maldonite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and titanite. Raman spectra show disordered structure of undeformed pyrobitumen nodules in contrast with the well

  1. Critical Mineralising Plumbing Systems - Analysis Using Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Crustal plumbing systems consist of an interconnected set of fractures. Recently, fracture systems have been viewed as examples of critical systems (Perez-Reche et al., 2008). Various styles of critical systems can be distinguished. The classical form of critical behaviour occurs when some tuning parameter (such as elastic modulus or stress) reaches a critical value that initiates fracture. This is expressed as a single catastrophic event which is repeated as the system reloads. Another extreme in behaviour is self-organised criticality (SOC) where the system fails through the development of small avalanches of fractures with continuous forcing. Perez-Reche et al. (2008) discuss systems that can evolve from classical criticality to self-organised criticality or to other regimes. Each regime is characterised spatially by a range in the fractal dimension, D. Massive catastrophic behaviour (called SNAP), in two dimensions, is characterised by1 ˜ D ˜ 1.5. SOC has D ? 1.5whereas distributed small avalanches (called POP) are characterised by1.5 ˜ D ˜ 2. The aim is to distinguish SNAP terrains from POP terrains which seem highly probable mineralising plumbing systems based on previous modelling (Miller and Nur, 2000) and work by Sibson (1992), Cox (1999) and Cox et al. (2001) that portrays the evolution of the plumbing system as a swarm of seismic aftershocks; this constitutes a typical POP regime. We explore whether or not the plumbing systems for hydrothermal systems have fractal dimensions in the POP-range for critical systems, and whether or not there is more diagnostic information to be obtained from the multi-fractal spectrum. The hypothesis is that fracture systems analysed using wavelets define multifractal patterns which are diagnostic of hydrothermal systems. References Cox SF. Deformational controls on the dynamics of fluid flow in mesothermal gold systems. In: McCaffrey K, Lonergan L, Wilkinson J, editors. Fractures, Fluid Flow and Mineralization

  2. Constraints on the composition of ore fluids and implications for mineralising events at the Cleo gold deposit, Eastern Goldfields Province, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.M.; Johnson, C.A.; Watling, R.J.; Premo, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Cleo gold deposit, 55 km south of Laverton in the Eastern Goldfields Province of Western Australia, is characterised by banded iron-formation (BIF)-hosted ore zones in the gently dipping Sunrise Shear Zone and high-grade vein-hosted ore in the Western Lodes. There is evidence that gold mineralisation in the Western Lodes (which occurred at ca 2655 Ma) post-dates the majority of displacement along the Sunrise Shear Zone, but it remains uncertain if the ore in both structures formed simultaneously or separately. Overall, the Pb, Nd, Sr, C. O and S isotopic compositions of ore-related minerals from both the Western Lodes and ore zones in the Sunrise Shear Zone are similar. Early low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids and late high-salinity fluids with similar characteristics are trapped in inclusions in quartz veins from both the Sunrise Shear Zone and the Western Lodes. The early CO2, CO2-H2O, and H2O- dominant inclusions are interpreted as being related to ore formation, and to have formed from a single low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluid as a result of intermittent fluid immiscibility. Homogenisation temperatures indicate that these inclusions were trapped at approximately 280??C and at approximately 4 km depth, in the deeper epizonal range. Differences between the ore zones are detected in the trace-element composition of gold samples, with gold from the Sunrise Shear Zone enriched in Ni, Pb, Sn, Te and Zn, and depleted In As, Bi, Cd, Cu and Sb, relative to gold from the Western Lodes. Although there are differences in gold composition between the Sunrise Shear Zone and Western Lodes, and hence the metal content of ore fluids may have varied slightly between the different ore zones, no other systematic fluid or solute differences are detected between the ore zones. Given the fact that the ore fluids in each zone have very similar bulk properties, the considerable differences in gold grade, sulfide mineral abundance, and ore textures between the two ore zones

  3. Structural controls, temperature-pressure conditions and fluid evolution of orogenic gold mineralisation at the Betam mine, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem A.

    2008-01-01

    migration. Homogenisation temperatures of the trans-granular H2O-NaCl inclusions are much lower (130-221°C), implying different fluids late in the shear zone formation. Fluid densities calculated from aqueous-carbonic inclusions along a single trail are between 0.88 and 0.98 g/cm3, and the resulting isochores suggest trapping pressures of 2-2.6 kbar. Based on the arsenopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite cotectic, arsenopyrite (30.4-30.7 wt.% As) associated with gold inclusions indicates a temperature range of 325-344°C. This ore paragenesis constrains f S2 to the range of 10-10 to 10-8.5 bar. Under such conditions, gold was likely transported mainly as bisulphide complexes by low salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids and precipitated because of variations in pH and f O2 through pressure fluctuation and CO2 effervescence as the ore fluids infiltrated the shear zone, along with precipitation of carbonate and sericite. Wallrock sulphidation also likely contributed to destabilising the gold-bisulphide complexes and precipitating gold in the hydrothermal alteration zone adjacent to the mineralised quartz veins.

  4. Processes of attenuation of dissolved arsenic downstream from historic gold mine sites, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Haffert, Laura; Craw, Dave

    2008-11-01

    Mine and processing sites in the mesothermal gold deposits of the Reefton gold field, New Zealand, generate extremely high dissolved As concentrations (up to 59 mg/L). Attenuation of these waters takes place by at least one of the three mechanisms: (1) precipitation of the secondary arsenic mineral scorodite, (2) chemisorption onto iron oxyhydroxide (HFO) and (3) dilution with regional catchment water. The presence and effectiveness of these mechanisms vary among the three studied catchments. A strong physiochemical control on arsenic attenuation was identified due to a chemical gradient within the gold field itself and processing methods, which can generate site specific arsenic minerals, such as arsenolite. Precipitation of scorodite only occurs in the presence of dissolving arsenolite, which is a roasting by-product present at two of the studied sites. Abundant HFO is generated in the pyritic mesothermal part of the gold field, and here chemisorption onto HFO is the dominant attenuation process. In the non-pyritic part of the gold field, HFO is mainly produced as a result of ankerite dissolution but only where sufficiently exposed mineralised rock is present. In the absence of significant adsorption sites, dissolved As is attenuated only via less effective dilution and ecosystem guidelines are exceeded over kilometres downstream from the mineralised zone until drainage waters are diluted by regional catchment water. Catchment morphology was identified as a major control on dilution. Despite the presence of strong As point sources upstream, mine-related As contributes <10% to the regional As river load in all three catchments. On a regional scale As mobility across a wide range of pH regimes reveals a strong control of scorodite, which has already been observed locally. PMID:18691740

  5. Mineralogical, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope constraints on mechanisms of ore deposition at the Samgwang mine (Republic of Korea)—a mesothermal, vein-hosted gold-silver deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Bong Chul; Lee, Hyun Koo; White, Noel C.

    2010-02-01

    The Samgwang mine is located in the Cheongyang gold district (Cheonan Metallogenic Province) of the Republic of Korea. It consists of eight massive, gold-bearing quartz veins that filled NE- and NW-striking fractures along fault zones in Precambrian granitic gneiss of the Gyeonggi massif. Their mineralogy and paragenesis allow two separate vein-forming episodes to be recognized, temporally separated by a major faulting event. The ore minerals occur in quartz and calcite of stage I, associated with fracturing and healing of veins. Hydrothermal wall-rock alteration minerals of stage I include Fe-rich chlorite (Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios 0.74-0.81), muscovite, illite, K-feldspar, and minor arsenopyrite, pyrite, and carbonates. Sulfide minerals deposited along with electrum during this stage include arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, galena, argentite, pyrargyrite, and argentian tetrahedrite. Only calcite was deposited during stage II. Fluid inclusions in quartz contain three main types of C-O-H fluids: CO2-rich, CO2-H2O, and aqueous inclusions. Quartz veins related to early sulfides in stage I were deposited from H2O-NaCl-CO2 fluids (1,500-5,000 bar, average 3,200) with T htotal values of 200°C to 383°C and salinities less than about 7 wt.% NaCl equiv. Late sulfide deposition was related to H2O-NaCl fluids (140-1,300 bar, average 700) with T htotal values of 110°C to 385°C and salinities less than about 11 wt.% NaCl equiv. These fluids either evolved through immiscibility of H2O-NaCl-CO2 fluids as a result of a decrease in fluid pressure, or through mixing with deeply circulated meteoric waters as a result of uplift or unloading during mineralization, or both. Measured and calculated sulfur isotope compositions (δ34SH2S = 1.5 to 4.8‰) of hydrothermal fluids from the stage I quartz veins indicate that ore sulfur was derived mainly from a magmatic source. The calculated and measured oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (δ18OH2O

  6. Constraints on the development of orogenic style gold mineralisation at Mineral de Talca, Coastal Range, central Chile: evidence from a combined structural, mineralogical, S and Pb isotope and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, Emily A.; Holwell, David A.; Oliver, Nicholas H. S.; Mortensen, James K.; Rovardi, Matthew P.; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2015-08-01

    Mineral de Talca is a rare occurrence of Mesozoic, gold-bearing quartz vein mineralisation situated within the Coastal Range of northern Chile. Quartz veins controlled by NNW-SSE-trending faults are hosted by Devonian-Carboniferous metasediments of greenschist facies and younger, undeformed granitoid and gabbro intrusions. The principal structural control in the area is the easterly dipping, NNW-SSE-trending El Teniente Fault, which most likely developed as an extensional normal fault in the Triassic but was later reactivated as a strike-slip fault during subsequent compression. A dilational zone in the El Teniente Fault appears to have focussed fluid flow, and an array of NW-SE-trending veins is present as splays off the El Teniente Fault. Mineralised quartz veins typically up to a metre thick occur in three main orientations: (1) parallel to and within NNW-SSE-trending, E-dipping faults throughout the area; (2) along NW-SE-trending, NE-dipping structures which may also host andesite dykes; and (3) rarer E-W-trending, subvertical veins. All mineralised quartz veins show evidence of multiple fluid events with anastomosing and crosscutting veins and veinlets, some of which contain up to 3.5 vol.% base metal sulphides. Mineralogically, Au is present in three textural occurrences, identified by 3D CT scanning: (1) with arsenopyrite and pyrite in altered wall rock and along the margins of some of the veins; (2) with Cu-Pb-Zn sulphides within quartz veins; and (3) as nuggets and clusters of native Au within quartz. Fluid inclusion work indicates the presence of CO2-CH4-bearing fluids with homogenisation temperatures of ˜350 °C and aqueous fluids with low-moderate salinities (0.4-15.5 wt% NaCl eq.) with homogenisation temperatures in the range of 161-321 °C. The presence of Au with arsenopyrite and pyrite in structurally controlled quartz veins and in greenschist facies rocks with evidence of CO2-bearing fluids is consistent with an orogenic style classification for

  7. Disturbed 40Ar 39Ar systematics in hydrothermal biotite and hornblende at the Scotia gold mine, Western Australia: Evidence for argon loss associated with post-mineralisation fluid movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Adam J. R.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    1997-11-01

    Homblende and biotite that formed during gold mineralisation at the Scotia mine, Western Australia, have erratic 40Ar 39Ar release spectra and total gas ages that are ˜200-900 million year younger than the ca. 2600-2620 Ma minimum age of gold mineralisation, as given by 40Ar 39Ar plateau (muscovite) ages of crosscutting pegmatite dykes. Analysed hornblendes are dominated by magnesio hornblende but also contain small domains of ferro-actinolitic hornblende, actinolitic hornblende, and actinolite. Biotite also appears to be substantially altered to chlorite along cleavage planes. Relatively young apparent ages and high K/Ca ratios of argon released from hornblendes at temperatures less than ˜1000°C are interpreted to be the result of degassing of contaminant biotite. However, this cannot totally explain the young ages of hornblendes. Gas fractions released at furnace temperatures above 1000 C, where the effect of biotite degassing is demonstrably negligible, still have apparent ages that are ˜200-900 million years younger than the age of muscovite from post-gold pegmatite dykes. The close proximity of disturbed hydrothermal hornblende samples to apparently undisturbed pegmatite muscovite samples (less than a few metres in some cases) is difficult to reconcile with argon loss in hydrothermal hornblende being the product of thermally-driven volume diffusion. Given a suitable thermal history, argon loss could occur preferentially in hornblendes if (1) the closure (for slow cooling) and blocking (for reheating) temperatures of hydrothermal hornblendes were lower than published estimates, as has been observed in structurally complex metamorphic hornblendes and/or (2) the closure and blocking temperature of pegmatite muscovite were higher than commonly estimated. However, neither of these interpretations can easily explain the large variation in hornblende ages. It is instead suggested that argon loss occurred during mineral-fluid interaction during movement of a

  8. Dual origins of lode gold deposits in the Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, Bruce E.; Murowchick, James B.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    1986-06-01

    From Late Jurassic to late Tertiary time, two geologically, geochemically, and genetically distinct gold mineralization processes were active in the Canadian Cordillera. One group of deposits can be characterized as epithermal because of its association with intermediate to felsic volcanics, regional caldera structures, low pH alteration zones, low Au/Ag values, and quartz-chalcedony-barite-fluorite gangue. The second group of deposits is mesothermal in character and has strong similarities to the Mother Lode deposits of California, being associated with transcurrent faults, intermediate pH alteration zones, and quartz ± carbonate, albite, mariposite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, scheelite gangue. Compared to epithermal deposits, mesothermal deposits have higher As, W, and Au/Ag values, higher CO2 content in fluid inclusions, and δ18O values of ore-forming fluids of +3‰ to +10‰ vs. -14‰ to -7‰ for epithermal deposits. Like the gold deposits in Nevada and Colorado, epithermal mineralization in the Canadian Cordillera formed from the shallow circulation of meteoric water in subaerial, intermediate to felsic volcanic complexes. In contrast, mesothermal gold deposits throughout the North American Cordillera are shown to be the product of deep circulation and evolution of meteoric water in structures associated with major, transcurrent fault zones. Similarities between Archean lode gold deposits and mesothermal deposits of the Cordillera suggest that Archean lode deposits may have been produced by processes similar to those involved in the formation of Cordilleran mesothermal deposits.

  9. Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems. Bruce E Hobbs1,2, Alison Ord1 and Mark A. Munro1. 1. Centre for Exploration Targeting, The University of Western Australia, M006, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. 2. CSIRO Earth and Resource Engineering, Bentley, WA, Australia Hydrothermal mineralising systems are presented as large, open chemical reactors held far from equilibrium during their life-time by the influx of heat, fluid and dissolved chemical species. As such they are nonlinear dynamical systems and need to be analysed using the tools that have been developed for such systems. Hydrothermal systems undergo a number of transitions during their evolution and this paper focuses on methods for characterising these transitions in a quantitative manner and establishing whether they resemble first or second (critical) phase transitions or whether they have some other kind of nature. Critical phase transitions are characterised by long range correlations for some parameter characteristic of the system, power-law probability distributions so that there is no characteristic length scale and a high sensitivity to perturbations; as one approaches criticality, characteristic parameters for the system scale in a power law manner with distance from the critical point. The transitions undergone in mineralised hydrothermal systems are: (i) widespread, non-localised mineral alteration involving exothermic mineral reactions that produce hydrous silicate phases, carbonates and iron-oxides, (ii) strongly localised veining, brecciation and/or stock-work formation, (iii) a series of endothermic mineral reactions involving the formation of non-hydrous silicates, sulphides and metals such as gold, (iv) multiple repetitions of transitions (ii) and (iii). We have quantified aspects of these transitions in gold deposits from the Yilgarn craton of Western Australia using wavelet transforms. This technique is convenient and fast. It enables one to establish if

  10. The sources and evolution of mineralising fluids in iron oxide-copper-gold systems, Norrbotten, Sweden: Constraints from Br/Cl ratios and stable Cl isotopes of fluid inclusion leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, S. A.; Smith, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have analysed the halogen concentrations and chlorine stable isotope composition of fluid inclusion leachates from three spatially associated Fe-oxide ± Cu ± Au mineralising systems in Norrbotten, Sweden. Fluid inclusions in late-stage veins in Fe-oxide-apatite deposits contain saline brines and have a wide range of Br/Cl molar ratios, from 0.2 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -3.1‰ to -1.0‰. Leachates from saline fluid inclusions from the Greenstone and Porphyry hosted Cu-Au prospects have Br/Cl ratios that range from 0.2 to 0.5 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -5.6‰ to -1.3‰. Finally, the Cu-Au deposits hosted by the Nautanen Deformation Zone (NDZ) have Br/Cl molar ratios from 0.4 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values that range from -2.4‰ to +0.5‰, although the bulk of the data fall within 0‰ ± 0.5‰. The Br/Cl ratios of leachates are consistent with the derivation of salinity from magmatic sources or from the dissolution of halite. Most of the isotopic data from the Fe-oxide-apatite and Greenstone deposits are consistent with a mantle derived source of the chlorine, with the exception of the four samples with the most negative values. The origin of the low δ 37Cl values in these samples is unknown but we suggest that there may have been some modification of the Cl-isotope signature due to fractionation between the mineralising fluids and Cl-rich silicate assemblages found in the alteration haloes around the deposits. If such a process has occurred then a modified crustal source of the chlorine for all the samples cannot be ruled out although the amount of fractionation necessary to generate the low δ 37Cl values would be significantly larger. The source of Cl in the NDZ deposits has a crustal signature, which suggests the Cl in this system may be derived from (meta-) evaporites or from input from crustal melts such as granitic pegmatites of the Lina Suite.

  11. Meniscal mineralisation in little spotted cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the stifle joints of little spotted cats in captivity using radiographic and CT studies. The hypothesis was that these animals would have meniscal mineralisation that could be detectable by imaging studies. Twelve intact little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus), 2 females and 10 males, aged from 1.5 to 11.11 years old and weighing 1.9–3.05 kg were studied. These animals, which were living in the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoo, had no symptoms or known disease processes at the time of the study. The plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans of both stifle joints were performed under general anaesthesia. Sequential transverse images were acquired on a spiral scanner. Results No signs of articular disease were observed in any of the animals. Radiographically, the meniscal mineralisation was detected as an oval radiopacity in the cranial compartment on the mediolateral projection, located within the area of the medial meniscus. On craniocaudal projection, the mineralisation was more difficult to visualise. In one of the animals, it was not possible to identify the meniscal mineralisation in either of the stifle joints. Using CT, meniscal mineralisation was best identified in the transverse plane images. Conclusions Meniscal mineralisation appears to be a normal anatomic feature in little spotted cats. PMID:23506083

  12. Rapid dewatering of the crust deduced from ages of mesothermal gold deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Snee, L.W.; Miller, L.D.; Newberry, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The large-scale migration of fluids through the continental crust has been well documented, but there is no consensus regarding the timing of fluid migration relative to erogenic episodes, or rates of crustal dewatering1. Here we present 40Ar/39Ar dates for muscovites from quartz veins along a major shear zone in southeast Alaska, which show that the veins were emplaced in the early Eocene, during the late stages of orogenic deformation. Hydrothermal activity took place for only about 1 Myr and along a distance of at least 200 km. The fluids were generated by metamorphic reactions in subducted crust along the North American plate margin, and were apparently trapped in the crust by the low permeabilities accompanying a convergent tectonic regime until 56 Myr ago. The rapid dewatering event coincided with a change in plate motion at 56-55 Myr, which caused a shift from convergent to partly transcurrent tectonics. We suggest that this change in tectonic regime led to increased crustal permeabilities and hence the possibility of large-scale fluid migration.

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and bone mineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yuan, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone that is mainly secreted by osteocytes and osteoblasts in bone. The critical role of FGF23 in mineral ion homeostasis was first identified in human genetic and acquired rachitic diseases and has been further characterised in animal models. Recent studies have revealed that the levels of FGF23 increase significantly at the very early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may play a critical role in mineral ion disorders and bone metabolism in these patients. Our recent publications have also shown that FGF23 and its cofactor, Klotho, may play an independent role in directly regulating bone mineralisation instead of producing a systematic effect. In this review, we will discuss the new role of FGF23 in bone mineralisation and the pathophysiology of CKD-related bone disorders. PMID:25655009

  14. Gold deposit styles and placer gold characterisation in northern and east-central Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitfield, Peter E. J; Styles, Michael T.; Taylor, Cliff D.; Key, Roger M.; Bauer, Wilfried; Ralison, A, Vonimanitra

    2009-01-01

    Microchemical characterisation of bedrock and placer gold grains from six gold districts within the Archaean domains and intervening Neoproterozoic Anaboriana-Manampotsy belt of northern and east-central Madagascar show few opaque inclusions (e.g pyrrhotite, Bi tellurides) but wide range of Ag contents (40wt%). Some districts exhibit multiple source populations of grains. The ‘greenstone belt’ terranes have an orogenic gold signature locally with an intrusion-related to epithermal overprint. Proterozoic metasediments with felsic to ultramafic bodies yield dominantly intrusion-related gold. A high proportion of secondary gold (<0.5wt% Ag) is related to recycling of paleoplacers and erosion of post-Gondwana planation surfaces and indicates that some mesothermal gold systems were already partially to wholly removed by erosion by the PermoTriassic.

  15. Disorders of Phosphate Homeostasis and Tissue Mineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is absorbed from the diet in the gut, stored as hydroxyapatite in the skeleton, and excreted with the urine. The balance between these compartments determines the circulating phosphate concentration. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has recently been discovered and is part of a previously unrecognised hormonal bone-kidney axis. Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome, and dentin matrix protein 1 regulate the expression of FGF23 in osteocytes, which then is O-glycosylated by UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosamine: poly-peptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase 3 and secreted into the circulation. FGF23 binds with high affinity to fibroblast growth factor receptor 1c in the presence of its co-receptor Klotho. It inhibits, either directly or indirectly, reabsorption of phosphate and the synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxy-vita-min-D by the renal proximal tubule and the secretion of parathyroid hormone by the parathyroid glands. Acquired or inborn errors affecting this newly discovered hormonal system can lead to abnormal phosphate homeostasis and/or tissue mineralisation. This chapter will provide an update on the current knowledge of the pathophysiology, the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and therapy of the disorders of phosphate homeostasis and tissue mineralisation. PMID:19494665

  16. Disorders of phosphate homeostasis and tissue mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Jüppner, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate is absorbed from the diet in the gut, stored as hydroxyapatite in the skeleton, and excreted with the urine. The balance between these compartments determines the circulating phosphate concentration. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has recently been discovered and is part of a previously unrecognised hormonal bone-kidney axis. Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome, and dentin matrix protein 1 regulate the expression of FGF23 in osteocytes, which then is O-glycosylated by UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase 3 and secreted into the circulation. FGF23 binds with high affinity to fibroblast growth factor receptor 1c in the presence of its co-receptor Klotho. It inhibits, either directly or indirectly, reabsorption of phosphate and the synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin-D by the renal proximal tubule and the secretion of parathyroid hormone by the parathyroid glands. Acquired or inborn errors affecting this newly discovered hormonal system can lead to abnormal phosphate homeostasis and/or tissue mineralisation. This chapter will provide an update on the current knowledge of the pathophysiology, the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and therapy of the disorders of phosphate homeostasis and tissue mineralisation. PMID:19494665

  17. Fusibacter fontis sp. nov., a sulfur-reducing, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a mesothermic Tunisian spring.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Fauque, Guy; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-10-01

    Strain KhalAKB1T, a mesophilic, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, was isolated from water collected from a mesothermic Tunisian spring. Cells were Gram-staining-positive rods, occurring singly or in pairs and motile by one lateral flagellum. Strain KhalAKB1T grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-35 g NaCl l- 1 (optimum 1 g NaCl l- 1). It fermented yeast extract and a wide range of carbohydrates including cellobiose, d-glucose, d-ribose, sucrose, d-xylose, maltose, d-galactose and starch as electron donors. Acetate, ethanol, CO2 and H2 were end products of glucose metabolism. It reduced elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite, into sulfide. The DNA G+C content was 37.6 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggested Fusibacter bizertensis as the closest relative of this isolate (identity of 97.2 % to the type strain). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic taxonomic characteristics, strain KhalAKB1T is proposed to be assigned to a novel species within the genus Fusibacter, order Clostridiales, Fusibacter fontis sp. nov. The type strain is KhalAKB1T ( = DSM 28450T = JCM 19912T). PMID:26296995

  18. Hydrothermal alteration in metasedimentary rock-hosted orogenic gold deposits, Reefton goldfield, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Anthony B.; Brathwaite, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Orogenic or mesothermal quartz lodes in lower Palaeozoic Greenland Group metasedimentary rocks of the Reefton area have produced 67 tonnes (t) of gold prior to 1951, and recent exploration has identified new gold resources in several deposits, including the largest past producers, Blackwater and Globe-Progress. The metasedimentary rocks consist of alternating sandstone and mudstone beds that were metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies prior to being hydrothermally altered adjacent to the quartz lodes. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites averaging Q65-F10-R25, with detrital grains of quartz, rock fragments, muscovite, and plagioclase and biotite that were altered to albite and chlorite, respectively, during metamorphism. Accessory minerals are graphite, apatite, zircon, tourmaline and titanite. Hydrothermal alteration of the sandstones has developed a mineral assemblage of K-mica, carbonate (dolomite, ankerite, ferroan magnesite and magnesian siderite), chlorite, pyrite and arsenopyrite. The abundance of hydrothermal chlorite is greater at Blackwater than at the other prospects studied. Hydrothermal alteration associated with the quartz lodes is marked by bleaching, magnesian siderite spots, disseminated arsenopyrite and pyrite and thin carbonate, quartz and sulphide veins. These trends are accompanied by increasing concentrations of S, As and Sb and decreasing Na, and a decrease of Fe and Mg in K-mica. The alkali alteration indices 3K/Al (representing K-mica) and Na/Al (representing albite) generally show antipathetic trends, with 3K/Al increasing near the lodes and Na/Al decreasing. These trends reflect the replacement of albite by K-mica. Carbonate alteration indices CO2/(Ca + Mg +Fe) and CO2/[Ca + Mg + Fe -0.5(S + As)] quantify the abundance of hydrothermal carbonates, but they show variable correlation with the lodes. They increase the width of the alteration halo in the hanging wall of the lodes at the Globe-Progress and General Gordon prospects

  19. Pyrophosphate: a key inhibitor of mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Arnett, Timothy R; Russell, R Graham G

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphate has long been known as a by-product of many intracellular biosynthetic reactions, and was first identified as a key endogenous inhibitor of biomineralisation in the 1960s. The major source of pyrophosphate appears to be extracellular ATP, which is released from cells in a controlled manner. Once released, ATP can be rapidly hydrolysed by ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases to produce pyrophosphate. The main action of pyrophosphate is to directly inhibit hydroxyapatite formation thereby acting as a physiological 'water-softener'. Evidence suggests pyrophosphate may also act as a signalling molecule to influence gene expression and regulate its own production and breakdown. This review will summarise our current understanding of pyrophosphate metabolism and how it regulates bone mineralisation and prevents harmful soft tissue calcification. PMID:27061894

  20. Discrimination of precious/base metal mineralising systems by fractal analysis, Mt Isa, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, T.; Oliver, N.

    2003-04-01

    Fractal analysis of deposit and prospect distribution provides a new and valuable tool in interpreting mineralisation patterns and developing exploration strategies, as demonstrated here for the Mount Isa block in Queensland, Australia. The district is one of the world’s most richly endowed base metal provinces; it also has significant precious metal deposits. Genetic models for the base metal deposits have included syngenetic and epigenetic extremes. The comprehensive data base in the North West Queensland Mineral Province Report is used to analyse copper (n=1867), copper-gold (n=211), gold (n=80), zinc-lead-silver (n=186) and uranium (n=212) mineral occurrences, prospects, existing and abandoned mines. Spatial distributions are analysed by counting the number of boxes (N[r]) of size r containing one or more localities as a function of r. Spectacularly different relationships between N[r] and r are observed for the different metals. In all cases, the trend of N[r] with r becomes almost flat at values of r on the order of hundreds of metres. This ``roll-off" effect may be due to lack of discovery of deposits. Relationships between N[r] and r at the largest box sizes may be influenced by a truncation effect. Approximate fractal dimensions (D) of the spatial distribution of each deposit type were evaluated avoiding both roll-off and truncation. The most clustered distributions were observed for Au (D ˜0.29) followed by Zn-Pb-Ag (D ˜0.41), U (D ˜0.87), Cu-Au (D ˜0.93) and Cu (D ˜1.3). This implies that there are strong differences between the mineralising systems of Au and Cu, and that neither Cu nor Au is clearly related to the family of Cu-Au deposits in the district. Au mineralization is highly clustered, implying localisation of mineralising fluid flow. In contrast, the Cu pattern indicates a more pervasive mineralising system. The latter is compatible with popular models which suggest that fluid mixing led to copper deposition, and that both metal source

  1. Mercury Methylation and Detoxification by Novel Microorganisms in Mercury Enriched Mesothermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gionfriddo, C. M.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Stott, M.; Wick, R. R.; Schultz, M. B.; Holt, K. E.; Moreau, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hot springs and fumaroles release significant quantities of aqueous and gaseous mercury into the environment. Yet few studies have looked at the microbial underpinnings of mercury transformations in geothermal settings. Recent advancements in culture-independent molecular techniques, such as ultra-high-throughput sequencing, allow us to delve deeply into the functional and phylogenetic make-up of these extreme environments. Here we present results from deep metagenomic sequencing of geothermal microbial communities cycling mercury, focussing on the connections between putative metabolisms and mercury methylation, and the evolution of the mer-operon. Presented are data from two adjacent, acidic (pH<3), mesothermal (33-68 °C) hot springs of the Ngawha geothermal field (New Zealand), extremely enriched in total mercury (>1000 ng L-1), and varying methylmercury concentrations (1-10 ng L-1). Microbial communities of both springs are dominated by mercury resistant acidophilic, sulfur- and iron-cycling microbes: Acidithiobacillus, Thiomonas, and Thermoplasma. Mercury methylation genes (hgcAB) were only detected in the cooler spring (∆T~10 °C), with an order of magnitude greater methylmercury (10 ng L-1). The hgcAB genes have no known closest relatives (<90%), but lowest common ancestor analysis matched members of the Firmicutes and Deltaproteobacteria as well as uncultured environmental bacteria. Our findings show that geothermal microbial communities are capable of a net production of methylmercury, alongside active demethylation-reduction by mer-capable microbes, despite selective pressures from low pH and high mercury levels. However, temperature may be the major limiting factor on mercury biomethylation in geothermal settings, as no hgcAB genes were detected in the spring that was nearly identical in all physio-chemical parameters to its neighbour except for temperature (T >40°C), and methylmercury concentration. We conclude that the relative amount of mercury

  2. Regulation of soil organic C mineralisation at the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Ruamps, Léo S; Nunan, Naoise; Pouteau, Valérie; Leloup, Julie; Raynaud, Xavier; Roy, Virginie; Chenu, Claire

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the factors that regulate C mineralisation at the soil pore scale or how these factors vary throughout the pore network. This study sought to understand how the decomposition of organic carbon varies within the soil pore network and to determine the relative importance of local environmental properties relative to biological properties as controlling factors. This was achieved by sterilising samples of soil and reinoculating them with axenic bacterial suspensions using the matric potential to target different locations in the pore network. Carbon mineralisation curves were described with two-compartment first-order models to distinguish CO2 derived from the labile organic carbon released during sterilisation from CO2 derived from organic C unaffected by sterilisation. The data indicated that the size of the labile pool of organic C, possibly of microbial origin, varied as a function of location in the pore network but that the organic carbon unaffected by sterilisation did not. The mineralisation rate of the labile C varied with the bacterial type inoculated, but the mineralisation rate of the organic C unaffected by sterilisation was insensitive to bacterial type. Taken together, the results suggest that microbial metabolism is a less significant regulator of soil organic carbon decomposition than are microbial habitat properties. PMID:23346944

  3. Crustal-scale structures in the Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier of north Australia: their seismic response and influence on mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Barry J.; Goleby, Bruce R.; Goncharov, Alexey G.; Wyborn, L. A. I.; Collins, C. D. N.; MacCready, Tyler

    1998-03-01

    The Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier in northern Australia is prospective for base metals and gold. It contains a Western Fold Belt (including the Leichhardt River Fault Trough) and an Eastern Fold Belt, separated by older basement rocks of the Kalkadoon Leichhardt Belt. Sediments and volcanics in both fold belts were deposited in rifts which were subsequently shortened by up to 50%. Mineralisation appears to be partitioned: large-tonnage lead and zinc deposits are more prevalent in the Leichhardt River Fault Trough, and most gold and copper occurrences are in the Eastern Fold Belt. Cross-sections of the inlier derived from coincident seismic reflection and refraction profiling are dominated by the youngest tectonic events. The refraction data imply a west-dipping lens of high-velocity intermediate-to-mafic rock in the middle to upper crust in the east of the inlier. It is collinear with another lens in the lower crust in the west of the inlier. The lenses form a belt of high-velocity rock cutting the crust from top to bottom and from east to west. The reflection data reveal different styles of compression-related structures in the east and west of the inlier. Thin-skinned tectonics dominate in the Eastern Fold Belt. The sediments and volcanics are thrust to the west along a number of shallowly east-dipping upper-crustal detachments. The detachments in turn are cut by steeply east-dipping reverse faults which link into the zone of high-velocity rocks defined by the refraction data. In contrast, faults in the Western Fold Belt are steep and penetrate to mid-crustal levels and probably also link into the belt of high-velocity material deeper in the crust. The partitioning into different tectonic styles occurs across the Kalkadoon Leichhardt Belt, which appears to have acted as a buttress during the crustal shortening. Published mineralisation models attribute the lead-zinc mineralisation to circulating fluids at shallow crustal levels within the Leichhardt River Fault

  4. Correlative spectroscopy of silicates in mineralised nodules formed from osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Fearn, Sarah; Gentleman, Eileen; Spillane, Liam; Carzaniga, Raffaella; McComb, David W.; Stevens, Molly M.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2013-07-01

    Silicon supplementation has been shown to play an important role in skeleton development, however, the potential role that silicon plays in mediating bone formation, and an understanding of where it might localise in the resulting bone tissue remain elusive. An improved understanding of these processes could have important implications for treating pathological mineralisation. A key aspect of defining the role of silicon in bone is to characterise its distribution and coordination environment, however, there is currently almost no information available on either. We have combined a sample-preparation method that simultaneously preserved mineral, ions, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the distribution and coordination environment of silicon in murine osteoblasts (OBs) in an in vitro model of bone formation. SIMS analysis showed a high level of surface contamination from polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) resulting from sample preparation. When the PDMS was removed, silicon compounds could not be detected within the nodules either by SIMS or by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. In comparison, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) provided a powerful and potentially widely applicable means to define the coordination environment and localisation of silicon in mineralising tissues. We show that trace levels of silicon were only detectable from the mineral deposits located on the collagen and in the peripheral region of mineralised matrix, possibly the newly mineralised regions of the OB nodules. Taken together our results suggest that silicon plays a biological role in bone formation, however, the precise mechanism by which silicon exerts its physicochemical effects remains uncertain. Our analytical results open the door for compelling new sets of EELS experiments that can provide detailed and specific information about the role that silicates play in bone

  5. Correlative spectroscopy of silicates in mineralised nodules formed from osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Fearn, Sarah; Gentleman, Eileen; Spillane, Liam; Carzaniga, Raffaella; McComb, David W.; Stevens, Molly M.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2013-07-01

    Silicon supplementation has been shown to play an important role in skeleton development, however, the potential role that silicon plays in mediating bone formation, and an understanding of where it might localise in the resulting bone tissue remain elusive. An improved understanding of these processes could have important implications for treating pathological mineralisation. A key aspect of defining the role of silicon in bone is to characterise its distribution and coordination environment, however, there is currently almost no information available on either. We have combined a sample-preparation method that simultaneously preserved mineral, ions, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the distribution and coordination environment of silicon in murine osteoblasts (OBs) in an in vitro model of bone formation. SIMS analysis showed a high level of surface contamination from polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) resulting from sample preparation. When the PDMS was removed, silicon compounds could not be detected within the nodules either by SIMS or by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. In comparison, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) provided a powerful and potentially widely applicable means to define the coordination environment and localisation of silicon in mineralising tissues. We show that trace levels of silicon were only detectable from the mineral deposits located on the collagen and in the peripheral region of mineralised matrix, possibly the newly mineralised regions of the OB nodules. Taken together our results suggest that silicon plays a biological role in bone formation, however, the precise mechanism by which silicon exerts its physicochemical effects remains uncertain. Our analytical results open the door for compelling new sets of EELS experiments that can provide detailed and specific information about the role that silicates play in bone

  6. Geological and thermochronological studies of the Dashui gold deposit, West Qinling Orogen, Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingtao; Evans, Noreen J.; McInnes, Brent I. A.; Batt, Geoffrey E.; McCuaig, Campbell T.; Bagas, Leon; Tohver, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The Dashui gold deposit is a structurally controlled, Carlin-type gold deposit hosted by recrystallised limestone in the West Qinling Orogen of Central China. The major, structurally late east-trending Dashui Fault forms the hanging wall to the gold mineralisation at the Dashui mine and defines the contact between Middle Triassic limestone and a steeply dipping overlying succession of Middle Triassic argillaceous limestone, dolomite, and sandstone. Multiple carbonate veins and large-scale supergene enrichment, represented by hematite, goethite, limonite and jarosite, characterise the deposit. Detailed geochronological investigation using zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating reveals that volcanic rocks closely associated with the Dashui gold deposit were synchronous with the Ge'erkuohe Granite and pre-date mineralisation. The igneous dyke sample from the hanging wall has the same U-Pb zircon age as the footwall, ca. 213 Ma. (U-Th)/He thermochronology on dykes in the hanging wall and footwall of the Dashui Fault yields identical (U-Th)/He zircon ages of ca. 210 Ma but distinct (U-Th)/He apatite ages of ca. 136 and 211 Ma, respectively. Therefore, the hanging wall and footwall are interpreted as having distinct post-mineralisation exhumation histories. Reverse fault movement exhumed the hanging wall ~2 to 4 km since the Late Triassic with the main component of faulting taking place between the Late Triassic and Early Cretaceous. These relationships suggest a Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous age for the primary gold mineralisation at the Dashui gold deposit, with the corollary that any `missing portion' of the deposit, previously hypothesised to exist in the hanging wall of the Dashui Fault, has been eroded away. The mineralisation in the footwall may have been supergene enriched soon after the primary mineralisation was emplaced, because it has been located at shallow depth since the Late Triassic. Semi-quantitative results obtained in this study also constrain the maximum

  7. Orebody Modelling for Exploration: The Western Mineralisation, Broken Hill, NSW

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfolah Hamedani, Mohammad Plimer, Ian Rutherford; Xu Chaoshui

    2012-09-15

    The Western Mineralisation in the Broken Hill deposit was studied to identify the zonation sequence of lithogeochemical haloes along and across the strike of the orebody. Samples used are from 77 drill holes and the samples were assayed for Pb, Zn, Fe, S, Cu, Ag, Cd, Sb, Bi and As. Variogram analyses were calculated for all the elements and kriging was used to construct the 3D block model. Analysis of cross sections along and across the strike of the orebody shows that Bi and Sb form broader halos around sulphide masses and this suggests that they are pathfinder elements for the Pb and Zn elements of this orebody. The threshold concentrations (minimum anomaly) of the 10 elements were determined using the concentration-area analysis. On east-west vertical cross sections, the values of linear productivity, variability gradient and zonality index were calculated for each element. Based on the maximum zonality index of each element, the sequence of geochemical zonation pattern was determined from top to bottom of the orebody. The result shows that S, Pb, Zn and Cd tend to concentrate in the upper part of the mineralisation whereas Ag, Cu, Bi and As have a tendency to concentrate in the lower part of the mineralised rocks. Also, an empirical product ratio index was developed based on the position of the elements in the zonation sequence. The methods and results of this research are applicable to exploration of similar Zn and Pb sulphide ore deposits.

  8. Relationships between deformation and mesothermal veins in the Sunshine Mine area, Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Jaclyn Marie

    The Coeur d'Alene district in northern Idaho is a world class Pb-Ag mesothermal vein system that has produced about 360 million ounces of silver, lead, and zinc since the 1880s. Despite the long history of exploration and production, the district does not have a predictive model for exploration based on a sound understanding of structural controls on the silver ore deposits; this is certainly the case for the Sunshine Mine and surrounding area. Fault kinematic history in the district shows a regional scale fault system reactivated over time with dextral, sinistral, and dip-slip displacement. The fault system is superimposed on regional deformation fabrics that were examined for this study in the Sunshine Mine area. Cleavage sets observed in the Sunshine mine area, distinguished by orientation and superposition relationships, are consistent with the findings of Smith (2004) which defined cleavage sets referred to as S1, S2, and S3. Two additional deformation fabrics that appear spatially tied to fault zones formed between development of cleavages S2 and S3. The multiple cleavages, fault zones, and their intersections are interpreted to act as pathways for hydrothermal fluids associated with vein formation and silver ore deposition. Thin section kinematic analysis of vein and shear zone samples defined a dip-slip sense of shear associated with the Sterling vein. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis of vein and shear zone samples failed to define a lattice preferred crystallographic orientation that defined shear sense. Similarly, cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of thin section textures failed to define a dominant shear sense and fault kinematics. Nevertheless, additional study using these techniques is warranted. Both field observation and thin section analysis demonstrate a direct relationship between shear zones, veins, and mineralization potential, clarifying the need for detailed fault maps for the Sunshine Mine area and Coeur d'Alene district.

  9. The Paddy's Flat Gold District (Murchison, Western Australia), insight on a rheologically and structurally control lode gold deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebaud, N.; Hollingsworth, D.; Gonzalez-Alvarez, I.

    2007-12-01

    In the North-West of the world class gold producer Yilgarn craton lies the Murchison Goldfield (Western Australia). Several rich deposits mined since the turn of the 19th century suggest that this late-Archaean terrane is highly prospective for gold exploration. Located in the northern part of the Murchison goldfield, the Paddy's Flat District recorded a production of ~2 Moz. The Paddy's Flat Gold District area is located on an N-S trending, steeply east dipping shear on the north western limb of an upright isoclinal fold known as the Polelle syncline. It is hosted in a strained and metamorphosed volcanic and minor sedimentary sequence. Mineralisation within the Paddy's Flat District is not limited to a particular rock type and it is associated with a wide range of lithologies including: (i) intermediate to felsic extrusive volcanics, (ii) intrusive porphyrytic microgranite, (iii) ultramafic volcanic assemblage and (iv) iron rich banded chert. Instead, the mineralisation is highly structurally controled by the Paddy's Flat shear zone which provided fluid-pathways for the mineralising fluid. Regardless of the lithological composition, the mineral assemblage associated with the gold mineralisation consists of quartz, carbonate (ankerite, siderite), sulphides (pyrite, arsenopyrite), fuchsite and sericite assemblage suggesting the introduction of an oxidizing fluid rich in Au, S, As and K ± SiO2. At Paddys Flat the mineralisation is spatially associated with rheologicaly competent units or with domains located at the boundary between rheologically distinct lithologies within the main shear. The fluid pathways provided by the shear zone and the rheological contrast are suggested to be key parameters in the formation of economic lode gold deposit in the Paddy's Flat district.

  10. Ore-forming processes in the Drazhnoe gold-quartz deposit (Eastern Yakutia, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Prokofiev, V. Yu.; Imamendinov, B. N.; Kryazhev, S. G.; Alekseev, V. Yu.; Sidorov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Themobarogeochemical investigations revealed that quartz from the Drazhnoe deposit was formed in mesothermal conditions at depths of 3-4 km from carbon dioxide-water fluids with wide salinity variations and an admixture of methane. Several types of fluids are distinguishable on the basis of the composition of extracts: hydrocarbonate-sodium, highly diluted, and late sulfate-hydrocarbonate-sodium with elevated salinity. Ore minerals precipitated in the thermostatic environments against the background of fluid heterogenization due to a probably significant pressure drop and mixing of different solutions. Metamorphic processes related to the early collision stage provided no substantial impact on the composition and potential of gold ore mineralization.

  11. Lithologically controlled invisible gold, Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Doug; Craw, Dave; Finnigan, Craig

    2015-02-01

    The newly discovered Cretaceous Coffee orogenic gold deposit (>4 Moz resource) consists of an extensive oxidised zone developed on primary sulphidic rock. The primary mineralised rock is characterised by invisible gold in arsenian pyrite that has replaced biotite in selected host rocks. The deposit has a cryptic surface expression and is an example of an extremely subtle exploration target. Hydrothermal emplacement was controlled by extensional fractures, with breccias, but most mineralisation was focused on biotite-bearing granitic gneiss, metasedimentary gneisses, and younger biotite granite. Fine-grained (<0.1 mm) arsenian pyrite replaced biotite along mineral cleavage planes and followed biotite-rich metamorphic and post-metamorphic structural fabrics. Arsenian pyrite also formed overgrowths on earlier coarse-grained (up to 2 mm) barren hydrothermal pyrite. Arsenian pyrite is concentrically zoned on the 1-10-μm scale with respect to As, Sb, and Au contents and typically contains ˜5 wt% As, ˜500 mg/kg Sb, and ˜500 mg/kg Au, in solid solution. Biotite replacement was accompanied by sericitisation, silicification, and ankerite impregnation. Hydrothermal alteration involved dilution and localised depletion of K, Na, and Al in silicified host rocks, but most Ca, Mg, and Fe concentrations remained broadly constant. Magnesium-rich ultramafic host rocks were only weakly mineralised with auriferous arsenian pyrite and have fuchsite and magnesite alteration. Near-surface oxidation has liberated nanoparticulate and microparticulate supergene gold, which remains essentially invisible. Varying degrees of oxidation extend as deep as 250 m below the present subdued topographic surface, well beyond the present vadose zone, and this deep oxidation may have occurred during post-mineralisation uplift and erosion in the Cretaceous. Oxidation has leached some As from the surficial mineralised rocks, decreasing the geochemical signal, which is also obscured by the localised

  12. Mapping Hydrothermal Alterations in the Muteh Gold Mining Area in Iran by using ASTER satellite Imagery data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi Haroni, Hooshang; Hassan Tabatabaei, Seyed

    2016-04-01

    Muteh gold mining area is located in 160 km NW of Isfahan town. Gold mineralization is meso-thermal type and associated with silisic, seresitic and carbonate alterations as well as with hematite and goethite. Image processing and interpretation were applied on the ASTER satellite imagery data of about 400 km2 at the Muteh gold mining area to identify hydrothermal alterations and iron oxides associated with gold mineralization. After applying preprocessing methods such as radiometric and geometric corrections, image processing methods of Principal Components Analysis (PCA), Least Square Fit (Ls-Fit) and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) were applied on the ASTER data to identify hydrothermal alterations and iron oxides. In this research reference spectra of minerals such as chlorite, hematite, clay minerals and phengite identified from laboratory spectral analysis of collected samples were used to map the hydrothermal alterations. Finally, identified hydrothermal alteration and iron oxides were validated by visiting and sampling some of the mapped hydrothermal alterations.

  13. The role of intrusions in the formation of Irish-type mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Jim; Reed, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    The Stonepark Prospect is located in County Limerick, south-central Ireland. Multiple zones of Zn-Pb mineralisation have been identified at Stonepark and these are approximately 5 km west of the Pallas Green Prospect. At Stonepark, the sulphide bodies are hosted within the Waulsortian Limestone and closely resemble other Irish-type deposits. The mineralisation is composed of pyrite-marcasite, sphalerite and galena with gangue Fe-dolomite and calcite cements. A key difference at Stonepark is the presence of Chadian-aged volcanic rocks (Knockroe Volcanics) that intrude into and overlie the Waulsortian Limestone. Subsequent hydrothermal brecciation of the Waulsortian Limestone and Knockroe intrusions resulted in the formation of tabular polymict breccia bodies containing mixed carbonate and clasts of intrusive rocks. These have then been overprinted by massive sulphide mineralisation. Further syn-mineralisation brecciation has overprinted the earlier breccias. Drilling has demonstrated a spatial relationship between the volume of intrusive rocks (dykes and polymict breccias) and Zn-Pb mineralisation. This association suggests that the intrusive rocks provided a mechanism for the introduction of the mineralising fluids into the breccia bodies. This is significant as to date no large controlling fault has been identified, as is seen at other Irish-type deposits. Further work is required to understand the alteration process of the intrusive rocks and how this may relate to the mineralising process.

  14. Is the rhizosphere priming effect an important mechanism for nitrogen mineralisation in soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Conor; Baggs, Elizabeth; Morley, Nicholas; Wall, David; Paterson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    In soil, nitrogen is mobilised from soil organic matter (SOM) to pools more readily available to plants (mineralisation), mediated by the microbial biomass. Multiple mechanisms underpin this process, including the priming effect (PE) which is increasingly recognised as an important driver of N mineralisation. The PE is where microbes utilize labile carbon from roots (root exudates or senescing plant material) for energy and subsequently mineralise SOM for nutrients, inevitably mobilising nutrients from SOM to plant available pools. However, the mechanism and regulators underpinning PE's are virtually unknown. This work investigates the importance of priming for N mineralisation. We hypothesized that 1) addition of labile C would increase gross N mineralisation and plant N uptake, and that this is soil-specific; 2) the stoichiometry of primed and basal mineralisation fluxes would be different, indicative of these processes being functionally distinct; and 3) the presence of fertilizer nitrogen and grazing would reduce primed and basal mineralisation and reduce plant uptake of SOM derived N. To do this we coupled continuous steady-state 13C labelling and 15N isotope dilution to measure specific gross C and N fluxes from two contrasting soils. Addition of carbon increased gross C and N fluxes from SOM, but the effect was soil-specific. The C-to-N ratio of the flux from 'primed' SOM was much lower than that of the basal flux indicating that the release of labile carbon from plant roots functions as a nutrient acquisition response, increasing mineralisation of SOM. Addition of N fertiliser resulted in negative priming of SOM, but overall and in both soils, the plant accessed more SOM-derived N. Grazing and priming were closely coupled, with grazing increasing SOM priming. Our results demonstrate that priming effects are an integral component of N mineralisation and should be incorporated into nitrogen cycling models.

  15. Characterisation of matrix vesicles in skeletal and soft tissue mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Cui, L; Houston, D A; Farquharson, C; MacRae, V E

    2016-06-01

    The importance of matrix vesicles (MVs) has been repeatedly highlighted in the formation of cartilage, bone, and dentin since their discovery in 1967. These nano-vesicular structures, which are found in the extracellular matrix, are believed to be one of the sites of mineral nucleation that occurs in the organic matrix of the skeletal tissues. In the more recent years, there have been numerous reports on the observation of MV-like particles in calcified vascular tissues that could be playing a similar role. Therefore, here, we review the characteristics MVs possess that enable them to participate in mineral deposition. Additionally, we outline the content of skeletal tissue- and soft tissue-derived MVs, and discuss their key mineralisation mediators that could be targeted for future therapeutic use. PMID:27072517

  16. Elucidation of differential mineralisation on native and regenerated silk matrices.

    PubMed

    Midha, Swati; Tripathi, Rohit; Geng, Hua; Lee, Peter D; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2016-11-01

    Bone mineralisation is a well-orchestrated procedure triggered by a protein-based template inducing the nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals on the matrix. In an attempt to fabricate superior nanocomposites from silk fibroin, textile braided structures made of natively spun fibres of Bombyx mori silkworm were compared against regenerated fibroin (lyophilized and films) underpinning the influence of intrinsic properties of fibroin matrices on HA nucleation. We found that native braids could bind Ca(2+) ions through electrostatic attraction, which initiated the nucleation and deposition of HA, as evidenced by discrete shift in amide peaks via ATR-FTIR. This phenomenon also suggests the involvement of amide linkages in promoting HA nucleation on fibroin. Moreover, CaCl2-SBF immersion of native braids resulted in preferential growth of HA along the c-axis, forming needle-like nanocrystals and possessing Ca/P ratio comparable to commercial HA. Though regenerated lyophilized matrix also witnessed prominent peak shift in amide linkages, HA growth was restricted to (211) plane only, albeit at a significantly lower intensity than braids. Regenerated films, on the other hand, provided no crystallographic evidence of HA deposition within 7days of SBF immersion. The present work sheds light on the primary fibroin structure of B. mori which probably plays a crucial role in regulating template-induced biomineralisation on the matrix. We also found that intrinsic material properties such as surface roughness, geometry, specific surface area, tortuosity and secondary conformation exert influence in modulating the extent of mineralisation. Thus our work generates useful insights and warrants future studies to further investigate the potential of bone mimetic, silk/mineral nanocomposite matrices for orthopaedic applications. PMID:27524066

  17. Permo Triassic unconformity-related Au-Pd mineralisation, South Devon, UK: new insights and the European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Tom J.; Bouch, Jon E.; Gunn, Andrew G.; McKervey, John A.; Naden, Jonathan; Scrivener, Richard C.; Styles, Michael T.; Large, Duncan E.

    2005-07-01

    An integrated mineralogical-geochemical study of unconformity-related Au-Pd occurrences within and around the Permo Triassic basins of southwest England, UK, has confirmed the importance of low temperature (86±13°C), hydrothermal carbonate veins as hosts for the mineralisation. Fluid inclusion data for the carbonate gangue, supported by stable isotope (13C and 18O) and radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr) data, have identified three principal fluids: (1) a reducing calcic brine [>25 wt% salinity, <0.5 NaCl/(NaCl+CaCl2)] originating in the sub-unconformity basement and an expression of advanced mineral fluid interaction; (2) an oxidising sodic brine [~16 wt% salinity, >0.9 NaCl/(NaCl+CaCl2)] originating in the post-unconformity red beds under evaporitic conditions, and (3) an oxygenated, low salinity groundwater (<3 wt% salinity). The sodic brine is reasoned to be the parent metalliferous fluid and to have acquired its enrichment in Au and Pd by the leaching of immature sediments and intra-rift volcanic rocks within the local Permo Triassic basins. Metal precipitation is linked to the destabilisation of Au and Pd chloride complexes by either mixing with calcic brines, dilution by groundwaters or interaction with reduced lithologies. This explains the diversity of mineralised settings below and above the unconformity and their affinity with red bed brines. The paucity of sulphide minerals, the development of selenides (as ore minerals and as mineral inclusion in gold grains), the presence of rhodochrosite and manganoan calcites (up to 2.5 wt% Mn in calcite) and the co-precipitation of hematite and manganese oxides are consistent with the overall high oxidation state of the ore fluids. A genetic model is proposed linking Permo Triassic red beds, the mixing of oxidising and reducing brines, and the development of unconformity-related precious metal mineralisation. Comparison with other European Permo Triassic basins reveals striking similarities in geological setting, mineralogy

  18. Modelling the role of graphite in development of a mineralised mid-crustal shear zone, Macraes mine, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Phaedra; Craw, Dave

    2008-02-01

    The Hyde-Macraes Shear Zone (HMSZ) is a mineralised low-angle shear within the Otago Schist traceable for ˜ 30 km with a NW strike. It is being actively mined along 12 km of this strike, producing > 6 Moz of gold. The shear zone formed under lower greenschist facies conditions as the host schist was uplifted through the brittle-ductile transition. Sheared rocks consist of greenschist facies schists with mineralogy only subtly different from that of the host schist. Pervasive fluid flow has occurred along grain boundaries and within microshears whose development has been enhanced by the deposition of hydrothermal graphite. We model the development of these microshears using a three-dimensional numerical code. For an inhomogeneous initial rock with lithostatic fluid pressures and a dynamic permeability deformed under dextral non-coaxial flow, deformation is distributed into weak shear bands. Graphite deposition and associated reaction-softening have a dramatic effect on the development of model shear zones. Graphite is deposited into a shear band, weakening it and further localising the deformation into that shear band, producing an anastomosing and interconnected shear zone structure such as observed in the HMSZ. The degrees of graphite precipitation and graphite-induced weakening are varied in the models. Graphite precipitation with a low degree of reaction-softening results in more diffuse shear bands. In contrast less graphite deposition but with a high degree of reaction-softening leads to the development of more focused shear bands. Graphite deposition has clearly controlled the formation of the HMSZ structure, and is an important indicator of potentially mineralised mid-crustal structures elsewhere.

  19. Radioactive disequilibria in mineralised fracture samples from two uranium occurrences in northern Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smellie, John A.T.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mineralised fractures from two uranium occurrences in northern Sweden were examined mineralogically and isotopically to establish the presence or absence of radioactive equilibrium that may indicate recent rock-water interaction processes based on the natural mobility of uranium (i.e.; during the last 0.5 Ma). The results show evidence of radioactive disequilibrium in six of the nine samples investigated. Disequilibria are attributable to solution to solid 234U recoil gain (weakly mineralised zones adjacent to the main mineralisation) and solid to solution 234U recoil loss (moderate to highly mineralised zones). The absence of significant 238U loss in the samples emphasises the reducing conditions at the sampled depths. ?? 1984.

  20. Age constraints on Tarkwaian palaeoplacer and lode-gold formation in the Tarkwa-Damang district, SW Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigois, J.-P.; Groves, D.I.; Fletcher, I.R.; McNaughton, N.J.; Snee, L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Two major epigenetic gold-forming events are recorded in the world-class gold province of southwest Ghana. A pre-Tarkwaian event was the source of the world-class Tarkwa palaeoplacers whereas post-Birimian and Tarkwaian deformation, which was related to the Eburnean orogeny, gave rise to the world-class (e.g. Prestea) to giant (e.g. Obuasi) orogenic gold deposits which have made the region famous for more than 2,500 years. A maximum age of 2133 ?? 4 Ma for Tarkwaian sedimentation is provided by 71 of 111 concordant SHRIMP II U Pb dates from detrital zircons in Tarkwaian clastic rocks from Damang and Bippo Bin, northeast of Tarkwa. The overall data distribution broadly overlaps the relatively poorly constrained ages of Birimian volcanism and associated Dixcove-type granitoid emplacement, indicating syntectonic development of the Tarkwaian sedimentary basin. These zircon ages argue against derivation of the palaeoplacer gold from an orogenic gold source related to the compressional phase of an orogeny significantly older than the Eburnean orogeny. Instead, they suggest that the gold source was either orogenic gold lodes related to an earlier compressional phase of a diachronous Eburnean orogeny or ca. 2200-2100 Ma intrusion-related gold lode. The CO2-rich fluid inclusions in associated vein-quartz pebbles are permissive of either source. At the Damang deposit, an epigenetic, orogenic lode-gold system clearly overprinted, and sulphidised low-grade palaeoplacer hematite magnetite gold occurrences in the Banket Series conglomerate within the Tarkwaian sedimentary sequence. Gold mineralisation is demonstrably post-peak metamorphism, as gold-related alteration assemblages overprint metamorphic assemblages in host rocks. In alteration zones surrounding the dominant, subhorizontal auriferous quartz veins, there are rare occurrences of hydrothermal xenotime which give a SHRIMP U Pb age of 2063 ?? 9 Ma for gold mineralisation. The similar structural timing of epigenetic gold

  1. Late Archean mineralised cyanobacterial mats and their modern analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, J.; Altermann, W.; Kremer, B.; Kempe, S.; Eriksson, P. G.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Reported are findings of Neoarchean benthic colonial coccoid cyanobacteria preserved as abundant remnants of mineralized capsules and sheaths visible in SEM images as characteristic patterns after etching highly polished carbonate rock platelets. The samples described herein were collected from the Nauga Formation at Prieska (Kaapvaal craton, South Africa). The stratigraphic position of the sampling horizon (Fig. 1) is bracketed by single zircon ages from intercalated tuffs, of 2588±6 Ma and 2549±7Ma [1]. The cyanobacteria-bearing samples are located within sedimentary sequence which begins with Peritidal Member displaying increasingly transgressive character, passing upward into the Chert Member and followed by the Proto-BIF Member and by the Naute Shale Member of the Nauga Formation successively. All three latter members were deposited below the fair weather wave base. As in our previous report [2], the samples are taken from lenses of massive micritic flat pebble conglomerate occurring in otherwise finely laminated siliceous shales intercalating with thin bedded platy limestone. This part of the Nauga Formation is about 30 m thick. The calcareous, cyanobacteria-bearing flat pebble conglomerate and thin intercalations of fine-grained detrital limestones embedded in the clayey sapropel-rich deposits are interpreted as carbonate sediments winnowed during stormy weather from the nearby located peritidal carbonate platform. The mass occurrence and exceptional preservation of mineralised cyanobacterial remains in the micritic carbonate (Mg-calcite) of the redeposited flat pebbles can be explained by their sudden burial in deeper, probably anoxic clay- and sapropel-rich sediments. When examined with standard petrographic optical microscopic technique, the micritic carbonates show rather obscure structure (Fig. 2a), whereas under the SEM, polished and slightly etched platelets of the same samples reveal surprisingly well preserved patterns (Fig. 2b

  2. Environmental health impacts of dispersed mineralisation in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. C.; Mundalamo, H. R.

    2010-11-01

    The crust of South Africa has undergone various episodes and styles of mineralisation, dating as far back as the Archaean. The suite of minerals produced is diverse and includes metals, non-metals and industrial minerals. Since the Pleistocene, substantial quantities of elements, both nutritional and toxic, that were involved in ore forming processes, have been remobilised and redistributed by surficial processes of intense tropical weathering, leaching, eluviation, podsolisation and gleying; and more recently, by mining and related processes, as well as by other urban and industrial activities. As a result of this "dispersion" it is not uncommon to find large tracts of the country containing anomalous trace element contents or deficiencies in essential micro-nutrient elements. Through water and food crops, extremes in trace element variation in soils are transmitted into the food chain, with often undesirable consequences for human and animal health. But the known variations are not as yet adequately documented. Nor is there sufficient knowledge on the implications of these variations for the health of the environment and its ecosystems. Nutrient deficient soils may be the principal causative factor in the devastating endemic osteoarthritic disease that afflicts two-thirds of the women in Maputaland, for instance. The generally low Se status of agricultural soils could represent an important co-factor in the relatively high diffusion rates of HIV-AIDS in the country. The impact of geology on animal health also remains an area of critical concern to both farmers and managers of the hugely important wildlife game reserves. This paper discusses a few known relationships between trace element excess/deficiency stemming originally from mineralisation processes, and the local and regional distribution of diseases in man and animals in South Africa. It is submitted that the challenge for future research in medical geology would lie in an organised effort aimed at

  3. Characteristics of gold deposits in northern Sonora, Mexico: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silberman, M.L.; Giles, D.A.; Graubard, C.

    1988-01-01

    The complex geology of northern Sonora has a variety of environments suitable for gold mineralisation, and many of the gold prospects occur within or adjacent to the southwestern boundary of the megashear in Precambrian, Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks. The characteristics types of gold deposits have been delineated by reconnaissance field investigations of the authors. There are four main environments of lode gold deposits present in Sonora: epithermal veins and breccias; discontinuous quartz veins; structurally controlled Au; and carbonate sedimentary-hosted disseminated Au. -after Authors

  4. Using Geomodelling and Geophysical Inversion to Evaluate the Geological Controls on Low-Sulphidation Epithermal Au-Ag mineralisation in the Drummond and Bowen Basins, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltrin, Leonardo; Baker, Timothy; Oliver, Nick; Scott, Margaretha; Wilkinson, Kate; Fitzell, Melanie; Dixon, Owen; Bertelli, Martina

    2008-05-01

    We present a 3D geological model that integrates different datasets and incorporates geophysical inversion of airborne gravimetric and magnetic surveys of the northern part of the Drummond and Bowen basins. These basins are known for their endowment of low-sulphidation, epithermal Au-Ag mineralisation. The objective of this computer based reconstruction is to empirically evaluate the key controlling variables that contributed to the spatial localization of 147 Palaeozoic and Mesozoic shallow hydrothermal gold systems, found predominantly in veins and breccia hosted in basal volcanics and volcaniclastic intervals developed in a back-arc rift environment. The model provides a three-dimensional, regional scale (100,000 km2) perspective on the spatial associations between geology, structure, magmatism and known mineral occurrences, representing a 3D framework for precious-metals exploration. Results of 3D visualisation of geological and geophysical data suggest that magmatic intrusions, and correlative volcanic centres localized most of the major deposits and also controlled the arrangement of clusters of uneconomic Au-Ag occurrences. The empirical modelling supports a model for the genesis of low-sulphidation epithermal Au-Ag mineralisation that favours a strong spatial association with shallow felsic to intermediate magmatic intrusions, similarly to that proposed for high-sulphidation systems. Geophysical inversion estimates for the depth of magmatic bodies suggest also that they may have controlled the efficiency of the hydrothermal, mineralising systems-shallow intrusions tend to be associated with greater tonnages of Au-Ag and are spatially associated with the larger clusters of occurrences. However, the composition of magmatic intrusions (mafic, intermediate, felsic) may have been important in regulating the amount of available bisulphide in the volatile phase, exerting a control on Au grade/tonnage independent of the depth of emplacement of intrusions.

  5. Late Archean mineralised cyanobacterial mats and their modern analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, J.; Altermann, W.; Kremer, B.; Kempe, S.; Eriksson, P. G.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Reported are findings of Neoarchean benthic colonial coccoid cyanobacteria preserved as abundant remnants of mineralized capsules and sheaths visible in SEM images as characteristic patterns after etching highly polished carbonate rock platelets. The samples described herein were collected from the Nauga Formation at Prieska (Kaapvaal craton, South Africa). The stratigraphic position of the sampling horizon (Fig. 1) is bracketed by single zircon ages from intercalated tuffs, of 2588±6 Ma and 2549±7Ma [1]. The cyanobacteria-bearing samples are located within sedimentary sequence which begins with Peritidal Member displaying increasingly transgressive character, passing upward into the Chert Member and followed by the Proto-BIF Member and by the Naute Shale Member of the Nauga Formation successively. All three latter members were deposited below the fair weather wave base. As in our previous report [2], the samples are taken from lenses of massive micritic flat pebble conglomerate occurring in otherwise finely laminated siliceous shales intercalating with thin bedded platy limestone. This part of the Nauga Formation is about 30 m thick. The calcareous, cyanobacteria-bearing flat pebble conglomerate and thin intercalations of fine-grained detrital limestones embedded in the clayey sapropel-rich deposits are interpreted as carbonate sediments winnowed during stormy weather from the nearby located peritidal carbonate platform. The mass occurrence and exceptional preservation of mineralised cyanobacterial remains in the micritic carbonate (Mg-calcite) of the redeposited flat pebbles can be explained by their sudden burial in deeper, probably anoxic clay- and sapropel-rich sediments. When examined with standard petrographic optical microscopic technique, the micritic carbonates show rather obscure structure (Fig. 2a), whereas under the SEM, polished and slightly etched platelets of the same samples reveal surprisingly well preserved patterns (Fig. 2b

  6. Controls on maximum fluid overpressure defining conditions for mesozonal mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2004-06-01

    The mesozonal environment for mineralisation (˜10±5 km depth) occurs towards the base of the seismogenic zone in the upper continental crust which, in areas of strong fluid release, acts as a stressed elastic lid containing overpressured hydrothermal fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration at depth. Au-quartz lodes in this environment are hosted by fault-fracture meshes comprising dilatant extensional and extensional-shear fractures interlinked by low-displacement faults. They form in a range of tectonic regimes but are most extensively developed in compressional/transpressional settings. A brittle failure mode plot contrasting compressional and extensional stress regimes demonstrates that: (i) high fluid overpressures are easier to sustain in compressional regimes that also allow the highest amplitude fluid-pressure cycling; (ii) dilatant mesh structures serve as high-permeability conduits only under high fluid-pressure and low differential stress in the absence of through-going cohesionless faults that are well-oriented for reactivation; and, (iii) the critical interdependence of differential stress and sustainable overpressure ensures that changes in stress state are accompanied by fluid redistribution. The specialised circumstances allowing high-flux flow of overpressured fluids are generally short-lived and are terminated by the formation of through-going, favourably oriented faults.

  7. The Yatela gold deposit: 2 billion years in the making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, K. A. A.; Matsheka, I. R.; Bruguier, O.; Masurel, Q.; Bosch, D.; Caby, R.; Monié, P.

    2015-12-01

    Gold mineralisation in the Yatela Main gold mine is hosted in a saprolitic residuum situated above Birimian supracrustal rocks, and at depth. The supracrustal rocks comprise metamorphosed calcitic and dolomitic marbles that were intruded by diorite (2106 ± 10 Ma, 207Pb/206Pb), and sandstone-siltstone-shale sequences (youngest detrital zircon population dated at 2139 ± 6 Ma). In-situ gold-sulphide mineralisation is associated with hydrothermal activity synchronous to emplacement of the diorite and forms a sub-economic resource; however, the overlying saprolitic residuum hosts economic gold mineralisation in friable lateritized palaeosols and aeolian sands (loess). Samples of saprolitic residuum were studied to investigate the morphology and composition of gold grains as a proxy for distance from source (and possible exploration vector) because the deposit hosts both angular and detrital gold suggesting both proximal and distal sources. U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons also indicated a proximal and distal source, with the age spectra giving Archaean (2.83-3.28 Ga), and Palaeoproterozoic (1.95-2.20 Ga) to Neoproterozoic (1.1-1.8 Ga) zircons in the Yatela depocentre. The 1.1-1.8 Ga age spectrum restricts the maximum age for the first deposition of the sedimentary units in the Neoproterozoic, or during early deposition in the Taoudeni Basin. Models for formation of the residuum include distal and proximal sources for detritus into the depocentre, however, it is more likely that material was sourced locally and included recycled material. The creation of a deep laterite weathering profile and supergene enrichment of the residuum probably took place during the mid-Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

  8. Linking transcriptional responses to organismal tolerance reveals mechanisms of thermal sensitivity in a mesothermal endangered fish.

    PubMed

    Komoroske, Lisa M; Connon, Richard E; Jeffries, Ken M; Fangue, Nann A

    2015-10-01

    Forecasting species' responses to climate change requires understanding the underlying mechanisms governing environmental stress tolerance, including acclimation capacity and acute stress responses. Current knowledge of these physiological processes in aquatic ectotherms is largely drawn from eurythermal or extreme stenothermal species. Yet many species of conservation concern exhibit tolerance windows and acclimation capacities in between these extremes. We linked transcriptome profiles to organismal tolerance in a mesothermal endangered fish, the delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), to quantify the cellular processes, sublethal thresholds and effects of thermal acclimation on acute stress responses. Delta smelt initiated rapid molecular changes in line with expectations of theoretical thermal limitation models, but also exhibited diminished capacity to modify the expression of some genes and cellular mechanisms key to coping with acute thermal stress found in eurytherms. Sublethal critical thresholds occurred 4-6 °C below their upper tolerance limits, and thermal acclimation shifted the onset of acute thermal stress and tolerance as predicted. However, we found evidence that delta smelt's limited thermal plasticity may be partially due to an inability of individuals to effectively make physiological adjustments to truly achieve new homoeostasis under heightened temperatures, resulting in chronic thermal stress. These findings provide insight into the physiological basis of the diverse patterns of thermal tolerances observed in nature. Moreover, understanding how underlying molecular mechanisms shape thermal acclimation capacity, acute stress responses and ultimately differential phenotypes contributes to a predictive framework to deduce species' responses in situ to changes in selective pressures due to climate change. PMID:26339983

  9. How do cold-sensitive species endure ice ages? Phylogeographic and paleodistribution models of postglacial range expansion of the mesothermic drought-tolerant conifer Austrocedrus chilensis.

    PubMed

    Souto, Cintia P; Kitzberger, Thomas; Arbetman, Marina P; Premoli, Andrea C

    2015-11-01

    In view of global climate change, it is important to understand the responses of tree species to climate changes in the past. Combinations of phylogeographic analysis of genetic evidence, coupled with species distribution models (SDMs), are improving our understanding on this subject. We combined SDMs and microsatellite data from populations of the entire range of Austrocedrus chilensis, a dominant mesotherm (cold-sensitive) conifer of dryland forests of the southern Andes, to test the hypothesis of long-distance postglacial migration from northern and warmer refugia at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The SDM indicated suitable conditions for Austrocedrus in northern Chile (western) at the LGM and largely unsuitable conditions in Argentina (eastern). Population genetic diversity and effective population sizes within populations decreased southward along the Andes, consistent with the hypothesis of long-distance dispersal from a northern refugium. Results support the hypothesis of one (or a few) warmer (low latitude) refugia in Chile for Austrocedrus. On balance, the evidence suggests that in contrast to cold-tolerant tree taxa with the capacity to fast-track postglacial warming thanks to local refugia, cold-sensitive species might have undergone long-distance range expansion, lagging behind progressive climate change throughout the Holocene. PMID:26079667

  10. Mineralised organic remains from cesspits at the Roman town of Silchester: Processes and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lisa-Jane R.; Almond, Matthew J.; Cook, Samantha R.; Pantos, Manolis; Tobin, Mark J.; Thomas, Luanne A.

    2008-12-01

    Mineralised organic remains (including apple pips and cereal grains) collected during the ongoing excavations of Insula IX at the Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire have been analysed by a combination of SEM-EDX, powder XRD and IR spectroscopy. The experiments included mapping experiments using spatially resolved versions of each technique. IR and powder XRD mapping have been carried out utilising the synchrotron source at The Daresbury Laboratory on stations 11.1 and 9.6. It is concluded that these samples are preserved by rapid mineralisation in the carbonate-substituted calcium phosphate mineral, dahllite. The rapid mineralisation leads to excellent preservation of the samples and a small crystal size. The value of IR spectroscopy in studying materials like this where the crystal size is small is demonstrated. A comparison is made between the excellent preservation seen in this context and the much poorer preservation of mineralised remains seen in Context 5276 or Cesspit 5251. Comments on the possible mechanism of mineralisation of these samples are made.

  11. Survey of spontaneous dystrophic mineralisation of pineal gland in ageing rats.

    PubMed

    Majeed, S K

    1997-11-01

    The survey included 151 rats from several carcinogenicity studies up to 104 weeks and 260 rats from short-term studies up to 52 weeks. All studies were performed during the period 1990-1996. Young rats up to 52 weeks of age showed normal structural appearance, in 134 male rats the incidence of mineralisation was 6.3% and in 126 females the incidence was only slightly less at 5.6%. In ageing rats, 70-104 weeks, 88 males and 63 females showed far higher incidence of mineralisation, 83% and 57% respectively, showing that the incidence of mineralisation in ageing rats was higher in males than females. The focal mineralisation occurred mainly at the margin of the gland in the subcapsular region mostly adjacent to small blood vessels. On occasions these involved the parenchymal cells in the middle part of the gland. The focal mineralisation stained positive with von Kossa indicating presence of calcium and also with PAS (Pariodic Acid-Schiff method), indicating presence of neutral mucopolysaccharide. There was no evidence of positivity with Perl's stain (for ferric salts), Toluidine blue (for protein) or Alcian blue (for acid mucopolysaccharides). With Oil Red O there was evidence of presence of fat or lipid in pinealocytes. PMID:9428987

  12. Mineralised organic remains from cesspits at the Roman town of Silchester: processes and preservation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lisa-Jane R; Almond, Matthew J; Cook, Samantha R; Pantos, Manolis; Tobin, Mark J; Thomas, Luanne A

    2008-12-01

    Mineralised organic remains (including apple pips and cereal grains) collected during the ongoing excavations of Insula IX at the Roman town of Silchester, Hampshire have been analysed by a combination of SEM-EDX, powder XRD and IR spectroscopy. The experiments included mapping experiments using spatially resolved versions of each technique. IR and powder XRD mapping have been carried out utilising the synchrotron source at The Daresbury Laboratory on stations 11.1 and 9.6. It is concluded that these samples are preserved by rapid mineralisation in the carbonate-substituted calcium phosphate mineral, dahllite. The rapid mineralisation leads to excellent preservation of the samples and a small crystal size. The value of IR spectroscopy in studying materials like this where the crystal size is small is demonstrated. A comparison is made between the excellent preservation seen in this context and the much poorer preservation of mineralised remains seen in Context 5276 or Cesspit 5251. Comments on the possible mechanism of mineralisation of these samples are made. PMID:18406198

  13. Potential anthropogenic mobilisation of mercury and arsenic from soils on mineralised rocks, Northland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Craw, D

    2005-02-01

    Eroded roots of hot spring systems in Northland, New Zealand consist of mineralised rocks containing sulfide minerals. Marcasite and cinnabar are the dominant sulfides with subordinate pyrite. Deep weathering and leached soil formation has occurred in a warm temperate to subtropical climate with up to 3 m/year rainfall. Decomposition of the iron sulfides in natural and anthropogenic rock exposures yields acid rock drainage with pH typically between 2 and 4, and locally down to pH 1. Soils and weathered rocks developed on basement greywacke have negligible acid neutralisation capacity. Natural rainforest soils have pH between 4 and 5 on unmineralised greywacke, and pH is as low as 3.5 in soils on mineralised rocks. Roads with aggregate made from mineralised rocks have pH near 3, and quarries from which the rock was extracted can have pH down to 1. Mineralised rocks are enriched in arsenic and mercury, both of which are environmentally available as solid solution impurities in iron sulfides and phosphate minerals. Base metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) are present at low levels in soils, at or below typical basement rock background. Decomposition of the iron sulfides releases the solid solution arsenic and mercury into the acid rock drainage solutions. Phosphate minerals release their impurities only under strongly acid conditions (pH<1). Arsenic and mercury are adsorbed on to iron oxyhydroxides in soils, concentrated in the C horizon, with up to 4000 ppm arsenic and 100 ppm mercury. Waters emanating from acid rock drainage areas have arsenic and mercury below drinking water limits. Leaching experiments and theoretical predictions indicate that both arsenic and mercury are least mobile in acid soils, at pH of c. 3-4. This optimum pH range for fixation of arsenic and mercury on iron oxyhydroxides in soils is similar to natural pH at the field site of this study. However, neutralisation of acid soils developed on mineralised rocks is likely to decrease adsorption and enhance

  14. The importance of plant-soil interactions for N mineralisation in different soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Conor; Paterson, Eric; Baggs, Elizabeth; Morley, Nicholas; Wall, David; Schulte, Rogier

    2013-04-01

    The last hundred years has seen major advancements in our knowledge of nitrogen mineralisation in soil, but key drivers and controls remain poorly understood. Due to an increase in the global population there is a higher demand on food production. To accommodate this demand agriculture has increased its use of N based fertilizers, but these pose risks for water quality and GHG emissions as N can be lost through nitrate leaching, ammonia volatilization, and denitrification processes (Velthof, et al., 2009). Therefore, understanding the underlying processes that determine the soils ability to supply N to the plant is vital for effective optimisation of N-fertilisation with crop demand. Carbon rich compounds exuded from plant roots to the rhizosphere, which are utilized by the microbial biomass and support activities including nutrient transformations, may be a key unaccounted for driver of N mineralisation. The main aim of this study was to study the impact of root exudates on turnover of C and N in soil, as mediated by the microbial community. Two soil types, known to contrast in N-mineralisation capacity, were used to determine relationships between C inputs, organic matter mineralisation (priming effects) and N fluxes. 15N and 13C stable isotope approaches were used to quantify the importance of rhizosphere processes on C and N mineralisation. Gross nitrogen mineralisation was measured using 15N pool dilution. Total soil CO2 efflux was measured and 13C isotope partitioning was applied to quantify SOM turnover and microbial biomass respiration. Also, 13C was traced through the microbial biomass (chloroform fumigation) to separate pool-substitution effects (apparent priming) from altered microbial utilisation of soil organic matter (real priming effects). Addition of labile carbon resulted in an increase in N-mineralisation from soil organic matter in both soils. Concurrent with this there was an increase in microbial biomass size, indicating that labile C elicited

  15. Assessing the mineralisation of charcoal carbon in temperate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascough, P. L.; Tilston, E.; Garnett, M.

    2012-04-01

    Charcoal is pyrolized biomass characterized by its high C content and environmental recalcitrance. Recently 'biochar' has emerged as a concept as a means of long-term C sequestration with a sequestration potential that is comparable with current global anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions (5.5-9.5 Pg C yr-1 and 5.4 Pg C yr-1, respectively). However, charcoal is not a permanent C sink and estimates of charcoal degradation rates vary from the decadal or centennial timescales, with soil residence times in the order of thousands of years. Possible mechanisms of charcoal degradation include biotically and abiotically-mediated transformation and mineralization processes, resulting in a range of products of varying recalcitrance, including CO2. In soil science the decomposition of organic matter is routinely estimated by measuring CO2 efflux, but a key obstacle for the quantification of charcoal-derived CO2 is the accurate and precise apportionment of C sources arising from slow decomposition rates. Moreover, the addition of charcoal to soil can promote decomposition of indigenous soil organic matter and the concomitant increase in CO2 production does not therefore necessarily demonstrate mineralization of the charcoal C. Radiocarbon (14C) offers significant benefits in this regard as a sensitive technique for C source apportionment. We used the 14C content of CO2 respired by a surface soil to quantify the rate of charcoal mineralization, thus demonstrating the efficacy and sensitivity of our 14C approach for estimating charcoal degradation. During incubation the variations in charcoal-derived C mineralization are consistent with the loss of more labile components in the charcoal with a maximum of 2.1% of the evolved CO2-C being attributable to mineralisation of charcoal C. Extrapolation to an annual basis suggests that the loss rate of charcoal C is <1%, supporting the view that rates of charcoal C respiration are slow in temperate woodland soil. Implications for

  16. Ammonium Concentrations in Produced Waters from a Mesothermic Oil Field Subjected to Nitrate Injection Decrease through Formation of Denitrifying Biomass and Anammox Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cornish Shartau, Sabrina L.; Yurkiw, Marcy; Lin, Shiping; Grigoryan, Aleksandr A.; Lambo, Adewale; Park, Hyung-Soo; Lomans, Bart P.; van der Biezen, Erwin; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    Community analysis of a mesothermic oil field, subjected to continuous field-wide injection of nitrate to remove sulfide, with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of heterotrophic and sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB and soNRB). These reduce nitrate by dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (e.g., Sulfurospirillum and Denitrovibrio) or by denitrification (e.g., Sulfurimonas, Arcobacter, and Thauera). Monitoring of ammonium concentrations in producing wells (PWs) indicated that denitrification was the main pathway for nitrate reduction in the field: breakthrough of nitrate and nitrite in two PWs was not associated with an increase in the ammonium concentration, and no increase in the ammonium concentration was seen in any of 11 producing wells during periods of increased nitrate injection. Instead, ammonium concentrations in produced waters decreased on average from 0.3 to 0.2 mM during 2 years of nitrate injection. Physiological studies with produced water-derived hNRB microcosms indicated increased biomass formation associated with denitrification as a possible cause for decreasing ammonium concentrations. Use of anammox-specific primers and cloning of the resulting PCR product gave clones affiliated with the known anammox genera “Candidatus Brocadia” and “Candidatus Kuenenia,” indicating that the anammox reaction may also contribute to declining ammonium concentrations. Overall, the results indicate the following: (i) that nitrate injected into an oil field to oxidize sulfide is primarily reduced by denitrifying bacteria, of which many genera have been identified by DGGE, and (ii) that perhaps counterintuitively, nitrate injection leads to decreasing ammonium concentrations in produced waters. PMID:20562276

  17. Fungal Ferromanganese Mineralisation in Cretaceous Dinosaur Bones from the Gobi Desert, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Kremer, Barbara; Wrzosek, Beata; Królikowska, Agata; Kaźmierczak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Well-preserved mycelia of fungal- or saprolegnia-like biota mineralised by ferromanganese oxides were found for the first time in long bones of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Gobi Desert (Nemegt Valley, Mongolia). The mycelia formed a biofilm on the wall of the bone marrow cavity and penetrated the osteon channels of the nearby bone tissue. Optical microscopy, Raman, SEM/EDS, SEM/BSE, electron microprobe and cathodoluminescence analyses revealed that the mineralisation of the mycelia proceeded in two stages. The first stage was early post-mortem mineralisation of the hyphae by Fe/Mn-oxide coatings and microconcretions. Probably this proceeded in a mildly acidic to circumneutral environment, predominantly due to heterotrophic bacteria degrading the mycelial necromass and liberating Fe and Mn sorbed by the mycelia during its lifetime. The second stage of mineralisation, which proceeded much later following the final burial of the bones in an alkaline environment, resulted from the massive precipitation of calcite and occasionally barite on the iron/manganese-oxide-coated mycelia. The mineral phases produced by fungal biofilms colonising the interiors of decaying dinosaur bones not only enhance the preservation (fossilisation) of fungal remains but can also be used as indicators of the geochemistry of the dinosaur burial sites. PMID:26863014

  18. Fungal Ferromanganese Mineralisation in Cretaceous Dinosaur Bones from the Gobi Desert, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Wrzosek, Beata; Królikowska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Well-preserved mycelia of fungal- or saprolegnia-like biota mineralised by ferromanganese oxides were found for the first time in long bones of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Gobi Desert (Nemegt Valley, Mongolia). The mycelia formed a biofilm on the wall of the bone marrow cavity and penetrated the osteon channels of the nearby bone tissue. Optical microscopy, Raman, SEM/EDS, SEM/BSE, electron microprobe and cathodoluminescence analyses revealed that the mineralisation of the mycelia proceeded in two stages. The first stage was early post-mortem mineralisation of the hyphae by Fe/Mn-oxide coatings and microconcretions. Probably this proceeded in a mildly acidic to circumneutral environment, predominantly due to heterotrophic bacteria degrading the mycelial necromass and liberating Fe and Mn sorbed by the mycelia during its lifetime. The second stage of mineralisation, which proceeded much later following the final burial of the bones in an alkaline environment, resulted from the massive precipitation of calcite and occasionally barite on the iron/manganese-oxide-coated mycelia. The mineral phases produced by fungal biofilms colonising the interiors of decaying dinosaur bones not only enhance the preservation (fossilisation) of fungal remains but can also be used as indicators of the geochemistry of the dinosaur burial sites. PMID:26863014

  19. Application of gold compositional analyses to mineral exploration in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, J.C.; Campbell, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Native gold is a mineral composed of Au, Ag and Cu in solid solution and it usually contains one or more trace metals as lattice impurities, as mineral inclusions, in grain boundaries or in surface coatings. Alloy proportions of Au, Ag and Cu, together with certain other elements, can be thought of as constituting a gold "signature". Gold is associated with a great variety of ore deposits and has characteristic signatures for each of several types of ore deposits. Signatures for gold derived from igneous-metamorphic, hypothermal, mesothermal and epithermal deposits reflect conditions of ore formation by their content of Ag, Cu and characteristic associated elements. At higher temperatures of ore formation, gold has low Ag and high Cu content, and Bi and Pb are the most abundant trace elements. But at lower temperatures of ore formation, Ag is high, Cu is low, and Pb is the most abundant trace element. The same trend in gold signatures is observable in gold mining districts, such as Central City, Colorado, where zoning as shown by mineral assemblages indicates ore deposition at progressively lower temperatures as the distance from a central high-temperature zone increases. The signatures of gold may be useful in searching for porphyry Cu deposits. Signatures from Butte (Montana), Mineral Park (Arizona) and Cala Abajo (Puerto Rico), on the basis of limited sampling, are similar and distinctive. They are characterized by a similar assemblage of trace elements and are relatively high in both Ag and Cu. Another application of gold compositional data is in tracing placer gold to its bedrock source. For example, the Ag content of placer gold in the Tarryall district of Colorado differed from that of nearly all of the bedrock sources of gold found by early prospectors. However, one lightly prospected area peripheral to the Tertiary quartz monzonite stock at Montgomery Gulch contains gold with a Ag content similar to that of the placer gold. This area is the most likely

  20. Mineral-petrochemical wallrock alteration of rocks in Bericul gold-ore deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, I.; Yuxuan, Zhang; Abramova, R.

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of mineral associations in near-veined zonal propylite-beresite metasomatic columns of mesothermal Bericul gold-ore deposit was analyzed. However, the polymineral composition in the inner (axial and adjacent with it rear) zones is inconsistent to the existing metasomatic column theoretical model. According to Korzhinskii metasomatic zoning theory, implied monomineral (quartz) and binary-mineral (quartz, sericite) compositions are characteristic of axial and rear zones, respectively. In common with above- mentioned facts, the zoning formation of differential component mobility is influenced by two additional factors: counter diffusion of components from fractured fluids into pores and diffusion mechanism of mass transfer it's from pores fluids into fractured of rock-fluid systems.

  1. Gold deposition caused by carbonation of biotite during late-stage fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark A.; White, Alistair J. R.; Fisher, Louise A.; Hough, Robert M.; Cleverley, James S.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration reactions associated with gold mineralisation can be used to elucidate the nature of the fluid that transported gold into a deposit. At the Junction gold deposit, Kambalda, Western Australia, gold is hosted in a metamorphosed and hydrothermally altered dolerite. Mineralisation at the deposit scale is associated with zones of K, CO2 and S metasomatism, as is common in many greenstone hosted gold deposits. However, at the thin-section scale gold is not closely associated with sulphide minerals but within zones of carbonate metasomatism and K-loss where pre-existing biotite has reacted to produce chlorite, muscovite and Fe-Mg carbonates. Gold precipitation is intimately associated with biotite breakdown where calcite is locally absent. Quantified mineral modes from detailed microstructural mapping are used to balance reactions describing the breakdown of biotite in the presence and absence of calcite. Using the basic assumption that Al is immobile during metasomatism the reactions are successfully balanced, even in a manifestly open system. Modelling of fluid-rock reactions using HCh constrains the fluid composition (0.11 < X(CO2) < 0.13) and fluid-rock ratios (< 12:1) that can produce the observed mineral assemblage. Additional modelling of solid solution mineral phases using THERMOCALC estimates alteration conditions of 390 °C, 4 kbar and also suggests a fluid X(CO2) ~ 0.1. Both these models show that the observed muscovite and chlorite compositions can be produced primarily through the removal of K from the measured precursor biotite. We show that it is not possible to transport and deposit all the gold observed in the alteration zone with the low fluid-rock ratios obtained from modelling of silicate alteration and inferred gold concentrations in these fluids. We suggest that this is typical of greenstone hosted gold deposits and that mechanisms other than aqueous solution, which can transport higher gold concentrations, must be considered.

  2. Metallogenic epoch of the Jiapigou gold belt, Jilin Province, China: Constrains from rare earth element, fluid inclusion geochemistry and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhixin; Yuan, Wanming; Wang, Changming; Liu, Xiangwei; Xu, Xiaotong; Yang, Liya

    2012-12-01

    The Jiapigou gold belt is located on the northern margin of the North China Craton, and is one of the most important gold-mining and production regions in the circum-Pacific metallogenic zone. Research has been conducted in this area since the 1960s, however, the timing of the gold mineralisation is still unresolved, and an ideal metallogenic model has not been well established. To address these questions, a systematic geological, geochemical and geochronological investigation was conducted. The study revealed that (i) the gold-bearing quartz veins can be divided into two groups, earlier and later gold-bearing quartz veins according to their occurrence and the geochemical characteristics, (ii) the geochemical characteristics of the ore bodies, while similar to granite, are clearly different from the altered rock, and (iii) the geochemical characteristics of the later gold-bearing quartz veins have more similarity to the altered rock than the earlier gold-bearing quartz veins do. Therefore, we conclude that two independent stages of metallogenesis within the Jiapigou gold deposit area are related to magmatic activity in the Palaeoproterozoic and the Yanshanian stage of the Mesozoic, that the ore-forming fluids are mainly of magmatic origin, and that magma contamination by the altered rock was stronger in the Mesozoic. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb data show that the age of the Palaeoproterozoic granite is ~2426.0 Ma and that of the Mesozoic granite is ~166.2 Ma; these ages can be interpreted as the maximum ages of the two periods of gold mineralisation. In addition to investigating the geotectonic and regional structure of the Jiapigou gold belt, this study also proposes that the WNW-trending zone of gold mineralisation is a result of a magmatic event within the basement in the early Palaeoproterozoic, and that large-scale sinistral strike-slip displacements of the Huifahe and Liangjiang Faults in the late Middle Triassic (Yanshanian epoch) controlled the later tectono

  3. Organic phosphorus mineralisation in a temperate grassland soil under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Andresen, Louise; Gorenflo, André D.; Müller, Christoph; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for all biota and significant proportions of P in soil are present in organic form. Increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO2]) have been shown to influence plant P uptake traits, resulting in plant-mediated changes in soil P pools. However, little is known on the effect of elevated [CO2] on organic P mineralisation rates in soil. Study design & hypotheses: A 33P isotopic dilution experiment was performed with soils of the 17-year-old Giessen free air carbon dioxide enrichment (GiFACE) - trial. At the GiFACE, three plots are treated with 20 % elevated [CO2] while three control plots receive ambient air. We hypothesised that i) the observed positive effect of elevated [CO2] on plant growth translates into differences in soil organic P mineralisation rates between treated and untreated plots, resulting in ii) differences in soil organic P pools. Methods: Fresh soil (0-8 cm) was sampled from each plot, labelled with a carrier free 33P solution and incubated for 36 days at 19° C in the dark. On six time points, inorganic P and 33P in soil filtrates, soil microorganisms (by liquid fumigation) and resin extractable P were quantified. The baseline of 33P isotopic dilution was assessed from a short term batch experiment and extrapolated for 36 days. Gross organic P mineralisation rates were determined as the difference between isotopic dilution in the incubated soils (physicochemical + biological processes) minus extrapolated values (physicochemical processes only). Additionally, enzyme addition assays on alkaline soil extracts were performed to quantify different soil organic P classes, using enzymes with a known substrate specificity. Results & Discussion: Gross organic P mineralisation rates were high during the first three days (5.5 - 34.3 mg P kg‑1 d‑1), possibly due to the soil disturbance at labelling soils with 33P. However, gross organic P mineralisation decreased rapidly to rates between

  4. The Yatela gold deposit in Mali, West Africa: The final product of a long-lived history of hydrothermal alteration and weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masurel, Quentin; Miller, John; Hein, Kim A. A.; Hanssen, Eric; Thébaud, Nicolas; Ulrich, Stanislav; Kaisin, Jean; Tessougue, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The Yatela gold deposit is located in the Kédougou-Kénieba inlier (KKI), a window of ca. 2200-2050 Ma rocks that are exposed in eastern Senegal and western Mali. The geology of the KKI differs from other Paleoproterozoic granite-greenstone belts and sedimentary basins by the abundance of carbonate rocks. The Yatela deposit occurs within 8 km of the regional-scale Senegal-Mali Shear Zone. Country rocks in the Yatela region have been subjected to polycyclic deformation and regional greenschist-facies metamorphism. A syn-kinematic diorite stock has intruded the metasedimentary sequences in the open pit and is associated with a hornblende-hornfels contact aureole. Field relationships and micro-textural data indicate that the primary gold mineralisation is shear-hosted. The similar relative timing and structural setting between the Yatela primary gold mineralisation and other world-class deposits in the region (e.g., Loulo, Lawrence et al., 2013a; Massawa, Treloar et al., 2014; Sadiola Hill, Masurel et al., in press) suggest that regional orogenic gold mineralisation occurred during a period of transcurrent tectonics, after the cessation of regional compressional deformation. The primary gold mineralisation at Yatela, however, is low-grade and sub-economic. It is hosted by marbles and, to a lesser extent, diorite. The primary ore is pyrite-rich, with abundant chalcopyrite, minor arsenopyrite and accessory Zn-Pb-Sb-Fe-Ag-Co-Ni-bearing mineral species. Post-Birimian surficial dissolution of hydrothermally altered and mineralised host marbles resulted in the creation of troughs, which were draped and infilled with a ferruginous dissolution residue enriched in gold. This auriferous residuum formed the economic resource mined at Yatela until decommissioning in 2013. The Yatela gold deposit is unique with respect to mineralisation types encountered in West Africa because an auriferous residuum of economic interest (>1 Moz) derives from an underlying sub-economic Birimian

  5. Negative Priming Effect on Organic Matter Mineralisation in NE Atlantic Slope Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gontikaki, Evangelia; Thornton, Barry; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Witte, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    The priming effect (PE) is a complex phenomenon which describes a modification (acceleration or retardation) in the mineralisation rate of refractory organic matter (OM) following inputs of labile material. PEs are well-studied in terrestrial ecosystems owing to their potential importance in the evolution of soil carbon stocks but have been largely ignored in aquatic systems despite the fact that the prerequisite for their occurrence, i.e. the co-existence of labile and refractory OM, is also true for sediments. We conducted stable isotope tracer experiments in continental margin sediments from the NE Atlantic (550–950 m) to study PE occurrence and intensity in relation to labile OM input. Sediment slurries were treated with increasing quantities of the 13C-labelled diatom Thalassiosira rotula and PE was quantified after 7, 14 and 21 days. There was a stepwise effect of diatom quantity on its mineralisation although mineralisation efficiency dropped with increasing substrate amounts. The addition of diatomaceous OM yielded a negative PE (i.e. retardation of existing sediment OM mineralisation) at the end of the experiment regardless of diatom quantity. Negative PE is often the result of preferential utilisation of the newly deposited labile material by the microbial community (“preferential substrate utilization”, PSU) which is usually observed at excessive substrate additions. The fact that PSU and the associated negative PE occurred even at low substrate levels in this study could be attributed to limited amounts of OM subject to priming in our study area (∼0.2% organic carbon [OC]) which seems to be an exception among continental slopes (typically >0.5%OC). We postulate that PEs will normally be positive in continental slope sediments and that their intensity will be a direct function of sediment OC content. More experiments with varying supply of substrate targeting C-poor vs. C-rich sediments are needed to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:23840766

  6. On fragmenting, densely mineralised acellular protrusions into articular cartilage and their possible role in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Davis, G R; Mills, D; Zikmund, T; Cox, T M; Adams, V L; Niker, A; Wilson, P J; Dillon, J P; Ranganath, L R; Jeffery, N; Jarvis, J C; Gallagher, J A

    2014-10-01

    High density mineralised protrusions (HDMP) from the tidemark mineralising front into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC) were first described in Thoroughbred racehorse fetlock joints and later in Icelandic horse hock joints. We now report them in human material. Whole femoral heads removed at operation for joint replacement or from dissection room cadavers were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual echo steady state at 0.23 mm resolution, then 26-μm resolution high contrast X-ray microtomography, sectioned and embedded in polymethylmethacrylate, blocks cut and polished and re-imaged with 6-μm resolution X-ray microtomography. Tissue mineralisation density was imaged using backscattered electron SEM (BSE SEM) at 20 kV with uncoated samples. HAC histology was studied by BSE SEM after staining block faces with ammonium triiodide solution. HDMP arise via the extrusion of an unknown mineralisable matrix into clefts in HAC, a process of acellular dystrophic calcification. Their formation may be an extension of a crack self-healing mechanism found in bone and articular calcified cartilage. Mineral concentration exceeds that of articular calcified cartilage and is not uniform. It is probable that they have not been reported previously because they are removed by decalcification with standard protocols. Mineral phase morphology frequently shows the agglomeration of many fine particles into larger concretions. HDMP are surrounded by HAC, are brittle, and show fault lines within them. Dense fragments found within damaged HAC could make a significant contribution to joint destruction. At least larger HDMP can be detected with the best MRI imaging ex vivo. PMID:25132002

  7. Microbial and diagenetic steps leading to the mineralisation of Great Salt Lake microbialites.

    PubMed

    Pace, Aurélie; Bourillot, Raphaël; Bouton, Anthony; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Galaup, Serge; Bundeleva, Irina; Patrier, Patricia; Dupraz, Christophe; Thomazo, Christophe; Sansjofre, Pierre; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Franceschi, Michel; Anguy, Yannick; Pigot, Léa; Virgone, Aurélien; Visscher, Pieter T

    2016-01-01

    Microbialites are widespread in modern and fossil hypersaline environments, where they provide a unique sedimentary archive. Authigenic mineral precipitation in modern microbialites results from a complex interplay between microbial metabolisms, organic matrices and environmental parameters. Here, we combined mineralogical and microscopic analyses with measurements of metabolic activity in order to characterise the mineralisation of microbial mats forming microbialites in the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). Our results show that the mineralisation process takes place in three steps progressing along geochemical gradients produced through microbial activity. First, a poorly crystallized Mg-Si phase precipitates on alveolar extracellular organic matrix due to a rise of the pH in the zone of active oxygenic photosynthesis. Second, aragonite patches nucleate in close proximity to sulfate reduction hotspots, as a result of the degradation of cyanobacteria and extracellular organic matrix mediated by, among others, sulfate reducing bacteria. A final step consists of partial replacement of aragonite by dolomite, possibly in neutral to slightly acidic porewater. This might occur due to dissolution-precipitation reactions when the most recalcitrant part of the organic matrix is degraded. The mineralisation pathways proposed here provide pivotal insight for the interpretation of microbial processes in past hypersaline environments. PMID:27527125

  8. Cartilage damage involving extrusion of mineralisable matrix from the articular calcified cartilage and subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A; Riggs, C M; Bushby, A J; McDermott, B; Pinchbeck, G L; Clegg, P D

    2011-01-01

    Arthropathy of the distal articular surfaces of the third metacarpal (Mc3) and metatarsal (Mt3) bones in the Thoroughbred racehorse (Tb) is a natural model of repetitive overload arthrosis. We describe a novel pathology that affects the articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) and which is associated with hyaline articular cartilage degeneration. Parasagittal slices cut from the palmar quadrant of the distal condyles of the left Mc3/Mt3 of 39 trained Tbs euthanized for welfare reasons were imaged by point projection microradiography, and backscattered electron (BSE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy, and confocal scanning light microscopy. Mechanical properties were studied by nanoindentation. Data on the horses' training and racing career were also collected. Highly mineralised projections were observed extending from cracks in the ACC mineralising front into the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC) up to two-thirds the thickness of the HAC, and were associated with focal HAC surface fibrillation directly overlying their site. Nanoindentation identified this extruded matrix to be stiffer than any other mineralised phase in the specimen by a factor of two. The presence of projections was associated with a higher cartilage Mankin histology score (P<0.02) and increased amounts of gross cartilage loss pathologically on the condyle (P<0.02). Presence of projections was not significantly associated with: total number of racing seasons, age of horse, amount of earnings, number of days in training, total distance galloped in career, or presence of wear lines. PMID:21623571

  9. Efficiency of the Regulation of Otolith Mineralisation and Susceptibility to kinetotic Behaviour in Parabolic Aircraft Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, M.; Weigele, J.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Under diminished gravity e g during the respective phase in the course of parabolic aircraft flight PF humans often suffer from motion sickness a kinetsosis due to sensorimotor disorders Using fish as a model system we previously provided ample evidence that an individually differently pronounced asymmetric mineralisation calcification of inner ear stones otoliths leads to the individually different susceptibility to such disorders Depending on the disposition of an individual fish the mineralisation of otoliths is more or less strictly regulated by the central nervous system via a gravity-dependent feedback loop Long-term hypergravity centrifuge e g slows down otolith mineralisation whereas simulated microgravity clinostat yields opposite results Such long-term experiments under altered gravity moreover affect otolith asymmetry According to our working hypothesis the efficiency of the respective regulatory mechanism differs among individual animals This efficiency is postulated to be high in animals who behave normally under microgravity conditions whereas it is assumed to be low in such individuals who reveal a kinetotic behaviour at diminished G-forces In order to test this hypothesis two groups of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were kept under long-term hypergravity centrifuge and simulated microgravity clinostat respectively in order to manipulate the efficiency of the aforementioned regulatory mechanism Subsequently the animals were subjected to diminished gravity in the course of PFs and it was analysed

  10. Microbial and diagenetic steps leading to the mineralisation of Great Salt Lake microbialites

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Aurélie; Bourillot, Raphaël; Bouton, Anthony; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Galaup, Serge; Bundeleva, Irina; Patrier, Patricia; Dupraz, Christophe; Thomazo, Christophe; Sansjofre, Pierre; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Franceschi, Michel; Anguy, Yannick; Pigot, Léa; Virgone, Aurélien; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2016-01-01

    Microbialites are widespread in modern and fossil hypersaline environments, where they provide a unique sedimentary archive. Authigenic mineral precipitation in modern microbialites results from a complex interplay between microbial metabolisms, organic matrices and environmental parameters. Here, we combined mineralogical and microscopic analyses with measurements of metabolic activity in order to characterise the mineralisation of microbial mats forming microbialites in the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). Our results show that the mineralisation process takes place in three steps progressing along geochemical gradients produced through microbial activity. First, a poorly crystallized Mg-Si phase precipitates on alveolar extracellular organic matrix due to a rise of the pH in the zone of active oxygenic photosynthesis. Second, aragonite patches nucleate in close proximity to sulfate reduction hotspots, as a result of the degradation of cyanobacteria and extracellular organic matrix mediated by, among others, sulfate reducing bacteria. A final step consists of partial replacement of aragonite by dolomite, possibly in neutral to slightly acidic porewater. This might occur due to dissolution-precipitation reactions when the most recalcitrant part of the organic matrix is degraded. The mineralisation pathways proposed here provide pivotal insight for the interpretation of microbial processes in past hypersaline environments. PMID:27527125

  11. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-07-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  12. Orogenesis, high-T thermal events, and gold vein formation within metamorphic rocks of the Alaskan Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Snee, L.W.; Pickthorn, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Mesothermal, gold-bearing quartz veins are widespread within allochthonous terranes of Alaska that are composed dominantly of greenschist-facies metasedimentary rocks. The most productive lode deposits are concentrated in south-central and southeastern Alaska; small and generally nonproductive gold-bearing veins occur upstream from major placer deposits in interior and northern Alaska. Ore-forming fluids in all areas are consistent with derivation from metamorphic devolatilisation reactions, and a close temporal relationship exists between high-T tectonic deformation, igneous activity, and gold mineralization. Ore fluids were of consistently low salinity, CO2-rich, and had ??18O values of 7 ???-12??? and ??D values between -15??? and -35???. Upper-crustal temperatures within the metamorphosed terranes reached at least 450-500??C before onset of significant gold-forming hydrothermal activity. In southern Alaska, gold deposits formed during latter stages of Tertiary, subduction-related, collisional orogenesis and were often temporally coeval with calc-alkaline magmatism. -from Authors

  13. New mineralogical and isotopic constraints on Main Zone-hosted PGE mineralisation at Moorddrift, northern Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwell, D. A.; Jones, A.; Smith, J. W.; Boyce, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    The northern limb of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa contains a number of occurrences of platinum-group element (PGE) mineralisation within Main Zone rocks, whereas the rest of the complex has PGE-depleted Main Zone units. On the farm Moorddrift, Cu-Ni-PGE sulphide mineralisation is hosted within the Upper Main Zone in a layered package of gabbronorites, mottled anorthosites and thin pyroxenites. Our observations indicate that a 10-m-thick, `reef-style' package of mineralisation has been extensively `disturbed', forming a mega breccia which in some localities may distribute mineralised rocks over intersections of over 300 m. The sulphides are made up of pyrrhotite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite, heavily altered around their margins and overprinted by secondary pyrite. Platinum-group mineral assemblages typical of primary magmatic deposits, with Pt and Pd tellurides and sperrylite, are present in the `reef-style' package, whereas there is a decrease in tellurides and an increase in antimonides in the `disturbed' package, interpreted to be related to hydrothermal recrystallization during veining and brecciation. Sulphur isotopes show that all sulphides within the mineralised package on Moorddrift have a crustal signature consistent with local country rock sediments of the Transvaal Supergroup. We interpret the mineralisation at Moorddrift as a primary sulphide reef, likely produced as a result of the mixing of crustally contaminated magmas in the Upper Main Zone, which has been locally disrupted post-crystallisation. At present, there are no firm links between Moorddrift and the other known PGE occurrences in the Main Zone at the Aurora and Waterberg projects, although the stratigraphic position of all may be similar and thus intriguing. Nonetheless, they do demonstrate that the Main Zone of the northern limb of the Bushveld Complex, unlike the eastern and western limbs, can be considered a fertile unit for potential PGE mineralisation.

  14. Noble gases fingerprint a metasedimentary fluid source in the Macraes orogenic gold deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R. J.; Burgess, Ray; Craw, Dave; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-04-01

    The world-class Macraes orogenic gold deposit (˜10 Moz resource) formed during the late metamorphic uplift of a metasedimentary schist belt in southern New Zealand. Mineralising fluids, metals and metalloids were derived from within the metasedimentary host. Helium and argon extracted from fluid inclusions in sulphide mineral grains (three crush extractions from one sample) have crustal signatures, with no evidence for mantle input (R/Ra = 0.03). Xenon extracted from mineralised quartz samples provides evidence for extensive interaction between fluid and maturing organic material within the metasedimentary host rocks, with 132Xe/36Ar ratios up to 200 times greater than air. Similarly, I/Cl ratios for fluids extracted from mineralised quartz are similar to those of brines from marine sediments that have interacted with organic matter and are ten times higher than typical magmatic/mantle fluids. The Macraes mineralising fluids were compositionally variable, reflecting either mixing of two different crustal fluids in the metasedimentary pile or a single fluid type that has had varying degrees of interaction with the host metasediments. Evidence for additional input of meteoric water is equivocal, but minor meteoric incursion cannot be discounted. The Macraes deposit formed in a metasedimentary belt without associated coeval magmatism, and therefore represents a purely crustal metamorphogenic end member in a spectrum of orogenic hydrothermal processes that can include magmatic and/or mantle fluid input elsewhere in the world. There is no evidence for involvement of minor intercalated metabasic rocks in the Macraes mineralising system. Hydrothermal fluids that formed other, smaller, orogenic deposits in the same metamorphic belt have less pronounced noble gas and halogen evidence for crustal fluid-rock interaction than at Macraes, but these deposits also formed from broadly similar metamorphogenic processes.

  15. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four‐layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel‐fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel‐fibred bone, showing osteon‐like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we

  16. Geochemical and Isotopic Constrains on the Origin of Kaymaz Gold Deposit, Eskisehir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toygar, Ozlem; Sendir, Huseyin; Mutlu, Halim; Demirbilek, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system produced several gold deposits in Turkey related to subduction, collision, post-collision and rifting processes. The Kaymaz gold deposit in mid-west Anatolia, 65 km southeast of Eskisehir city, is an orogenic gold deposit which formed in association with listwaenites. The gold occurrence is closely related to listwaenitization process and intense silicification. SiO2 content is up to 96% due to pervasive hydrothermal alteration. Listwaenites are enriched in Au, Ag and several metals in varying levels which are also variably correlated with other trace elements. Regarding rare earth element concentrations in the mineralized zone, light rare earth elements are found to display different variations with respect to gold content. It is proposed that these differences are due to the presence of more than one fluid type in the system and/or different phases which transported ore minerals at varying extent. According to microthermometric data on quartz samples, the temperature of the mineralization between 200°C-420°C and 3.9%-9.6% NaCl eq., the deposit is an epithermal-mesothermal type mineralization. δ18O compositions of quartz samples and calculated δ18OH2O values at homogenization temperatures indicate that boiling process and/or hydrothermal fluids affected the system at more than one stage. δ34S compositions of pyrite samples show a magmatic source for sulfur in the system probably originating from local granite intrusion in the area. Keywords: Kaymaz, Eskisehir, gold, geochemistry, stable isotopes, fluid inclusion

  17. Gross and net rates of nitrogen mineralisation in soil amended with composted olive mill pomace.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Muñoz, B; Hatch, D J; Bol, R; Dixon, E R; García-Ruiz, R

    2011-06-15

    Olive mill pomace is the major waste product in the olive oil industry and composting these by-products for the purpose of recycling nutrients and organic matter is a sound environmental strategy. Yet little is known about the quantity and timing of nitrogen (N) release from composted olive mill pomace. This paper assesses both gross (using the (15)N dilution technique) and net (aerobic incubation) nitrogen (N) mineralisation and N(2)O emissions of soil amended with seven commercially available composts of olive mill pomace (COMP). All are currently produced in Andalusia and differ in the proportions of raw materials co-composted with the pomace. The absence of significant differences in net N or gross mineralisation and nitrification in COMP-amended soil compared with a control, except for COMP combined with poultry manure, highlighted the recalcitrant nature of the COMP-N. Applications of COMP are hence unlikely to supply available N in available forms, at least in the short-term. Furthermore, N(2)O emissions from COMP-amended soil were negligible and, therefore, applications in the field should not result in increased N loss through denitrification. PMID:21594919

  18. Marano volcanic rocks, East Azarbaijan Province, Iran, and associated Fe mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh Somarin, A.

    2004-10-01

    There are two main types of economic iron ore deposits in Iran: (1) magmatic segregation deposits and (2) skarns. Most of the hydrothermal iron deposits in Iran, except for the skarns, are uneconomic. One of these uneconomic hydrothermal deposits is the Marano Fe deposit, located in East Azarbaijan Province (NW Iran). This deposit is considered to have been formed by an epithermal style of mineralisation related to a volcanic-dome. There are 5 volcanic domes in the Marano area, ranging in composition from dacite to rhyolite. The volcanic rocks show geochemical evidence of fractionation of biotite, hornblende, magnetite, apatite and feldspars. The Marano volcanic domes crystallised from an I-type magma, formed in a volcanic arc setting. Fe mineralisation has occurred around one of these Marano domes (MA dome) in which the igneous rocks contain more biotite and hornblende and are less fractionated than in the other domes. The main Fe oxide, hematite, occurs as veins and disseminations in sedimentary wall rocks. Alteration of the minerals in the host rocks suggests aS2<10-9.5, aO2>10-34.2 and pH<5.5. The small size and shallow-level of emplacement of magma, together with the absence of extensive hydrothermally altered zones, shows that the hydrothermal system was not voluminous enough to form an economic iron deposit.

  19. Bone mineral homeostasis, bone growth, and mineralisation during years of pubertal growth: a unifying concept.

    PubMed Central

    Krabbe, S; Transbøl, I; Christiansen, C

    1982-01-01

    Serum calcium, magnesium proteins, phosphate, and immunoparathyroid hormone were measured in 338 normal children and adolescents aged between 7 and 20 years and in 123 normal adults aged between 21 and 50 years. Protein corrected serum calcium and magnesium remained stable throughout the study. Despite hyperphosphataemia protein corrected calcium exceeded the concentrations of normal adults. Serum phosphate and the Ca X P product greatly exceeded adult values and fell rather slowly towards adult levels after the pubertal growth spurt. Serum immunoparathyroid hormone tended to exceed normal adult values and was judged high for the level of serum calcium. Similarities between mineral metabolism in childhood an adolescence and in acromegaly were striking. On this basis in the light of studies demonstrating stimulatory actions of gonadal hormones on growth hormone and of growth hormone on the secretion of parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, a unifying concept is developed. This concept places growth hormone in the unique position of being the main driver and co-ordinator during childhood and adolescence of bone growth an mineralisation on the one hand, and of blood mineral homeostasis on the other. Gonadal hormones probably express some of their actions through stimulation of growth hormone secretion and others by different mechanisms. According to this concept growth hormone is maintaining th Ca X P product at a suitable high level as long as growth hormone and gonadal hormones deliver bone matrix for mineralisation at a high rate. PMID:7092291

  20. Non-exhaustive extraction techniques (NEETs) for the prediction of naphthalene mineralisation in soil.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Colin J; Semple, Kirk T; Paton, Graeme I

    2004-12-15

    Non-exhaustive extraction techniques (NEETs) have been shown to measure the putatively bioavailable fraction of hydrophobic compounds in soil. To date, these studies have only considered bioavailability in a single soil type. In this study, naphthalene was amended into five different soil types and mineralisation, bacterial biosensor response and the number of indigenous microbial naphthalene degraders were determined. Two NEETs were used to extract the naphthalene from soil; hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and XAD-4. The HPCD extractable fraction correlated closely (R2 = 0.917) with the portion that was mineralised, but the XAD-4 extract did not (R2 = 0.044). HPCD may be ideal for the rapid assessment of the fraction of a hydrophobic organic contaminant that is available for biodegradation. A NEET that complements environmental microbial analysis will enhance our understanding of soil pollution interactions and equip us better in designing risk assessment models that integrate biological parameters. This application, although refined for soil samples, should be transferable to other environmental matrices. PMID:15598535

  1. Fractionation of 238U/235U by reduction during low temperature uranium mineralisation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Melissa J.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Kaltenbach, Angela; Turner, Simon P.; Schaefer, Bruce F.

    2014-02-01

    Investigations of ‘stable’ uranium isotope fractionation during low temperature, redox transformations may provide new insights into the usefulness of the 238U/235U isotope system as a tracer of palaeoredox processes. Sandstone-hosted uranium deposits accumulate at an oxidation/reduction interface within an aquifer from the low temperature reduction of soluble U(VI) complexes in groundwaters, forming insoluble U(IV) minerals. This setting provides an ideal environment in which to investigate the effects of redox transformations on 238U/235U fractionation. Here we present the first coupled measurements of 238U/235U isotopic compositions and U concentrations for groundwaters and mineralised sediment samples from the same redox system in the vicinity of the high-grade Pepegoona sandstone-hosted uranium deposit, Australia. The mineralised sediment samples display extremely variable 238U/235U ratios (herein expressed as δUCRM145238, the per-mil deviation from the international NBL standard CRM145). The majority of mineralised sediment samples have δUCRM145238 values between -1.30±0.05 and 0.55±0.12‰, spanning a ca. 2‰ range. However, one sample has an unusually light isotopic composition of -4.13±0.05‰, which suggests a total range of U isotopic variability of up to ca. 5‰, the largest variation found thus far in a single natural redox system. The 238U/235U isotopic signature of the mineralised sediments becomes progressively heavier (enriched in 238U) along the groundwater flow path. The groundwaters show a greater than 2‰ variation in their 238U/235U ratios, ranging from δUCRM145238 values of -2.39±0.07 to -0.71±0.05‰. The majority of the groundwater data exhibit a clear systematic relationship between 238U/235U isotopic composition and U concentration; samples with the lowest U concentrations have the lowest 238U/235U ratios. The preferential incorporation of 238U during reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and precipitation of uranium minerals leaves

  2. Predictive mapping of prospectivity for orogenic gold in Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Sarah; Woldai, Tsehaie; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; van Ruitenbeek, Frank J. A.

    2014-11-01

    Integration of enhanced regional geo-datasets has facilitated new geological interpretation and modelling of prospectivity for orogenic gold in southwestern Uganda. The geo-datasets include historical geological maps, geological field data, digital terrain models, Landsat TM data and airborne geophysical data. The study area, bordered by the western branch of the East African Rift, covers a range of different aged terranes including the Archaean basement gneisses, Palaeoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary Buganda Toro Belt, Mesoproterozoic clastic sedimentary Karagwe Ankolean Belt and several outliers of undeformed Neoproterozoic sediments. The mineral systems approach to practical exploration targeting requires a framework to link conceptual models of mineralisation with available data. A conceptual model requires good understanding of key processes and their timing within the geodynamic history of an area. The challenge is that processes cannot be mapped, only their results or effects. In this study, a district-scale (1:100,000) investigation is considered appropriate given the scarcity of geological information and the absence of world-renowned gold deposits in southwestern Uganda. At this scale of orogenic gold mineral systems understanding, evidence for the source of gold, active pathways and the physical traps are considered critical. Following the mineral system approach, these processes critical to orogenic gold systems are translated into district-scale mappable proxies using available regional-scale datasets. Tectono-stratigraphic domains, mantle indicators and gold occurrences represent the “source of gold” as a critical process. Zones of hydrothermal alteration were extracted from radiometric data, structures involved in the orogenies and terrane contacts were extracted to represent the active pathway as a critical process and finally the physical throttle is represented by rheological contrasts and geological complexity. Then, the knowledge

  3. Reaction mechanism for the replacement of calcite by dolomite and siderite: implications for geochemistry, microstructure and porosity evolution during hydrothermal mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark A.; Timms, Nicholas E.; Hough, Robert M.; Cleverley, James S.

    2013-10-01

    Carbonate reactions are common in mineral deposits due to CO2-rich mineralising fluids. This study presents the first in-depth, integrated analysis of microstructure and microchemistry of fluid-mediated carbonate reaction textures at hydrothermal conditions. In doing so, we describe the mechanisms by which carbonate phases replace one another, and the implications for the evolution of geochemistry, rock microstructures and porosity. The sample from the 1.95 Moz Junction gold deposit, Western Australia, contains calcite derived from carbonation of a metamorphic amphibole—plagioclase assemblage that has further altered to siderite and dolomite. The calcite is porous and contains iron-rich calcite blebs interpreted to have resulted from fluid-mediated replacement of compositionally heterogeneous amphiboles. The siderite is polycrystalline but nucleates topotactically on the calcite. As a result, the boundaries between adjacent grains are low-angle boundaries (<10°), which are geometrically similar to those formed by crystal-plastic deformation and recovery. Growth zoning within individual siderite grains shows that the low-angle boundaries are growth features and not due to deformation. Low-angle boundaries develop due to the propagation of defects at grain faces and zone boundaries and by impingement of grains that nucleated with small misorientations relative to each other during grain growth. The cores of siderite grains are aligned with the twin planes in the parent calcite crystal showing that the reactant Fe entered the crystal along the twin boundaries. Dolomite grains, many of which appear to in-fill space generated by the siderite replacement, also show alignment of cores along the calcite twin planes, suggesting that they did not grow into space but replaced the calcite. Where dolomite is seen directly replacing calcite, it nucleates on the Fe-rich calcite due to the increased compatibility of the Fe-bearing calcite lattice relative to the pure calcite

  4. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  5. Structural controls on Tertiary orogenic gold mineralization during initiation of a mountain belt, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.; Begbie, M.; MacKenzie, D.

    2006-10-01

    Two types of structurally controlled hydrothermal mineralization have occurred during folding of fissile schist in southern New Zealand: fold-related mineralization and normal fault-related mineralization. Both types have the same mineralogy and textures, and are dominated by quartz-ankerite veins and silicified breccias with ankeritic alteration. Most mineralized zones are thin (centimetre scale), although host schist is commonly impregnated with ankerite up to 20 m away. Thick (up to 5 m wide) mineralized zones are generally gold-bearing and contain pyrite and arsenopyrite with stibnite pods locally. Some of these auriferous zones have been extensively mined historically despite rugged topography and difficult access. Mineralization occurred during regional tectonic compression in the initial stages of development of the Southern Alps mountain belt at the Pacific-Australian plate boundary in the Miocene. Most of the gold-bearing deposits occur in east to south-east, striking normal faults that cut across mesoscopic folds in a belt that coincides with the southern termination of a regional-scale north trending antiform. Mineralized zones have similar structural control and relative timing to a nearby swarm of Miocene lamprophyre dykes and carbonatites. Limited stable isotopic data (C and O) and trace element geochemistry suggest that there was probably no genetic link between the igneous activity and gold mineralization. However, these two types of fluid flow have been controlled by the same tectonically created crustal plumbing system. This Miocene hydrothermal activity and gold deposition demonstrates that orogenic (mesothermal) mineralization can occur during the inception of an orogenic belt, not just in the latter stages as is commonly believed. These Miocene structures have been preserved in the orogen because the locus of uplift has moved northwards, so the early-formed gold deposits have not yet been structurally overprinted or eroded.

  6. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Case, Sean D C; Gómez-Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood. This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal drying process (input temperature 95 °C, thermal fluid circuit temperature 200 °C, 95 % dry matter content). The drying process reduced the ammonium content of the biosolids and reduced it further at higher drying temperatures. These findings were attributed to ammonia volatilisation. The percentage of mineralisable organic N fraction (min-N) in the biosolids, and nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production were analysed 120 days after addition to soil. When incubated at soil field capacity (pF 2), none of the dried biosolids had a greater min-N than the AD biosolids (46.4 %). Min-N was lowest in biosolids dried at higher temperatures (e.g. 19.3 % at 250 °C vs 35.4 % at 70 °C). Considering only the dried biosolids, min-N was greater in WWTP-dried biosolids (50.5 %) than all of the laboratory-dried biosolids with the exception of the 70 °C-dried biosolids. Biosolid carbon mineralisation (CO2 release) and N2O production was also the lowest in treatments of the highest drying temperature, suggesting that this material was more recalcitrant. Overall, thermal drying temperature had a significant influence on N availability from the AD biosolids, but drying did not improve the N availability of these biosolids in any case. PMID:27068895

  7. Genesis of the Abu Marawat gold deposit, central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem A.; Akawy, Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Gold mineralisation at the Abu Marawat mine, central Eastern Desert of Egypt, is related to a system of massive and sheared, milky quartz veins cutting a sequence of Neoproterozoic island arc metavolcanic/volcaniclastic rocks and related banded iron formation (BIF). Sulphide-bearing quartz veins and related hydrothermal breccia bodies display a range of textures including sheared, boudinaged and recrystallised quartz, open space filling and microbreccia. These variable textures imply a complex history of crack-seal mechanism characterising the relation between mineral deposition and a major N-S-trending shear zone, during a late brittle-ductile deformation event which affected the area at about 550 Ma. Gold-base metal mineralisation is associated with brecciation and fracturing of the iron ore bands, close to silicified shears and related quartz veins. The auriferous quartz lodes are characterised by the occurrence of visible pyrite-chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite ± sphalerite ± galena mineralisation. Gold is refractory in pyrite and chalcopyrite, but rare visible gold/electrum and telluride specks were observed in a few samples. Hydrothermal alteration includes pervasive silicification, pyritisation, sericitisation, carbonatisation confined to a delicate set of veins and altered shears, and a more widespread propylitic alteration assemblage (quartz + chlorite + pyrite + calcite ± epidote). Fluid inclusion petrography and microthermometric studies suggest heterogeneous trapping of a low-salinity (1.4-6.7 wt.% eq. NaCl) aqueous solution and a carbonic fluid. Evidence for fluid immiscibility during ore formation includes variable liquid/vapour ratios in inclusions along individual trails and bulk inclusion homogenisation into liquid and occasionally to vapour at comparable temperatures. The trapping conditions of intragranular aqueous-carbonic inclusions approximate 264-378 °C at 700-1300 bar. Similar temperature estimates have been obtained from Al

  8. Gold liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Lipids are an important class of molecules, being found in membranes, HDL, LDL, and other natural structures, serving essential roles in structure and with varied functions such as compartmentalization and transport. Synthetic liposomes are also widely used as delivery and release vehicles for drugs, cosmetics, and other chemicals; soap is made from lipids. Lipids may form bilayer or multilammellar vesicles, micelles, sheets, tubes, and other structures. Lipid molecules may be linked to proteins, carbohydrates, or other moieties. EM study of this essential ingredient of life has lagged, due to lack of direct methods to visualize lipids without extensive alteration. OsO4 reacts with double bonds in membrane phospholipids, forming crossbridges. This has been the method of choice to both fix and stain membranes, thus far. An earlier work described the use of tungstate clusters (W{sub 11}) attached to lipid moieties to form lipid structures and lipid probes. With the development of gold clusters, it is now possible to covalently and specifically link a dense gold sphere to a lipid molecule; for example, reacting a mono-N-hydroxysuccinimide Nanogold cluster with the amino group on phosphatidyl ethanolaminine. Examples of a gold-fatty acid and a gold-phospholipid are shown.

  9. Orogenic-type copper-gold-arsenic-(bismuth) mineralization at Flatschach (Eastern Alps), Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Johann G.; Leitner, Thomas; Paar, Werner H.

    2015-10-01

    Structurally controlled Cu-Au mineralization in the historic Flatschach mining district (Styria, Austria) occurs in a NE-SW to NNE-WSW oriented vein system as multiple steep-dipping calcite-(dolomite)-quartz veins in amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks (banded gneisses/amphibolites, orthogneisses, metagranitoids) of the poly-metamorphosed Austroalpine Silvretta-Seckau nappe. Vein formation postdated ductile deformation events and Eoalpine (Late Cretaceous) peak metamorphism but predated Early to Middle Miocene sediment deposition in the Fohnsdorf pull-apart basin; coal-bearing sediments cover the metamorphic basement plus the mineralized veins at the northern edge of the basin. Three gold-bearing ore stages consist of a stage 1 primary hydrothermal (mesothermal?) ore assemblage dominated by chalcopyrite, pyrite and arsenopyrite. Associated minor minerals include alloclasite, enargite, bornite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth and matildite. Gold in this stage is spatially associated with chalcopyrite occurring as inclusions, along re-healed micro-fractures or along grain boundaries of chalcopyrite with pyrite or arsenopyrite. Sericite-carbonate alteration is developed around the veins. Stage 2 ore minerals formed by the replacement of stage 1 sulfides and include digenite, anilite, "blue-remaining covellite" (spionkopite, yarrowite), bismuth, and the rare copper arsenides domeykite and koutekite. Gold in stage 2 is angular to rounded in shape and occurs primarily in the carbonate (calcite, Fe-dolomite) gangue and less commonly together with digenite, domeykite/koutekite and bismuth. Stage 3 is a strongly oxidized assemblage that includes hematite, cuprite, and various secondary Cu- and Fe-hydroxides and -carbonates. It formed during supergene weathering. Stage 1 and 2 gold consists mostly of electrum (gold fineness 640-860; mean = 725; n = 46), and rare near pure gold (fineness 930-940; n = 6). Gold in stage 3 is Ag-rich electrum (fineness 350-490, n = 12), and has a

  10. Mineralisation studies of 14C-labelled metsulfuron-methyl, tribenuron-methyl, chlorsulfuron and thifensulfuron-methyl in one Danish soil and groundwater sediment profile.

    PubMed

    Andersen, S M; Hertz, P B; Holst, T; Bossi, R; Jacobsen, C S

    2001-11-01

    Bacterial mineralisation of four sulfonylurea herbicides at 20 microg kg(-1) in a sandy soil from nine different depths in a sandy soil horizon (5-780 cm) was investigated in laboratory studies. Metsulfuron-methyl, chlorsulfuron, and tribenuron-methyl were 14C-labelled in the sulfonamide ring, while thifensulfuron-methyl was labelled in the thiophene ring. The highest mineralised amount in 126 days was observed for metsulfuron-methyl (40%) followed by tribenuron-methyl (25%), and thifensulfuron-methyl (11%). Chlorsulfuron showed low mineralisation in all the soils tested (<4%). Mineralisation of the herbicides metsulfuron-methyl and tribenuron-methyl varied according to soil depth (upper profile: 5-70 cm, and lower profile: 165-780 cm) and were proven faster in soil taken from depths 5-7 and 30-35 cm, and slower in depths 45-50 and 70-75 cm. Mineralisation was absent in the lower profile (165-780 cm). As an indicator of microbial activity bacterial counts were taken at the experimental start; these counts grouped in three levels: highest in the surface layer (5-7 cm), slightly lower in the depths 30-75 cm, and lowest in the lower profile (165-780 cm). Residual concentrations of metsulfuron-methyl correlated to the accumulated amount mineralised, with high residual concentrations in soil showing low mineralisation. Also chlorsulfuron showed high residual concentrations with increasing depth in the upper profile, but the relatively high dissipation at 30-35 cm and lower one at 45-50 cm could not be related with the lack of mineralisation. This shows that hydrolysis occurs, but mineralisation of the chloro-substituted sulfonamide is restricted. Tribenuron-methyl and thifensulfuron-methyl could not be detected due to interference with other compounds. PMID:11695596

  11. Identifying metabolites related to nitrogen mineralisation using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . T McDonald, Noeleen; Graham, Stewart; Watson, Catherine; Gordon, Alan; Lalor, Stan; Laughlin, Ronnie; Elliott, Chris; . P Wall, David

    2015-04-01

    Exploring new analysis techniques to enhance our knowledge of the various metabolites within our soil systems is imperative. Principally, this knowledge would allow us to link key metabolites with functional influences on critical nutrient processes, such as the nitrogen (N) mineralisation in soils. Currently there are few studies that utilize proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) to characterize multiple metabolites within a soil sample. The aim of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of 1H NMR for isolating multiple metabolites that are related to the mineralizable N (MN) capacity across a range of 35 Irish grassland soils. Soils were measured for MN using the standard seven day anaerobic incubation (AI-7). Additionally, soils were also analysed for a range of physio-chemical properties [e.g. total N, total C, mineral N, texture and soil organic matter (SOM)]. Proton NMR analysis was carried on these soils by extracting with 40% methanol:water, lyophilizing and reconstituting in deuterium oxide and recording the NMR spectra on a 400MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer. Once the NMR data were spectrally processed and analysed using multivariate statistical analysis, seven metabolites were identified as having significant relationships with MN (glucose, trimethylamine, glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, 4-aminohippuirc acid and citric acid). Following quantification, glucose was shown to explain the largest percentage variability in MN (72%). These outcomes suggest that sources of labile carbon are essential in regulating N mineralisation and the capacity of plant available N derived from SOM-N pools in these soils. Although, smaller in concentration, the amino acids; 4-aminohippuirc acid, glutamic acid and serine also significantly (P<0.05) explained 43%, 27% and 19% of the variability in MN, respectively. This novel study highlights the effectiveness of using 1H NMR as a practical approach to profile multiple metabolites in

  12. Magmatic Controls on the Genesis of Ni-Cu-PGE Sulphide Mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, R. J.; Fiorentini, M.; Baratoux, D.; Micklethwaite, S.; Sener, K.; McCuaig, C.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread igneous activity, which shows striking mineralogical, petrographical and chemical similarities with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, intensely affected, reshaped and buried the primordial Martian crust. This study evaluates for the first time whether the broad igneous activity on Mars may have led to the formation of orthomagmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation similar to that associated with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites. Particular focus is laid on two different components of the Martian Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineral system: 1) the potential metal and sulphur fertility of source regions, and 2) the physical/chemical processes that enable sulphide supersaturation and metal concentration into an immiscible sulphide liquid. We show that potentially metal-rich Martian mantle melts likely reach sulphide saturation within 20-35 wt% of simple silicate fractionation; a value that is comparable to that of the terrestrial equivalents (i.e. ferropicrites and komatiites). However, the majority of terrestrial world-class Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide deposits originated by the assimilation of crustal sulphur-rich country rocks, allowing the attainment of sulphide supersaturation and liquid segregation during early stages of magma evolution. The high sulphur content in Martian crustal lithologies, ranging from sulphide bearing magmatic rocks to sulphate-rich regoliths and sedimentary deposits, imply that mantle melts potentially assimilated significant amounts of crustal sulphur during their ascent and emplacement. As a main outcome we show that channelled and fluid lava flows, which potentially emplaced and incised into these sulphur-rich crustal lithologies, are the most promising systems that may have led to the formation of Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation on Mars.

  13. Trace element mapping of pyrite from Archean gold deposits - A comparison between PIXE and EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agangi, A.; Przybyłowicz, W.; Hofmann, A.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical zoning of pyrites can record the evolution of mineralising fluids at widely varying P-T conditions ranging from diagenesis to medium-grade metamorphism. If preserved, zoning can reveal growth textures, brecciation and veining, resorption and recrystallisation events, thus shedding light on the processes that contributed to ore formation. Chemical zoning of sulfides is invisible in optical microscopy, but can be studied by chemical etching, high-contrast back-scattering electron images, and elemental imaging. In this study we compared micro-PIXE and WDS-EPMA elemental maps on the chemically zoned pyrites in mineralised vein-bearing samples from the Sheba and Fairview gold mines in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Elemental images show complex distribution of trace elements, suggesting multiple events of pyrite crystallisation and gold deposition. EPMA maps show fine-scale variations reflecting growth and recrystallisation textures marked, in particular, by variations of As, Ni, and Co. In PIXE maps, gold occurs both as finely-distributed and discrete inclusions, suggesting incorporation in the pyrite structure as solid solution, and deposition as electrum inclusions, respectively. Micro-PIXE and EPMA provide complementary information, forming together a powerful tool to obtain information on chemical zoning of pyrites in ore deposits.

  14. Hydrocarbon-mediated gold and uranium concentration in the Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Williams-Jones, Anthony; Schumann, Dirk; Couillard, Martin; Murray, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The Witwatersrand deposits in South Africa represent the largest repository of gold in the World and a major resource of uranium. The genesis of the gold and uranium ores in the quartz-pebble conglomerates (reefs), however, is still a matter of considerable discussion. Opinion has been divided over whether they represent paleo-placers that have been partly remobilised by hydrothermal fluids or if the mineralisation is entirely hydrothermal in origin. In addition, recently published models have proposed a syngenetic origin for the gold involving bacterially-mediated precipitation from meteoric water and shallow seawater. An important feature of the gold and uranium mineralisation in the reefs is the strong spatial association with organic matter. In some reefs, up to 70% of the gold and almost the entire uranium resource is spatially associated with pyrobitumen seams, suggesting a genetic relationship of the gold-uranium mineralisation with hydrocarbons. Here we report results of a study of the Carbon Leader Reef, using high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM / TEM) and LA-ICP-MS that provide new insights into the role of hydrocarbons in the concentration of the gold and uranium. A detailed examination revealed gold monocrystals containing numerous rounded or elliptical inclusions filled with pyrobitumen. We interpret these inclusions to record the crystallisation of the gold around droplets of a hydrocarbon liquid that migrated through the Witwatersrand basin, and was converted to pyrobitumen by being heated. We propose that the gold was transported in a hydrothermal fluid as a bisulphide complex and that this fluid mixed with the hydrocarbon liquid to form a water-oil emulsion. The interaction between the two fluids caused a sharp reduction in fO2 at the water-oil interface, which destabilised the gold-bisulphide complexes, causing gold monocrystals to precipitate around the oil droplets. In contrast to the gold, uraninite, the principal

  15. Gold potential in the Dalradian rocks of NW Northern Ireland: GIS-based prospectivity analysis using Tellus data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusty, P. A. J.; McDonnell, P. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Chacksfield, B. C.; Cooper, M.

    2009-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are essential tools for the management and integration of the large amounts of multivariate spatial data used in mineral exploration. Prospectivity analysis combines these datasets, in the context of a mineral deposit model, to produce a map showing the distribution of potential for a particular type of mineral deposit. In this example Arc-Spatial Data Modeller software has been used to analyse the prospectivity for orogenic vein gold mineralisation in the Dalradian rocks of north-western Northern Ireland. A knowledge-driven (fuzzy logic) approach was used because of the small number of gold deposits within the area. Fuzzy logic is used in situations where information is inexact and the use of classical set theory is inappropriate. Fuzzy logic allows assignment of weightings to exploration data on a continuous scale from 1 (full membership) to 0 (full non-membership). This allows a level of uncertainty or 'fuzziness' to be incorporated into the modelling. The key stages of prospectivity analysis are: (1) analysis of the deposit model to determine key exploration indicators; (2) data processing, interpretation and analysis to extract key indicators; (3) assignment of weightings, zones and styles of influence to key indicators; and (4) calculation of prospectivity. This research is based largely on new geochemical and geophysical data resulting from the Tellus Project in Northern Ireland. The Tellus Project involved geochemical and airborne geophysical surveys over the whole of Northern Ireland carried out between 2004-6 with funding from the Government of Northern Ireland. The study area (3074 km2) is underlain mainly by Neoproterozoic rocks of the Dalradian Supergroup (ca. 590 Ma) which form part of the Caledonide orogenic belt. The Dalradian Supergroup comprises a thick succession of semi-pelites, psammites and pelites, with graphitic pelite horizons that host much of the known gold mineralisation. In the Sperrin Mountains two

  16. Is It Real Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-01-01

    Features acid tests for determining whether jewelry is "real" gold or simply gold-plated. Describes the carat system of denoting gold content and explains how alloys are used to create various shades of gold jewelry. Addresses the question of whether gold jewelry can turn a wearer's skin green by considering various oxidation reactions. (WRM)

  17. Long-term influence of biochar on native organic carbon mineralisation in a low-carbon clayey soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupinder Pal; Cowie, Annette L

    2014-01-01

    Biochar can influence native soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation through "priming effects". However, the long-term direction, persistence and extent of SOC priming by biochar remain uncertain. Using natural (13)C abundance and under controlled laboratory conditions, we show that biochar-stimulated SOC mineralisation ("positive priming") caused a loss of 4 to 44 mg C g(-1) SOC over 2.3 years in a clayey, unplanted soil (0.42% OC). Positive priming was greater for manure-based or 400°C biochars, cf. plant-based or 550°C biochars, but was trivial relative to recalcitrant C in biochar. From 2.3 to 5.0 years, the amount of positively-primed soil CO2-C in the biochar treatments decreased by 4 to 7 mg C g(-1) SOC. We conclude that biochar stimulates native SOC mineralisation in the low-C clayey soil but that this effect decreases with time, possibly due to depletion of labile SOC from initial positive priming, and/or stabilisation of SOC caused by biochar-induced organo-mineral interactions. PMID:24446050

  18. Volcanic red-bed copper mineralisation related to submarine basalt alteration, Mont Alexandre, Quebec Appalachians, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Beaudoin, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Two types of native copper occur in Upper Silurian basaltic rocks in the Mont Alexandre area, Quebec Appalachians: (1) type 1 forms micrometric inclusions in plagioclase and is possibly magmatic in origin, whereas (2) type 2 occurs as coarse-grained patches rimmed by cuprite in altered porphyritic basalt. Type 1 has higher contents of sulphur (2,000-20,263 ppm) and arsenic (146-6,017 ppm), and a broader range of silver abundances (<65-2,186 ppm Ag) than type 2 (149-1,288 ppm S, <90-146 As, <65-928 ppm Ag). No mineral inclusions of sulphide or arsenide in native copper were observed at the electron-microprobe scale. Primary igneous fabrics are preserved, but the basaltic flows are pervasively oxidised and plagioclase is albitised. Chlorite replaces plagioclase and forms interstitial aggregates in the groundmass and has Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios ranging from 0.29 to 0.36 with calculated temperatures between 155°C and 182°C. Copper sulphides in vacuoles and veinlets are associated with malachite, fibro-radiating albite and yarrowite (Cu9S8 with up to 0.3 wt% Ag). Bulk-rock concentrations of thallium and lithium range from 70 to 310 ppb and 10 to 22 ppm, respectively, and thallium is positively correlated with Fe2O3. Such concentrations of thallium and lithium are typical of spilitisation during heated seawater-basalt interaction. Spilitisation is consistent with the regional geological setting of deepwater-facies sedimentation, but is different from current models for volcanic red-bed copper, which indicate subaerial oxidation of volcanic flows. The volcanic red-bed copper model should be re-examined to account for native copper mineralisation in basalts altered by warm seawater.

  19. The Kohuamuri siliceous sinter as a vector for epithermal mineralisation, Coromandel Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Ayrton; Campbell, Kathleen; Rowland, Julie; Browne, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The Kohuamuri siliceous sinter is the largest known fossil hot-spring system in the Hauraki Goldfield, a 200 × 40 km volcanic terrain with at least 50 adularia-illite epithermal deposits formed 16.3-5.6 Ma within the Coromandel Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The sinter is associated with rhyolite and ignimbrite of the Whitianga Caldera (Miocene-Pliocene) and consists of two deposits, the Kohuamuri deposit itself, a large in situ outcrop (47,000 m2) and its associated sinter boulder field (4500 m2), and the Kaitoke deposit 900 m to the southwest, comprising boulders in a landslide situated on a normal fault. The well-preserved macroscopic and microscopic textures at Kohuamuri are similar to actively forming and ancient hot-spring deposits elsewhere, derived from deep circulating, magmatically heated, near-neutral pH alkali chloride fluids oversaturated in amorphous silica and that discharge at the Earth's surface at ≤100 °C. Lithofacies, petrography, mineralogy, as well as trace element concentrations of the Kohuamuri/Kaitoke deposits were used to locate likely palaeo-thermal conduits from the deep reservoir and to reconstruct the palaeoenvironmental setting of the siliceous sinter as an aid to assessing the economic potential of the ancient geothermal system. Both deposits contain the high-temperature (>75 °C) geyserite lithofacies, with the Kohuamuri deposit also exhibiting textures affiliated with cooler middle and distal sinter apron areas, as well as geothermally influenced marsh facies. Trace element analysis of sinter lithofacies revealed concentrations and zonations of Au, Ag, base metals (Pb, Cu, Zn) and pathfinder elements (As, Sb) associated with epithermal deposits, elevated in the proximal vent area, and providing evidence of possible Au and Ag ore mineralisation at depth. The methodology used in this study could be utilised globally to identify and assess as yet unidentified epithermal deposits.

  20. Age and paragenesis of mineralisation at Coronation Hill uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Karin; Meffre, Sebastien; Davidson, Garry

    2014-06-01

    Coronation Hill is a U + Au + platinum group elements deposit in the South Alligator Valley (SAV) field in northern Australia, south of the better known unconformity-style U East Alligator Rivers (EAR) field. The SAV field differs from the EAR by having a more complex basin-basement architecture. A volcanically active fault trough (Jawoyn Sub-basin) developed on older basement and then was disrupted by renewed faulting, before being buried beneath regional McArthur Basin sandstones that are also the main hanging wall to the EAR deposits. Primary mineralisation at Coronation Hill formed at 1607 ± 26 Ma (rather than 600-900 Ma as previously thought), and so it is likely that the SAV was part of a single west McArthur Basin dilational event. Most ore is hosted in sub-vertical faults and breccias in the competent volcanic cover sequence. This favoured fluid mixing, acid buffering (forming illite) and oxidation of Fe2+ and reduced C-rich assemblages as important uranium depositional mechanisms. However, reduction of U in fractured older pyrite (Pb model age of 1833 ± 67 Ma) is an important trap in diorite. Some primary ore was remobilised at 675 ± 21 Ma to form coarse uraninite + Ni-Co pyrite networks containing radiogenic Pb. Coronation Hill is polymetallic, and in this respect resembles the `egress'-style U deposits in the Athabascan Basin (Canada). However, these are all cover-hosted. A hypothesis for further testing is that Coronation Hill is also egress-style, with ores formed by fluids rising through basement-hosted fault networks (U reduction by diorite pyrite and carbonaceous shale), and into veins and breccias in the overlying Jawoyn Sub-basin volcano-sedimentary succession.

  1. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the nonclassical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 hours after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  2. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E; Kim, Jong R; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2010-09-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 h after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  3. A comparison of the in vitro mineralisation and dentinogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue, bone marrow and dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Davies, O G; Cooper, P R; Shelton, R M; Smith, A J; Scheven, B A

    2015-07-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies provide a biological basis for the regeneration of mineralised tissues. Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue (ADSCs), bone marrow (BMSCs) and dental pulp (DPSCs) have the capacity to form mineralised tissue. However, studies comparing the capacity of ADSCs with BMSCs and DPSCs for mineralised tissue engineering are lacking, and their ability to regenerate dental tissues has not been fully explored. Characterisation of the cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for MSC markers indicated that they were immunophenotypically similar. Alizarin red (AR) staining and micro-computed tomography (µCT) analyses demonstrated that the osteogenic potential of DPSCs was significantly greater than that of BMSCs and ADSCs. Scanning electron microscopy and AR staining showed that the pattern of mineralisation in DPSC cultures differed from ADSCs and BMSCs, with DPSC cultures lacking defined mineralised nodules and instead forming a diffuse layer of low-density mineral. Dentine matrix components (DMCs) were used to promote dentinogenic differentiation. Their addition to cultures resulted in increased amounts of mineral deposited in all three cultures and significantly increased the density of mineral deposited in BMSC cultures, as determined by µCT analysis. Addition of DMCs also increased the relative gene expression levels of the dentinogenic markers dentine sialophosphoprotein and dentine matrix protein 1 in ADSC and BMSC cultures. In conclusion, DPSCs show the greatest potential to produce a comparatively high volume of mineralised matrix; however, both dentinogenesis and mineral volume was enhanced in ADSC and BMSC cultures by DMCs, suggesting that these cells show promise for regenerative dental therapies. PMID:24997523

  4. Multistage deformation of Au-quartz veins (Laurieras, French Massif Central): evidence for late gold introduction from microstructural, isotopic and fluid inclusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essarraj, S.; Boiron, M.-C.; Cathelineau, M.; Fourcade, S.

    2001-07-01

    The relative chronology of fluid migration, quartz and Au-deposition in a silicified fault from the main Au-district (Laurieras, St Yrieix district) from northern French Massif Central has been determined from microstructural, fluid inclusion, isotopic and ore mineral evidences. Three main stages of fluid circulation, microfracturing and quartz crystallization, and ore deposition were distinguished on the basis of textural relationships and the pressure, temperature and composition of the palaeo-fluids: (1) a series of early fluid events was responsible for the localized drainage of retrograde metamorphic fluids along the main fault and the subsequent sealing by milky and microcrystalline quartz preceeded the main Au-ore stages. Early fluids were aqueous-carbonic, trapped under lithostatic to sublithostatic pressures at temperatures in the range 350-500°C. Subsequently, several types of microstructures were developed in the early quartz matrix. (2) NS microfractures filled by clear quartz, arsenopyrite and boulangerite (I) contain significant refractory gold concentrations. Clear quartz formed from aqueous-carbonic fluids of lower densities than those of the earlier fluids. Significant pressure drops, down to pressures around 55 MPa were responsible for a local immiscibility of the aqueous-carbonic fluids at temperatures of 340±20°C. (3) The main ore stage is characterized by the formation of dense sets of sub-vertical (EW) microfractures, healed fluid inclusion planes in quartz, and filled by ore minerals (native gold, galena and boulangerite II) when they crosscut earlier sulfides. The fluids are aqueous with low and decreasing salinity, and probable trapping temperatures around 230°C. Isotopic data, obtained on microfissured quartz, indicate these dilute aqueous fluids may be considered as meteoric waters that deeply infiltrated the crust. Late microfissuring of a mesothermal quartz vein, originally barren (only with pyrite and arsenopyrite), appears to be

  5. Mineralisation of collagen rich soft tissues and osteocyte lacunae in Enpp1−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Hajjawi, Mark O.R.; MacRae, Vicky E.; Huesa, Carmen; Boyde, Alan; Millán, José Luis; Arnett, Timothy R.; Orriss, Isabel R.

    2014-01-01

    Ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases (NPPs) hydrolyse nucleotide triphosphates to the corresponding nucleotide monophosphates and the mineralisation inhibitor, pyrophosphate (PPi). This study examined the role of NPP1 in osteocytes, osteoclasts and cortical bone, using a mouse model lacking NPP1 (Enpp1−/−). We used microcomputed tomography (μCT) to investigate how NPP1 deletion affects cortical bone structure; excised humerus bones from 8, 15 and 22-week old mice were scanned at 0.9 μm. Although no changes were evident in the cortical bone of 8-week old Enpp1−/− mice, significant differences were observed in older animals. Cortical bone volume was decreased 28% in 22-week Enpp1−/− mice, whilst cortical porosity was reduced 30% and 60% at 15 and 22-weeks, respectively. This was accompanied by up to a 15% decrease in closed pore diameter and a 55% reduction in the number of pores. Cortical thickness was reduced up to 35% in 15 and 22-week Enpp1−/− animals and the endosteal diameter was increased up to 23%. Thus, the cortical bone from Enpp1−/− mice was thinner and less porous, with a larger marrow space. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a decrease in the size and number of blood vessel channels in the cortical bone as well as a 40% reduction in the mean plan area of osteocyte lacunae. We noted that the number of viable osteocytes isolated from the long bones of Enpp1−/− mice was decreased ≤ 50%. In contrast, osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were unaffected by NPP1 deletion. μCT and histological analysis of Enpp1−/− mice also revealed calcification of the joints and vertebrae as well as soft tissues including the whisker follicles, ear pinna and trachea. This calcification worsened as the animals aged. Together, these data highlight the key role of NPP1 in regulating calcification of both soft and skeletal tissues. PMID:25260930

  6. Photochemical mineralisation in a humic boreal lake: temporal variability and contribution to carbon dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, M. M.; Tranvik, L. J.; Koehler, B.

    2015-10-01

    Sunlight induces photochemical mineralisation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in inland waters, resulting in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere. Photochemical rate modelling is used to determine sunlight-induced CO2 emissions on large spatial and temporal scales. A sensitive model parameter is the wavelength-specific photochemical CDOM reactivity, the apparent quantum yield (AQY). The modelling studies so far assume that AQY spectra determined for single lakes and on single occasions represent larger spatial and temporal scales. Here, we studied a humic boreal lake in Sweden. We measured AQY spectra for photochemical DIC production monthly between June and November 2014 and parameterised a photochemical rate model. Photochemical reactivity increased slightly during the open water period, likely due to a high rainfall event with consecutive mixing in autumn that increased availability of highly photoreactive CDOM. However, the variability in AQY spectra over time was much smaller than previously reported variability in AQY spectra across lakes. Yet, using either the AQY spectrum from the least or from the most photoreactive water sample resulted in a 5-fold difference in simulated annual DIC photoproduction (2.0 ± 0.1 and 10.3 ± 0.7 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively). Using the monthly measured AQY spectrum to simulate DIC photoproduction for month-long time periods resulted in an apparent time lag between irradiance and DIC photoproduction. This suggested that temporal variability in AQY spectra occurs on shorter time scales. Therefore, we parameterised the model with the pooled AQY spectrum of six monthly measurements. Simulated DIC photoproduction for three years (2012-2014) averaged 4.5 ± 0.2 g C m-2 yr-1, which represented 3 % of the mean CO2 emissions from this lake. We conclude that (1) it may be recommendable to conduct repeated AQY measurements across the season for more accurate simulation of

  7. On the role of the central nervous system in regulating the mineralisation of inner-ear otoliths of fish.

    PubMed

    Anken, Ralf H

    2006-12-01

    Stato- or otoliths are calcified structures in the organ of balance and equilibrium of vertebrates, the inner ear, where they enhance its sensitivity to gravity. The compact otoliths of fish are composed of the calcium carbonate polymorph aragonite and a small fraction of organic molecules. The latter form a protein skeleton which determines the morphology of an otolith as well as its crystal lattice structure. This short review addresses findings according to which the brain obviously plays a prominent role in regulating the mineralisation of fish otoliths and depends on the gravity vector. Overall, otolith mineralisation has thus been identified to be a unique, neuronally guided biomineralisation process. The following is a hypothetical model for regulation of calcification by efferent vestibular neurons: (1) release of calcium at tight junctions in the macular epithelia, (2) macular carbonic anhydrase activity (which in turn is responsible for carbonate deposition), (3) chemical composition of matrix proteins. The rationale and evidence that support this model are discussed. PMID:17180502

  8. Gold bead implants.

    PubMed

    Durkes, T E

    1992-03-01

    Gold bead implantation is an experimental area of study in the acupuncture field dealing with chronic diseases. Special acupuncture techniques are required to implant the gold beads successfully in the proper location. Gold beads are used to treat degenerative joint disease, osteochondritis, osteochondritis dessicans, ventral spondylosis, and seizures. PMID:1581658

  9. New constraints on fluid sources in orogenic gold deposits, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bin; Kendrick, Mark A.; Fairmaid, Alison M.; Phillips, David; Wilson, Christopher J. L.; Mernagh, Terrence P.

    2012-03-01

    Br/I ratios provide evidence for organic Br and I released during metamorphism of the shales. Therefore, the regional data provide strong evidence for the involvement of sedimentary components in gold mineralisation, but are consistent with deeper metamorphic fluid sources from basement volcano-sedimentary rocks. The overlying sediments are probably involved in gold mineralisation via fluid-rock interaction.

  10. Fluid inclusions, stable isotopes and gold deposition at Björkdal, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, C.; Billström, K.; Gustavsson, K.; Fallick, A. E.

    1994-06-01

    The Björkdal gold deposit is located in the eastern part of the Early Proterozoic Skellefte district in northern Sweden. The ore zone is hosted by a granitoid which intrudes a 1.9 Ga old supracrustal sequence and consists of a network of quartz veins between two shear zones. The ore mineralogy, alteration assemblages, ore fluid characteristics and general setting of the Björkdal deposit reveal many similarities with mesothermal Archean systems. Three types of fluids are represented by fluid inclusions observed in quartz, scheelite and calcite. The first type consists of a CO2-rich fluid which is syngenetic with the formation of the quartz veins. These inclusions occur in quartz and scheelite. Isotopic equilibrium temperatures derived from quartz-scheelite pairs reflect depositional temperatures around 375 °C. Molar volumes of the carbonic fluid inclusions, ranging down to 55 cm3mole, indicate a maximum lithostatic trapping pressure of 1.8 kbar. These fluids were generated at depth in conjunction with early orogenic magma-forming processes. The gold was introduced to the vein system by the carbonic fluid but the gold was deposited after reactions between this fluid and the wall-rock, producing a slightly alkaline, more CH4-rich aqueous type 2 fluid. Fluid inclusions of this chemically modified fluid indicate that the precipitation of the gold, together with pyrrhotite, pyrite and chalcopyrite, occurred under heterogenous conditions at a temperature of 220 °C and a hydrostatic pressure of 0.5 kbar. The gold deposition occurred from fluids with a δ 18O signature of around +8‰ and δD values close to zero per mil. Any metamorphic influence on the stable isotopic signatures is regarded as minimal. The isotope data suggest rather that a surface-derived fluid component had access to the vein system during this process. At a post-vein forming stage (metamorphic stage ?) a secondary episode of gold mobilization occurred as suggested by the aqueous type 3 inclusions

  11. Carbonate dykes associated with Arch˦an lode-Au mineralisation, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, L. W.; Ward, J. H. W.; Horstmann, U. E.; Jordaan, L. J.; Eaton, B.

    2000-02-01

    Carbonate dykes, exposed within the Barberton greenstone belt, display geochemical signatures similar to altered carbonatite. The trace element signature normalised to primordial mantle, and the chondrite-normalised REE trends of the Ulundi Dyke display geochemical similarities to carbonatites. In addition, stable isotope results from the Ulundi Dyke (δ13Cwhole rock and δ18Owhole rock range from -3.7 to -4.9‰ and 12.8 to 13.2‰, respectively) are similar to values found for samples of wall rock and vein carbonate from Arch˦an Au-quartz-carbonate-sulphide vein systems studied in the Barberton greenstone belt. Although the data do not plot in the field of primary igneous carbonatite, they are similar to data of deuterically-altered carbonatite. These associations strengthen the deduction that Iode-Au mineralised fractures and shear zones in the Barberton greenstone belt were open to mantle-tapping fundamental faults.

  12. Soluble factors produced by PC-3 prostate cells decrease collagen content and mineralisation rate in fetal rat osteoblasts in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Santibáñez, J. F.; Silva, S.; Martínez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 70% of patients with prostate cancer develop bone metastases in the advanced state of the disease. In the present study, we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factors that inhibit the mineralisation process in vitro, decreasing the content of type I collagen in rat fetal calvaria osteoblasts. We investigated the capacity of conditioned media (CM) from the human prostatic tumour cell line PC-3 to inhibit the expression of the differentiation programme on osteoblasts in culture, with a primary focus on type I collagen synthesis and degradation. Our results show that PC-3 CM inhibits collagen synthesis and stimulates the production of interstitial collagenase from osteoblasts. A consequential decrease in the content of immunoreactive type I collagen was observed. We have previously demonstrated that PC-3 CM blocks osteoblast differentiation in culture. We propose that under the effect of factors present in PC-3 CM, osteoblastic cells retain the undifferentiated phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8695358

  13. Effects of long-term alendronate treatment on bone mineralisation, resorption parameters and biomechanics of single human vertebral trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Krause, M; Soltau, M; Zimmermann, E A; Hahn, M; Kornet, J; Hapfelmeier, A; Breer, S; Morlock, M; Wulff, B; Püschel, K; Glueer, C-C; Amling, M; Busse, B

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-established fracture risk reduction, bisphosphonates are the most frequently used therapeutic agent to treat osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates reduce fracture risk by suppressing bone resorption, but the lower bone turnover could have a negative impact on bone quality at the tissue level. Here, we directly assess the structural and mechanical characteristics of cancellous bone from the lumbar vertebrae (L5) in non-treated osteoporotic controls (n=21), mid-term alendronate-treated osteoporotic patients (n=6), and long-term alendronate-treated osteoporotic patients (n=7). The strength and toughness of single trabeculae were evaluated, while the structure was characterised through measurements of microdamage accumulation, mineralisation distribution, and histological indices. The alendronate-treated cases had a reduced eroded surface (ES/BS, p<0.001) and a higher bone mineralisation in comparison to non-treated controls (p=0.037), which is indicative of low turnover associated with treatment. However, the amount of microdamage and the mechanical properties were similar among the control and treatment groups. As the tissue mineral density (TMD) increased significantly with alendronate treatment compared to non-treated osteoporotic controls, the reduction in resorption cavities could counterbalance the higher TMD allowing the alendronate-treated bone to maintain its mechanical properties and resist microdamage accumulation. A multivariate analysis of the possible predictors supports the theory that multiple factors (e.g., body mass index, TMD, and ES/BS) can impact the mechanical properties. Our results suggest that long-term alendronate treatment shows no adverse impact on mechanical cancellous bone characteristics. PMID:25241965

  14. Review of the Senegalo-Malian shear zone system - Timing, kinematics and implications for possible Au mineralisation styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diene, M.; Fullgraf, T.; Diatta, F.; Gloaguen, E.; Gueye, M.; Ndiaye, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Kédougou Kénieba Inlier (KKI) of eastern Senegal forms a typical Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt characterised by low-metamorphic sequences of volcanic rocks and volcano-sediments that have been intruded at various stages by gabbroic suites and calc-alkaline granitoids. The main structures of the KKI comprise two anastomosing structures about N-S trending shear belts that are distinguished into the western Main Transcurrent Zone (MTZ) and the eastern Senegalo-Malian shear zone system (SMSZ). These shear belts are taken to define the limits between the western Mako, the central Diale-Kéniebandi and the eastern Daléma-Kofi domains even though transitions exist between their characteristic deposition sequences. Remote sensing analysis of airborne geophysics and satellite data (Landsat, ENVI, SRTM) in combination with geological field mapping, structural analysis and geochronology suggests that the SMSZ represents a Birimian structure that records a main stage of deformation that could characterise the major transcurrent Eburnean tectonics (D2) dated from 2105 Ma (Feybesse et al., 2006a-e). This sinistral transpressive deformation marked by a major constraint oriented NNW-SSE, is accompanied by a NNE-SSW extension leading to the opening of dilational areas such as small pull-apart basins marked by local calk-alkaline volcanic sequences and several coeval intrusions of the Boboti Suite dated 2080 ± 0.9 Ma (Hirdes and Davis, 2002). A post-Birimian to pre-Neoproterozoic deformation post dates the transcurrent phase and is marked by regional N-S extension. Review of the existing Au-mineralisation models in combination with the spatial analysis of soil geochemical data suggest seven possible mineralisation styles that are related to the transpressional tectonics and coeval magmatism.

  15. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  16. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  17. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04 mol L(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.86±0.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to

  18. Structure and mineralisation density of antler and pedicle bone in red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) exposed to different levels of environmental fluoride: a quantitative backscattered electron imaging study

    PubMed Central

    KIERDORF, UWE; KIERDORF, HORST; BOYDE, ALAN

    2000-01-01

    The structure and relative degree of mineralisation of antler and pedicle bone of yearling red deer stags exposed either to low or high levels of environmental fluoride were determined by digital quantitative backscattered electron (BSE) imaging. Bone fluoride content (BFC) in antlers (845±86 mg F−/kg ash, arithmetic mean± S.E.M.) and pedicles (1448±154 mg F−/kg ash) of deer from a highly fluoride polluted area in North Bohemia (Czech Republic) were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those of controls from uncontaminated regions in West Germany (antlers: 206±41, pedicles: 322±52 mg F−/kg ash). Mean (56.5±4.5%) and maximum (84.9±2.1%) mineralised bone area of the control antlers significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) exceeded the corresponding values for the N. Bohemian deer (43.3±1.3 and 73.3±1.9%, respectively), while the pedicles from the 2 groups did not differ significantly. In the pooled antler samples (n = 18), negative correlations existed between BFC and mean (rs = −0.62, P < 0.01) as well as maximum (rs = −0.69, P < 0.01) mineralised bone area. Morphological imaging revealed a decreased width and an increased porosity of the antler cortex in the N. Bohemian specimens. Mean (148.5±1.7) and maximum (154.2±1.7) BSE-signal intensities (= grey levels; range between a monobrominated (grey level 0) and a monoiodinated (grey level 255) dimethacrylate resin standard) of the antlers from the controls were significantly higher than those of the N. Bohemian deer (140.7±2.1 and 145.7±2.2, respectively; P < 0.05 for both comparisons). In the pooled antler samples, negative correlations between BFC and mean (rs = −0.51, P < 0.05) as well as maximum (rs = −0.52, P < 0.05) BSE-signal intensities were observed. No significant differences in mineralisation density parameters were found for the 2 pedicle samples, and BFC and mineralisation density of the pooled pedicles were uncorrelated. Morphological imaging revealed bone mottling

  19. New lithogeochemical and mineralogical exploration of Li-Sn greisen mineralisation in old mining adits of the Zinnwald deposit, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neßler, Jörg; Seifert, Thomas; Gutzmer, Jens; Müller, Armin; Henker, Jan; Kühn, Kersten

    2014-05-01

    The polymetallic Zinnwald-Cínovec deposit is represented by greisen-type mineralisation hosted within the apical portion of a small granite intrusion. Similar to other granitic stocks with Sn-W mineralisation in the Erzgebirge, the Zinnwald granite intruded during the post-collisional stage of the late-Variscan (Permo-Carboniferous) magmatic evolution. These intrusions are characterised by the prominent enrichment of incompatible elements (F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, Nb and Ta) and the depletion of P2O5. The deposit is located in the eastern part of the Erzgebirge region, Germany and straddles the border between Germany and the Czech Republic. It is characterised by flat dipping, sheet-like greisen ore bodies (up to 40 m in thickness) and veins (up to 1 m in thickness) located in the apical part and along the quaquaversal dipping edges of the granite stock. The greisen bodies predominantly consist of quartz, Li-Rb-Cs-bearing mica (named zinnwaldite), topaz, fluorite and accessory kaolinite and cassiterite. Historically mined for its cassiterite and wolframite ores since the 16th and 19th century, respectively, the deposit still provides access to a wide spread system of drifts and adits. Selected parts of the underground mine are now presented by the visitor's mine "Vereinigt Zwitterfeld zu Zinnwald". These local conditions are favourable for the re-examination of the exhibited greisen mineralisation. Within the framework of the ongoing Li and Sn exploration project of the SolarWorld Solicium GmbH in the German part of the deposit, an underground sampling campaign has been conducted, incorporating a series of 88 channel samples gained at two different levels (Tiefer Bünau adit = 750 m a.s.l.; Tiefe Hilfe Gottes adit = 720 m a.s.l.). Equally spaced channels of 2 m intervals and approximate dimensions of 180 x 5 x 2.5 cm have been created on pre-selected and detailed mapped walls of two different adits within the mine. The sample material has been gained for mineralogical

  20. Pb isotopic constraints on the formation of the Dikulushi Cu-Pb-Zn-Ag mineralisation, Kundelungu Plateau (Democratic Republic of Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haest, Maarten; Schneider, Jens; Cloquet, Christophe; Latruwe, Kris; Vanhaecke, Frank; Muchez, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Base metal-Ag mineralisation at Dikulushi and in other deposits on the Kundelungu Plateau (Democratic Republic of Congo) developed during two episodes. Subeconomic Cu-Pb-Zn-Fe polysulphide ores were generated during the Lufilian Orogeny (c. 520 Ma ago) in a set of E-W- and NE-SW-oriented faults. Their lead has a relatively unradiogenic and internally inhomogeneous isotopic composition (206Pb/204Pb = 18.07-18.49), most likely generated by mixing of Pb from isotopically heterogeneous clastic sources. These sulphides were remobilised and enriched after the Lufilian Orogeny, along reactivated and newly formed NE-SW-oriented faults into a chalcocite-dominated Cu-Ag mineralisation of high economic interest. The chalcocite samples contain only trace amounts of lead and show mostly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures that fall along a linear trend in the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb diagram (206Pb/204Pb = 18.66-23.65; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.72-16.02). These anomalous characteristics reflect a two-stage evolution involving admixture of both radiogenic lead and uranium during a young fluid event possibly c. 100 Ma ago. The Pb isotope systematics of local host rocks to mineralisation also indicate some comparable young disturbance of their U-Th-Pb systems, related to the same event. They could have provided Pb with sufficiently radiogenic compositions that was added to less radiogenic Pb remobilised from precursor Cu-Pb-Zn-Fe polysulphides, whereas the U most likely originated from external sources. Local metal sources are also suggested by the 208Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb systematics of combined ore and rock lead, which indicate a pronounced and diversified lithological control of the immediate host rocks on the chalcocite-dominated Cu-Ag ores. The Pb isotope systematics of polysulphide mineralisation on the Kundelungu Plateau clearly record a diachronous evolution.

  1. Tectonic controls on hydrothermal mineralisation in hot continental crust: Thermal modelling and spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, K.; Porwal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits provide a record of excess energy flux and mass transfer in the Earth's lithosphere. The heterogeneous distribution of ore deposits in space and time provides a challenge to uniformitarian geodynamic and tectonic concepts, but unusual thermal and structural events often coincide with high mineral endowment. In the Australian Proterozoic continental backarcs and intracratonic rifts host large resources of base metals, gold, and uranium. We present thermal models and spatial analyses of mineral occurrences within the Mount Isa Inlier, an inverted Mesoproterozoic rift in northwest Queensland, Australia, to demonstrate how thermal structure, tectonic style and crustal scale fluid flow are related. In the Mount Isa Inlier, radiogenic heat production contributes significantly to present day surface heat flow, and Mesoproterozoic geotherms of 40°C km-1 in the upper crust can be inferred from lithosphere-scale conductive models. The combination of thick continental crust and high temperatures implies that localization of deformation was limited to a thin upper crustal layer. During rifting mid-crustal rocks intruded by syn-extensional granites were exhumed as metamorphic core complexes in strike-parallel linear basement belts. The resulting horizontal strength contrast between sedimentary basins and shallow basement domains became a focus for deformation during subsequent crustal shortening. Our spatial analysis of mineral occurrences demonstrates that epigenetic copper mineralization at Mount Isa correlates positively with steep fault zones bounding linear basement domains, and granites within these domains. Mineralization potential is greatly increased, because high permeability along steep fault zones enables hydrothermal fluid flow between magmatic, metamorphic and sedimentary reservoirs. We argue that the deformation behavior of hot continental lithosphere generates a favorable environment for hydrothermal mineralization by linking shallow

  2. Quantitative proteomics provides new insights into chicken eggshell matrix protein functions during the primary events of mineralisation and the active calcification phase.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-08-01

    Eggshell is a bioceramic composed of 95% calcium carbonate mineral and 3.5% organic matrix. Its structural organisation is controlled by its organic matrix. We have used quantitative proteomics to study four key stages of shell mineralisation: 1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), 2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, 3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and 4) development of a columnar structure with preferential calcite crystal orientation. This approach explored the distribution of 216 shell matrix proteins found at the four stages. Variations in abundance according to these calcification events were observed for 175 proteins. A putative function related to the mineralisation process was predicted by bioinformatics for 77 of them and was further characterised. We confirmed the important role of lysozyme, ovotransferrin, ovocleidin-17 and ovocleidin-116 for shell calcification process, characterised major calcium binding proteins (EDIL3, ALB, MFGE8, NUCB2), and described novel proteoglycans core proteins (GPC4, HAPLN3). We suggest that OVAL and OC-17 play a role in the stabilisation of ACC. Finally, we report proteins involved in the regulation of proteins driving the mineralisation. They correspond to numerous molecular chaperones including CLU, PPIB and OCX21, protease and protease inhibitors including OVM and CST3, and regulators of phosphorylation. PMID:26049031

  3. Structural, mineralogical and geochemical constraints on the atypical komatiite-hosted Turret deposit in the Agnew-Mt. White district, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voute, F.; Thébaud, N.

    2015-08-01

    In the Norseman-Wiluna belt, Yilgarn Craton, the Agnew-Mt. White district is the host of many gold deposits. Located in the hinge of the regional Lawlers anticline, the Turret gold deposit is structurally controlled by the Table Hill shear zone that transects the Agnew Ultramafic unit. Geochemistry, coupled with petrographic data, allowed the delineation of the paragenetic sequence associated with gold mineralisation and include (1) a pervasive talc-carbonate alteration assemblage, (2) a pre-mineralisation stage associated with pervasive arsenopyrite + chalcopyrite + pyrrhotite + pyrite alteration, followed by (3) a late deformation event along a dilatational segment of the main Table Hill shear zone, leading to the formation of a breccia hosting a Cu-Bi-Mo-Au (± Ag ± Zn ± Te ± W) metal assemblage. The presence of Au-Ag-Cu alloys, native bismuth, chalcopyrite and other Bi-Te-S phases in the mineralisation stage suggest that gold may have been scavenged from the hydrothermal fluids by composite Bi-Te-Cu-Au-Ag-S liquids or melts. Using this mineral paragenetic sequence, together with mineralogical re-equilibration textures observed, we show that the gold deposition at Turret occurred over a temperature range approximately between c. 350 and 270 °C. This temperature range, together with the structural control and typical mesothermal alteration pattern including carbonate-chlorite alteration, shows that the Turret deposit shares common characteristics with the orogenic gold deposit class. However, the metal association of Cu, Au, Bi, and Mo, the quartz-poor, and high copper-sulphide content (up to 15 %) are characteristics that depart from the typical orogenic gold deposit mineralogy. Through comparison with similar deposits in the Yilgarn Craton and worldwide, we propose that the Turret deposit represents an example of a porphyry-derived Au-Cu-Bi-Mo deposit.

  4. Economic geology: Hidden gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeremy P.

    2011-02-01

    How the giant sediment-hosted gold deposits of Nevada were formed is disputed. A model linking regional tectonics with magma emplacement and fluid generation at depth suggests that these deposits result from an optimal coincidence of processes.

  5. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  6. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  7. Getting the Gold Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Epner Technology, Inc., worked with Goddard Space Center to apply gold coating to the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mirror. This partnership resulted in new commercial applications for Epner's LaserGold(R) process in the automotive industry. Previously, the company did not have equipment large enough to handle the plating of the stainless steel panels cost effectively. Seeing a chance to renew this effort, Epner Technology and Goddard entered into an agreement by which NASA would fund the facility needed to do the gold-plating, and Epner Technology would cover all other costs as part of their internal research and development. The VCL mirror project proceeded successfully, fulfilling Goddard's needs and leaving Epner Technology with a new facility to provide LaserGold for the automotive industry. The new capability means increased power savings and improvements in both quality and production time for BMW Manufacturing Corporation of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Cadillac of Detroit, Michigan, as well as other manufacturers who have implemented Epner Technology's LaserGold process. LaserGold(R) is a registered trademark of Epner Technology, Inc.

  8. Gold and palladium minerals (including empirical PdCuBiSe3) from the former Roter Bär mine, St. Andreasberg, Harz Mountains, Germany: a result of low-temperature, oxidising fluid overprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Ließmann, Wilfried; Lehmann, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    At Roter Bär, a former underground mine in the polymetallic deposits of St. Andreasberg in the middle-Harz vein district, Germany, native gold and palladium minerals occur very locally in clausthalite-hematite pockets of few millimetres across in carbonate veinlets. The native gold is a Au-Ag intermetallic compound and the palladium minerals are characterised as mertieite-II [Pd8(Sb,As)3] and empirical PdCuBiSe3 with some S. The latter coexists with bohdanowiczite (AgBiSe2), a mineral that is stable below 120 °C. The geological setting of Roter Bär, underneath a post-Variscan unconformity, and its hematite-selenide-gold association suggest that oxidising hydrothermal brines of low temperature were instrumental to the Au-Pd mineralisation. The Roter Bär Au-Pd mineralisation can be explained by Permo-Triassic, red-bed-derived brines in the context of post-Variscan, unconformity-related fluid overprint.

  9. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry as a potential minerals exploration tool: Case studies from Creede, CO, Jerritt Canyon, NV, Coeur d'Alene district, ID and MT, southern Alaska mesothermal veins, and mid-continent MVT's

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Hofstra, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation now permit quantitative analysis of gas species from individual fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion gas data can be applied to minerals exploration empirically to establish chemical (gas composition) signatures of the ore fluids, and conceptually through the development of genetic models of ore formation from a framework of integrated geologic, geochemical, and isotopic investigations. Case studies of fluid inclusion gas chemistry from ore deposits representing a spectrum of ore-forming processes and environments are presented to illustrate both the empirical and conceptual approaches. We consider epithermal silver-gold deposits of Creede, Colorado, Carlin-type sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits of Jerritt Canyon, Nevada, metamorphic silver-base-metal veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho and Montana, gold-quartz veins in accreted terranes of southern Alaska, and the mid-continent base-metal sulfide deposits of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT's). Variations in gas chemistry determine the redox state of the ore fluids, provide compositional input for gas geothermometers, characterize ore fluid chemistry (e.g., CH4CO2, H2SSO2, CO2/H2S, organic-rich fluids, gas-rich and gas-poor fluids), identify magmatic, meteoric, metamorphic, shallow and deep basin fluids in ore systems, locate upwelling plumes of magmatic-derived volatiles, zones of boiling and volatile separation, interfaces between contrasting fluids, and important zones of fluid mixing. Present techniques are immediately applicable to exploration programsas empirical studies that monitor fluid inclusion gas threshold concentration levels, presence or absence of certain gases, or changes in gas ratios. We suggest that the greater contribution of fluid inclusion gas analysis is in the integrated and comprehensive chemical dimension that gas data impart to genetic models, and in the exploration concepts based on processes and environments of ore formation derived from

  10. LUMINOSITY INCREASES IN GOLD-GOLD OPERATION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.AHERNS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    After an exploratory phase, during which a number of beam parameters were varied, the RHIC experiments now demand higher luminosity to study heavy ion collisions in detail. In gold-gold, operation, RHIC delivers now twice the design luminosity. During the last gold-gold operating period (Run-4) the machine delivered 15 times more luminosity than during the previous gold-gold operating period (Run-2), two years ago. We give an overview of the changes that increased the instantaneous luminosity and luminosity lifetime, raised the reliability, and improved the operational efficiency.

  11. Possible genetic link between I-type granite and orogenic gold deposits in Egypt (metamorphic-magmatic interaction?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Monsef, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The orogenic gold deposits are a distinctive type of deposits that revealed unique temporal and spatial association with an orogeny. Where, the system of gold veins and related ore minerals was confined to hydrothermal solutions formed during compressional to transpressional deformation processes at convergent plate margins in accretionary and collisional orogens, with the respect to ongoing deep-crustal, subduction-related thermal processes. In Egypt, most of vein-type and dyke-type gold mineralization are restricted to granitic rocks or at least near of granitic intrusion that seems to have had an important influence on gold mineralization. Shear zone-related, mesothermal gold deposits of Fatira and Gidami mines in the northern Eastern Desert of Egypt are found within granitic bodies or at the contact between granites and metavolcanic rocks. The hosting-granitic rocks in Fatira and Gidami areas are mainly of granodioritic composition (I-Type granite) which is related to calc-alkaline magmatic series. However, Fatira granitoids were developed within island arc tectonic settings related to mature island arc system (Late-orogenic stage), at relatively low temperature (around 660° C) and medium pressure between (5 - 10 Kbar). On the other hand, Gidami granitoids were developed during the collision stage in continental arc regime related to active continental margin (Syn-orogeny), which were crystallized at relatively high temperature (700-720° C) and low pressure (around 0.1 Kbar). The ore mineralogy includes pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, covellite, ilmenite, goethite ± pyrrhotite ± pentlandite ± galena ± molybdenite. Native gold is detected only in Gidami mineralization as small inclusions within pyrite and goethite or as tiny grains scattered within quartz vein (in close proximity to the sulfides). In Fatira deposits, it is detected only by microprobe analysis within the crystal lattice of pyrite and jarosite. Fluid inclusions study for the mineralized

  12. A reappraisal of the age, origin and structural setting of sulphide mineralisation in the UK North Pennines Orefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Bob; Dempsey, Eddie; Selby, David; Le Cornu, Chris; Young, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The North Pennines Orefield (NPO) is centred on the Alston block, a structural high of fractured Carboniferous sedimentary rocks that unconformably overlie a Devonian age (ca. 399 Ma) granite pluton buried at shallow depths (<0.5 km). The orefield has long been considered to be a classic example of a Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) deposit where the source of the metals and sulphur are derived by hydrothermal leaching of the host sedimentary (carbonate-rich) rocks. The vein-hosted part of the orefield consists of linked systems of shear and tensile fractures with a variety of regionally recognised orientations (ESE-WNW Quarter Point, NE-SW, NW-SE Cross Veins). These are associated with lead (galena), iron (pyrite, pyrrhotite, marcasite), copper (chalcopyrite), zinc (sphalerite), fluorite, barite and quartz mineralization. New Rhenium-Osmium (Re-Os) isotope geochemical analysis of the vein-hosted pyrite mineralization suggests that: (i) the metalliferous ores of the NPO formed ca. 294Ma (earliest Permian); and (ii) that they carry an initial Os ratio indicative of a mantle source similar to that indicated by the initial Os ratio of the Whin Sill dolerite suite (emplacement ages ca. 297-294 Ma). New field observations and stress inversion analyses show that at least two regional deformation events are recognised in the Carboniferous host rocks of the NPO. A initial phase of Late Carboniferous ('Variscan') N-S compression pre-dates mineralisation and leads to formation of the NW-SE fractures, initiation of the Burtreeford Disturbance as a N-S fault and compressional reactivation of the previously extensional E-W Lunedale Fault. A later phase of dextral transtension (NNE-SSW extension, ESE-WNW compression) leads to the formation of the ESE-WNW and NE-SW veins, together with compressional reactivation of the Burtreeford Disturbance and Lunedale Fault. Field and microstructural analyses show that the transtensional deformation is synchronous with the main phases of NPO

  13. Gold carbenes, gold-stabilized carbocations, and cationic intermediates relevant to gold-catalysed enyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Harris, R J; Widenhoefer, R A

    2016-08-21

    Cationic gold complexes in which gold is bound to a formally divalent carbon atom, typically formulated as gold carbenes or α-metallocarbenium ions, have been widely invoked in a range of gold-catalyzed transformations, most notably in the gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization of 1,n-enynes. Although the existence of gold carbene complexes as intermediates in gold-catalyzed transformations is supported by a wealth of indirect experimental data and by computation, until recently no examples of cationic gold carbenes/α-metallocarbenium ions had been synthesized nor had any cationic intermediates generated via gold-catalyzed enyne cycloaddition been directly observed. Largely for this reason, there has been considerable debate regarding the electronic structure of these cationic complexes, in particular the relative contributions of the carbene (LAu(+)[double bond, length as m-dash]CR2) and α-metallocarbenium (LAu-CR2(+)) forms, which is intimately related to the extent of d → p backbonding from gold to the C1 carbon atom. However, over the past ∼ seven years, a number of cationic gold carbene complexes have been synthesized in solution and generated in the gas phase and cationic intermediates have been directly observed in the gold-catalyzed cycloaddition of enynes. Together, these advances provide insight into the nature and electronic structure of gold carbene/α-metallocarbenium complexes and the cationic intermediates generated via gold-catalyzed enyne cycloaddition. Herein we review recent advances in this area. PMID:27146712

  14. Photochemical mineralisation in a boreal brown water lake: considerable temporal variability and minor contribution to carbon dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, Marloes; Tranvik, Lars; Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Koehler, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Sunlight induces photochemical mineralisation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in inland waters, resulting in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to the atmosphere. Photochemical rate modelling is used to determine sunlight-induced CO2 emissions on large spatial and temporal scales. A sensitive model parameter is the wavelength-specific photochemical CDOM reactivity, the apparent quantum yield (AQY). However, the temporal variability of AQY spectra within inland waters remains poorly constrained. Here, we studied a boreal brown water lake in Sweden. We measured AQY spectra for photochemical DIC production monthly between June and November 2014 and parameterised a photochemical rate model. The total AQY between 280 and 600 nm increased about 3-fold during the open-water period, likely due to a high rainfall event with consecutive mixing in autumn that increased availability of highly photoreactive CDOM. However, the variability in AQY spectra over time was much smaller than previously reported variability in AQY spectra between lakes. Yet, using either the AQY spectrum from the least or from the most photoreactive water sample resulted in a 5-fold difference in simulated annual DIC photoproduction (2012-2014), with 2.0 ± 0.1 and 10.3 ± 0.7 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This corresponded to 1 and 8 % of the mean CO2 emissions measured from this lake. We conclude that (1) it may be recommendable to conduct repeated AQY measurements throughout the season for more accurate simulation of annual photochemical DIC production in lakes and (2), in agreement with previous studies, direct CDOM photomineralisation makes only a minor contribution to mean CO2 emissions from Swedish brown water lakes.

  15. Use of multiscalar processing of remotely sensed data in Kalan fracturation networks, west Kalimantan, Indonesia, for future mineralisations research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hs, Karyono; Ruhland, Michel

    The Kalan area is located on the northern margin of the Schwaner Mountains. Its regional geology comprises essentially more or less metamorphosed Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary rocks about 3000-4000 m thick which make up a metasilt, metapelite and meta-argillite series surrounded by a tonalitic complex. These were affected by at least two main periods of tectonic deformation. The first was a plastic deformation that formed the schistosity in the metapelite, the fracture cleavage in the metasilt and the regional folding with the N70°E axial direction which plunges 30°NE and strikes N50°E/50°S. There is also uranium mineralisation in the fractures and schistosity. The second was a brittle deformation that did not cause any extensive bed sliding, fracture or schistosity displacements. However, the regularity of fractures and faults patterns of this area revealed by the present young relief and morphology is visible on remote sensing, pictures in spite of a thick cover of equatorial forest. The 4 direction systems, from tens to thousand of meters long, visible on aerial photographs and satellite images, give various networks of fractures in different lithologies that are measurable in the field. Generally, these tectonic accidents are superimposed on the drainage pattern. The reorganisation of these systems observed on the ERST image analysis might be the result of a large, N40-N50°E, sinistral strike-slip fault, called the Kalan alignment. Another remote sensing method applied to the Landsat scene with the path row number 120-60 LS4 has revealed more details in several sectors. Their combination with the field tectonic analysis provides an improved base document for mineral research.

  16. Gravity worms in the prospecting of epigenetic gold deposits: Example from the Northern Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahti, Ilkka; Nykänen, Vesa; Niiranen, Tero

    2010-05-01

    ) or partly (Kiistala shear zone) whereas the presence of some major shear zones is indicated by truncation of worms at the location of the shear zone (Hanhimaa and Muusa shear zone). The important part of our work is the evaluation of the spatial correlation of gravity worms and known gold deposits using the weights-of-evidence calculation procedure. Our results show that presence of gravity worms are indicative of the structures controlling most epigenetic gold deposits in the CLGB area. Therefore, worming-technique proved to be an excellent tool in mapping of structures being prospective for epigenetic gold deposits in the study area and therefore likely in other areas of similar geology. References: Eilu, P., Pankka, H., Keinänen, V., Kortelainen, V., Niiranen, T., Pulkkinen, E., 2007. Characteristics of gold mineralisation in the greenstone belts of northern Finland. In: Gold in the Central Lapland Greenstone Belt. Geological Survey of Finland. Special Paper 44. Espoo: Geological Survey of Finland, 57-106. Hornby, P., Boschetti, F. & Horowitz, F., 1999. Analysis of potential field data in the wavelet domain. Geophysical Journal International, 137, 175 - 196.

  17. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  18. Biorecovery of gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of ionic and metallic gold (Au) from a wide variety of solutions by selected species of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, and higher plants is documented. Gold accumulations were up to 7.0 g/kg dry weight (DW) in various species of bacteria, 25.0 g/kg DW in freshwater algae, 84.0 g/kg DW in peat, and 100.0 g/kg DW in dried fungus mixed with keratinous material. Mechanisms of accumulation include oxidation, dissolution, reduction, leaching, and sorption. Uptake patterns are significantly modified by the physicochemical milieu. Crab exoskeletons accumulate up to 4.9 g Au/kg DW; however, gold accumulations in various tissues of living teleosts, decapod crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs are negligible.

  19. Microcomputed tomographic analysis of human condyles in unilateral condylar hyperplasia: increased cortical porosity and trabecular bone volume fraction with reduced mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Karssemakers, L H E; Nolte, J W; Tuinzing, D B; Langenbach, G E J; Raijmakers, P G; Becking, A G

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral condylar hyperplasia or hyperactivity is a disorder of growth that affects the mandible, and our aim was to visualise the 3-dimensional bony microstructure of resected mandibular condyles of affected patients. We prospectively studied 17 patients with a clinical presentation of progressive mandibular asymmetry and an abnormal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scan. All patients were treated by condylectomy to arrest progression. The resected condyles were scanned with micro-CT (18 μm resolution). Rectangular volumes of interest were selected in 4 quadrants (lateromedial and superoinferior) of the trabecular bone of each condyle. Variables of bone architecture (volume fraction, trabecular number, thickness, and separation, degree of mineralisation, and degree of structural anisotrophy) were calculated with routine morphometric software. Eight of the 17 resected condyles showed clear destruction of the subchondral layer of cortical bone. There was a significant superoinferior gradient for all trabecular variables. Mean (SD) bone volume fraction (25.1 (6) %), trabecular number (1.69 (0.26) mm(-1)), trabecular thickness (0.17 (0.03) mm), and degree of mineralisation (695.39 (39.83) mg HA/cm(3)) were higher in the superior region. Trabecular separation (0.6 (0.16) mm) and structural anisotropy (1.84 (0.28)) were higher in the inferior region. The micro-CT analysis showed increased cortical porosity in many of the condyles studied. It also showed a higher bone volume fraction, greater trabecular thickness and trabecular separation, greater trabecular number, and less mineralisation in the condyles of the 17 patients compared with the known architecture of unaffected mandibular condyles. PMID:25219775

  20. Characterisation of mineralisation of bone and cartilage: X-ray diffraction and Ca and Sr K α X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Muthuvelu, P.; Ellis, R. E.; Green, E. M.; Attenburrow, D.; Barrett, R.; Arkill, K.; Colridge, D. B.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-10-01

    Bone is a dynamic structure, constantly remodelling in response to changing mechanical and environmental factors. This is particularly evident in the mineral component encrusting the collagenous framework. The mineral is principally in the form of calcium apatite, but calcium can exchange with strontium, both during the cellular processes of mineralisation and resorption and by passive exchange with the deposited crystals. Mineralisation is generally characterized by densitometry, but because of the differences in absorption cross sections of calcium and strontium it can be misleading in studies of composition. In this work we have used X-ray diffraction to identify calcium and strontium apatite and X-ray fluorescence to quantify strontium and calcium distribution. With the beam characteristics available from synchrotron radiation, this has enabled us to obtain microscopic resolution on thin sections of bone and cartilage from the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. Two issues have been investigated; the first is the distribution of mineral in the bone-cartilage interface and within individual trabeculae. In trabecular bone the ratio of strontium to calcium concentration was typically 0.0035 ± 0.0020, and higher by a factor of ∼3 at the periphery than in the centre of a trabeculum (possibly reflecting the more rapid turnover of mineral in the surface layer). In the dense subchondral bone the ratio was similar, approximately doubling in the calcified cartilage. The second objective was to explore the changes in mineralisation associated with development of osteoarthrosis. We analysed lesions showing cartilage thinning and changes in the trabecular organization and density of the underlying bone. At the centre of the lesion the ratio of strontium to calcium was much lower than that in normal tissue, although the calcified cartilage still showed a higher ratio than the underlying bone. In the superficially normal tissue around the lesion the calcified cartilage

  1. Bone mineralisation of weaned piglets fed a diet free of inorganic phosphorus and supplemented with phytase, as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Grzegorz; Weremko, Dagmara; Sobol, Monika; Raj, Stanisława

    2015-01-01

    Sixteen female piglets (58 d of age, 16.8 ± 0.8 kg body weight [BW]) were assigned to two groups (n = 8) and received until day 100 of age (50.3 ± 1.2 kg BW) ad libitum either a diet with a standard (diet C) or low (diet L) total phosphorus (P) content (5.38 and 4.23 g/kg, respectively). Diet C was supplemented with mineral P (1.15 g/kg) and did not contain microbial phytase. Diet L did not contain any inorganic P but 750 FTU/kg of microbial phytase. Despite these treatments, both diets were composed with the same ingredients. Body mineralisation of each gilt was assessed by determining the bone mineral content (BMC), area bone mineral density (BMD) by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at days 58, 72, 86 and 100 of age. Feeding diet L caused a higher P digestibility (p = 0.008) measured from days 72 to 86 of age and at 100 days of age a higher BMC and BMD (p ≤ 0.01). Furthermore, the gilts of group L deposited more minerals in the body than control pigs (by 2.4 g/d, p = 0.008). It was found that BMD and BMC were positively correlated with body lean mass and digestible P intake. The results indicated that, even for very young pigs, the addition of microbial phytase instead of inorganic P increases the amount of digestible P covering the requirements of piglets for proper bone mineralisation. Furthermore, it was proved that the DXA method can be successfully applied to measure body fat and lean mass contents as well as bone mineralisation of growing pigs using the same animals. PMID:26062598

  2. Processing Gold Quarry refractory ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausen, D. M.

    1989-04-01

    The Gold Quarry deposit is the largest sediment-hosted gold deposit yet discovered on the Carlin trend in northern Nevada. However, despite the locale's vast reserves, the gold is difficult to extract from portions of the deposit. Detailed, ongoing mineralogical analyses assure proper treatment of the ore.

  3. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  5. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  6. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  7. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  8. Gold and gold working in Late Bronze Age Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Vavelidis, M; Andreou, S

    2008-04-01

    Numerous objects of gold displaying an impressive variety of types and manufacturing techniques are known from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) contexts of Mycenaean Greece, but very little is known about the origin and processing of gold during the second millennium B.C: . Ancient literature and recent research indicate that northern Greece is probably the richest gold-bearing region in Greece, and yet, very little evidence exists regarding the exploitation of its deposits and the production as well as use of gold in the area during prehistory. The unusual find of a group of small stone crucibles at the prehistoric settlement of Thessaloniki Toumba, one with visible traces of gold melting, proves local production and offers a rare opportunity to examine the process of on-site gold working. Furthermore, the comparison of the chemical composition of prehistoric artefacts from two settlements with those of gold deposits in their immediate areas supports the local extraction of gold and opens up the prospect for some of the Mycenaean gold to have originated in northern Greece. The scarcity of gold items in northern Greek LBA contexts may not represent the actual amount of gold produced and consumed, but could be a result of the local social attitudes towards the circulation and deposition of artefacts from precious metals. PMID:18087685

  9. Digging for Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  10. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  11. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  12. Gold trifluoromethyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Gil-Rubio, Juan; Vicente, José

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the synthesis, reactivity and applications of gold trifluoromethyl complexes, which are the only isolated perfluoroalkyl complexes of gold. The most reported examples are neutral Au(i) complexes of the type [Au(CF3)L], whereas only two Au(ii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been reported, both being diamagnetic and containing a strong Au-Au bond. A number of Au(iii) trifluoromethyl complexes have been prepared by oxidative addition of halogens or iodotrifluoromethane to Au(i) complexes or, in a few cases, by transmetallation reactions. Owing to the limitations of the available synthetic methods, a lower number of examples is known, particularly for the oxidation states (ii) and (iii). Gold trifluoromethyl complexes present singular characteristics, such as thermal stability, strong Au-C bonds and, in some cases, reactive α-C-F bonds. Some of the Au(iii) complexes reported, show unusually easy reductive elimination reactions of trifluoromethylated products which could be applied in the development of gold-catalyzed processes for the trifluoromethylation of organic compounds. PMID:26169553

  13. Thermotectonic history of the Marañón Fold-Thrust Belt, Peru: Insights into mineralisation in an evolving orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrenberg, Arne F.; Kohn, Barry P.; Holcombe, Rodney J.; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Fold-thrust belts along convergent margins around the world host major ore deposits. The origin of such ore deposits is commonly episodic and so are the temporal and spatial variations in deformation styles in these fold-thrust belts. Here we focus on the Marañón Fold-Thrust Belt (MFTB) of the Peruvian Andes, and demonstrate a link between the spatio-temporal distribution of ore deposits and thick-skinned tectonics. We present low-temperature thermochronology results from the MFTB that document the uplift/exhumation history and timing of thick-skinned tectonics and vergence reversal. Our results suggest that the thermal history of the MFTB involved two discrete intervals of opposed-vergence, large-scale crustal deformation since the Late Cretaceous. An early interval, at ~ 80-20 Ma, was associated with folding and east-vergent thin-skinned tectonics, and was followed by west-vergent thick-skinned deformation at ~ 20-0 Ma. Furthermore, our findings suggest that thick-skinned contraction was coincident with increased focusing of mineralising fluids and ore deposition in the MFTB during the early Miocene, and in the mid-Miocene both mineralisation and deformation were enhanced by subduction of the Nazca Ridge underneath the South American Plate.

  14. Archaean atmospheric evolution: evidence from the Witwatersrand gold fields, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2005-04-01

    , hydrothermal gold deposit. Consequently, the best-fit genetic model involves post-depositional textural and mineralogical modification of original fluvial placer deposits. On the Kaapvaal Craton, Witwatersrand-type mineralisation is recorded over an extended period of time from 3074 to 2642 Ma. Rounded pyrite is common in the coarser grained fractions of the siliciclastic basin fill. A lack of sulphur isotope fractionation and typical magmatic δ34S values support its detrital origin. Together with rounded uraninite, which is particularly abundant in the older beds, it provides important constraints on the redox potential of the Meso- to Neoarchaean (3.1-2.6 Ga) atmosphere and hydrosphere. In combination with eukaryotic steroids documented from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, the ambient Neoarchaean oxygen fugacity is calculated as having been approximately 10 -3, in equilibrium with a relatively acidic hydrosphere (pH=6). This is in agreement with the preservation of mass-independent S isotope fractionation, which provides independent support for an anoxic atmosphere and which has so far been recorded predominantly from sediments older than 2.3 Ga. An acidic meteoric palaeoenvironment is supported by intense chemical weathering below erosional unconformity surfaces in the Witwatersrand Basin. In contrast to the pyrite-bearing fluvial and near-shore shallow marine deposits, marine shale deposits contain magnetite. This supports the postulated reducing environment but also highlights total sulphur concentrations in the ancient ocean that were orders of magnitude lower than in modern ocean water.

  15. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  16. Timing of porphyry (Cu-Mo) and base metal (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) mineralisation in a magmatic-hydrothermal system—Morococha district, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Honza; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Bendezú, Aldo; Ovtcharova, Maria; Spikings, Richard; Stein, Holly; Fontboté, Lluís

    2015-12-01

    The Morococha district in central Peru is characterised by economically important Cordilleran polymetallic (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) vein and replacement bodies and the large Toromocho porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in its centre. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology data for various porphyry-related hydrothermal mineralisation styles record a 3.5-Ma multi-stage history of magmatic-hydrothermal activity in the district. In the late Miocene, three individual magmatic-hydrothermal centres were active: the Codiciada, Toromocho, and Ticlio centres, each separated in time and space. The Codiciada centre is the oldest magmatic-hydrothermal system in the district and consists of a composite porphyry stock associated with anhydrous skarn and quartz-molybdenite veins. The hydrothermal events are recorded by a titanite U-Pb age at 9.3 ± 0.2 Ma and a molybdenite Re-Os age at 9.26 ± 0.03 Ma. These ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages for porphyry intrusions of the composite stock and indicate a time span of 0.2 Ma for magmatic-hydrothermal activity. The small Ticlio magmatic-hydrothermal centre in the west of the district has a maximum duration of 0.3 Ma, ranging from porphyry emplacement to porphyry mineralisation at 8.04 ± 0.14 Ma (40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling age). The Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre has a minimum of five recorded porphyry intrusions that span a total of 1.3 Ma and is responsible for the formation of the giant Toromocho Cu-Mo deposit. At least two hydrothermal pulses are identified. Post-dating a first pulse of molybdenite mineralisation, wide-spread hydrous skarn covers an area of over 6 km2 and is recorded by five 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages at 7.2-6.8 Ma. These ages mark the end of the slowly cooling and long-lived Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre soon after last magmatic activity at 7.26 ± 0.02 Ma. District-wide (50 km2) Cordilleran base metal vein and replacement bodies post-date the youngest recorded porphyry mineralisation event at Toromocho

  17. Application of airborne LiDAR to the detailed geological mapping of mineralised terrain: the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebby, S.; Cunningham, D.; Naden, J.; Tansey, K.

    2009-04-01

    forest cover. To examine the efficacy of LiDAR in mineral exploration, an airborne survey was flown over approximately 375 km2 of the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus—a region noted for its volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS)-style mineralisation. Although most commonly found at the Lower Pillow Lava-Upper Pillow Lava interface, sulphide mineralisation occurs throughout the pillow lava sequence. Therefore, accurate identification of geological contacts is a key parameter for VMS exploration in the Troodos complex. However, the existing geological maps, produced using a combination of conventional field mapping and aerial photograph interpretation, have significant differences and do not adequately represent the geological complexity in high detail. In this study, we present a semi-automated algorithm for the detailed lithological mapping of a 16 km2 study area using high-resolution (4 m) airborne LiDAR topographic data in which non-ground features such as trees and buildings have been removed (i.e., bare-earth). Differences in the geomorphological characteristics of each major lithological unit result in each unit having a distinctive topographic signature in the bare-earth LiDAR DEM. Thematic maps (slope, curvature and surface roughness) are derived from the LiDAR DEM in order to quantify the topographic signatures associated with each lithological unit. With the thematic maps as the input layers, Kohonen's Self-Organising Map is used as a supervised artificial neural network to assign each pixel to a lithology to produce a geological map. The algorithm successfully identifies the major lithological units—Basal Group (> 50 % dykes and < 50 % pillow lavas), pillow lavas, alluvium and Lefkara Formation (chalks and marls)—in excellent detail and highlights geological features to a 20 m resolution. Although the ability to distinguish between lithologies in some areas is affected by anthropogenic activity (e.g., farming), the resultant lithological map easily surpasses the

  18. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  19. 'Pot of Gold'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  20. Watching single gold nanorods grow.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhongqing; Qi, Hua; Li, Min; Tang, Bochong; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Han, Ruiling; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-05-01

    The consecutive evolution process of single gold nanorods is monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The single-crystal gold nanorods investigated are grown directly on surfaces to which gold seed particles are covalently linked. The growth kinetics for single nanorods is derived from the 3D information recorded by AFM. A better understanding of the seed-mediated growth mechanism may ultimately lead to the direct growth of aligned nanorods on surfaces. PMID:22378704

  1. South Tien Shan orogenic belt: structure, magmatism and gold mineralization (Uzbekistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneev, Rustam; Seltmann, Reimer

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Tien Shan represents one of the key units of the Central Asian orogenic belt in Uzbekistan. Together with the Beltau-Kurama volcano-plutonic arc it formed as a result of subduction of the crust under the Turkistan paleoocean and the Kazakhstan continent, followed by collision and post-collisional strike-slip processes. The Southern Tien Shan is of particular interest due to its gold mineralisation. It hosts the giant Muruntau gold deposit and the large gold deposits of Amantaitau, Daugyztau, Myutenbay (Kyzylkum ore district) and Charmitan, Guzhumsay, Urtalik (Nurata ore district). The Middle Tienshan hosts within the Beltau-Kurama volcano-plutonic arc the Kurama ore district with the giant Kalmakyr Cu-Au porphyry and large epithermal Au-Ag deposits of Kochbulak and Kyzylalma. Yakubchuk et al. (2005) and others stress that the largest ore clusters are confined by the intersections of volcano-plutonic belts and transform faults in result of sinistral strike slip dislocations during the Permo-Carboniferous. Others believe that the ore giants are in addition controlled by hot spots - a mantle plume, superimposed on the crust architecture shaped by the subduction processes. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of main intrusive massifs of Uzbekistan (CERCAMS data) showed that granitoid magmatism is predominantly of postcollisional age, manifested in the accretionary units at 270-290 Ma, whereas subduction magmatism prevails as characteristic in the volcano-plutonic arc at 300-320 Ma. Determination of sulphide mineralization ages using Os-Re method (CERCAMS data), are respectively 283-289 Ma and 298-314 Ma. The studies were performed in the framework of IGCP- 592. References 1. Yakubchuk A.S., Shatov V.V., Kirwin D. et al., (2005) Gold and base metal metallogeny of the Central Asian Orogenic supercollage: Society of Economic Geologists, Inc. Economic Geology, 100th, Anniversary Volume, 1035-1068. 2. Groves, D.I., Goldfarb, R.J., Gebre-Mariam, M., Hagemann, S.G. and

  2. Simulation of substrate erosion and sulphate assimilation by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for the genesis of precious metal-rich sulphide mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Gaillard, Fabrice; Fiorentini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    On Earth, high temperature mafic to ultramafic lava flows, such as komatiites and ferropicrites of the Archean and Proterozic eons, can be hosts to Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation. Mechanical/thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks is ascribed as the principal mechanism that leads to sulphide supersaturation, batch segregation and subsequent accumulation of metal-enriched magmatic sulphides (e.g., Bekker et al., Science, 2009). In order to investigate the likelihood of the occurrence of similar sulphide mineralisation in extraterrestrial magmatic systems, we numerically modelled erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of Martian lavas, some of which display chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, on a variety of consolidated sedimentary sulphate-rich substrates. The modelling approach relies on the integration of i) mathematical lava erosion models for turbulent flows (Williams et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998), ii) thermodynamic volatile degassing models (Gaillard et al., Space Sci. Rev., 2013), and iii) formulations on the stability of sulphides (Fortin et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2015). A series of scenarios are examined in which various Martian mafic to ultramafic mantle-derived melts emplace over, and assimilate consolidated sulphate-rich substrates, such as the sedimentary lithologies (i.e., conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones) recently discovered at the Gale Crater landing site. Our modellings show that lavas emplacing over consolidated sedimentary substrate rather than stiff basaltic crust, are governed by relatively high cooling and substrate erosion rates. The rapid assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates at fO2 ≳QFM-1. This effect is further enhanced with increased temperature. Nevertheless, sulphide supersaturation in the way of sulphate

  3. Mineralisation of amethyst-bearing geodes in Ametista do Sul (Brazil) from low-temperature sedimentary brines: evidence from monophase liquid inclusions and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, H. Albert; Krüger, Yves; Taubald, Heinrich; van den Kerkhof, Alfons M.; Frenz, Martin; Morteani, Giulio

    2014-10-01

    Fluid inclusion studies in combination with hydrogen, oxygen and sulphur isotope data provide novel insights into the genesis of giant amethyst-bearing geodes in Early Cretaceous Paraná continental flood basalts at Amestita do Sul, Brazil. Monophase liquid inclusions in colourless quartz, amethyst, calcite, barite and gypsum were analysed by microthermometry after stimulating bubble nucleation using single femtosecond laser pulses. The salinity of the fluid inclusions was determined from ice-melting temperatures and a combination of prograde and retrograde homogenisation temperatures via the density maximum of the aqueous solutions. Four mineralisation stages are distinguished. In stage I, celadonite, chalcedony and pyrite formed under reducing conditions in a thermally stable environment. Low δ34SV-CDT values of pyrite (-25 to -32 ‰) suggest biogenic sulphate reduction by organotrophic bacteria. During the subsequent stages II (amethyst, goethite and anhydrite), III (early subhedral calcite) and IV (barite, late subhedral calcite and gypsum), the oxidation state of the fluid changed towards more oxidising conditions and microbial sulphate reduction ceased. Three distinct modes of fluid salinities around 5.3, 3.4 and 0.3 wt% NaCl-equivalent characterise the mineralisation stages II, III and IV, respectively. The salinity of the stage I fluid is unknown due to lack of fluid inclusions. Variation in homogenisation temperatures and in δ18O values of amethyst show evidence of repeated pulses of ascending hydrothermal fluids of up to 80-90 °C infiltrating a basaltic host rock of less than 45 °C. Colourless quartz and amethyst formed at temperatures between 40 and 80 °C, while the different calcite generations and late gypsum precipitated at temperatures below 45 °C. Calculated oxygen isotope composition of the amethyst-precipitating fluid in combination with δD values of amethyst-hosted fluid inclusions (-59 to -51 ‰) show a significant 18O-shift from the

  4. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  5. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  6. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  7. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  8. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  9. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M. D.

    1998-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Mössbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  10. Erosion and assimilation of substrate by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for sulphur degassing and the genesis of orthomagmatic Ni-Cu±(PGE) sulphide mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, D.; Baumgartner, R. J.; Gaillard, F.; Fiorentini, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Archean and Proterozoic komatiites and ferropicrites are mantle plume-related, low-viscosity, high-temperature, mafic to ultramafic lava flows. They are hosts to Ni-Cu±(PGE) sulphide mineralisation, which generally formed due to the segregation of sulphides following thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks. We numerically simulated erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of iron-rich Martian lavas displaying chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial mafic to ultramafic lavas, on a variety of basaltic and sedimentary sulphate-rich substratum. With the adoption of the lava flow and erosion model of Williams et al. (JGR, 1998), thermodynamic simulations were implemented to (semi-) quantify the potential changes in melt parameter (i.e., chemistry, temperature, and oxygen fugacity) that dictate the sulphur capacity of silicate melts. Modelling was also performed to assess the role of volatile degassing (Gaillard et al., SSR, 2013) on the sulphur inventory of Martian lavas. Our modelling show that lavas emplacing over basaltic crust are governed by low cooling rates, as well as low erosion and assimilation capacities, thus resulting in calculated near-cotectic proportions of sulphides segregating relatively late upon lava emplacement (usually > 100 km flow distance). The rapid assimilation of highly erodible and sulphate-rich Martian regolith may trigger sulphide supersaturation and batch segregation of sulphides well above cotectic proportions relatively early during the establishment of magmatic flow (<100 km flow distance). However, the assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates. This process may limit or even counteract the overall positive effect of sulphate assimilation on achieving sulphide supersaturation, sulphide segregation and the genesis of Ni-Cu±(PGE) sulphide mineralisation.

  11. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  12. The Gold at Fort Knox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that, although U.S. currency today is pure fiat money and not backed by gold or any other precious metal, students frequently ask, "But what about the gold at Fort Knox?" Describes what is really located at Fort Knox, why it is there, its implications for public policy. (CFR)

  13. When cyclopropenes meet gold catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Miege, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cyclopropenes as substrates entered the field of gold catalysis in 2008 and have proven to be valuable partners in a variety of gold-catalyzed reactions. The different contributions in this growing research area are summarized in this review. PMID:21804867

  14. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  15. Optical properties of gold-silica-gold multilayer nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Fleming, Ryan C; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2008-11-24

    The spectral and angular radiation properties of gold-silica-gold multilayer nanoshells are investigated using Mie theory for concentric multilayer spheres. The spectral tunability of multilayer nanoshells is explained and characterized by a plasmon hybridization model and a universal scaling principle. A thinner intermediate silica layer, scaled by particle size, red shifts the plasmon resonance. This shift is relatively insensitive to the overall particle size and follows the universal scaling principle with respect to the resonant wavelength of a conventional silica-gold core-shell nanoshell. The extra tunability provided by the inner core further shifts the extinction peak to longer wavelengths, which is difficult to achieve on conventional sub-100 nm nanoshells due to limitations in synthesizing ultrathin gold coatings. We found multilayer nanoshells to be more absorbing with a larger gold core, a thinner silica layer, and a thinner outer gold shell. Both scattering intensity and angular radiation pattern were found to differ from conventional nanoshells due to spectral modulation from the inner core. Multilayer nanoshells may provide more backscattering at wavelengths where silica-gold core-shell nanoshells predominantly forward scatter. PMID:19030045

  16. Gold-catalyzed homogeneous oxidative cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Peng, Yu; Cui, Li; Zhang, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Oxidizing gold? A gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycle is essential for the first oxidative cross-coupling reaction in gold catalysis. By using Selectfluor for gold(I) oxidation, this chemistry reveals the synthetic potential of incorporating gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycles into contemporary gold chemistry and promises a new area of gold research by merging powerful gold catalysis and oxidative metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. PMID:19322869

  17. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  18. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  19. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  20. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  1. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  2. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  3. 20th-Century Gold Rush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wargo, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents Nevada's gold rush activities spurred by technological advancements in search methods. Describes the events that led to the twentieth-century gold rush, the techniques for finding deposits and the geological formation process of disseminated gold deposits. Vignettes present the gold extraction process, cross-section, and profile of a…

  4. Enhancement of gold recovery using bioleaching from gold concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The gold in refractory ores is encapsulated as fine particles (sometimes at a molecular level) in the crystal structure of the sulfide (typically pyrite with or without arsenopyrite) matrix. This makes it impossible to extract a significant amount of refractory gold by cyanidation since the cyanide solution cannot penetrate the pyrite/arsenopyrite crystals and dissolve gold particles, even after fine grinding. To effectively extract gold from these ores, an oxidative pretreatment is necessary to break down the sulfide matrix. The most popular methods of pretreatment include nitric acid oxidation, roasting, pressure oxidation and biological oxidation by microorganisms. This study investigated the bioleaching efficiency of Au concentrate under batch experimental conditions (adaptation cycles and chemical composition adaptation) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from gold mine leachate in Sunsin gold mine, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at two different chemical composition (CuSO4 and ZnSO4), two different adaptation cycles 1'st (3 weeks) and 2'nd (6 weeks). The results showed that the pH in the bacteria inoculating sample decreased than initial condition and Eh increased. In the chemical composition adaptation case, the leached accumulation content of Fe and Pb was exhibited in CuSO4 adaptation bacteria sample more than in ZnSO4 adaptation bacteria samples, possibly due to pre-adaptation effect on chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) in gold concentrate. And after 21 days on the CuSO4 adaptation cycles case, content of Fe and Pb was appeared at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 1.82 and Pb - 25.81 times per control sample) lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 2.87 and Pb - 62.05 times per control sample). This study indicates that adaptation chemical composition and adaptation cycles can play an important role in bioleaching of gold concentrate in eco-/economic metallurgy process.

  5. Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Synthesis of Heterocycles via Gold-Catalyzed Heteroatom Addition to Unsaturated C-C Bonds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization of Polyunsaturated Compounds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds via α-Oxo Gold Carbenoid * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cycloaddition Reactions * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Activation of Carbonyl Groups and Alcohols * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds through Gold-Mediated C-H Bond Functionalization * Gold-Catalyzed Domino Cyclization/Oxidative Coupling Reactions * Conclusions * References

  6. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  7. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  8. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-08

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5 mm in the best glassformer. Au{sub 49}Ag{sub 5.5}Pd{sub 2.3}Cu{sub 26.9}Si{sub 16.3} has a liquidus temperature of 644 K, a glass transition temperature of 401 K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58 K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is {approx}350 Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  9. Nanoporous gold for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Stine, Keith J; Jefferson, Kenise; Shulga, Olga V

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) is a material of emerging interest for immobilization of biomolecules and -especially enzymes. NPG materials provide a high gold surface area onto which biomolecules can either be directly physisorbed or covalently linked after first modifying the NPG with a self-assembled monolayer. The material can be used as a high surface area electrode and with immobilized enzymes can be used for amperometric detection schemes. NPG can be prepared in a variety of formats from alloys containing less than 50 atomic% gold by dealloying procedures. Related high surface area gold structures have been prepared using templating approaches. Covalent enzyme immobilization can be achieved by first forming a self-assembled monolayer on NPG bearing a terminal reactive functional group followed by conjugation to the enzyme through amide linkages to lysine residues. PMID:20865389

  10. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  11. A eutectic gold vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tou, T. Y.; Cheak, K. E.; Low, K. S.

    This paper presents a eutectic gold vapour laser (EGVL) which uses the eutectic alloy of gold and silicon, Au/3.15Si, as the lasant. It was observed that, at low input power operation, the presence of the silicon vapour could increase the output of the 627.8 nm laser line by (50-60)% when compared with a gold vapour laser (GVL) which uses pure gold as the lasant. The improved laser output for the EGVL may be explained by an increased electron density, as a result of Penning ionization of silicon atoms. However, for higher input power operation, the EGVL showed a slower rate of increase in its laser output power and was overtaken by GVLs at a tube operating temperature of around 1650°C. This may be explained by a lowering of the electron temperature owing to increasing inelastic collisions between the electrons and silicon atoms which, although excited, may not produce additional electrons.

  12. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Titanium/gold process characterization

      SciTech Connect

      Fajardo, L.S.

      1991-11-01

      Characterization of the titanium/gold (Ti/Au) deposition process used at the Allied-Signal Inc., Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation (AMO) was performed. Tests were conducted to set up evaporation parameters, correlate titanium and gold thicknesses to sheet resistance, improve thickness uniformity, and reduce frontside contamination of deposit material on product wafers. The Ti/Au process is the final step in the production of integrated circuits (ICs) at the AMO wafer fabrication facility. 3 figs.

    • Photochemical synthesis of gold nanorods.

      PubMed

      Kim, Franklin; Song, Jae Hee; Yang, Peidong

      2002-12-01

      Gold nanorods have been synthesized by photochemically reducing gold ions within a micellar solution. The aspect ratio of the rods can be controlled with the addition of silver ions. This process reported here is highly promising for producing uniform nanorods, and more importantly it will be useful in resolving the growth mechanism of anisotropic metal nanoparticles due to its simplicity and the relatively slow growth rate of the nanorods. PMID:12452700

    • Precipitation of gold into metastable gold silicide in silicon

      SciTech Connect

      Baumann, F.H.; Schroeter, W. )

      1991-03-15

      We report a detailed investigation of the precipitation behavior of gold in float-zone silicon from a highly supersaturated solution. Nucleation, morphology, and crystallography as well as the decomposition of the solution were examined using high-resolution electron microscopy, selected area diffraction combined with tilting experiments, Hall-effect measurements, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. After in-diffusion of gold at 1275 {degree}C annealing experiments were performed at 850 {degree}C for durations ranging from 5 min up to 35 d. It is shown that gold precipitates in small spherical particles (diameter: 10--20 nm) consisting of a metastable gold silicide. By means of selected area diffraction combined with a special tilting procedure, the unit cell is proved to be orthorhombic with lattice parameters {ital a}=0.971 nm, {ital b}=0.768 nm, and {ital c}=0.703 nm. Systematic absence of reflections in several precipitate zone-axis patterns reveals the space group of the silicide to be {ital Pnma} or {ital Pn}2{sub 1}{ital a}. According to Hall-effect measurements the concentration of substitutional gold decreases to a few percent within 5 min annealing at 850 {degree}C. Only a part of it has precipitated in gold silicide particles, which are found at small extrinsic stacking faults. The stacking faults represent a density of self-interstitials Si{sub {ital i}} of about 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, which according to control experiments is about a factor of 50 above the equilibrium concentration of Si{sub {ital i}} at 1274 {degree}C. As annealing proceeds the stacking faults disappear, and gold is finally found in spherical particles embedded stress-free into the silicon matrix.

    • Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

      2013-04-01

      This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

    • A follow-up study on indoor 222Rn, 220Rn their decay product concentrations in a mineralised zone of Himachal Pradesh, India.

      PubMed

      Bajwa, B S; Singh, Parminder; Singh, Prabhjot; Saini, Komal; Singh, Surinder; Sahoo, B K; Sapra, B K

      2016-03-01

      A follow-up study was taken up in a mineralised zone situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, to investigate high values of radon concentrations reported in past studies as well to update the old radon data based on bare SSNTD technique. In the present investigation, the concentrations of indoor radon, thoron and their decay products have been measured using the newly developed radon/thoron discriminating diffusion chamber with single entry face, direct radon and thoron progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS), respectively. The measurements have been carried out in 75 dwellings of 14 different villages where the previous studies were carried out using bare SSNTD technique. It was observed that high values of earlier reported radon concentrations were mainly due to thoron interference in the Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (LR-115 type II) exposed in bare mode. Now, the average concentration values and the estimated annual inhalation dose in these villages have been found to be within the reference level as recommended by the ICRP. The annual average indoor radon and thoron concentrations observed in these dwellings have been found to vary from 44±12 to 157±73 Bq m(-3) and 44±11 to 240±125 Bq m(-3), respectively. The equilibrium equivalent concentrations of radon and thoron decay products have been observed to be in the range of 10 to 63 and 1 to 5 Bq m(-3), respectively. PMID:26184660

    • A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory.

      PubMed

      Frostick, A; Bollhöfer, A; Parry, D

      2011-10-01

      Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly #2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra. PMID:20471726

    • The effect of polystyrene sodium sulfonate grafting on polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments on in vitro mineralisation and in vivo bone tissue integration.

      PubMed

      Vaquette, Cédryck; Viateau, Véronique; Guérard, Sandra; Anagnostou, Fani; Manassero, Mathieu; Castner, David G; Migonney, Véronique

      2013-09-01

      This study investigates the impact of polystyrene sodium sulfonate (PolyNaSS) grafting onto the osseo-integration of a polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament (Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System, LARS™) used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The performance of grafted and non-grafted ligaments was assessed in vitro by culturing human osteoblasts under osteogenic induction and this demonstrated that the surface modification was capable of up-regulating the secretion of ALP and induced higher level of mineralisation as measured 6 weeks post-seeding by Micro-Computed Tomography. Grafted and non-grafted LARS™ were subsequently implanted in an ovine model for ACL reconstruction and the ligament-to-bone interface was evaluated by histology and biomechanical testings 3 and 12 months post-implantation. The grafted ligaments exhibited more frequent direct ligament-to-bone contact and bone formation in the core of the ligament at the later time point than the non-grafted specimens, the grafting also significantly reduced the fibrous encapsulation of the ligament 12 months post-implantation. However, this improved osseo-integration was not translated into a significant increase in the biomechanical pull-out loads. These results provide evidences that PolyNaSS grafting improved the osseo-integration of the artificial ligament within the bone tunnels. This might positively influence the outcome of the surgical reconstructions, as higher ligament stability is believed to limit micro-movement and therefore permits earlier and enhanced healing. PMID:23790438

    • Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

      PubMed

      Maggon, Krishan

      2007-01-01

      The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  1. Deformation mechanisms in gold nanowires and nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, R.; Derby, B.

    2011-03-01

    We present a study of the deformation of gold nanowires of diameter 30-70 nm and nanoporous gold specimens with ligament diameter 5-10 nm, both produced by electrodeposition into anodised aluminium oxide templates. The nanowires show extensive surface slip steps and low dislocation densities with a few perfect dislocation loops, Shockley partial dislocations and microtwins observed after deformation. Nanoporous specimens show deformation localised to the nodes between the ligaments of the foamed structure, with high densities of microtwins and Shockley partial dislocations in these regions. Similar dislocation structures are seen in larger nanowires deformed in bending. This is shown to be consistent with a strain gradient plasticity model for the deformation of nanoporous gold, with the strain gradient accommodated by geometrically necessary twins and partial dislocations.

  2. Annealing relaxation of ultrasmall gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Except serving as an excellent gift on proper occasions, gold finds applications in life sciences, particularly in diagnostics and therapeutics. These applications were made possible by gold nanoparticles, which differ drastically from macroscopic gold. Versatile surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles allows coating with small molecules, polymers, biological recognition molecules. Theoretical investigation of nanoscale gold is not trivial, because of numerous metastable states in these systems. Unlike elsewhere, this work obtains equilibrium structures using annealing simulations within the recently introduced PM7-MD method. Geometries of the ultrasmall gold nanostructures with chalcogen coverage are described at finite temperature, for the first time.

  3. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h. PMID:24359519

  4. Biomedical applications of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cabuzu, Daniela; Cirja, Andreea; Puiu, Rebecca; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles may be used in different domains, one of most important being the biomedical field. They have suitable properties for controlled drug delivery, cancer treatment, biomedical imaging, diagnosis and many others, due to their excellent compatibility with the human organism, low toxicity and tunable stability, small dimensions, and possibility to interact with a variety of substances. They also have optical properties, being able to absorb infrared light. Moreover, due to their large surface and the ability of being coated with a variety of therapeutic agents, gold nanoparticles have been showed a great potential to be used as drug delivery systems. Gold nanoparticles are intensively studied in biomedicine, and recent studies revealed the fact that they can cross the blood-brain barrier, may interact with the DNA and produce genotoxic effects. Because of their ability of producing heat, they can target and kill the tumors, being used very often in photodynamic therapy. Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized in many ways, but the most common are the biological and chemical methods, however the chemical method offers the advantage of better controlling the size and shape of the nanoparticles. In this review, we present the principal applications of gold nanoparticles in the biomedical field, like cancer treatment, amyloid-like fibrillogenesis inhibitors, transplacental treatment, the development of specific scaffolds and drug delivery systems. PMID:25877087

  5. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  6. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  7. Recent Developments in Australian Gold Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Rodney B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new technologies that have greatly improved the extraction efficiency of gold ore, including: altering plant layout to promote efficiency, engaging Filiblast forced oxidation and bioxidation systems, and updating the electrowinning procedure at the gold recovery stage. (JRH)

  8. Economic geology: Gold buried by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Copard, Yoann

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa contains extraordinary amounts of gold. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the gold may have accumulated there in response to a perfect storm of conditions available only during the Archaean.

  9. Colloidal gold nanorods: from reduction to growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungweon; El-Sayed, Mostafa; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2005-03-01

    Formation of gold nanorods(NRs) in controlled reduction condition was investigated. Gold NRs were synthesized by seed mediated method where pre-made gold nanospheres were added to a growth solution containing surfactants, reducing agent and compound of gold ion and surfactant. Reduction mechanism was manipulated by changing catalytic activity of seed. Seed of different size and capping agent coverage led to different dispersity of NRs since seed plays a role as catalyst as well as nucleation site. The difference between the redox potentials of gold species and reducing agent(δE) was controlled by the strength of reducing agent and the stability of the gold compound. As δE leading to changing the morphology of resulting gold NRs. The surface of gold NRs with a series of aspect ratio was functionalized by thiolated beta cyclodextrin which binds preferentially to the end of NRs and promotes the orientation of rod-rod pair even without host-guest interaction.

  10. Ultrastable and Biofunctionalizable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akash; Moyano, Daniel F; Parnsubsakul, Attasith; Papadopoulos, Alexander; Wang, Li-Sheng; Landis, Ryan F; Das, Riddha; Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for biological and material applications due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, decreased colloidal stability and formation of irreversible aggregates while freeze-drying nanomaterials limit their use in real world applications. Here, we report a new generation of surface ligands based on a combination of short oligo (ethylene glycol) chains and zwitterions capable of providing nonfouling characteristics while maintaining colloidal stability and functionalization capabilities. Additionally, conjugation of these gold nanoparticles with avidin can help the development of a universal toolkit for further functionalization of nanomaterials. PMID:27191946

  11. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in general. 100.4 Section 100.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general....

  12. Characterizing the textural features of gold ores for optimizing gold extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausen, Donald M.

    2000-04-01

    The beneficiation of gold ores begins with an examination and classification of the types of gold occurrences and recovery methods. Measurements can provide the necessary grind size for liberation and determine the sizes and associations of gold with gangue materials. In this article, the textural features several gold occurrences are described and compared.

  13. Formation, structure, and orientation of gold silicide on gold surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. K.; Bauer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of gold silicide on Au films evaporated onto Si(111) surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Surface condition, film thickness, deposition temperature, annealing temperature, and heating rate during annealing are varied. Several oriented crystalline silicide layers are observed.

  14. Substituting gold for silver improves electrical connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, J. R.; Pickard, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    In attaching external leads to thin film sensors of platinum ribbon, liquid gold is applied to each end of the ribbon and the leads are soldered to the cured gold. The cured and soldered liquid gold shows no tendency to migrate and retains initial resistance characteristics when exposed to elevated temperatures.

  15. Simulation with models of increasing complexity of CO2 emissions and nitrogen mineralisation, after soil application of labelled pig slurry and maize stalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechini, Luca; Marino Gallina, Pietro; Geromel, Gabriele; Corti, Martina; Cavalli, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    High amounts of nitrogen are available per unit area in regions with intensive livestock operations. In swine farms, pig slurries are frequently incorporated in the soil together with maize stalks. Simulation models may help to understand nitrogen dynamics associated with animal manure and crop residue decomposition in the soil, and to support the definition of best management practices. The objective of this work was to test the ability of different models to simulate CO2 emissions and nitrogen mineralisation during a laboratory incubation (under optimal soil water content and constant temperature) of maize stalks (ST) and pig slurry (PS). A loam soil was amended with labelled (15N) or unlabelled maize stalks and pig slurries, in the presence of ammonium sulphate (AS). These treatments were established: unfertilised soil; ST15 + AS + PS; ST + AS15 + PS; and ST + AS + PS15. During 180 days, we measured CO2 emissions; microbial biomass C, N, and 15N; and soil mineral N (SMN and SM-15N). Three models of increasing complexity were calibrated using measured data. The models were two modifications of ICBM 2B/N (Kätterer and Andrén, 2001) and CN-SIM (Petersen et al., 2005). The three models simulated rather accurately the emissions of CO2 throughout the incubation period (Relative Root Mean Squared Error, RRMSE = 8-25). The simplest model (with one pool for ST and one for PS) strongly overestimated SMN immobilisation from day 3 to day 21, both in the treatments with AS15 and PS15 (RRMSE = 27-30%). The other two models represented rather well the dynamics of SMN in the soil (RRMSE = 21-25%), simulating a fast increase of nitrate concentration in the first days, and slower rates of nitrification thereafter. Worse performances were obtained with all models for the simulation of SM-15N in the treatment with ST15 (RRMSE = 64-104%): experimental data showed positive mineralization of stalk-derived N from the beginning of the incubation, while models strongly underestimated

  16. Geology and geochemistry of high-grade, volcanic rock-hosted, mercury mineralisation in the Nuevo Entredicho deposit, Almadén district, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jébrak, Michel; Higueras, Pablo L.; Marcoux, Éric; Lorenzo, Saturnino

    2002-06-01

    The Nuevo Entredicho deposit contains the richest concentration of mercury in the Almadén district, locally grading as much as 45% Hg. This ore deposit is hosted within an alkaline, conically shaped diatreme, about 150 m in diameter, which was subsequently filled with phreatomagmatic breccias. The diatreme cuts an Ordovician to Silurian clastic sedimentary rock sequence that is intercalated with basaltic sills. Structural analysis reveals a complex tectonic history with three main phases of Hercynian deformation. Mineralisation occurs as cinnabar replacements in volcanic tuffs and breccias and as recrystallised veins in tensions cracks associated with pyrophyllite and hydrothermal pyrite, which is strongly enriched in Cu, Pb and Hg. Lead isotopes in pyrite are characterised by high 207Pb/204Pb ratios (15.70-15.75), suggesting a contribution of ancient upper continental crust remobilised by Silurian-Devonian volcanism, with no mantle involvement. Sulphur isotopes of epigenetic cinnabar and pyrite range from +10.3 to +10.8‰ and from +10.6 to +11.9‰ respectively, suggesting a uniform sulphur source or a constant mixing ratio in the ore fluids. These isotopic compositions differ from those measured in the syngenetic deposits of the Almadén district; they suggest a higher temperature of ore formation of about 300 °C, and a genesis related to a distinct hydrothermal flow path at the Nuevo Entredicho deposit. Deposition of anomalously high-grade mercury ore at Nuevo Entredicho is related to a combination of (1) an abundance of black shale that provided sulphur and increasingly reducing conditions with high sulphide/sulphate ratios, (2) explosive Silurian-Devonian mafic magmatism that provided an initial source of mercury, (3) tectonic activity that lead to structurally favourable sites for ore deposition, and (4) replacement of secondary, carbonate-rich volcanic rocks.

  17. Metasomatic silicate chemistry at the Bayan Obo Fe REE Nb deposit, Inner Mongolia, China: Contrasting chemistry and evolution of fenitising and mineralising fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Fenite aureoles around carbonatite dykes, and alteration associated with Fe-REE-Nb ore bodies at Bayan Obo, Inner Mongolia, China, show alkali silicate assemblages containing aegirine-augite, (magnesio-)riebeckite, (magnesio-)arfvedsonite, and phlogopite, accompanied by varying amounts of apatite, albite and quartz. In both fenites and orebodies simple thermodynamic constraints indicate mineral parageneses are consistent with rock buffered cooling accompanied by the infiltration of a range of externally buffered hydrothermal fluids. Statistical analysis of amphibole chemistry indicates that even in apparently texturally well constrained paragenetic stages wide variations in chemistry occur in both the ore bodies and fenites. Much of this variation is attributable to the Mg and F content of amphibole, and is therefore interpreted as a result of variation in externally controlled variables ( P, T, initial fluid composition) rather than internally controlled variables such as protolith composition. Similarities in chemistry exist between fenite and some ore body amphiboles. Thermodynamic analysis of the composition of biotite and apatite allows constraints to be placed on the F-content of hydrothermal fluids, and indicates relatively consistent compositions in fenites and orebodies (log aHF/ aH 2O = - 3.8 to - 3.6 at 300 °C and 1 kbar). Amphibole and biotite associated with niobate mineralization are both enriched in fluorine relative to the rest of the paragenesis, and biotite compositions indicate significantly higher HF activities in the hydrothermal fluid (log aHF/ aH 2O = - 2.6 at 300 °C and 1 kbar). The data presented here reinforce previous interpretations of the complex, multistage nature of mineralisation at Bayan Obo, but are still consistent with a direct involvement of carbonatite derived fluids during ore genesis.

  18. Gold, Silver and Bronze Citations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents the gold, silver, and bronze winners of a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client, total area, total…

  19. Gold color in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cameron, T

    1997-01-01

    This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed. PMID:9524484

  20. Shape Stability of Gold Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Steve; Bertone, Jane; Cizeron, Joel; Wahi, Raj; Colvin, Vicki

    2000-03-01

    Photoreduction of gold salts in inverse micelles can lead to the formation of colloidal gold. A wide variety of well-defined and facetted shapes are seen in the product; though these nanocrystals are highly crystalline, high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal the presence of specific crystalline defects, primarily twin planes. These defects are correlated to the nanocrystals shape, and lead us to postulate a shape control mechanism dependent on the presence of crystalline defects. Among the observed shapes from this reaction are anisotropic nanocrystals with aspect ratios ranging from 5 to 10. The rod percentage can be maximized by controlling the water to surfactant ratio in the solution, and is only observed when the reduction process is photoinitiated. Rod growth can be activated, allowing for the formation of gold nanoneedles with aspect ratios exceeding 30. The smallest dimensions of these nanocrystals are 10 nm, which is large enough that melting point depressions because of finite size are expected to be minimal. Nevertheless, anisotropic particles anneal to more symmetric shapes at temperatures of only 600 to 700 C. Electron microscopy studies of these shape changing processes at high temperatures indicate that the nanocrystals anneal quite suddenly, with rapid movements of many gold atoms.

  1. Detrital zircon without detritus: a result of 496-Ma-old fluid-rock interaction during the gold-lode formation of Passagem, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Zeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Zircon and xenotime occur in tourmaline-rich hydrothermal pockets in the auriferous lode of Passagem de Mariana, a world-class gold deposit. Zircon grains show pristine oscillatory zoning, but many of them are altered, exhibiting porous domains filled with graphite. Uranium-Pb dating of zircon, using in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, yields ages between 3.2 and 2.65 Ga, which match those for detrital zircon of the footwall quartzite of the > 2.65-Ga-old Moeda Formation. Discordant analyses point to zircon-age resetting during the Brasiliano orogeny at ca. 500 Ma. This interpretation is supported by U-Pb dating of euhedral xenotime immediately adjacent to altered zircon within the same tourmaline pocket. The xenotime grains give a Concordia age of 496.3 ± 2.0 Ma, which is identical to that determined for monazite of a quartz-hematite vein-type deposit (i.e., jacutinga lode) in the region (Itabira), another important mineralisation style of gold. The occurrence of relatively abundant inherited detrital zircon, but absence of rock fragments in the tourmaline pocket investigated here, implies that detrital material was completely replaced by tourmaline. The graphite overprint on the altered detrital zircon attests to a reducing fluid, which was likely formed by fluid-rock interaction with carbonaceous phyllite of the Batatal Formation, the host rock of the Passagem lode.

  2. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    PubMed

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed. PMID:25423733

  3. Bimodal porous gold opals for molecular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Yu, Hyunung; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Myung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Seung; Robinson, David B.

    2013-11-01

    We have fabricated bimodal porous gold skeletons by double-templating routes using poly(styrene) colloidal opals as templates. The fabricated gold skeletons show a bimodal pore-size distribution, with small pores within spheres and large pores between spheres. The templated bimodal porous gold skeletons were applied in Raman scattering experiments to study sensing efficiency for probe molecules. We found that the bimodal porous gold skeletons showed obvious enhancement of Raman scattering signals versus that of the unimodal porous gold which only has interstitial pores of several hundred nanometers.

  4. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  5. Heteroepitaxial gold (111) rings on mica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.W.; Chen, N.F.; Yan, F.; Goedel, Werner A.

    2005-05-16

    Two-dimensionally arranged gold rings were prepared by depositing a polymeric membrane bearing a dense array of uniform pores onto a mica substrate, filling the pores with a solution of a gold precursor, evaporation of the solvent and calcinations. The epitaxy of gold rings is confirmed by x-ray diffraction measurements, and the epitaxial relationship between gold rings and the mica was found to be Au(111)[1-10] parallel mica(001)[010]. The polar and azimuthal angular spreads are 0.3 deg. and 1 deg., respectively, which is at least equal to or better than the quality of the corresponding epitaxial gold-film on mica.

  6. Arsenic microdistribution and speciation in toenail clippings of children living in a historic gold mining area.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Dora C; Dowling, Kim; Gerson, Andrea R; Sim, Malcolm R; Sutton, Stephen R; Newville, Matthew; Russell, Robert; McOrist, Gordon

    2010-05-15

    Arsenic is naturally associated with gold mineralisation and elevated in some soils and mine waste around historical gold mining activity in Victoria, Australia. To explore uptake, arsenic concentrations in children's toenail clippings and household soils were measured, and the microdistribution and speciation of arsenic in situ in toenail clipping thin sections investigated using synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques. The ability to differentiate exogenous arsenic was explored by investigating surface contamination on cleaned clippings using depth profiling, and direct diffusion of arsenic into incubated clippings. Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.15 to 2.1 microg/g (n=29) in clipping samples and from 3.3 to 130 microg/g (n=22) in household soils, with significant correlation between transformed arsenic concentrations (Pearson's r=0.42, P=0.023) when household soil was treated as independent. In clipping thin sections (n=2), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping showed discrete layering of arsenic consistent with nail structure, and irregular arsenic incorporation along the nail growth axis. Arsenic concentrations were heterogeneous at 10x10 microm microprobe spot locations investigated (<0.1 to 13.3 microg/g). X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra suggested the presence of two distinct arsenic species: a lower oxidation state species, possibly with mixed sulphur and methyl coordination (denoted As(approximately III)(-S, -CH3)); and a higher oxidation state species (denoted As(approximately V)(-O)). Depth profiling suggested that surface contamination was unlikely (n=4), and XRF and XANES analyses of thin sections of clippings incubated in dry or wet mine waste, or untreated, suggested direct diffusion of arsenic occurred under moist conditions. These findings suggest that arsenic in soil contributes to some systemic absorption associated with periodic exposures among children resident in areas of historic gold mining activity in

  7. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  8. Pegylation increases platelet biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Rahme, Kamil; Corbalan, J Jose; Faulkner, Colm; Holmes, Justin D; Tajber, Lidia; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2014-06-01

    The increasing use of gold nanoparticles in medical diagnosis and treatment has raised the concern over their blood compatibility. The interactions of nanoparticles with blood components may lead to platelet aggregation and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, medical applications of gold nanoparticles call for increased nanoparticle stability and biocompatibility. Functionalisation of nanoparticles with polythelene glycol (PEGylation) is known to modulate cell-particle interactions. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of PEGylated-gold nanoparticles on human platelet function and endothelial cells in vitro. Gold nanoparticles, 15 nm in diameter, were synthesised in water using sodium citrate as a reducing and stabilising agent. Functionalised polyethylene glycol-based thiol polymers were used to coat and stabilise pre-synthesised gold nanoparticles. The interaction of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with human platelets was measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. Platelet-nanoparticles interaction was imaged using phase-contrast, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The inflammatory effects of gold nanoparticles-citrate and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles in endothelial cells were measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. PEGylated-gold nanoparticles were stable under physiological conditions and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-5400 and PEGylated-gold nanoparticles-10800 did not affect platelet aggregation as measured by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation. In addition, PEGylated-gold nanoparticles did not induce an inflammatory response when incubated with endothelial cells. Therefore, this study shows that PEGylated-gold nanoparticles with a higher molecular weight of the polymer chain are both platelet- and endothelium-compatible making them attractive candidates for biomedical applications. PMID:24749395

  9. Metal release from gold-containing jewelry materials: no gold release detected.

    PubMed

    Lidén, C; Nordenadler, M; Skare, L

    1998-12-01

    Metal release from 13 different gold-containing jewelry alloys stored for 1 and 3 weeks in artificial sweat was analysed. For chemical analysis, inductively-coupled plasma detection (ICP) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AA), with flame and with furnace, were used. No release of gold was detected. It is unlikely that skin contact with gold-containing metallic items such as jewelry is responsible for inducing contact allergy to gold or allergic contact dermatitis due to the gold. The patch-test reactivity to gold sodium thiosulfate needs to be explained by some other mechanism(s). PMID:9874018

  10. Gold nanoparticles and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge Alberto; González-Ortega, Omar; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccines constitute an advantageous immunization approach to achieve broad immunization against widespread diseases; however, improvements in this field are still required to expand their exploitation. As gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and can be easily functionalized with antigens, they have been proposed as carriers for the delivery of vaccines. The study of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in vaccinology has been of interest for a number of research groups in recent years and important advances have been made. This review provides a summary of the AuNPs synthesis methodologies and an updated overview of the current AuNPs-based vaccines under development. The implications of these advances for the development of new mucosal vaccines as well as future prospects for the field are discussed. PMID:26152550