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Sample records for messenger rna interferase

  1. Crystallization of the Staphylococcus aureus MazF mRNA interferase

    PubMed Central

    Zorzini, Valentina; Haesaerts, Sarah; Donegan, Niles P.; Fu, Zhibiao; Cheung, Ambrose L.; van Nuland, Nico A. J.; Loris, Remy

    2011-01-01

    mazEF modules encode toxin–antitoxin pairs that are involved in the bacterial stress response through controlled and specific degradation of mRNA. Staphylococcus aureus MazF and MazE constitute a unique toxin–antitoxin module under regulation of the sigB operon. A MazF-type mRNA interferase is combined with an antitoxin of unknown fold. Crystals of S. aureus MazF (SaMazF) were grown in space group P212121. The crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and are likely to contain two SaMazF dimers in the asymmetric unit. PMID:21393849

  2. Canine procalcitonin messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kuzi, Sharon; Aroch, Itamar; Peleg, Keren; Karnieli, Ohad; Klement, Eyal; Dank, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Procalcitonin is considered an acute phase protein used as both a marker of infection and prognosis in human medicine. Canine procalcitonin has been previously sequenced; however, its use as a diagnostic or prognostic tool in dogs has never been assessed. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for canine procalcitonin messenger RNA (mRNA) was developed. Whole blood samples were collected from ill and healthy dogs. RNA was extracted and the real-time PCR was assessed. The patients' diagnoses, complete blood cell count, and differential leukocyte count results were recorded. Based on the diagnosis, dogs were divided into 5 groups: inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, other diseases, and healthy controls. Procalcitonin mRNA expression and the hematological measures were compared between groups, and their correlations were assessed. Procalcitonin mRNA expression was assessed in 70 dogs, including infectious (17), noninfectious inflammatory (17), neoplastic (18), other diseases (7), and healthy controls (11), and was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in all ill dogs versus controls. Procalcitonin may therefore be considered an acutephase protein in dogs. However, there were no significant differences in procalcitonin mRNA expression between ill dog groups and no correlations between its expression levels and hematological measures. In 5 dogs of all disease categories, procalcitonin mRNA expression was measured twice during the course of disease. The changes in its levels were in agreement with the clinical evaluation of improvement or deterioration, suggesting a possible prognostic value. PMID:18776098

  3. Messenger RNA modifications: Form, distribution, and function.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Wendy V; Bell, Tristan A; Schaening, Cassandra

    2016-06-17

    RNA contains more than 100 distinct modifications that promote the functions of stable noncoding RNAs in translation and splicing. Recent technical advances have revealed widespread and sparse modification of messenger RNAs with N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C), and pseudouridine (Ψ). Here we discuss the rapidly evolving understanding of the location, regulation, and function of these dynamic mRNA marks, collectively termed the epitranscriptome. We highlight differences among modifications and between species that could instruct ongoing efforts to understand how specific mRNA target sites are selected and how their modification is regulated. Diverse molecular consequences of individual m(6)A modifications are beginning to be revealed, but the effects of m(5)C and Ψ remain largely unknown. Future work linking molecular effects to organismal phenotypes will broaden our understanding of mRNA modifications as cell and developmental regulators. PMID:27313037

  4. RNA-Seq: revelation of the messengers.

    PubMed

    Van Verk, Marcel C; Hickman, Richard; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2013-04-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) is rapidly outcompeting microarrays as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, the bioinformatics skills required for RNA-Seq data analysis often pose a significant hurdle for many biologists. Here, we put forward the concepts and considerations that are critical for RNA-Seq data analysis and provide a generic tutorial with example data that outlines the whole pipeline from next-generation sequencing output to quantification of differential gene expression. PMID:23481128

  5. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  6. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-07-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation.

  7. Localization of angiotensinogen messenger RNA in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Cassis, L A; Lynch, K R; Peach, M J

    1988-06-01

    The distribution of angiotensinogen messenger (mRNA) was determined in the rat aorta. Other investigators have demonstrated the presence of angiotensinogen mRNA in whole rat aorta; however, its precise location in the blood vessel wall has not been defined. When various layers of the vessel wall were separated by dissection or cell dispersion, angiotensinogen mRNA levels were greatest in the periaortic adipose tissue. Angiotensinogen mRNA was present in very small levels in the adventitia, with no detectable levels in the muscle layer. In addition to periaortic adipose tissue, angiotensinogen mRNA was also present in the interscapular brown fat pad of the rat. The high levels of angiotensinogen mRNA in periaortic brown adipose tissue suggests that angiotensin may be synthesized there and responses may exist in this tissue or adjacent sympathetic nerve terminals. PMID:3383369

  8. The dynamic N1-methyladenosine methylome in eukaryotic messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dominissini, Dan; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Peer, Eyal; Kol, Nitzan; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Dai, Qing; Di Segni, Ayelet; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Clark, Wesley C.; Zheng, Guanqun; Pan, Tao; Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Hershkovitz, Vera; Han, Dali; Doré, Louis C.; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated post-transcriptionally through dynamic and reversible RNA modifications. A recent noteworthy example is N6-methyladenosine (m6A), which affects messenger RNA (mRNA) localization, stability, translation and splicing. Here we report on a new mRNA modification, N1-methyladenosine (m1A), that occurs on thousands of different gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, at an estimated average transcript stoichiometry of 20% in humans. Employing newly developed sequencing approaches, we show that m1A is enriched around the start codon upstream of the first splice site: it preferentially decorates more structured regions around canonical and alternative translation initiation sites, is dynamic in response to physiological conditions, and correlates positively with protein production. These unique features are highly conserved in mouse and human cells, strongly indicating a functional role for m1A in promoting translation of methylated mRNA. PMID:26863196

  9. Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Zhang, Gong; Nagar, Apoorva; Ignatova, Zoya; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    A simple measure for the efficiency of protein synthesis by ribosomes is provided by the steady state amount of protein per messenger RNA (mRNA), the so-called translational ratio, which is proportional to the translation rate. Taking the degradation of mRNA into account, we show theoretically that both the translation rate and the translational ratio decrease with increasing mRNA length, in agreement with available experimental data for the prokaryote Escherichia coli. We also show that, compared to prokaryotes, mRNA degradation in eukaryotes leads to a less rapid decrease of the translational ratio. This finding is consistent with the fact that, compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes tend to have longer proteins.

  10. The dynamic N(1)-methyladenosine methylome in eukaryotic messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Dominissini, Dan; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Peer, Eyal; Kol, Nitzan; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Dai, Qing; Di Segni, Ayelet; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Clark, Wesley C; Zheng, Guanqun; Pan, Tao; Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Hershkovitz, Vera; Han, Dali; Doré, Louis C; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; He, Chuan

    2016-02-25

    Gene expression can be regulated post-transcriptionally through dynamic and reversible RNA modifications. A recent noteworthy example is N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), which affects messenger RNA (mRNA) localization, stability, translation and splicing. Here we report on a new mRNA modification, N(1)-methyladenosine (m(1)A), that occurs on thousands of different gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, at an estimated average transcript stoichiometry of 20% in humans. Employing newly developed sequencing approaches, we show that m(1)A is enriched around the start codon upstream of the first splice site: it preferentially decorates more structured regions around canonical and alternative translation initiation sites, is dynamic in response to physiological conditions, and correlates positively with protein production. These unique features are highly conserved in mouse and human cells, strongly indicating a functional role for m(1)A in promoting translation of methylated mRNA. PMID:26863196

  11. Translation of globin messenger RNA by the mouse ovum

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, R. L.; Chen, H. Y.; Trumbauer, M. E.; Avarbock, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Xenopus oocyte can translate rabbit haemoglobin messenger RNA (mRNA) following microinjection of the message into the cell1. The Xenopus oocyte has since been shown to be capable of translating a variety of messenger RNAs from different species2–4. This system has proved useful in understanding the mechanism of message translation and has also provided information about the translation capability of the Xenopus oocyte5,6. Several other cell types, including HeLa cells and fibroblasts, can also translate exogenous message injected into the cell7,8. However, there have been no reports of injection of mRNA into oocytes or fertilised one-cell ova of mammalian species. Nevertheless, the latter system could be of considerable use in studying the processing of exogenous messages in a mammalian system undergoing development, as well as providing insight into the way the early embryo processes injected messages and the protein products of such messages. We report here the results of injecting message into the fertilised one-cell mouse ovum and show that both mouse and rabbit globin mRNA are translated in this system. PMID:7352032

  12. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  13. Multifunctional triblock copolymers for intracellular messenger RNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C.; Convertine, A.J.; Stayton, P.S.; Bryers, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a promising alternative to plasmid DNA (pDNA) for gene vaccination applications, but safe and effective delivery systems are rare. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to synthesize a series of triblock copolymers designed to enhance the intracellular delivery of mRNA. These materials are composed of a cationic dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) segment to mediate mRNA condensation, a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) segment to enhance stability and biocompatibility, and a pH-responsive endosomolytic copolymer of diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) designed to facilitate cytosolic entry. The blocking order and PEGMA segment length were systematically varied to investigate the effect of different polymer architectures on mRNA delivery efficacy. These polymers were monodisperse, exhibited pH-dependent hemolytic activity, and condensed mRNA into 86–216 nm particles. mRNA polyplexes formed from polymers with the PEGMA segment in the center of the polymer chain displayed the greatest stability to heparin displacement and were associated with the highest transfection efficiencies in two immune cell lines, RAW 264.7 macrophages (77%) and DC2.4 dendritic cells (50%). Transfected DC2.4 cells were shown to be capable of subsequently activating antigen-specific T cells, demonstrating the potential of these multifunctional triblock copolymers for mRNA-based vaccination strategies. PMID:22784603

  14. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  15. Kinetic oscillations in the expression of messenger RNA, regulatory protein, and nonprotein coding RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-06-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-mRNA association or (ii) ncRNA-protein association resulting in degradation of the corresponding complex. The kinetic models, describing these two scenarios and taking into account that the association of ncRNA with a target occurs after ncRNA conversion from the initial form to the final form (e.g., from a long RNA to microRNA), are found to predict oscillations provided that the rate of ncRNA formation increases with increasing protein population.

  16. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  17. Cotranslational microRNA mediated messenger RNA destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Tat, Trinh To; Maroney, Patricia A; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Coller, Jeff; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (22 nucleotide) regulatory molecules that play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes. These RNAs, which bind to targeted mRNAs via limited base pairing interactions, act to reduce protein production from those mRNAs. Considerable evidence indicates that miRNAs destabilize targeted mRNAs by recruiting enzymes that function in normal mRNA decay and mRNA degradation is widely thought to occur when mRNAs are in a ribosome free state. Nevertheless, when examined, miRNA targeted mRNAs are invariably found to be polysome associated; observations that appear to be at face value incompatible with a simple decay model. Here, we provide evidence that turnover of miRNA-targeted mRNAs occurs while they are being translated. Cotranslational mRNA degradation is initiated by decapping and proceeds 5’ to 3’ behind the last translating ribosome. These results provide an explanation for a long standing mystery in the miRNA field. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12880.001 PMID:27058298

  18. A discontinuous hammerhead ribozyme embedded in a mammalian messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Structured RNAs embedded in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs can regulate gene expression. In bacteria, control of a metabolite gene is mediated by the self-cleaving activity of a ribozyme embedded in its 5′ UTR1. This discovery has raised the question of whether gene-regulating ribozymes also exist in eukaryotic mRNAs. Here we show that highly active hammerhead ribozymes2,3 are present in the 3′ UTRs of rodent C-type lectin type II (Clec2) genes4–7. Using a hammerhead RNA motif search with relaxed delimitation of the non-conserved regions, we detected ribozyme sequences in which the invariant regions, in contrast to the previously identified continuous hammerheads8–10, occur as two fragments separated by hundreds of nucleotides. Notably, a fragment pair can assemble to form an active hammerhead ribozyme structure between the translation termination and the poly-adenylation signals within the 3′ UTR. We demonstrate that this hammerhead structure can self-cleave both in vitro and in vivo, and is able to reduce protein expression in mouse cells. These results indicate that an unrecognized mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation involving association of discontinuous ribozyme sequences within an mRNA may be modulating the expression of several CLEC2 proteins that function in bone remodelling and the immune response of several mammals. PMID:18615019

  19. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  20. MicroRNA and messenger RNA profiling reveals new biomarkers and mechanisms for RDX induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RDX is a well-known pollutant to induce neurotoxicity. MicroRNAs (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles are useful tools for toxicogenomics studies. It is worthy to integrate MiRNA and mRNA expression data to understand RDX-induced neurotoxicity. Results Rats were treated with or without RDX for 48 h. Both miRNA and mRNA profiles were conducted using brain tissues. Nine miRNAs were significantly regulated by RDX. Of these, 6 and 3 miRNAs were up- and down-regulated respectively. The putative target genes of RDX-regulated miRNAs were highly nervous system function genes and pathways enriched. Fifteen differentially genes altered by RDX from mRNA profiles were the putative targets of regulated miRNAs. The induction of miR-71, miR-27ab, miR-98, and miR-135a expression by RDX, could reduce the expression of the genes POLE4, C5ORF13, SULF1 and ROCK2, and eventually induce neurotoxicity. Over-expression of miR-27ab, or reduction of the expression of unknown miRNAs by RDX, could up-regulate HMGCR expression and contribute to neurotoxicity. RDX regulated immune and inflammation response miRNAs and genes could contribute to RDX- induced neurotoxicity and other toxicities as well as animal defending reaction response to RDX exposure. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that integrating miRNA and mRNA profiles is valuable to indentify novel biomarkers and molecular mechanisms for RDX-induced neurological disorder and neurotoxicity. PMID:25559034

  1. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  2. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-01

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26751491

  3. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  4. Decreased Globin Messenger RNA in Thalassemia Detected by Molecular Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kacian, D. L.; Gambino, R.; Dow, L. W.; Grossbard, E.; Natta, C.; Ramirez, F.; Spiegelman, S.; Marks, P. A.; Bank, A.

    1973-01-01

    In previous studies of patients with β thalassemia, mRNA extracted from reticulocytes in peripheral blood when added to cell-free systems reproduces the deficient β-chain synthesis characteristic of intact cells. The present studies with specific probes for α and β mRNA were designed to decide whether the decreased β mRNA activity is due to the presence of abnormal or reduced β globin mRNA in these cells. Purified α and β complementary DNAs (cDNAs) have been synthesized with RNA-instructed DNA polymerase; α and β mRNAs isolated from heavy (β-producing) and light (α-producing) polyribosomes of rabbit reticulocytes were used as templates. Each of the cDNAs is more than 80% pure by the criterion of biological activity. The α cDNA labeled with [32P]dCTP and the β cDNA labeled with [3H]dCTP have been added simultaneously to reaction mixtures containing various concentrations of mRNA from thalassemic and nonthalassemic subjects. The extent and rate of hybridization were determined, permitting a comparison of relative α and β mRNA content in the same annealing mixture. In six nonthalassemic patients, relatively equal amounts of hybridizable α and β mRNA appear to be present. In five of seven patients with β-thalassemia, significantly decreased amounts of β mRNA compared to α mRNA can be demonstrated. In two patients with Hemoglobin H disease, there is a decreased amount of α mRNA compared to β mRNA. PMID:4124307

  5. Self-complementarity of messenger RNA's of periodic proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ycas, M.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the mRNA's of three periodic proteins, collagen, keratin and freezing point depressing glycoproteins show a marked degree of self-complementarity. The possible origin of this self-complementarity is discussed.

  6. The synthesis and stability of cytoplasmic messenger RNA during myoblast differentiation in culture.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, M E; Caput, D; Cohen, A; Whalen, R G; Gros, F

    1974-04-01

    The synthesis of poly(A)-containing cytoplasmic RNA was examined in primary myoblast cultures prepared from skeletal muscle of fetal calves. After a period of cell division, these cells undergo fusion, with concomitant appearance of acetylcholine receptor and subsequent myosin synthesis. In the dividing myoblast there is a high level of messenger RNA synthesis, including a 26S RNA, the size of a putative messenger for the large subunit of myosin. In the transition period prior to fusion, there are quantitative changes in RNA synthesis. At this time, there is a pronounced production of 26S RNA, which diminishes during fusion. The possibility that 26S RNA is accumulated in the dividing myoblast was investigated by chase experiments. At fusion, there is a marked increase in the half-lives of a number of messenger RNA species, including 26 S, which increases from about 10 hr in the dividing cell to a value of more than 50 hr. The identity of the more rapidly turning over 26 S in the myoblasts, compared to that of the 26 S at fusion, was examined in terms of polysomal distribution, migration on gels, and hybridization with complementary DNA for the myosin message. The results of these analyses suggest that the 26S species are identical. Thus, it would appear that in a predetermined cell like the myoblast, the transition to the differentiated state of myotube that is synthesizing muscle specific proteins is effected by the stabilization of messenger already being actively transcribed: terminal differentiation, with respect to myosin synthesis, is preceded by the stabilization of 26S RNA. PMID:4524649

  7. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  8. Distribution of angiotensin type-1 receptor messenger RNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, Z; Palkovits, M; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1998-02-01

    Angiotensin II and angiotensin III in the brain exert their various effects by acting on two pharmacologically well-defined receptors, the type-1 (AT1) and the type-2 (AT2) receptors. Receptor binding autoradiography has revealed the dominant presence of AT1 in brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular, body fluid and neuroendocrine control. The cloning of the AT1 complementary DNA has revealed the existence of two receptor subtypes in rodents, AT1A and AT1B. Using specific riboprobes for in situ hybridization, we have previously shown that the AT1A messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in the rat forebrain; in contrast the AT1B subtype predominates in the anterior pituitary. Using a similar technical approach, the aim of the present study was to establish the precise anatomical localization of cells synthetising the AT1A receptor in the adult rat brain. High AT1A messenger RNA expression was found in the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, the subfornical organ, the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus, the parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the area postrema, in agreement with previous autoradiographic studies, describing a high density of AT1 binding sites in these nuclei. In addition, AT1A messenger RNA expression was detected in several brain areas, where no AT1 binding was reported previously. Thus, we identify strong expression of AT1A messenger RNA expression in scattered cells of the lateral parts of the preoptic region, the lateral hypothalamus and several brainstem nuclei. In none of these structures was the AT1B messenger RNA detectable at the microscopic level. In conclusion, it is suggested that angiotensins may exert their central effects on body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis mainly via the AT1A receptor subtype. PMID:9483539

  9. Expression of neurotensin messenger RNA in a human carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a distal gut peptide, has important regulatory and trophic effects throughout the gut; however the intracellular mechanisms that regulate the gene expression and release of human NT are not known. The purpose of this endeavor was to study a functioning human pancreatic carcinoid cell line (called BON) in vitro that expresses the NT gene, and to study the effect of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal-transduction pathway on the expression and release of human NT. RNA was prepared from BON cell line (which has been established in this laboratory); the RNA was analyzed for NT mRNA expression by Northern hybridization with a complementary DNA probe. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that the NT gene is expressed in BON and is transcribed to two mRNAs of 1.0- and 1.5-kb sizes. In the second part of this study, BON cells were treated with either forskolin (FSK), which increases intracellular levels of cAMP, or with serotonin (5-HT), which reduces cAMP in BON cells. Forskolin produced a dose-dependent increase in NT peptide release and, furthermore, FSK (10(-6) mol/L) rapidly increased NT mRNA abundance 1 hour after addition; conversely, 5-HT (10(-5) mol/L) decreased NT mRNA at 1 hour. Neurotensin mRNA levels returned to control values by 3 hours after either FSK or 5-HT, which suggests that the transcript half-life for NT is relatively short. These findings show that the expression and peptide release of human NT is mediated, in part, by the cAMP signal-transduction pathway. Our human carcinoid cell line will provide a useful model to study the in vitro regulation of NT gene expression and peptide release. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1659338

  10. Messenger RNA exchange between scions and rootstocks in grafted grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrated the existence of genome-scale mRNA exchange in grafted grapevines, a woody fruit species with significant economic importance. By using diagnostic SNPs derived from high throughput genome sequencing, we identified more than three thousand genes transporting mRNAs across graft junctio...

  11. Labelling and imaging of single endogenous messenger RNA particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    RNA molecules carry out widely diverse functions in numerous different physiological processes in living cells. The RNA life cycle from transcription, through the processing of nascent RNA, to the regulatory function of non-coding RNA and cytoplasmic translation of messenger RNA has been studied extensively using biochemical and molecular biology techniques. In this Commentary, we highlight how single molecule imaging and particle tracking can yield further insight into the dynamics of RNA particles in living cells. In the past few years, a variety of bright and photo-stable labelling techniques have been developed to generate sufficient contrast for imaging of single endogenous RNAs in vivo. New imaging modalities allow determination of not only lateral but also axial positions with high precision within the cellular context, and across a wide range of specimen from yeast and bacteria to cultured cells, and even multicellular organisms or live animals. A whole range of methods to locate and track single particles, and to analyze trajectory data are available to yield detailed information about the kinetics of all parts of the RNA life cycle. Although the concepts presented are applicable to all types of RNA, we showcase here the wealth of information gained from in vivo imaging of single particles by discussing studies investigating dynamics of intranuclear trafficking, nuclear pore transport and cytoplasmic transport of endogenous messenger RNA. PMID:26416818

  12. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  13. Control of a Salmonella virulence locus by an ATP-sensing leader messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2012-06-14

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica resides within a membrane-bound compartment inside macrophages. This compartment must be acidified for Salmonella to survive within macrophages, possibly because acidic pH promotes expression of Salmonella virulence proteins. We reasoned that Salmonella might sense its surroundings have turned acidic not only upon protonation of the extracytoplasmic domain of a protein sensor but also by an increase in cytosolic ATP levels, because conditions that enhance the proton gradient across the bacterial inner membrane stimulate ATP synthesis. Here we report that an increase in cytosolic ATP promotes transcription of the coding region for the virulence gene mgtC, which is the most highly induced horizontally acquired gene when Salmonella is inside macrophages. This transcript is induced both upon media acidification and by physiological conditions that increase ATP levels independently of acidification. ATP is sensed by the coupling/uncoupling of transcription of the unusually long mgtC leader messenger RNA and translation of a short open reading frame located in this region. A mutation in the mgtC leader messenger RNA that eliminates the response to ATP hinders mgtC expression inside macrophages and attenuates Salmonella virulence in mice. Our results define a singular example of an ATP-sensing leader messenger RNA. Moreover, they indicate that pathogens can interpret extracellular cues by the impact they have on cellular metabolites. PMID:22699622

  14. Detection of the Messenger RNA Encoding for the Ferredoxin-Dependent Glutamate Synthase in Maize Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Commere, Bernard; Vidal, Jean; Suzuki, Akira; Gadal, Pierre; Caboche, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.7.1), glutamate oxoglutarate aminotransferase (glutamate synthase) (GOGAT) messenger RNA was extracted from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves and partially purified through oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography and ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. mRNA were translated in vitro using a reticulocyte system. The glutamate synthase subunit was characterized by immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ferredoxin-glutamate synthase. The in vitro synthesized protein and the 145 kilodaltons genuine maize leaf subunit of GOGAT were found to comigrate in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16664732

  15. Anti-tumour cytotoxicity of poly(A)-containing messenger RNA isolated from tumour-specific immunogenic RNA.

    PubMed

    Greenup, C J; Vallera, D A; Pennline, K J; Kolodziej, B J; Dodd, M C

    1978-07-01

    The transfer of tumour-specific cytotoxicity against a murine fibrosar-coma has been demonstrated in vitro using xenogeneic RNA extracted from tumour-cell-immune animals. Poly(A)-tailed messenger RNA from immunogenic RNA was isolated by passage through an oligo(dT)-cellulose column, and evaluated to determine whether the same tumour-specific cytotoxicity could be transferred. Aliquots of normal C3H mouse lymphocytes were treated with poly(A)-containing immune RNA, whole-cell immune RNA lacking poly(A) and total cellular immune RNA. Treated cells were tested in vitro using an adaptation of the Takasugi and Klein microcytotoxicity assay. Percent cytotoxicity was calculted using cells treated with fractions of normal RNA as control. An increase in tumour cytotoxicity was found with poly(A)-containing immune RNA. The optimum dose of poly(A)-tailed immune RNA was estimated as 6.5 microgram of RNA per 4 x 10(6) lymphocytes. Populations of lymphocytes were separated using glass and nylon wool. T- and B-enriched populations were treated with various RNA components. The adherent cell population showed no significant cytotoxicity, whilst treatment of the nonadherent population with poly(A)-tailed immune RNA produced high levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:687518

  16. Anti-tumour cytotoxicity of poly(A)-containing messenger RNA isolated from tumour-specific immunogenic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Greenup, C. J.; Vallera, D. A.; Pennline, K. J.; Kolodziej, B. J.; Dodd, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The transfer of tumour-specific cytotoxicity against a murine fibrosar-coma has been demonstrated in vitro using xenogeneic RNA extracted from tumour-cell-immune animals. Poly(A)-tailed messenger RNA from immunogenic RNA was isolated by passage through an oligo(dT)-cellulose column, and evaluated to determine whether the same tumour-specific cytotoxicity could be transferred. Aliquots of normal C3H mouse lymphocytes were treated with poly(A)-containing immune RNA, whole-cell immune RNA lacking poly(A) and total cellular immune RNA. Treated cells were tested in vitro using an adaptation of the Takasugi and Klein microcytotoxicity assay. Percent cytotoxicity was calculted using cells treated with fractions of normal RNA as control. An increase in tumour cytotoxicity was found with poly(A)-containing immune RNA. The optimum dose of poly(A)-tailed immune RNA was estimated as 6.5 microgram of RNA per 4 x 10(6) lymphocytes. Populations of lymphocytes were separated using glass and nylon wool. T- and B-enriched populations were treated with various RNA components. The adherent cell population showed no significant cytotoxicity, whilst treatment of the nonadherent population with poly(A)-tailed immune RNA produced high levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:687518

  17. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, Jolynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  18. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B; McComb, David W; Schmittgen, Thomas D; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery. PMID:26916931

  19. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, JoLynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery. PMID:26916931

  20. Messenger RNA-based therapeutics for the treatment of apoptosis-associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Akitsugu; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for treating diseases that are closely associated with excessive apoptosis, because the gene can effectively and sustainably introduce anti-apoptotic factors into cells. However, DNA delivery poses the risk of random genomic integration, leading to overexpression of the delivered gene and cancer development. Messenger RNA (mRNA) can evade integration events in target cells. We examined the use of mRNA-based therapeutics for introducing anti-apoptotic factors by using a mouse model of fulminant hepatitis. For introducing mRNA into the liver, a synthesised polymer-based carrier of polyplex nanomicelles was used for hydrodynamic intravenous injection. Using GFP as a reporter, we demonstrate that mRNA delivery induced efficient protein expression in almost 100% of liver cells, while plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery provided a smaller percentage of GFP-positive cells. Analyses using Cy5-labelled mRNA and pDNA revealed that efficient expression by mRNA was attributed to a simple intracellular mechanism, without the need for nuclear entry. Consistent with this observation, Bcl-2 mRNA was more effective on reducing apoptosis in the liver of mice with fulminant hepatitis than Bcl-2 pDNA. Therefore, mRNA-based therapeutics combined with an effective delivery system such as polyplex nanomicelles is a promising treatment for intractable diseases associated with excessive apoptosis. PMID:26507781

  1. The formation of internal 6-methyladenine residues in eucaryotic messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Tuck, M T

    1992-03-01

    1. The formation of internal 6-methyladenine (m6A) residues in eucaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) is a postsynthetic modification in which S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) serves as the methyl donor. 2. Of the methyl groups incorporated into mature mRNA 30-50% occur in m6A residues. 3. Although most cellular and certain viral mRNAs contain at least one m6A residue, some transcripts such as those coding for histone and globin are completely lacking in this modification. 4. 6-Methyladenine residues have also been localized to heterogeneous nuclear RNA (HnRNA), and for the most part these residues are conserved during mRNA processing. 5. In all known cases, the m6A residues are also found in a strict consensus sequence, Gm6AC or Am6AC, within the transcript. 6. Although the biological significance of internal adenine methylation in eucaryotic mRNA remains unclear, a great deal of research has indicated that this modification may be required for mRNA transport to the cytoplasm, the selection of splice sites or other RNA processing reactions. PMID:1551452

  2. Virus-Specific Messenger RNA and Nascent Polypeptides in Polyribosomes of Cells Replicating Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, G.; Tsuchida, N.; Shanmugam, G.; Green, M.

    1973-01-01

    We present evidence that virus-specific RNA is present in polyribosomes of transformed cells replicating the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex and that it serves as messenger RNA for the synthesis of viral-coded proteins. Both virus-specific RNA (detected by hybridization with the [3H]DNA product of the viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase) and nascent viral polypeptides (measured by precipitation with antiserum to purified virus) were found in membrane-bound and free polyribosomes. Membrane-bound polyribosomes contained a higher content of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides. From 60 to 70% of viral RNA sequences were released from polyribosomes with EDTA, consistent with a function as messenger RNA. Maximum amounts of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides were found in the polyribosome region sedimenting at about 350 S. PMID:4352969

  3. Cellular localization of dopamine D2 receptor messenger RNA in the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Peterfreund, R A; Kosofsky, B E; Fink, J S

    1995-12-01

    The actions of dopamine are mediated by specific, high-affinity, G protein-coupled receptors. Multiple subtypes of dopamine receptors have been characterized, including the D2 subtype (D2R). Cells within the dorsal root and petrosal ganglia of the rat express D2R messenger RNA (mRNA) consistent with D2R expression by primary sensory neurons. We hypothesized that neurons of the trigeminal ganglion express D2R mRNA. Total cellular RNA from rat trigeminal ganglia was analyzed on Northern blots under high stringency conditions. Hybridization of trigeminal ganglion RNA resulted in a signal which comigrated with striatal, pituitary, and hypothalamic D2R mRNA. To determine the distribution of D2R expressing cells in the trigeminal ganglion, cryostat sections were analyzed by in situ hybridization followed by emulsion autoradiography. We identified a population of clustered cells labeled with dense grain concentrations over their cytoplasms. These findings demonstrate the expression of D2 dopamine receptor mRNA in discrete subpopulations of neurons in the rat trigeminal ganglion. Our observations suggest that drugs active at dopamine receptors of the D2 subtype are potential modulators of sensory activity of neurons whose cell bodies reside in the trigeminal ganglion. D2 dopamine receptors may thus have a role in clinical pain syndromes involving the head and neck. PMID:7486101

  4. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  5. Comment on ``Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-02-01

    In a recent paper by Valleriani [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.042903 83, 042903 (2011)], a simple model for the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) is presented. Using this model, the protein translational ratio r, defined as the ratio of protein translation rate ωtl from mRNA to protein degradation rate ωp, is obtained. The key point in obtaining the translational ratio r is to get the protein translation rate ωtl. In Valleriani 's paper, ωtl is obtained as the mean value of the measured translation rate, which is the ratio of the synthesized protein number to the mRNA lifetime. However, in experiments, different methods might be used to obtain the value of ωtl. Therefore, to apply Valleriani 's model to more general experiments, in this Comment three methods to obtain the translation rate ωtl, and consequently the translational ratio r, are presented. Based on one of the methods which might be employed in most of the experiments, we find that the translational ratio r decays exponentially with mRNA length in prokaryotic cells, and decays reciprocally with mRNA length in eukaryotic cells. This result is slight different from that which was obtained in Valleriani 's paper.

  6. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  7. Antidepressants upregulate messenger RNA levels of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1).

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Chlan-Fourney, J; Juorio, A V; Bennett, V L; Shrikhande, S; Bowen, R C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of amitriptyline, bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine on the gene expression of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in a catecholamine cell in vitro model. DESIGN: Molecular study of a cultured cell line. INTERVENTIONS: Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were incubated in 1 and 10 mumol/L of various antidepressant medications for 24 or 48 hours. OUTCOME MEASURES: Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: Amitriptyline up-regulated SOD1 messenger RNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The greatest up-regulation was following incubation with 10 mumol/L amitriptyline for 48 hours. The addition of bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine to PC12 cell cultures also up-regulated SOD1 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that some antidepressants have the ability to positively regulate neuroprotective genes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:10721683

  8. An intercistronic region and ribosome-binding site in bacterial messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, T; Yanofsky, C

    1975-01-01

    A messenger RNA fragment about 220 nucleotides long has been isolated from 32-P-labeled tryptophan operon mRNA of Escherichia coli. When point mutations at the end of trpB and the beginning of trpA were introduced, the resulting nucleotide changes were found; hence the mRNA fragment must include the trpB-trpA intercistronic region. Most of the nucleotide sequences can be assigned to specific locations in the structural genes, based on the amino-acid sequences of the trpB and trpA proteins. In vitro, ribosomes bind to this piece of mRNA and protect from nuclease attack a region about 40 nucleotides long, containing a central AUG codon. The triplet codons to the 3' side of this AUG correspond to the first seven amino acids of the trpA protein; the codons to the 5' side correspond to the last six amino acids of the trpB protein. Translation of trpB is terminated by single UGA codon, which overlaps the trpA AUG initiation codon: UGAUG. Thus the untranslated "intercistronic" region consists of only two nucleotides. The RNA sequence spanning this region undoubtedly fulfills two functions, specifying ribosome recognition signals as well as encoding amino-acid sequences. Images PMID:1094468

  9. Messenger RNA sequence and the translation process --a particle transport perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, Royce K. P.

    2008-03-01

    The translation process in bacteria has been under intensive study. A key question concerns the quantitative effect of different elongation rates, associated with different codons, on the overall translation efficiency. Starting with a simple particle transport model, the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we incorporate the essential components of the translation process: Ribosomes, cognate tRNA concentrations, and messenger RNA (mRNA) templates correspond to particles, hopping rates, and the underlying lattice, respectively. Using simulations and mean-field approximations to obtain the stationary currents (the protein production rates) associated with different mRNA sequences, we are especially interested in the effect of slow codons, i.e., codons which are associated with rare tRNAs and are therefore translated very slowly. As the first step, we look at a ``designed sequence'' with one and two slow codons and quantify the marked impact of their spatial distribution to the currents. Extending the results to several mRNA sequences taken from real genes, we argue that an effective translation rate including the information from the vicinity of each codon needs to be taken into consideration when seeking an efficient strategy to optimize the protein production.

  10. Messenger RNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification: research and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Su-hua; Di, Zhou; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2013-10-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. However, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time consumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Recently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profiling, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibility with current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review, we provided an overview of the present knowledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possible practical application to forensic casework. PMID:24466779

  11. Messenger RNAs bearing tRNA-like features exemplified by interferon alfa 5 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toledano, Rosa; Gómez, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to ascertain whether liver mRNA species share common structural features with hepatitis C virus (HCV) mRNA that allow them to support the RNase-P (pre-tRNA/processing enzyme) cleavage reaction in vitro. The presence of RNase-P competitive elements in the liver mRNA population was determined by means of biochemical techniques, and a set of sensitive mRNA species were identified through microarray screening. Cleavage specificity and substrate length requirement of around 200 nts, were determined for three mRNA species. One of these cleavage sites was found in interferon-alpha 5 (IFNA5) mRNA between specific base positions and with the characteristic RNase-P chemistry of cleavage. It was mapped within a cloverleaf-like structure revealed by a comparative structural analysis based on several direct enzymes and chemical probing methods of three RNA fragments of increasing size, and subsequently contrasted against site-directed mutants. The core region was coincident with the reported signal for the cytoplasmic accumulation region (CAR) in IFNAs. Striking similarities with the tRNA-like element of the antagonist HCV mRNA were found. In general, this study provides a new way of looking at a variety of viral tRNA-like motifs as this type of structural mimicry might be related to specific host mRNA species rather than, or in addition to, tRNA itself. PMID:25900662

  12. Killifish metallothionein messenger RNA expression following temperature perturbation and cadmium exposure

    PubMed Central

    Van Cleef-Toedt, Kathleen A.; Kaplan, Lisa A. E.; Crivello, Joseph F.

    2001-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT), a cysteine-rich metal binding protein, is considered to play an essential role in the regulation of intracellular metals. Induction of MT in mammalian and nonmammalian tissues following heavy metal exposure may serve as a defense mechanism and a biomarker of environmental exposure to chemical stressors such as toxic metals. In this study, MT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was characterized in male and female nonspawning and spawning killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) following an 8-day exposure to specific sublethal stressors, which included temperature perturbation (26°C or 10°C) and/or 6 ppb of waterborne cadmium chloride (CdCl2). Hepatic, gill, and intestinal MT mRNA, expressed as copy number per microgram of total RNA, was assessed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and electrochemiluminescence using winter flounder (Pleuronectes americanus) MT complementary DNA primers. Liver, gill, and intestine MT mRNA expression was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in nonspawning killifish exposed to 26°C compared with those exposed to 19°C (control). In addition, a significant (P < 0.05) increase in gill MT mRNA induction was observed in nonspawning killifish exposed to 6 ppb of waterborne CdCl2 compared with controls. The results of this study demonstrate significant MT mRNA induction in nonspawning killifish following short-term exposure to physiological and chemical stressors. Thus, further research may be necessary before the use of killifish MT mRNA induction as a biomarker of environmental chemical stress exposure alone. PMID:11795472

  13. Self-assembled Messenger RNA Nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) for Efficient Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Lee, Jong Bum

    2015-01-01

    Although mRNA has several advantages over plasmid DNA when delivered into cells for gene expression, mRNA transfection is a very rare occurrence in gene delivery. This is mainly because of the labile nature of RNA, resulting in a low expression level of the desired protein. In this study, self-assembled mRNA nanoparticles (mRNA-NPs) packed with multiple repeats of mRNA were synthesized to achieve efficient gene expression. This approach required only a one-step process to synthesize particles with a minimal amount of plasmid DNA to produce the RNA transcripts via rolling circle transcription. Moreover, there are no concerns for cytotoxicity which can be caused by chemical condensates because mRNA-NPs are made entirely of mRNA. An examination of the cells transfected with the mRNA-NPs encoding the green fluorescence protein (GFP) confirmed that the mRNA-NPs can be used as a novel platform for effective gene delivery. PMID:26235529

  14. The Riia Gene of Bacteriophage T4. II. Regulation of Its Messenger RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Daegelen, P.; Brody, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the rII genes are first introduced into cells which had been previously infected by T4 phage deleted for these genes, the kinetics of synthesis of rIIA and rIIB RNA are rapid and identical. We show that this rapid synthesis depends on a functional motA gene for rIIB, but not for rIIA, RNA synthesis. By primer-extension mapping of T4 messenger RNA, we find three promoters close to the rIIA gene. One of them is an early promoter just before the rIIA.1 gene; it is used under all conditions tested. Another is in the coding portion of the rIIA.1 gene; it is weak, primarily because of a 19-bp spacing between the -10 and -35 elements, and its use is stimulated by T4 functions. The third is a motA-dependent (middle) promoter which has an unusual CCCGCTT box at -33. We present results which suggest that none of these promoters is likely to be the site at which the motB and motC gene products exercise their major influence on rIIA RNA synthesis. PMID:2379818

  15. Xp54 and related (DDX6-like) RNA helicases: roles in messenger RNP assembly, translation regulation and RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Andrew; Sommerville, John

    2006-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Xp54 is an integral component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles of Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, several abundant proteins bind pre-mRNA transcripts to modulate nuclear export, RNA stability and translational fate. Of these, Xp54, the mRNA-masking protein FRGY2 and its activating protein kinase CK2α, bind to nascent transcripts on chromosome loops, whereas an Xp54-associated factor, RapA/B, binds to the mRNP complex in the cytoplasm. Over-expression, mutation and knockdown experiments indicate that Xp54 functions to change the conformation of mRNP complexes, displacing one subset of proteins to accommodate another. The sequence of Xp54 is highly conserved in a wide spectrum of organisms. Like Xp54, Drosophila Me31B and Caenorhabditis CGH-1 are required for proper meiotic development, apparently by regulating the translational activation of stored mRNPs and also for sorting certain mRNPs into germplasm-containing structures. Studies on yeast Dhh1 and mammalian rck/p54 have revealed a key role for these helicases in mRNA degradation and in earlier remodelling of mRNP for entry into translation, storage or decay pathways. The versatility of Xp54 and related helicases in modulating the metabolism of mRNAs at all stages of their lifetimes marks them out as key regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression. PMID:16769775

  16. Detection of messenger RNA from the isoleucine--valine operons of Salmonella typhimurium by heterologous DNA-RNA hybridization: involvement of transfer RNA in transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Childs, G; Sonnenberg, F; Freundlich, M

    1977-03-01

    A hybridization assay using Escherichia coli K-12 DNA isolated from the specialized transducing bacteriophage gammaCI857St68h80 dilv was used to examine the rate of synthesis of the messenger RNA's (mRNA) derived from the isoleucine-valine (ilv) gene cluster of Salmonella typhimurium. In all cases examined, changes in ilv enzyme levels could be correlated with changes in the rate of synthesis of ilv mRNA. Several well characterized regulatory mutants of S. typhimurium had rates of synthesis of ilv mRNA 3 to 8-fold higher than the repressed wild-type strain. The increased rates of ilv mRNA synthesis found in a hisT strain as well as in isoleucyl-and leucyl-tRNA SYNTHETASE MUTANTS, STRONGLY SUGGESTS A ROLE FOR BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINOACYL-TRNA's in transcriptional control. PMID:327261

  17. Colored petri net modeling of small interfering RNA-mediated messenger RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nickaeen, Niloofar; Moein, Shiva; Heidary, Zarifeh; Ghaisari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling of biological systems is an attractive way for studying complex biological systems and their behaviors. Petri Nets, due to their ability to model systems with various levels of qualitative information, have been wildly used in modeling biological systems in which enough qualitative data may not be at disposal. These nets have been used to answer questions regarding the dynamics of different cell behaviors including the translation process. In one stage of the translation process, the RNA sequence may be degraded. In the process of degradation of RNA sequence, small-noncoding RNA molecules known as small interfering RNA (siRNA) match the target RNA sequence. As a result of this matching, the target RNA sequence is destroyed. Materials and Methods: In this context, the process of matching and destruction is modeled using Colored Petri Nets (CPNs). The model is constructed using CPNs which allow tokens to have a value or type on them. Thus, CPN is a suitable tool to model string structures in which each element of the string has a different type. Using CPNs, long RNA, and siRNA strings are modeled with a finite set of colors. The model is simulated via CPN Tools. Results: A CPN model of the matching between RNA and siRNA strings is constructed in CPN Tools environment. Conclusion: In previous studies, a network of stoichiometric equations was modeled. However, in this particular study, we modeled the mechanism behind the silencing process. Modeling this kind of mechanisms provides us with a tool to examine the effects of different factors such as mutation or drugs on the process. PMID:27376039

  18. MicroRNA Seed Region Length Impact on Target Messenger RNA Expression and Survival in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lila E.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNA) repress messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally through binding to the 3’ UTR of the mRNA with the miRNA seed region. It has been purported that longer seed regions have a greater efficacy on mRNA repression. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating differential expression of miRNAs involved in regulating the immune response, an important mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC), by seed length category. We subsequently evaluated differential expression of these miRNAs’ targets in colonic tissue and the impact of these miRNAs on CRC survival. We determined sequence complementarity between each miRNA seed region and the 3’ UTR of each experimentally verified mRNA target gene. We classified miRNAs into groups based on seed regions matching perfectly to a mRNA UTR with six bases beginning at position two, seven bases beginning at position one, seven bases beginning at position two, or eight bases beginning at position one. We analyzed these groups in terms of miRNA differential expression between carcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa, differential colonic target mRNA expression, and risk of dying from CRC. After correction for multiple comparisons, the proportion of the miRNAs that were associated with differential mRNA expression was 0% for the 6-mer, 13.64% for the 7α-mer group, 12.82% for the 7β-mer group, and 8.70% for the 8-mer group. The proportion of miRNAs associated with survival was 20% for the 6-mer group, 27.27% for the 7α-mer group, 10.23% for the 7β-mer group, and 21.74% for the 8-mer group. We did not see a linear relationship between seed length and miRNA expression dysregulation, mRNA expression, or survival. Our findings do not support the hypothesis the seed region length alone influences mRNA repression. PMID:27123865

  19. Messenger RNA- Versus Retrovirus-Based Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies: Analysis of Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients’ iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. PMID:24736403

  20. Parathyroid hormone induces c-fos and c-jun messenger RNA in rat osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    PTH is a potent regulator of osteoblast gene expression, yet the nuclear events that mediate PTH action are poorly understood. We were interested in identifying immediate early genes which may regulate PTH-altered gene expression in the osteoblast. Therefore, we examined the effects of PTH on c-fos and c-jun gene expression in a rat osteoblastic cell line (UMR 106-01). Under control conditions, c-fos and c-jun mRNAs were present at low basal levels. After PTH treatment, c-fos mRNA abundance dramatically increased, with a maximal and transient response at 30 min. PTH also stimulated an increase in c-jun mRNA, but in a biphasic manner, with maximal levels at 30 min and 2 h. These responses were dose dependent, not altered by cotreatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and preceded PTH-induced expression of matrix metallo-proteinase-1 mRNA. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of c-fos and c-jun transcription after PTH exposure. To determine the signal transduction pathways involved, second messenger analogs were tested for their ability to mimic the effects of PTH. 8-Bromo-cAMP and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused increases in the abundance of c-fos and c-jun transcripts. Ionomycin had no effect on the expression of these genes. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA resulted in a decrease in basal c-jun expression, but did not alter the PTH-mediated increase in c-fos, c-jun, or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  2. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M.; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-01-01

    fAter being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22°C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes. PMID:12473688

  3. PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin biopsies: testing the effectiveness of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Visigalli, Davide; Radice, Davide; Fiorina, Elisabetta; Solari, Alessandra; Lauria, Giuseppe; Reilly, Mary M; Santoro, Lucio; Schenone, Angelo; Pareyson, Davide

    2014-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with increased gene dosage for PMP22. Therapeutic approaches are currently aiming at correcting PMP22 over-expression. It is unknown whether PMP22 can be used as a biological marker of disease progression and therapy efficacy. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsies of 45 patients with CMT1A, obtained at study entry and after 24-months of treatment either with ascorbic acid or placebo. Data of a subgroup of patients were also compared with matched healthy subjects. Finally, we analysed PMP22 messenger RNA levels in sural nerve biopsies. We did not find significant differences in the levels of any known PMP22 transcripts in treated or untreated patients with CMT1A, thus confirming that ascorbic acid does not impact on the molecular features of CMT1A. Most importantly, we did not observe any correlation between PMP22 messenger RNA levels and the different clinical and electrophysiological outcome measures, underscoring the weakness of PMP22 to mirror the phenotypic variability of patients with CMT1A. We did not find increased PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin and sural nerve biopsies of patients with CMT1A compared with relative controls. In conclusion, this study shows that ascorbic acid does not impact on PMP22 transcriptional regulation and PMP22 is not a suitable biomarker for CMT1A. PMID:24812204

  4. Human bitter perception correlates with bitter receptor messenger RNA expression in taste cells123

    PubMed Central

    Lipchock, Sarah V; Mennella, Julie A; Spielman, Andrew I; Reed, Danielle R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alleles of the receptor gene TAS2R38 are responsible in part for the variation in bitter taste perception of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and structurally similar compounds (eg, glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables). At low concentrations, people with the PAV (“taster” amino acid sequence) form of TAS2R38 perceive these bitter compounds, whereas most with the AVI (“nontaster” amino acid sequence) form do not; heterozygotes (PAV/AVI) show the widest range of bitter perception. Objectives: The objectives were to examine individual differences in expression of PAV-TAS2R38 messenger RNA (mRNA) among heterozygotes, to test the hypotheses that the abundance of allele-specific gene expression accounts for the variation in human bitter taste perception, and to relate to dietary intake of bitter-tasting beverages and foods. Design: Heterozygous individuals (n = 22) provided psychophysical evaluation of the bitterness of PROP, glucosinolate-containing broccoli juice, non–glucosinolate-containing carrot juice, and several bitter non-TAS2R38 ligands as well as dietary recalls. Fungiform taste papillae were examined for allele-specific TAS2R38 expression by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: PAV-TAS2R38 mRNA expression was measured in 18 of 22 heterozygous subjects. Relative expression varied widely and positively correlated with ratings of bitterness intensity of PROP (P = 0.007) and broccoli juice (P = 0.004) but not of the control solutions carrot juice (P = 0.26), NaCl (P = 0.68), caffeine (P = 0.24), or urea (P = 0.47). Expression amounts were related to self-reported recent and habitual caffeine intake (P = 0.060, P = 0.005); vegetable intake was too low to analyze. Conclusions: We provide evidence that PAV-TAS2R38 expression amount correlates with individual differences in bitter sensory perception and diet. The nature of this correlation calls for additional research on the molecular mechanisms associated with some individual

  5. A Novel Route Controlling Begomovirus Resistance by the Messenger RNA Surveillance Factor Pelota

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Moshe; Karniel, Uri; Gelbart, Dana; Fogel, Doron; Evenor, Dalia; Kutsher, Yaarit; Makhbash, Zion; Nahon, Sahadia; Shlomo, Haviva; Chen, Lea; Reuveni, Moshe; Levin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a devastating disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) that can be effectively controlled by the deployment of resistant cultivars. The TYLCV-resistant line TY172 carries a major recessive locus for TYLCV resistance, designated ty-5, on chromosome 4. In this study, the association between 27 polymorphic DNA markers, spanning the ty-5 locus, and the resistance characteristics of individual plants inoculated with TYLCV in 51 segregating recombinant populations were analyzed. These analyses localized ty-5 into a 425 bp region containing two transversions: one in the first exon of a gene encoding the tomato homolog of the messenger RNA surveillance factor Pelota (Pelo), and a second in its proximal promoter. Analyses of susceptible and resistant lines revealed that the relative transcript level of the gene remained unchanged, regardless of whether the plants were infected with TYLCV or not. This suggests that the polymorphism discovered in the coding region of the gene controls the resistance. Silencing of Pelo in a susceptible line rendered the transgenic plants highly resistant, while in the resistant line TY172 had no effect on symptom development. In addition, over-expression of the susceptible allele of the gene in the resistant TY172 line rendered it susceptible, while over-expression of the resistant allele in susceptible plants had no effect. These results confirm that Pelo is the gene controlling resistance at the ty-5 locus. Pelo, implicated in the ribosome recycling-phase of protein synthesis, offers an alternative route to promote resistance to TYLCV and other viruses. PMID:26448569

  6. Systemic delivery of messenger RNA for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using polyplex nanomicelles with a cholesterol moiety.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Ishii, Takehiko; Matsui, Akitsugu; Tockary, Theofilus Agrios; Takeda, Kaori Machitani; Uchida, Hirokuni; Osada, Kensuke; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    Systemic delivery of messenger RNA (mRNA) is technically challenging because mRNA is highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation in the blood circulation. In this study, we used a nanomicelle-based platform, prepared from mRNA and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-polycation block copolymers. A cholesterol (Chol) moiety was attached to the ω-terminus of the block copolymer to increase the stability of the nanomicelle by hydrophobic interaction. After in vitro screening, polyaspartamide with four aminoethylene repeats in its side chain (PAsp(TEP)) was selected as the cationic segment of the block copolymer, because it contributes to enhance nuclease resistance and high protein expression from the mRNA. After intravenous injection, PEG-PAsp(TEP)-Chol nanomicelles showed significantly enhanced blood retention of mRNA in comparison to nanomicelles without Chol. We used the nanomicelles for treating intractable pancreatic cancer in a subcutaneous inoculation mouse model through the delivery of mRNA encoding an anti-angiogenic protein (sFlt-1). PEG-PAsp(TEP)-Chol nanomicelles generated efficient protein expression from the delivered mRNA in tumor tissue, resulting in remarkable inhibition of the tumor growth, whereas nanomicelles without Chol failed to show a detectable therapeutic effect. In conclusion, the stabilized nanomicelle system led to the successful systemic delivery of mRNA in therapeutic application, holding great promise for the treatment of various diseases. PMID:26763736

  7. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS) is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA) is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index < 29. Participants ingested the stool marker Cr2O3 (300 mg/day) for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients) and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies), all with a body mass index < 29. Messenger RNA level of the BA transporter genes for ileal lipid binding protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, organic solute transporter alpha, and organic solute transporter beta were similar in GS and GS-free subjects. Messenger RNA level of Cyp27A1, encoding the enzyme 27α-hydroxylase, the short heterodimer partner and farnesoid X receptor remained unchanged, whereas the mRNA level of Cyp7A1, the rate limiting step of BA synthesis, was increased more than 400% (p < 0.01) in the liver of GS compared to GS-free subjects. Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that

  8. In vivo expression of beta-galactosidase by rat oviduct exposed to naked DNA or messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana; Venegas, Alejandro; Croxatto, Horacio B

    2002-01-01

    Intra-oviductal administration of RNA obtained from oviducts of estradiol-treated rats resulted in accelerated egg transport (Ríos et al., 1997). It is probable that estradiol-induced messenger RNA (mRNA) entered oviductal cells and was translated into the proteins involved in accelerated egg transport. In order to test this interpretation we deposited in vivo 50 micrograms of pure beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) mRNA, 50 micrograms of pure DNA from the reporter gene beta-gal under SV40 promoter or the vehicle (control oviducts) into the oviductal lumen of rats. Twenty four hours later the beta-gal activity was assayed in oviductal tissue homogenates using o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside as a substrate. The administration of beta-gal mRNA and pSVBgal plasmid increased beta-gal activity by 71% and 142%, respectively, over the control oviducts. These results indicate that naked DNA and mRNA coding for beta-gal can enter oviductal cells and be translated into an active enzyme. They are consistent with the interpretation that embryo transport acceleration caused by the injection of estradiol-induced RNA in the oviduct involves translation of the injected mRNA. PMID:12462985

  9. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  10. 1,25(OH)2D3 and cAMP synergistically induce complement 5a receptor messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Biskobing, D; Titus, L; Thornton, D L; Catherwood, B D; Nanes, M S

    1996-02-01

    Complement 5a receptor (C5aR) mediates both acute and chronic participation of monocytes in the immune response. In the human U937 monoblast, C5aR is maximally expressed 4 days after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 (or cycloheximide) and prostaglandin E2 combined. The authors asked whether these agents altered expression of C5aR messenger RNA (mRNA). Unstimulated U937 cells expressed neither C5aR mRNA nor C5a binding. Complement 5aR mRNA rose 3 hours after prostaglandin E2 application and fell to basal levels by 12 hours. This early rise in C5aR mRNA did not cause an acute rise in C5a binding, which gradually increased between 1 and 4 days. Neither 1,25(OH)2D3 nor cycloheximide induced expression of C5aR mRNA in the absence of prostaglandin E2 but did enhance prostaglandin E2-stimulated C5aR mRNA expression and C5a binding. The authors observed a late increase in C5aR mRNA at day 3 in treated cells. Inhibition of this late rise in mRNA with 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside attenuated C5a binding by 65%, indicating its importance in the generation of C5a binding sites. The expression of functional C5aR is, therefore, a complex process involving regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:8615377

  11. Selective pyramidal cell reduction of GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit messenger RNA expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A

    2011-09-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABA(A) receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα)-containing pyramidal cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65)-containing interneurons in layer 3 of the PFC from matched schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression was significantly 40% lower in pyramidal cells, but was not altered in interneurons. Lower α1 subunit mRNA expression in pyramidal cells was not attributable to potential confounding factors, and thus appeared to reflect the disease process of schizophrenia. These results suggest that pyramidal cell inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia, whereas inhibition of GABA neurons is maintained. The cell type specificity of these findings may reflect a compensatory response to enhance layer 3 pyramidal cell activity in the face of the diminished excitatory drive associated with the lower dendritic spine density on these neurons. PMID:21677653

  12. Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-12-01

    We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcript in the population of messenger RNA (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify targets signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-napthyl-phosphate. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcript in as little as 4.6 ng mRNA without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcript in total mRNA population. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate and quantitative tool alternate to the RQ-PCR for early disease diagnosis.

  13. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment. PMID:26728350

  14. MIWI and piRNA-mediated cleavage of messenger RNAs in mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Kang, Jun-Yan; Gou, Lan-Tao; Wang, Jiajia; Xue, Yuanchao; Skogerboe, Geir; Dai, Peng; Huang, Da-Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Mo-Fang; He, Shunmin

    2015-01-01

    The piRNA machinery is known for its role in mediating epigenetic silencing of transposons. Recent studies suggest that this function also involves piRNA-guided cleavage of transposon-derived transcripts. As many piRNAs also appear to have the capacity to target diverse mRNAs, this raises the intriguing possibility that piRNAs may act extensively as siRNAs to degrade specific mRNAs. To directly test this hypothesis, we compared mouse PIWI (MIWI)-associated piRNAs with experimentally identified cleaved mRNA fragments from mouse testes, and observed cleavage sites that predominantly occur at position 10 from the 5′ end of putative targeting piRNAs. We also noted strong biases for U and A residues at nucleotide positions 1 and 10, respectively, in both piRNAs and mRNA fragments, features that resemble the pattern of piRNA amplification by the 'ping-pong' cycle. Through mapping of MIWI-RNA interactions by CLIP-seq and gene expression profiling, we found that many potential piRNA-targeted mRNAs directly interact with MIWI and show elevated expression levels in the testes of Miwi catalytic mutant mice. Reporter-based assays further revealed the importance of base pairing between piRNAs and mRNA targets and the requirement for both the slicer activity and piRNA-loading ability of MIWI in piRNA-mediated target repression. Importantly, we demonstrated that proper turnover of certain key piRNA targets is essential for sperm formation. Together, these findings reveal the siRNA-like function of the piRNA machinery in mouse testes and its central requirement for male germ cell development and maturation. PMID:25582079

  15. Nucleolin stabilizes Bcl-X L messenger RNA in response to UVA irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack; Tsaprailis, George; Bowden, G Tim

    2008-02-15

    Our laboratory has previously reported that UVA irradiation can increase the expression of Bcl-X(L), an antiapoptotic molecule, by stabilizing its mRNA in cultured immortalized human keratinocytes. To understand the mechanism by which the Bcl-X(L) message is stabilized, we used a synthetic Bcl-X(L) 3'-untranslated region (UTR) to capture RNA-binding proteins. Nucleolin was identified as one of the binding proteins as determined by tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography analysis. Further study showed that nucleolin specifically recognized the AU-rich elements (AUUUA) in the 3'-UTR of the Bcl-X(L) mRNA and could stabilize the mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of nucleolin stabilizes the Bcl-X(L) mRNA in HeLa cells, whereas reducing nucleolin by small interfering RNA shortens the Bcl-X(L) mRNA half-life. Interestingly, nucleolin physically interacted with polyadenylate [poly(A)]-binding protein through it RGG motifs. Its stabilizing effect on the Bcl-X(L) mRNA was dependent upon the presence of poly(A) tail. Based on these data, we propose a model in which nucleolin protects the Bcl-X(L) mRNA from nuclease degradation by enhancing the stability of the ribonucleoprotein loop structure. PMID:18281479

  16. Characterization and gestational regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA in human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Frim, D M; Emanuel, R L; Robinson, B G; Smas, C M; Adler, G K; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a hypothalamic neuropeptide involved in the regulation of ACTH secretion, has been detected by RIA in extracts of human placenta. We wished to determine whether this immunoreactive substance is a product of CRH gene expression in the placenta. We have found authentic human CRH (hCRH) mRNA in human placental tissue that is similar in size to hypothalamic CRH mRNA. Furthermore, the transcriptional initiation site for placental hCRH mRNA is identical to that previously predicted for hypothalamic hCRH mRNA, 23-26 nucleotides downstream from a canonical promoter element. Placental hCRH mRNA increases more than 20-fold in the 5 wk preceding parturition, in parallel with a rise in placental hCRH peptide content. These data strongly suggest that the hCRH gene is expressed in the placenta and that this expression changes dramatically during gestation. Images PMID:3260606

  17. Analysis of messenger RNA expression by in situ hybridization using RNA probes synthesized via in vitro transcription

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Bradley S.; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the spatial patterning of mRNA expression is critically important for assigning functional and physiological significance to a given gene product. Given the tens of thousands of mRNAs in the mammalian genome, a full assessment of individual gene functions would ideally be overlaid upon knowledge of the specific cell types expressing each mRNA. In situ hybridization approaches represent a molecular biological/histological method that can reveal cellular patterns of mRNA expression. Here, we present detailed procedures for the detection of specific mRNAs using radioactive RNA probes in tissue sections followed by autoradiographic detection. These methods allow for the specific and sensitive detection of spatial patterns of mRNA expression, thereby linking mRNA expression with cell type and function. Radioactive detection methods also facilitate semi-quantitative analyses of changes in mRNA gene expression. PMID:20699122

  18. Serum Messenger RNA as a Biomarker and its Clinical Usefulness in Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Norimasa; Hasegawa, Junichi; Shiota, Goshi

    2008-01-01

    A number of biomarkers are used clinically and many protein-based assay methods are available. Improvements in the method to utilize specific antibodies have led to remarkable progress in clinical diagnosis using biomarkers. Proteomics studies to identify better biomarkers have been performed worldwide by using a protein-based comprehensive method. The detection rate of conventional biomarkers can not improve further. Now is a time that a breakthrough is needed. We previously proposed mRNA, which is circulating in the body, as a novel material for biomarkers. mRNA is an unexpectedly useful molecule, not only because it can detect genes with a low expression level in protein, but also because it can detect the expression from non-coding RNA precursor genes or gene products with limited secretion from the cells. Circulating mRNA has been thought to be unstable in blood containing RNase. We confirm that mRNA remains at the same level for 24 hours after blood sampling. Unlike DNA, the RNA molecule can reflect events in the human body which occurred within a day, resulting in an early diagnosis of diseases. We report the possibility to detect and quantify cancer-derived mRNAs circulating in human vessels. We introduce the detection of serum mRNA as a useful biomarker of human malignancies. PMID:21892326

  19. An unusually long non-coding region in rat lens alpha-crystallin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moormann, R J; van der Velden, H M; Dodemont, H J; Andreoli, P M; Bloemendal, H; Schoenmakers, J G

    1981-01-01

    Most of the mRNA sequence coding for the alpha A2 chain of the ocular lens protein alpha-crystallin from rat, has been determined by sequencing cloned DNA copies of this mRNA. The 892-base pair cDNA sequence encompasses all but 52 N-terminal amino acids of the alpha A2 chain. It lacks the sequence characteristic for the 22 extra amino acids inserted in the alpha A2 -like chain, named alpha AIns. A stretch of 583 nuceotides, representing more than 50% of the entire mRNA sequence, is located 3' wards of the alpha A2 coding sequence. It contains the characteristic AAUAAA signal involved in poly(A) -addition and represents an unexpectedly long non-coding region. Examination of the total cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA of rat lens by filter-hybridization and subsequent translation of the electrophoretically separated mRNA fractions shows that the alpha A2 chain is encoded by mRNA species which are distinct from the alpha AIns encoding mRNA. No evidence is obtained for an extensive size heterogeneity in the 3' untranslated regions of these two different rat lens mRNAs. Images PMID:6171772

  20. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    SciTech Connect

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  1. The nucleolin targeting aptamer AS1411 destabilizes Bcl-2 messenger RNA in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Sridharan; Chen, Weiwei; Spicer, Eleanor K; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Fernandes, Daniel J

    2008-04-01

    We sought to determine whether nucleolin, a bcl-2 mRNA-binding protein, has a role in the regulation of bcl-2 mRNA stability in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the efficacy of the aptamer AS1411 in targeting nucleolin and inducing bcl-2 mRNA instability and cytotoxicity in these cells. AS1411 at 5 micromol/L inhibited the growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas 20 micromol/L AS1411 had no effect on the growth rate or viability of normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. This selectivity of AS1411 was related to a greater uptake of AS1411 into the cytoplasm of MCF-7 cells compared with MCF-10A cells and to a 4-fold higher level of cytoplasmic nucleolin in MCF-7 cells. Stable siRNA knockdown of nucleolin in MCF-7 cells reduced nucleolin and bcl-2 protein levels and decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA from 11 to 5 hours. Similarly, AS1411 (10 micromol/L) decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells to 1.0 and 1.2 hours, respectively. In contrast, AS1411 had no effect on the stability of bcl-2 mRNA in normal MCF-10A cells. AS1411 also inhibited the binding of nucleolin to the instability element AU-rich element 1 of bcl-2 mRNA in a cell-free system and in MCF-7 cells. Together, the results suggest that AS1411 acts as a molecular decoy by competing with bcl-2 mRNA for binding to cytoplasmic nucleolin in these breast cancer cell lines. This interferes with the stabilization of bcl-2 mRNA by nucleolin and may be one mechanism by which AS1411 induces tumor cell death. PMID:18381443

  2. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  3. The regulation of GRP78 and messenger RNA levels by hypoxia is modulated by protein kinase C activators and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Koong, A.C.; Auger, E.A.; Chen, E.Y.; Giaccia, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    In this study, we have shown that steady-state levels of glucose-regulated 78 kDa (GRP78) protein and messenger RNA increase during a 5-h exposure to 0.02% oxygen. This increase in GRP78 protein and mRNA induced by hypoxia can be abolished by a 1-h pretreatment of cells before hypoxia with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors staurosporine and H7 at concentrations at which the drugs themselves do not cause cytotoxicity. Although all studies using protein kinase inhibitors must be interpreted with caution, staurosporine and H7 have been shown to be potent inhibitors of PKC activity, suggesting a role for PKC in mediating the transcriptional regulation of GRP78 by hypoxia. Further support for PKC in regulating GRP78 gene expression by hypoxia stems from gel-mobility shift studies in mixtures of nuclear extracts from aerobic or hypoxic cells with a 36 bp region of the GRP78 promoter (-170 to -135). Binding of this factor could be inhibited by pretreating cells with the PKC inhibitor staurosporine before hypoxia or activated by treating cells with the PKC-activating phorbol ester TPA. These data suggest that activation of this hypoxia-responsive factor is sensitive to oxygen levels and seems to be mediated through a PKC signal transduction pathway. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Venom immunotherapy modulates interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma messenger RNA expression of peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Akoum, H; Tsicopoulos, A; Vorng, H; Wallaert, B; Dessaint, J P; Joseph, M; Hamid, Q; Tonnel, A B

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which specific immunotherapy exerts its beneficial effect remains unclear. In order to evaluate the influence of venom immunotherapy on the T-cell cytokine pattern of allergic reactions, we studied interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA expression of peripheral T lymphocytes from 12 patients undergoing rush venom desensitization, before treatment at Day 0 (D0), at Day 15 (D15) and Day 90 (D90) after treatment, and from seven controls. Antigen-specific T-cell proliferation was also determined. Cytokine mRNA expression was evaluated using in situ hybridization, 24 hr after culture of peripheral T cells with medium, venom, or an unrelated allergen. Allergen-induced T-cell proliferation decreased at D15 and D90 of rush immunotherapy (P < or = 0.02). In venom-stimulated cultures of the patient group, there was a decrease in IL-4 mRNA-positive cells at D15 and D90 (P < or = 0.001). Before desensitization, IFN-gamma mRNA expression was lower in patients than in controls and did not increase after in vitro allergen stimulation. In contrast, after immunotherapy, spontaneous IFN-gamma mRNA expression increased, but only at D90 (P < or = 0.001). The cytokine pattern observed at D90 after immunotherapy was similar to that observed in control subjects. In conclusion, venom immunotherapy induced an altered cytokine mRNA pattern in allergen-stimulated T cells which was dissociated from the early changes of allergen-induced T-cell responsiveness. PMID:8675214

  5. GENE PROBE FOR PO MESSENGER RNA USED TO INDEX ACRYLAMIDE TOXIC NEUROPATHY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gene probe for the PNS myelin glycoprotein PO (PO-mRNA) was used to monitor acrylamide neuropathy in Sprague Dawley rats prior to, concurrent with, and subsequent to, ultrastructurally and immunocytochemically defined nerve damage. ats were dosed every other day with acrylamide...

  6. Rational design of avian metapneumovirus live attenuated vaccines by inhibiting viral messenger RNA cap methyltransferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), also known as avian pneumovirus or turkey rhinotracheitis, is a non-segmented negative-sense RNA virus belonging to the family of Paramyxoviridae, the subfamily Pneumovirinae, and the genus Metapneumovirus. aMPV is the causative agent of respiratory tract infection and ...

  7. Polysomes, Messenger RNA, and Growth in Soybean Stems during Development and Water Deficit 1

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Hugh S.; Mullet, John E.; Boyer, John S.

    1988-01-01

    The polysome status and populations of polysomal mRNA were examined in different regions of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) stems that contained either dividing, elongating, or mature (nongrowing) cells. There was a developmental gradient of polysome content in which the dividing tissue had the highest levels and the mature tissue the lowest. A few hours after transplanting the seedlings to vermiculite having low water content (water potential Ψw = −0.29 megapascals), stem growth rate decreased to 30% of well-watered controls and the polysome content decreased most in the dividing and elongating tissues. After 24 to 36 hours, stem growth and polysome content recovered gradually. In vitro translation products of polysomal mRNA from dividing, elongating or mature tissue were examined on two-dimensional gels. In well-watered controls, each of the stem regions was enriched in a small subset of the polysomal mRNA population, probably because of developmentally regulated gene expression. Exposing plants to low Ψw for 24 hours induced a change in the relative abundance of a small number of polysomal mRNAs in the elongating and mature tissues, but not in the dividing tissue. After 24 to 72 hours at low Ψw, the changes in polysomal mRNA population were reversed in the elongating tissue. The data indicate that changes in stem growth at low water potential are associated with changes in polysome status and polysomal mRNA in the elongating tissue. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16665977

  8. Internal 6-methyladenine residues increase the in vitro translation efficiency of dihydrofolate reductase messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Heilman, K L; Leach, R A; Tuck, M T

    1996-07-01

    N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) is found internally in a number of mRNA molecules from higher eucaryotic cells. In these investigations, it was found that the presence of m6A residues increase the in vitro translation efficiency of capped T7 transcripts of mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mRNA. Using an in vitro rabbit reticulocyte translation system, the formation of internal m6A residues in the DHFR transcripts resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in translated DHFR compared to transcripts void of internal m6A residues. Translation in a wheat germ system, however, resulted in no increase in translation efficiency upon m6A formation, suggesting that the mechanism may be species-specific. PMID:8925412

  9. Identification, localization, and regulation of passerine GnRH-I messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George E

    2009-04-01

    The neuropeptide GnRH-I is critical for the regulation of reproduction in all vertebrates. Study of the regulation of GnRH-I in passerine songbirds has been the focus of studies on subjects as diverse as photoperiodism, puberty, stress, nutrition, processing of auditory information, migration, global climate change, and evolutionary biology. Until now, analysis of GnRH-I in songbirds has been limited to measurement of immunoreactive peptide. Measurement of mRNA regulation has been impossible because of lack of knowledge of the GnRH gene sequence, despite many attempts in the last 20 years to identify it. Thus, the relative roles of environmental, social, physiological, and evolutionary influences upon passerine GnRH regulation have remained enigmatic. Here, we report the first cloning of GnRH-I cDNA from a songbird, Taeniopygia guttata, its localization and regulation. Although the homology of its translated precursor polypeptide between chicken GnRH-I precursor polypeptide was only 54%, zebra finch GnRH-I precursor contained an amino acid sequence that can be processed into chicken GnRH-I peptide (pEHWSYGLQPG-amide). In situ hybridization combined with immunocytochemistry showed co-localization of GnRH-I mRNA and immunoreactive peptide in the preoptic area of sexually mature birds. GnRH-I mRNA signal was greatly reduced in sexually immature birds. Ovary mass of female birds was positively correlated with GnRH-I mRNA level in the brain. These data will now permit molecular analysis of the regulation of songbird reproduction by physical, social, and physiological cues, along with fine scale analysis of selection pressures acting upon the reproductive system of songbirds. (244/250). PMID:19136620

  10. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  11. Sequence analysis of the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, P H; Gillam, S; Smith, M; Milstein, C

    1977-01-01

    Using an oligonucleotide d(pT10-C-A) as primer, cDNA has been transcribed from the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain mRNA and sequenced by a modification1 of the 'plus-minus' gel method2. The sequence obtained has partially corrected and extended a previously obtained sequence3. The new data contains an unusual sequence in which a trinucleotide is repeated seven times. Images PMID:405661

  12. Expression and localization of gastrin messenger RNA and peptide in spermatogenic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schalling, M; Persson, H; Pelto-Huikko, M; Odum, L; Ekman, P; Gottlieb, C; Hökfelt, T; Rehfeld, J F

    1990-01-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the gene encoding cholecystokinin (CCK) is expressed in spermatogenic cells of several mammalian species. In the present study we show that a gene homologous to the CCK-related hormone, gastrin, is expressed in the human testis. The mRNA hybridizing to a human gastrin cDNA probe in the human testis was of the same size (0.7 kb) as gastrin mRNA in the human antrum. By in situ hybridization the gastrinlike mRNA was localized to seminiferous tubules. Immunocytochemical staining of human testis revealed gastrinlike peptides in the seminiferous tubules primarily at a position corresponding to spermatids and spermatozoa. In ejaculated spermatozoa gastrinlike immunoreactivity was localized to the acrosome. Acrosomal localization could also be shown in spermatids with electron microscopy. Extracts of the human testis contained significant amounts of progastrin, but no bioactive amidated gastrins. In contrast, ejaculated sperm contained mature carboxyamidated gastrin 34 and gastrin 17. The concentration of gastrin in ejaculated human spermatozoa varied considerably between individuals. We suggest that amidated gastrin (in humans) and CCK (in other mammals) are released during the acrosome reaction and that they may be important for fertilization. Images PMID:2117026

  13. Identification of target messenger RNA substrates for the murine deleted in azoospermia-like RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinfu; Trifillis, Panayiota; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2002-02-01

    The murine autosomal deleted in azoospermia-like protein (mDAZL) is a germ cell-restricted RNA-binding protein essential for sperm production. Homozygous disruption of the mDAZL gene results in the absence of germ cells beyond the spermatogonial stage. Progress into the function of DAZL in spermatogenesis has been hampered without identification of the cognate mRNA substrates that it binds to and regulates. Using the isolation of specific nucleic acids associated with proteins (SNAAP) technique recently developed in our lab, we identified mRNAs from testis that were specifically bound by mDAZL. One mRNA encoded the Tpx-1 protein, a testicular cell adhesion protein essential for the progression of spermatogenesis. A 26-nucleotide region necessary and sufficient to bind mDAZL was found within additional mRNAs isolated by the screen. These included mRNA encoding Pam, a protein associated with myc; GRSF1, an mRNA-binding protein involved in translation activation, and TRF2, a TATA box-binding protein-like protein involved in transcriptional regulation. Each mRNA containing the mDAZL binding site was specifically bound by mDAZL. A similar sequence is also present in the Cdc25A mRNA, a threonine/tyrosine phosphatase involved in cell cycle progression. The mDAZL and Cdc25A homologues are functionally linked in Drosophila and are necessary for spermatogenesis. Our demonstration that Tpx-1 and Cdc25A mRNAs are bound by mDAZL suggests that mDAZL regulates a subset of mRNAs necessary for germ cell development and cell cycle progression. Understanding how mDAZL regulates the target mRNAs will provide new insights into spermatogenesis, strategies for therapeutic intervention in azoospermic patients, and novel approaches for male contraception. PMID:11804965

  14. Skeletal Muscle MicroRNA and Messenger RNA Profiling in Cofilin-2 Deficient Mice Reveals Cell Cycle Dysregulation Hindering Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah U.; Joshi, Mugdha; Savic, Talia; Beggs, Alan H.; Agrawal, Pankaj B.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are rare skeletal muscle diseases presenting in early age with hypotonia and weakness often linked to a genetic defect. Mutations in the gene for cofilin-2 (CFL2) have been identified in several families as a cause of congenital myopathy with nemaline bodies and cores. Here we explore the global messenger and microRNA expression patterns in quadriceps muscle samples from cofillin-2-null mice and compare them with sibling-matched wild-type mice to determine the molecular pathways and mechanisms involved. Cell cycle processes are markedly dysregulated, with altered expression of genes involved in mitotic spindle formation, and evidence of loss of cell cycle checkpoint regulation. Importantly, alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation pathways are present in both mRNA and miRNA expression patterns. Specifically, p21 transcript levels were increased, and the expression of p21 targets, such as cyclin D and cyclin E, was decreased. We therefore hypothesize that deficiency of cofilin-2 is associated with interruption of the cell cycle at several checkpoints, hindering muscle regeneration. Identification of these pathways is an important step towards developing appropriate therapies against various congenital myopathies. PMID:25874796

  15. Increased P-glycoprotein messenger RNA stability in rat liver tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Bradley, G; Ling, V

    1998-10-01

    P-glycoproteins (Pgp) are comprised of a small family of plasma membrane proteins whose abundance in cultured cells is often associated with the multidrug resistance phenotype. Overexpression of Pgp has been observed in many types of human cancers, but the molecular basis for this overexpression has not been established. We have used primary monolayer cultures of adult rat hepatocytes and a stepwise model of rat liver carcinogenesis to study the regulation of Pgp gene expression. We observed a marked overexpression of Pgp, specifically the class II Pgp, in both systems. In addition, we observed that a number of unrelated genes including alpha-tubulin, beta-actin, gamma-actin, cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18, and c-myc are overexpressed in cultured hepatocytes, and they are also overexpressed during liver carcinogenesis and in transplantable tumors. Nuclear run-on assays showed no increase in the transcriptional activity of Pgp genes in transplantable liver tumors compared to normal liver. Studies of in vivo mRNA stability, however, revealed that all three Pgp mRNAs were relatively stable in transplantable liver tumors (t(1/2) > 12 h), in contrast to what was found in normal liver (t(1/2) < 2 h). In addition, mRNA for several other genes, including alpha-tubulin, c-myc, and cyclin D1, all appear to be stabilized in the tumors. These findings suggest that the overexpression of Pgp genes in rat liver tumors may be the result of a mechanism involving stabilization of a diverse group of mRNAs. PMID:9731740

  16. Bisphenol S alters embryonic viability, development, gallbladder size, and messenger RNA expression in chicken embryos exposed via egg injection.

    PubMed

    Crump, Doug; Chiu, Suzanne; Williams, Kim L

    2016-06-01

    Amid concerns about the toxicological effects and environmental prevalence of bisphenol A (BPA), efforts to find suitable, safer replacement alternatives are essential. Bisphenol S (BPS) is a potential chemical substitute for BPA; however, few studies are available confirming that it has a more desirable ecotoxicological profile. In the present study, BPS was injected into the air cell of unincubated, fertilized chicken embryos at 6 concentrations ranging from 0 μg/g to 207 μg/g egg to determine effects on pipping success, development, hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations. Concentrations of BPS increased in a dose-dependent manner in whole-embryo homogenates, and exposure to the highest dose, 207 μg/g, resulted in decreased pipping success (estimated median lethal dose  = 279 μg/g; 95% confidence interval = 161-486 μg/g). Exposure to BPS also reduced growth metrics including embryo mass and tarsus length, whereas the most pronounced phenotypic effect was the concentration-dependent, significant increase in gallbladder size at concentrations ≥52.8 μg/g. These adverse phenotypic outcomes were associated with the modulation of gene targets from a chicken ToxChip polymerase chain reaction array, which are involved with xenobiotic metabolism, lipid homeostasis, bile acid synthesis, and the thyroid hormone pathway. Expression levels of 2 estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin, were too low at the sampling time point assessed (i.e., pipping embryos) to quantify changes, and no effects were observed on circulating free thyroxine or bile acid concentrations. The present study provides novel, whole-animal toxicological data for a BPA replacement alternative that is not well characterized. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1541-1549. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26606162

  17. Second Messengers.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alexandra C; Bootman, Martin D; Scott, John D

    2016-01-01

    Second messengers are small molecules and ions that relay signals received by cell-surface receptors to effector proteins. They include a wide variety of chemical species and have diverse properties that allow them to signal within membranes (e.g., hydrophobic molecules such as lipids and lipid derivatives), within the cytosol (e.g., polar molecules such as nucleotides and ions), or between the two (e.g., gases and free radicals). Second messengers are typically present at low concentrations in resting cells and can be rapidly produced or released when cells are stimulated. The levels of second messengers are exquisitely controlled temporally and spatially, and, during signaling, enzymatic reactions or opening of ion channels ensure that they are highly amplified. These messengers then diffuse rapidly from the source and bind to target proteins to alter their properties (activity, localization, stability, etc.) to propagate signaling. PMID:27481708

  18. Coordinated microRNA and messenger RNA expression profiles for understanding sexual dimorphism of gonads and the potential roles of microRNA in the steroidogenesis pathway in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Qing; Li, Baojun; An, Lixia; Hao, Ruirong; Zhao, Jinliang; Liu, Shaozhen; Song, Jing

    2016-03-15

    Sexual dimorphism is a widespread phenomenon in animals. However, the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating this dimorphism is not fully understood. In our study, we used an integrated approach to identify functional targets of miRNA by combining the paired expression profiles of miRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in ovaries and testes of young Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. The results revealed that 67 upregulated and nine downregulated miRNAs and 2299 upregulated and 3260 downregulated genes were identified in the ovary compared with those in the testis (P < 0.01). The target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted and overlapped with the differentially expressed mRNAs. Furthermore, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were conducted in these coincident genes. By correlating miRNA-mRNA and predicting computational target, two types of negatively regulatory miRNA-mRNA correlations (upregulated or downregulated miRNA and downregulated or upregulated mRNA) were obtained. Seven functional miRNA-target gene pairs, miR-17-5p/DMRT1, miR-20a/DMRT1, miR-138/CYP17A2, miR-338/CYP17A2, miR-200a/CYP17A2, miR-456/AMH, and miR-138/AMH, were predicted at the sequence level and further detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction on the basis of the significantly negative relationships. Our results suggest that the integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling can provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of sexual dimorphism. PMID:26719037

  19. Friedrich Miescher Prize awardee lecture review. A conserved family of nuclear export receptors mediates the exit of messenger RNA to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Izaurralde, E

    2001-07-01

    The distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells is the segregation of RNA biogenesis and DNA replication in the nucleus, separate from the cytoplasmic machinery for protein synthesis. As a consequence, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and all cytoplasmic RNAs from nuclear origin need to be transported from their site of synthesis in the nucleus to their final cytoplasmic destination. Nuclear export occurs through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and is mediated by saturable transport receptors, which shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The past years have seen great progress in the characterization of the mRNA export pathway and the identification of proteins involved in this process. A novel family of nuclear export receptors (the NXF family), distinct from the well-characterized family of importin beta-like proteins, has been implicated in the export of mRNA to the cytoplasm. PMID:11529502

  20. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  1. A single base deletion in the Tfm androgen receptor gene creates a short-lived messenger RNA that directs internal translation initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, M L; Meo, T; Bourgarel, P; Guenet, J L; Tosi, M

    1991-01-01

    Testosterone-resistant male mice hemizygous for the X-chromosome-linked mutant gene Tfm express detectable but severely reduced levels of androgen receptor mRNA, amounting to about 10% of the level found in normal male littermates. No structural abnormality could be identified in the coding region of the messenger by a series of RNase-protection assays. However, cell-free translation of RNAs transcribed in vitro from enzymatically amplified overlapping segments of exon 1 revealed a truncated receptor protein and helped to localize the site of premature termination. Sequence analysis of the relevant DNA segment disclosed that deletion of a single nucleotide in the hexacytidine stretch at position 1107-1112 alters the reading frame of the messenger and introduces 41 missense amino acids before a premature termination codon at position 1235-1237. Separately initiated carboxyl-terminal polypeptides are synthesized in vitro, starting probably at the in-frame AUG codon 1507-1509, which lies in a favorable context for translation initiation, and at the non-AUG codon 1144-1146. Transcriptional impairments of the Tfm gene were ruled out by a quantitative analysis of enzymatically amplified nuclear RNA precursors. No other change could be identified by sequencing the complete coding region of Tfm cDNA. The finding of the unsuspected termination codon and the evidence of internally initiated carboxyl-terminal polypeptides reconcile previous conclusions and account for all known phenotypic properties of the mutation. Images PMID:1924321

  2. Erythropoietin messenger RNA levels in developing mice and transfer of /sup 125/I-erythropoietin by the placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Koury, M.J.; Bondurant, M.C.; Graber, S.E.; Sawyer, S.T.

    1988-07-01

    Erythropoietin (EP) mRNA was measured in normal and anemic mice during fetal and postnatal development. Normal fetal livers at 14 d of gestation contained a low level of EP mRNA. By day 19 of gestation, no EP mRNA was detected in normal or anemic fetal livers or normal fetal kidneys, but anemic fetal kidneys had low levels of EP mRNA. Newborn through adult stage mice responded to anemia by accumulating renal and hepatic EP mRNA. However, total liver EP mRNA was considerably less than that of the kidneys. Juvenile animals, 1-4 wk old, were hyperresponsive to anemia in that they produced more EP mRNA than adults. Moreover, nonanemic juveniles had readily measured renal EP mRNA, whereas the adult level was at the lower limit of detection. Because of the very low level of fetal EP mRNA, placental transfer of EP was evaluated. When administered to the pregnant mouse, /sup 125/I-EP was transferred in significant amounts to the fetuses. These results indicate that in mice the kidney is the main organ of EP production at all stages of postnatal development and that adult kidney may also play some role in providing EP for fetal erythropoiesis via placental transfer of maternal hormone.

  3. Expression of endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) messenger (m) RNA in a GH-transgenic tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Caelers, Antje; Maclean, Norman; Hwang, Gyulin; Eppler, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    We have previously produced transgenic fish from crosses between a wild-type female tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and a G transgenic male. This line of growth-enhanced tilapia carries a single copy of a chinook salmon (s) growth hormone (GH) gene spliced to an ocean pout antifreeze promoter (OPA-FPcsGH) co-ligated to a carp beta-actin/lacZ reporter gene construct, integrated into the tilapia genome. Because little is known about the expression sites of transgenes, we have characterised the gene expression patterns of sGH and tilapia (t)GH in transgenic tilapia using a newly established real-time PCR to measure the absolute mRNA amounts of both hormones. The sGH gene, which was expected to be expressed mainly in liver, was also found to be expressed in other organs, such as gills, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, intestine and testes. However, in pituitary no sGH mRNA but only tGH mRNA was found. Tilapia GH mRNA in wild-type pituitary amounted to 226 +/- 30 pg/microg total RNA but in transgenics only to 187 +/- 43 pg/microg total RNA. Liver exhibited the highest level of sGH mRNA (8.3 +/- 2.5 pg/microg total RNA) but the extrahepatic sites expressed considerable amounts of sGH mRNA ranging from 4.1 +/- 2.0 pg/microg total RNA in gills to 0.2 +/- 0.08 pg/microg total RNA in kidney. The widespread expression of the sGH gene is assumed to be due to the tissue specificity of the type III AFP gene promoter. It is assumed that our transgenic experiments, which in contrast to some other approaches caused no obvious organ abnormalities, mimick the GH expression during ontogeny. Because sGH mRNA is expressed both in liver and in extrahepatic sites it may not only promote secretion and release of liver-derived (endocrine) IGF-I leading to an overall growth enhancement but also stimulate IGF-I expression within the different organs in a paracrine/autocrine manner and, thus, further promote organ growth. PMID:15865052

  4. Follicular progesterone concentrations and messenger RNA expression of MATER and OCT-4 in immature bovine oocytes as predictors of developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Urrego, R; Herrera-Puerta, E; Chavarria, N A; Camargo, O; Wrenzycki, C; Rodriguez-Osorio, N

    2015-04-15

    The ability of bovine embryos to develop to the blastocyst stage and to implant and generate healthy offspring depends greatly on the competence of the oocyte. Oocyte competence is attributed to its close communication with the follicular environment and to its capacity to synthesize and store substantial amounts of messenger RNA. Higher developmental competence of bovine oocytes has been associated with both the expression of a cohort of developmental genes and the concentration of sex steroids in the follicular fluid. The aim of this study was to identify differences in the expression of FST in cumulus cells and OCT-4 and MATER in oocytes and the influence of the follicular progesterone and follicular estrogen concentration on the competence of bovine oocytes retrieved 30 minutes or 4 hours after slaughter. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were left in postmortem ovaries for 30 minutes (group I) or 4 hours (group II) at 30 °C. Aspirated oocytes were then subjected to IVM, IVF, and IVC or were evaluated for MATER and OCT-4 messenger RNA abundance by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Total RNA was isolated from pools of 100 oocytes for each experimental replicate. Progesterone and estradiol concentration in follicular fluid was evaluated by immunoassay using an IMMULITE 2000 analyzer. Three repeats of in vitro embryo production were performed with a total of 455 (group I) and 470 (group II) COCs. There were no significant differences between the cleavage rates (72 hours postinsemination [hpi]) between both groups (63.5% vs. 69.1%). However, blastocyst (168 hpi) and hatching (216 hpi) rates were higher (P < 0.05) in group II compared with those of group I (21.3% vs. 30.7% and 27.6% vs. 51.5%, respectively). Group II oocytes exhibited the highest MATER and OCT-4 abundance (P < 0.05). Follicular estradiol concentration was not different between both the groups, whereas the progesterone concentration was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in group II follicles. These

  5. betaMinor-globin messenger RNA accumulation in reticulocytes governs improved erythropoiesis in beta thalassemic mice after erythropoietin complementary DNA electrotransfer in muscles.

    PubMed

    Samakoglu, S; Fattori, E; Lamartina, S; Toniatti, C; Stockholm, D; Heard, J M; Bohl, D

    2001-04-15

    Mechanisms governing the induction of effective erythropoiesis in response to erythropoietin (Epo) oversecretion have been investigated in beta thalassemic C57Bl/6(Hbbth) mice. Naked DNA encoding an expression vector for mouse Epo was introduced into skeletal muscles by electrotransfer. A transient increase of serum Epo concentrations with a proportional augmentation of hematocrit values was observed. Various parameters relevant to beta thalassemia were surveyed in blood samples taken before treatment, at the peak of Epo secretion, and when the phenotype reverted to anemia. We measured globin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in reticulocytes by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, globin chain synthesis levels, and several indicators of erythrocyte membrane quality, including bound alpha chains, bound immunoglobulins, main protein components, and iron compartmentalization. Data indicated that high serum Epo levels primarily affect betaminor-globin mRNA accumulation in reticulocytes. Other changes subsequent to intense Epo stimulation, like increased betaminor/alpha-globin chain synthesis ratio, reduced levels of alpha chains and immunoglobulins bound to membranes, improved spectrin/band 3 ratio, increased red blood cell survival, and improved erythropoiesis appeared as consequences of increased betaminor-globin mRNA levels. This conclusion is consistent with models postulating that intense Epo stimulation induces the expansion and differentiation of erythroid progenitors committed to fetal erythropoiesis. Although phenotypic correction was partial in mice, and comparable achievements will probably be more difficult to obtain in humans, naked DNA electrotransfer may provide a safe and low-cost method for reassessing the potentials of Epo as an inducer of fetal erythropoiesis reactivation in patients with beta thalassemia. PMID:11290581

  6. Expression of messenger RNA for gonadotropin receptor in the granulosa layer during the ovulatory cycle of hens.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, N; Takeishi, M; Goto, H; Tagami, M; Mizutani, T; Miyamoto, K; Doi, O; Kamiyoshi, M

    2001-06-01

    The present experiments were conducted to evaluate the mRNA levels of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) in granulosa layers during the ovulatory cycle of hens, in relation to the release of LH and steroid hormones. After the release of LH, progesterone (P4) and estradiol-17beta (E2), found 4-5 h before ovulation, LHR and FSHR mRNA levels were observed to decrease in the granulosa layers of the largest (F1) and second largest (F2) preovulatory follicles, with the greatest in the LHR mRNA level of F1. P4 concentrations in the granulosa layers of F1 and F2 increased 4-5 h before ovulation, with greater in F1 than in F2. F2 concentrations in the theca layers were greater in F2 than in F1 throughout the ovulatory cycle. Also, the injection of ovine LH caused decreases in the mRNA levels of LHR and FSHR in the granulosa layers. However, these decreases were abolished by the injection of aminoglutethimide, an inhibitor of steroid synthesis. These results suggest that in hen granulosa cells, the mRNA levels of not only LHR but also FSHR are down-regulated by LH and the down-regulation may be mediated steroid hormones. PMID:11423305

  7. Effect of flax supplementation and growth promotants on lipoprotein lipase and glycogenin messenger RNA concentrations in finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Waylan, A T; Dunn, J D; Johnson, B J; Kayser, J P; Sissom, E K

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerols into monoacylglycerol and fatty acids, which are taken up by tissues and used for energy. Glycogenin is the core protein on which glycogen molecules are synthesized. There is one molecule of glycogenin per molecule of glycogen in skeletal muscle; therefore, glycogen storage is limited by the amount of glycogenin present in muscle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding flaxseed, a source of PUFA, and administering a growth promoter on steady-state LPL and glycogenin mRNA content of muscle in finishing cattle. Sixteen crossbred steers (initial BW = 397 kg), given ad libitum access to a 92% concentrate diet for 28 d, were used in a four-treatment, 2 x 2 factorial experiment, with flaxseed supplementation (0 or 5% of dietary DM) and implanting (not implanted or implanted with Revalor-S) as the main effects. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the LM at 0, 14, and 28 d, and used to quantify LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations using real-time quantitative PCR. Implanting with Revalor-S did not affect LPL (P = 0.13) or glycogenin (P = 0.98) mRNA concentrations. A day x flaxseed interaction (P < 0.001) was observed for both LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations. No differences (P > 0.10) were observed between 0 and 5% flaxseed supplemented steers; however, at 28 d, nonflaxseed-fed steers had 4.1- and 5.7-fold increases (P < 0.001) over flaxseed steers for LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, respectively. To further evaluate the effects of alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LA) on LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, muscle satellite cells were isolated from five finishing steers, and different alpha-LA concentrations were applied in culture. The RNA was isolated from the bovine satellite cells. Addition of alpha-LA numerically increased (P = 0.16) the LPL mRNA concentration 48% at 1 microM alpha-LA compared with the control. The expression of glycogenin was increased (P < 0.05) 50% at 1

  8. The influence of glucocorticoid on the fibrinogen messenger RNA content of rat liver in vivo and in hepatocyte suspension culture.

    PubMed Central

    Princen, H M; Moshage, H J; de Haard, H J; van Gemert, P J; Yap, S H

    1984-01-01

    The plasma concentration of fibrinogen, one of the major acute-phase proteins produced by the liver, increases during the acute-phase response as a result of enhanced synthesis in liver. Since adrenal-cortical hormones have been thought to have a key role in the regulation of the fibrinogen synthesis, fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA sequences were determined in the present study, by using a specific complementary-DNA probe, in RNA fractions obtained from rat hepatocytes exposed to glucocorticoids in vitro (hepatocyte suspension cultures) and in vivo. Maximal induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA (to 400% of the control value) was found in vitro at 0.1 microM-dexamethasone after 9 h of incubation. The same magnitude of induction was obtained with 20 microM-cortisol or 60 microM-corticosterone. In contrast with the findings in vitro, no induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA was observed in the liver at various times after injection of different doses of glucocorticoids into rats. These results suggest that more complex regulatory mechanisms are involved and that glucocorticoids are not the sole regulatory factors in vivo in the enhanced synthesis of fibrinogen during the acute-phase response. PMID:6547834

  9. Association of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Messenger RNA Level, Food Intake, and Growth in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) is a potent hypothalamic anorectic peptide in mammals and fish. We hypothesized that increased food intake is associated with changes in expression of CART mRNA within the brain of channel catfish. Objectives were to clone the CART gene, examine ...

  10. Gifsy-1 Prophage IsrK with Dual Function as Small and Messenger RNA Modulates Vital Bacterial Machineries.

    PubMed

    Hershko-Shalev, Tal; Odenheimer-Bergman, Ahuva; Elgrably-Weiss, Maya; Ben-Zvi, Tamar; Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Seri, Hemda; Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg; Altuvia, Shoshy

    2016-04-01

    While an increasing number of conserved small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to function in general bacterial physiology, the roles and modes of action of sRNAs from horizontally acquired genomic regions remain little understood. The IsrK sRNA of Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella belongs to the latter class. This regulatory RNA exists in two isoforms. The first forms, when a portion of transcripts originating from isrK promoter reads-through the IsrK transcription-terminator producing a translationally inactive mRNA target. Acting in trans, the second isoform, short IsrK RNA, binds the inactive transcript rendering it translationally active. By switching on translation of the first isoform, short IsrK indirectly activates the production of AntQ, an antiterminator protein located upstream of isrK. Expression of antQ globally interferes with transcription termination resulting in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells expressing AntQ display condensed chromatin morphology and localization of UvrD to the nucleoid. The toxic phenotype of AntQ can be rescued by co-expression of the transcription termination factor, Rho, or RNase H, which protects genomic DNA from breaks by resolving R-loops. We propose that AntQ causes conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus promotes DNA damage. The isrK locus represents a unique example of an island-encoded sRNA that exerts a highly complex regulatory mechanism to tune the expression of a toxic protein. PMID:27057757

  11. Gifsy-1 Prophage IsrK with Dual Function as Small and Messenger RNA Modulates Vital Bacterial Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Hershko-Shalev, Tal; Odenheimer-Bergman, Ahuva; Elgrably-Weiss, Maya; Ben-Zvi, Tamar; Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Seri, Hemda; Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg; Altuvia, Shoshy

    2016-01-01

    While an increasing number of conserved small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are known to function in general bacterial physiology, the roles and modes of action of sRNAs from horizontally acquired genomic regions remain little understood. The IsrK sRNA of Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella belongs to the latter class. This regulatory RNA exists in two isoforms. The first forms, when a portion of transcripts originating from isrK promoter reads-through the IsrK transcription-terminator producing a translationally inactive mRNA target. Acting in trans, the second isoform, short IsrK RNA, binds the inactive transcript rendering it translationally active. By switching on translation of the first isoform, short IsrK indirectly activates the production of AntQ, an antiterminator protein located upstream of isrK. Expression of antQ globally interferes with transcription termination resulting in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells expressing AntQ display condensed chromatin morphology and localization of UvrD to the nucleoid. The toxic phenotype of AntQ can be rescued by co-expression of the transcription termination factor, Rho, or RNase H, which protects genomic DNA from breaks by resolving R-loops. We propose that AntQ causes conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus promotes DNA damage. The isrK locus represents a unique example of an island-encoded sRNA that exerts a highly complex regulatory mechanism to tune the expression of a toxic protein. PMID:27057757

  12. Regulation of corticotropin receptor number and messenger RNA in cultured human adrenocortical cells by corticotropin and angiotensin II.

    PubMed Central

    Lebrethon, M C; Naville, D; Begeot, M; Saez, J M

    1994-01-01

    The regulation of ACTH receptor binding sites and mRNA by ACTH and angiotensin II (A-II) was studied using cultured human adrenal fasciculata reticularis cells (HAC). These cells expressed two major ACTH receptor transcripts of 1.8 and 3.4 kb and three minor ones of 4, 7, and 11 kb. ACTH increased the levels of all these transcripts in a time- and dose-dependent manner. At a maximal concentration of 10(-8) M, ACTH enhanced 21- and 4-fold the level of ACTH receptor mRNA and the number of receptors per cell, respectively. Pretreatment of HAC with A-II produced a dose-dependent enhancement of ACTH receptor mRNA that was associated with an increase of both ACTH receptor number and responsiveness to this hormone. The effects of A-II were completely blocked by an AT1 receptor subtype antagonist but not by an AT2 antagonist. The effects of ACTH together with A-II on ACTH receptor mRNA were greater than those induced by each hormone alone. These results show that ACTH receptor number and mRNA are positively regulated by the two main hormones (ACTH and A-II) which, in vivo, regulate adrenocortical functions. In addition, they also show that HAC are a target for A-II. Thus, regulation of ACTH receptors may be one mechanism by which ACTH and A-II regulate adrenocortical functions under both normal and pathological conditions. Images PMID:8163681

  13. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3′ major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion. PMID:11160889

  14. Elliptocytosis in patients with C-terminal domain mutations of protein 4.1 correlates with encoded messenger RNA levels rather than with alterations in primary protein structure.

    PubMed

    Morinière, M; Ribeiro, L; Dalla Venezia, N; Deguillien, M; Maillet, P; Cynober, T; Delhommeau, F; Almeida, H; Tamagnini, G; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    2000-03-01

    Early biochemical studies defined 4 functional domains of the erythroid protein 4.1 (4.1R). From amino-terminal to carboxy-terminal, these are 30 kd, 16 kd, 10 kd, and 22/24 kd in size. Although the functional properties of both the 30-kd and the 10-kd domain have been demonstrated in red cells, no functional activities have been assigned to either the 16-kd or the 22/24-kd domain in these cells. We here describe new mutations in the sequence encoding the C-terminal 22/24-kd domain that are associated with hereditary elliptocytosis. An unusually mild phenotype observed in heterozygous and homozygous members of 1 family suggested heterogeneity in the pattern of expression of 4.1R deficiency. Using a variety of protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) quantification strategies, we showed that, regardless of the alteration in the C-terminal primary sequence, when the protein is produced, it assembles at the cell membrane. In addition, we found that alterations in red cell morphologic features and membrane function correlate with the amount of membrane-associated protein-and therefore with the amount of mRNA accumulated-rather than with the primary structure of the variant proteins. These data suggest that an intact sequence at exons 19 through 21 encoding part of the C-terminal 22/24-kd region is not required for proper protein 4.1R assembly in mature red cells. (Blood. 2000;95:1834-1841) PMID:10688845

  15. Differential and tissue-specific regulation of the multiple rat c-erbA messenger RNA species by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Hodin, R A; Lazar, M A; Chin, W W

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) has been shown to regulate the level of its receptor in a number of tissues and cell lines. Recently, proteins encoded by the protooncogene c-erbA have been identified as T3 receptors. In the rat, four c-erbA gene products have been isolated, three of which, r-erbA alpha-1, r-erbA beta-1, and r-erbA beta-2, encode biologically active T3 receptors; the fourth, r-erbA alpha-2, may play an inhibitory role in T3 action. The present work examines the molecular nature of T3 receptor autoregulation using probes specific for each c-erbA mRNA. Rats were rendered hypothyroid with propylthiouracil and then treated with either saline or T3. Northern blot analyses reveal marked tissue-specific and differential regulation of the multiple c-erbA mRNAs by T3. In the pituitary the levels of r-erbA beta-1 mRNA increase, whereas the levels of the pituitary-specific r-erbA beta-2 mRNA decrease with T3 treatment. In heart, kidney, liver, and brain the levels of r-erbA beta-1 are unaffected by thyroidal status. The levels of both r-erbA alpha mRNAs decrease with T3 treatment in all tissues examined except for the brain, where there is no change. In addition, we find that changes in the mRNAs encoding specific subpopulations of T3 receptors do not always parallel changes in total nuclear T3 binding. Differential regulation of the specific c-erbA mRNA species could have important consequences for T3 action. PMID:2153150

  16. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  17. The transfer-messenger RNA-small protein B system plays a role in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaohui; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Huiqing; Gao, Qingqing; Xiong, Liping; Gao, Ruxia; Gao, Song; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-11-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is capable of colonizing outside of the intestinal tract and evolving into a systemic infection. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a member of the ExPEC group and causes avian colibacillosis. Transfer-mRNA-small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB)-mediated trans-translation is a bacterial translational control system that directs the modification and degradation of proteins, the biosynthesis of which has stalled or has been interrupted, facilitating the rescue of ribosomes stalled at the 3' ends of defective mRNAs that lack a stop codon. We found that disruption of one, or both, of the smpB or ssrA genes significantly decreased the virulence of the APEC strain E058, as assessed by chicken infection assays. Furthermore, the mutants were obviously attenuated in colonization and persistence assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the transcription levels of the transcriptional regulation gene rfaH and the virulence genes kpsM, chuA, and iss were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain. Macrophage infection assays showed that the mutant strains reduced the replication and/or survival ability in the macrophage HD11 cell line compared to that of the parent strain, E058. However, no significant differences were observed in ingestion by macrophages and in chicken serum resistance between the mutant and the wild-type strains. These data indicate that the tmRNA-SmpB system is important in the pathogenesis of APEC O2 strain E058. PMID:24013628

  18. The Transfer-Messenger RNA-Small Protein B System Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaohui; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Huiqing; Gao, Qingqing; Xiong, Liping; Gao, Ruxia; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is capable of colonizing outside of the intestinal tract and evolving into a systemic infection. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a member of the ExPEC group and causes avian colibacillosis. Transfer-mRNA-small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB)-mediated trans-translation is a bacterial translational control system that directs the modification and degradation of proteins, the biosynthesis of which has stalled or has been interrupted, facilitating the rescue of ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends of defective mRNAs that lack a stop codon. We found that disruption of one, or both, of the smpB or ssrA genes significantly decreased the virulence of the APEC strain E058, as assessed by chicken infection assays. Furthermore, the mutants were obviously attenuated in colonization and persistence assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the transcription levels of the transcriptional regulation gene rfaH and the virulence genes kpsM, chuA, and iss were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain. Macrophage infection assays showed that the mutant strains reduced the replication and/or survival ability in the macrophage HD11 cell line compared to that of the parent strain, E058. However, no significant differences were observed in ingestion by macrophages and in chicken serum resistance between the mutant and the wild-type strains. These data indicate that the tmRNA-SmpB system is important in the pathogenesis of APEC O2 strain E058. PMID:24013628

  19. Identification of the messenger RNA for human cutaneous fatty acid-binding protein as a metastasis inducer.

    PubMed

    Jing, C; Beesley, C; Foster, C S; Rudland, P S; Fujii, H; Ono, T; Chen, H; Smith, P H; Ke, Y

    2000-05-01

    Using our recently developed systematic differential display and complete comparison of gene expression approaches combined with other methods, we have identified a large number of mRNAs that are expressed differentially between benign and malignant human cells. One such mRNA that is common to prostate and breast carcinoma cell lines encodes the human cutaneous fatty acid-binding protein (C-FABP). Northern and slot blot analyses confirm that the expression levels of C-FABP mRNA in the malignant prostate and breast carcinoma cell lines are 4.9+/-0.9- to 16.9+/-2.1-fold higher than those expressed in the benign cell lines. A similar difference between the benign and malignant cell lines was also detected at the protein level. In situ hybridization experiments have detected overexpression of the mRNA for C-FABP in human prostate carcinoma tissues. Transfection of a C-FABP expression construct into the benign, nonmetastatic rat mammary epithelial cell line Rama 37 and inoculation of the C-FABP expression transfectants into syngeneic Wistar-Furth rats produce a significant number (P < 0.05) of animals with metastases (6 of 26 animals), whereas the control transfectants generated by the vector alone yield no such metastases. Measurements of mRNA and protein levels with Northern and Western blotting show that C-FABP is not expressed in the control transfectant cells produced by the vector alone but is highly expressed in the pool of C-FABP transfectants and-the sublines established from their metastases. Immunocytochemical staining with antibodies to C-FABP shows that C-FABP is not expressed in the primary tumors developed from the control transfectants that have failed to metastasize, but it is expressed in both the primary tumors developed from the C-FABP transfectants and their metastases. Reinoculation of the sublines established from metastases in syngeneic rats has produced a higher proportion (50%) of animals (7 of 14 animals) with metastases than that obtained in

  20. Experimental murine myopia induces collagen type Iα1 (COL1A1) DNA methylation and altered COL1A1 messenger RNA expression in sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Ji, Fengtao; An, Jianhong; Zhao, Fuxin; Shi, Fanjun; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuan; Jiao, Shiming; Yan, Dongsheng; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, JiangFan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether myopia development is associated with changes of scleral DNA methylation in cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in the collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) promoter and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels following murine form deprivation myopia. Methods Fifty-seven C57BL/6 mice (postnatal day 23) were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) monocular form deprivation (MD) in which a diffuser lens was placed over one eye for 28 days; (2) normal controls without MD; (3) MD recovery in which the diffuser lens was removed for seven days; and (4) MD recovery normal controls. The DNA methylation pattern in COL1A1 promoter and exon 1 was determined by bisulfite DNA sequencing, and the COL1A1 mRNA level in sclera was determined by quantitative PCR. Results MD was found to induce myopia in the treated eyes. Six CpG sites in the promoter and exon 1 region of COL1A1 were methylated with significantly higher frequency in the treated eyes than normal control eyes (p<0.05), with CpG island methylation in MD-contralateral eyes being intermediate. Consistent with the CpG methylation, scleral COL1A1 mRNA was reduced by 57% in the MD-treated eyes compared to normal controls (p<0.05). After seven days of MD recovery, CpG methylation was significantly reduced (p=0.01). The methylation patterns returned to near normal level in five CpG sites, but the sixth was hypomethylated compared to normal controls. Conclusions In parallel with the development of myopia and the reduced COL1A1 mRNA, the frequency of methylation in CpG sites of the COL1A1 promoter/exon 1 increased during MD and returned to near normal during recovery. Thus, hypermethylation of CpG sites in the promoter/exon 1 of COL1A1 may underlie reduced collagen synthesis at the transcriptional level in myopic scleras. PMID:22690110

  1. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency. PMID:25150122

  2. Autoantibodies to protein transport and messenger RNA processing pathways: endosomes, lysosomes, Golgi complex, proteasomes, assemblyosomes, exosomes, and GW bodies.

    PubMed

    Stinton, Laura M; Eystathioy, Theophany; Selak, Sanja; Chan, Edward K L; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2004-01-01

    Over 50 years ago the lupus erythematosus (LE) cell phenomenon was described and this was quickly followed by the introduction of the LE cell test and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) to detect antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in clinical laboratories. Recently, attention has turned to the identification of the autoantigens that bind to cytoplasmic organelles such as the Golgi complex, endosomes and other "cytoplasmic somes". Three endosome autoantigens include early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1, 160 kDa), cytoplasmic linker protein-170 (CLIP-170, 170 kDa), and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). Antibodies to EEA1 were seen in a variety of conditions but approximately 40% of the patients had a neurological disease. Despite the prominence of lysosomes in cells and tissues, reports of autoantibodies are limited to the lysosomal antigen h-LAMP-2 and the cytoplasmic antineutrophil antibodies (cANCA). Autoantigens in the Golgi complex include giantin/macrogolgin, golgin-245, golgin 160, golgin-97, golgin 95/gm130, and golgin-67. More recently, there has been an interest in autoantibodies that bind components of the "SMN complex" or the "assemblyosome". Arginine/glycine (RG)-rich domains in components of the SMN complex interact with Sm, like-Sm (LSm), fibrillarin, RNA helicase A (Gu), and coilin proteins, all of which are antigen targets in a variety of diseases. More recently, components of a novel cytoplasmic structure named GW bodies (GWBs) have been identified as targets of human autoantibodies. Components of GWBs include GW182, a unique mRNA-binding protein, like Sm proteins (LSms), and decapping (hDcp1) and exonuclease (Xrn) enzymes. Current evidence suggests that GWBs are involved in the cytoplasmic processing of mRNAs. Autoantibodies to the "cytoplasmic somes" are relatively uncommon and serological tests to detect most of them are not widely available. PMID:14962794

  3. Complementary DNA cloning, messenger RNA expression, and induction of alpha-class glutathione S-transferases in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Buetler, T M; Eaton, D L

    1992-01-15

    Glutathione S-transferases (EC 2.5.1.18) are a multigene family of related proteins divided into four classes. Each class has multiple isoforms that exhibit tissue-specific expression, which may be an important determinant of susceptibility of that tissue to toxic injury or cancer. Recent studies have suggested that alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoforms may play an important role in the development of cancers. Several alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isozymes have been characterized, purified, and cloned from a number of species, including rats, mice, and humans. Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and mRNA expression of two alpha-class glutathione S-transferases from mouse liver, termed mYa and mYc. While mYa was shown to be identical to the known alpha-class glutathione S-transferase complementary DNA clone pGT41 (W. R. Pearson et al., J. Biol. Chem., 263: 13324-13332, 1988), the other clone, mYc, was demonstrated to be a novel complementary DNA clone encoding a glutathione S-transferase homologous to rat Yc (subunit 2). The mRNA for this novel complementary DNA is expressed constitutively in mouse liver. It also is the major alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform expressed in lung. The levels of expression of the butylated hydroxyanisole-inducible form (mYa) are highest in kidney and intestine. Treatment of mice with butylated hydroxyanisole had little effect on the expression levels of mYc but strongly induced mYa expression in liver. Butylated hydroxyanisole treatment increased expression levels for both mYa and mYc to varying degrees in kidney, lung, and intestine. The importance of the novel mouse liver alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform (mYc) in the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and other carcinogens is discussed. PMID:1728405

  4. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-11-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26212048

  5. Stability of Reference Genes for Messenger RNA Quantification by Real-Time PCR in Mouse Dextran Sodium Sulfate Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Nour; Hussein, Hayam; Wang, Hongxing; Rabbi, Mohammad F.; Bernstein, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many animal models have been developed to characterize the complexity of colonic inflammation. In dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) experimental colitis in mice the choice of reference genes is critical for accurate quantification of target genes using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR). No studies have addressed the performance of reference genes in mice DSS-experimental colitis. This study aimed to determine the stability of reference genes expression (RGE) in DSS-experimental murine colitis. Methods Colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice using DSS5% for 5 days, control group received water. RNA was extracted from inflamed and non-inflamed colon. Using RT-qPCR, comparative analysis of 13 RGE was performed according to predefined criteria and relative colonic TNF-α and IL-1β gene expression was determined by calculating the difference in the threshold cycle. Results Colitis significantly altered the stability of mucosal RGE. Commonly used glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh), β-actin (Actb), or β2-microglobulin (β2m) showed the highest variability within the inflamed and control groups. Conversely, TATA-box-binding protein (Tbp) and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (Eef2) were not affected by inflammation and were the most stable genes. Normalization of colonic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels was dependent on the reference gene used. Depending on the genes used to normalize the data, statistical significance varied from significant when TBP / Eef2 were used to non-significant when Gapdh, Actb or β2m were used. Conclusions This study highlights the appropriate choice of RGE to ensure adequate normalization of RT-qPCR data when using this model. Suboptimal RGE may explain controversial results from published studies. We recommend using Tbp and Eef2 instead of Gapdh, Actb or β2m as reference genes. PMID:27244258

  6. In situ changes in the relative abundance of human epidermal cytokine messenger RNA levels following exposure to the poison ivy/oak contact allergen urushiol.

    PubMed

    Boehm, K D; Yun, J K; Strohl, K P; Trefzer, U; Häffner, A; Elmets, C A

    1996-06-01

    Abstract: Epidermal keratinocytes in culture have been shown to produce many cytokines, and their proteins have been identified in skin tissue samples. It has therefore been assumed that these cytokines are transcribed in vivo by the epidermis in response to contact allergens. In this report, in situ hybridization was used to detect the messenger RNAs for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in samples of human skin prior to and at various times after application of urushiol, the immunogenic component of poison ivy/oak. In sensitive subjects, IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha mRNAs showed a progressive increase in transcript levels that paralleled the clinical and histological features of the inflammatory process. The time-course of the IL-1 beta response differed from that of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha, in that there was an early (by 6 h after urushiol administration) elevation in IL-1 beta mRNA that occurred before there was evidence of inflammation and had returned to background levels by 72 h when the reaction had reached its peak. In contrast to urushiol-sensitive subjects, urushiol-anergic individuals did not exhibit an increase in IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The data provide evidence for an in vivo role for epidermal IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha transcription in the regulation of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha polypeptide levels in the epidermis in response to this common contact allergen. PMID:8840155

  7. Messenger RNA expression and immunolocalization of psoriasin in the goat mammary gland and its milk concentration after an intramammary infusion of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G W; Lai, S J; Yoshimura, Y; Isobe, N

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasin (S100A7) is a member of the S100 protein family of calcium-binding proteins and plays a crucial role in local host defenses. The present study aimed to identify the expression of S100A7 in the goat mammary gland and in milk. The goat S100A7 coding DNA sequence was identified using direct sequencing. An S100A7 antibody was raised in rabbits by immunization with a synthetic S100A7 peptide consisting of 13 amino acids. Messenger RNA expression and protein localization in different regions of a healthy mammary gland were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Changes in the concentration of S100A7 in the milk after an intramammary infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined by an enzyme immunoassay. The goat S100A7 peptide had 98% and 86% sequence similarity to that of sheep and bovines, respectively. The S100A7 mRNA expression was higher in the teat and udder skin than in the cistern and parenchyma of the mammary gland. Immunoreactive S100A7 was localized in the epithelial cells of the alveolus and gland cistern, and stratified squamous epithelium of the teat. Psoriasin as a secreted protein was detectable in healthy milk, and an intramammary LPS infusion increased the concentration of S100A7 in the milk. The results suggest that S100A7 is produced in the epithelial cells of the mammary gland and is secreted into the milk. PMID:25023088

  8. Accuracy of histone H3 messenger RNA in situ hybridization for the assessment of cell proliferation in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V; Cass, L; Coon, J S; Spaulding, D; Preisler, H D

    1997-05-01

    Histone H3 mRNA in situ hybridization was compared to a reference method, iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) immunohistochemistry of tissues labeled in vivo, as a means for assessing the proportion of S-phase cells (labeling index, LI) in oral tumor and normal mucosa. Paraffin sections from 16 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma were studied. Patients received an IdUrd infusion before the biopsy was taken. Tissue sections were coded before counting the percentages of S-phase cells. A high correlation was found between the results obtained by the two techniques. The average histone H3 and IdUrd LIs of the tumors were 28.5 +/- 2.4% and 29.2 +/- 2.7%, respectively (P = 0.85), with a Spearman correlation coefficient r = 0.95 (P < 0. 0001). The histone H3 LI of the basal layer of normal mucosa was 3.1 +/- 0.8%, whereas the IdUrd LI was 2.7 +/- 0.9% (P = 0.74), with r = 0.78 (P = 0.004). In the suprabasal layers, these parameters were 21. 3 +/- 2.3% and 23.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively (P = 0.56), with r = 0.93 (P < 0.0001). In sections stained for both histone H3 and IdUrd, most cells were double labeled, with very few cells containing only one of the labels. In some specimens, large areas of H3-stained cells did not contain IdUrd-labeled cells, suggesting that during the IdUrd infusion, the precursor did not reach these areas. Two specimens were histone H3 negative. They were also negative when hybridized with beta-actin probe, indicating degradation of mRNAs in these samples. The results of this study demonstrate that the histone H3 mRNA in situ hybridization performed in human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues provides the same data as does labeling the tumors in vivo with halogenated pyrimidine. PMID:9815735

  9. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    PubMed

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  10. A possible role for the guide RNA U-tail as a specificity determinant in formation of guide RNA-messenger RNA chimeras in mitochondrial extracts of Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Arts, G J; Sloof, P; Benne, R

    1995-07-01

    Chimeric g(uide) RNA:pre-mRNA molecules are potential intermediates of the RNA editing process in kinetoplastid mitochondria. We have studied the characteristics of chimeric molecules formed in mitochondrial extracts of the insect trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata which had been supplied with synthetic NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunit-7 gRNA and pre-mRNA variants. The ability of a gRNA to participate in chimera formation in this system depends on the possibility of base pairing with the pre-mRNA via the anchor sequence, but not on the presence of a U-tail or a full-length informational part. Chimeras formed with a specific gRNA:pre-mRNA pair displayed a large variation in length, due to variably sized 3' end truncations of the gRNA moieties and variation in the sites in the pre-mRNA to which the gRNAs were attached. Surprisingly, the presence of a U-tail in the gRNA for a large part determined the specificity of the linkage. In 60% of the cases gRNAs possessing a U-tail of at least one residue were attached to an editing site, whereas 75% of the gRNAs without Us were attached to non-editing sites. Furthermore, the chimera forming activity was greatly stimulated by the addition of ATP but not by AMP-CPP, an ATP-analogue with a non-hydrolyzable alpha-beta phosphate bond. This suggests the involvement in the chimera formation of an RNA ligase. PMID:8577329

  11. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Video Gallery

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  12. Olive leaf extract suppresses messenger RNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and enhances insulin receptor substrate 1 expression in the rats with streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Jung, Ji-Hye; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, HyunSook

    2014-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, is a metabolic disease resulting from defects in both insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Recently, olive leaf has been reported as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antidiabetic agent. This study sought to investigate whether olive leaf extract can improve the insulin resistance and inflammation response in rats with type 2 diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin. After administering olive leaf extract for 8 weeks (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight), rats given the higher dose showed significantly lower blood glucose, serum total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared with those of diabetic control rats (P < .05). Results of oral glucose tolerance tests, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL) 6 in the liver show significantly decreased glucose level in rats given either dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Both olive leaf extract-treated groups showed significantly increased insulin receptor substrate 1 expression (P < .05). Tumor necrosis factor α, IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expressions in epididymis adipose tissue were significantly lower in rats that received higher dose of olive leaf extract (P < .05). Lymphocyte infiltration was not observed in these rats. The results suggest that olive leaf extract may attenuate insulin resistance by suppressing mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and elevating of insulin receptor substrate 1 expression. PMID:24916559

  13. Effect of repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent on messenger RNA levels for interleukin-1β, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, and interleukin 10 in the developing rat brain after injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Topper, Lauren A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Microglia undergo maturation during the third trimester of human development (equivalent to the first 1-2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents), during which these cells may be particularly sensitive to insult. Alcohol exposure during this period can activate the neuroimmune system, an effect that may contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Here, we investigated whether repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent in rats has a priming effect on the neuroimmune response to injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pups were exposed to alcohol in vapor chambers for 4 h daily from postnatal day (PD)2 to PD16 (peak blood alcohol concentrations ∼150 mg/dL). On PD17, rats were injected with either saline or LPS (50 μg/kg) and the frontal cortex, cerebellar vermis, and dentate gyrus were collected 2 h later. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the pro-inflammatory agents interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2), as well as levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10), were measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. LPS consistently increased IL-1β and CCL2 mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum of both male and female rats. Furthermore, the LPS-induced increase of IL-1β mRNA levels was significantly blunted in the frontal cortex of alcohol-exposed female rats. Conversely, LPS only minimally affected IL-10 mRNA expression and there were no significant differences between air- and alcohol-exposed rats. Taken together with the literature regarding the effect of third-trimester alcohol exposure on the neuroimmune system, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to lower levels is less disruptive to the neuroimmune system than binge-like exposure to high doses of alcohol. PMID:25446642

  14. Expression of alpha fetoprotein messenger RNA in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and effect of L-4-oxalysine on the expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing-Wang; Xu, Bin

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To investigate alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) mRNA expression in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and the effect of L-4-oxalysine (OXL) on the expression. METHODS: Bel-7404 human hepatoma cells were maintained in RPMI 1640 media. Human AFP cDNA probe was labelled with digoxigenin-11-dUTP by the random primer labelling method. The expression of AFP mRNA in Bel-7404 cells was determined by an in situ hybridization technique with digoxigenin-labelled human AFP cDNA probe. The positive intensities of AFP mRNA in cells were analyzed by microspectrophotometer and expressed as absorbance at 470 nm. For the experiment with OXL, cells were incubated with various concentrations of the agent for 72 h. RESULTS: Essentially all the hepatoma cells contained AFP mRNA in the cytoplasm, although in various amounts. The specificity of the hybridization reaction was confirmed by control experiments in which the use of Rnase-treated BEL-7404 cells, non-AFP producing cells (HL-60 human leukemia cells) or a nonspecific cDNA probe resulted in negative hybridization. When the cells were treated with OXL (25, 50 mg/L), the content of AFP mRNA in the cytoplasm was decreased with the inhibition percentages of 34.3% and 70.1%, respectively (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: AFP mRNA was expressed in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and OXL suppressed AFP mRNA expression in the cells. PMID:11819302

  15. Differential time course of liver and kidney glucose-6 phosphatase activity during long-term fasting in rat correlates with differential time course of messenger RNA level.

    PubMed

    Minassian, C; Zitoun, C; Mithieux, G

    1996-02-01

    We have studied the role of Glc6Pase mRNA abundance in the time course of Glc6Pase activity in liver and kidney during long-term fasting in rat. Refered to the mRNA level in the fed state, Glc6Pase mRNA abundance was increased by 3.5 +/- 0.5 and 3.7 +/- 0.5 times (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 5) in the 24 h and 48 h-fasted liver, respectively. Then, the liver Glc6Pase mRNA was decreased to the level of the fed liver after 72 and 96 h of fasting (1.0 +/- 0.3 and 1.4 +/- 0.3). In the kidney, Glc6Pase mRNA abundance was increased by 2.7 +/- 1.0 and 5 +/- 1.2 times at 24 and 48 h of fasting, respectively. Then, it plateaued at the level of the 48 h fasted kidney after 72 h and 96 h of fasting (4.5 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 1.0). After 24 and 48 h-refeeding, the abundance of Glc6Pase mRNA in 48 h-fasted rats was decreased to the level found in the liver and kidney of fed rats. The time course of the activity of Glc6Pase catalytic subunit during fasting and refeeding was strikingly parallel to the time course of Glc6Pase mRNA level in respective tissues. These data strongly suggest that the differential expression of Glc6Pase activity in liver and kidney in the course of fasting may be accounted for by the respective time course of mRNA abundance in both organs. PMID:8717437

  16. Differential effects of metalloporphyrins on messenger RNA levels of delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase. Studies in cultured chick embryo liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cable, E E; Pepe, J A; Karamitsios, N C; Lambrecht, R W; Bonkovsky, H L

    1994-01-01

    The acute porphyrias in relapse are commonly treated with intravenous heme infusion to decrease the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, normally the rate-controlling enzyme in heme biosynthesis. The biochemical effects of heme treatment are short-lived, probably due in part to heme-mediated induction of heme oxygenase, the rate-controlling enzyme for heme degradation. In this work, selected nonheme metalloporphyrins were screened for their ability to reduce delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase mRNA and induce heme oxygenase mRNA in chick embryo liver cell cultures. Of the metalloporphyrins tested, only zinc-mesoporphyrin reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase mRNA without increasing heme oxygenase mRNA. The combination of zinc-mesoporphyrin and heme, at nanomolar concentrations, decreased delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of zinc-mesoporphyrin (50 nM) and heme (200 nM) decreased the half-life of the mRNA for delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase from 5.2 to 2.5 h, while a similar decrease was produced by heme (10 microM) alone (2.2 h). The ability of zinc-mesoporphyrin to supplement the reduction of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase mRNA by heme, in a process similar to that observed with heme alone, provides a rationale for further investigation of this compound for eventual use as a supplement to heme therapy of the acute porphyrias and perhaps other conditions in which heme may be of benefit. Images PMID:8040318

  17. Use of molecular beacons to probe for messenger RNA release from ribosomes during 5'-translational blockage by consecutive low-usage codons in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenwu; Tyagi, Sanjay; Kramer, Fred R.; Goldman, Emanuel

    2000-03-01

    In `5'-translational blockage,' significantly reduced yields of proteins are synthesized in Escherichia coli when consecutive low-usage codons are inserted near translation starts of messages (with reduced or no effect when these same codons are inserted downstream). We tested the hypothesis that ribosomes encountering these low-usage codons prematurely release the mRNA. RNA from polysome gradients was fractionated into pools of polysomes, monosomes and ribosomes-free. New hybridization probes, called `molecular beacons,' and standard slot-blots, were used to detect test messages containing either consecutive low-usage AGG (arginine) or synonymous high-usage CGU insertions near the 5' end. The results show an approximately twofold increase in the ratio of free to bound mRNA when the low-usage codons were present compared to high-usage codons. In contrast, there was no difference in the ratio of free to bound mRNA when consecutive low-usage CUA or high-usage CUG (leucine) codons were inserted, or when the arginine codons were inserted near the 3' end. These data indicate that at least some mRNA is released from ribosomes during 5'-translational blockage by arginine but not leucine codons, and they support proposals that premature termination of translation can occur in some conditions in vivo in the absence of a stop codon.

  18. The Adh-related gene of Drosophila melanogaster is expressed as a functional dicistronic messenger RNA: multigenic transcription in higher organisms.

    PubMed

    Brogna, S; Ashburner, M

    1997-04-15

    Essentially all eukaryotic cellular mRNAs are monocistronic, and are usually transcribed individually. Two tandemly arranged Drosophila genes, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and Adh-related (Adhr), are transcribed as a dicistronic transcript. From transcripts initiated from the Adh promoter, two classes of mRNA are accumulated, one is monocistronic and encodes Adh alone, the other is dicistronic and includes the open reading frames of both Adh and Adhr. The dicistronic transcript is found in polysomes and the Adhr protein product is detected by antibody staining. We present evidence that the accumulation of the dicistronic mRNA is controlled at the level of the 3' end processing. PMID:9155028

  19. SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS-INDUCED ALTERATION OF INFLAMMATORY CXCL CHEMOKINE MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION AND HISTOLOGIC CHANGES IN THE CECA OF INFECTED CHICKS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the avian host immune response to Salmonella enteritidis, we examined mRNA expression for 8 genes: CXCLi1[K60], CXCLi2 [IL-8/CAF], Interferon [IFN]-y Interleukin [IL] -1, IL-6, IL-12, IL-12, and Gallinacin [Gal] -2 in the cecum of young chicks one week post-inoculation with Sa...

  20. Effect of acute heat stress on heat shock protein 70 messenger RNA and on heat shock protein expression in the liver of broilers.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, J E; Ferro, J A; Stefani, R M; Ferro, M I; Gomes, S L; Macari, M

    1996-05-01

    1. The synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA and the expression of Hsp70 in the liver of broiler chickens submitted to acute heat stress (35 degrees C for 5 h) was investigated. 2. Hsp70 expression was detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using a polyclonal antiserum against Hsp70 of Blastocladiella emersonii. The specific signal of Hsp70 mRNA was analysed by Northern blot using as probe a Hsp70 cDNA of B. emersonii. 3. An increase in the amount of Hsp70 was detected from the first up to the fifth hour of acute heat exposure. This increase in the amount of Hsp70 was accompanied by an increase in Hsp70 mRNA which peaked at 3 h. 4. This study shows that the heat induced increase in Hsp70 mRNA and protein in broiler liver, in vivo, are time dependent, similar to that in mammals. PMID:8773853

  1. Regulation of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit variants in human myasthenia gravis. Quantification of steady-state levels of messenger RNA in muscle biopsy using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, T; Levasseur, P; Truffault, F; Cottin, C; Gaud, C; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1994-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies that attack the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the decrease in AChR levels at the neuromuscular junction, we investigated the regulation of AChR expression by analyzing mRNA of the two AChR alpha subunit isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) in muscle samples from myasthenic patients relative to controls. We applied a quantitative method based on reverse transcription of total RNA followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using an internal standard we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. An increased expression of mRNA coding for the alpha subunit of the AChR isoforms was observed in severely affected patients (P < 0.003 versus controls) but not in moderately affected patients, independently of the anti-AChR antibody titer. Study of mRNA precursor levels indicates a higher expression in severely affected patients compared to controls, suggesting an enhanced rate of transcription of the message coding for the alpha subunit isoforms in these patients. We have also reported that mRNA encoding both isoforms are expressed at an approximate 1:1 ratio in controls and in patients. We have thus identified a new biological parameter correlated with disease severity, and provide evidence of a compensatory mechanism to balance the loss of AChR in human myasthenia gravis, which is probably triggered only above a certain degree of AChR loss. Images PMID:8040257

  2. Increased messenger RNA for allograft inflammatory factor-1, LERK-5, and a novel gene in 17.5-day relative to 15.5-day bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Glover, Michelle D; Seidel, George E

    2003-09-01

    Considerable embryonic loss occurs between Gestation Days 15 and 18 in cattle when critical cellular and molecular events occur, including maternal recognition of pregnancy. To gain insight into these events, mRNA differential display analysis was used to identify eight unique cDNA fragments present in greater abundance in 17.5-day than in 15.5-day bovine embryos. Four cDNA fragments, confirmed to be upregulated in 17.5-day embryos using Northern analysis, were cloned and sequenced. Three cDNA fragments shared sequence identities with known homologs: human allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1), human LERK-5, and bovine interferon-tau. One novel cDNA fragment did not share sequence identity to previously reported genes, except for a similar DNA sequence in the human genome. AIF-1 mRNA was present in developing placenta through Gestation Day 36, and abundant levels were observed in adult bovine spleen and lung. The novel gene, which we have named periattachment factor (PAF), was not detected in adult tissues using Northern analysis or in conceptuses between Days 30 and 36 of pregnancy. Additional sequence information for bPAF was obtained from a cDNA library constructed from a 25-day bovine embryo. The protein corresponding to the open reading frame has four protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a nuclear targeting sequence, but no obvious DNA or RNA binding motifs. Abundant expression of this gene during a narrow but critical window of embryonic development makes it worthy of further study. PMID:12773430

  3. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver.

    PubMed

    Pašková, Ľudmila; Kuncírová, Viera; Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Čavojský, Tomáš; Bilka, František; Šišková, Katarína; Paulíková, Ingrid; Bezáková, Lýdia; Bauerová, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  4. Expression of messenger RNA for ADAMTS subtypes changes in the periovulatory follicle after the gonadotropin surge and during luteal development and regression in cattle.

    PubMed

    Madan, Pavneesh; Bridges, Phillip J; Komar, Carolyn M; Beristain, Alexander G; Rajamahendran, Rajadurai; Fortune, Joanne E; MacCalman, Colin D

    2003-11-01

    Extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix occurs in the ovary during the periovulatory period. Matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, are believed to play integral roles in this highly regulated series of cellular events, but their specific roles remain unclear. Recent cloning studies have identified a novel family of metalloproteinases, the ADAMTS (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin motifs) family. The regulated expression of distinct ADAMTS subtypes has been shown to be required for tissue morphogenesis during embryonic development and for maintaining the integrity of tissues in the adult. In the present studies, we have determined that multiple ADAMTS subtypes are present in the bovine ovary using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction strategy. In particular, ADAMTS-1, -2, -3, -4, -5 (also known as ADAMTS-11), -7, -8, and -9, but not ADAMTS-6, -10, or -12, mRNA transcripts were detected in granulosa cells of nonatretic ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. The levels of mRNA for these ovarian ADAMTS were up- or down-regulated or remained unchanged in the granulosa and/or theca cells of the dominant follicle following the preovulatory surge of gonadotropins, depending on the subtype and/or the cell compartment, and in the corpus luteum during the luteal phase of the estrous cycle. The complex expression patterns observed for the distinct ADAMTS subtypes in the granulosa and theca cells of the periovulatory follicle and in the luteal tissues of the bovine ovary suggest that these novel proteases mediate, at least in part, the remodeling events underlying folliculogenesis and ovulation and the formation, maintenance, and regression of the corpus luteum. PMID:12855604

  5. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  6. MESSENGER: Science payload status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R.; Solomon, S.; Gold, R.

    2003-04-01

    MESSENGER is a NASA Discovery mission to reach Mercury and orbit that planet for an Earth year, gathering data with a miniaturized scientific payload. The MESSENGER project is now entering the integration and test phase as the spacecraft is assembled and the instruments are calibrated and delivered to the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray and Neutron spectrometer (GRNS) and X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) experienced detector changes in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (based upon more experience with similar instrumentation on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous, NEAR-Shoemaker, mission and on Mars Odyssey). The gamma-ray portion of GRNS uses a high-purity germanium crystal cooled to ˜90K and surrounded by an active shield to detect characteristic gamma-rays from the planet. The neutron spectrometer uses Li-glass and plastic scintillators to detect and separate thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. The XRS spectrometer uses three gas-filled proportional counters looking at the planet and a solar monitor to measure X-ray fluorescence lines from the planet's surface. These instruments thus provide information on elemental abundances. The optical remote-sensing instruments map the planet in several spectral bands (Mercury Dual Imaging System -- MDIS), measure surface spectral reflectance in the visible and infra-red and exospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet and visible (Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer -- MASCS), and measure surface topography (Mercury Laser Altimeter -- MLA). The combination of altimetry with MLA and radio-science (RS) measurements will allow maps of the gravitational field of the planet and inference of the planet's obliquity and physical amplitude. The combination of boom-mounted magnetometer (MAG) and combined Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) allows internal and external sources of magnetic field to be separated, providing knowledge of both Mercury's internal structure and its magnetosphere and

  7. Changes in brain ribonuclease (BRB) messenger RNA in granulosa cells (GCs) of dominant vs subordinate ovarian follicles of cattle and the regulation of BRB gene expression in bovine GCs.

    PubMed

    Dentis, J L; Schreiber, N B; Gilliam, J N; Schutz, L F; Spicer, L J

    2016-04-01

    Brain ribonuclease (BRB) is a member of the ribonuclease A superfamily that is constitutively expressed in a range of tissues and is the functional homolog of human ribonuclease 1. This study was designed to characterize BRB gene expression in granulosa cells (GCs) during development of bovine dominant ovarian follicles and to determine the hormonal regulation of BRB in GCs. Estrous cycles of Holstein cows (n = 18) were synchronized, and cows were ovariectomized on either day 3 to 4 or day 5 to 6 after ovulation during dominant follicle growth and selection. Ovaries were collected, follicular fluid (FFL) was aspirated, and GCs were collected for RNA isolation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Follicles were categorized as small (1-5 mm; pooled per ovary), medium (5-8 mm; individually collected), or large (8.1-17 mm; individually collected) based on surface diameter. Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in FFL. Abundance of BRB messenger RNA (mRNA) in GCs was 8.6- to 11.8-fold greater (P < 0.05) in small (n = 31), medium (n = 66), and large (n = 33) subordinate E2-inactive (FFL E2 < P4) follicles than in large (n = 16) dominant E2-active (FFL E2 > P4) follicles. In the largest 4 follicles, GCs BRB mRNA abundance was negatively correlated (P < 0.01) with FFL E2 (r = -0.65) and E2:P4 ratio (r = -0.46). In experiment 2, GCs from large (8-22 mm diameter) and small (1-5 mm diameter) follicles were treated with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1; 0 or 30 ng/mL) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (0 or 30 ng/mL); IGF1 increased (P < 0.05) BRB mRNA abundance, and tumor necrosis factor alpha decreased (P < 0.001) the IGF1-induced BRB mRNA abundance in large-follicle GCs. In experiment 3 to 6, E2, follicle-stimulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 9, cortisol, wingless 3A, or sonic hedgehog did not affect (P > 0.10) abundance of BRB mRNA in GCs; thyroxine and luteinizing hormone increased (P < 0.05), whereas

  8. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an indicator of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Taguchi, Kenichi; Ohno, Shinji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Kubo, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of the expressions of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 and EGFR was performed in 130 cases of primary PTs (83 benign, 28 borderline, 19 malignant), 34 recurrent/metastatic PTs, and 26 fibroadenomas (FAs). Among the primary tumors, a high expression of IMP3 was significantly more frequently present in malignant PTs (17/19, 89%) than in the FAs (0/26, 0%), benign PTs (0/83, 0%) and borderline PTs (3/28, 11%). The recurrent and metastatic lesions of malignant PTs also showed high IMP3 expression (3/5 [60%] and 6/6 [100%], respectively). Most malignant PTs showed strong IMP3 expression at the interductal area or more diffusely, whereas weak and focal (low) expression of IMP3 was limited to the periductal area in FAs and benign PTs. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor grade and high IMP3 expression. Overexpressions of IMP3 and EGFR were significantly associated with shorter periods of metastasis-free and disease-free survival. The results suggest that high expressions of IMP3 and EGFR with a characteristic staining pattern may be helpful for both identifying malignant PT and predicting the prognosis of these tumors. PMID:27137988

  9. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  10. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  11. Lack of HLA class I antigen expression by melanoma cells SK-MEL-33 caused by a reading frameshift in beta 2-microglobulin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Cao, Y; Albino, A P; Zeff, R A; Houghton, A; Ferrone, S

    1993-01-01

    The lack of HLA class I antigen expression by the melanoma cell line SK-MEL-33 is caused by a unique lesion in beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-mu). Sequencing of beta 2-mu mRNA detected a guanosine deletion at position 323 in codon 76 that causes a frameshift with a subsequent introduction of a stop codon at a position 54 base upstream of the normal position of the stop codon in the message. The loss of 18 amino acids and the change of 6 amino acids, including a cysteine at position 80 in the carboxy terminus of beta 2-mu, are likely to cause marked changes in the structure of the polypeptide. The latter may account for the inability of beta 2-mu to associate with HLA class I heavy chains and for its lack of reactivity with the anti-beta 2-mu mAb tested. HLA class I antigen expression on SK-MEL-33 cells was reconstituted after transfection with a wild-type B2m gene, therefore indicating that the abnormality of endogenous B2m gene is the only mechanism underlying lack of HLA class I antigen expression by SK-MEL-33 cells. The guanosine deletion in B2m gene was detected also in the melanoma tissue from which SK-MEL-33 cells had originated. Therefore, the molecular lesion identified in the SK-MEL-33 melanoma cell line is not caused by a mutation acquired during growth in vitro but is likely to reflect a somatic mutation during tumor progression. Images PMID:8432869

  12. Messenger RNA-based therapeutics for brain diseases: An animal study for augmenting clearance of beta-amyloid by intracerebral administration of neprilysin mRNA loaded in polyplex nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Perche, Federico; Ikegami, Masaru; Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2016-08-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is considered to be the metabolic imbalance between anabolism and clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ), and the strategy of breaking the equilibrium between soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ is likely to help prevent the progression of AD. Neprilysin (NEP) plays a major role in the clearance of Aβ in the brain, and its supplementation using viral vectors has shown to decrease Aβ deposition and prevent pathogenic changes in the brain. In this study, we developed a new therapeutic strategy by mRNA-based gene introduction. mRNA has the advantages of negligible risk of random integration into genome and not needing to be transcribed precludes the need for nuclear entry. This allows efficient protein expression in slowly-dividing or non-dividing cells, such as neural cells. We constructed mRNA encoding the mouse NEP protein and evaluated its ability degrade Aβ. In vitro transfection of NEP mRNA to primary neurons exhibited Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) degradation activity superior to that of NEP encoding plasmid DNA. We then evaluated the in vivo activity of NEP mRNA by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion using a cationic polymer-based PEGylated nanocarrier to form polyplex nanomicelles, which have been shown to have a high potential to deliver mRNA to various target tissues and organs. Nanomicelles carrying a GFP-NEP fusion mRNA produced efficient protein expression in a diffuse manner surrounding the ventricular space. An ELISA evaluation revealed that the mRNA infusion significantly augmented NEP level and effectively reduced the concentration of Aβ that had been supplemented in the mouse brain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of introducing exogenous mRNA for the treatment of brain diseases, opening the new era of mRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:27282413

  13. Expression of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), but not IGF-I mRNA, in human preovulatory granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Geisthovel, F; Moretti-Rojas, I; Asch, R H; Rojas, F J

    1989-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play an important role as intra-ovarian regulators in several mammalian species. Recently, we and others have reported the presence of both IGF-I and IGF-II in human follicular fluid. The source of these follicular IGFs, however, has not been determined. In this study, we have evaluated the possibility that human ovarian granulosa cells are a production site of IGFs in vivo. We used cDNA probes to analyse directly IGF-I and IGF-II gene expression at the level of mRNA content in granulosa cells from preovulatory follicles of women undergoing either gamete intra-Fallopian transfer or in-vitro fertilization. Samples of granulosa cell RNA enriched for polyadenylated RNA [poly(A)+RNA] were hybridized with probes for human IGF-I, human IGF-II and human actin (as a control). Transfer blot analysis revealed that the enriched poly(A)+RNA of human granulosa cells from preovulatory follicles contained no detectable IGF-I mRNA. In contrast, three species of IGF-II mRNA of approximately 6.1, 4.9 and 2.1 kb were detected. These data suggest that IGF-II mRNA, but not IGF-I mRNA, is expressed in human granulosa cells collected immediately before ovulation. Our results support the concept that human ovarian IGF-II is produced locally and may function in an autocrine or paracrine fashion in the human ovary in vivo. PMID:2613863

  14. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions targeting the messenger RNA of icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes to detect viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathy, Dhanurekha; Kulandai, Lily Therese; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Hajib Narahari Rao, Madhavan; Rathinam, Sridhar; Narasimhan, Meenakshi

    2015-12-01

    There is an urgent need for a rapid and reliable test to detect actively multiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens for an early initiation of the appropriate antituberculous treatment. This study was aimed at the optimization and application of nested reverse transcriptase-PCR (nRT-PCR) targeting the messenger RNA of the icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes directly from sputum specimens, and their evaluation against the culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT mycobacterial culture system. 203 Sputum samples from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients and 30 control specimens (clinically proven viral or bacterial infections other than tuberculosis) were included in this study. The mycobacterial culture was performed by the BACTEC MicroMGIT system following the manufacturer's instructions. The primers for nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were indigenously designed using the Primer-BLAST software, and optimized for sensitivity and specificity. The icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were able to pick up 63.9%, 67.2%, and 58.75%, respectively, of culture-negative sputum specimens collected from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients. However, three (1.4%) were negative for nRT-PCR, but M. tuberculosis culture positive. All the 30 controls were negative for culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT method and all three nRT-PCR. The novel nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes developed in this study are rapid and reliable diagnostic tools to detect viable M. tuberculosis directly from sputum specimens. However, further study by including a larger number of sputum specimens needs to be carried out to ascertain the diagnostic utility of the novel nRT-PCRs optimized in the study. PMID:26964814

  15. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  16. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  17. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  18. Differential response to L-triiodothyronine of anterior pituitary growth hormone messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and beta-thyrotropin mRNA in a hypothyroid Walker 256 carcinoma-bearing rat model of nonthyroidal disease.

    PubMed

    Hupart, K H; DeFesi, C R; Katz, C P; Shapiro, L E; Surks, M I

    1990-01-01

    To continue our studies on the influence of T3 on TSH regulation in the Walker 256 carcinoma-bearing rat model of nonthyroidal disease, we measured the effect of T3 on pituitary content of beta TSH mRNA and rat (r) TSH in hypothyroid control (C) and tumor-bearing (T) rats. The effect of T3 on TSH regulation was compared to effects on GH mRNA and rGH in the same animals. mRNA content was normalized to a pool of pituitaries from euthyroid rats (= 1.0). beta TSH mRNA increased 18-fold in both hypothyroid C and T rats and then decreased similarly with increasing T3 infusion to a value of 0.1. GH mRNA content decreased to 0.11 +/- 0.01 in hypothyroid C rats, but to only 0.38 +/- 0.02 in T rats (P less than 0.001). The pituitary contents of GH mRNA and rGH in hypothyroid T rats was significantly greater than those in C rats at all T3 infusion rates. These data together with our previous report of decreased nuclear T3 in T rats suggest that regulation of beta TSH mRNA by T3 is intact in T rats, but occurs at a lower concentration of nuclear T3. In contrast, the GH mRNA response is enhanced, displaying differential regulation of these two T3-responsive gene products in this model of nonthyroidal illness. PMID:2294008

  19. Spacer-length dependence of programmed −1 or −2 ribosomal frameshifting on a U6A heptamer supports a role for messenger RNA (mRNA) tension in frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhaoru; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Brierley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting is employed in the expression of a number of viral and cellular genes. In this process, the ribosome slips backwards by a single nucleotide and continues translation of an overlapping reading frame, generating a fusion protein. Frameshifting signals comprise a heptanucleotide slippery sequence, where the ribosome changes frame, and a stimulatory RNA structure, a stem–loop or RNA pseudoknot. Antisense oligonucleotides annealed appropriately 3′ of a slippery sequence have also shown activity in frameshifting, at least in vitro. Here we examined frameshifting at the U6A slippery sequence of the HIV gag/pol signal and found high levels of both −1 and −2 frameshifting with stem–loop, pseudoknot or antisense oligonucleotide stimulators. By examining −1 and −2 frameshifting outcomes on mRNAs with varying slippery sequence-stimulatory RNA spacing distances, we found that −2 frameshifting was optimal at a spacer length 1–2 nucleotides shorter than that optimal for −1 frameshifting with all stimulatory RNAs tested. We propose that the shorter spacer increases the tension on the mRNA such that when the tRNA detaches, it more readily enters the −2 frame on the U6A heptamer. We propose that mRNA tension is central to frameshifting, whether promoted by stem–loop, pseudoknot or antisense oligonucleotide stimulator. PMID:22743270

  20. Genome-wide microRNA and messenger RNA profiling in rodent liver development implicates mir302b and mir20a in repressing transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Hou, Juan; Alder, Olivia; Ye, Xin; Lee, Sam; Cullum, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Zhao, Yongjun; Warner, Stephanie M; Knight, Darryl A; Yang, Decheng; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recently discovered small RNA molecules that regulate developmental processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; however, the identity of miRNAs and their functions during liver development are largely unknown. Here we investigated the miRNA and gene expression profiles for embryonic day (E)8.5 endoderm, E14.5 Dlk1(+) liver cells (hepatoblasts), and adult liver by employing Illumina sequencing. We found that miRNAs were abundantly expressed at all three stages. Using K-means clustering analysis, 13 miRNA clusters with distinct temporal expression patterns were identified. mir302b, an endoderm-enriched miRNA, was identified as an miRNA whose predicted targets are expressed highly in E14.5 hepatoblasts but low in the endoderm. We validated the expression of mir302b in the endoderm by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Interestingly, mir20a, the most highly expressed miRNA in the endoderm library, was also predicted to regulate some of the same targets as mir302b. We found that through targeting Tgfbr2, mir302b and mir20a are able to regulate transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signal transduction. Moreover, mir302b can repress liver markers in an embryonic stem cell differentiation model. Collectively, we uncovered dynamic patterns of individual miRNAs during liver development, as well as miRNA networks that could be essential for the specification and differentiation of liver progenitors. (HEPATOLOGY 2013). PMID:23315977

  1. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  2. NASA Now: MESSENGER in Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Larry Evans, Senior Scientist for MESSENGER, discusses the difficulty of getting to Mercury, the challenges of visiting a planet so close to the sun and what we hope to discover when the spacec...

  3. Mycobacterial toxin MazF-mt6 inhibits translation through cleavage of 23S rRNA at the ribosomal A site.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Edifor, Regina; Sharp, Jared D; Ouyang, Ming; Konkimalla, Arvind; Husson, Robert N; Woychik, Nancy A

    2013-05-21

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains an unusually high number of toxin-antitoxin modules, some of which have been suggested to play a role in the establishment and maintenance of latent tuberculosis. Nine of these toxin-antitoxin loci belong to the mazEF family, encoding the intracellular toxin MazF and its antitoxin inhibitor MazE. Nearly every MazF ortholog recognizes a unique three- or five-base RNA sequence and cleaves mRNA. As a result, these toxins selectively target a subset of the transcriptome for degradation and are known as "mRNA interferases." Here we demonstrate that a MazF family member from M. tuberculosis, MazF-mt6, has an additional role--inhibiting translation through targeted cleavage of 23S rRNA in the evolutionarily conserved helix/loop 70. We first determined that MazF-mt6 cleaves mRNA at (5')UU↓CCU(3') sequences. We then discovered that MazF-mt6 also cleaves M. tuberculosis 23S rRNA at a single UUCCU in the ribosomal A site that contacts tRNA and ribosome recycling factor. To gain further mechanistic insight, we demonstrated that MazF-mt6-mediated cleavage of rRNA can inhibit protein synthesis in the absence of mRNA cleavage. Finally, consistent with the position of 23S rRNA cleavage, MazF-mt6 destabilized 50S-30S ribosomal subunit association. Collectively, these results show that MazF toxins do not universally act as mRNA interferases, because MazF-mt6 inhibits protein synthesis by cleaving 23S rRNA in the ribosome active center. PMID:23650345

  4. Moving RNA moves RNA forward.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lina; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Wenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Cell communication affects all aspects of cell structure and behavior, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, division, and coordination of various physiological functions. The moving RNA in plants and mammalian cells indicates that nucleic acid could be one of the various types of messengers for cell communication. The microvesicle is a critical pathway that mediates RNA moving and keeps moving RNA stable in body fluids. When moving miRNA enters the target cell, it functions by altering the gene expression profile and significantly inhibiting mRNA translation in recipient cells. Thus, moving RNA may act as a long-range modulator during development, organogenesis, and tumor metastasis. PMID:24008386

  5. RNA epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modification. PMID:24768686

  6. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  7. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  8. Possible correlation of b3-a2-type bcr-abl messenger RNA defined by semiquantitative RT-PCR to platelet and megakaryocyte counts in Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, K; Futaki, M; Dan, K; Nomura, T

    1994-04-01

    Thirty-five patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were classified on the basis of the fusion pattern of bcr-abl mRNA determined by the reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Semiquantitative assay of the bcr exon 2/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b2-a2) and bcr exon 3/abl exon 2 fused mRNA (b3-a2) resulted in 21 patients showing b3-a2 type mRNA, seven showing b2-a2 type and seven showing coexpression. Quantification of the autoradiographic signals of amplified products was estimated using an MCID image analysis system. The relative intensity was defined as the ratio of bcr-abl signal to that of beta-actin. The relationship between the semiquantified bcr-abl mRNA and the platelet/megakaryocyte counts was analyzed. A possible correlation was found between the semiquantified b3-a2 type mRNA and the platelet (p < .05, N = 28) and megakaryocyte (p < .05, N = 13) counts of these patients. This finding suggests the possibility that b3-a2 mRNA may affect the thrombopoietic activity in Ph1-positive CML in a dose-response manner. PMID:7520786

  9. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and markedly different system-level responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active, with large magnetic field components normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was stable. In contrast, the IMF during the third flyby varied from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited during that encounter to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Instead, plasmoid release was highly correlated with four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects provide a basis for comparison and contrast with what is known about the response of the Earth s magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  10. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  11. Neutralino Dark Matter in Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kyu Jung

    2008-11-23

    The lightest neutralino is one of the best candidate for dark matter. In gauge messenger models, It is generic that bino and wino masses are almostly degenerate. Because of this, neutralino annihilation becomes more efficient. Also, gauge messenger models have squeezed mass spectrum so that there are many resonance and co-annihilation regions, and can give correct amount of neutralino relic density.

  12. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  13. Quantitative analysis of messenger RNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), tissue inhibitor-2 of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP-2), and steroidogenic enzymes in bovine placentomes during gestation and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Yamamoto, D; Ohtani, M; Miyamoto, A

    2007-07-01

    The relationship between the mRNA expression of proteolytic and steroidogenic enzymes in bovine placentomes was examined. Caruncle and cotyledon tissues were collected every 6 hr after spontaneous parturition until the fetal membranes were released. Based on the time of fetal membrane release after parturition, the specimens were classified as follows: (1) the early group, in which the fetal membranes were released within 6 hr after parturition; and (2) the late group, in which the fetal membranes were released 6-12 hr after parturition. The placentomes from a slaughterhouse were additionally collected as samples for the examination of enzymes during the gestation period. The mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes in the cotyledon was observed to be higher than that in caruncle tissues; however, the mRNA expression patterns of P450scc and StAR tended to be similar in both placental tissues. On the other hand, although the expression levels of TIMP-2 mRNA in both caruncle and cotyledon tissues were similar, during gestation and postpartum the expression levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were approximately 10 times higher in caruncle than in cotyledon tissue. Marked contrasting changes in mRNA expression patterns between pre- and postpartum periods were observed for MMP-2 and MMP-9 in caruncle tissues and for MMP-9 and TIMP-2 in cotyledon tissues. The present study provides the first evidence that MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-2 mRNAs are expressed in bovine placentomes during the gestational and postpartum periods and suggests that these enzymes, in conjunction with steroidogenic enzymes, mediate fetal membrane detachment after parturition. PMID:17154296

  14. HOMOLOGOUS UP-REGULATION OF THE GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE RECEPTOR IN A T3-1 CELLS IS ASSOCIATED WITH UNCHANGED RECEPTOR MESSENGER RNA (MRNA) LEVELS AND ALTERED MRNA ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Depending on the concentration and duration of agonist exposure, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number either increases or decreases in response to GnRH. he molecular basis of this regulation could involve a combination of modulation of gene transcription, RNA pro...

  15. Ca2+ ionophore A23187-dependent stabilization of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in murine thymoma EL-4 cells is mediated through two distinct regions in the 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Akahane, K; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1993-05-15

    We analyze the role of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 in the induction of GM-CSF mRNA expression in EL-4 thymoma cells. Northern analysis shows that A23187 increases the half-life of GM-CSF mRNA. To identify potential Ca2+ response elements in the GM-CSF mRNA, we produced stable transfectants containing pRSV-CAT (EL-4cat) or hybrid constructs in which most of the GM-CSF 3'-untranslated region (EL-4gm) or the adenosine-uridine boxes alone (EL-4au) were placed in a downstream position from the CAT coding region. A23187 induces a 4.4-fold increase in CAT activity in EL-4cat cells and a 210-fold and 48-fold increase in CAT activity in EL-4gm and EL-4au cells, respectively. Actinomycin D chase experiments in transfected cells demonstrate that A23187 increases the half-life of CAT mRNA from 15 min to 3 h in EL-4au cells and more than 3 h in EL-4gm cells, suggesting that the effect of Ca2+ is mediated predominantly by the adenosine-uridine boxes with a smaller contribution from upstream regions. To map these upstream regions, we transfected cells with constructs containing mutations of the 3'-untranslated region. With two of these mutations, corresponding to a region located about 160 bases upstream of the adenosine-uridine boxes, CAT activity was induced only 50-fold compared to 200-fold in EL-4gm cells. These data indicate that two regions within the GM-CSF 3'-untranslated region interact to modulate Ca2+ effects on GM-CSF mRNA half-life. PMID:8482841

  16. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  17. The Mercury exosphere after MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary; McClintock, William; Vervack, Ronald; Merkel, Aimee; Burger, Matthew; Cassidy, Timothy; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2016-07-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed sodium, calcium and magnesium emisison in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis for >16 Mercury years. The MASCS observations showed that calcium in Mercury's exosphere is persistently concentrated in the dawn hemisphere and is of extreme temperature (>50,000 K). The column abundance varies seasonally, and is extremely repeatable each Mercury year. In addition, the calcium exhibits a persistent maximum not at perihelion but 20° after perihelion, an enhancement that was shown to be coincident with the probable intersection of Mercury's orbit with a dust stream originating at Comet Encke. Any mechanism producing the Mercurian Ca exosphere must explain the facts that the Ca is extremely hot, that it is seen almost exclusively on the dawnside of the planet, and that its content varies seasonally, not sporadically. Energization of the Ca atoms was suggested to originate through dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules ejected by meteoritic impacts. Magnesium was also observed on a daily basis throughout the MESSENGER orbital phase. Mg has its own spatial and temporal pattern, peaking at mid-morning instead of early morning like Ca, and exhibiting a warm thermal profile, about 5000 K, unlike the extreme temperature of Ca which is an order of magnitude hotter. Although Mercury's sodium exosphere has been observed from the ground for many decades, the MASCS observations showed that, like calcium, the sodium exosphere is dominated by seasonal variations, not sporadic variations. However a conundrum exists as to why ground-based observations show highly variable high-latitude variations that eluded the MASCS. The origin of a persistent south polar enhancement has not been explained. The more volatile element, Na, is again colder, about 1200 K, but not thermally accommodated to the surface temperature. A

  18. The Magnetometer Instrument on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Acuña, Mario H.; Lohr, David A.; Scheifele, John; Raval, Asseem; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.

    2007-08-01

    The Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is a low-noise, tri-axial, fluxgate instrument with its sensor mounted on a 3.6-m-long boom. The boom was deployed on March 8, 2005. The primary MAG science objectives are to determine the structure of Mercury’s intrinsic magnetic field and infer its origin. Mariner 10 observations indicate a planetary moment in the range 170 to 350 nT R {M/3} (where R M is Mercury’s mean radius). The uncertainties in the dipole moment are associated with the Mariner 10 trajectory and variability of the measured field. By orbiting Mercury, MESSENGER will significantly improve the determination of dipole and higher-order moments. The latter are essential to understanding the thermal history of the planet. MAG has a coarse range, ±51,300 nT full scale (1.6-nT resolution), for pre-flight testing, and a fine range, ±1,530 nT full scale (0.047-nT resolution), for Mercury operation. A magnetic cleanliness program was followed to minimize variable and static spacecraft-generated fields at the sensor. Observations during and after boom deployment indicate that the fixed residual field is less than a few nT at the location of the sensor, and initial observations indicate that the variable field is below 0.05 nT at least above about 3 Hz. Analog signals from the three axes are low-pass filtered (10-Hz cutoff) and sampled simultaneously by three 20-bit analog-to-digital converters every 50 ms. To accommodate variable telemetry rates, MAG provides 11 output rates from 0.01 s-1 to 20 s-1. Continuous measurement of fluctuations is provided with a digital 1-10 Hz bandpass filter. This fluctuation level is used to trigger high-time-resolution sampling in eight-minute segments to record events of interest when continuous high-rate sampling is not possible. The MAG instrument will provide accurate characterization of the intrinsic planetary field, magnetospheric structure, and

  19. MESSENGER'S First and Second Flybys of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only approximately 1000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th and October 6th, 2008 close flybys of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  20. Stranded Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq for All RNA Types

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pearlly X.; Fang, Fang; Buechlein, Aaron; Ford, James B.; Tang, Haixu; Huang, Tim H.; Burow, Matthew E.; Liu, Yunlong; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Stranded whole transcriptome RNA-Seq described in this unit captures quantitative expression data for all types of RNA including, but not limited to miRNA (microRNA), piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA), snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), lincRNA (large non-coding intergenic RNA), SRP RNA (signal recognition particle RNA), tRNA (transfer RNA), mtRNA (mitochondrial RNA) and mRNA (messenger RNA). The size and nature of these types of RNA are irrelevant to the approach described here. Barcoded libraries for multiplexing on the Illumina platform are generated with this approach but it can be applied to other platforms with a few modifications. PMID:25599667

  1. Inhibition of GABAA receptor-mediated current responses by enoxacin (new quinolone) and felbinac (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse-brain messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, J; Shimokawa, M; Yamamoto, K; Sawada, Y; Asanuma, A; Yanagisawa, K; Iga, T

    1993-07-01

    The convulsant interaction between enoxacin (ENX), a new quinolone antibacterial agent (NQ), and felbinac (FLB), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), in vivo was reproduced as the change of GABA-induced current response in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse brain mRNA. GABA (10 microM) response was inhibited by ENX in a dose-dependent manner, and IC50 of ENX was 96 microM. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of ENX was 80-fold potentiated in the presence of 10 microM FLB. The GABAA-antagonistic interaction between these two drugs in vitro was considered a possible mechanism of convulsant reaction after concomitant administration of NQs and NSAIDs in vivo. PMID:7691340

  2. The Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 6 (CPSF6) Subunit of the Capsid-recruited Pre-messenger RNA Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) Complex Mediates HIV-1 Integration into Genes.

    PubMed

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Serrao, Erik; Sowd, Gregory A; Qian, Juan; Hao, Caili; Dasgupta, Twishasri; Engelman, Alan N; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-05-27

    HIV-1 favors integration into active genes and gene-enriched regions of host cell chromosomes, thus maximizing the probability of provirus expression immediately after integration. This requires cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA 3' end processing that binds HIV-1 capsid and connects HIV-1 preintegration complexes to intranuclear trafficking pathways that link integration to transcriptionally active chromatin. CPSF6 together with CPSF5 and CPSF7 are known subunits of the cleavage factor I (CFIm) 3' end processing complex; however, CPSF6 could participate in additional protein complexes. The molecular mechanisms underpinning the role of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection remain to be defined. Here, we show that a majority of cellular CPSF6 is incorporated into the CFIm complex. HIV-1 capsid recruits CFIm in a CPSF6-dependent manner, which suggests that the CFIm complex mediates the known effects of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection. To dissect the roles of CPSF6 and other CFIm complex subunits in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed virologic and integration site targeting properties of a CPSF6 variant with mutations that prevent its incorporation into CFIm We show, somewhat surprisingly, that CPSF6 incorporation into CFIm is not required for its ability to direct preferential HIV-1 integration into genes. The CPSF5 and CPSF7 subunits appear to have only a minor, if any, role in this process even though they appear to facilitate CPSF6 binding to capsid. Thus, CPSF6 alone controls the key molecular interactions that specify HIV-1 preintegration complex trafficking to active chromatin. PMID:26994143

  3. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have established that selective damage to the early-developing components of the mesostriatal dopamine system produces profound changes in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated behaviors, while decreasing D1 receptor density. In order to better understand the effects of early intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions, we studied the ontogenetic expression (postnatal days 7, 14, 35 and 90) of D1 and D2 receptors, and their corresponding messenger RNAs, in rats that had received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine or vehicle lesions on postnatal day 1. Using receptor autoradiography, significant (P < 0.05) decreases in [3H]SCH 23390 binding to D1 receptors in the rostral and caudal dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals were evident by postnatal day 7, and remained depressed at all future time points. A significant decrease in D1 receptor concentration occurred in the dorsolateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). [3H]Spiperone binding to D2 receptor sites was unchanged throughout the entire study. In situ hybridization for D1 and D2 messenger RNA expression showed contrasting results. 6-Hydroxydopamine induced significant decreases of D1 messenger RNA levels in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate by postnatal day 7. By postnatal day 14, messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of the 6-hydroxydopamine group, and remained elevated thereafter. D1 messenger RNA levels became elevated in the lateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). The opposing changes in D1 receptor concentrations and the messenger RNA encoding the protein did not occur as a consequence of increased transport of D1 receptors to striatonigral terminals. D2 messenger RNA levels in the dorsal caudate were significantly decreased on postnatal day 7, and became higher than controls at postnatal day 14, but were unchanged from controls at later time points

  4. File-based data processing on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiarz, Christopher J.; Artis, David A.; Calloway, Andrew B.; Frangos, Constantine M.; Heggestad, Brian K.; Holland, Douglas B.; Stratton, William C.

    2003-11-01

    As part of the system software, MESSENGER will be using a file-based system for the transfer and processing of instrument and spacecraft data. The flow of files within the MESSENGER software architecture begins with the receipt of science data by the main processor and the creation of files containing these data by the flight software. The files are then autonomously selected for downlink via a priority-based algorithm, packaged for transmittal via the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), and radiated to the ground. The ground software reconstructs the files via its implementation of CFDP, performs further processing on the file, and sends it to the operations data archive and the Science Operations Center. The MESSENGER spacecraft operations team manages the overall handling of these files through interaction with both the flight and ground systems.

  5. File-based data processing on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiarz, Christopher J.; Artis, David A.; Calloway, Andrew B.; Frangos, Constantine M.; Heggestad, Brian K.; Holland, Douglas B.; Stratton, William C.

    2006-10-01

    As part of the system software, MESSENGER will be using a file-based system for the transfer and processing of instrument and spacecraft data. The flow of files within the MESSENGER software architecture begins with the receipt of science data by the main processor and the creation of files containing these data by the flight software. The files are then autonomously selected for downlink via a priority-based algorithm, packaged for transmittal via the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), and radiated to the ground. The ground software reconstructs the files via its implementation of CFDP, performs further processing on the file, and sends it to the operations data archive and the Science Operations Center. The MESSENGER spacecraft operations team manages the overall handling of these files through interaction with both the flight and ground systems.

  6. An Integrative Analysis of microRNA and mRNA Profiling in CML Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Farah J; El Eit, Rabab; Nasr, Rihab

    2016-01-01

    Integrative analysis of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) in Chronic Myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells is an important technique to study the involvement of miRNA and their targets in CML stem cells self-renewal, maintenance, and therapeutic resistance. Here, we describe a simplified integrative analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software after performing proper RNA extraction, miRNA and mRNA microarray and data analysis. PMID:27581151

  7. Functionalities of expressed messenger RNAs revealed from mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ben-Yang; Weng, Meng-Pin

    2016-07-01

    Total messenger RNAs mRNAs that are produced from a given gene under a certain set of conditions include both functional and nonfunctional transcripts. The high prevalence of nonfunctional mRNAs that have been detected in cells has raised questions regarding the functional implications of mRNA expression patterns and divergences. Phenotypes that result from the mutagenesis of protein-coding genes have provided the most straightforward descriptions of gene functions, and such data obtained from model organisms have facilitated investigations of the functionalities of expressed mRNAs. Mutant phenotype data from mouse tissues have revealed various attributes of functional mRNAs, including tissue-specificity, strength of expression, and evolutionary conservation. In addition, the role that mRNA expression evolution plays in driving morphological evolution has been revealed from studies designed to exploit morphological and physiological phenotypes of mouse mutants. Investigations into yeast essential genes (defined by an absence of colony growth after gene deletion) have further described gene regulatory strategies that reduce protein expression noise by mediating the rates of transcription and translation. In addition to the functional significance of expressed mRNAs as described in the abovementioned findings, the functionalities of other type of RNAs (i.e., noncoding RNAs) remain to be characterized with systematic mutations and phenotyping of the DNA regions that encode these RNA molecules. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:416-427. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1329 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26748449

  8. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Philips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, M. T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  9. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Slavin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission angles

  10. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early orbital operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.; MESSENGER Team

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  11. Molecular biology Mediating transcription and RNA export

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Taatjes, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    The finding that the Mediator protein complex contributes to messenger RNA export from the nucleus in yeast adds to a growing list of roles for the complex in regulating transcriptional processes. PMID:26450052

  12. Staphylococcus aureus MazF specifically cleaves a pentad sequence, UACAU, which is unusually abundant in the mRNA for pathogenic adhesive factor SraP.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Inoue, Koichi; Yoshizumi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yonglong; Ouyang, Ming; Kato, Fuminori; Sugai, Motoyuki; Inouye, Masayori

    2009-05-01

    Escherichia coli mRNA interferases, such as MazF and ChpBK, are sequence-specific endoribonucleases encoded by toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems present in its genome. A MazF homologue in Staphylococcus aureus (MazF(Sa)) has been shown to inhibit cell growth when induced in E. coli. Here, we determined the cleavage site for MazF(Sa) with the use of phage MS2 RNA as a substrate and CspA, an RNA chaperone, which prevents the formation of secondary structures in the RNA substrate. MazF(Sa) specifically cleaves the RNA at a pentad sequence, U downward arrow ACAU. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that this pentad sequence is significantly abundant in several genes, including the sraP gene in the S. aureus N315 strain. This gene encodes a serine-rich protein, which is known to play an important role in adhesion of the pathogen to human tissues and thus in endovascular infection. We demonstrated that the sraP mRNA became extremely unstable in comparison with the ompA mRNA only when MazF(Sa) was induced in E. coli. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that the pentad sequence is also significantly abundant in the mRNAs for all the pathogenic factors in S. aureus. This observation suggests a possible regulatory relationship between the MazEF(Sa) TA module and the pathogenicity in S. aureus. PMID:19251861

  13. Attitude Sensor and Gyro Calibration for Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Pittelkau, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit Attitude Determination/Calibration (RADICAL(TM)) filter was used to estimate star tracker and gyro calibration parameters using MESSENGER telemetry data from three calibration events. We present an overview of the MESSENGER attitude sensors and their configuration is given, the calibration maneuvers are described, the results are compared with previous calibrations, and variations and trends in the estimated calibration parameters are examined. The warm restart and covariance bump features of the RADICAL(TM) filter were used to estimate calibration parameters from two disjoint telemetry streams. Results show that the calibration parameters converge faster with much less transient variation during convergence than when the filter is cold-started at the start of each telemetry stream.

  14. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-10-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft to infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The hot portion of the source appears to be highly variable. The authors acknowledge support from NASA through the MESSENGER Participating Scientist Program and Planetary Atmospheres research grants.

  15. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  16. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, J.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  17. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  18. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  19. A mathematical analysis of second messenger compartmentalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular compartmentalization of second messengers can lead to microdomains of elevated concentration that are thought to be involved in ensuring signaling specificity. Most experimental evidence for this compartmentalization involves the second messenger adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). One possible way of creating these compartments, supported by recent experiments, is to spatially separate the source of cAMP from regions of elevated PDE concentration. To quantify this possibility, we study here a simplified geometry in two dimensions (2D) and in three dimensions (3D), containing a cAMP point source and regions with different degradation constants. Using the symmetry of our geometry, we are able to derive steady state solutions for the cAMP concentration as a function of the system parameters. Furthermore, we show, using analytics as well as direct numerical simulations, that for physiologically relevant time scales the steady state solution has been reached. Our results indicate that elevating the degradation constant throughout the cell, except for a small microdomain surrounding the source, requires an unphysiologically high cellular PDE concentration. On the other hand, a tight spatial relationship of localized PDEs with the cAMP source can result in functional microdomains while maintaining a physiologically plausible cellular PDE concentration.

  20. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios. This article is an excerpt from an ICRC 2015 proceedings contribution [1].

  1. Expression of hemocyanin and digestive enzyme messenger RNAs in the hepatopancreas of the Black Tiger Shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Sigrid A; Johnson, Samuel E

    2002-10-01

    In order to define the cellular site of synthesis for hemocyanin and digestive enzymes in the decapod hepatopancreas, we studied the expression of messenger ribonucleic acids (RNAs) for these molecules in the epithelium lining hepatopancreas tubules. In situ hybridisation of gene probes for the digestive enzymes amylase, cathepsin-L, cellulase, chitinase-1 and trypsin to tissue sections of the shrimp hepatopancreas confirmed that the F-cells lining tertiary, secondary and primary ducts are the sites of synthesis for digestive enzyme messenger RNA (mRNA). The F-cells also contained mRNA for the hemocyanin gene. This finding raises important questions on the mechanism by which mature hemocyanin accumulates in the shrimp hemolymph. Our in situ hybridisation studies further showed that Penaeus monodon F-cells remain transcriptionally active for digestive enzyme mRNAs during periods of starvation. PMID:12381378

  2. Imaging During MESSENGER's Second Flyby of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Prockter, L. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Laslo, N. R.; Kang, H. K.; Hawkins, S. E.; Vaughan, R. M.; Head, J. W.; Solomon, S. C.; MESSENGER Team

    2008-12-01

    During MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury on October 6, 2008, the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) will acquire 1287 images. The images will include coverage of about 30% of Mercury's surface not previously seen by spacecraft. A portion of the newly imaged terrain will be viewed during the inbound portion of the flyby. On the outbound leg, MDIS will image additional previously unseen terrain as well as regions imaged under different illumination geometry by Mariner 10. These new images, when combined with images from Mariner 10 and from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, will enable the first regional- resolution global view of Mercury constituting a combined total coverage of about 96% of the planet's surface. MDIS consists of both a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the following imaging activities are planned: about 86 minutes before the spacecraft's closest pass by the planet, the WAC will acquire images through 11 different narrow-band color filters of the approaching crescent planet at a resolution of about 5 km/pixel. At slightly less than 1 hour to closest approach, the NAC will acquire a 4-column x 11-row mosaic with an approximate resolution of 450 m/pixel. At 8 minutes after closest approach, the WAC will obtain the highest-resolution multispectral images to date of Mercury's surface, imaging a portion of the surface through 11 color filters at resolutions of about 250-600 m/pixel. A strip of high-resolution NAC images, with a resolution of approximately 100 m/pixel, will follow these WAC observations. The NAC will next acquire a 15-column x 13- row high-resolution mosaic of the northern hemisphere of the departing planet, beginning approximately 21 minutes after closest approach, with resolutions of 140-300 m/pixel; this mosaic will fill a large gore in the Mariner 10 data. At about 42 minutes following closest approach, the WAC will acquire a 3x3, 11-filter, full- planet mosaic with an

  3. The cosmic mult-messenger background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    The cosmic star formation history associated with baryon flows within the large scale structure of the expanding Universe has many important consequences, such as cosmic chemical- and galaxy evolution. Stars and accreting compact objects subsequently produce light, from the radio band to the highest photon energies, and dust within galaxies reprocesses a significant fraction of this light into the IR region. The Universe creates a radiation background that adds to the relic field from the big bang, the CMB. In addition, Cosmic Rays are created on variouys scales, and interact with this diffuse radiation field, and neutrinos are added as well. A multi-messenger field is created whose evolution with redshift contains a tremendous amount of cosmological information. We discuss several aspects of this story, emphasizing the background in the HE regime and the neutrino sector, and disccus the use of gamma-ray sources as probes.

  4. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-01

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the "penetrating" component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  5. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  6. Theory of high-energy messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  7. Mercury's magnetosphere after MESSENGER's first flyby.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Killen, Rosemary M; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2008-07-01

    Observations by MESSENGER show that Mercury's magnetosphere is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions. The most abundant, Na+, is broadly distributed but exhibits flux maxima in the magnetosheath, where the local plasma flow speed is high, and near the spacecraft's closest approach, where atmospheric density should peak. The magnetic field showed reconnection signatures in the form of flux transfer events, azimuthal rotations consistent with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetopause, and extensive ultralow-frequency wave activity. Two outbound current sheet boundaries were observed, across which the magnetic field decreased in a manner suggestive of a double magnetopause. The separation of these current layers, comparable to the gyro-radius of a Na+ pickup ion entering the magnetosphere after being accelerated in the magnetosheath, may indicate a planetary ion boundary layer. PMID:18599776

  8. Endogenous Arabidopsis messenger RNAs transported to distant tissues.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Christoph J; Rojas-Triana, Monica; Stecyk, Ewelina; Schudoma, Christian; Zhang, Wenna; Yang, Lei; Miñambres, Miguel; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X; Paz-Ares, Javier; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Kragler, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The concept that proteins and small RNAs can move to and function in distant body parts is well established. However, non-cell-autonomy of small RNA molecules raises the question: To what extent are protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) exchanged between tissues in plants? Here we report the comprehensive identification of 2,006 genes producing mobile RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. The analysis of variant ecotype transcripts that were present in heterografted plants allowed the identification of mRNAs moving between various organs under normal or nutrient-limiting conditions. Most of these mobile transcripts seem to follow the phloem-dependent allocation pathway transporting sugars from photosynthetic tissues to roots via the vasculature. Notably, a high number of transcripts also move in the opposite, root-to-shoot direction and are transported to specific tissues including flowers. Proteomic data on grafted plants indicate the presence of proteins from mobile RNAs, allowing the possibility that they may be translated at their destination site. The mobility of a high number of mRNAs suggests that a postulated tissue-specific gene expression profile might not be predictive for the actual plant body part in which a transcript exerts its function. PMID:27247031

  9. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters with Mercury have provided new measurements dynamic variations in the coupled atmosphere magnetosphere system. The two flybys took place under very different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The northward IMF during the first encounter produced a very quiet, stable magnetosphere. Neutral sodium atoms and photo-ions were observed to high altitudes ; > 2000 km, even in the subsolar region demonstrating the important role played by more energetic neutral atom production processes such as sputtering. Consistent with predictions of magnetospheric models for northward IMF, the neutral atmosphere was observed to have its strongest sources in the high latitude northern hemisphere for the first flyby. The southward IMF for the second encounter revealed a highly dynamic magnetosphere. Reconnection between the interplanetary and planetary magnetic fields is known to control the rate of energy transfer from the solar wind and to drive magnetospheric convection. The MESSENGER magnetic field measurements revealed that the rate at which interplanetary magnetic fields were reconnecting to planetary fields was a factor of 10 greater than is usually observed at Earth. This extremely high reconnection results in a large magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause and the formation of flux transfer events that are much larger relative to the size of the forward magnetosphere than is observed at Earth. The resulting magnetospheric configuration allows the solar wind access to much of the dayside surface of the Mercury. This widespread impingement of the solar wind on Mercury's surface is a likely source of the less structured sodium exosphere imaged during the second flyby and quite possibly the high degree of exospheric temporal variability observed by ground-based telescopes.

  10. Direct Fe2+ Sensing by Iron-responsive Messenger RNA·Repressor Complexes Weakens Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mateen A.; Walden, William E.; Goss, Dixie J.; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    Fe2+ is now shown to weaken binding between ferritin and mitochondrial aconitase messenger RNA noncoding regulatory structures ((iron-responsive element) (IRE)-RNAs) and the regulatory proteins (IRPs), which adds a direct role of iron to regulation that can complement the well known regulatory protein modification and degradative pathways related to iron-induced mRNA translation. We observe that the Kd value increases 17-fold in 5′-untranslated region IRE-RNA·repressor complexes; Fe2+, is studied in the absence of O2. Other metal ions, Mn2+ and Mg2+ have similar effects to Fe2+ but the required Mg2+ concentration is 100 times greater than for Fe2+ or Mn2+. Metal ions also weaken ethidium bromide binding to IRE-RNA with no effect on IRP fluorescence, using Mn2+ as an O2-resistant surrogate for Fe2+, indicating that metal ions bound IRE-RNA but not IRP. Fe2+ decreases IRP repressor complex stability of ferritin IRE-RNA 5–10 times compared with 2–5 times for mitochondrial aconitase IRE-RNA, over the same concentration range, suggesting that differences among IRE-RNA structures contribute to the differences in the iron responses observed in vivo. The results show the IRE-RNA·repressor complex literally responds to Fe2+, selectively for each IRE-mRNA. PMID:19720833

  11. Antisense-induced messenger depletion corrects a COL6A2 dominant mutation in Ullrich myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gualandi, Francesca; Manzati, Elisa; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Passarelli, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perrone, Daniela; Squarzoni, Stefano; Pegoraro, Elena; Bonaldo, Paolo; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    Collagen VI gene mutations cause Ullrich and Bethlem muscular dystrophies. Pathogenic mutations frequently have a dominant negative effect, with defects in collagen VI chain secretion and assembly. It is agreed that, conversely, collagen VI haploinsufficiency has no pathological consequences. Thus, RNA-targeting approaches aimed at preferentially inactivating the mutated COL6 messenger may represent a promising therapeutic strategy. By in vitro studies we obtained the preferential depletion of the mutated COL6A2 messenger, by targeting a common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), cistronic with a dominant COL6A2 mutation. We used a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2'OMePS) antisense oligonucleotide covering the SNP within exon 3, which is out of frame. Exon 3 skipping has the effect of depleting the mutated transcript via RNA nonsense-mediated decay, recovering the correct collagen VI secretion and restoring the ability to form an interconnected microfilament network into the extracellular matrix. This novel RNA modulation approach to correcting dominant mutations may represent a therapeutic strategy potentially applicable to a great variety of mutations and diseases. PMID:22992134

  12. Exosomes as divine messengers: are they the Hermes of modern molecular oncology?

    PubMed

    Braicu, C; Tomuleasa, C; Monroig, P; Cucuianu, A; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Calin, G A

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles that convey key elements with the potential to modulate intercellular communication. They are known to be secreted from all types of cells, and are crucial messengers that can regulate cellular processes by 'trafficking' molecules from cells of one tissue to another. The exosomal content has been shown to be broad, composed of different types of cytokines, growth factors, proteins, or nucleic acids. Besides messenger RNA (mRNA) they can also contain noncoding transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous cellular regulators of protein expression. In diseases such as cancer, exosomes can facilitate tumor progression by altering their vesicular content and supplying the tumor niche with molecules that favor the progression of oncogenic processes such as proliferation, invasion and metastasis, or even drug resistance. The packaging of their molecular content is known to be tissue specific, a fact that makes them interesting tools in clinical diagnostics and ideal candidates for biomarkers. In the current report, we describe the main properties of exosomes and explain their involvement in processes such as cell differentiation and cell death. Furthermore, we emphasize the need of developing patient-targeted treatments by applying the conceptualization of exosomal-derived miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:25236394

  13. Exosomes as divine messengers: are they the Hermes of modern molecular oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Braicu, C; Tomuleasa, C; Monroig, P; Cucuianu, A; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Calin, G A

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles that convey key elements with the potential to modulate intercellular communication. They are known to be secreted from all types of cells, and are crucial messengers that can regulate cellular processes by ‘trafficking' molecules from cells of one tissue to another. The exosomal content has been shown to be broad, composed of different types of cytokines, growth factors, proteins, or nucleic acids. Besides messenger RNA (mRNA) they can also contain noncoding transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous cellular regulators of protein expression. In diseases such as cancer, exosomes can facilitate tumor progression by altering their vesicular content and supplying the tumor niche with molecules that favor the progression of oncogenic processes such as proliferation, invasion and metastasis, or even drug resistance. The packaging of their molecular content is known to be tissue specific, a fact that makes them interesting tools in clinical diagnostics and ideal candidates for biomarkers. In the current report, we describe the main properties of exosomes and explain their involvement in processes such as cell differentiation and cell death. Furthermore, we emphasize the need of developing patient-targeted treatments by applying the conceptualization of exosomal-derived miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:25236394

  14. The pivotal regulatory landscape of RNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Mason, Christopher E

    2014-01-01

    Posttranscriptionally modified nucleosides in RNA play integral roles in the cellular control of biological information that is encoded in DNA. The modifications of RNA span all three phylogenetic domains (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya) and are pervasive across RNA types, including messenger RNA (mRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and (less frequently) small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Nucleotide modifications are also one of the most evolutionarily conserved properties of RNAs, and the sites of modification are under strong selective pressure. However, many of these modifications, as well as their prevalence and impact, have only recently been discovered. Here, we examine both labile and permanent modifications, from simple methylation to complex transcript alteration (RNA editing and intron retention); detail the models for their processing; and highlight remaining questions in the field of the epitranscriptome. PMID:24898039

  15. Proteobacterial ArfA peptides are synthesized from non-stop messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Poole, Stephen J; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Benbow, Sarah; Hayes, Christopher S

    2012-08-24

    The translation of non-stop mRNA (which lack in-frame stop codons) represents a significant quality control problem for all organisms. In eubacteria, the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) system facilitates recycling of stalled ribosomes from non-stop mRNA in a process termed trans-translation or ribosome rescue. During rescue, the nascent chain is tagged with the tmRNA-encoded ssrA peptide, which promotes polypeptide degradation after release from the stalled ribosome. Escherichia coli possesses an additional ribosome rescue pathway mediated by the ArfA peptide. The E. coli arfA message contains a hairpin structure that is cleaved by RNase III to produce a non-stop transcript. Therefore, ArfA levels are controlled by tmRNA through ssrA-peptide tagging and proteolysis. Here, we examine whether ArfA homologues from other bacteria are also regulated by RNase III and tmRNA. We searched 431 arfA coding sequences for mRNA secondary structures and found that 82.8% of the transcripts contain predicted hairpins in their 3'-coding regions. The arfA hairpins from Haemophilus influenzae, Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio fischeri, and Pasteurella multocida are all cleaved by RNase III as predicted, whereas the hairpin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions as an intrinsic transcription terminator to generate non-stop mRNA. Each ArfA homologue is ssrA-tagged and degraded when expressed in wild-type E. coli cells, but accumulates in mutants lacking tmRNA. Together, these findings show that ArfA synthesis from non-stop mRNA is a conserved mechanism to regulate the alternative ribosome rescue pathway. This strategy ensures that ArfA homologues are only deployed when the tmRNA system is incapacitated or overwhelmed by stalled ribosomes. PMID:22791716

  16. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  17. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  18. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee; Vervack, Ronald J.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere comprised of atomic species including hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and likely oxygen. Because it is collisionless. the exosphere's composition represents a balance of the active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment. GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data has been the substantial differences in the spatial distribution of each species, Our modeling demonstrates that these differences cannot be due to post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure. but instead point to differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry. with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere significantly greater than over the dusk. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced in a molecular exosphere (e.g., one consisting of CaO). Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Preliminary results suggest a high temperature ( I-2x 10(exp 4) K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. The high temperature is consistent with the dissociation of CaO in a near-surface exosphere with scale height <= 100 km, which imparts 2 eV to the freshly produced Ca atom. This

  19. Messenger Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, M.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14.2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER'S Magnetometer (MAG) (2.3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury.

  20. Universal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for simultaneous amplification of messengerRNAs and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mader, Andreas; Riehle, Ulrike; Brandstetter, Thomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Ruehe, Juergen

    2012-11-19

    A universal NASBA assay is presented for simultaneous amplification of multiple microRNA (miRNA) and messengerRNA (mRNA) sequences. First, miRNA and mRNA sequences are reverse transcribed using tailed reverse transcription primer pairs containing a gene-specific and an non-specific region. For reverse transcription of small miRNA molecules a non-specific region is incorporated into a structured stem-loop reverse transcription primer. Second, a universal NASBA primer pair that recognizes the tagged cDNA molecules enables a simultaneous, transcription-based amplification reaction (NASBA) of all different cDNA molecules in one reaction. The NASBA products (RNA copies) are detected by gene-specific DNA probes immobilized on a biochip. By using the multiplex reverse transcription combined with the universal NASBA amplification up to 14 different mRNA and miRNA sequences can be specifically amplified and detected in parallel. In comparison with standard multiplex NASBA assays this approach strongly enhances the multiplex capacity of NASBA-based amplification reactions. Furthermore simultaneous assaying of different RNA classes can be achieved that might be beneficial for studying miRNA-based regulation of gene expression or for RNA-based tumor diagnostics. PMID:23140948

  1. First MESSENGER orbital observations of Mercury's librations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-10-01

    We have coregistered laser altimeter profiles from 3 years of MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) orbital observations with stereo digital terrain models to infer the rotation parameters for the planet Mercury. In particular, we provide the first observations of Mercury's librations from orbit. We have also confirmed available estimates for the orientation of the spin axis and the mean rotation rate of the planet. We find a large libration amplitude of 38.9 ± 1.3 arc sec and an obliquity of the spin axis of 2.029 ± 0.085 arc min, results confirming that Mercury possesses a liquid outer core. The mean rotation rate is observed to be (6.13851804 ± 9.4 × 10-7)°/d (a spin period of 58.6460768 days ± 0.78 s), significantly higher than the expected resonant rotation rate. As a possible explanation we suggest that Mercury is undergoing long-period librational motion, related to planetary perturbations of its orbit.

  2. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury will provide the first new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet since the Mariner 10 flybys that took place over 30 years ago. The closest approach distance for this first MESSENGER flyby is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 km and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries observed by MESSENGER will be examined and compared against those found in the earlier Mariner 10 measurements and the predictions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. The structure of the magnetopause will be investigated for the presence of flux transfer events or other evidence of magnetic reconnection as will the more general implications of these new MESSENGER bow shock and magnetopause observations for the global solar wind interaction with Mercury.

  4. MESSENGER's use of solar sailing for cost and risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel J.; McAdams, James V.; Bedini, Peter D.; Calloway, Andrew B.; Williams, Kenneth E.; Page, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission used six planetary gravity assists in order to enable capture into orbit about Mercury. A key element of MESSENGER's successful trajectory was achieving the proper gravity assist from each planetary flyby. The criticality of the MESSENGER gravity assists levied tight accuracy requirements on the planetary-flyby targeting. Major errors could have precluded Mercury orbit insertion or required modifications to the trajectory that increased mission complexity, cost, and risk by requiring additional Mercury flybys and extending mission duration. Throughout the mission, MESSENGER modified its strategy for achieving accurate planetary flybys. By using solar sailing, the MESSENGER team was able to eliminate all of the flyby approach maneuvers without sacrificing flyby accuracy, thereby saving mission ΔV margin. The elimination of these approach maneuvers also markedly reduced mission risk, as these approach maneuvers were nominally planned during a time of heightened sensitivity to errors and precluded unique flyby science opportunities. The paradigm shift used by MESSENGER may be useful for other interplanetary missions, particularly if their trajectories require gravity assists in the inner solar system.

  5. Exploration of Mercury: The MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA’s Discovery Program, has been collecting orbital observations of Mercury since March 2011. Elemental remote sensing of Mercury’s surface indicates that the moderately volatile elements Na, K, and S are not depleted relative to other terrestrial planets. Orbital images document widespread evidence for ancient volcanic activity ranging from effusive to explosive eruptions. High-resolution images have revealed the presence of irregular rimless depressions or “hollows” likely produced by the loss to diurnal heating or sputtering of some volatile-rich material. Polar deposits in permanently shadowed high-latitude regions are dominated by water ice on the basis of neutron spectrometry, surface reflectance, and thermal modeling with measured topography; in most locations the ice is covered by 10-30 cm of anomalously dark volatile material postulated to consist of complex organic compounds. The tectonic history of Mercury is dominated by greater planetary contraction than previously recognized; long-wavelength changes in topography postdated the emplacement of large expanses of volcanic plains. Gravity and topography measurements indicate that mascons and crustal thinning are associated with some impact basins. Mercury’s internal magnetic field is that of a dipole offset from the planet’s center by ~0.2 Mercury radii, a geometry difficult to reconcile with existing dynamo models. Magnetospheric measurements have revealed a highly time-variable and spatially structured particle environment. Despite complex feedbacks among the exosphere, magnetosphere, and surface, the large-scale structure of the exosphere - dominated by Na, Ca, and Mg - shows seasonal variations in general agreement with those expected from variations in solar flux with Mercury true anomaly but little variation with changing solar conditions. Energetic electron events are

  6. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  7. Mercury's global evolution: New views from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, S. A., II; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Grott, M.; McCoy, T.; Stanley, S.

    2015-12-01

    MESSENGER's exploration of Mercury has revealed the planet's rich and dynamic history and provided new constraints on the processes that control its internal evolution. Mercury's surface records evidence of an extensive geological history. This evidence includes resurfacing by impacts and volcanism prior to the end of the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and a subsequent rapid waning of effusive volcanism. Volcanism is an important indicator of the history of melt production. Thousands of globally distributed, contractional tectonic landforms collectively have accommodated a decrease in Mercury's radius of 5-7 km since the end of the LHB. Such contraction results from planetary cooling and crystallization within Mercury's metallic core. Measurements of surface chemistry have provided constraints on internal radiogenic heat production necessary to understand more fully Mercury's thermal evolution. Elemental abundances also reveal that Mercury is strongly chemically reduced, suggesting that the core's iron is alloyed with silicon as well as sulfur, which constrains the dynamics and crystallization of the metallic core. Magnetometer observations show that Mercury's dynamo-generated, dominantly dipolar field is displaced ~500 km northward along the rotation axis. Low-altitude magnetic field observations late in the mission led to the discovery of crustal magnetization in Mercury's ancient crust, dating to at least 3.7 Ga, which places a new constraint on the timing of the dynamo. Monte Carlo parameterized mantle convection models, constrained by these observations, indicate that for global contraction of 7 km or less, mantle convection persists to the present ~40% of the time, with the likelihood of modern convection decreasing with less global contraction. Slow present cooling in these models indicates that dynamo generation is strongly influenced by both a static layer at the top of the core and convective motions within the core driven by compositional buoyancy.

  8. Induction of avidin messenger ribonucleic acid in the chick oviduct by progesterone and other steroids.

    PubMed

    Kunnas, T A; Joensuu, T K; Viitala, K K; Sopanen, P; Tuohimaa, P; Kulomaa, M S

    1992-06-01

    Avidin gene expression was analyzed using an avidin immunoassay and RNA hybridization analysis. To ascertain whether the induction of the avidin gene by progesterone remains specific also during secondary restimulation with diethylstilbestrol, chicks were given different steroid hormones or hormone combinations. Progesterone-specific induction of avidin protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) was 15- to 30-fold over the control even after secondary restimulation with diethylstilbestrol. A functional difference between the progesterone response element and glucocorticoid response element was suggested, since dexamethasone alone did not induce avidin in vivo. In spite of progesterone specificity, a combination of progesterone with other steroids nevertheless generated a synergistic increase in the amount of avidin mRNA. This may indicate that binding of progesterone receptor to the progesterone response element may be important to alter the functional activity of other hormone response elements present on the avidin gene. The time response curve of the avidin mRNA induction by progesterone was also determined. Avidin mRNA was detectable 8 h after progesterone induction, and its amount was maximal after 16-24 h. This would indicate that the avidin gene belongs in the so-called late responder genes, which also include chicken ovalbumin, ovomucoid, and lysozyme genes. PMID:1375902

  9. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  10. The tmRNA website

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from themore » same organism.« less

  11. The tmRNA website

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Corey M.; Williams, Kelly P.

    2014-11-05

    We report that the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its partner protein SmpB act together in resolving problems arising when translating bacterial ribosomes reach the end of mRNA with no stop codon. Their genes have been found in nearly all bacterial genomes and in some organelles. The tmRNA Website serves tmRNA sequences, alignments and feature annotations, and has recently moved to http: //bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna/. New features include software used to find the sequences, an update raising the number of unique tmRNA sequences from 492 to 1716, and a database of SmpB sequences which are served along with the tmRNA sequence from the same organism.

  12. Coordinate estrogen-regulated instability of serum protein-coding messenger RNAs in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pastori, R L; Moskaitis, J E; Buzek, S W; Schoenberg, D R

    1991-04-01

    Estrogen causes the cytoplasmic destabilization of albumin and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in Xenopus laevis liver. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether mRNA destabilization is a generalized phenomenon in response to estrogen, or whether this process is restricted to a particular class of mRNAs. To address this, we have expanded our bank of serum protein-coding cDNA clones to include transferrin, the second protein of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor and clone 12B, for which there is no mammalian homolog. Together with albumin and gamma-fibrinogen, these represent more than 85% of the mRNAs encoding liver secreted proteins. Estrogen administration to male Xenopus or to liver explant cultures causes the generalized disappearance of all of these mRNAs. In contrast, estrogen has no effect on actin, ferritin, or poly(A)-binding protein mRNA, all of which encode intracellular proteins. We have previously demonstrated that albumin mRNA is degraded in both messenger ribonucleoprotein and polysome fractions. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrates the same pattern for degradation of all other serum protein-coding mRNAs. Estrogen has no effect on the amounts or gradient distribution of actin, ferritin, or poly(A)-binding protein mRNA. We conclude that regulated destabilization of mRNAs encoding secreted proteins is a generalized phenomenon in response to estrogen stimulation of Xenopus liver. PMID:1922078

  13. Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Nathalie C.; Hauck, Steven A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Roberts, James H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2013-05-01

    observations of Mercury by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft provide new constraints on that planet's thermal and interior evolution. Specifically, MESSENGER observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium, and potassium at the surface, and identified a range of surface compositions consistent with high-temperature, high-degree partial melts of the mantle. Additionally, MESSENGER data have placed new limits on the spatial and temporal variation in volcanic and tectonic activity and enabled determination that the planet's core is larger than previously estimated. Because Mercury's mantle layer is also thinner than previously thought, this result gives greater likelihood to the possibility that mantle convection is marginally supercritical or even that the mantle is not convecting. We simulate mantle convection and magma generation within Mercury's mantle under two-dimensional axisymmetry and a broad range of conditions to understand the implications of MESSENGER observations for the thermal evolution of the planet. These models demonstrate that mantle convection can persist in such a thin mantle for a substantial portion of Mercury's history, and often to the present, as long as the mantle is thicker than ~300 km. We also find that magma generation in Mercury's convecting mantle is capable of producing widespread magmas by large-degree partial melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology.

  14. Differential regulation of host mRNA translation during obligate pathogen-plant interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus infection reprograms the plant messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptome by activating or interfering with a variety of signaling pathways, but the effects on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To address this issue, Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA transcripts were quantif...

  15. RNomics in Drosophila melanogaster: identification of 66 candidates for novel non-messenger RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guozhong; Klämbt, Christian; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Brosius, Jürgen; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    By generating a specialised cDNA library from four different developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified 66 candidates for small non-messenger RNAs (snmRNAs) and have confirmed their expression by northern blot analysis. Thirteen of them were expressed at certain stages of D.melanogaster development, only. Thirty-five species belong to the class of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), divided into 15 members from the C/D subclass and 20 members from the H/ACA subclass, which mostly guide 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively, of rRNA and snRNAs. These also include two outstanding C/D snoRNAs, U3 and U14, both functioning as pre-rRNA chaperones. Surprisingly, the sequence of the Drosophila U14 snoRNA reflects a major change of function of this snoRNA in Diptera relative to yeast and vertebrates. Among the 22 snmRNAs lacking known sequence and structure motifs, five were located in intergenic regions, two in introns, five in untranslated regions of mRNAs, eight were derived from open reading frames, and two were transcribed opposite to an intron. Interestingly, detection of two RNA species from this group implies that certain snmRNA species are processed from alternatively spliced pre-mRNAs. Surprisingly, a few snmRNA sequences could not be found on the published D.melanogaster genome, which might suggest that more snmRNA genes (as well as mRNAs) are hidden in unsequenced regions of the genome. PMID:12736298

  16. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  17. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  18. How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshon, B.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach (Epo) Team

    2010-12-01

    How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science In the film The Last Starfighter, an alien civilization grooms their future champion—a kid on Earth—using a video game. As he gains proficiency in the game, he masters the skills he needs to pilot a starship and save their civilization. The NASA MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is using the same tactic to train citizen scientists to help the Science Team explore the planet Mercury. We are building a new series of games that appear to be designed primarily for fun, but that guide players through a knowledge and skill set that they will need for future science missions in support of MESSENGER mission scientists. As players score points, they gain expertise. Once they achieve a sufficiently high score, they will be invited to become participants in Mercury Zoo, a new program being designed by Zooniverse. Zooniverse created Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo, programs that allow interested citizens to participate in the exploration and interpretation of galaxy and lunar data. Scientists use the citizen interpretations to further refine their exploration of the same data, thereby narrowing their focus and saving precious time. Mercury Zoo will be designed with input from the MESSENGER Science Team. This project will not only support the MESSENGER mission, but it will also add to the growing cadre of informed members of the public available to help with other citizen science projects—building on the concept that engaged, informed citizens can help scientists make new discoveries. The MESSENGER EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for Educational Resources (CERES) at Montana State University (MSU) - Bozeman; National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE); Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL); National Air and Space Museum (NASM); Science

  19. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  20. Launch and Early Operation of the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdridge, Mark E.; Calloway, Andrew B.

    2007-08-01

    On August 3, 2004, at 2:15 a.m. EST, the MESSENGER mission to Mercury began with liftoff of the Delta II 7925H launch vehicle and 1,107-kg spacecraft including seven instruments. MESSENGER is the seventh in the series of NASA Discovery missions, the third to be built and operated by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) following the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker and Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) missions. The MESSENGER team at JHU/APL is using efficient operations approaches developed in support of the low-cost NEAR and CONTOUR operations while incorporating improved approaches for reducing total mission risk. This paper provides an overview of the designs and operational practices implemented to conduct the MESSENGER mission safely and effectively. These practices include proven approaches used on past JHU/APL operations and new improvements implemented to reduce risk, including adherence to time-proven standards of conduct in the planning and implementation of the mission. This paper also discusses the unique challenges of operating in orbit around Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, and what specific measures are being taken to address those challenges.

  1. First Laser Altimeter Measurements of Mercury from the MESSENGER Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A.; Cavanaugh, John F.; McGarry, Jan F.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter performed the first laser ranging measurements to Mercury during the Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) flyby in January 2008. The instrument successfully ranged to 600 km at an off-nadir angle >60 and to >1600 km in the nadir direction.

  2. Messenger in the Barn: Networking in a Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes the use of a synchronous communication application (MSN Messenger) in a large academic computing environment. It draws on data from interviews, questionnaires and student marks to examine the link between use of the application and success measured through module marks. The relationship is not simple. Total abstainers and…

  3. MESSENGER Observation of Mercury's Magnetopause: Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Boardsen, S. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Sarantos, M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury has provided new observations of the magnetopause of this small magnetosphere, particularly concerning the effect of the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the structure and dynamics of this boundary. The IMF was northward immediately prior to and following the passage of the MESSENGER spacecraft through Mercury's magnetosphere. However, several-minute episodes of southward IMF were observed in the magnetosheath during the inbound portion of the encounter. Evidence for reconnection at the dayside magnetopause in the form of well-developed flux transfer events (FTEs) was observed in the magnetosheath following some of these southward-B, intervals. The inbound magnetopause crossing seen in the magnetic field measurements is consistent with a transition from the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet. Immediately following MESSENGER'S entry into the magnetosphere, rotational perturbations in the magnetic field similar to those seen at the Earth in association with large-scale plasma sheet vortices driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetotail boundary at the Earth were observed. The outbound magnetopause occurred during northward IMF B(sub z) and had the characteristics of a tangential discontinuity. These new observations by MESSENGER may be combined and compared with the magnetopause measurements collected by Mariner 10 to derive new understanding of the response of Mercury's magnetopause to IMF direction and its effect on the rate of solar wind energy and mass input to this small magnetosphere.

  4. Splicing remodels messenger ribonucleoprotein architecture via eIF4A3-dependent and -independent recruitment of exon junction complex components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuo; Krainer, Adrian R

    2007-07-10

    Pre-mRNA splicing not only removes introns and joins exons to generate spliced mRNA but also results in remodeling of the spliced messenger ribonucleoprotein, influencing various downstream events. This remodeling includes the loading of an exon-exon junction complex (EJC). It is unclear how the spliceosome recruits the EJC onto the mRNA and whether EJC formation or EJC components are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Here we immunodepleted the EJC core component eIF4A3 from HeLa cell nuclear extract and found that eIF4A3 is dispensable for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. However, eIF4A3 is required for the splicing-dependent loading of the Y14/Magoh heterodimer onto mRNA, and this activity of human eIF4A3 is also present in the Drosophila ortholog. Surprisingly, the loading of six other EJC components was not affected by eIF4A3 depletion, suggesting that their binding to mRNA involves different or redundant pathways. Finally, we found that the assembly of the EJC onto mRNA occurs at the late stages of the splicing reaction and requires the second-step splicing and mRNA-release factor HRH1/hPrp22. The EJC-dependent and -independent recruitment of RNA-binding proteins onto mRNA suggests a role for the EJC in messenger ribonucleoprotein remodeling involving interactions with other proteins already bound to the pre-mRNA, which has implications for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and other mRNA transactions. PMID:17606899

  5. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student... be filed by an employer or group of employers. Preferential consideration will be given...

  6. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student... be filed by an employer or group of employers. Preferential consideration will be given...

  7. A jack of all trades: the multiple roles of the unique essential second messenger cyclic di-AMP.

    PubMed

    Commichau, Fabian M; Dickmanns, Achim; Gundlach, Jan; Ficner, Ralf; Stülke, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Second messengers are key components of many signal transduction pathways. In addition to cyclic AMP, ppGpp and cyclic di-GMP, many bacteria use also cyclic di-AMP as a second messenger. This molecule is synthesized by distinct classes of diadenylate cyclases and degraded by phosphodiesterases. The control of the intracellular c-di-AMP pool is very important since both a lack of this molecule and its accumulation can inhibit growth of the bacteria. In many firmicutes, c-di-AMP is essential, making it the only known essential second messenger. Cyclic di-AMP is implicated in a variety of functions in the cell, including cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, DNA repair and the control of gene expression. To understand the molecular mechanisms behind these functions, targets of c-di-AMP have been identified and characterized. Interestingly, c-di-AMP can bind both proteins and RNA molecules. Several proteins that interact with c-di-AMP are required to control the intracellular potassium concentration. In Bacillus subtilis, c-di-AMP also binds a riboswitch that controls the expression of a potassium transporter. Thus, c-di-AMP is the only known second messenger that controls a biological process by interacting with both a protein and the riboswitch that regulates its expression. Moreover, in Listeria monocytogenes c-di-AMP controls the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme that is required to replenish the citric acid cycle. Here, we review the components of the c-di-AMP signaling system. PMID:25869574

  8. RNomics: an experimental approach that identifies 201 candidates for novel, small, non-messenger RNAs in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Kiefmann, Martin; Meier-Ewert, Sebastian; O’Brien, John; Lehrach, Hans; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre; Brosius, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    In mouse brain cDNA libraries generated from small RNA molecules we have identified a total of 201 different expressed RNA sequences potentially encoding novel small non-messenger RNA species (snmRNAs). Based on sequence and structural motifs, 113 of these RNAs can be assigned to the C/D box or H/ACA box subclass of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), known as guide RNAs for rRNA. While 30 RNAs represent mouse homologues of previously identified human C/D or H/ACA snoRNAs, 83 correspond to entirely novel snoRNAs. Among these, for the first time, we identified four C/D box snoRNAs and four H/ACA box snoRNAs predicted to direct modifications within U2, U4 or U6 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Furthermore, 25 snoRNAs from either class lacked antisense elements for rRNAs or snRNAs. Therefore, additional snoRNA targets have to be considered. Surprisingly, six C/D box snoRNAs and one H/ACA box snoRNA were expressed exclusively in brain. Of the 88 RNAs not belonging to either snoRNA subclass, at least 26 are probably derived from truncated heterogeneous nuclear RNAs (hnRNAs) or mRNAs. Short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) are located on five RNA sequences and may represent rare examples of transcribed SINEs. The remaining RNA species could not as yet be assigned either to any snmRNA class or to a part of a larger hnRNA/mRNA. It is likely that at least some of the latter will represent novel, unclassified snmRNAs. PMID:11387227

  9. Small RNA in the nucleus: the RNA-chromatin ping-pong

    PubMed Central

    Olovnikov, Ivan; Aravin, Alexei A.; Toth, Katalin Fejes

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes use several classes of small RNA molecules to guide diverse protein machineries to target messenger RNA. The role of small RNA in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability and translation is now well established. Small RNAs can also guide sequence-specific modification of chromatin structure and thus contribute to establishment and maintenance of distinct chromatin domains. In this review we summarize the model for the inter-dependent interaction between small RNA and chromatin that has emerged from studies on fission yeast and plants. We focus on recent results that link a distinct class of small RNAs, the piRNAs, to chromatin regulation in animals. PMID:22349141

  10. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's bow shock and magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuña, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Trávníček, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14, 2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) (2,3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury. Here we present new models of bow shock and magnetopause shape and location that incorporate both the MESSENGER and earlier Mariner 10 measurements of these boundaries. A fast magnetosonic Mach number for the solar wind at Mercury's distance from the Sun of ~ 3 is derived from the shape of the bow shock. This value is consistent with earlier observations at these distances from the Sun by the Helios mission. The shape of Mercury's magnetopause and the thickness of the magnetosheath are found to be similar to that of the Earth, suggesting that the solar wind interaction is dominated by its dipolar magnetic field. MESSENGER measurements near the magnetopause do, however, indicate that internal plasma pressure does contribute to the pressure balance across this boundary. MAG and FIPS measurements are used to estimate the ratio of plasma thermal pressure to magnetic pressure at the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and dawn terminator regions, under the assumption that pressure is balanced across the inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings. To investigate the possible origins of the plasma ions in these regions, we utilize a combination of FIPS measurements and the results of 3-D hybrid [6] and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with Mercury for the upstream conditions