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Sample records for metabolic pathway leading

  1. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  2. Evolution of a pathway for chlorobenzene metabolism leads to natural attenuation in contaminated groundwater

    PubMed

    van der Meer JR; Werlen; Nishino; Spain

    1998-11-01

    Complete metabolism of chlorinated benzenes is not a feature that is generally found in aerobic bacteria but is thought to be due to a novel recombination of two separate gene clusters. Such a recombination could be responsible for adaptation of a natural microbial community in response to contamination with synthetic chemicals. This hypothesis was tested in a chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated aquifer. CB-degrading bacteria from a contaminated site were characterized for a number of years by examining a combination of growth characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR, and DNA sequence data. The genetic information obtained for the CB pathway of the predominant microorganism, Ralstonia sp. strain JS705, revealed a unique combination of (partially duplicated) genes for chlorocatechol degradation and genes for a benzene-toluene type of aromatic ring dioxygenase. The organism was detected in CB-polluted groundwater by hybridizing colonies cultivated on low-strength heterotrophic media with probes for the CB pathway. Southern hybridizations performed to determine the organization of the CB pathway genes and the 16S ribosomal DNA indicated that CB-degrading organisms isolated from different wells at the site were identical to JS705. Physiological characterization by the Biolog test system revealed some differences. The genes for the aromatic ring dioxygenase and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase of JS705 were detected in toluene and benzene degraders from the same site. Our results suggest that recent horizontal gene transfer and genetic recombination of existing genes between indigenous microorganisms were the mechanisms for evolution of the catabolic pathway. Evolution of the CB pathway seems to have created the capacity for natural attenuation of CB at the contaminated site. PMID:9797264

  3. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver. PMID:26843403

  4. Thiamine modulates metabolism of the phenylpropanoid pathway leading to enhanced resistance to Plasmopara viticola in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously, we have reported the ability of thiamine (vitamin B1) to induce resistance against Plasmopara viticola in a susceptible grapevine cv. Chardonnay. However, mechanisms underlying vitamins, especially, thiamine-induced disease resistance in grapevine are still largely unknown. Here, we assessed whether thiamine could modulate phenylpropanoid pathway-derived phytoalexins in grapevine plants, as well as, the role of such secondary metabolites in thiamine-induced resistance process to P. viticola. Results Our data show that thiamine treatment elicited the expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes in grapevine plants. The expression of these genes correlated with an accumulation of stilbenes, phenolic compounds, flavonoids and lignin. Furthermore, the total anti-oxidant potential of thiamine-treaded plants was increased by 3.5-fold higher level as compared with untreated-control plants. Four phenolic compounds are responsible of 97% of the total anti-oxidant potential of thiamine-treated plants. Among these compounds, is the caftaric acid, belonging to the hydroxy-cinnamic acids family. This element contributed, by its own, by 20% of this total anti-oxidant potential. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis revealed a concomitant presence of unbranched-altered P. viticola mycelia and stilbenes production in the leaf mesophyll of thiamine-treated inoculated plants, suggesting that stilbenes are an important component of thiamine-induced resistance in grapevine. Conclusion This work is the first to show the role of thiamine, as a vitamin, in the modulation of grapevine plant secondary metabolism contributing to an enhanced resistance to P. viticola, the most destructive fungal disease in vineyards. PMID:23442597

  5. Metabolic pathways leading to detoxification of triptolide, a major active component of the herbal medicine Tripterygium wilfordii.

    PubMed

    Du, Fuying; Liu, Zhaohua; Li, Xinxiu; Xing, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Triptolide (TP) shows promising anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity but with severe toxicity. TP is a natural reactive electrophile containing three epoxide groups, which are usually linked to hepatotoxicity via their ability to covalently bind to cellular macromolecules. In this study, metabolic pathways leading to detoxification of TP were evaluated in glutathione (GSH)-depleted (treated with L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoxinine, BSO) and aminobenzotriazole (ABT; a non-specific inhibitor for P450s)-treated mice. The toxicity of TP in mice was evaluated in terms of mortality and levels of serum alanine transaminase (ALT). In incubates with NADPH- and GSH-supplemented liver microsomes, seven GSH conjugates derived from TP were detected. In mice, these hydrolytically unstable GSH conjugates underwent γ-glutamyltranspeptidase/dipeptidases-mediated hydrolysis leading to two major cysteinylglycine conjugates, which underwent further hydrolysis by dipeptidases to form two cysteine conjugates of TP. In ABT-treated mice, the hydroxylated metabolites of TP were found at a lower level than normal mice, and their subsequent conjugated metabolites were not found. The level of cysteinylglycine and cysteine conjugates derived from NADPH-independent metabolism increased in mice treated with both TP and BSO (or ABT), which could be the stress response to toxicity of TP. Compared with normal mice, mortality and ALT levels were significantly higher in TP-treated mice, indicating the toxicity of TP. Pretreatment of ABT increased the toxicity caused by TP, whereas the mortality decreased in GSH-depleted mice. Metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes to less reactive metabolites implied a high potential for detoxification of TP. The GSH conjugation pathway also contributed to TP's detoxification in mice. PMID:23836259

  6. Metabolic Pathways Leading to Mercury Methylation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS †

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Chan; Chase, Theodore; Bartha, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of methylmercury by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS was investigated on the basis of 14C incorporation from precursors and the measurement of relevant enzyme activities in cell extracts. The previously observed incorporation of C-3 from serine into methylmercury was confirmed by measurement of relatively high activities of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and other enzymes of this pathway. High rates of label incorporation into methylmercury from H14COO- and H14CO3- prompted the assay of enzymes of the acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthase pathway. These enzymes were found to be present but at activity levels much lower than those reported for acetogens. Propyl iodide inhibited methylmercury and acetyl-CoA syntheses to similar extents, and methylmercury synthesis was found to compete with acetyl-CoA synthesis for methyl groups. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in methylmercury synthesis by D. desulfuricans LS the methyl group is transferred from CH3-tetrahydrofolate via methylcobalamin. The methyl group may originate from C-3 of serine or from formate via the acetyl-CoA synthase pathway. These pathways are not unique to D. desulfuricans LS, and thus the ability of this bacterium to methylate mercury is most likely associated with the substrate specificity of its enzymes. PMID:16349435

  7. Identifying Branched Metabolic Pathways by Merging Linear Metabolic Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison P.; Bennett, George N.; Kavraki, Lydia E.

    This paper presents a graph-based algorithm for identifying complex metabolic pathways in multi-genome scale metabolic data. These complex pathways are called branched pathways because they can arrive at a target compound through combinations of pathways that split compounds into smaller ones, work in parallel with many compounds, and join compounds into larger ones. While most previous work has focused on identifying linear metabolic pathways, branched metabolic pathways predominate in metabolic networks. Automatic identification of branched pathways has a number of important applications in areas that require deeper understanding of metabolism, such as metabolic engineering and drug target identification. Our algorithm utilizes explicit atom tracking to identify linear metabolic pathways and then merges them together into branched metabolic pathways. We provide results on two well-characterized metabolic pathways that demonstrate that this new merging approach can efficiently find biologically relevant branched metabolic pathways with complex structures.

  8. MPW : the metabolic pathways database.

    SciTech Connect

    Selkov, E., Jr.; Grechkin, Y.; Mikhailova, N.; Selkov, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Russian Academy of Sciences

    1998-01-01

    The Metabolic Pathways Database (MPW) (www.biobase.com/emphome.html/homepage. html.pags/pathways.html) a derivative of EMP (www.biobase.com/EMP) plays a fundamental role in the technology of metabolic reconstructions from sequenced genomes under the PUMA (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/PUMA/Production/ ReconstructedMetabolism/reconstruction.html), WIT (www.mcs.anl.gov/home/compbio/WIT/wit.html ) and WIT2 (beauty.isdn.msc.anl.gov/WIT2.pub/CGI/user.cgi) systems. In October 1997, it included some 2800 pathway diagrams covering primary and secondary metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction pathways, intracellular traffic, translation and transcription. In the current public release of MPW (beauty.isdn.mcs.anl.gov/MPW), the encoding is based on the logical structure of the pathways and is represented by the objects commonly used in electronic circuit design. This facilitates drawing and editing the diagrams and makes possible automation of the basic simulation operations such as deriving stoichiometric matrices, rate laws, and, ultimately, dynamic models of metabolic pathways. Individual pathway diagrams, automatically derived from the original ASCII records, are stored as SGML instances supplemented by relational indices. An auxiliary database of compound names and structures, encoded in the SMILES format, is maintained to unambiguously connect the pathways to the chemical structures of their intermediates.

  9. METABOLIC PATHWAY REGULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research efforts in the past two decades have revealed the complex mechanisms employed by fungi to control gene activity. The tremendous expansion in our knowledge of the regulation of nitrogen metabolism and carbon metabolism, due largely to the powerful combination of genetics, biochemistry, and ...

  10. Evolutionary algorithm for metabolic pathways synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Matias F; Stegmayer, Georgina; Milone, Diego H

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic pathway building is an active field of research, necessary to understand and manipulate the metabolism of organisms. There are different approaches, mainly based on classical search methods, to find linear sequences of reactions linking two compounds. However, an important limitation of these methods is the exponential increase of search trees when a large number of compounds and reactions is considered. Besides, such models do not take into account all substrates for each reaction during the search, leading to solutions that lack biological feasibility in many cases. This work proposes a new evolutionary algorithm that allows searching not only linear, but also branched metabolic pathways, formed by feasible reactions that relate multiple compounds simultaneously. Tests performed using several sets of reactions show that this algorithm is able to find feasible linear and branched metabolic pathways. PMID:27080162

  11. Representations of metabolic knowledge: pathways.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Paley, S M

    1994-01-01

    The automatic generation of drawings of metabolic pathways is a challenging problem that depends intimately on exactly what information has been recorded for each pathway, and on how that information is encoded. The chief contributions of the paper are a minimized representation for biochemical pathways called the predecessor list, and inference procedures for converting the predecessor list into a pathway-graph representation that can serve as input to a pathway-drawing algorithm. The predecessor list has several advantages over the pathway graph, including its compactness and its lack of redundancy. The conversion between the two representations can be formulated as both a constraint-satisfaction problem and a logical inference problem, whose goal is to assign directions to reactions, and to determine which are the main chemical compounds in the reaction. We describe a set of production rules that solves this inference problem. We also present heuristics for inferring whether the exterior compounds that are substrates of reactions at the periphery of a pathway are side or main compounds. These techniques were evaluated on 18 metabolic pathways from the EcoCyc knowledge base. PMID:7584392

  12. Origin and evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Fondi, Marco

    2009-03-01

    The emergence and evolution of metabolic pathways represented a crucial step in molecular and cellular evolution. In fact, the exhaustion of the prebiotic supply of amino acids and other compounds that were likely present in the ancestral environment, imposed an important selective pressure, favoring those primordial heterotrophic cells which became capable of synthesizing those molecules. Thus, the emergence of metabolic pathways allowed primitive organisms to become increasingly less-dependent on exogenous sources of organic compounds. Comparative analyses of genes and genomes from organisms belonging to Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya revealed that, during evolution, different forces and molecular mechanisms might have driven the shaping of genomes and the arisal of new metabolic abilities. Among these gene elongations, gene and operon duplications undoubtedly played a major role since they can lead to the (immediate) appearance of new genetic material that, in turn, might undergo evolutionary divergence giving rise to new genes coding for new metabolic abilities. Gene duplication has been invoked in the different schemes proposed to explain why and how the extant metabolic pathways have arisen and shaped. Both the analysis of completely sequenced genomes and directed evolution experiments strongly support one of them, i.e. the patchwork hypothesis, according to which metabolic pathways have been assembled through the recruitment of primitive enzymes that could react with a wide range of chemically related substrates. However, the analysis of the structure and organization of genes belonging to ancient metabolic pathways, such as histidine biosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, suggested that other different hypothesis, i.e. the retrograde hypothesis or the semi-enzymatic theory, may account for the arisal of some metabolic routes.

  13. Methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Sharkey, T D

    2014-08-01

    Covering: up to February 2014. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is the recently discovered source of isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) in most bacteria, some eukaryotic parasites, and the plastids of plant cells. The precursors lead to the formation of various isoprenoids having diverse roles in different biological processes. Some isoprenoids have important commercial uses. Isoprene, which is made in surprising abundance by some trees, plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The genetic regulation of this pathway has been discussed but information about metabolic regulation is just now becoming available. This review covers metabolic regulation of the MEP pathway starting from the inputs of carbon, ATP, and reducing power. A number of different regulatory mechanisms involving intermediate metabolites and/or enzymes are discussed. Some recent data indicate that methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcDP), the fifth intermediate of this pathway, is a key metabolite. It has been found to play diverse roles in regulation within the pathway as well as coordinating other biological processes by acting as a stress regulator in bacteria and possibly a retrograde signal from plastids to the nucleus in plants. In this review we focus on the role of the MEP pathway in photosynthetic leaves during isoprene emission and more generally the metabolic regulation of the MEP pathway in both plants and bacteria. PMID:24921065

  14. Reduction of inositol (1,4,5)–trisphosphate affects the overall phosphoinositol pathway and leads to modifications in light signalling and secondary metabolism in tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; de Silva, Kanishka; Ballu, Clarisse; Ali, Nawab; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositol pathway is one of the major eukaryotic signalling pathways. The metabolite of the phosphoinositol pathway, inositol- (1,4,5) trisphosphate (InsP3), is a regulator of plant responses to a wide variety of stresses, including light, drought, cold, and salinity. It was found that the expression of InsP 5-ptase, the enzyme that hydrolyses InsP3, also dramatically affects the levels of inositol phosphate metabolites and the secondary metabolites in transgenic tomato plants. Tomato plants expressing InsP 5-ptase exhibited a reduction in the levels of several important inositol phosphates, including InsP1, InsP2, InsP3, and InsP4. Reduced levels of inositol phosphates accompanied an increase in the accumulation of phenylpropanoids (rutin, chlorogenic acid) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in the transgenic fruits of tomato plants. The enhanced accumulation of these metabolites in transgenic tomato plants was in direct correspondence with the observed up-regulation of the genes that express the key enzymes of ascorbic acid metabolism (myo-inositol oxygenase, MIOX; L-galactono-γ-lactone dehydrogenase, GLDH) and phenylpropanoid metabolism (chalcone synthase, CHS1; cinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate transferase, HCT). To understand the molecular links between the activation of different branches of plant metabolism and InsP3 reduction in tomato fruits, the expression of transcription factors known to be involved in light signalling was analysed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression of LeHY5, SIMYB12, and LeELIP was found to be higher in fruits expressing InsP 5-ptase. These results suggest possible interconnections between phosphoinositol metabolism, light signalling, and secondary metabolism in plants. Our study also revealed the biotechnological potential for the genetic improvement of crop plants by the manipulation of the phosphoinositol pathway. PMID:21994174

  15. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems. PMID:26904095

  16. On the origin of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrophic theory of the origin of life is the only proposal available with experimental support. This comes from the ease of prebiotic synthesis under strongly reducing conditions. The prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds by reduction of CO(2) to monomers used by the first organisms would also be considered an heterotrophic origin. Autotrophy means that the first organisms biosynthesized their cell constituents as well as assembling them. Prebiotic synthetic pathways are all different from the biosynthetic pathways of the last common ancestor (LCA). The steps leading to the origin of the metabolic pathways are closer to prebiotic chemistry than to those in the LCA. There may have been different biosynthetic routes between the prebiotic and the LCAs that played an early role in metabolism but have disappeared from extant organisms. The semienzymatic theory of the origin of metabolism proposed here is similar to the Horowitz hypothesis but includes the use of compounds leaking from preexisting pathways as well as prebiotic compounds from the environment.

  17. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages. PMID:26628609

  18. Metabolic pathways of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Huang, Lingli; Kuča, Kamil; Wang, Xu; Chen, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2011-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) as a carcinogenic of group 2B to humans is produced by various fungi strains as Aspergillus and Penicillium. It is one of the most common contaminant in foodstuff. OTA is nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, teratogenic, and immunotoxic and is assumed to cause Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (BEN), a chronic kidney disease in humans when it is digested in combination with mycotoxin citrinin. The metabolism affects greatly the fates and the toxicity of a mycotoxins in humans, animals, and plants. The understanding of the metabolism of mycotoxins by the organism as fungi, yeast, bacteria and enzymes would be very helpful for the control of the contamination by the mycotoxins in foods and feeds, and understanding of the biotransformation of the mycotoxin in the body of humans, animals, plants, microorganisms would be beneficial to the risk assessment of food safety. In animals and humans, OTA can be metabolized in the kidney, liver and intestines. Hydrolysis, hydroxylation, lactone-opening and conjugation are the major metabolic pathways. OTalpha (OTα) formed by the cleavage of the peptidic bond in OTA is a major metabolite not only in animals and humans, but also in microorganisms and enzyme systems. It is considered as a nontoxic product. However, the lactone-opened product (OP-OTA), found in rodents, is higher toxic than its parent, OTA.. (4R)-4-OH-OTA is the major hydroxy product in rodents, whereas the 4S isomer is the major in pigs. 10-OH-OTA is currently found only in rabbits. Furthermore, OTA can lose the chlorine on C-5 to produce ochratoxin B (OTB), and OTB is further to 4-OH-OTB and ochratoxin β (OTβ). Ochratoxin quinine/hydroquinone (OTQ/OTHQ) is the metabolite of OTA in animals. In addition, the conjugates of OTA such as hexose and pentose conjugates can be found in animals. Such more polar metabolites make OTA to eliminate faster. Currently, a debate exits on the formation of OTA-DNA adducts. Plants can metabolize OTA as well. OH-OTA methyl ester

  19. Production of bulk chemicals via novel metabolic pathways in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Dong In; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has been playing important roles in developing high performance microorganisms capable of producing various chemicals and materials from renewable biomass in a sustainable manner. Synthetic and systems biology are also contributing significantly to the creation of novel pathways and the whole cell-wide optimization of metabolic performance, respectively. In order to expand the spectrum of chemicals that can be produced biotechnologically, it is necessary to broaden the metabolic capacities of microorganisms. Expanding the metabolic pathways for biosynthesizing the target chemicals requires not only the enumeration of a series of known enzymes, but also the identification of biochemical gaps whose corresponding enzymes might not actually exist in nature; this issue is the focus of this paper. First, pathway prediction tools, effectively combining reactions that lead to the production of a target chemical, are analyzed in terms of logics representing chemical information, and designing and ranking the proposed metabolic pathways. Then, several approaches for potentially filling in the gaps of the novel metabolic pathway are suggested along with relevant examples, including the use of promiscuous enzymes that flexibly utilize different substrates, design of novel enzymes for non-natural reactions, and exploration of hypothetical proteins. Finally, strain optimization by systems metabolic engineering in the context of novel metabolic pathways constructed is briefly described. It is hoped that this review paper will provide logical ways of efficiently utilizing 'big' biological data to design and develop novel metabolic pathways for the production of various bulk chemicals that are currently produced from fossil resources. PMID:23280013

  20. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  1. The metabolic pathway collection: an update.

    PubMed

    Selkov, E; Galimova, M; Goryanin, I; Gretchkin, Y; Ivanova, N; Komarov, Y; Maltsev, N; Mikhailova, N; Nenashev, V; Overbeek, R; Panyushkina, E; Pronevitch, L; Selkov, E

    1997-01-01

    The Metabolic Pathway Collection from EMP is an extraction of data from the larger Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways database (EMP). This extraction has been made publicly available in the hope that others will find it useful for a variety of purposes. The original release in October 1995 contained 1814 distinct pathways. The current collection contains 2180. Metabolic reconstructions for the first completely sequenced organisms-Haemophilus influenzae,Mycoplasma genitalium,Saccharomyces cerevisiaeandMethanococcus janaschii-are all included in the current release. All of the pathways in the collections are available as ASCII files in the form generated by the main curator, Evgeni Selkov. In addition, we are offering a more structured encoding of a subset of the collection; our initial release of this subcollection includes all of the pathways inMycoplasma genitalium, and we ultimately intend to offer the entire collection in this form as well. PMID:9016500

  2. Evolution of Dominance in Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Homayoun C.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2004-01-01

    Dominance is a form of phenotypic robustness to mutations. Understanding how such robustness can evolve provides a window into how the relation between genotype and phenotype can evolve. As such, the issue of dominance evolution is a question about the evolution of inheritance systems. Attempts at explaining the evolution of dominance have run into two problems. One is that selection for dominance is sensitive to the frequency of heterozygotes. Accordingly, dominance cannot evolve unless special conditions lead to the presence of a high frequency of mutant alleles in the population. Second, on the basis of theoretical results in metabolic control analysis, it has been proposed that metabolic systems possess inherent constraints. These hypothetical constraints imply the default manifestation of dominance of the wild type with respect to the effects of mutations at most loci. Hence, some biologists have maintained that an evolutionary explanation is not relevant to dominance. In this article, we put into question the hypothetical assumption of default metabolic constraints. We show that this assumption is based on an exclusion of important nonlinear interactions that can occur between enzymes in a pathway. With an a priori exclusion of such interactions, the possibility of epistasis and hence dominance modification is eliminated. We present a theoretical model that integrates enzyme kinetics and population genetics to address dominance evolution in metabolic pathways. In the case of mutations that decrease enzyme concentrations, and given the mechanistic constraints of Michaelis-Menten-type catalysis, it is shown that dominance of the wild type can be extensively modified in a two-enzyme pathway. Moreover, we discuss analytical results indicating that the conclusions from the two-enzyme case can be generalized to any number of enzymes. Dominance modification is achieved chiefly through changes in enzyme concentrations or kinetic parameters such as kcat, both of which

  3. The Evolution of Fungal Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rokas, Antonis

    2014-01-01

    Fungi contain a remarkable range of metabolic pathways, sometimes encoded by gene clusters, enabling them to digest most organic matter and synthesize an array of potent small molecules. Although metabolism is fundamental to the fungal lifestyle, we still know little about how major evolutionary processes, such as gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), have interacted with clustered and non-clustered fungal metabolic pathways to give rise to this metabolic versatility. We examined the synteny and evolutionary history of 247,202 fungal genes encoding enzymes that catalyze 875 distinct metabolic reactions from 130 pathways in 208 diverse genomes. We found that gene clustering varied greatly with respect to metabolic category and lineage; for example, clustered genes in Saccharomycotina yeasts were overrepresented in nucleotide metabolism, whereas clustered genes in Pezizomycotina were more common in lipid and amino acid metabolism. The effects of both GD and HGT were more pronounced in clustered genes than in their non-clustered counterparts and were differentially distributed across fungal lineages; specifically, GD, which was an order of magnitude more abundant than HGT, was most frequently observed in Agaricomycetes, whereas HGT was much more prevalent in Pezizomycotina. The effect of HGT in some Pezizomycotina was particularly strong; for example, we identified 111 HGT events associated with the 15 Aspergillus genomes, which sharply contrasts with the 60 HGT events detected for the 48 genomes from the entire Saccharomycotina subphylum. Finally, the impact of GD within a metabolic category was typically consistent across all fungal lineages, whereas the impact of HGT was variable. These results indicate that GD is the dominant process underlying fungal metabolic diversity, whereas HGT is episodic and acts in a category- or lineage-specific manner. Both processes have a greater impact on clustered genes, suggesting that metabolic gene clusters

  4. Obesity-Driven Gut Microbiota Inflammatory Pathways to Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz H. A.; Galvão, José G. F. M.; da Silva, Juliane Santos de França; de Sales-Neto, José M.; Rodrigues-Mascarenhas, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism, and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signaling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome. PMID:26635627

  5. Expression of complete metabolic pathways in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Krichevsky, Alexander; Zaltsman, Adi; King, Lisa; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering emerged as a methodology to introduce only few transgenes into the plant genome. Following fast-paced developments of the past few decades, engineering of much larger numbers of transgenes became a reality, allowing to introduce full metabolic pathways from other organisms into plants and generate transgenics with startling new traits. From the advent of the classical plant genetic engineering, the transgenes were introduced into the nuclear genome of the plant cell, and this strategy still is quite successful when applied to few transgenes. However, for introducing large number of transgenes, we advocate that the chloroplast genome is a superior choice, especially for engineering of new complete metabolic pathways into plants. The ability to genetically engineer plants with complex and fully functional metabolic pathways from other organisms bears a substantial promise in generation of pharmaceuticals, i.e., biopharming, and new agricultural crops with that traits never existed before, leading to enhancement in quality of human life. PMID:22616478

  6. An evolutionary approach for searching metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Matias F; Stegmayer, Georgina; Milone, Diego H

    2013-11-01

    Searching metabolic pathways that relate two compounds is a common task in bioinformatics. This is of particular interest when trying, for example, to discover metabolic relations among compounds clustered with a data mining technique. Search strategies find sequences to relate two or more states (compounds) using an appropriate set of transitions (reactions). Evolutionary algorithms carry out the search guided by a fitness function and explore multiple candidate solutions using stochastic operators. In this work we propose an evolutionary algorithm for searching metabolic pathways between two compounds. The operators and fitness function employed are described and the effect of mutation rate is studied. Performance of this algorithm is compared with two classical search strategies. Source code and dataset are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sourcesinc/files/eamp/ PMID:24209916

  7. The metabolic pathway collection from EMP: the enzymes and metabolic pathways database.

    PubMed

    Selkov, E; Basmanova, S; Gaasterland, T; Goryanin, I; Gretchkin, Y; Maltsev, N; Nenashev, V; Overbeek, R; Panyushkina, E; Pronevitch, L; Selkov, E; Yunus, I

    1996-01-01

    The Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways database (EMP) is an encoding of the contents of over 10 000 original publications on the topics of enzymology and metabolism. This large body of information has been transformed into a queryable database. An extraction of over 1800 pictorial representations of metabolic pathways from this collection is freely available on the World Wide Web. We believe that this collection will play an important role in the interpretation of genetic sequence data, as well as offering a meaningful framework for the integration of many other forms of biological data. PMID:8594593

  8. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of metabolic pathways of bromochloromethane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloromethane (BCM) is a volatile compound that if metabolized can lead to toxicity in different organs. Using a physiologically-based phannacokinetic model, we explore two hypotheses describing the metabolic pathways of BCM in rats: a two-pathway model exploiting both the e...

  9. Ocular Metabolism of Levobunolol: Historic and Emerging Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Dumouchel, Jennifer L; Dunne, Christine E; Saran, Chitra; Cirello, Amanda L; Gunduz, Mithat

    2016-08-01

    Although ocular transport and delivery have been well studied, metabolism in the eye is not well documented, even for clinically available medications such as levobunolol, a potent and nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Recently, we reported an in vitro methodology that could be used to evaluate ocular metabolism across preclinical species and humans. The current investigation provides detailed in vitro ocular and liver metabolism of levobunolol in rat, rabbit, and human S9 fractions, including the formation of equipotent active metabolite, dihydrolevobunolol, with the help of high-resolution mass spectrometry. 11 of the 16 metabolites of levobunolol identified herein, including a direct acetyl conjugate of levobunolol observed in all ocular and liver fractions, have not been reported in the literature. The study documents the identification of six human ocular metabolites that have never been reported. The current investigation presents evidence for ocular and hepatic metabolism of levobunolol via non-cytochrome P450 pathways, which have not been comprehensively investigated to date. Our results indicated that rat liver S9 and human ocular S9 fractions formed the most metabolites. Furthermore, liver was a poor in vitro surrogate for eye, and rat and rabbit were poor surrogates for human in terms of the rate and extent of levobunolol metabolism. PMID:27190057

  10. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  11. kpath: integration of metabolic pathway linked data

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Delgado, Ismael; García-Godoy, María Jesús; López-Camacho, Esteban; Rybinski, Maciej; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the Life Sciences domain has experienced a rapid growth in the amount of available biological databases. The heterogeneity of these databases makes data integration a challenging issue. Some integration challenges are locating resources, relationships, data formats, synonyms or ambiguity. The Linked Data approach partially solves the heterogeneity problems by introducing a uniform data representation model. Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for publishing and connecting structured data on the Web. This article introduces kpath, a database that integrates information related to metabolic pathways. kpath also provides a navigational interface that enables not only the browsing, but also the deep use of the integrated data to build metabolic networks based on existing disperse knowledge. This user interface has been used to showcase relationships that can be inferred from the information available in several public databases. Database URL: The public Linked Data repository can be queried at http://sparql.kpath.khaos.uma.es using the graph URI “www.khaos.uma.es/metabolic-pathways-app”. The GUI providing navigational access to kpath database is available at http://browser.kpath.khaos.uma.es. PMID:26055101

  12. kpath: integration of metabolic pathway linked data.

    PubMed

    Navas-Delgado, Ismael; García-Godoy, María Jesús; López-Camacho, Esteban; Rybinski, Maciej; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the Life Sciences domain has experienced a rapid growth in the amount of available biological databases. The heterogeneity of these databases makes data integration a challenging issue. Some integration challenges are locating resources, relationships, data formats, synonyms or ambiguity. The Linked Data approach partially solves the heterogeneity problems by introducing a uniform data representation model. Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for publishing and connecting structured data on the Web. This article introduces kpath, a database that integrates information related to metabolic pathways. kpath also provides a navigational interface that enables not only the browsing, but also the deep use of the integrated data to build metabolic networks based on existing disperse knowledge. This user interface has been used to showcase relationships that can be inferred from the information available in several public databases. PMID:26055101

  13. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Bertrand; Lee, Jinoo; Valkova, Nelly; Dhirapong, Amy; Lin, Pei-Yin; Fiehn, Oliver; Kültz, Dietmar; Weiss, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values < 2.0 E-05) in glycolysis, propanoate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, urea cycle and arginine/proline metabolism, as well as in the non-metabolic p53 and FAS pathways. In a pilot study using random urine samples from both ccRCC and control patients, we performed metabolic profiling and found that only sorbitol, a component of an alternative glycolysis pathway, is significantly elevated at 5.4-fold in RCC patients as compared to controls. Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids

  14. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde. PMID:25834233

  15. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DeLoache, William C.; Russ, Zachary N.; Dueber, John E.

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzymemore » pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. Lastly, this work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.« less

  16. A Newton Cooperative Genetic Algorithm Method for In Silico Optimization of Metabolic Pathway Production

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an in silico optimization method of metabolic pathway production. The metabolic pathway can be represented by a mathematical model known as the generalized mass action model, which leads to a complex nonlinear equations system. The optimization process becomes difficult when steady state and the constraints of the components in the metabolic pathway are involved. To deal with this situation, this paper presents an in silico optimization method, namely the Newton Cooperative Genetic Algorithm (NCGA). The NCGA used Newton method in dealing with the metabolic pathway, and then integrated genetic algorithm and cooperative co-evolutionary algorithm. The proposed method was experimentally applied on the benchmark metabolic pathways, and the results showed that the NCGA achieved better results compared to the existing methods. PMID:25961295

  17. Benzo[a]pyrene affects Jurkat T cells in the activated state via the antioxidant response element dependent Nrf2 pathway leading to decreased IL-2 secretion and redirecting glutamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Rockstroh, Maxie; Wagner, Juliane; Baumann, Sven; Schorsch, Katrin; Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina; Bergen, Martin von; Tomm, Janina M.

    2013-06-15

    There is a clear evidence that environmental pollutants, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), can have detrimental effects on the immune system, whereas the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Jurkat T cells share many properties with native T lymphocytes and therefore are an appropriate model to analyze the effects of environmental pollutants on T cells and their activation. Since environmental compounds frequently occur at low, not acute toxic concentrations, we analyzed the effects of two subtoxic concentrations, 50 nM and 5 μM, on non- and activated cells. B[a]P interferes directly with the stimulation process as proven by an altered IL-2 secretion. Furthermore, B[a]P exposure results in significant proteomic changes as shown by DIGE analysis. Pathway analysis revealed an involvement of the AhR independent Nrf2 pathway in the altered processes observed in unstimulated and stimulated cells. A participation of the Nrf2 pathway in the change of IL-2 secretion was confirmed by exposing cells to the Nrf2 activator tBHQ. tBHQ and 5 μM B[a]P caused similar alterations of IL-2 secretion and glutamine/glutamate metabolism. Moreover, the proteome changes in unstimulated cells point towards a modified regulation of the cytoskeleton and cellular stress response, which was proven by western blotting. Additionally, there is a strong evidence for alterations in metabolic pathways caused by B[a]P exposure in stimulated cells. Especially the glutamine/glutamate metabolism was indicated by proteome pathway analysis and validated by metabolite measurements. The detrimental effects were slightly enhanced in stimulated cells, suggesting that stimulated cells are more vulnerable to the environmental pollutant model compound B[a]P. - Highlights: • B[a]P affects the proteome of Jurkat T cells also at low concentrations. • Exposure to B[a]P (50 nM, 5 μM) did not change Jurkat T cell viability. • Both B[a]P concentrations altered the IL-2 secretion of stimulated cells.

  18. High-throughput evaluation of synthetic metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in the field of metabolic engineering is the efficient identification of a metabolic pathway genotype that maximizes specific productivity over a robust range of process conditions. Here we review current methods for optimizing specific productivity of metabolic pathways in living cells. New tools for library generation, computational analysis of pathway sequence-flux space, and high-throughput screening and selection techniques are discussed. PMID:27453919

  19. [Analyze and compare metabolic pathways of Bacillus cereus group].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chan; Wang, Yan; Xu, Cheng-Chen; He, Jin; Zhang, Qing-Ye; Yu, Zi-Niu

    2011-10-01

    A large number of data and information was obtained from genome sequencing and high-throughput genomic studies, use of the information to study metabolic networks become a new hotspot in biological research. This article compared different methods to reconstruct metabolic networks and analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of each methods, and then introduced some researches about carbohydrate metabolism pathways, amino acid metabolic pathways, and energy metabolism pathways of 9 strains of Bacillus cereus, 6 strains of B. anthracis,,6 strain of B. thuringiensis, and finds out their similarities and characteristics. These three strains have some necessary metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid cycle, alanine metabolism, histidine metabolism, and energy metabolism, but they may have some specific pathways. B cereus has higher efficiency in utilizing monosaccharide, B. anthracis is rich in degradation and transport pathways of amino acids. A glutamate metabolic bypass way exists in B. thuringiensis. Analysis of metabolic pathways provides a new way to study and use food toxin, anthrax toxin, and insecticidal toxin of these strains in future. PMID:21993280

  20. Variations in metabolic pathways create challenges for automated metabolic reconstructions: Examples from the tetrahydrofolate synthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The availability of thousands of sequenced genomes has revealed the diversity of biochemical solutions to similar chemical problems. Even for molecules at the heart of metabolism, such as cofactors, the pathway enzymes first discovered in model organisms like Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae are often not universally conserved. Tetrahydrofolate (THF) (or its close relative tetrahydromethanopterin) is a universal and essential C1-carrier that most microbes and plants synthesize de novo. The THF biosynthesis pathway and enzymes are, however, not universal and alternate solutions are found for most steps, making this pathway a challenge to annotate automatically in many genomes. Comparing THF pathway reconstructions and functional annotations of a chosen set of folate synthesis genes in specific prokaryotes revealed the strengths and weaknesses of different microbial annotation platforms. This analysis revealed that most current platforms fail in metabolic reconstruction of variant pathways. However, all the pieces are in place to quickly correct these deficiencies if the different databases were built on each other's strengths. PMID:25210598

  1. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  2. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  3. Metabolic Pathways Visualization Skills Development by Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Vanessa J. S. V.; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a metabolic pathways visualization skill test (MPVST) to gain greater insight into our students' abilities to comprehend the visual information presented in metabolic pathways diagrams. The test is able to discriminate students' visualization ability with respect to six specific visualization skills that we identified as key to…

  4. Metabolic inflexibility: when mitochondrial indecision leads to metabolic gridlock.

    PubMed

    Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-12-01

    Normal energy metabolism is characterized by periodic shifts in glucose and fat oxidation, as the mitochondrial machinery responsible for carbon combustion switches freely between alternative fuels according to physiological and nutritional circumstances. These transitions in fuel choice are orchestrated by an intricate network of metabolic and cell signaling events that enable exquisite crosstalk and cooperation between competing substrates to maintain energy and glucose homeostasis. By contrast, obesity-related cardiometabolic diseases are increasingly recognized as disorders of metabolic inflexibility, in which nutrient overload and heightened substrate competition result in mitochondrial indecision, impaired fuel switching, and energy dysregulation. This Perspective offers a speculative view on the molecular origins and pathophysiological consequences of metabolic inflexibility. PMID:25480291

  5. Metabolic Inflexibility: When Mitochondrial Indecision Leads to Metabolic Gridlock

    PubMed Central

    Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Normal energy metabolism is characterized by periodic shifts in glucose and fat oxidation, as the mitochondrial machinery responsible for carbon combustion switches freely between alternative fuels according to physiological and nutritional circumstances. These transitions in fuel choice are orchestrated by an intricate network of metabolic and cell signaling events that enable exquisite crosstalk and cooperation between competing substrates to maintain energy and glucose homeostasis. By contrast, obesity-related cardiometabolic diseases are increasingly recognized as disorders of metabolic inflexibility, in which nutrient overload and heightened substrate competition result in mitochondrial indecision, impaired fuel switching, and energy dysregulation. This Perspective offers a speculative view on the molecular origins and pathophysiological consequences of metabolic inflexibility. PMID:25480291

  6. UniPathway: a resource for the exploration and annotation of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Morgat, Anne; Coissac, Eric; Coudert, Elisabeth; Axelsen, Kristian B; Keller, Guillaume; Bairoch, Amos; Bridge, Alan; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis; Viari, Alain

    2012-01-01

    UniPathway (http://www.unipathway.org) is a fully manually curated resource for the representation and annotation of metabolic pathways. UniPathway provides explicit representations of enzyme-catalyzed and spontaneous chemical reactions, as well as a hierarchical representation of metabolic pathways. This hierarchy uses linear subpathways as the basic building block for the assembly of larger and more complex pathways, including species-specific pathway variants. All of the pathway data in UniPathway has been extensively cross-linked to existing pathway resources such as KEGG and MetaCyc, as well as sequence resources such as the UniProt KnowledgeBase (UniProtKB), for which UniPathway provides a controlled vocabulary for pathway annotation. We introduce here the basic concepts underlying the UniPathway resource, with the aim of allowing users to fully exploit the information provided by UniPathway. PMID:22102589

  7. UniPathway: a resource for the exploration and annotation of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Morgat, Anne; Coissac, Eric; Coudert, Elisabeth; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Keller, Guillaume; Bairoch, Amos; Bridge, Alan; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis; Viari, Alain

    2012-01-01

    UniPathway (http://www.unipathway.org) is a fully manually curated resource for the representation and annotation of metabolic pathways. UniPathway provides explicit representations of enzyme-catalyzed and spontaneous chemical reactions, as well as a hierarchical representation of metabolic pathways. This hierarchy uses linear subpathways as the basic building block for the assembly of larger and more complex pathways, including species-specific pathway variants. All of the pathway data in UniPathway has been extensively cross-linked to existing pathway resources such as KEGG and MetaCyc, as well as sequence resources such as the UniProt KnowledgeBase (UniProtKB), for which UniPathway provides a controlled vocabulary for pathway annotation. We introduce here the basic concepts underlying the UniPathway resource, with the aim of allowing users to fully exploit the information provided by UniPathway. PMID:22102589

  8. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are associated with severe lead poisoning. Leaded gasoline and lead in food, but not lead-based paint, are strongly associated with population blood lead levels in both young children and adults. Soil lead and house dust, but not lead-based paint, are associated with population blood lead levels in children. Most soil lead and house dust are associated with leaded gasoline. Lead-based paint dust is associated with cases of renovation of either exterior or interior environments in which the paint was pulverized. Based upon the limited data to date, abatement of soil lead is more effective than abatement of lead-based paint in reducing blood lead levels of young children. About equal numbers of children under 7 years of age are exposed to soil lead and lead-based paint. Seasonality studies point to soil lead as the main source of population blood lead levels. Soil lead is a greater risk factor than lead-based paint to children engaged in hand-to-mouth and pica behavior. In summary, soil lead is important for addressing the population of children at risk of lead poisoning. When soil lead is acknowledged by regulators and the public health community as an important pathway of human lead exposure, then more effective opportunities for improving primary lead prevention can become a reality. Images Figure 1 PMID:9539015

  9. Oxygen and the evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    While a considerable amount of evidence has been accumulated about the history of oxygen on this planet, little is known about the relative amounts to which primitive cells might have been exposed. One clue may be found in the metabolic pathways of extant microorganisms. While eucaryotes are principally aerobic organisms, a number are capable of anaerobic growth by fermentation. One such eucaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, will grow in the complete absence of oxygen when supplemented with unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. Oxygen-requiring enzymes are involved in the synthesis of both of these compounds. Studies have demonstrated that the oxidative desaturation of palmitic acid and the conversion of squalene to sterols occur in the range of 10-(3) to 10(-2) PAL. Thus, if the oxygen requirements of these enzymatic processes are an indication, eucaryotes might be more primitive than anticipated from the microfossil record. Results of studies on the oxygen requirements for sterol and unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in a more primitive procaryotic system are also discussed.

  10. Curation and Computational Design of Bioenergy-Related Metabolic Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Peter D.

    2014-09-12

    Pathway Tools is a systems-biology software package written by SRI International (SRI) that produces Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) for organisms with a sequenced genome. Pathway Tools also provides a wide range of capabilities for analyzing predicted metabolic networks and user-generated omics data. More than 5,000 academic, industrial, and government groups have licensed Pathway Tools. This user community includes researchers at all three DOE bioenergy centers, as well as academic and industrial metabolic engineering (ME) groups. An integral part of the Pathway Tools software is MetaCyc, a large, multiorganism database of metabolic pathways and enzymes that SRI and its academic collaborators manually curate. This project included two main goals: I. Enhance the MetaCyc content of bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. II. Develop computational tools for engineering metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, in particular for bioenergy-related pathways. In part I, SRI proposed to significantly expand the coverage of bioenergy-related metabolic information in MetaCyc, followed by the generation of organism-specific PGDBs for all energy-relevant organisms sequenced at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Part I objectives included: 1: Expand the content of MetaCyc to include bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. 2: Enhance the Pathway Tools software to enable display of complex polymer degradation processes. 3: Create new PGDBs for the energy-related organisms sequenced by JGI, update existing PGDBs with new MetaCyc content, and make these data available to JBEI via the BioCyc website. In part II, SRI proposed to develop an efficient computational tool for the engineering of metabolic pathways. Part II objectives included: 4: Develop computational tools for generating metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, enabling users to specify parameters such as starting and ending compounds, and preferred or disallowed intermediate compounds

  11. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  12. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth

    PubMed Central

    Boroughs, Lindsey K.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further. PMID:25774832

  13. LRRK2 Pathways Leading to Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 are associated with inherited Parkinson's disease (PD) in a large number of families, and the genetic locus containing the LRRK2 gene contains a risk factor for sporadic PD. The LRRK2 protein contains several domains that suggest a role in cellular signaling, including a kinase domain. It is also clear that LRRK2 interacts, either physically or genetically, with several other important proteins implicated in PD, suggesting that LRRK2 may be a central player in the pathways that underlie parkinsonism. As such, LRRK2 has been proposed to be a plausible target for therapeutic intervention, with kinase inhibition being pursued most actively. However, there are still several fundamental aspects of LRRK2 biology and function that remain unresolved at this time. This review will focus on the key questions of normal function of LRRK2 and how this might be related to the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:26008812

  14. Metabolic pathway resources at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two maize metabolic networks are available at MaizeGDB: MaizeCyc (http://maizecyc.maizegdb.org, also at Gramene) and CornCyc (http://corncyc.maizegdb.org, also at the Plant Metabolic Network). MaizeCyc was developed by Gramene, and CornCyc by the Plant Metabolic Network, both in collaboration with M...

  15. Exposure to lead affects male biothiols metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Błaszczyk, Iwona; Dobrakowski, Michał; Romuk, Ewa; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Adamek, Mariusz; Birkner, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    The most important biothiols include glutathione, homocysteine (HCY), cysteine and proteins. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the influence of lead on the biothiol turnover--the concentration of HCY and protein sulfhydryl groups (P-SH) in the serum and reduced glutathione (G-SH) in erythrocytes--in individuals (employees of metal works) exposed to lead and to evaluate its probable oxidative disorders, measured as the carbonyl protein (CP) concentration in serum. The exposed workers were divided into 2 subgroups: 1) low lead exposure (LPb), with a lead concentration in the blood (PbB) of 20-45 µg dl(-1) (n= 102), and 2) high lead exposure (HPb), with PbB = 45-60 µg dl(-1) (n= 81). The control group consisted of 72 office workers or other healthy subjects with no history of occupational exposure to lead. All the controls had normal PbB (<10 μg dl(-1)) and ZPP (<2.5 μg dl(-1)) levels. The concentration of HCY was higher in the LPb group by 11% and in the HPb group by 26%, compared with the control group (n=72). The CP concentration in these 2 groups was more than twice as high as that of the control group, with 108% and 125% increases for the LPb and HPb groups, respectively; G-SH was lower by 6.6% and 7.4% for the LPb and HPb groups, respectively; P-SH was lower by 8.2% and 13% for the LPb and HPb groups, respectively. Lead decreases levels of glutathione and protein thiol groups. Lead-induced oxidative stress contributes to the observed elevation of protein carbonyl groups. Besides, lead poisoning seems to be associated with hyperhomocysteinaemia, which may promote the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:24364442

  16. On the levels of enzymatic substrate specificity: Implications for the early evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Diaz-Villagomez, E.; Mills, T.; Oro, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most frequently invoked explanation for the origin of metabolic pathways is the retrograde evolution hypothesis. In contrast, according to the so-called 'patchwork' theory, metabolism evolved by the recruitment of relatively inefficient small enzymes of broad specificity that could react with a wide range of chemically related substrates. In this paper it is argued that both sequence comparisons and experimental results on enzyme substrate specificity support the patchwork assembly theory. The available evidence supports previous suggestions that gene duplication events followed by a gradual neoDarwinian accumulation of mutations and other minute genetic changes lead to the narrowing and modification of enzyme function in at least some primordial metabolic pathways.

  17. Serum Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Metabolic Pathways in Patients with Post-traumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lunzhao; Shi, Shuting; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Xia, Zi-an; Xing, Zhihua; Peng, Weijun; Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disability, adversely affects the quality of life of TBI patients, and exacts a personal and economic cost that is difficult to quantify. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is currently unknown, and an effective treatment of the disease has not yet been identified. This study aimed to advance our understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis; thus, metabolomics based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical methods were used to identify potential biomarkers and the associated metabolic pathways of post-TBI cognitive impairment. A biomarker panel consisting of nine serum metabolites (serine, pyroglutamic acid, phenylalanine, galactose, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, citric acid, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyrate) was identified to be able to discriminate between TBI patients with cognitive impairment, TBI patients without cognitive impairment and healthy controls. Furthermore, associations between these metabolite markers and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates were identified. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify several serum metabolite markers and investigate the altered metabolic pathway that is associated with post-TBI cognitive impairment. These markers appear to be suitable for further investigation of the disease mechanisms of post-TBI cognitive impairment. PMID:26883691

  18. Sequential activation of metabolic pathways: a dynamic optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Ingalls, Brian P; Middleton, Richard H; Kalamatianos, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    The regulation of cellular metabolism facilitates robust cellular operation in the face of changing external conditions. The cellular response to this varying environment may include the activation or inactivation of appropriate metabolic pathways. Experimental and numerical observations of sequential timing in pathway activation have been reported in the literature. It has been argued that such patterns can be rationalized by means of an underlying optimal metabolic design. In this paper we pose a dynamic optimization problem that accounts for time-resource minimization in pathway activation under constrained total enzyme abundance. The optimized variables are time-dependent enzyme concentrations that drive the pathway to a steady state characterized by a prescribed metabolic flux. The problem formulation addresses unbranched pathways with irreversible kinetics. Neither specific reaction kinetics nor fixed pathway length are assumed.In the optimal solution, each enzyme follows a switching profile between zero and maximum concentration, following a temporal sequence that matches the pathway topology. This result provides an analytic justification of the sequential activation previously described in the literature. In contrast with the existent numerical approaches, the activation sequence is proven to be optimal for a generic class of monomolecular kinetics. This class includes, but is not limited to, Mass Action, Michaelis-Menten, Hill, and some Power-law models. This suggests that sequential enzyme expression may be a common feature of metabolic regulation, as it is a robust property of optimal pathway activation. PMID:19412635

  19. Tracking the pathway of arsenic metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the toxic and carcinogenic properties of arsenic have been recognized for centuries, only in the past few decades has research focused on understanding the metabolic fate of arsenic in humans and relating metabolism to adverse health effects. In humans, conversion of in...

  20. Integrated Interactive Chart as a Tool for Teaching Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogiannis, Stavros; Pagkalos, Ioannis; Koufoudakis, Panagiotis; Dashi, Ino; Pontikeri, Kyriaki; Christodoulou, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every…

  1. Nutrient-sensing pathways and metabolic regulation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Simon, M Celeste

    2013-10-14

    Stem cells exert precise regulation to maintain a balance of self-renewal and differentiation programs to sustain tissue homeostasis throughout the life of an organism. Recent evidence suggests that this regulation is modulated, in part, via metabolic changes and modifications of nutrient-sensing pathways such as mTOR and AMPK. It is becoming increasingly clear that stem cells inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in favor of aerobic glycolysis for energy production. Recent progress has detailed the molecular mechanisms of this metabolic phenotype and has offered insight into new metabolic pathways that may be involved in stem cell homeostasis. PMID:24127214

  2. Pollen wall development: the associated enzymes and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Zhang, Z; Cao, J

    2013-03-01

    Pollen grains are surrounded by a sculpted wall, which protects male gametophytes from various environmental stresses and microbial attacks, and also facilitates pollination. Pollen wall development requires lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, and some key genes and proteins that participate in these processes have recently been identified. Here, we summarise the genes and describe their functions during pollen wall development via several metabolic pathways. A working model involving substances and catalytic enzyme reactions that occur during pollen development is also presented. This model provides information on the complete process of pollen wall development with respect to metabolic pathways. PMID:23252839

  3. Metabolic pathways visualization skills development by undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Vanessa J S V; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a metabolic pathways visualization skill test (MPVST) to gain greater insight into our students' abilities to comprehend the visual information presented in metabolic pathways diagrams. The test is able to discriminate students' visualization ability with respect to six specific visualization skills that we identified as key to the understanding of metabolic map diagrams. Application of the MPVST to B. S. Biochemistry students showed that their visualization skills develop informally and progressively during their college years. Furthermore, the complex nature of biochemical pathways, together with students' lack of familiarity with metabolic maps, suggests that it is important for instructors to spend more time than usual explaining visual representations to their students. PMID:25721431

  4. Predicting metabolic pathways by sub-network extraction.

    PubMed

    Faust, Karoline; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Various methods result in groups of functionally related genes obtained from genomes (operons, regulons, syntheny groups, and phylogenetic profiles), transcriptomes (co-expression groups) and proteomes (modules of interacting proteins). When such groups contain two or more enzyme-coding genes, graph analysis methods can be applied to extract a metabolic pathway that interconnects them. We describe here the way to use the Pathway extraction tool available on the NeAT Web server ( http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/neat/ ) to piece together the metabolic pathway from a group of associated, enzyme-coding genes. The tool identifies the reactions that can be catalyzed by the products of the query genes (seed reactions), and applies sub-graph extraction algorithms to extract from a metabolic network a sub-network that connects the seed reactions. This sub-network represents the predicted metabolic pathway. We describe here the pathway prediction process in a step-by-step way, give hints about the main parametric choices, and illustrate how this tool can be used to extract metabolic pathways from bacterial genomes, on the basis of two study cases: the isoleucine-valine operon in Escherichia coli and a predicted operon in Cupriavidus (Ralstonia) metallidurans. PMID:22144151

  5. Interdisciplinary Pathways for Urban Metabolism Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    With its rapid rise as a metaphor to express coupled natural-human systems in cities, the concept of urban metabolism is evolving into a series of relatively distinct research frameworks amongst various disciplines, with varying definitions, theories, models, and emphases. In industrial ecology, housed primarily within the disciplinary domain of engineering, urban metabolism research has focused on quantifying material and energy flows into, within, and out of cities, using methodologies such as material flow analysis and life cycle assessment. In the field of urban ecology, which is strongly influenced by ecology and urban planning, research focus has been placed on understanding and modeling the complex patterns and processes of human-ecological systems within urban areas. Finally, in political ecology, closely aligned with human geography and anthropology, scholars theorize about the interwoven knots of social and natural processes, material flows, and spatial structures that form the urban metabolism. This paper offers three potential interdisciplinary urban metabolism research tracks that might integrate elements of these three "ecologies," thereby bridging engineering and the social and physical sciences. First, it presents the idea of infrastructure ecology, which explores the complex, emergent interdependencies between gray (water and wastewater, transportation, etc) and green (e.g. parks, greenways) infrastructure systems, as nested within a broader socio-economic context. For cities to be sustainable and resilient over time-space, the theory follows, these is a need to understand and redesign these infrastructure linkages. Second, there is the concept of an urban-scale carbon metabolism model which integrates consumption-based material flow analysis (including goods, water, and materials), with the carbon sink and source dynamics of the built environment (e.g. buildings, etc) and urban ecosystems. Finally, there is the political ecology of the material

  6. Influence of metabolic pathways on dam longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolism is an ever-changing dynamic system that can influence various physiological conditions including reproductive performance. It has been established that use of caloric restriction can enhance lifespan. But, it is also a well known fact that high energy demands in tandem with moderate to ...

  7. Multiple pathways leading to genomic instability and tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, M.A.; Fishel, R.

    1994-12-31

    Genome instability is a hallmark of many cancers and is thought to play a role in tumorigenesis. Several types of genomic alterations have been described in various tumor cell lines, including expansion and contraction of microsatellite sequences and gross chromosomal rearrangements such as translocations, deletions, and gene amplification events. Several lines of evidence implicate a role for genome instability in the development of neoplasias as well as tumor progression. In hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), the instability of microsatellite sequences throughout the genome of tumors has been observed. Furthermore, microsatellite instability has been observed in 20-30% of ovarian, gastric, pancreatic, prostate, and lung tumors, and occurs at a very early stage in the development of sporadic endometrial tumors. Chromosomal translocations have been implicated in oncogene activation in several lymphomas. Barrett`s esophagus is a condition in which the progression into a cancerous state appears to proceed through a loss of cell cycle regulation, to genetic instability, and finally to the production of a solid tumor. In addition, other cancer-prone syndromes such as ataxia telangiectasia display an increase in chromosomal translocations and a loss of cell cycle regulation. The biochemical activities involved in the generation of these alterations are poorly understood and the subject of a great deal of debate. Defects in several aspects of DNA metabolism and cell cycle regulation have been proposed to be involved in the alteration of chromosomal structure. Here we discuss the possibility that several pathways exist that could lead to the development of genome instability, a higher than normal mutation rate, and the development of tumor cells.

  8. Phosphoketolase pathway contributes to carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Lee, Tai-Chi; Rommelfanger, Sarah; Gjersing, Erica; Cano, Melissa; Maness, Pin-Ching; Ghirardi, Maria; Yu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Central carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria comprises the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle, glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Redundancy in this complex metabolic network renders the rational engineering of cyanobacterial metabolism for the generation of biomass, biofuels and chemicals a challenge. Here we report the presence of a functional phosphoketolase pathway, which splits xylulose-5-phosphate (or fructose-6-phosphate) to acetate precursor acetyl phosphate, in an engineered strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis (ΔglgC/xylAB), in which glycogen synthesis is blocked, and xylose catabolism enabled through the introduction of xylose isomerase and xylulokinase. We show that this mutant strain is able to metabolise xylose to acetate on nitrogen starvation. To see whether acetate production in the mutant is linked to the activity of phosphoketolase, we disrupted a putative phosphoketolase gene (slr0453) in the ΔglgC/xylAB strain, and monitored metabolic flux using (13)C labelling; acetate and 2-oxoglutarate production was reduced in the light. A metabolic flux analysis, based on isotopic data, suggests that the phosphoketolase pathway metabolises over 30% of the carbon consumed by ΔglgC/xylAB during photomixotrophic growth on xylose and CO2. Disruption of the putative phosphoketolase gene in wild-type Synechocystis also led to a deficiency in acetate production in the dark, indicative of a contribution of the phosphoketolase pathway to heterotrophic metabolism. We suggest that the phosphoketolase pathway, previously uncharacterized in photosynthetic organisms, confers flexibility in energy and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria, and could be exploited to increase the efficiency of cyanobacterial carbon metabolism and photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27250745

  9. Perturbation Experiments: Approaches for Metabolic Pathway Analysis in Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michael; Tröndle, Julia; Albermann, Christoph; Sprenger, Georg A; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, targeted metabolic engineering of microbial cells has become one of the major tools in bioprocess design and optimization. For successful application, a detailed knowledge is necessary about the relevant metabolic pathways and their regulation inside the cells. Since in vitro experiments cannot display process conditions and behavior properly, process data about the cells' metabolic state have to be collected in vivo. For this purpose, special techniques and methods are necessary. Therefore, most techniques enabling in vivo characterization of metabolic pathways rely on perturbation experiments, which can be divided into dynamic and steady-state approaches. To avoid any process disturbance, approaches which enable perturbation of cell metabolism in parallel to the continuing production process are reasonable. Furthermore, the fast dynamics of microbial production processes amplifies the need of parallelized data generation. These points motivate the development of a parallelized approach for multiple metabolic perturbation experiments outside the operating production reactor. An appropriate approach for in vivo characterization of metabolic pathways is presented and applied exemplarily to a microbial L-phenylalanine production process on a 15 L-scale. PMID:25981857

  10. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  11. Environmental factors affecting pregnancy: endocrine disrupters, nutrients and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao; Johnson, Gregory A; Wang, Xiaoqiu

    2014-12-01

    Uterine adenogenesis, a unique post-natal event in mammals, is vulnerable to endocrine disruption by estrogens and progestins resulting in infertility or reduced prolificacy. The absence of uterine glands results in insufficient transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen to support conceptus development. Arginine, a component of histotroph, is substrate for production of nitric oxide, polyamines and agmatine and, with secreted phosphoprotein 1, it affects cytoskeletal organization of trophectoderm. Arginine is critical for development of the conceptus, pregnancy recognition signaling, implantation and placentation. Conceptuses of ungulates and cetaceans convert glucose to fructose which is metabolized via multiple pathways to support growth and development. However, high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks and foods may increase risks for metabolic disorders and increase insulin resistance in adults. Understanding endocrine disrupters and dietary substances, and novel pathways for nutrient metabolism during pregnancy can improve survival and growth, and prevent chronic metabolic diseases in offspring. PMID:25224489

  12. Estimation of metabolic pathway systems from different data sources.

    PubMed

    Voit, E O; Goel, G; Chou, I-C; Fonseca, L L

    2009-11-01

    Parameter estimation is the main bottleneck of metabolic pathway modelling. It may be addressed from the bottom up, using information on metabolites, enzymes and modulators, or from the top down, using metabolic time series data, which have become more prevalent in recent years. The authors propose here that it is useful to combine the two strategies and to complement time-series analysis with kinetic information. In particular, the authors investigate how the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) may be supplemented with other types of estimation. Using the glycolytic pathway in Lactococcus lactis as an illustration example, the authors demonstrate some strategies of such supplementation. PMID:19947777

  13. Metabolic tinker: an online tool for guiding the design of synthetic metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    McClymont, Kent; Soyer, Orkun S

    2013-06-01

    One of the primary aims of synthetic biology is to (re)design metabolic pathways towards the production of desired chemicals. The fast pace of developments in molecular biology increasingly makes it possible to experimentally redesign existing pathways and implement de novo ones in microbes or using in vitro platforms. For such experimental studies, the bottleneck is shifting from implementation of pathways towards their initial design. Here, we present an online tool called 'Metabolic Tinker', which aims to guide the design of synthetic metabolic pathways between any two desired compounds. Given two user-defined 'target' and 'source' compounds, Metabolic Tinker searches for thermodynamically feasible paths in the entire known metabolic universe using a tailored heuristic search strategy. Compared with similar graph-based search tools, Metabolic Tinker returns a larger number of possible paths owing to its broad search base and fast heuristic, and provides for the first time thermodynamic feasibility information for the discovered paths. Metabolic Tinker is available as a web service at http://osslab.ex.ac.uk/tinker.aspx. The same website also provides the source code for Metabolic Tinker, allowing it to be developed further or run on personal machines for specific applications. PMID:23580552

  14. Glucose metabolism and hexosamine pathway regulate oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Gitenay, D; Wiel, C; Lallet-Daher, H; Vindrieux, D; Aubert, S; Payen, L; Simonnet, H; Bernard, D

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) prevents the ability of oncogenic signals to induce tumorigenesis. It is now largely admitted that the mitogenic effect of oncogenes requires metabolic adaptations to respond to new energetic and bio constituent needs. Yet, whether glucose metabolism affects OIS response is largely unknown. This is largely because of the fact that most of the OIS cellular models are cultivated in glucose excess. In this study, we used human epithelial cells, cultivated without glucose excess, to study alteration and functional role of glucose metabolism during OIS. We report a slowdown of glucose uptake and metabolism during OIS. Increasing glucose metabolism by expressing hexokinase2 (HK2), which converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), favors escape from OIS. Inversely, expressing a glucose-6-phosphatase, [corrected] pharmacological inhibition of HK2, or adding nonmetabolizable glucose induced a premature senescence. Manipulations of various metabolites covering G6P downstream pathways (hexosamine, glycolysis, and pentose phosphate pathways) suggest an unexpected role of the hexosamine pathway in controlling OIS. Altogether, our results show that decreased glucose metabolism occurs during and participates to OIS. PMID:24577087

  15. Metabolic flux analysis of diterpene biosynthesis pathway in rice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Jin; Kim, Bo-Ra; Kim, Soo-Un

    2005-09-01

    Relative transcript levels of eight rice diterpene cyclases at the branch points of gibberellins and phytoalexins biosynthesis pathway were measured by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Metabolic flux analysis by the distribution ratio of common substrate showed that UV-irradiation of etiolated rice seedlings decreased the flux for primary metabolism of gibberellins biosynthesis by half (from 62 to 27%) and 41% of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate was used for induction of pimaradiene intermediate as the major phytoalexin. In comparison, light-illumination used almost all geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (96%) for gibberellin biosynthesis to stimulate the plant growth and strongly repressed the metabolic flux for phytoalexins biosynthesis. PMID:16215852

  16. Hypoxia signaling pathways in cancer metabolism: the importance of co-selecting interconnected physiological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Both tumor hypoxia and dysregulated metabolism are classical features of cancer. Recent analyses have revealed complex interconnections between oncogenic activation, hypoxia signaling systems and metabolic pathways that are dysregulated in cancer. These studies have demonstrated that rather than responding simply to error signals arising from energy depletion or tumor hypoxia, metabolic and hypoxia signaling pathways are also directly connected to oncogenic signaling mechanisms at many points. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in these networks. It will also discuss the role of these interconnected pathways in generating the cancer phenotype; in particular, the implications of switching massive pathways that are physiologically 'hard-wired’ to oncogenic mechanisms driving cancer. PMID:24491179

  17. Loss of polyubiquitin gene Ubb leads to metabolic and sleep abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, K.-Y.; Fujiki, N.; Kazantzis, M.; Garza, J. C.; Bouley, D. M.; Stahl, A.; Lu, X.-Y.; Nishino, S.; Kopito, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Ubiquitin performs essential roles in a myriad of signalling pathways required for cellular function and survival. Recently, we reported that disruption of the stress-inducible ubiquitin-encoding gene Ubb reduces ubiquitin content in the hypothalamus and leads to adult-onset obesity coupled with a loss of arcuate nucleus neurones and disrupted energy homeostasis in mice. Neuropeptides expressed in the hypothalamus control both metabolic and sleep behaviours. In order to demonstrate that the loss of Ubb results in broad hypothalamic abnormalities, we attempted to determine whether metabolic and sleep behaviours were altered in Ubb knockout mice. Methods Metabolic rate and energy expenditure were measured in a metabolic chamber, and sleep stage was monitored via electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording. The presence of neurodegeneration and increased reactive gliosis in the hypothalamus were also evaluated. Results We found that Ubb disruption leads to early-onset reduced activity and metabolic rate. Additionally, we have demonstrated that sleep behaviour is altered and sleep homeostasis is disrupted in Ubb knockout mice. These early metabolic and sleep abnormalities are accompanied by persistent reactive gliosis and the loss of arcuate nucleus neurones, but are independent of neurodegeneration in the lateral hypothalamus. Conclusions Ubb knockout mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with hypothalamic dysfunction. Our data also indicate that Ubb is essential for the maintenance of the ubiquitin levels required for proper regulation of metabolic and sleep behaviours in mice. PMID:20002312

  18. A general definition of metabolic pathways useful for systematic organization and analysis of complex metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Fell, D A; Dandekar, T

    2000-03-01

    A set of linear pathways often does not capture the full range of behaviors of a metabolic network. The concept of 'elementary flux modes' provides a mathematical tool to define and comprehensively describe all metabolic routes that are both stoichiometrically and thermodynamically feasible for a group of enzymes. We have used this concept to analyze the interplay between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and glycolysis. The set of elementary modes for this system involves conventional glycolysis, a futile cycle, all the modes of PPP function described in biochemistry textbooks, and additional modes that are a priori equally entitled to pathway status. Applications include maximizing product yield in amino acid and antibiotic synthesis, reconstruction and consistency checks of metabolism from genome data, analysis of enzyme deficiencies, and drug target identification in metabolic networks. PMID:10700151

  19. XTMS: pathway design in an eXTended metabolic space

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Pablo; Parutto, Pierre; Herisson, Joan; Pandit, Shashi Bhushan; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    As metabolic engineering and synthetic biology progress toward reaching the goal of a more sustainable use of biological resources, the need of increasing the number of value-added chemicals that can be produced in industrial organisms becomes more imperative. Exploring, however, the vast possibility of pathways amenable to engineering through heterologous genes expression in a chassis organism is complex and unattainable manually. Here, we present XTMS, a web-based pathway analysis platform available at http://xtms.issb.genopole.fr, which provides full access to the set of pathways that can be imported into a chassis organism such as Escherichia coli through the application of an Extended Metabolic Space modeling framework. The XTMS approach consists on determining the set of biochemical transformations that can potentially be processed in vivo as modeled by molecular signatures, a specific coding system for derivation of reaction rules for metabolic reactions and enumeration of all the corresponding substrates and products. Most promising routes are described in terms of metabolite exchange, maximum allowable pathway yield, toxicity and enzyme efficiency. By answering such critical design points, XTMS not only paves the road toward the rationalization of metabolic engineering, but also opens new processing possibilities for non-natural metabolites and novel enzymatic transformations. PMID:24792156

  20. A Guided Discovery Approach for Learning Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2005-01-01

    Learning the wealth of information in metabolic pathways is both challenging and overwhelming for students. A step-by-step guided discovery approach to the learning of the chemical steps in gluconeogenesis and the citric acid cycle is described. This approach starts from concepts the student already knows, develops these further in a logical…

  1. XTMS: pathway design in an eXTended metabolic space.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Parutto, Pierre; Herisson, Joan; Pandit, Shashi Bhushan; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-07-01

    As metabolic engineering and synthetic biology progress toward reaching the goal of a more sustainable use of biological resources, the need of increasing the number of value-added chemicals that can be produced in industrial organisms becomes more imperative. Exploring, however, the vast possibility of pathways amenable to engineering through heterologous genes expression in a chassis organism is complex and unattainable manually. Here, we present XTMS, a web-based pathway analysis platform available at http://xtms.issb.genopole.fr, which provides full access to the set of pathways that can be imported into a chassis organism such as Escherichia coli through the application of an Extended Metabolic Space modeling framework. The XTMS approach consists on determining the set of biochemical transformations that can potentially be processed in vivo as modeled by molecular signatures, a specific coding system for derivation of reaction rules for metabolic reactions and enumeration of all the corresponding substrates and products. Most promising routes are described in terms of metabolite exchange, maximum allowable pathway yield, toxicity and enzyme efficiency. By answering such critical design points, XTMS not only paves the road toward the rationalization of metabolic engineering, but also opens new processing possibilities for non-natural metabolites and novel enzymatic transformations. PMID:24792156

  2. Evidence supporting predicted metabolic pathways for Vibrio cholerae: gene expression data and clinical tests

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Romero, Pedro R.; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Karp, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the diarrheal illness cholera, can kill an infected adult in 24 h. V.cholerae lives as an autochthonous microbe in estuaries, rivers and coastal waters. A better understanding of its metabolic pathways will assist the development of more effective treatments and will provide a deeper understanding of how this bacterium persists in natural aquatic habitats. Using the completed V.cholerae genome sequence and PathoLogic software, we created VchoCyc, a pathway-genome database that predicted 171 likely metabolic pathways in the bacterium. We report here experimental evidence supporting the computationally predicted pathways. The evidence comes from microarray gene expression studies of V.cholerae in the stools of three cholera patients [D. S. Merrell, S. M. Butler, F. Qadri, N. A. Dolganov, A. Alam, M. B. Cohen, S. B. Calderwood, G. K. Schoolnik and A. Camilli (2002) Nature, 417, 642–645.], from gene expression studies in minimal growth conditions and LB rich medium, and from clinical tests that identify V.cholerae. Expression data provide evidence supporting 92 (53%) of the 171 pathways. The clinical tests provide evidence supporting seven pathways, with six pathways supported by both methods. VchoCyc provides biologists with a useful tool for analyzing this organism's metabolic and genomic information, which could lead to potential insights into new anti-bacterial agents. VchoCyc is available in the BioCyc database collection (). PMID:16682451

  3. Pathways and functions of gut microbiota metabolism impacting host physiology.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Smitha; Alden, Nicholas; Lee, Kyongbum

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial populations in the human intestine impact host physiological functions through their metabolic activity. In addition to performing essential catabolic and biotransformation functions, the gut microbiota produces bioactive small molecules that mediate interactions with the host and contribute to the neurohumoral axes connecting the intestine with other parts of the body. This review discusses recent progress in characterizing the metabolic products of the gut microbiota and their biological functions, focusing on studies that investigate the responsible bacterial pathways and cognate host receptors. Several key areas are highlighted for future development: context-based analysis targeting pathways; integration of analytical approaches; metabolic modeling; and synthetic systems for in vivo manipulation of microbiota functions. Prospectively, these developments could further our mechanistic understanding of host-microbiota interactions. PMID:26340103

  4. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders leading to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amitabha

    2010-01-01

    One of the first steps toward the correct diagnosis of dementia is to segregate out the nondegenerative dementias from possible degenerative dementias. Nondegenerative dementias could be due to traumatic, endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, toxic, infective, and immunological causes. They could also be caused by tumors, subdural hematomas, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Many of the nondegenerative dementias occur at an earlier age and often progress quickly compared to Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative dementias. Many are treatable or preventable with simple measures. This review aims to give an overview of some of the more important endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders that may lead to dementia. PMID:21369420

  5. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders leading to dementia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amitabha

    2010-12-01

    One of the first steps toward the correct diagnosis of dementia is to segregate out the nondegenerative dementias from possible degenerative dementias. Nondegenerative dementias could be due to traumatic, endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, toxic, infective, and immunological causes. They could also be caused by tumors, subdural hematomas, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Many of the nondegenerative dementias occur at an earlier age and often progress quickly compared to Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative dementias. Many are treatable or preventable with simple measures. This review aims to give an overview of some of the more important endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders that may lead to dementia. PMID:21369420

  6. Active and Inactive Metabolic Pathways in Tumor Spheroids: Determination by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Hunnewell, Michael; Forbes, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Active metabolic pathways in three-dimensional cancer-cell cultures are potential chemotherapeutic targets that would be effective throughout tumors. Chaotic vasculature creates cellular regions in tumors with distinct metabolic behavior that are only present in aggregate cell masses. To quantify cancer cell metabolism, transformed mouse fibroblasts were grown as spheroids and fed isotopically labeled culture medium. Metabolite uptake and production rates were measured as functions of time. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry was used quantify the extent of labeling on amino acids present in cytoplasmic extracts. The labeling pattern identified several active and inactive metabolic pathways: glutaminolysis was found to be active, and malic enzyme and gluconeogenesis were inactive. Transformed cells in spheroids were also found to actively synthesize serine, cysteine, alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and proline; and not synthesize glutamine. The activities of these pathways suggest that cancer cells consume glutamine for biosynthesis and not to provide cellular energy. Determining active metabolic pathways indicates how cells direct carbon flow and may lead to the discovery of novel molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:20014107

  7. Exploring poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate metabolism through network-based extreme pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dewu; Ding, Yanrui; Cai, Yujie; Chen, Shouwen; Xu, Wenbo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this article is to obtain a more detailed insight into poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism through network-based metabolic pathway analysis. We employ extreme pathways to perform this study, because calculating and interpreting extreme pathways is a promising way for pathway analysis and metabolic engineering. After giving an in silico model of butanoate metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis 97-27 (btk), extreme pathways were calculated and classified. Furthermore, the type I and II extreme pathways were further classified and analyzed in detail based on their structure and functional capabilities. Besides "historical" biochemical pathways, the results also suggest that there are some novel pathways. PMID:18600631

  8. Pathway Thermodynamics Highlights Kinetic Obstacles in Central Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Flamholz, Avi; Reznik, Ed; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Milo, Ron

    2014-01-01

    In metabolism research, thermodynamics is usually used to determine the directionality of a reaction or the feasibility of a pathway. However, the relationship between thermodynamic potentials and fluxes is not limited to questions of directionality: thermodynamics also affects the kinetics of reactions through the flux-force relationship, which states that the logarithm of the ratio between the forward and reverse fluxes is directly proportional to the change in Gibbs energy due to a reaction (ΔrG′). Accordingly, if an enzyme catalyzes a reaction with a ΔrG′ of -5.7 kJ/mol then the forward flux will be roughly ten times the reverse flux. As ΔrG′ approaches equilibrium (ΔrG′ = 0 kJ/mol), exponentially more enzyme counterproductively catalyzes the reverse reaction, reducing the net rate at which the reaction proceeds. Thus, the enzyme level required to achieve a given flux increases dramatically near equilibrium. Here, we develop a framework for quantifying the degree to which pathways suffer these thermodynamic limitations on flux. For each pathway, we calculate a single thermodynamically-derived metric (the Max-min Driving Force, MDF), which enables objective ranking of pathways by the degree to which their flux is constrained by low thermodynamic driving force. Our framework accounts for the effect of pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentration ranges and allows us to quantify how alterations to the pathway structure affect the pathway's thermodynamics. Applying this methodology to pathways of central metabolism sheds light on some of their features, including metabolic bypasses (e.g., fermentation pathways bypassing substrate-level phosphorylation), substrate channeling (e.g., of oxaloacetate from malate dehydrogenase to citrate synthase), and use of alternative cofactors (e.g., quinone as an electron acceptor instead of NAD). The methods presented here place another arrow in metabolic engineers' quiver, providing a simple means of evaluating

  9. Metabolic Control Analysis: A Tool for Designing Strategies to Manipulate Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Olín-Sandoval, Viridiana

    2008-01-01

    The traditional experimental approaches used for changing the flux or the concentration of a particular metabolite of a metabolic pathway have been mostly based on the inhibition or over-expression of the presumed rate-limiting step. However, the attempts to manipulate a metabolic pathway by following such approach have proved to be unsuccessful. Metabolic Control Analysis (MCA) establishes how to determine, quantitatively, the degree of control that a given enzyme exerts on flux and on the concentration of metabolites, thus substituting the intuitive, qualitative concept of rate limiting step. Moreover, MCA helps to understand (i) the underlying mechanisms by which a given enzyme exerts high or low control and (ii) why the control of the pathway is shared by several pathway enzymes and transporters. By applying MCA it is possible to identify the steps that should be modified to achieve a successful alteration of flux or metabolite concentration in pathways of biotechnological (e.g., large scale metabolite production) or clinical relevance (e.g., drug therapy). The different MCA experimental approaches developed for the determination of the flux-control distribution in several pathways are described. Full understanding of the pathway properties when is working under a variety of conditions can help to attain a successful manipulation of flux and metabolite concentration. PMID:18629230

  10. Metabolic activation of efferent pathways from the rat area postrema.

    PubMed

    Gross, P M; Wainman, D S; Shaver, S W; Wall, K M; Ferguson, A V

    1990-03-01

    We used the quantitative [14C]deoxyglucose method and autoradiography to evaluate metabolic activity in 47 individual cerebral structures or subregions that are part of neural pathways emanating from the brain stem circumventricular organ, area postrema. Electrical stimulation of the dorsocentral area postrema in halothane-ventilated rats produced hypotension and increased glucose metabolism by several structures within the ascending trajectories of efferent neural projections from the nucleus. Structures in the caudal medulla oblongata, including three subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and nucleus ambiguus-A1 noradrenergic region, had increases of metabolism during stimulation of 32-62%. Pontine activation occurred specifically in the locus coeruleus and lateral parabrachial nuclei (increases of 24-36%). Magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, and median eminence showed increases in metabolism of 22-34%. An 89% elevation of glucose metabolism by the pituitary neural lobe resulted. The findings are evidence for functional activation of specific structures within ascending neural pathways from area postrema to forebrain mechanisms regulating blood pressure and fluid balance. PMID:2316724

  11. Discovery of a metabolic alternative to the classical mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dellas, Nikki; Thomas, Suzanne T; Manning, Gerard; Noel, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    Eukarya, Archaea, and some Bacteria encode all or part of the essential mevalonate (MVA) metabolic pathway clinically modulated using statins. Curiously, two components of the MVA pathway are often absent from archaeal genomes. The search for these missing elements led to the discovery of isopentenyl phosphate kinase (IPK), one of two activities necessary to furnish the universal five-carbon isoprenoid building block, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Unexpectedly, we now report functional IPKs also exist in Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, amongst a subset of species within the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi, we identified a new enzyme catalyzing the missing decarboxylative step of the putative alternative MVA pathway. These results demonstrate, for the first time, a functioning alternative MVA pathway. Key to this pathway is the catalytic actions of a newly uncovered enzyme, mevalonate phosphate decarboxylase (MPD) and IPK. Together, these two discoveries suggest that unforeseen variation in isoprenoid metabolism may be widespread in nature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00672.001 PMID:24327557

  12. Design and Performance of a Xenobiotic Metabolism Database Manager for Building Metabolic Pathway Databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge for scientists and regulators is accounting for the metabolic activation of chemicals that may lead to increased toxicity. Reliable forecasting of chemical metabolism is a critical factor in estimating a chemical’s toxic potential. Research is underway to develo...

  13. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression. PMID:26876265

  14. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Brown, H. Alex

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields—ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity—have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. PMID:24440821

  15. Exploring De Novo metabolic pathways from pyruvate to propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Andrew; Zhang, Miaomin; Ro, Soo; Clendennen, Stephanie; Shelton, Michael C; Tyo, Keith E J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides an efficient, sustainable solution for chemical production. However, designing biochemical pathways based solely on known reactions does not exploit its full potential. Enzymes are known to accept non-native substrates, which may allow novel, advantageous reactions. We have previously developed a computational program named Biological Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) to predict promiscuous enzyme activities and design synthetic pathways, using generalized reaction rules curated from biochemical reaction databases. Here, we use BNICE to design pathways synthesizing propionic acid from pyruvate. The currently known natural pathways produce undesirable by-products lactic acid and succinic acid, reducing their economic viability. BNICE predicted seven pathways containing four reaction steps or less, five of which avoid these by-products. Among the 16 biochemical reactions comprising these pathways, 44% were validated by literature references. More than 28% of these known reactions were not in the BNICE training dataset, showing that BNICE was able to predict novel enzyme substrates. Most of the pathways included the intermediate acrylic acid. As acrylic acid bioproduction has been well advanced, we focused on the critical step of reducing acrylic acid to propionic acid. We experimentally validated that Oye2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can catalyze this reaction at a slow turnover rate (10(-3) s(-1) ), which was unknown to occur with this enzyme, and is an important finding for further propionic acid metabolic engineering. These results validate BNICE as a pathway-searching tool that can predict previously unknown promiscuous enzyme activities and show that computational methods can elucidate novel biochemical pathways for industrial applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:303-311, 2016. PMID:26821575

  16. Evolutionary Rate Heterogeneity of Primary and Secondary Metabolic Pathway Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dola; Mukherjee, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Primary metabolism is essential to plants for growth and development, and secondary metabolism helps plants to interact with the environment. Many plant metabolites are industrially important. These metabolites are produced by plants through complex metabolic pathways. Lack of knowledge about these pathways is hindering the successful breeding practices for these metabolites. For a better knowledge of the metabolism in plants as a whole, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes is a prerequisite. In this study, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes has been analyzed in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Primary metabolic pathway genes were found to be more conserved than secondary metabolic pathway genes. Several factors such as gene structure, expression level, tissue specificity, multifunctionality, and domain number are the key factors behind this evolutionary rate variation. This study will help to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of plant metabolism. PMID:26556590

  17. Elucidation of metabolic pathways from enzyme classification data.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew G; Tipton, Keith F

    2014-01-01

    The IUBMB Enzyme List is widely used by other databases as a source for avoiding ambiguity in the recognition of enzymes as catalytic entities. However, it was not designed for metabolic pathway tracing, which has become increasingly important in systems biology. A Reactions Database has been created from the material in the Enzyme List to allow reactions to be searched by substrate/product, and pathways to be traced from any selected starting/seed substrate. An extensive synonym glossary allows searches by many of the alternative names, including accepted abbreviations, by which a chemical compound may be known. This database was necessary for the development of the application Reaction Explorer ( http://www.reaction-explorer.org ), which was written in Real Studio ( http://www.realsoftware.com/realstudio/ ) to search the Reactions Database and draw metabolic pathways from reactions selected by the user. Having input the name of the starting compound (the "seed"), the user is presented with a list of all reactions containing that compound and then selects the product of interest as the next point on the ensuing graph. The pathway diagram is then generated as the process iterates. A contextual menu is provided, which allows the user: (1) to remove a compound from the graph, along with all associated links; (2) to search the reactions database again for additional reactions involving the compound; (3) to search for the compound within the Enzyme List. PMID:24218216

  18. The sphingolipid salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2008-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cells, many of which function as bioactive signaling molecules. Of these, ceramide is a central metabolite and plays key roles in a variety of cellular responses, including regulation of cell growth, viability, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramide is composed of the long-chain sphingoid base, sphingosine, in N-linkage to a variety of acyl groups. Sphingosine serves as the product of sphingolipid catabolism, and it is mostly salvaged through re-acylation, resulting in the generation of ceramide or its derivatives. This recycling of sphingosine is termed the “salvage pathway”, and recent evidence points to important roles for this pathway in ceramide metabolism and function. A number of enzymes are involved in the salvage pathway, and these include sphingomyelinases, cerebrosidases, ceramidases, and ceramide synthases. Recent studies suggest that the salvage pathway is not only subject to regulation, but it also modulates the formation of ceramide and subsequent ceramide-dependent cellular signals. This review focuses on the salvage pathway in ceramide metabolism, its regulation, its experimental analysis, and emerging biological functions. PMID:18191382

  19. Understanding specificity in metabolic pathways-Structural biology of human nucleotide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Welin, Martin; Nordlund, Paer

    2010-05-21

    Interactions are the foundation of life at the molecular level. In the plethora of activities in the cell, the evolution of enzyme specificity requires the balancing of appropriate substrate affinity with a negative selection, in order to minimize interactions with other potential substrates in the cell. To understand the structural basis for enzyme specificity, the comparison of structural and biochemical data between enzymes within pathways using similar substrates and effectors is valuable. Nucleotide metabolism is one of the largest metabolic pathways in the human cell and is of outstanding therapeutic importance since it activates and catabolises nucleoside based anti-proliferative drugs and serves as a direct target for anti-proliferative drugs. In recent years the structural coverage of the enzymes involved in human nucleotide metabolism has been dramatically improved and is approaching completion. An important factor has been the contribution from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at Karolinska Institutet, which recently has solved 33 novel structures of enzymes and enzyme domains in human nucleotide metabolism pathways and homologs thereof. In this review we will discuss some of the principles for substrate specificity of enzymes in human nucleotide metabolism illustrated by a selected set of enzyme families where a detailed understanding of the structural determinants for specificity is now emerging.

  20. An Interactive, Integrated, Instructional Pathway to the LEAD Science Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalda, S.; Clark, R.; Davis, L.; Wiziecki, E. N.

    2008-12-01

    Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) is a bold and revolutionary paradigm that through a Web-based Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) exposes the user to a rich environment of data, models, data mining and visualization and analysis tools, enabling the user to ask science questions of applications while the complexity of the software and middleware managing these applications is hidden from the user. From its inception in 2003, LEAD has championed goals that have context for the future of weather and related research and education. LEAD espouses to lowering the barrier for using complex end-to-end weather technologies by a) democratizing the availability of advanced weather technologies, b) empowering the user of these technologies to tackle a variety of problems, and c) facilitating learning and understanding. LEAD, as it exists today, is poised to enable a diverse community of scientists, educators, students, and operational practitioners. The project has been informed by atmospheric and computer scientists, educators, and educational consultants who, in search of new knowledge, understanding, ideas, and learning methodologies, seek easy access to new capabilities that allow for user-directed and interactive query and acquisition, simulation, assimilation, data mining, computational modeling, and visualization. As one component of the total LEAD effort, the LEAD education team has designed interactive, integrated, instructional pathways within a set of learning modules (LEAD-to-Learn) to facilitate, enhance, and enable the use of the LEAD gateway in the classroom. The LEAD education initiative focuses on the means to integrate data, tools, and services used by researchers into undergraduate meteorology education in order to provide an authentic and contextualized environment for teaching and learning. Educators, educational specialists, and students from meteorology and computer science backgrounds have collaborated on the design and development

  1. Metabolic activation of carcinogenic ethylbenzene leads to oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Uchida, Takafumi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Toda, Chitose; Sakai, Yoshie; Ueda, Koji; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Kojima, Nakao

    2004-12-01

    Ethylbenzene is carcinogenic to rats and mice, while it has no mutagenic activity. We have investigated whether ethylbenzene undergoes metabolic activation, leading to DNA damage. Ethylbenzene was metabolized to 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol by rat liver microsomes. Furthermore, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol were metabolically transformed to ring-dihydroxylated metabolites such as ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol, respectively. Experiment with 32P-labeled DNA fragment revealed that both ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II). These dihydroxylated compounds also induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase, methional and Cu(I)-specific chelator, bathocuproine, significantly (P<0.05) inhibited oxidative DNA damage, whereas free hydroxyl radical scavenger and superoxide dismutase did not. These results suggest that Cu(I) and H2O2 produced via oxidation of ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol are involved in oxidative DNA damage. Addition of an endogenous reductant NADH dramatically enhanced 4-ethylcatechol-induced oxidative DNA damage, whereas ethylhydroquinone-induced DNA damage was slightly enhanced. Enhancing effect of NADH on oxidative DNA damage by 4-ethylcatechol may be explained by assuming that reactive species are generated from the redox cycle. In conclusion, these active dihydroxylated metabolites would be involved in the mechanism of carcinogenesis by ethylbenzene. PMID:15560893

  2. Metabolic control of YAP and TAZ by the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Naomi; Specchia, Valeria; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Mano, Miguel; Dupont, Sirio; Manfrin, Andrea; Ingallina, Eleonora; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Rosato, Antonio; Piccolo, Stefano; Del Sal, Giannino

    2014-04-01

    The YAP and TAZ mediators of the Hippo pathway (hereafter called YAP/TAZ) promote tissue proliferation and organ growth. However, how their biological properties intersect with cellular metabolism remains unexplained. Here, we show that YAP/TAZ activity is controlled by the SREBP/mevalonate pathway. Inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway (HMG-CoA reductase) by statins opposes YAP/TAZ nuclear localization and transcriptional responses. Mechanistically, the geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate produced by the mevalonate cascade is required for activation of Rho GTPases that, in turn, activate YAP/TAZ by inhibiting their phosphorylation and promoting their nuclear accumulation. The mevalonate-YAP/TAZ axis is required for proliferation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In Drosophila melanogaster, inhibition of mevalonate biosynthesis and geranylgeranylation blunts the eye overgrowth induced by Yorkie, the YAP/TAZ orthologue. In tumour cells, YAP/TAZ activation is promoted by increased levels of mevalonic acid produced by SREBP transcriptional activity, which is induced by its oncogenic cofactor mutant p53. These findings reveal an additional layer of YAP/TAZ regulation by metabolic cues. PMID:24658687

  3. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R. A.; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008), 10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged.

  4. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R A; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008)HDTYAT0018-067X10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged. PMID:27300918

  5. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  6. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  7. Characterizability of metabolic pathway systems from time series data.

    PubMed

    Voit, Eberhard O

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decade, the biomathematical community has devoted substantial effort to the complicated challenge of estimating parameter values for biological systems models. An even more difficult issue is the characterization of functional forms for the processes that govern these systems. Most parameter estimation approaches tacitly assume that these forms are known or can be assumed with some validity. However, this assumption is not always true. The recently proposed method of Dynamic Flux Estimation (DFE) addresses this problem in a genuinely novel fashion for metabolic pathway systems. Specifically, DFE allows the characterization of fluxes within such systems through an analysis of metabolic time series data. Its main drawback is the fact that DFE can only directly be applied if the pathway system contains as many metabolites as unknown fluxes. This situation is unfortunately rare. To overcome this roadblock, earlier work in this field had proposed strategies for augmenting the set of unknown fluxes with independent kinetic information, which however is not always available. Employing Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse methods of linear algebra, the present article discusses an approach for characterizing fluxes from metabolic time series data that is applicable even if the pathway system is underdetermined and contains more fluxes than metabolites. Intriguingly, this approach is independent of a specific modeling framework and unaffected by noise in the experimental time series data. The results reveal whether any fluxes may be characterized and, if so, which subset is characterizable. They also help with the identification of fluxes that, if they could be determined independently, would allow the application of DFE. PMID:23391489

  8. Gene-Based Mapping and Pathway Analysis of Metabolic Traits in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ngoc-Thuy; Gross, Josef Johann; van Dorland, Annette; Tetens, Jens; Thaller, Georg; Schlather, Martin; Bruckmaier, Rupert; Simianer, Henner

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic adaptation of dairy cows during the transition period has been studied intensively in the last decades. However, until now, only few studies have paid attention to the genetic aspects of this process. Here, we present the results of a gene-based mapping and pathway analysis with the measurements of three key metabolites, (1) non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), (2) beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) and (3) glucose, characterizing the metabolic adaptability of dairy cows before and after calving. In contrast to the conventional single-marker approach, we identify 99 significant and biologically sensible genes associated with at least one of the considered phenotypes and thus giving evidence for a genetic basis of the metabolic adaptability. Moreover, our results strongly suggest three pathways involved in the metabolism of steroids and lipids are potential candidates for the adaptive regulation of dairy cows in their early lactation. From our perspective, a closer investigation of our findings will lead to a step forward in understanding the variability in the metabolic adaptability of dairy cows in their early lactation. PMID:25789767

  9. A specific cholesterol metabolic pathway is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Hu, Xi-Han; Li, Qin; Xiong, Ying; Hu, Guang-Jing; Xu, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xi-Xiao; Chang, Catherine C.Y.; Liu, Yin-Kun; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in cholesterol homeostasis. It exclusively receives and metabolizes oxysterols, which are important metabolites of cholesterol and are more cytotoxic than free cholesterol, from all extrahepatic tissues. Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) impair certain liver functions and cause pathological alterations in many processes including cholesterol metabolism. However, the link between an altered cholesterol metabolism and HCC development is unclear. Human ACAT2 is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver. Our previous studies have shown that ACAT2 is induced in certain HCC tissues. Here, by investigating tissue samples from HCC patients and HCC cell lines, we report that a specific cholesterol metabolic pathway, involving induction of ACAT2 and esterification of excess oxysterols for secretion to avoid cytotoxicity, is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth. Inhibiting ACAT2 leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified oxysterols and suppresses the growth of both HCC cell lines and their xenograft tumors. Further mechanistic studies reveal that HCC-linked promoter hypomethylation is essential for the induction of ACAT2 gene expression. We postulate that specifically blocking this HCC-established cholesterol metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic applications for HCC patients. PMID:24163426

  10. PPARs, Cardiovascular Metabolism, and Function: Near- or Far-from-Equilibrium Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR α, β/δ and γ) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes and gene regulation of cellular metabolism, particularly in the cardiovascular system. Moreover, PPARs have various extra metabolic roles, in circadian rhythms, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this review, we focus mainly on the effects of PPARs on some thermodynamic processes, which can behave either near equilibrium, or far-from-equilibrium. New functions of PPARs are reported in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a human genetic heart disease. It is now possible to link the genetic desmosomal abnormalitiy to the presence of fat in the right ventricle, partly due to an overexpression of PPARγ. Moreover, PPARs are directly or indirectly involved in cellular oscillatory processes such as the Wnt-b-catenin pathway, circadian rhythms of arterial blood pressure and cardiac frequency and glycolysis metabolic pathway. Dysfunction of clock genes and PPARγ may lead to hyperphagia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death, In pathological conditions, regulatory processes of the cardiovascular system may bifurcate towards new states, such as those encountered in hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and heart failure. Numerous of these oscillatory mechanisms, organized in time and space, behave far from equilibrium and are “dissipative structures”. PMID:20706650

  11. Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

    Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

  12. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  13. Features of an altered AMPK metabolic pathway in Gilbert’s Syndrome, and its role in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Mölzer, Christine; Wallner, Marlies; Kern, Carina; Tosevska, Anela; Schwarz, Ursula; Zadnikar, Rene; Doberer, Daniel; Marculescu, Rodrig; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Energy metabolism, involving the ATP-dependent AMPK-PgC-Ppar pathway impacts metabolic health immensely, in that its impairment can lead to obesity, giving rise to disease. Based on observations that individuals with Gilbert’s syndrome (GS; UGT1A1*28 promoter mutation) are generally lighter, leaner and healthier than controls, specific inter-group differences in the AMPK pathway regulation were explored. Therefore, a case-control study involving 120 fasted, healthy, age- and gender matched subjects with/without GS, was conducted. By utilising intra-cellular flow cytometry (next to assessing AMPKα1 gene expression), levels of functioning proteins (phospho-AMPK α1/α2, PgC 1 α, Ppar α and γ) were measured in PBMCs (peripheral blood mononucleated cells). In GS individuals, rates of phospho-AMPK α1/α2, -Ppar α/γ and of PgC 1α were significantly higher, attesting to a boosted fasting response in this condition. In line with this finding, AMPKα1 gene expression was equal between the groups, possibly stressing the post-translational importance of boosted fasting effects in GS. In reflection of an apparently improved health status, GS individuals had significantly lower BMI, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride levels. Herewith, we propose a new theory to explain why individuals having GS are leaner and healthier, and are therefore less likely to contract metabolic diseases or die prematurely thereof. PMID:27444220

  14. Formate Assimilation: The Metabolic Architecture of Natural and Synthetic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren

    2016-07-19

    Formate may become an ideal mediator between the physicochemical and biological realms, as it can be produced efficiently from multiple available sources, such as electricity and biomass, and serve as one of the simplest organic compounds for providing both carbon and energy to living cells. However, limiting the realization of formate as a microbial feedstock is the low diversity of formate-fixing enzymes and thereby the small number of naturally occurring formate-assimilation pathways. Here, the natural enzymes and pathways supporting formate assimilation are presented and discussed together with proposed synthetic routes that could permit growth on formate via existing as well as novel formate-fixing reactions. By considering such synthetic routes, the diversity of metabolic solutions for formate assimilation can be expanded dramatically, such that different host organisms, cultivation conditions, and desired products could be matched with the most suitable pathway. Astute application of old and new formate-assimilation pathways may thus become a cornerstone in the development of sustainable strategies for microbial production of value-added chemicals. PMID:27348189

  15. Inferring pathways leading to organic-sulfur mineralization in the Bacillales.

    PubMed

    Santana, Margarida M; Gonzalez, Juan M; Clara, Maria I

    2016-02-01

    Microbial organic sulfur mineralization to sulfate in terrestrial systems is poorly understood. The process is often missing in published sulfur cycle models. Studies on microbial sulfur cycling have been mostly centered on transformations of inorganic sulfur, mainly on sulfate-reducing and inorganic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Nevertheless, organic sulfur constitutes most sulfur in soils. Recent reports demonstrate that the mobilization of organic-bound-sulfur as sulfate in terrestrial environments occurs preferentially under high temperatures and thermophilic Firmicutes bacteria play a major role in the process, carrying out dissimilative organic-sulfur oxidation. So far, the determinant metabolic reactions of such activity have not been evaluated. Here, in silico analysis was performed on the genomes of sulfate-producing thermophilic genera and mesophilic low-sulfate producers, revealing that highest sulfate production is related to the simultaneous presence of metabolic pathways leading to sulfite synthesis, similar to the ones found in mammalian cells. Those pathways include reverse transsulfuration reactions (tightly associated with methionine cycling), and the presence of aspartate aminotransferases (ATs) with the potential of 3-sulfinoalanine AT and cysteine AT activity, which ultimately leads to sulfite production. Sulfite is oxidized to sulfate by sulfite oxidase, this enzyme is determinant in sulfate synthesis, and it is absent in many mesophiles. PMID:24506486

  16. A workflow for mathematical modeling of subcellular metabolic pathways in leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade genome sequencing has experienced a rapid technological development resulting in numerous sequencing projects and applications in life science. In plant molecular biology, the availability of sequence data on whole genomes has enabled the reconstruction of metabolic networks. Enzymatic reactions are predicted by the sequence information. Pathways arise due to the participation of chemical compounds as substrates and products in these reactions. Although several of these comprehensive networks have been reconstructed for the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the integration of experimental data is still challenging. Particularly the analysis of subcellular organization of plant cells limits the understanding of regulatory instances in these metabolic networks in vivo. In this study, we develop an approach for the functional integration of experimental high-throughput data into such large-scale networks. We present a subcellular metabolic network model comprising 524 metabolic intermediates and 548 metabolic interactions derived from a total of 2769 reactions. We demonstrate how to link the metabolite covariance matrix of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions with the subcellular metabolic network model for the inverse calculation of the biochemical Jacobian, finally resulting in the calculation of a matrix which satisfies a Lyaponov equation. In this way, different strategies of metabolite compartmentation and involved reactions were identified in the accessions when exposed to low temperature. PMID:24400018

  17. Yeast Pathway Kit: A Method for Metabolic Pathway Assembly with Automatically Simulated Executable Documentation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Azevedo, Flávio; Parachin, Nadia Skorupa; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F; Johansson, Björn

    2016-05-20

    We have developed the Yeast Pathway Kit (YPK) for rational and random metabolic pathway assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using reusable and redistributable genetic elements. Genetic elements are cloned in a suicide vector in a rapid process that omits PCR product purification. Single-gene expression cassettes are assembled in vivo using genetic elements that are both promoters and terminators (TP). Cassettes sharing genetic elements are assembled by recombination into multigene pathways. A wide selection of prefabricated TP elements makes assembly both rapid and inexpensive. An innovative software tool automatically produces detailed self-contained executable documentation in the form of pydna code in the narrative Jupyter notebook format to facilitate planning and sharing YPK projects. A d-xylose catabolic pathway was created using YPK with four or eight genes that resulted in one of the highest growth rates reported on d-xylose (0.18 h(-1)) for recombinant S. cerevisiae without adaptation. The two-step assembly of single-gene expression cassettes into multigene pathways may improve the yield of correct pathways at the cost of adding overall complexity, which is offset by the supplied software tool. PMID:26916955

  18. Shared Metabolic Pathways in a Coevolved Insect-Bacterial Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Calum W.; Bouvaine, Sophie; Newell, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    The symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola lacks key genes in the biosynthesis of five essential amino acids (EAAs), and yet its animal hosts (aphids) depend on the symbiosis for the synthesis of these EAAs (isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and valine). We tested the hypothesis, derived from genome annotation, that the missing Buchnera reactions are mediated by host enzymes, with the exchange of metabolic intermediates between the partners. The specialized host cells bearing Buchnera were separated into a Buchnera fraction and a Buchnera-free host cell fraction (HF). Addition of HF to isolated Buchnera preparations significantly increased the production of leucine and phenylalanine, and recombinant enzymes mediating the final reactions in branched-chain amino acid and phenylalanine synthesis rescued the production of these EAAs by Buchnera preparations without HF. The likely precursors for the missing proximal reactions in isoleucine and methionine synthesis were identified, and they differed from predictions based on genome annotations: synthesis of 2-oxobutanoate, the aphid-derived precursor of isoleucine synthesis, was stimulated by homoserine and not threonine via threonine dehydratase, and production of the homocysteine precursor of methionine was driven by cystathionine, not cysteine, via reversal of the transsulfuration pathway. The evolution of shared metabolic pathways in this symbiosis can be attributed to host compensation for genomic deterioration in the symbiont, involving changes in host gene expression networks to recruit specific enzymes to the host cell. PMID:23892755

  19. Triple negative breast cancer: the role of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dean, S J R; Rhodes, A

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in Malaysia and other Asian countries is on the increase, reflecting lifestyle changes some of which are known risk factors for the development of breast cancer. Most breast cancers are amenable to adjuvant therapies that target hormone receptors or HER2 receptors on the surface of the cancer cells and bring about significant improvement in survival. However, approximately 17% of Malaysian women with breast cancer, present with tumours that are devoid of these receptors and are consequently termed 'triple negative' breast cancers. These triple negative breast cancers typically occur in women of a younger age than receptor positive cancers, are predominantly of high grade tumours and the prognosis is usually poor. There is therefore a pressing need to understand the biological pathways that drive these tumours, in order that effective strategies are developed to treat these aggressive tumours. With the increasing affluence of developing countries, obesity and Type II Diabetes are also on the rise. These diseases are associated with an increased risk of developing a range of cancers including those of the breast. In particular, the metabolic syndrome has been shown to be associated with triple negative breast cancer. This article reviews some of the metabolic pathways and biomarkers which have been shown to be aberrantly expressed in triple negative breast cancer and highlights some of the ongoing work in this area. PMID:25500513

  20. Sucrose metabolic pathways in sweetgum and pecan seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sung, S S; Kormanik, P P; Xu, D P; Black, C C

    1989-03-01

    Sucrose metabolism and glycolysis were studied in one- to two-year-old seedlings of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and pecan (Curya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch). The sucrose synthase pathway was identified as the dominant sucrose metabolic activity in sucrose sink tissues such as terminal buds and the root cambial zone. The sucrose synthase pathway was completely dependent on uridine diphosphate and pyrophosphate and it was activated by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. Both acid and neutral invertases were less active than sucrose synthase in sucrose sink tissues. According to the magnitude of seasonal changes in activity, sucrose synthase, the pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase, and fructokinase were identified as adaptive enzymes, whereas neutral invertase, uridine diphosphate-glucopyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucomutase, and the nonspecific, nucleotide triphosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase were identified as maintenance enzymes. The periodically high activities of pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase indicate that pyrophosphate can serve as an energy source in trees. The observations support the hypothesis that sucrose glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in plants proceed by a network of alternative enzymes and substrates. PMID:14972997

  1. Shared metabolic pathways in a coevolved insect-bacterial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Russell, Calum W; Bouvaine, Sophie; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-10-01

    The symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola lacks key genes in the biosynthesis of five essential amino acids (EAAs), and yet its animal hosts (aphids) depend on the symbiosis for the synthesis of these EAAs (isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and valine). We tested the hypothesis, derived from genome annotation, that the missing Buchnera reactions are mediated by host enzymes, with the exchange of metabolic intermediates between the partners. The specialized host cells bearing Buchnera were separated into a Buchnera fraction and a Buchnera-free host cell fraction (HF). Addition of HF to isolated Buchnera preparations significantly increased the production of leucine and phenylalanine, and recombinant enzymes mediating the final reactions in branched-chain amino acid and phenylalanine synthesis rescued the production of these EAAs by Buchnera preparations without HF. The likely precursors for the missing proximal reactions in isoleucine and methionine synthesis were identified, and they differed from predictions based on genome annotations: synthesis of 2-oxobutanoate, the aphid-derived precursor of isoleucine synthesis, was stimulated by homoserine and not threonine via threonine dehydratase, and production of the homocysteine precursor of methionine was driven by cystathionine, not cysteine, via reversal of the transsulfuration pathway. The evolution of shared metabolic pathways in this symbiosis can be attributed to host compensation for genomic deterioration in the symbiont, involving changes in host gene expression networks to recruit specific enzymes to the host cell. PMID:23892755

  2. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Seto, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  3. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    KUZUYAMA, Tomohisa; SETO, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  4. Central Metabolic Pathways of Hyperthermophiles: Important Clues on how Metabolism Gives Rise to Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronimus, R. S.; Morgan, H. W.

    2004-06-01

    Vital clues on life's origins within the galaxy exist here on present day Earth. Life is currently divided into the three domains Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya based on the phylogeny of small ribosomal subunit RNA (16S/18S) gene sequences. The domains are presumed to share a ``last universal common ancestor'' (LUCA). Hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea, which are able to thrive at 80^{circ}C or higher, dominate the bottom of the tree of life and are thus suggested to be the least evolved, or most ``ancient''. Geochemical data indicates that life first appeared on Earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago in a hot environment. Due to these considerations, hyperthermophiles represent the most appropriate microorganisms to investigate the origins of metabolism. The central biochemical pathway of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis (the Embden-Meyerhof pathway) which produces six carbon sugars from three carbon compounds is present in all organisms and can provide important hints concerning the early development of metabolism. Significantly, there are a number of striking deviations from the textbook canonical reaction sequence that are found, particularly in hyperthermophilic archaea. In this paper the phylogenetic istribution of enzymes of the pathway is detailed; overall, the distribution pattern provides strong evidence for the pathway to have developed from the bottom-up.

  5. The genes and enzymes of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are a heterogeneous group of plant isoprenoids primarily involved in photosynthesis. In plants the cleavage of carotenoids leads to the formation of the phytohormones abscisic acid and strigolactone, and C13-norisoprenoids involved in the characteristic flavour and aroma compounds in flowers and fruits and are of specific importance in the varietal character of grapes and wine. This work extends the previous reports of carotenoid gene expression and photosynthetic pigment analysis by providing an up-to-date pathway analysis and an important framework for the analysis of carotenoid metabolic pathways in grapevine. Results Comparative genomics was used to identify 42 genes putatively involved in carotenoid biosynthesis/catabolism in grapevine. The genes are distributed on 16 of the 19 chromosomes and have been localised to the physical map of the heterozygous ENTAV115 grapevine sequence. Nine of the genes occur as single copies whereas the rest of the carotenoid metabolic genes have more than one paralogue. The cDNA copies of eleven corresponding genes from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Pinotage were characterised, and four where shown to be functional. Microarrays provided expression profiles of 39 accessions in the metabolic pathway during three berry developmental stages in Sauvignon blanc, whereas an optimised HPLC analysis provided the concentrations of individual carotenoids. This provides evidence of the functioning of the lutein epoxide cycle and the respective genes in grapevine. Similarly, orthologues of genes leading to the formation of strigolactone involved in shoot branching inhibition were identified: CCD7, CCD8 and MAX1. Moreover, the isoforms typically have different expression patterns, confirming the complex regulation of the pathway. Of particular interest is the expression pattern of the three VvNCEDs: Our results support previous findings that VvNCED3 is likely the isoform linked to ABA content in berries. Conclusions The

  6. Metabolism via Arginase or Nitric Oxide Synthase: Two Competing Arginine Pathways in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Meera; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale; Closs, Ellen I.; Munder, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in the immune system, both as antimicrobial effector cells and as immunoregulatory cells, which induce, suppress or modulate adaptive immune responses. These key aspects of macrophage biology are fundamentally driven by the phenotype of macrophage arginine metabolism that is prevalent in an evolving or ongoing immune response. M1 macrophages express the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, which metabolizes arginine to nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline. NO can be metabolized to further downstream reactive nitrogen species, while citrulline might be reused for efficient NO synthesis via the citrulline–NO cycle. M2 macrophages are characterized by expression of the enzyme arginase, which hydrolyzes arginine to ornithine and urea. The arginase pathway limits arginine availability for NO synthesis and ornithine itself can further feed into the important downstream pathways of polyamine and proline syntheses, which are important for cellular proliferation and tissue repair. M1 versus M2 polarization leads to opposing outcomes of inflammatory reactions, but depending on the context, M1 and M2 macrophages can be both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Notably, M1/M2 macrophage polarization can be driven by microbial infection or innate danger signals without any influence of adaptive immune cells, secondarily driving the T helper (Th)1/Th2 polarization of the evolving adaptive immune response. Since both arginine metabolic pathways cross-inhibit each other on the level of the respective arginine break-down products and Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes can drive or amplify macrophage M1/M2 dichotomy via cytokine activation, this forms the basis of a self-sustaining M1/M2 polarization of the whole immune response. Understanding the arginine metabolism of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes is therefore central to find new possibilities to manipulate immune responses in infection, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, and cancer. PMID:25386178

  7. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  8. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-10

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  9. In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways: Assembling old parts to build novel and functional structures

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Alejandro; Sebai, Sarra C; Sauveplane, Vincent; Ramaen, Odile; Pandjaitan, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    In our recent article “In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways by homeologous recombination in mitotic cells” we proposed a useful alternative to directed evolution methods that permits the generation of yeast cell libraries containing recombinant metabolic pathways from counterpart genes. The methodology was applied to generate single mosaic genes and intragenic mosaic pathways. We used flavonoid metabolism genes as a working model to assembly and express evolved pathways in DNA repair deficient cells. The present commentary revises the principles of gene and pathway mosaicism and explores the scope and perspectives of our results as an additional tool for synthetic biology. PMID:25482082

  10. The metabolism of carbohydrates and lipid peroxidation in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Dobrakowski, Michal; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to estimate the effect of occupational exposure to lead on the blood concentration of glucose and several enzymes involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To estimate the degree of lipid peroxidation, the concentrations of conjugated dienes were determined. The examined group included 145 healthy male employees of lead-zinc works. Taking into account the mean blood lead levels, the examined group was divided into two subgroups. The control group was composed of 36 healthy male administrative workers. The markers of lead exposure were significantly elevated in both subgroups when compared with the controls. There were no significant changes in fasting glucose concentration and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase activity in the study population. The concentration of conjugated dienes was significantly higher in both subgroups, whereas the activity of malate dehydrogenase was significantly higher only in the group with higher exposure. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase were significantly decreased in the examined subgroups. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreased significantly in the group with higher exposure and could be the cause of the elevated concentrations of conjugated dienes. It is possible to conclude that lead interferes with carbohydrate metabolism, but compensatory mechanisms seem to be efficient, as glucose homeostasis in lead-exposed workers was not disturbed. PMID:23833244

  11. Importance of understanding the main metabolic regulation in response to the specific pathway mutation for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yu; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Recent metabolic engineering practice was briefly reviewed in particular for the useful metabolite production such as natural products and biofuel productions. With the emphasis on systems biology approach, the metabolic regulation of the main metabolic pathways in E. coli was discussed from the points of view of enzyme level (allosteric and phosphorylation/ dephosphorylation) regulation, and gene level (transcriptional) regulation. Then the effects of the specific pathway gene knockout such as pts, pgi, zwf, gnd, pyk, ppc, pckA, lpdA, pfl gene knockout on the metabolism in E. coli were overviewed from the systems biology point of view with possible application for strain improvement point. PMID:24688678

  12. Metabolic pathways of benzimidazole anthelmintics in harebell (Campanula rotundifolia).

    PubMed

    Stuchlíková, Lucie; Jirásko, Robert; Skálová, Lenka; Pavlík, František; Szotáková, Barbora; Holčapek, Michal; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2016-08-01

    Benzimidazoles anthelmintics, which enter into environment primarily through excretion in the feces or urine of treated animals, can affect various organisms and disrupt ecosystem balance. The present study was designed to test the phytotoxicity and biotransformation of the three benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), fenbendazole (FBZ) and flubendazole (FLU) in the harebell (Campanula rotundifolia). This meadow plant commonly grows in pastures and comes into contact with anthelmintics through the excrements of treated animals. Suspensions of harebell cells in culture medium were used as an in vitro model system. ABZ, FLU and FBZ were not found to be toxic for harebell cells, which were able to metabolize ABZ, FLU and FBZ via the formation of a wide scale of metabolites. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) led to the identification of 24, 18 and 29 metabolites of ABZ, FLU and FBZ, respectively. Several novel metabolites were identified for the first time. Based on the obtained results, the schemes of the metabolic pathways of these anthelmintics were proposed. Most of these metabolites can be considered deactivation products, but a substantial portion of them may readily be decomposed to biologically active substances which could negatively affect ecosystems. PMID:27208642

  13. Exploring Metabolic Pathways and Regulation through Functional Chemoproteomic and Metabolomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing efforts have revealed a strikingly large number of uncharacterized genes, including poorly or uncharacterized metabolic enzymes, metabolites, and metabolic networks that operate in normal physiology, and also those enzymes and pathways that may be rewired under pathological conditions. Though deciphering the functions of the uncharacterized metabolic genome is a challenging prospect, it also presents an opportunity for identifying novel metabolic nodes that may be important in disease therapy. In this review, we will discuss the chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms employed in identifying, characterizing, and targeting nodal metabolic pathways important in physiology and disease, describing an integrated workflow for functional mapping of metabolic enzymes. PMID:25237861

  14. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  15. An Engineered Rare Codon Device for Optimization of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Li, Chunying; Khan, Md. Rezaul Islam; Wang, Yushu; Ruan, Yunfeng; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Xiaopan; Zhang, Kaisi; Zhao, Xiwen; Ye, Guanhao; Guo, Xizhi; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Rare codons generally arrest translation due to rarity of their cognate tRNAs. This property of rare codons can be utilized to regulate protein expression. In this study, a linear relationship was found between expression levels of genes and copy numbers of rare codons inserted within them. Based on this discovery, we constructed a molecular device in Escherichia coli using the rare codon AGG, its cognate tRNA (tRNAArg (CCU)), modified tRNAAsp (GUC → CCU), and truncated aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (TDRS) to switch the expression of reporter genes on or off as well as to precisely regulate their expression to various intermediate levels. To underscore the applicability of our work, we used the rare codon device to alter the expression levels of four genes of the fatty acid synthesis II (FASII) pathway (i.e. fabZ, fabG, fabI, and tesA’) in E. coli to optimize steady-state kinetics, which produced nearly two-fold increase in fatty acid yield. Thus, the proposed method has potential applications in regulating target protein expression at desired levels and optimizing metabolic pathways by precisely tuning in vivo molar ratio of relevant enzymes. PMID:26852704

  16. Selection Maintains Apparently Degenerate Metabolic Pathways due to Tradeoffs in Using Methylamine for Carbon versus Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Dipti D; Agashe, Deepa; Lee, Ming-Chun; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms often encode multiple non-orthologous metabolic modules that catalyze the same reaction. However, little experimental evidence actually demonstrates a selective basis for metabolic degeneracy. Many methylotrophs-microorganisms that grow on reduced single-carbon compounds-like Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 encode two routes for methylamine oxidation: the periplasmic methylamine dehydrogenase (MaDH) and the cytoplasmic N-methylglutamate (NMG) pathway. In Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, MaDH is essential for methylamine growth, but the NMG pathway has no known physiological role. Here, we use experimental evolution of two isolates lacking (or incapable of using) MaDH to uncover the physiological challenges that need to be overcome in order to use the NMG pathway for growth on methylamine as a carbon and energy source. Physiological characterization of the evolved isolates revealed regulatory rewiring to increase expression of the NMG pathway and novel mechanisms to mitigate cytoplasmic ammonia buildup. These adaptations led us to infer and validate environmental conditions under which the NMG pathway is advantageous compared to MaDH. The highly expressed MaDH enables rapid growth on high concentrations of methylamine as the primary carbon and energy substrate, whereas the energetically expensive NMG pathway plays a pivotal role during growth with methylamine as the sole nitrogen source, which we demonstrate is especially true under limiting concentrations (<1 mM). Tradeoffs between cellular localization and ammonium toxicity lead to selection for this apparent degeneracy as it is beneficial to facultative methylotrophs that have to switch between using methylamine as a carbon and energy source or just a nitrogen source. PMID:27212407

  17. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hong-mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury. PMID:27006086

  18. DHEA-Mediated Inhibition of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway Alters Oocyte Lipid Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Patricia T.; Frolova, Antonina I.; Chi, Maggie M.; Grindler, Natalia M.; Willcockson, Alexandra R.; Reynolds, Kasey A.; Zhao, Quihong

    2013-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hyperandrogenism have altered hormone levels and suffer from ovarian dysfunction leading to subfertility. We have attempted to generate a model of hyperandrogenism by feeding mice chow supplemented with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an androgen precursor that is often elevated in women with PCOS. Treated mice had polycystic ovaries, low ovulation rates, disrupted estrous cycles, and altered hormone levels. Because DHEA is an inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, we tested the hypothesis that oocytes from DHEA-exposed mice would have metabolic disruptions. Citrate levels, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lipid content in denuded oocytes from these mice were significantly lower than controls, suggesting abnormal tricarboxylic acid and pentose phosphate pathway metabolism. The lipid and citrate effects were reversible by supplementation with nicotinic acid, a precursor for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. These findings suggest that elevations in systemic DHEA can have a negative impact on oocyte metabolism and may contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes in women with hyperandrogenism and PCOS. PMID:24036000

  19. Singularity analysis of the AKT signaling pathway reveals connections between cancer and metabolic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2010-12-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. To optimize these properties, the intracellular concentration of the AKT protein must be sufficiently high to saturate its enzymes; the strength of the positive feedback must be stronger than that of the negative feedback. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions. In particular, a strategy for overcoming the limitations of mTOR inhibition is proposed for cancer therapy.

  20. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    PubMed Central

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O.; Sokolova, Inna M.; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated Pco2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and Peco2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO− 3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperaturedependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  1. Impact of ocean acidification on energy metabolism of oyster, Crassostrea gigas--changes in metabolic pathways and thermal response.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O; Sokolova, Inna M; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell, synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO₂-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO₂ levels (partial pressure of CO₂ in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated PCo₂ and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pH(e) = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO₂-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and P(e)CO₂ values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO₂-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO₂-incubated oysters ([HCO₃⁻](e) = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO₂-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pH(e) did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO₂-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO₂-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using ¹H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy

  2. Immune-Mediated Metabolic Kynurenine Pathways Are Involved in the Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction after Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shuang Qiang; Yang, Mi; Duan, Kai Ming

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after cardiopulmonary bypass is a serious complication that can lead to personality changes, memory loss, reduction in the ability to learn, and other central nervous system dysfunctions. In recent years, there have been improvements in measures to protect the brain during surgery, although the incidence of cognitive dysfunction after cardiac surgery remains high (33 to 83% short-term and 20 to 60% long-term cognitive dysfunction). Despite the large amount of basic and clinical research on the incidence of POCD, its exact pathogenesis and complexity are not clear. Many studies have shown that the kynurenine pathway (KP) and cognitive function in humans are closely related. Some reports also show that the imbalance of some metabolites of the KP such as kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid (QUIN), which act in dynamic equilibrium under physiologic conditions, have effects on the central nervous system and can significantly affect cognitive function. Further studies have shown that inflammatory mediators may act on key enzymes of the KP causing KP-induced disorders. Severe inflammatory reaction occurs in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass, which triggers metabolic pathways that are closely related to changes in cognitive function. In this review, we summarize that inflammation-induced metabolic kynurenine (KYN) pathway disorders are likely to have an important role in incidence of POCD after CPB surgery. PMID:25893921

  3. Regulatory Network of Secondary Metabolism in Brassica rapa: Insight into the Glucosinolate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pino Del Carpio, Dunia; Basnet, Ram Kumar; Arends, Danny; Lin, Ke; De Vos, Ric C. H.; Muth, Dorota; Kodde, Jan; Boutilier, Kim; Bucher, Johan; Wang, Xiaowu; Jansen, Ritsert; Bonnema, Guusje

    2014-01-01

    Brassica rapa studies towards metabolic variation have largely been focused on the profiling of the diversity of metabolic compounds in specific crop types or regional varieties, but none aimed to identify genes with regulatory function in metabolite composition. Here we followed a genetical genomics approach to identify regulatory genes for six biosynthetic pathways of health-related phytochemicals, i.e carotenoids, tocopherols, folates, glucosinolates, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Leaves from six weeks-old plants of a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population, consisting of 92 genotypes, were profiled for their secondary metabolite composition, using both targeted and LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics approaches. Furthermore, the same population was profiled for transcript variation using a microarray containing EST sequences mainly derived from three Brassica species: B. napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea. The biochemical pathway analysis was based on the network analyses of both metabolite QTLs (mQTLs) and transcript QTLs (eQTLs). Co-localization of mQTLs and eQTLs lead to the identification of candidate regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols and glucosinolates. We subsequently focused on the well-characterized glucosinolate pathway and revealed two hotspots of co-localization of eQTLs with mQTLs in linkage groups A03 and A09. Our results indicate that such a large-scale genetical genomics approach combining transcriptomics and metabolomics data can provide new insights into the genetic regulation of metabolite composition of Brassica vegetables. PMID:25222144

  4. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance studies of hepatic methoxyflurane metabolism. II. A reevaluation of hepatic metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, B S; Perlman, M E; London, R E

    1988-05-01

    Methoxyflurane (2,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoro-ethyl methyl ether) is believed to be metabolized via two convergent metabolic pathways. The relative flux through these two metabolic pathways has been investigated using a combination of in vivo surface coil NMR techniques and in vitro analyses of urinary metabolites. Analysis of the measured concentrations of inorganic fluoride, oxalate, and methoxydifluoroacetate in the urine of methoxyflurane-treated rats for 4 days after anesthesia indicates that the anesthetic is metabolized primarily via dechlorination to yield methoxydifluoroacetate. The methoxydifluoroacetate is largely excreted without further metabolism, although a small percentage of this metabolite is broken down to yield fluoride and oxalate, as determined by urine analysis of rats dosed with synthetic methoxydifluoroacetate. At early times after methoxyflurane exposure, the relative concentrations of methoxyflurane metabolites indicate that a significant fraction of the metabolic flux occurs via a different pathway, presumably demethylation, to yield dichloroacetate as an intermediate. Direct analysis of dichloroacetate in the urine using water-suppressed proton NMR indicates that the level of this metabolite is below the detection threshold of the method. Measurements made on the urine of rats dosed directly with dichloroacetate indicate that this compound is quickly metabolized, and dichloroacetate levels in urine are again found to be below the detection threshold. These results demonstrate the quantitative importance of the dechlorination pathway in the metabolism of methoxyflurane in rats. PMID:3367904

  5. Computational prediction of human metabolic pathways from the complete human genome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pedro; Wagg, Jonathan; Green, Michelle L; Kaiser, Dale; Krummenacker, Markus; Karp, Peter D

    2005-01-01

    Background We present a computational pathway analysis of the human genome that assigns enzymes encoded therein to predicted metabolic pathways. Pathway assignments place genes in their larger biological context, and are a necessary first step toward quantitative modeling of metabolism. Results Our analysis assigns 2,709 human enzymes to 896 bioreactions; 622 of the enzymes are assigned roles in 135 predicted metabolic pathways. The predicted pathways closely match the known nutritional requirements of humans. This analysis identifies probable omissions in the human genome annotation in the form of 203 pathway holes (missing enzymes within the predicted pathways). We have identified putative genes to fill 25 of these holes. The predicted human metabolic map is described by a Pathway/Genome Database called HumanCyc, which is available at . We describe the generation of HumanCyc, and present an analysis of the human metabolic map. For example, we compare the predicted human metabolic pathway complement to the pathways of Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and identify 35 pathways that are shared among all three organisms. Conclusions Our analysis elucidates a significant portion of the human metabolic map, and also indicates probable unidentified genes in the genome. HumanCyc provides a genome-based view of human nutrition that associates the essential dietary requirements of humans with a set of metabolic pathways whose existence is supported by the human genome. The database places many human genes in a pathway context, thereby facilitating analysis of gene expression, proteomics, and metabolomics datasets through a publicly available online tool called the Omics Viewer. PMID:15642094

  6. Neural-metabolic coupling in the central visual pathway.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ralph D; Li, Baowang

    2016-10-01

    Studies are described which are intended to improve our understanding of the primary measurements made in non-invasive neural imaging. The blood oxygenation level-dependent signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflects changes in deoxygenated haemoglobin. Tissue oxygen concentration, along with blood flow, changes during neural activation. Therefore, measurements of tissue oxygen together with the use of a neural sensor can provide direct estimates of neural-metabolic interactions. We have used this relationship in a series of studies in which a neural microelectrode is combined with an oxygen micro-sensor to make simultaneous co-localized measurements in the central visual pathway. Oxygen responses are typically biphasic with small initial dips followed by large secondary peaks during neural activation. By the use of established visual response characteristics, we have determined that the oxygen initial dip provides a better estimate of local neural function than the positive peak. This contrasts sharply with fMRI for which the initial dip is unreliable. To extend these studies, we have examined the relationship between the primary metabolic agents, glucose and lactate, and associated neural activity. For this work, we also use a Doppler technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) together with neural activity. Results show consistent synchronously timed changes such that increases in neural activity are accompanied by decreases in glucose and simultaneous increases in lactate. Measurements of CBF show clear delays with respect to neural response. This is consistent with a slight delay in blood flow with respect to oxygen delivery during neural activation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574310

  7. The metabolism of aromatic acids by micro-organisms. Metabolic pathways in the fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cain, R. B.; Bilton, R. F.; Darrah, Josephine A.

    1968-01-01

    1. The metabolic pathways of aromatic-ring fission were examined in a range of fungal genera that utilize several compounds related to lignin. 2. Most of the genera, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate or compounds that are degraded to the latter (e.g. caffeate, ferulate or vanillate), rapidly oxidized these compounds, but not catechol. 3. Such genera possessed a protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase and accumulated β-carboxymuconate as the product of protocatechuate oxidation. This enzyme had a high pH optimum in most organisms; the Rhodotorula enzyme was competitively inhibited by catechol. 4. β-Carboxymuconate was converted by all competent fungi into β-carboxymuconolactone, which was isolated and characterized. None of the fungi produced or utilized at significant rates the corresponding bacterial intermediate γ-carboxymuconolactone. 5. The lactonizing enzymes of Rhodotorula and Neurospora crassa had a pH optimum near 5·5 and approximate molecular weights of 19000 and 190000 respectively. 6. The fungi did not degrade the isomeric (+)-muconolactone, γ-carboxymethylenebutanolide or β-oxoadipate enol lactone at significant rates, and thus differ radically from bacteria, where β-oxoadipate enol lactone is the precursor of β-oxoadipate in all strains examined. 7. The end product of β-carboxymuconolactone metabolism by extracts was β-oxoadipate. 8. Evidence for a coenzyme A derivative of β-oxoadipate was found during further metabolism of this keto acid. 9. A few anomalous fungi, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, had no protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase, but possessed all the enzymes of the catechol pathway. Catechol was detected in the growth medium in one instance. 10. A strain of Penicillium sp. formed pyruvate but no β-oxoadipate from protocatechuate, suggesting the existence also of a `meta' type of ring cleavage among fungi. PMID:5691754

  8. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya R; McKarns, Susan; Demarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Sowers, James R

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance is associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contributes to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:23932846

  9. Electron attachment to antipyretics: Possible implications of their metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A.; Modelli, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    The empty-level structures and formation of negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals in a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), namely aspirin, paracetamol, phenacetin, and ibuprofen, were investigated in vacuo by electron transmission and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) spectroscopies, with the aim to model the behavior of these antipyretic agents under reductive conditions in vivo. The experimental findings are interpreted with the support of density functional theory calculations. The negative and neutral fragments formed by DEA in the gas phase display similarities with the main metabolites of these commonly used NSAIDs generated in vivo by the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, as well as with several known active agents. It is concluded that xenobiotic molecules which possess pronounced electron-accepting properties could in principle follow metabolic pathways which parallel the gas-phase dissociative decay channels observed in the DEA spectra at incident electron energies below 1 eV. Unwanted side effects as, e.g., hepatoxicity or carcinogenicity produced by the NSAIDs under study in human organism are discussed within the "free radical model" framework, reported earlier to describe the toxic action of the well-known model toxicant carbon tetrachloride.

  10. Electron attachment to antipyretics: possible implications of their metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A; Modelli, Alberto

    2012-06-21

    The empty-level structures and formation of negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals in a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), namely aspirin, paracetamol, phenacetin, and ibuprofen, were investigated in vacuo by electron transmission and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) spectroscopies, with the aim to model the behavior of these antipyretic agents under reductive conditions in vivo. The experimental findings are interpreted with the support of density functional theory calculations. The negative and neutral fragments formed by DEA in the gas phase display similarities with the main metabolites of these commonly used NSAIDs generated in vivo by the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, as well as with several known active agents. It is concluded that xenobiotic molecules which possess pronounced electron-accepting properties could in principle follow metabolic pathways which parallel the gas-phase dissociative decay channels observed in the DEA spectra at incident electron energies below 1 eV. Unwanted side effects as, e.g., hepatoxicity or carcinogenicity produced by the NSAIDs under study in human organism are discussed within the "free radical model" framework, reported earlier to describe the toxic action of the well-known model toxicant carbon tetrachloride. PMID:22779593

  11. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  12. EvoMS: An evolutionary tool to find de novo metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Matias F; Stegmayer, Georgina; Milone, Diego H

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary metabolic synthesizer (EvoMS) is an evolutionary tool capable of finding novel metabolic pathways linking several compounds through feasible reactions. It allows system biologists to explore different alternatives for relating specific metabolites, offering the possibility of indicating the initial compound or allowing the algorithm to automatically select it. Searching process can be followed graphically through several plots of the evolutionary process. Metabolic pathways found are displayed in a web browser as directed graphs. In all cases, solutions are networks of reactions that produce linear or branched metabolic pathways which are feasible from the specified set of available compounds. Source code of EvoMS is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sourcesinc/files/evoms/. Subsets of reactions are provided, as well as four examples for searching metabolic pathways among several compounds. Available as a web service at http://fich.unl.edu.ar/sinc/web-demo/evoms/. PMID:26092635

  13. Phylogenetic sequence of metabolic pathways in Precambrian cellular life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnabas, J.; Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1981-01-01

    A sequence of major metabolic events is presented as they may have appeared during prokaryote evolution. This is based on (1) the phylogenetic schema derived from sequences of bacterial ferredoxin, 2Fe-2S ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes; (2) metabolic settings in which these macromolecules are found; and (3) metabolic capabilities of the prokaryotes that carry these molecules.

  14. Perturbations of tyrosine metabolism promote the indolepyruvate pathway via tryptophan in host and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gangoiti, Jon A; Nyhan, William L; Barshop, Bruce A

    2015-03-01

    The drug nitisinone (NTBC) is used to treat tyrosinemia type I, and more recently has been also used for the treatment of another disorder of tyrosine metabolism, alkaptonuria. While studying the dose effects of NTBC treatment on alkaptonuria, untargeted metabolomics revealed perturbations in a completely separate pathway, that of tryptophan metabolism. Significant elevations in several indolic compounds associated with the indolepyruvate pathway of tryptophan metabolism were present in NTBC-treated patient sera and correlated with elevations of an intermediate of tyrosine metabolism. Indolic compounds of this pathway have long been associated with commensal bacterial and plant metabolism. These exogenous sources of indoles have been more recently implicated in affecting mammalian cell function and disease. We studied the correlation of these indolic compounds in other disorders of tyrosine metabolism including tyrosinemia types I and II as well as transient tyrosinemia, and demonstrated that 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (4-HPP) was directly responsible for the promotion of this pathway. We then investigated the regulation of the indolepyruvate pathway and the role of 4-HPP further in both mammalian cells and intestinal microbial cultures. We demonstrated that several of the indolic products, including indolepyruvate and indolelactate, were in fact generated by human cell metabolism, while the downstream indole metabolite, indolecarboxaldehyde, was produced exclusively by microbial cultures of human gut flora. This study describes a symbiotic perturbation in host and microbiome tryptophan metabolism in response to elevations related to defects of tyrosine metabolism and concomitant drug treatment. PMID:25680927

  15. CathaCyc, a metabolic pathway database built from Catharanthus roseus RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Fabris, Michele; Pollier, Jacob; Baart, Gino J E; Rombauts, Stephane; Hasnain, Ghulam; Rischer, Heiko; Memelink, Johan; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Goossens, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) synthesizes numerous terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), such as the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The TIA pathway operates in a complex metabolic network that steers plant growth and survival. Pathway databases and metabolic networks reconstructed from 'omics' sequence data can help to discover missing enzymes, study metabolic pathway evolution and, ultimately, engineer metabolic pathways. To date, such databases have mainly been built for model plant species with sequenced genomes. Although genome sequence data are not available for most medicinal plant species, next-generation sequencing is now extensively employed to create comprehensive medicinal plant transcriptome sequence resources. Here we report on the construction of CathaCyc, a detailed metabolic pathway database, from C. roseus RNA-Seq data sets. CathaCyc (version 1.0) contains 390 pathways with 1,347 assigned enzymes and spans primary and secondary metabolism. Curation of the pathways linked with the synthesis of TIAs and triterpenoids, their primary metabolic precursors, and their elicitors, the jasmonate hormones, demonstrated that RNA-Seq resources are suitable for the construction of pathway databases. CathaCyc is accessible online (http://www.cathacyc.org) and offers a range of tools for the visualization and analysis of metabolic networks and 'omics' data. Overlay with expression data from publicly available RNA-Seq resources demonstrated that two well-characterized C. roseus terpenoid pathways, those of TIAs and triterpenoids, are subject to distinct regulation by both developmental and environmental cues. We anticipate that databases such as CathaCyc will become key to the study and exploitation of the metabolism of medicinal plants. PMID:23493402

  16. The purine degradation pathway: possible role in paralytic shellfish toxin metabolism in the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1.

    PubMed

    Pomati, F; Manarolla, G; Rossi, O; Vigetti, D; Rossetti, C

    2001-12-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxic alkaloids and their major biological effect is due to the blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable cells. They have been recognised as an important health risk for humans, animals, and ecosystems worldwide. The metabolic pathways that lead to the production and the degradation of these toxic metabolites are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible link between PST accumulation and the activation of the metabolism that leads to purine degradation in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1. The purine catabolic pathway is related to the nitrogen microcycle in water environments, in which cyanobacteria use traces of purines and ureides as a nitrogen source for growth. Thus, the activity of allantoicase, a key inducible enzyme of this metabolism, was used as tool for assaying the activation of the purine degradation pathway. The enzyme and the pathway were induced by allantoic acid, the direct substrate of allantoicase, as well as by adenine and, to a lower degree, by urea, one of the main products of purine catabolism. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli was also employed and showed the best induction of allantoicase activity. In culture, Planktothrix sp. FP1 showed a differential accumulation of PST in consequence of the induction with different substrates. The cyanobacterial culture induced with allantoic acid accumulated 61.7% more toxins in comparison with the control. On the other hand, the cultures induced with adenine, urea, and the E. coli extract showed low PST accumulation, respectively, 1%, 38%, and 5% of the total toxins content detected in the noninduced culture. A degradation pathway for the PSTs can be hypothesised: as suggested for purine alkaloids in higher plants, saxitoxin (STX) and derivatives may also be converted into xanthine, urea, and further to CO2 and NH4+ or recycled in the primary metabolism through the purine degradation

  17. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics: applications to biomarker and metabolic pathway research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guangli; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become increasingly popular in molecular medicine. High-definition mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with pattern recognition methods, have been carried out to obtain comprehensive metabolite profiling and metabolic pathway of large biological datasets. This sets the scene for a new and powerful diagnostic approach. Analysis of the key metabolites in body fluids has become an important part of improving disease diagnosis. With technological advances in analytical techniques, the ability to measure low-molecular-weight metabolites in bio-samples provides a powerful platform for identifying metabolites that are uniquely correlated with a specific human disease. MS-based metabolomics can lead to enhanced understanding of disease mechanisms and to new diagnostic markers and has a strong potential to contribute to improving early diagnosis of diseases. This review will highlight the importance and benefit with certain characteristic examples of MS-metabolomics for identifying metabolic pathways and metabolites that accurately screen for potential diagnostic biomarkers of diseases. PMID:25739660

  18. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumor suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signaling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues such as liver, muscle, and adipose, a function that has made it a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumor suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway with established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer. PMID:19629071

  19. The Effect of the Hemochromatosis (HFE) Genotype on Lead Load and Iron Metabolism among Lead Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guangqin; Du, Guihua; Li, Huijun; Lin, Fen; Sun, Ziyong; Yang, Wei; Feng, Chang; Zhu, Gaochun; Li, Yanshu; Chen, Ying; Jiao, Huan; Zhou, Fankun

    2014-01-01

    Background Both an excess of toxic lead (Pb) and an essential iron disorder have been implicated in many diseases and public health problems. Iron metabolism genes, such as the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene, have been reported to be modifiers for lead absorption and storage. However, the HFE gene studies among the Asian population with occupationally high lead exposure are lacking. Objectives To explore the modifying effects of the HFE genotype (wild-type, H63D variant and C282Y variant) on the Pb load and iron metabolism among Asian Pb-workers with high occupational exposure. Methods Seven hundred and seventy-one employees from a lead smelter manufacturing company were tested to determine their Pb intoxication parameters, iron metabolic indexes and identify the HFE genotype. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Forty-five H63D variant carriers and no C282Y variant carrier were found among the 771 subjects. Compared with subjects with the wild-type genotype, H63D variant carriers had higher blood lead levels, even after controlling for factors such as age, sex, marriage, education, smoking and lead exposure levels. Multivariate analyses also showed that the H63D genotype modifies the associations between the blood lead levels and the body iron burden/transferrin. Conclusions No C282Y variant was found in this Asian population. The H63D genotype modified the association between the lead and iron metabolism such that increased blood lead is associated with a higher body iron content or a lower transferrin in the H63D variant. It is indicated that H63D variant carriers may be a potentially highly vulnerable sub-population if they are exposed to high lead levels occupationally. PMID:24988074

  20. Energy metabolism and energy-sensing pathways in mammalian embryonic and adult stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Rafalski, Victoria A.; Mancini, Elena; Brunet, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Metabolism is influenced by age, food intake, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity. How do physiological or pathological metabolic changes influence stem cells, which are crucial for tissue homeostasis? This Commentary reviews recent evidence that stem cells have different metabolic demands than differentiated cells, and that the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are functionally connected to the metabolic state of the cell and the surrounding stem cell niche. Furthermore, we present how energy-sensing signaling molecules and metabolism regulators are implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Finally, we discuss the emerging literature on the metabolism of induced pluripotent stem cells and how manipulating metabolic pathways might aid cellular reprogramming. Determining how energy metabolism regulates stem cell fate should shed light on the decline in tissue regeneration that occurs during aging and facilitate the development of therapies for degenerative or metabolic diseases. PMID:23420198

  1. Modeling the optimal central carbon metabolic pathways under feedback inhibition using flux balance analysis.

    PubMed

    De, Rajat K; Tomar, Namrata

    2012-12-01

    Metabolism is a complex process for energy production for cellular activity. It consists of a cascade of reactions that form a highly branched network in which the product of one reaction is the reactant of the next reaction. Metabolic pathways efficiently produce maximal amount of biomass while maintaining a steady-state behavior. The steady-state activity of such biochemical pathways necessarily incorporates feedback inhibition of the enzymes. This observation motivates us to incorporate feedback inhibition for modeling the optimal activity of metabolic pathways using flux balance analysis (FBA). We demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology on a synthetic pathway with and without feedback inhibition. Similarly, for the first time, the Central Carbon Metabolic (CCM) pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens have been modeled and compared based on the above understanding. The optimal pathway, which maximizes the amount of the target product(s), is selected from all those obtained by the proposed method. For this, we have observed the concentration of the product inhibited enzymes of CCM pathway and its influence on its corresponding metabolite/substrate. We have also studied the concentration of the enzymes which are responsible for the synthesis of target products. We further hypothesize that an optimal pathway would opt for higher flux rate reactions. In light of these observations, we can say that an optimal pathway should have lower enzyme concentration and higher flux rates. Finally, we demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method by comparing it with the extreme pathway analysis. PMID:22913632

  2. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). PMID:27163876

  3. Modelling and pathway identification involving the transport mechanism of a complex metabolic system in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xi; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-06-01

    The bio-dissimilation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by a complex metabolic system of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulation. In this paper, in consideration of the fact that the transport ways of 1,3-PD and glycerol with different weights across cell membrane are still unclear in batch culture, we consider 121 possible metabolic pathways and establish a novel mathematical model which is represented by a complex metabolic system. Taking into account the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentration of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium point for the metabolic system of batch culture, the novel approach used here is to define quantitatively biological robustness of the intracellular substance concentrations for the overall process of batch culture. To determine the most possible metabolic pathway, we take the defined biological robustness as cost function and establish an identification model, in which 1452 system parameters and 484 pathway parameters are involved. Simultaneously, the identification model is subject to the metabolic system, continuous state constraints and parameter constraints. As such, solving the identification model by a serial program is a very complicated task. We propose a parallel migration particle swarm optimization algorithm (MPSO) capable of solving the identification model in conjunction with the constraint transcription and smoothing approximation techniques. Numerical results show that the most possible metabolic pathway and the corresponding metabolic system can reasonably describe the process of batch culture.

  4. Sensitive cells: enabling tools for static and dynamic control of microbial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Trantas, Emmanouil A; Ververidis, Filippos; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos Ag

    2015-12-01

    Natural metabolic pathways are dynamically regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and protein levels. Despite this, traditional pathway engineering has relied on static control strategies to engender changes in metabolism, most likely due to ease of implementation and perceived predictability of design outcome. Increasingly in recent years, however, metabolic engineers have drawn inspiration from natural systems and have begun to harness dynamically controlled regulatory machinery to improve design of engineered microorganisms for production of specialty and commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent enabling technologies for engineering static control over pathway expression levels, and we discuss state-of-the-art dynamic control strategies that have yielded improved outcomes in the field of microbial metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we emphasize design of a novel class of genetically encoded controllers that will facilitate automatic, transient tuning of synthetic and endogenous pathways. PMID:26453934

  5. Effects of phoxim on nutrient metabolism and insulin signaling pathway in silkworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanchi; Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Xu, Kaizun; Ni, Min; Wang, Binbin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an important economic insect. Each year, poisoning caused by phoxim pesticide leads to huge economic losses in sericulture in China. Silkworm midgut is the major organ for food digestion and nutrient absorption. In this study, we found that the activity and expression of nutrition metabolism-related enzymes were dysregulated in midgut by phoxim exposure. DGE analysis revealed that 40 nutrition metabolism-related genes were differentially expressed. qRT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of insulin/insulin growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway genes Akt, PI3K, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS and PDK were reduced, whereas PTEN's expression was significantly increased in the midgut at 24 h after phoxim treatment. However, the transcription levels of Akt, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS, InR and PDK were elevated and reached the peaks at 48 h, which were 1.48-, 1.35-, 1.21-, 2.24-, 2.89-, and 1.44-fold of those of the control, respectively. At 72 h, the transcription of these genes was reduced. Akt phosphorylation level was increasing along with the growth of silkworms in the control group. However, phoxim treatment led to increased Akt phosphorylation that surged at 24 h but gradually decreased at 48 h and 72 h. The results indicated that phoxim dysregulated the expression of IIS pathway genes and induced abnormal nutrient metabolism in silkworm midgut, which may be the reason of the slow growth of silkworms. PMID:26741554

  6. Homeostasis of redox status derived from glucose metabolic pathway could be the key to understanding the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Yang, Chuanwei; Yang, Zhenduo; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Xiaoping; Mills, Gordon; Liu, Zesheng

    2015-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in mitochondria through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is vital for cell function. However, reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product from OXPHOS, is a major source of endogenously produced toxic stressors on the genome. In fact, ATP could be efficiently produced in a high throughput manner without ROS generation in cytosol through glycolysis, which could be a unique and critical metabolic pathway to prevent spontaneous mutation during DNA replication. Therefore glycolysis is dominant in robust proliferating cells. Indeed, aerobic glycolysis, or the Warburg effect, in normal proliferating cells is an example of homeostasis of redox status by transiently shifting metabolic flux from OXPHOS to glycolysis to avoid ROS generation during DNA synthesis and protect genome integrity. The process of maintaining redox homeostasis is driven by genome wide transcriptional clustering with mitochondrial retrograde signaling and coupled with the glucose metabolic pathway and cell division cycle. On the contrary, the Warburg effect in cancer cells is the results of the alteration of redox status from a reprogramed glucose metabolic pathway caused by the dysfunctional OXPHOS. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) disrupt mitochondrial structural integrity, leading to reduced OXPHOS capacity, sustained glycolysis and excessive ROS leak, all of which are responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. A “plumbing model” is used to illustrate how redox status could be regulated through glucose metabolic pathway and provide a new insight into the understanding of the Warburg effect in both normal and cancer cells. PMID:26101696

  7. Homeostasis of redox status derived from glucose metabolic pathway could be the key to understanding the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Yang, Chuanwei; Yang, Zhenduo; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Xiaoping; Mills, Gordon; Liu, Zesheng

    2015-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in mitochondria through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is vital for cell function. However, reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product from OXPHOS, is a major source of endogenously produced toxic stressors on the genome. In fact, ATP could be efficiently produced in a high throughput manner without ROS generation in cytosol through glycolysis, which could be a unique and critical metabolic pathway to prevent spontaneous mutation during DNA replication. Therefore glycolysis is dominant in robust proliferating cells. Indeed, aerobic glycolysis, or the Warburg effect, in normal proliferating cells is an example of homeostasis of redox status by transiently shifting metabolic flux from OXPHOS to glycolysis to avoid ROS generation during DNA synthesis and protect genome integrity. The process of maintaining redox homeostasis is driven by genome wide transcriptional clustering with mitochondrial retrograde signaling and coupled with the glucose metabolic pathway and cell division cycle. On the contrary, the Warburg effect in cancer cells is the results of the alteration of redox status from a reprogramed glucose metabolic pathway caused by the dysfunctional OXPHOS. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) disrupt mitochondrial structural integrity, leading to reduced OXPHOS capacity, sustained glycolysis and excessive ROS leak, all of which are responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. A “plumbing model” is used to illustrate how redox status could be regulated through glucose metabolic pathway and provide a new insight into the understanding of the Warburg effect in both normal and cancer cells. PMID:26045978

  8. Metabolic and pathway engineering to influence native and altered erythromycin production through E. coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2013-09-01

    The heterologous production of the complex antibiotic erythromycin through Escherichia coli provides a unique challenge in metabolic engineering. In addition to introducing the 19 foreign genes needed for heterologous biosynthesis, E. coli metabolism must be engineered to provide the propionyl-CoA and (2S)-methylmalonyl-CoA substrates required to allow erythromycin formation. In this work, three different pathways to propionyl-CoA were compared in the context of supporting E. coli erythromycin biosynthesis. The comparison revealed that alternative citramalate and threonine metabolic pathways (both starting from exogenous glycerol) were capable of supporting final compound formation equal to a proven pathway reliant upon exogenous propionate. Furthermore, two pathways to (2S)-methylmalonyl-CoA were compared in the production of a novel benzyl-erythromycin analog. A pathway dependent upon exogenous methylmalonate improved selectivity and facilitated antibiotic assessment of this new analog. PMID:23747605

  9. Gene expression changes in the tyrosine metabolic pathway regulate caste-specific cuticular pigmentation of termites.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Yudai; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, all castes have characteristic phenotypes suitable for their own tasks and to engage in social behavior. The acquisition of caste-specific phenotypes was a key event in the course of social insect evolution. However, understanding of the genetic basis and the developmental mechanisms that produce these phenotypes is still very limited. In particular, termites normally possess more than two castes with specific phenotypes (i.e. workers, soldiers, and reproductives), but proximate developmental mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In this study, we focused on the pigmentation of the cuticle as a model trait for caste-specific phenotypes, during the molts of each caste; workers, soldiers, presoldiers (intermediate stage of soldiers), and alates (primary reproductives) in Zootermopsis nevadensis. Expression patterns of cuticular tanning genes (members of the tyrosine metabolic pathway) were different among each molt, and high expression levels of several "key genes" were observed during each caste differentiation. For the differentiation of castes with well-tanned cuticles (i.e. soldiers and alates), all focal genes except DDC in the former were highly expressed. On the other hand, high expression levels of yellow and aaNAT were observed during worker and presoldier molts, respectively, but most other genes in the pathway were expressed at low levels. RNA interference (RNAi) of these key genes affected caste-specific cuticular pigmentation, leading to soldiers with yellowish-white heads and pigmented mandibular tips, presoldiers with partly pigmented head cuticles, and alates with the yellow head capsules. These results suggest that the pigmentation of caste-specific cuticles is achieved by the regulation of gene expression in the tyrosine metabolic pathway. PMID:27125584

  10. 'Rod and ring' formation from IMP dehydrogenase is regulated through the one-carbon metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Calise, S John; Purich, Daniel L; Nguyen, Thuy; Saleem, Dania A; Krueger, Claire; Yin, Joyce D; Chan, Edward K L

    2016-08-01

    'Rods and rings' (RRs) are conserved, non-membrane-bound intracellular polymeric structures composed, in part, of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a key enzyme leading to GMP and GTP biosynthesis. RR formation is induced by IMPDH inhibitors as well as glutamine deprivation. They also form upon treatment of cells with glutamine synthetase inhibitors. We now report that depriving cells of serine and glycine promotes RR formation, and we have traced these effects to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase-2 (SHMT2), pivotal enzymes in one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis. RR assembly is likewise induced upon DHFR inhibition by methotrexate or aminopterin as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of DHFR or SHMT2. Because RR assembly occurs when guanine nucleotide biosynthesis is inhibited, and because RRs rapidly disassemble after the addition of guanine nucleotide precursors, RR formation might be an adaptive homeostatic mechanism, allowing IMPDH to sense changes in the one-carbon folate pathway. PMID:27343244

  11. Lead toxicity and metabolism from lead sulfate fed to Holstein calves

    SciTech Connect

    Logner, K.R.; Neathery, M.W.; Miller, W.J.; Gentry, R.P.; Blackmon, D.M.; White, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Sixteen Holstein intact male calves averaging 85 kg and 74 days of age were assigned randomly to four dietary lead treatments according to body weight. They were fed for ad libitum consumption a control diet containing no added lead or the control diet supplemented with 500, 1500, or 4500 ppm lead as lead sulfate. One calf fed 1500 ppm lead and all four calves fed 4500 ppm lead died within 6 to 10 days after initiation of treatments. Death was sudden with few or no clinical signs prior to death. Those clinical signs that did appear included muscular tremors, gnashing of teeth, bellowing, and convulsions. Four control, four 500 ppm lead, and two 1500 ppm lead-fed calves survived the 7-wk experimental period. Feed consumption, body weight changes, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activity in blood plasma, and hemoglobin were not affected significantly by lead treatments. Packed cell volume in calves fed 500 and 1500 ppm added lead was reduced. Lead concentrations in blood, kidney, liver, bone, brain, and muscle were elevated in lead supplemented calves above those of controls. The highest concentrations of lead were in kidney and liver. 27 references, 6 tables.

  12. Use of Designer G Protein-Coupled Receptors to Dissect Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all metabolic processes, including glucose and energy homeostasis. Recently, the use of designer GPCRs referred to as designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) has made it possible to dissect metabolically relevant GPCR signaling pathways in a temporally and spatially controlled fashion in vivo. PMID:27381463

  13. "Design Your Own Disease" Assignment: Teaching Students to Apply Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Nick

    2010-01-01

    One of the major focuses of biochemistry courses is metabolic pathways. Although certain aspects of this content may require a rote approach, more applied techniques make these subject areas more interesting. This article describes the use of an assignment, "Design Your Own Disease" to teach students metabolic regulation and biosignaling…

  14. Simultaneous functions of the installed DAS/DAK formaldehyde-assimilation pathway and the original formaldehyde metabolic pathways enhance the ability of transgenic geranium to purify gaseous formaldehyde polluted environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengen; Xiao, Sunqin; Xuan, Xiuxia; Sun, Zhen; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-04-01

    The overexpression of dihydroxyacetone synthase (DAS) and dihydroxyacetone kinase (DAK) from methylotrophic yeasts in chloroplasts created a photosynthetic formaldehyde (HCHO)-assimilation pathway (DAS/DAK pathway) in transgenic tobacco. Geranium has abilities to absorb and metabolize HCHO. Results of this study showed that the installed DAS/DAK pathway functioning in chloroplasts greatly enhanced the role of the Calvin cycle in transgenic geranium under high concentrations of gaseous HCHO stress. Consequently, the yield of sugars from HCHO-assimilation increased approximately 6-fold in transgenic geranium leaves, and concomitantly, the role of three original HCHO metabolic pathways reduced, leading to a significant decrease in formic acid, citrate and glycine production from HCHO metabolism. Although the role of three metabolic pathways reduced in transgenic plants under high concentrations of gaseous HCHO stress, the installed DAS/DAK pathway could still function together with the original HCHO metabolic pathways. Consequently, the gaseous HCHO-resistance of transgenic plants was significantly improved, and the generation of H2O2 in the transgenic geranium leaves was significantly less than that in the wild type (WT) leaves. Under environmental-polluted gaseous HCHO stress for a long duration, the stomata conductance of transgenic plants remained approximately 2-fold higher than that of the WT, thereby increasing its ability to purify gaseous HCHO polluted environment. PMID:25698666

  15. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  16. Green pathways: Metabolic network analysis of plant systems.

    PubMed

    Dersch, Lisa Maria; Beckers, Veronique; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic engineering of plants with enhanced crop yield and value-added compositional traits is particularly challenging as they probably exhibit the highest metabolic network complexity of all living organisms. Therefore, approaches of plant metabolic network analysis, which can provide systems-level understanding of plant physiology, appear valuable as guidance for plant metabolic engineers. Strongly supported by the sequencing of plant genomes, a number of different experimental and computational methods have emerged in recent years to study plant systems at various levels: from heterotrophic cell cultures to autotrophic entire plants. The present review presents a state-of-the-art toolbox for plant metabolic network analysis. Among the described approaches are different in silico modeling techniques, including flux balance analysis, elementary flux mode analysis and kinetic flux profiling, as well as different variants of experiments with plant systems which use radioactive and stable isotopes to determine in vivo plant metabolic fluxes. The fundamental principles of these techniques, the required data input and the obtained flux information are enriched by technical advices, specific to plants. In addition, pioneering and high-impacting findings of plant metabolic network analysis highlight the potential of the field. PMID:26704307

  17. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  18. Cellular lead toxicity and metabolism in primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G.J.; Rosen, J.F.; Pounds, J.G. )

    1990-02-01

    A knowledge of bone lead metabolism is critical for understanding the toxicological importance of bone lead, as a toxicant both to bone cells and to soft tissues of the body, as lead is mobilized from large reservoirs in hard tissues. To further understand the processes that mediate metabolism of lead in bone, it is necessary to determine lead metabolism at the cellular level. Experiments were conducted to determine the intracellular steady-state {sup 210}Pb kinetics in cultures of primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells. Osteoblastic bone cells obtained by sequential collagenase digestion of mouse calvaria or rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were labeled with {sup 210}Pb as 5 microM lead acetate for 20 hr, and kinetic parameters were determined by measuring the efflux of {sup 210}Pb from the cells over a {sup 210}-min period. The intracellular metabolism of {sup 210}Pb was characterized by three kinetic pools of {sup 210}Pb in both cell types. Although the values of these parameters differed between the primary osteoblastic cells and ROS cells, the profile of {sup 210}Pb was remarkably similar in both cell types. Both types exhibited one large, slowly exchanging pool (S3), indicative of mitochondrial lead. These data show that primary osteoblastic bone cells and ROS cells exhibit similar steady-state lead kinetics, and intracellular lead distribution. These data also establish a working model of lead kinetics in osteoblastic bone cells and now permit an integrated view of lead kinetics in bone.

  19. Tolerance to lead-induced porphyrin metabolic disorders following lead pretreatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomokuni, K; Ichiba, M

    1990-12-01

    The protective effect of pretreatment with lead on lead-induced toxicity was investigated in mice, using some biological parameters such as urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and coproporphyrin, accumulation of erythrocyte protoporphyrin and inhibition of erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase; these are useful indicators for evaluating the effects on health of lead. It was demonstrated that pretreatment with a single intraperitoneal dose of 2 mg Pb/kg, 7 days prior to the challenge dose, prevents in part the increasing excretion of urinary ALA induced by a challenge exposure to lead (200 ppm) in the drinking water for 7 days. PMID:2260119

  20. Deciphering the biological effects of acupuncture treatment modulating multiple metabolism pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Weiping; Meng, Xiangcai; Liu, Li; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is widely used to treat various diseases. However, detailed biological interpretation of the acupuncture stimulations is limited. We here used metabolomics and proteomics technology, thereby identifying the serum small molecular metabolites into the effect and mechanism pathways of standardized acupuncture treatments at ‘Zusanli’ acupoint which was the most often used acupoint in previous reports. Comprehensive overview of serum metabolic profiles during acupuncture stimulation was investigated. Thirty-four differential metabolites were identified in serum metabolome and associated with ten metabolism pathways. Importantly, we have found that high impact glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism were acutely perturbed by acupuncture stimulation. As such, these alterations may be useful to clarify the biological mechanism of acupuncture stimulation. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified and such effects of acupuncture stimulation were found to play a role in transport, enzymatic activity, signaling pathway or receptor interaction. Pathway analysis further revealed that most of these proteins were found to play a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple metabolism pathways. It demonstrated that the metabolomics coupled with proteomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in understanding the biological effects of acupuncture stimulation. PMID:26879284

  1. Simultaneous prediction of enzyme orthologs from chemical transformation patterns for de novo metabolic pathway reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Kotera, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolic pathways are an important class of molecular networks consisting of compounds, enzymes and their interactions. The understanding of global metabolic pathways is extremely important for various applications in ecology and pharmacology. However, large parts of metabolic pathways remain unknown, and most organism-specific pathways contain many missing enzymes. Results: In this study we propose a novel method to predict the enzyme orthologs that catalyze the putative reactions to facilitate the de novo reconstruction of metabolic pathways from metabolome-scale compound sets. The algorithm detects the chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs using chemical graph alignments, and constructs a set of enzyme-specific classifiers to simultaneously predict all the enzyme orthologs that could catalyze the putative reactions of the substrate–product pairs in the joint learning framework. The originality of the method lies in its ability to make predictions for thousands of enzyme orthologs simultaneously, as well as its extraction of enzyme-specific chemical transformation patterns of substrate–product pairs. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method by applying it to some ten thousands of metabolic compounds, and analyze the extracted chemical transformation patterns that provide insights into the characteristics and specificities of enzymes. The proposed method will open the door to both primary (central) and secondary metabolism in genomics research, increasing research productivity to tackle a wide variety of environmental and public health matters. Availability and Implementation: Contact: maskot@bio.titech.ac.jp PMID:27307627

  2. Core Proteomic Analysis of Unique Metabolic Pathways of Salmonella enterica for the Identification of Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    of the unique metabolic pathways of the pathogens and mining the proteomic data of all completely sequenced strains of the pathogen, thus improving the quality and application of the results. We believe that the sharing of the knowledge from this study would eventually lead to bring about novel and unique therapeutic regimens against the infections caused by the S. enterica. PMID:26799565

  3. Clinical Relevance of Kynurenine Pathway in HIV/AIDS: An Immune Checkpoint at the Crossroads of Metabolism and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Routy, Jean-Pierre; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Kema, Ido; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway is associated with a wide variety of pathophysiological processes, of which tumor tolerance and immune dysfunction in several chronic viral infections including HIV are well known. The kynurenine pathway is at the crossroads of metabolism and immunity and plays an important role in inflammation while also playing an opposing role in the control of acute and chronic infections. In this review we have summarized findings from recent studies reporting modulation of tryptophan degrading the kynurenine pathway in the context of HIV infection. This immuno-metabolic pathway is modulated by three distinct inducible enzymes: indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 and 2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. Increased expression of these enzymes by antigen-presenting cells leads to local or systemic tryptophan depletion, resulting in a mechanism of defense against certain microorganisms. Conversely, it can also lead to immunosuppression by antigen-specific T-cell exhaustion and recruitment of T regulatory cells. Recently, among these enzymes, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 has been recognized to be an immune response checkpoint that plays an important role in HIV immune dysfunction, even in the context of antiretroviral therapy. In addition to the activation of the kynurenine pathway by HIV proteins Tat and Nef, the tryptophan-degrading bacteria present in the intestinal flora have been associated with dysfunction of gut mucosal CD4 Th17/Th22 cells, leading to microbial translocation and creating a systemic kynurenine pathway activation cycle. This self-sustaining feedback loop has deleterious effects on disease progression and on neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients. Therapy designed to break the vicious cycle of induced tryptophan degradation is warranted to revert immune exhaustion in HIV-infected persons. PMID:26035167

  4. Improving fatty acids production by engineering dynamic pathway regulation and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Koffas, Mattheos

    2014-01-01

    Global energy demand and environmental concerns have stimulated increasing efforts to produce carbon-neutral fuels directly from renewable resources. Microbially derived aliphatic hydrocarbons, the petroleum-replica fuels, have emerged as promising alternatives to meet this goal. However, engineering metabolic pathways with high productivity and yield requires dynamic redistribution of cellular resources and optimal control of pathway expression. Here we report a genetically encoded metabolic switch that enables dynamic regulation of fatty acids (FA) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. The engineered strains were able to dynamically compensate the critical enzymes involved in the supply and consumption of malonyl-CoA and efficiently redirect carbon flux toward FA biosynthesis. Implementation of this metabolic control resulted in an oscillatory malonyl-CoA pattern and a balanced metabolism between cell growth and product formation, yielding 15.7- and 2.1-fold improvement in FA titer compared with the wild-type strain and the strain carrying the uncontrolled metabolic pathway. This study provides a new paradigm in metabolic engineering to control and optimize metabolic pathways facilitating the high-yield production of other malonyl-CoA–derived compounds. PMID:25049420

  5. Applications of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to signaling and metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dawei; Liu, Ensheng; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2006-03-01

    Signaling transduction pathways play important roles in regulating cell functions, such as growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Metabolic pathways, on the other hand, generate many metabolites utilized by human body. Abnormal regulations of the enzymes and metabolites associated with these pathways may be related to diseases. In view of their importance, we are interested in applying non-equilibrium thermodynamics to investigate the properties and dynamic behaviors of these two types of pathways. The systems of concentration are the MAPK, coupled MAPK-PI3K, and insulin metabolic pathways. In the case of signaling pathways we study the properties of thermodynamic variables, such as the affinities and fluxes of individual reaction steps, as affected by the perturbations of rate constants, protein-protein interactions, and cross talks. In the case of metabolic pathways, we study the system dynamics, the stability of steady states, and the flux-affinity relations as functions of constant inputs and outputs as well as the parameters of feedback loops. Our goals are to shed light on the design principles of the biological pathways and to rank the most vulnerable nodes of these pathways.

  6. Metabolic pathways utilized by Phanerochaete chrysosporium for degradation of the cyclodiene pesticide endosulfan.

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, S W; Matsumura, F

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cultures of white rot fungi not favoring the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases are effective in degrading certain xenobiotics. In this study we have used endosulfan as a model xenobiotic to assess the enzymatic mechanisms of pesticide metabolism under ligninolytic (nutrient-deficient) and nonligninolytic (nutrient-rich) culture conditions. Rapid metabolism of this chlorinated pesticide occurred under each nutrient condition tested. However, the extent of degradation and the nature of the metabolic products differed for nutrient-deficient and nutrient-rich media. The pathways for endosulfan metabolism were characterized by analysis of the fungal metabolites produced. The major endosulfan metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-electron capture detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as endosulfan sulfate, endosulfan diol, endosulfan hydroxyether, and a unknown metabolite tentatively identified as endosulfan dialdehyde. The nature of the metabolites formed indicates that this organism utilizes both oxidative and hydrolytic pathways for metabolism of this pesticide. Piperonyl butoxide, a known cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the oxidation of endosulfan to endosulfan sulfate and enhanced hydrolysis of endosulfan to endosulfan diol. We suggest that the metabolism of endosulfan is mediated by two divergent pathways, one hydrolytic and the other oxidative. Judging by the inactivity of extracellular fluid and partially purified lignin peroxidase in metabolizing endosulfan, we conclude that metabolism of this compound does not involve the action of extracellular peroxidases. PMID:8593059

  7. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  8. Aging signaling pathways and circadian clock-dependent metabolic derangements

    PubMed Central

    Tevy, Maria Florencia; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga; Pincus, Zachary; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock machinery orchestrates organism metabolism in order to ensure that development, survival and reproduction are attuned to diurnal environmental variations. For unknown reasons, there is a decline in circadian rhythms with age, concomitant with declines in the overall metabolic tissues homeostasis and changes in the feeding behavior of aged organisms. This disruption of the relationship between the clock and the nutrient sensing networks might underlie age-related diseases; overall, greater knowledge of the molecular mediators of and variations in clock networks during lifespan may shed light on the aging process and how it may be delayed. In this review we address the complex links between the circadian clock, metabolic (dys)functions and aging in different model organisms. PMID:23299029

  9. Gut microbiome remodeling induces depressive-like behaviors through a pathway mediated by the host's metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, P; Zeng, B; Zhou, C; Liu, M; Fang, Z; Xu, X; Zeng, L; Chen, J; Fan, S; Du, X; Zhang, X; Yang, D; Yang, Y; Meng, H; Li, W; Melgiri, N D; Licinio, J; Wei, H; Xie, P

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the result of complex gene-environment interactions. According to the World Health Organization, MDD is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and it is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease. However, the definitive environmental mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of MDD remain elusive. The gut microbiome is an increasingly recognized environmental factor that can shape the brain through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. We show here that the absence of gut microbiota in germ-free (GF) mice resulted in decreased immobility time in the forced swimming test relative to conventionally raised healthy control mice. Moreover, from clinical sampling, the gut microbiotic compositions of MDD patients and healthy controls were significantly different with MDD patients characterized by significant changes in the relative abundance of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Fecal microbiota transplantation of GF mice with 'depression microbiota' derived from MDD patients resulted in depression-like behaviors compared with colonization with 'healthy microbiota' derived from healthy control individuals. Mice harboring 'depression microbiota' primarily exhibited disturbances of microbial genes and host metabolites involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. This study demonstrates that dysbiosis of the gut microbiome may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviors, in a pathway that is mediated through the host's metabolism. PMID:27067014

  10. SensiPath: computer-aided design of sensing-enabling metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Delépine, Baudoin; Libis, Vincent; Carbonell, Pablo; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-07-01

    Genetically-encoded biosensors offer a wide range of opportunities to develop advanced synthetic biology applications. Circuits with the ability of detecting and quantifying intracellular amounts of a compound of interest are central to whole-cell biosensors design for medical and environmental applications, and they also constitute essential parts for the selection and regulation of high-producer strains in metabolic engineering. However, the number of compounds that can be detected through natural mechanisms, like allosteric transcription factors, is limited; expanding the set of detectable compounds is therefore highly desirable. Here, we present the SensiPath web server, accessible at http://sensipath.micalis.fr SensiPath implements a strategy to enlarge the set of detectable compounds by screening for multi-step enzymatic transformations converting non-detectable compounds into detectable ones. The SensiPath approach is based on the encoding of reactions through signature descriptors to explore sensing-enabling metabolic pathways, which are putative biochemical transformations of the target compound leading to known effectors of transcription factors. In that way, SensiPath enlarges the design space by broadening the potential use of biosensors in synthetic biology applications. PMID:27106061

  11. Confirming a biological pathway in the metabolic syndrome--insight from the NHANES 1999-2002.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Kuo, Hsu-Ko; Li, Hung-Yuan; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of obesity in the development of the metabolic syndrome (MS). A total of 3,596 whites aged 19 years and above, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2002, were included for analysis. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. A structural equation model (SEM) was constructed to elucidate a pathway in which obesity initiated the cascade leading to full MS. The results of SEM demonstrated that obesity was positively associated with elevated CRP level (B = 0.05, P < 0.001). This higher inflammatory state directed to insulin resistance (B = 0.32, P < 0.001), which in turn was positively associated with dyslipidemia (B = 0.06, P < 0.001). Obesity could also directly and positively affect blood pressure (B = 0.51, P < 0.001), without the mediation of insulin resistance and/or inflammation. The results of the cross-sectional analysis in the white subjects have shown that obesity has a strong influence on hypertension that obtains little additional influence from inflammation or insulin resistance. The metabolic profile in the NHANES group has been confirmatory with the statement that there is a sequential effect from obesity to inflammation, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. This approach has allowed to inferring important biological insights about the nature of the relationships among the components of MS. PMID:18846046

  12. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  13. Mediated effect of endotoxin and lead upon hepatic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner, R.E.; Ebata, T.; Schumer, W.

    1984-10-01

    A test was made of the possibility that gram-negative bacterial cell wall lipopolysaccharides acted directly on key glucoregulatory enzymes in rat liver cytosol to cause the characteristic hypoglycemia of severe endotoxemia. Fasted male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by the simultaneous intravenous injection of lead acetate. The minimum systemic dosage of endotoxin necessary to perturb the normal pattern of hepatic glycolytic intermediates was determined by serial testing with diminishing dosages of endotoxin. The hepatocyte concentration of endotoxin was then calculated from this minimum dosage by use of literature data on the fraction of endotoxin delivered to liver cells after a systemic intravenous injection of radiochromium labeled lipopolysaccharides. Accepting a molecular weight of 118,000 daltons for the smallest endotoxin monomer capable of evoking a physiologic response, the molar amount of endotoxin present in 1 gram of hepatocytes was readily calculated. The concentration of glucoregulatory enzymes in parenchymal cells was then estimated from other literature sources. It was found that the amount of endotoxin in the hepatocytes was insufficient to combine directly with even 1 per cent of the quantity of a single key glucoregulatory enzyme in liver parenchyma. Since a one to one stoichiometric reaction between endotoxin and enzyme could not occur in the liver cytosol, a direct interaction mechanism between agonist and biocatalyst can be ruled out. It is concluded that bacterial endotoxin must act on hepatic glucoregulation by an indirect mechanism presumably based upon the release and operation of mediators.

  14. Regulatory role for the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in metabolism of energy substrates.

    PubMed

    Jobgen, Wenjuan Shi; Fried, Susan K; Fu, Wenjiang J; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2006-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase in virtually all cell types. Emerging evidence shows that NO regulates the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids in mammals. As an oxidant, pathological levels of NO inhibit nearly all enzyme-catalyzed reactions through protein oxidation. However, as a signaling molecule, physiological levels of NO stimulate glucose uptake as well as glucose and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and adipose tissue; inhibit the synthesis of glucose, glycogen, and fat in target tissues (e.g., liver and adipose); and enhance lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, an inhibition of NO synthesis causes hyperlipidemia and fat accretion in rats, whereas dietary arginine supplementation reduces fat mass in diabetic fatty rats. The putative underlying mechanisms may involve multiple cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate-dependent pathways. First, NO stimulates the phosphorylation of adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resulting in (1) a decreased level of malonyl-CoA via inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and activation of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase and (2) a decreased expression of genes related to lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). Second, NO increases the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipins, leading to the translocation of the lipase to the neutral lipid droplets and, hence, the stimulation of lipolysis. Third, NO activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, thereby enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. Fourth, NO increases blood flow to insulin-sensitive tissues, promoting substrate uptake and product removal via the circulation. Modulation of the arginine-NO pathway through dietary supplementation with L-arginine or L-citrulline may aid in the prevention and

  15. n-butanol: challenges and solutions for shifting natural metabolic pathways into a viable microbial production.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Paola; Porro, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    The economic upturn of the past 200 years would not have been conceivable without fossil resources such as coal and oil. However, the fossil-based economy increasingly reaches its limits and displays contradictions. Bioeconomy, strategically combining economy and ecology willing to make biobased and sustainable growth possible, is promising to make a significant contribution towards solving these issues. In this context, microbial bioconversions are promising to support partially the increasing need for materials and fuels starting from fresh, preferably waste, biomass. Butanol is a very attractive molecule finding applications both as a chemical platform and as a fuel. Today it principally derives from petroleum, but it also represents the final product of microbial catabolic pathways. Because of the need to maximize yield, titer and productivity to make the production competitive and viable, the challenge is to transform a robustly regulated metabolic network into the principal cellular activity. However, this goal can only be accomplished by a profound understanding of the cellular physiology, survival strategy and sensing/signalling cascades. Here, we shortly review on the natural cellular pathways and circumstances that lead to n-butanol accumulation, its physiological consequences that might not match industrial needs and on possible solutions for circumventing these natural constraints. PMID:27020412

  16. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways. PMID:27417934

  17. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves the production of branched-chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Avalos, José L; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeting metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production compared with overexpression of the enzymes involved in the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalization of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overproducing enzymes involved in only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains revealed that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves greater local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  18. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves production of branched chain alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, José L.; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeted expression of metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production levels compared with expression of the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalisation of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overexpressing only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains reveals that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves higher local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion, and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  19. FragariaCyc: A Metabolic Pathway Database for Woodland Strawberry Fragaria vesca.

    PubMed

    Naithani, Sushma; Partipilo, Christina M; Raja, Rajani; Elser, Justin L; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    FragariaCyc is a strawberry-specific cellular metabolic network based on the annotated genome sequence of Fragaria vesca L. ssp. vesca, accession Hawaii 4. It was built on the Pathway-Tools platform using MetaCyc as the reference. The experimental evidences from published literature were used for supporting/editing existing entities and for the addition of new pathways, enzymes, reactions, compounds, and small molecules in the database. To date, FragariaCyc comprises 66 super-pathways, 488 unique pathways, 2348 metabolic reactions, 3507 enzymes, and 2134 compounds. In addition to searching and browsing FragariaCyc, researchers can compare pathways across various plant metabolic networks and analyze their data using Omics Viewer tool. We view FragariaCyc as a resource for the community of researchers working with strawberry and related fruit crops. It can help understanding the regulation of overall metabolism of strawberry plant during development and in response to diseases and abiotic stresses. FragariaCyc is available online at http://pathways.cgrb.oregonstate.edu. PMID:26973684

  20. FragariaCyc: A Metabolic Pathway Database for Woodland Strawberry Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Sushma; Partipilo, Christina M.; Raja, Rajani; Elser, Justin L.; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    FragariaCyc is a strawberry-specific cellular metabolic network based on the annotated genome sequence of Fragaria vesca L. ssp. vesca, accession Hawaii 4. It was built on the Pathway-Tools platform using MetaCyc as the reference. The experimental evidences from published literature were used for supporting/editing existing entities and for the addition of new pathways, enzymes, reactions, compounds, and small molecules in the database. To date, FragariaCyc comprises 66 super-pathways, 488 unique pathways, 2348 metabolic reactions, 3507 enzymes, and 2134 compounds. In addition to searching and browsing FragariaCyc, researchers can compare pathways across various plant metabolic networks and analyze their data using Omics Viewer tool. We view FragariaCyc as a resource for the community of researchers working with strawberry and related fruit crops. It can help understanding the regulation of overall metabolism of strawberry plant during development and in response to diseases and abiotic stresses. FragariaCyc is available online at http://pathways.cgrb.oregonstate.edu. PMID:26973684

  1. Uncovering the Evolution of Lead In-Use Stocks in Lead-Acid Batteries and the Impact on Future Lead Metabolism in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Lujun; Tian, Jinping

    2016-05-17

    This study aims to illustrate the evolution of lead in-use stocks, particularly in lead-acid batteries (LABs), and their impact on future lead metabolism in China. First, we used a bottom-up methodology to study the evolution of lead in-use stocks in China from 2000 to 2014. It was found that the lead in-use stocks increased from 0.91 to 7.75 Mt. The principal driving force of such change is the rapid development of LABs-driven electric vehicles. Then, we proposed three scenarios, low, baseline, and high in-use stocks, to project the lead demand and supply toward 2030. The results show that the LAB demand will decrease as a result of competition and replacement by lithium ion batteries. The lead demand in China will come to a peak around 2018-2020 under the three scenarios, then reduce to 3.7, 4.6, and 5.3 Mt/yr in 2030. Meanwhile, primary lead outputs will follow the increase of zinc production in China. Secondary lead recovered from spent LABs will also increase gradually. The overall unused lead stocks in 2030 will be 49.6, 44.8, and 41.2 Mt under the three scenarios, some 3.5-5.7 times as big as the lead in-use stocks. Thus, a large amount of lead will have to be safely stockpiled or exported in China. PMID:27145338

  2. Incomplete Wood–Ljungdahl pathway facilitates one-carbon metabolism in organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Yi, Shan; Bill, Markus; Brisson, Vanessa L.; Feng, Xueyang; Men, Yujie; Conrad, Mark E.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The acetyl-CoA “Wood–Ljungdahl” pathway couples the folate-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolism to either CO2 reduction or acetate oxidation via acetyl-CoA. This pathway is distributed in diverse anaerobes and is used for both energy conservation and assimilation of C1 compounds. Genome annotations for all sequenced strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, an important bacterium involved in the bioremediation of chlorinated solvents, reveal homologous genes encoding an incomplete Wood–Ljungdahl pathway. Because this pathway lacks key enzymes for both C1 metabolism and CO2 reduction, its cellular functions remain elusive. Here we used D. mccartyi strain 195 as a model organism to investigate the metabolic function of this pathway and its impacts on the growth of strain 195. Surprisingly, this pathway cleaves acetyl-CoA to donate a methyl group for production of methyl-tetrahydrofolate (CH3-THF) for methionine biosynthesis, representing an unconventional strategy for generating CH3-THF in organisms without methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase. Carbon monoxide (CO) was found to accumulate as an obligate by-product from the acetyl-CoA cleavage because of the lack of a CO dehydrogenase in strain 195. CO accumulation inhibits the sustainable growth and dechlorination of strain 195 maintained in pure cultures, but can be prevented by CO-metabolizing anaerobes that coexist with D. mccartyi, resulting in an unusual syntrophic association. We also found that this pathway incorporates exogenous formate to support serine biosynthesis. This study of the incomplete Wood–Ljungdahl pathway in D. mccartyi indicates a unique bacterial C1 metabolism that is critical for D. mccartyi growth and interactions in dechlorinating communities and may play a role in other anaerobic communities. PMID:24733917

  3. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Archaea: Current Insights into Unusual Enzymes and Pathways and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many “classical” pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of “new,” unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented. PMID:24600042

  4. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, H.G.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.

    1994-11-01

    Polyhalogenated EPA Priority Pollutants are among the most toxic and persistent of the xenobiotic compounds found in the environment. In those instances when biodegradation does occure, it is typically via reductive dechlorination reactions in anaerobic sediments. These reactions are very slow and difficult to study. In this study, cytochrome P-450{sub cam} from Pseudomonas putida G786 and toluene dioxygenase from P. putida F1 were used to catalyze consecutive cometabolic dehalogenation reactions. New halogenated substrates for both were identified. The results demonstrate the metabolism of polybrominated compounds and chlorofluoroalkanes via the engineered metabolic pathway in P. putida G786(pHG-2). 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Analysis and Engineering of Metabolic Pathway Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Christoph

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was discovered as a natural overproducer of glutamate about 50 years ago. Linked to the steadily increasing economical importance of this microorganism for production of glutamate and other amino acids, the quest for efficient production strains has been an intense area of research during the past few decades. Efficient production strains were created by applying classical mutagenesis and selection and especially metabolic engineering strategies with the advent of recombinant DNA technology. Hereby experimental and computational approaches have provided fascinating insights into the metabolism of this microorganism and directed strain engineering. Today, C. glutamicum is applied to the industrial production of more than 2 million tons of amino acids per year. The huge achievements in recent years, including the sequencing of the complete genome and efficient post genomic approaches, now provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research - analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties of C. glutamicum on a global scale towards novel and superior bioprocesses.

  6. Metabolic Pathway Confirmation and Discovery Through 13C-labeling of Proteinogenic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Page, Lawrence; Feng, Xueyang; Berla, Bert; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbes have complex metabolic pathways that can be investigated using biochemistry and functional genomics methods. One important technique to examine cell central metabolism and discover new enzymes is 13C-assisted metabolism analysis 1. This technique is based on isotopic labeling, whereby microbes are fed with a 13C labeled substrates. By tracing the atom transition paths between metabolites in the biochemical network, we can determine functional pathways and discover new enzymes. As a complementary method to transcriptomics and proteomics, approaches for isotopomer-assisted analysis of metabolic pathways contain three major steps 2. First, we grow cells with 13C labeled substrates. In this step, the composition of the medium and the selection of labeled substrates are two key factors. To avoid measurement noises from non-labeled carbon in nutrient supplements, a minimal medium with a sole carbon source is required. Further, the choice of a labeled substrate is based on how effectively it will elucidate the pathway being analyzed. Because novel enzymes often involve different reaction stereochemistry or intermediate products, in general, singly labeled carbon substrates are more informative for detection of novel pathways than uniformly labeled ones for detection of novel pathways3, 4. Second, we analyze amino acid labeling patterns using GC-MS. Amino acids are abundant in protein and thus can be obtained from biomass hydrolysis. Amino acids can be derivatized by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (TBDMS) before GC separation. TBDMS derivatized amino acids can be fragmented by MS and result in different arrays of fragments. Based on the mass to charge (m/z) ratio of fragmented and unfragmented amino acids, we can deduce the possible labeled patterns of the central metabolites that are precursors of the amino acids. Third, we trace 13C carbon transitions in the proposed pathways and, based on the isotopomer data, confirm whether these

  7. The MetaCyc database of metabolic pathways and enzymes and the BioCyc collection of pathway/genome databases

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Ron; Altman, Tomer; Dreher, Kate; Fulcher, Carol A.; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Mueller, Lukas A.; Ong, Quang; Paley, Suzanne; Pujar, Anuradha; Shearer, Alexander G.; Travers, Michael; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Zhang, Peifen; Karp, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    The MetaCyc database (http://metacyc.org/) provides a comprehensive and freely accessible resource for metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. The pathways in MetaCyc are experimentally determined, small-molecule metabolic pathways and are curated from the primary scientific literature. MetaCyc contains more than 1800 pathways derived from more than 30 000 publications, and is the largest curated collection of metabolic pathways currently available. Most reactions in MetaCyc pathways are linked to one or more well-characterized enzymes, and both pathways and enzymes are annotated with reviews, evidence codes and literature citations. BioCyc (http://biocyc.org/) is a collection of more than 1700 organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs). Each BioCyc PGDB contains the full genome and predicted metabolic network of one organism. The network, which is predicted by the Pathway Tools software using MetaCyc as a reference database, consists of metabolites, enzymes, reactions and metabolic pathways. BioCyc PGDBs contain additional features, including predicted operons, transport systems and pathway-hole fillers. The BioCyc website and Pathway Tools software offer many tools for querying and analysis of PGDBs, including Omics Viewers and comparative analysis. New developments include a zoomable web interface for diagrams; flux-balance analysis model generation from PGDBs; web services; and a new tool called Web Groups. PMID:22102576

  8. Keap1/Nrf2 pathway in the frontiers of cancer and non-cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolism to their increased needs for energy and substrates for protein, lipid and nucleic acid synthesis. Nuclear erythroid factor 2-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway is usually activated in cancers and has been suggested to promote cancer cell survival mainly by inducing a large battery of cytoprotective genes. This mini review focuses on metabolic pathways, beyond cytoprotection, which can be directly or indirectly regulated by Nrf2 in cancer cells to affect their survival. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is enhanced by Nrf2 in cancers and aids their growth. PPP has also been found to be up-regulated in non-cancer tissues and other pathways, such as de novo lipogenesis, have been found to be repressed after activation of the Nrf2 pathway. The importance of these Nrf2-regulated metabolic pathways in cancer compared with non-cancer state remains to be determined. Last but not least, the importance of context about Nrf2 and cancer is highlighted as the Nrf2 pathway may be activated in cancers but its pharmacological activators are useful in chemoprevention. PMID:26551705

  9. Transcription Interference and ORF Nature Strongly Affect Promoter Strength in a Reconstituted Metabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carquet, Marie; Pompon, Denis; Truan, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Fine tuning of individual enzyme expression level is necessary to alleviate metabolic imbalances in synthetic heterologous pathways. A known approach consists of choosing a suitable combination of promoters, based on their characterized strengths in model conditions. We questioned whether each step of a multiple-gene synthetic pathway could be independently tunable at the transcription level. Three open reading frames, coding for enzymes involved in a synthetic pathway, were combinatorially associated to different promoters on an episomal plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We quantified the mRNA levels of the three genes in each strain of our generated combinatorial metabolic library. Our results evidenced that the ORF nature, position, and orientation induce strong discrepancies between the previously reported promoters’ strengths and the observed ones. We conclude that, in the context of metabolic reconstruction, the strength of usual promoters can be dramatically affected by many factors. Among them, transcriptional interference and ORF nature seem to be predominant. PMID:25767795

  10. Reprogramming metabolic pathways in vivo with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Pankowicz, Francis P; Barzi, Mercedes; Legras, Xavier; Hubert, Leroy; Mi, Tian; Tomolonis, Julie A; Ravishankar, Milan; Sun, Qin; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Sumazin, Pavel; Elsea, Sarah H; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2016-01-01

    Many metabolic liver disorders are refractory to drug therapy and require orthotopic liver transplantation. Here we demonstrate a new strategy, which we call metabolic pathway reprogramming, to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia type I in mice; rather than edit the disease-causing gene, we delete a gene in a disease-associated pathway to render the phenotype benign. Using CRISPR/Cas9 in vivo, we convert hepatocytes from tyrosinaemia type I into the benign tyrosinaemia type III by deleting Hpd (hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxigenase). Edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(-/-)) display a growth advantage over non-edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(+/+)) and, in some mice, almost completely replace them within 8 weeks. Hpd excision successfully reroutes tyrosine catabolism, leaving treated mice healthy and asymptomatic. Metabolic pathway reprogramming sidesteps potential difficulties associated with editing a critical disease-causing gene and can be explored as an option for treating other diseases. PMID:27572891

  11. Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Network-Wide Metabolic Pathway Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-resolution LC–MS-based untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope tracing provides a global overview of the cellular fate of precursor metabolites. This methodology enables detection of putative metabolites from biological samples and simultaneous quantification of the pattern and extent of isotope labeling. Labeling of Trypanosoma brucei cell cultures with 50% uniformly 13C-labeled glucose demonstrated incorporation of glucose-derived carbon into 187 of 588 putatively identified metabolites in diverse pathways including carbohydrate, nucleotide, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. Labeling patterns confirmed the metabolic pathways responsible for the biosynthesis of many detected metabolites, and labeling was detected in unexpected metabolites, including two higher sugar phosphates annotated as octulose phosphate and nonulose phosphate. This untargeted approach to stable isotope tracing facilitates the biochemical analysis of known pathways and yields rapid identification of previously unexplored areas of metabolism. PMID:22946681

  12. VEGF-B-induced vascular growth leads to metabolic reprogramming and ischemia resistance in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, Riikka; Bry, Maija; Robciuc, Marius R; Räsänen, Markus; Taavitsainen, Miia; Silvola, Johanna MU; Saraste, Antti; Hulmi, Juha J; Anisimov, Andrey; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Lindeman, Jan H; Eklund, Lauri; Hellberg, Sanna; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Zhuang, Zhen W; Simons, Michael; Djonov, Valentin; Knuuti, Juhani; Mervaala, Eero; Alitalo, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenic growth factors have recently been linked to tissue metabolism. We have used genetic gain- and loss-of function models to elucidate the effects and mechanisms of action of vascular endothelial growth factor-B (VEGF-B) in the heart. A cardiomyocyte-specific VEGF-B transgene induced an expanded coronary arterial tree and reprogramming of cardiomyocyte metabolism. This was associated with protection against myocardial infarction and preservation of mitochondrial complex I function upon ischemia-reperfusion. VEGF-B increased VEGF signals via VEGF receptor-2 to activate Erk1/2, which resulted in vascular growth. Akt and mTORC1 pathways were upregulated and AMPK downregulated, readjusting cardiomyocyte metabolic pathways to favor glucose oxidation and macromolecular biosynthesis. However, contrasting with a previous theory, there was no difference in fatty acid uptake by the heart between the VEGF-B transgenic, gene-targeted or wildtype rats. Importantly, we also show that VEGF-B expression is reduced in human heart disease. Our data indicate that VEGF-B could be used to increase the coronary vasculature and to reprogram myocardial metabolism to improve cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. Subject Categories Cardiovascular System; Metabolism See also: C Kupatt and R Hinkel (March 2014) PMID:24448490

  13. Regulation of Hydroxylation and Nitroreduction Pathways during Metabolism of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Imidacloprid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Qi; Mao, Shi-Yun; Sun, Shi-Lei; Yang, Wen-Long; Ge, Feng; Dai, Yi-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is mainly metabolized via nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways, which produce different metabolites that are toxic to mammals and insects. However, regulation of IMI metabolic flux between nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways is still unclear. In this study, Pseudomonas putida was found to metabolize IMI to 5-hydroxy and nitroso IMI and was therefore used for investigating the regulation of IMI metabolic flux. The cell growth time, cosubstrate, dissolved oxygen concentration, and pH showed significant effect on IMI degradation and nitroso and 5-hydroxy IMI formation. Gene cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli proved that P. putida KT2440 aldehyde oxidase mediated IMI nitroreduction to nitroso IMI, while cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) failed to improve IMI hydroxylation. Moreover, E. coli cells without CYP could hydroxylate IMI, demonstrating the role of a non-CYP enzyme in IMI hydroxylation. Thus, the present study helps to further understand the environmental fate of IMI and its underlying mechanism. PMID:27230024

  14. Cofactor Engineering for Enhancing the Flux of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of a diverse array of chemicals is now possible with biologically engineered strains, an approach that is greatly facilitated by the emergence of synthetic biology. This is principally achieved through pathway engineering in which enzyme activities are coordinated within a genetically amenable host to generate the product of interest. A great deal of attention is typically given to the quantitative levels of the enzymes with little regard to their overall qualitative states. This highly constrained approach fails to consider other factors that may be necessary for enzyme functionality. In particular, enzymes with physically bound cofactors, otherwise known as holoenzymes, require careful evaluation. Herein, we discuss the importance of cofactors for biocatalytic processes and show with empirical examples why the synthesis and integration of cofactors for the formation of holoenzymes warrant a great deal of attention within the context of pathway engineering. PMID:25221776

  15. Phosphate-responsive signaling pathway is a novel component of NAD+ metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin, Su-Ju

    2011-04-22

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor involved in various cellular biochemical reactions. To date the signaling pathways that regulate NAD(+) metabolism remain unclear due to the dynamic nature and complexity of the NAD(+) metabolic pathways and the difficulty of determining the levels of the interconvertible pyridine nucleotides. Nicotinamide riboside (NmR) is a key pyridine metabolite that is excreted and re-assimilated by yeast and plays important roles in the maintenance of NAD(+) pool. In this study we establish a NmR-specific reporter system and use it to identify yeast mutants with altered NmR/NAD(+) metabolism. We show that the phosphate-responsive signaling (PHO) pathway contributes to control NAD(+) metabolism. Yeast strains with activated PHO pathway show increases in both the release rate and internal concentration of NmR. We further identify Pho8, a PHO-regulated vacuolar phosphatase, as a potential NmR production factor. We also demonstrate that Fun26, a homolog of human ENT (equilibrative nucleoside transporter), localizes to the vacuolar membrane and establishes the size of the vacuolar and cytosolic NmR pools. In addition, the PHO pathway responds to depletion of cellular nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and mediates nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) catabolism, thereby contributing to both NmR salvage and phosphate acquisition. Therefore, NaMN is a putative molecular link connecting the PHO signaling and NAD(+) metabolic pathways. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis and regulation of NAD(+) metabolism in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21349851

  16. The return of metabolism: biochemistry and physiology of the pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stincone, Anna; Prigione, Alessandro; Cramer, Thorsten; Wamelink, Mirjam M. C.; Campbell, Kate; Cheung, Eric; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Grüning, Nana-Maria; Krüger, Antje; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Keller, Markus A.; Breitenbach, Michael; Brindle, Kevin M.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a fundamental component of cellular metabolism. The PPP is important to maintain carbon homoeostasis, to provide precursors for nucleotide and amino acid biosynthesis, to provide reducing molecules for anabolism, and to defeat oxidative stress. The PPP shares reactions with the Entner–Doudoroff pathway and Calvin cycle and divides into an oxidative and non-oxidative branch. The oxidative branch is highly active in most eukaryotes and converts glucose 6-phosphate into carbon dioxide, ribulose 5-phosphate and NADPH. The latter function is critical to maintain redox balance under stress situations, when cells proliferate rapidly, in ageing, and for the ‘Warburg effect’ of cancer cells. The non-oxidative branch instead is virtually ubiquitous, and metabolizes the glycolytic intermediates fructose 6-phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as well as sedoheptulose sugars, yielding ribose 5-phosphate for the synthesis of nucleic acids and sugar phosphate precursors for the synthesis of amino acids. Whereas the oxidative PPP is considered unidirectional, the non-oxidative branch can supply glycolysis with intermediates derived from ribose 5-phosphate and vice versa, depending on the biochemical demand. These functions require dynamic regulation of the PPP pathway that is achieved through hierarchical interactions between transcriptome, proteome and metabolome. Consequently, the biochemistry and regulation of this pathway, while still unresolved in many cases, are archetypal for the dynamics of the metabolic network of the cell. In this comprehensive article we review seminal work that led to the discovery and description of the pathway that date back now for 80 years, and address recent results about genetic and metabolic mechanisms that regulate its activity. These biochemical principles are discussed in the context of PPP deficiencies causing metabolic disease and the role of this pathway in biotechnology, bacterial and

  17. New prospects for deducing the evolutionary history of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes: Aromatic biosynthesis as a case-in-point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Jensen, Roy A.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolic pathways of prokaryotes are more biochemically diverse than is generally recognized. Distinctive biochemical features are shared by phylogenetic clusters. The hierarchical levels of characterstate clustering depends upon evolutionary events which fortuitously became fixed in the genome of a common ancestor. Prokaryotes can now be ordered on a phylogenetic tree. This allows the evolutionary steps that underlie the construction and regulation of appropriately complex biochemical pathways to be traced in an evolutionary progression of prokaryote types that house these pathways. Essentially the approach is to deduce ancestral character states at ever deeper phylogenetic levels, utilizing logical principles of maximum parsimony. The current perspective on the evolution of the biochemical pathway for biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids is developed as a case-in-point model for analyses that should be feasible with many major metabolic systems. Phenylalanine biosynthesis probably arose prior to the addition of branches leading to tyrosine and tryptophan. An evolutionary scenario is developed that begins with non-enzymatic reactions which may have operated in primitive systems, followed by the evolution of an enzymatic system that pre-dated the divergence of major lineages of modern eubacteria (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative purple bacteria, and cyanobacteria).

  18. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  19. A Canonical Correlation Analysis of AIDS Restriction Genes and Metabolic Pathways Identifies Purine Metabolism as a Key Cooperator

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanhui; Yuan, Jinjin; Wang, Zhengwu; Huang, Aiqiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Han, Xiao; Chen, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus causes a severe disease in humans, referred to as immune deficiency syndrome. Studies on the interaction between host genetic factors and the virus have revealed dozens of genes that impact diverse processes in the AIDS disease. To resolve more genetic factors related to AIDS, a canonical correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between AIDS restriction and metabolic pathway gene expression. The results show that HIV-1 postentry cellular viral cofactors from AIDS restriction genes are coexpressed in human transcriptome microarray datasets. Further, the purine metabolism pathway comprises novel host factors that are coexpressed with AIDS restriction genes. Using a canonical correlation analysis for expression is a reliable approach to exploring the mechanism underlying AIDS. PMID:27462363

  20. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  1. Histochemical research on metabolic pathways of glucose in some species of Mollusca Gastropoda.

    PubMed

    Bolognani Fantin, A M; Bolognani, L; Ottaviani, E; Franchini, A

    1987-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of glucose were studied by histochemical reactions in some species of gastropods living in different habitats. The glycolytic pathway is histochemically indicated by positive results for glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and D-lactate dehydrogenase. The enzymes of the Krebs cycle gave different responses: isocitrate dehydrogenase and L-malate dehydrogenase were positive, whilst succinate dehydrogenase was constantly negative. Malate synthetase activity was also demonstrated. Despite L-glutamate dehydrogenase is undetectable, the presence of transaminase indicates the gluconeogenetic route. Phosphoglucomutase and glucose-6-phosphate phosphatase appear also positive. The metabolic meaning of our results were discussed. PMID:3111150

  2. Inference system using softcomputing and mixed data applied in metabolic pathway datamining.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Tomás; Candel, Diego; Leiva, Mauricio; Dombrovskaia, Lioubov; Agulló, Loreine; Seeger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an inference system used for the identification of genes that encode enzymes of metabolic pathways. Input sequence alignment values are used to classify the best candidate genes for inclusion in a metabolic pathway map. The system workflow allows the user to provide feedback, which is stored in conjunction with analysed sequences for periodic retraining. The construction of the system involved the study of several different classifiers with various topologies, data sets and parameter normalisation data models. Experimental results show an excellent prediction capability with the classifiers trained with mixed data providing the best results. PMID:22479819

  3. Rapid and Efficient One-Step Metabolic Pathway Integration in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Bassalo, Marcelo C; Garst, Andrew D; Halweg-Edwards, Andrea L; Grau, William C; Domaille, Dylan W; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Gill, Ryan T

    2016-07-15

    Methods for importing heterologous genes into genetically tractable hosts are among the most desired tools of synthetic biology. Easy plug-and-play construction methods to rapidly test genes and pathways stably in the host genome would expedite synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications. Here, we describe a CRISPR-based strategy that allows highly efficient, single step integration of large pathways in Escherichia coli. This strategy allows high efficiency integration in a broad range of homology arm sizes and genomic positions, with efficiencies ranging from 70 to 100% in 7 distinct loci. To demonstrate the large size capability, we integrated a 10 kb construct to implement isobutanol production in a single day. The ability to efficiently integrate entire metabolic pathways in a rapid and markerless manner will facilitate testing and engineering of novel pathways using the E. coli genome as a stable testing platform. PMID:27072506

  4. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Manesia, Javed K; Xu, Zhuofei; Broekaert, Dorien; Boon, Ruben; van Vliet, Alex; Eelen, Guy; Vanwelden, Thomas; Stegen, Steve; Van Gastel, Nick; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Geert; Carmeliet, Peter; Khurana, Satish; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the fetal liver (FL) unlike adult bone marrow (BM) proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) and the citric acid cycle (TCA). We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (geno)toxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs. PMID:26599326

  5. Metabolic Reprogramming by the PI3K-Akt-mTOR Pathway in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lien, Evan C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in elucidating how metabolism is altered in cancer cells and how such dependencies can be targeted for therapeutic gain. At the core of this research is the concept that metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer cells to divert nutrients toward anabolic processes to facilitate enhanced growth and proliferation. Importantly, physiological cellular signaling mechanisms normally tightly regulate the ability of cells to gain access to and utilize nutrients, posing a fundamental barrier to transformation. This barrier is often overcome by aberrations in cellular signaling that drive tumor pathogenesis by enabling cancer cells to make critical cellular decisions in a cell-autonomous manner. One of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer is the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Here, we describe mechanisms by which this signaling network is responsible for controlling cellular metabolism. Through both the post-translational regulation and the induction of transcriptional programs, the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway coordinates the uptake and utilization of multiple nutrients, including glucose, glutamine, nucleotides, and lipids, in a manner best suited for supporting the enhanced growth and proliferation of cancer cells. These regulatory mechanisms illustrate how metabolic changes in cancer are closely intertwined with oncogenic signaling pathways that drive tumor initiation and progression. PMID:27557534

  6. Metabolic reprogramming: a new relevant pathway in adult adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Faria, André M.; Fragoso, Maria C. B. V.; Lovisolo, Silvana M.; Lerário, Antonio M.; Almeida, Madson Q.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) are complex neoplasias that may present unexpected clinical behavior, being imperative to identify new biological markers that can predict patient prognosis and provide new therapeutic options. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of metabolism-related key proteins in adrenocortical carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, CD147, CD44, GLUT1 and CAIX was evaluated in a series of 154 adult patients with adrenocortical neoplasia and associated with patients' clinicopathological parameters. A significant increase in was found for membranous expression of MCT4, GLUT1 and CAIX in carcinomas, when compared to adenomas. Importantly MCT1, GLUT1 and CAIX expressions were significantly associated with poor prognostic variables, including high nuclear grade, high mitotic index, advanced tumor staging, presence of metastasis, as well as shorter overall and disease free survival. In opposition, MCT2 membranous expression was associated with favorable prognostic parameters. Importantly, cytoplasmic expression of CD147 was identified as an independent predictor of longer overall survival and cytoplasmic expression of CAIX as an independent predictor of longer disease-free survival. We provide evidence for a metabolic reprogramming in adrenocortical malignant tumors towards the hyperglycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype, which was associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26587828

  7. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  8. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10*, we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  9. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10(*), we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  10. A Trans-omics Mathematical Analysis Reveals Novel Functions of the Ornithine Metabolic Pathway in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Kawamoto, Koichi; Kano, Yoshihiro; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Ishii, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics and computational modelling are expected to offer innovative approaches in human medical science. In the present study, we performed computational analyses and made predictions using transcriptome and metabolome datasets obtained from fluorescence-based visualisations of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the human oesophagus. This approach revealed an uncharacterized role for the ornithine metabolic pathway in the survival of chemotherapy-resistant CSCs. The present study fastens this rationale for further characterisation that may lead to the discovery of innovative drugs against robust CSCs. PMID:26864636

  11. A Trans-omics Mathematical Analysis Reveals Novel Functions of the Ornithine Metabolic Pathway in Cancer Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Kawamoto, Koichi; Kano, Yoshihiro; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Ishii, Hideshi

    2016-02-01

    Bioinformatics and computational modelling are expected to offer innovative approaches in human medical science. In the present study, we performed computational analyses and made predictions using transcriptome and metabolome datasets obtained from fluorescence-based visualisations of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the human oesophagus. This approach revealed an uncharacterized role for the ornithine metabolic pathway in the survival of chemotherapy-resistant CSCs. The present study fastens this rationale for further characterisation that may lead to the discovery of innovative drugs against robust CSCs.

  12. Optimal kinetic design of enzymes in a linear metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, G

    1993-06-24

    The rate equations for a sequence of enzymic reactions conforming to Michaelis-Menten kinetics have been analyzed in order to establish what kinetic design optimizes the steady-state reaction flux for a given total concentration of enzymes and a given average magnitude of true and apparent first-order rate constants in the reaction system. Analytical solutions are presented which have been derived with the assumptions that the concentration of the first substrate in the pathway represents a fixed parameter and that no diffusional constraints come into operation. The solutions prescribe that reaction flux in the examined system becomes optimal when all of the enzymes are present at equal active-site concentrations. The optimal kinetic design of each enzyme reaction is characterized by forward (true or apparent) first-order rate constants of equal magnitude and reverse rate constants of equal magnitude. This means that the optimal kinetic design of the examined pathway is highly uniform, individual enzymes being likely to exhibit optimal V values differing by a factor less than 5 and optimal Km/[S] values falling within the range 0.3-2. PMID:8518291

  13. Precursors and metabolic pathway for guaiacol production by Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rui; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Zhouli; Guo, Chunfeng; Liu, Bin; Liu, Laping; Wang, Yutang; Yue, Tianli

    2015-12-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris has recently received much attention due to its implication in the spoilage of pasteurized fruit juices, which was manifested by the production of guaiacol. Vanillic acid and vanillin have been accepted as the biochemical precursors of guaiacol in fruit juices. The purpose of this study was to try to find other precursors and elucidate details about the conversion of vanillic acid and vanillin to guaiacol by A. acidoterrestris. Four potential substrates including ferulic acid, catechol, phenylalanine and tyrosine were analyzed, but they could not be metabolized to guaiacol by all the thirty A. acidoterrestris strains tested. Resting cell studies and enzyme assays demonstrated that vanillin was reduced to vanillyl alcohol by NADPH-dependent vanillin reductase and oxidized to vanillic acid by NAD(P)(+)-dependent vanillin dehydrogenases in A. acidoterrestris DSM 3923. Vanillic acid underwent a nonoxidative decarboxylation to guaiacol. The reversible vanillic acid decarboxylase involved was oxygen insensitive and pyridine nucleotide-independent. PMID:26241489

  14. Deficient chaperone-mediated autophagy in liver leads to metabolic dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jaime L.; Suh, Yousin; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Summary The activity of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a catabolic pathway for selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes, decreases with age, but the consequences of this functional decline in vivo remain unknown. In this work, we have generated a conditional knockout mouse to selectively block CMA in liver. We have found that blockage of CMA causes hepatic glycogen depletion and hepatosteatosis. The liver phenotype is accompanied by reduced peripheral adiposity, increased energy expenditure, and altered glucose homeostasis. Comparative lysosomal proteomics revealed that key enzymes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are normally degraded by CMA and that impairment of their regulated degradation contributes to the metabolic abnormalities observed in CMA-defective animals. These findings highlight the involvement of CMA in regulating hepatic metabolism and suggest that the age-related decline in CMA may have a negative impact on the energetic balance in old organisms. PMID:25043815

  15. Combination of the tod and the tol pathways in redesigning a metabolic route of Pseudomonas putida for the mineralization of a benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yang-Young; Jung, Kwan-Hye; Kim, Hak-Sung

    1995-06-01

    Construction of a hybrid strain which is capable of mineralizing components of a benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture simultaneously was attempted by redesigning the metabolic pathway of Pseudomonas putida. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the tod and the tol pathways revealed that dihydrodiols formed from benzene, toluene, and p-xylene by toluene dioxygenase in the tod pathway could be channeled into the tol pathway by the action of cis-p-toluate-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, leading to complete mineralization of a benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture. Consequently, a hybrid strain was constructed by cloning todC1C2BA genes encoding toluene dioxygenase on RSF1010 and introducing the resulting plasmid into P. putida mt-2. The hybrid strain of P. putida TB105 was found to mineralize a benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture without accumulation of any metabolic intermediate. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  17. The evolution of control and distribution of adaptive mutations in a metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin M; Rausher, Mark D

    2010-02-01

    In an attempt to understand whether it should be expected that some genes tend to be used disproportionately often by natural selection, we investigated two related phenomena: the evolution of flux control among enzymes in a metabolic pathway and properties of adaptive substitutions in pathway enzymes. These two phenomena are related by the principle that adaptive substitutions should occur more frequently in enzymes with greater flux control. Predicting which enzymes will be preferentially involved in adaptive evolution thus requires an evolutionary theory of flux control. We investigated the evolution of enzyme control in metabolic pathways with two models of enzyme kinetics: metabolic control theory (MCT) and Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics (SK). Our models generate two main predictions for pathways in which reactions are moderately to highly irreversible: (1) flux control will evolve to be highly unequal among enzymes in a pathway and (2) upstream enzymes evolve a greater control coefficient then those downstream. This results in upstream enzymes fixing the majority of beneficial mutations during adaptive evolution. Once the population has reached high fitness, the trend is reversed, with the majority of neutral/slightly deleterious mutations occurring in downstream enzymes. These patterns are the result of three factors (the first of these is unique to the MCT simulations while the other two seem to be general properties of the metabolic pathways): (1) the majority of randomly selected, starting combinations of enzyme kinetic rates generate pathways that possess greater control for the upstream enzymes compared to downstream enzymes; (2) selection against large pools of intermediate substrates tends to prevent majority control by downstream enzymes; and (3) equivalent mutations in enzyme kinetic rates have the greatest effect on flux for enzymes with high levels of flux control, and these enzymes will accumulate adaptive substitutions, strengthening their

  18. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    . The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the poisoning, by nitrogen, of catalysts used in the hydrotreating and catalytic cracking of petroleum.

  19. Plant polyphenols alter a pathway of energy metabolism by inhibiting fecal Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Xie, Jinli; Huang, Jiachen; Chen, Long; Gao, Lijuan; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-03-01

    The function of plant polyphenols in controlling body weight has been in focus for a long time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of plant polyphenols on fecal microbiota utilizing oligosaccharides. Three plant polyphenols, quercetin, catechin and puerarin, were added into liquid media for fermenting for 24 h. The pH values, OD600 of the cultures and the content of carbohydrates at 0, 6, 10, 14, 18 and 24 h were determined. The abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in each culture was quantified with qPCR after 10 h of fermentation, and the bacterial composition was analyzed using the software Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology. The results revealed that all three plant polyphenols could significantly inhibit the growth of Bacteroidetes (P < 0.01) and Firmicutes (P < 0.01) while at the same time down-regulate the ratio of Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes (P < 0.01). But the fecal bacteria could maintain the ability to hydrolyze fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) in vitro. Among the tested polyphenols, catechin presented the most intense inhibitory activity towards the growth of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and quercetin was the second. Only the samples with catechin had a significantly lower energy metabolism (P < 0.05). In conclusion, plant polyphenols can change the pathway of degrading FOS or even energy metabolism in vivo by altering gut microbiota composition. It may be one of the mechanisms in which plant polyphenols can lead to body weight loss. It's the first report to study in vitro gastrointestinal microbiota fermenting dietary fibers under the intervention of plant polyphenols. PMID:26882962

  20. Elementary Vectors and Conformal Sums in Polyhedral Geometry and their Relevance for Metabolic Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stefan; Regensburger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental result in metabolic pathway analysis states that every flux mode can be decomposed into a sum of elementary modes. However, only a decomposition without cancelations is biochemically meaningful, since a reversible reaction cannot have different directions in the contributing elementary modes. This essential requirement has been largely overlooked by the metabolic pathway community. Indeed, every flux mode can be decomposed into elementary modes without cancelations. The result is an immediate consequence of a theorem by Rockafellar which states that every element of a linear subspace is a conformal sum (a sum without cancelations) of elementary vectors (support-minimal vectors). In this work, we extend the theorem, first to “subspace cones” and then to general polyhedral cones and polyhedra. Thereby, we refine Minkowski's and Carathéodory's theorems, two fundamental results in polyhedral geometry. We note that, in general, elementary vectors need not be support-minimal; in fact, they are conformally non-decomposable and form a unique minimal set of conformal generators. Our treatment is mathematically rigorous, but suitable for systems biologists, since we give self-contained proofs for our results and use concepts motivated by metabolic pathway analysis. In particular, we study cones defined by linear subspaces and nonnegativity conditions — like the flux cone — and use them to analyze general polyhedral cones and polyhedra. Finally, we review applications of elementary vectors and conformal sums in metabolic pathway analysis. PMID:27252734

  1. Elementary Vectors and Conformal Sums in Polyhedral Geometry and their Relevance for Metabolic Pathway Analysis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Regensburger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental result in metabolic pathway analysis states that every flux mode can be decomposed into a sum of elementary modes. However, only a decomposition without cancelations is biochemically meaningful, since a reversible reaction cannot have different directions in the contributing elementary modes. This essential requirement has been largely overlooked by the metabolic pathway community. Indeed, every flux mode can be decomposed into elementary modes without cancelations. The result is an immediate consequence of a theorem by Rockafellar which states that every element of a linear subspace is a conformal sum (a sum without cancelations) of elementary vectors (support-minimal vectors). In this work, we extend the theorem, first to "subspace cones" and then to general polyhedral cones and polyhedra. Thereby, we refine Minkowski's and Carathéodory's theorems, two fundamental results in polyhedral geometry. We note that, in general, elementary vectors need not be support-minimal; in fact, they are conformally non-decomposable and form a unique minimal set of conformal generators. Our treatment is mathematically rigorous, but suitable for systems biologists, since we give self-contained proofs for our results and use concepts motivated by metabolic pathway analysis. In particular, we study cones defined by linear subspaces and nonnegativity conditions - like the flux cone - and use them to analyze general polyhedral cones and polyhedra. Finally, we review applications of elementary vectors and conformal sums in metabolic pathway analysis. PMID:27252734

  2. Combinatorial metabolic pathway assembly in the yeast genome with RNA-guided Cas9.

    PubMed

    EauClaire, Steve F; Zhang, Jianzhong; Rivera, Corban Gregory; Huang, Lixuan L

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial platform for the production of grain and cellulosic ethanol, isobutanol, butanediol, isoprenoids, and other chemicals. The construction of a successful production strain usually involves multiple gene knockouts and chromosomal integration of expression cassettes to redirect the metabolic fluxes for the conversion of sugars and other feed stocks into the desired product. RNA-guided Cas9 based genome editing has been demonstrated in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts including S. cerevisiae, in which it has been additionally exploited as a tool for metabolic engineering. To extend the utilization of RNA-guided Cas9 as a metabolic pathway building tool, we demonstrated the direct assembly and chromosomal integration of up to 17 overlapping DNA fragments encoding the beta-carotene biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we generated a combinatorial strain library for the beta-carotene biosynthetic pathway, directly integrated into the yeast genome to create a diverse library of strains. This enabled the screening of combinatorial libraries in stable chromosomally integrated strains for rapid improvements of product titers. This combinatorial approach for pathway assembly will significantly accelerate the current speed of metabolic engineering for S. cerevisiae as an industrial platform, and increase the number of strains that can be simultaneously evaluated for enzyme screening, expression optimization and protein engineering to achieve the titer, rate and yield necessary for the commercialization of new industrial fermentation products. PMID:27138038

  3. Microbial structures, functions, and metabolic pathways in wastewater treatment bioreactors revealed using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Taitao; Fang, Zhiwei

    2012-12-18

    The objective of this study was to explore microbial community structures, functional profiles, and metabolic pathways in a lab-scale and a full-scale wastewater treatment bioreactors. In order to do this, over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data and 600,000 paired-end sequences of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, using DNA extracted from activated sludge in the two bioreactors. Three kinds of sequences (16S rRNA gene amplicons, 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from metagenomic sequencing, and predicted proteins) were used to conduct taxonomic assignments. Specially, relative abundances of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), metagenomic sequencing was demonstrated to be a better approach to quantify AOA and AOB in activated sludge samples. It was found that AOB were more abundant than AOA in both reactors. Furthermore, the analysis of the metabolic profiles indicated that the overall patterns of metabolic pathways in the two reactors were quite similar (73.3% of functions shared). However, for some pathways (such as carbohydrate metabolism and membrane transport), the two reactors differed in the number of pathway-specific genes. PMID:23151157

  4. The Heparan and Heparin Metabolism Pathway is Involved in Regulation of Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six genes involved in the heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism pathway, DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like), EXTL1 (exostoses (multiple)-like 1), HS6ST1 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1), HS6ST3 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3), NDST3 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (heparan gl...

  5. mTOR and metabolic pathways in T cell quiescence and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionally conserved serine and threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the promotion of cell growth and proliferation via integration of cellular and environmental cues. In adaptive immunity, the mTOR pathway orchestrates multiple physiological processes including the development and homeostasis of T cells under steady state, and their subsequent activation and differentiation upon antigen recognition. Associated with such fate decisions is the dynamic reprogramming of T cell metabolic pathways, as naïve, activated and memory cells are defined by distinct bioenergetic and biosynthetic activities. Emerging evidence indicates that mTOR signaling intersects with T cell metabolism at two major levels to constitute a critical control mechanism of T cell fate decisions. First, as a central environmental sensor, mTOR links immune signaling and the availability of nutrients, especially amino acids. Second, mTOR activates specific metabolic pathways in T cells such as aerobic glycolysis (also known as the “Warburg effect”) in a process dependent upon the induction of transcription factors MYC and HIF1α. Understanding how mTOR interplays with T cell metabolism to dictate T cell fates and functions will provide fundamental insights into the mechanism of immune responses and the development of novel therapeutics against immune-mediated diseases. In this review, we summarize the current advances on mTOR signaling and T cell metabolism in the control of development, homeostasis, activation and differentiation of T cells. PMID:23375549

  6. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Benefiel, Ann C.; Alizadeh-Ghamsari, Amir H.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites) or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins) origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to SRB or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the SRB. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23226130

  7. Deregulation of lipid metabolism pathway genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Daker, Maelinda; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Ahmad, Munirah; Takada, Kenzo; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2013-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique tumour of epithelial origin with a distinct geographical distribution, closely associated with the Epstein‑Barr virus (EBV). EBV‑encoded RNAs (EBERs) are small non‑polyadenylated RNAs that are abundantly expressed in latent EBV‑infected NPC cells. To study the role of EBERs in NPC, we established stable expression of EBERs in HK1, an EBV‑negative NPC cell line. Cells expressing EBERs consistently exhibited an increased growth rate. However, EBERs did not confer resistance towards cisplatin‑induced apoptosis or promote migration or invasion ability in the cells tested. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified potential candidate genes that were deregulated in NPC cells expressing EBERs. Gene Ontology analysis of the data set revealed that EBERs upregulate the cellular lipid metabolic process. Upregulation of low‑density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was observed in EBER‑expressing cells. NPC cells exhibited LDL‑dependent cell proliferation. In addition, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound, quercetin, known to inhibit FASN, was found to inhibit proliferation of NPC cells. PMID:23292678

  8. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Krzysztof Piotr; Maćkowska-Kędziora, Agnieszka; Sobolewski, Bogusław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine (GLN) is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose) and NADPH2 (from glutamine) to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system. PMID:26583064

  9. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Krzysztof Piotr; Maćkowska-Kędziora, Agnieszka; Sobolewski, Bogusław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine (GLN) is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose) and NADPH2 (from glutamine) to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system. PMID:26583064

  10. GROWTH RETARDANTS: Effects on Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Other Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Wilhelm

    2000-06-01

    Plant growth retardants are applied in agronomic and horticultural crops to reduce unwanted longitudinal shoot growth without lowering plant productivity. Most growth retardants act by inhibiting gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. To date, four different types of such inhibitors are known: (a) Onium compounds, such as chlormequat chloride, mepiquat chloride, chlorphonium, and AMO-1618, which block the cyclases copalyl-diphosphate synthase and ent-kaurene synthase involved in the early steps of GA metabolism. (b) Compounds with an N-containing heterocycle, e.g. ancymidol, flurprimidol, tetcyclacis, paclobutrazol, uniconazole-P, and inabenfide. These retardants block cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases, thereby inhibiting oxidation of ent-kaurene into ent-kaurenoic acid. (c) Structural mimics of 2-oxoglutaric acid, which is the co-substrate of dioxygenases that catalyze late steps of GA formation. Acylcyclohexanediones, e.g. prohexadione-Ca and trinexapac-ethyl and daminozide, block particularly 3ss-hydroxylation, thereby inhibiting the formation of highly active GAs from inactive precursors, and (d) 16,17-Dihydro-GA5 and related structures act most likely by mimicking the GA precursor substrate of the same dioxygenases. Enzymes, similar to the ones involved in GA biosynthesis, are also of importance in the formation of abscisic acid, ethylene, sterols, flavonoids, and other plant constituents. Changes in the levels of these compounds found after treatment with growth retardants can mostly be explained by side activities on such enzymes. PMID:15012200