Sample records for metabolic processes affected

  1. Does methamphetamine affect bone metabolism?

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masafumi; Katsuyama, Hironobu; Watanabe, Yoko; Okuyama, Toshiko; Fushimi, Shigeko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Nata, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    There is a close relationship between the central nervous system activity and bone metabolism. Therefore, methamphetamine (METH), which stimulates the central nervous system, is expected to affect bone turnover. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of METH in bone metabolism. Mice were divided into 3 groups, the control group receiving saline injections, and the 5 and 10mg/kg METH groups (n=6 in each group). All groups received an injection of saline or METH every other day for 8 weeks. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by X-ray computed tomography. We examined biochemical markers and histomorphometric changes in the second cancellous bone of the left femoral distal end. The animals that were administered 5mg/kg METH showed an increased locomotor activity, whereas those receiving 10mg/kg displayed an abnormal and stereotyped behavior. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations were normal compared to the controls, whereas the serum protein concentration was lower in the METH groups. BMD was unchanged in all groups. Bone formation markers such as alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin significantly increased in the 5mg/kg METH group, but not in the 10mg/kg METH group. In contrast, bone resorption markers such as C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b did not change in any of the METH groups. Histomorphometric analyses were consistent with the biochemical markers data. A significant increase in osteoblasts, especially in type III osteoblasts, was observed in the 5mg/kg METH group, whereas other parameters of bone resorption and mineralization remained unchanged. These results indicate that bone remodeling in this group was unbalanced. In contrast, in the 10mg/kg METH group, some parameters of bone formation were significantly or slightly decreased, suggesting a low turnover metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that METH had distinct dose-dependent effects on bone turnover and that METH might induce adverse effects, leading to osteoporosis. PMID:24582730

  2. Ibogaine affects brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paskulin, Roman; Jamnik, Polona; Zivin, Marko; Raspor, Peter; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-12-15

    Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid present in the root of the plant Tabernanthe iboga. It is known to attenuate abstinence syndrome in animal models of drug addiction. Since the anti-addiction effect lasts longer than the presence of ibogaine in the body, some profound metabolic changes are expected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ibogaine on protein expression in rat brains. Rats were treated with ibogaine at 20 mg/kg body weight i.p. and subsequently examined at 24 and 72 h. Proteins were extracted from whole brain and separated by two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis. Individual proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Enzymes of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle namely glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase A, pyruvate kinase and malate dehydrogenase were induced. The results suggest that the remedial effect of ibogaine could be mediated by the change in energy availability. Since energy dissipating detoxification and reversion of tolerance to different drugs of abuse requires underlying functional and structural changes in the cell, higher metabolic turnover would be favourable. Understanding the pharmacodynamics of anti-addiction drugs highlights the subcellular aspects of addiction diseases, in addition to neurological and psychological perspectives. PMID:17054944

  3. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Briana Mezuk

    2008-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved,\\u000a although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or\\u000a alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current\\u000a evidence regarding the association of unipolar

  4. Effect of high temperature on the metabolic processes affecting sorbitol synthesis in the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, M E.; Hendrix, D L.; Wolfe, G R.

    1999-01-01

    Whiteflies accumulate the polyhydric alcohol, sorbitol, when exposed to temperatures greater than about 30 degrees C. Feeding experiments using artificial diets containing labeled sucrose showed that more of the label was incorporated into whitefly bodies and less was excreted in the honeydew when feeding was conducted at 41 compared with 25 degrees C. Analysis of the components of the honeydew showed that more of the excreted label was in glucose and fructose and less in trehalulose at 41 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. A similar effect of temperature on honeydew composition occurred for whiteflies feeding on cotton leaves. Measurement of the activities of glycolytic, pentose-phosphate and polyol pathway enzymes at 30 and 42 degrees C showed that NADPH-dependent ketose reductase/sorbitol dehydrogenase (NADPH-KR/SDH), sucrase, glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were stimulated to a greater extent at 42 degrees C than trehalulose synthase and fructokinase. NAD(+)-sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD(+)-SDH) activity was inhibited at 42 degrees C. We propose that high temperature alters metabolic activity in a way that increases the availability of fructose and stimulates pentose-phosphate pathway activity, providing both the substrate and coenzyme for sorbitol synthesis. High temperature also increases the activity of NADPH-KR/SDH, the enzyme in whiteflies that synthesizes sorbitol, but inhibits the activity of NAD(+)-SDH, the enzyme that degrades sorbitol. PMID:12770392

  5. Positive affect and psychobiological processes.

    PubMed

    Dockray, Samantha; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Positive affect has been associated with favourable health outcomes, and it is likely that several biological processes mediate the effects of positive mood on physical health. There is converging evidence that positive affect activates the neuroendocrine, autonomic and immune systems in distinct and functionally meaningful ways. Cortisol, both total output and the awakening response, has consistently been shown to be lower among individuals with higher levels of positive affect. The beneficial effects of positive mood on cardiovascular function, including heart rate and blood pressure, and the immune system have also been described. The influence of positive affect on these psychobiological processes is independent of negative affect, suggesting that positive affect may have characteristic biological correlates. The duration and conceptualisation of positive affect may be important considerations in understanding how different biological systems are activated in association with positive affect. The association of positive affect and psychobiological processes has been established, and these biological correlates may be partly responsible for the protective effects of positive affect on health outcomes. PMID:20097225

  6. Abnormal folate metabolism in foetuses affected by neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Chitty, Lyn S; Burren, Katie A; Doudney, Kit; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Stanier, Philip; Scott, Rosemary; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid supplementation can prevent many cases of neural tube defects (NTDs), whereas suboptimal maternal folate status is a risk factor, suggesting that folate metabolism is a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. Despite extensive genetic analysis of folate cycle enzymes, and quantification of metabolites in maternal blood, neither the protective mechanism nor the relationship between maternal folate status and susceptibility are understood in most cases. In order to investigate potential abnormalities in folate metabolism in the embryo itself, we derived primary fibroblastic cell lines from foetuses affected by NTDs and subjected them to the dU suppression test, a sensitive metabolic test of folate metabolism. Significantly, a subset of NTD cases exhibited low scores in this test, indicative of abnormalities in folate cycling that may be causally linked to the defect. Susceptibility to NTDs may be increased by suppression of the methylation cycle, which is interlinked with the folate cycle. However, reduced efficacy in the dU suppression test was not associated with altered abundance of the methylation cycle intermediates, s-adenosylmethionine and s-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that a methylation cycle defect is unlikely to be responsible for the observed abnormality of folate metabolism. Genotyping of samples for known polymorphisms in genes encoding folate-associated enzymes did not reveal any correlation between specific genotypes and the observed abnormalities in folate metabolism. These data suggest that as yet unrecognized genetic variants result in embryonic abnormalities of folate cycling that may be causally related to NTDs. PMID:17438019

  7. Affective Processes and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma Deitch; Feshbach, Seymour

    1987-01-01

    Data indicate that for girls, affective dispositional factors (empathy, depressive affectivity, aggression, and self-concept) are intimately linked to cognitive development and academic achievement. (PCB)

  8. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures.

  9. [Metabolic changes in the liver as affected by nicotinic acid].

    PubMed

    Orbetsova, V

    1981-01-01

    The author carried out a dynamic study on the metabolic changes in liver under the influence of nicotinic acid, administered singly by intramuscular injection in a dose of 2mM/kg of body weight. She examined at the 1th, 3th, 6th and 24th hour the changes in the levels of nicotine-amide coenzymes (NAD, NAD-H and NADP), adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP and AMP), the metabolic lactate and pyruvate and the enzymes LDH, MDH, GOT and GPT. The obtained data were compared with those of the control groups, treated with saline and killed at the same intervals as the experimental animals. Furthermore she made also a comparison with an intact group, presented as O group, whose values served as basal. The obtained data showed that after application of the nicotinic acid (NA) complex metabolic changes occurred in liver, due to its basic effects-stimulation of biosynthesis of nicotinamide coenzymes and inhibition of lipolysis in the fatty tissue. Most probably the effect on the biosynthesis of NAD was primary, which showed later substantial regulatory influence both on lipolysis in the fatty acid and on the metabolization of mobilizing lipids on behalf of the liver. Parallel occurring metabolic processes in the aorta and in the vascular wall in general, stimulation of the biological oxidation and bioenergetics formed the whole antilipolytic and antiarteriogenic action of nicotinic acid. PMID:7308122

  10. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridiamore »demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production.« less

  11. Interactions between dietary boron and thiamine affect lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Herbel, J.L.; Hunt, C.D. (Dept. of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-15

    An experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that dietary boron impacts upon the function of various coenzymes involved in energy metabolism. In a 2 {times} 7 factorially-arranged experiment, weanling, vitamin D{sub 3}-deprived rats were fed a ground corn-casein-corn oil based diet supplemented with 0 or 2 mg boron/kg and 50% of the requirement for thiamine (TM), riboflavin (RF), pantothenic acid (PA) or pyridoxine (PX); 0% for folic acid (FA) or nicotinic acid (NA). All vitamins were supplemented in adequate amounts in the control diet. At 8 weeks of age, the TM dietary treatment was the one most affected by supplemental dietary boron (SDB). In rats that were fed 50% TM, SDB increased plasma concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), and the liver to body weight (L/B) ratio. However, in the SDB animals, adequate amounts of TM decreased the means of those variables to near that observed in non-SDB rats fed 50% TM. The findings suggest that an interaction between dietary boron and TM affects lipid metabolism.

  12. Affect, Behavioural Schemas and the Proving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, Annie; McKee, Kerry; Selden, John

    2010-01-01

    In this largely theoretical article, we discuss the relation between a kind of affect, behavioural schemas and aspects of the proving process. We begin with affect as described in the mathematics education literature, but soon narrow our focus to a particular kind of affect--nonemotional cognitive feelings. We then mention the position of feelings…

  13. METALS: MICROBIAL PROCESSES AFFECTING METALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of metals in the environment due to anthropogenic activities has led to concern over the long-term fate of metal contaminants and the impact of metal accumulation on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In nature, microorganisms carry out many different processes that influence the b...

  14. Derivative processes for modelling metabolic fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Žurauskien?, Justina; Kirk, Paul; Thorne, Thomas; Pinney, John; Stumpf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: One of the challenging questions in modelling biological systems is to characterize the functional forms of the processes that control and orchestrate molecular and cellular phenotypes. Recently proposed methods for the analysis of metabolic pathways, for example, dynamic flux estimation, can only provide estimates of the underlying fluxes at discrete time points but fail to capture the complete temporal behaviour. To describe the dynamic variation of the fluxes, we additionally require the assumption of specific functional forms that can capture the temporal behaviour. However, it also remains unclear how to address the noise which might be present in experimentally measured metabolite concentrations. Results: Here we propose a novel approach to modelling metabolic fluxes: derivative processes that are based on multiple-output Gaussian processes (MGPs), which are a flexible non-parametric Bayesian modelling technique. The main advantages that follow from MGPs approach include the natural non-parametric representation of the fluxes and ability to impute the missing data in between the measurements. Our derivative process approach allows us to model changes in metabolite derivative concentrations and to characterize the temporal behaviour of metabolic fluxes from time course data. Because the derivative of a Gaussian process is itself a Gaussian process, we can readily link metabolite concentrations to metabolic fluxes and vice versa. Here we discuss how this can be implemented in an MGP framework and illustrate its application to simple models, including nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli. Availability and implementation: R code is available from the authors upon request. Contact: j.norkunaite@imperial.ac.uk; m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24578401

  15. Adipose triglyceride lipase affects triacylglycerol metabolism at brain barriers.

    PubMed

    Etschmaier, Karoline; Becker, Tatjana; Eichmann, Thomas O; Schweinzer, Cornelia; Scholler, Monika; Tam-Amersdorfer, Carmen; Poeckl, Michael; Schuligoi, Rufina; Kober, Alexandra; Chirackal Manavalan, Anil Paul; Rechberger, Gerald N; Streith, Ingo E; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Panzenboeck, Ute

    2011-12-01

    Currently, little is known about the role of intracellular triacylglycerol (TAG) lipases in the brain. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is encoded by the PNPLA2 gene and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of ATGL deficiency on brain lipid metabolism in vivo using an established knock-out mouse model (ATGL-ko). A moderate decrease in TAG hydrolase activity detected in ATGL-ko versus wild-type brain tissue was accompanied by a 14-fold increase in TAG levels and an altered composition of TAG-associated fatty acids in ATGL-ko brains. Oil Red O staining revealed a severe accumulation of neutral lipids associated to cerebrovascular cells and in distinct brain regions namely the ependymal cell layer and the choroid plexus along the ventricular system. In situ hybridization histochemistry identified ATGL mRNA expression in ependymal cells, the choroid plexus, pyramidal cells of the hippocampus, and the dentate gyrus. Our findings imply that ATGL is involved in brain fatty acid metabolism, particularly in regions mediating transport and exchange processes: the brain-CSF interface, the blood-CSF barrier, and the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21951135

  16. Cardiac metabolic pathways affected in the mouse model of barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  17. Cardiac Metabolic Pathways Affected in the Mouse Model of Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W.; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  18. Miltefosine affects lipid metabolism in Leishmania donovani promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Rakotomanga, M; Blanc, S; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Loiseau, P M

    2007-04-01

    Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine [HePC]) is the first orally active antileishmanial drug. Transient HePC treatment of Leishmania donovani promastigotes at 10 microM significantly reduced the phosphatidylcholine content and enhanced the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in parasite membranes, suggesting a partial inactivation of PE-N-methyltransferase. Phospholipase D activity did not seem to be affected by HePC. In addition, the enhancement of the lysophosphatidylcholine content could be ascribed to phospholipase A2 activation. Moreover, transient HePC treatment had no effect on the fatty acid alkyl chain length or the fatty acid unsaturation rate. Concerning sterols, we found a strong reduction of the C24 alkylated sterol content, and the enhancement of the cholesterol content could be the result of the HePC condensation effect with sterols. Because some of the effects observed after transient HePC treatment were different from those previously observed in HePC-resistant parasites, it could be hypothesized that continuous in vitro drug pressure induces the mechanisms of regulation in Leishmania lipid metabolism. PMID:17242145

  19. Affective pictures processing, attention, and pain tolerance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minet de Wied; Marinus N Verbaten

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether attention mediates the effects of affective distractors on cold pressor pain, or whether the cognitive processes of priming and appraisal best account for the effects. In Experiment I, 65 male respondents were exposed to either pleasant, neutral or unpleasant pictures selected from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). The cold-pressor test was administered

  20. Affective processing in bilingual speakers: disembodied cognition?

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    A recent study by Keysar, Hayakawa, and An (2012) suggests that "thinking in a foreign language" may reduce decision biases because a foreign language provides a greater emotional distance than a native tongue. The possibility of such "disembodied" cognition is of great interest for theories of affect and cognition and for many other areas of psychological theory and practice, from clinical and forensic psychology to marketing, but first this claim needs to be properly evaluated. The purpose of this review is to examine the findings of clinical, introspective, cognitive, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging studies of affective processing in bilingual speakers in order to identify converging patterns of results, to evaluate the claim about "disembodied cognition," and to outline directions for future inquiry. The findings to date reveal two interrelated processing effects. First-language (L1) advantage refers to increased automaticity of affective processing in the L1 and heightened electrodermal reactivity to L1 emotion-laden words. Second-language (L2) advantage refers to decreased automaticity of affective processing in the L2, which reduces interference effects and lowers electrodermal reactivity to negative emotional stimuli. The differences in L1 and L2 affective processing suggest that in some bilingual speakers, in particular late bilinguals and foreign language users, respective languages may be differentially embodied, with the later learned language processed semantically but not affectively. This difference accounts for the reduction of framing biases in L2 processing in the study by Keysar et al. (2012). The follow-up discussion identifies the limits of the findings to date in terms of participant populations, levels of processing, and types of stimuli, puts forth alternative explanations of the documented effects, and articulates predictions to be tested in future research. PMID:23163422

  1. Gut Microbiome Phenotypes Driven by Host Genetics Affect Arsenic Metabolism

    E-print Network

    Lu, Kun

    Large individual differences in susceptibility to arsenic-induced diseases are well-documented and frequently associated with different patterns of arsenic metabolism. In this context, the role of the gut microbiome in ...

  2. Leptin expression affects metabolic rate in zebrafish embryos (D. rerio).

    PubMed

    Dalman, Mark R; Liu, Qin; King, Mason D; Bagatto, Brian; Londraville, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotide technology to knockdown leptin-(A) gene expression in developing zebrafish embryos and measured its effects on metabolic rate and cardiovascular function. Using two indicators of metabolic rate, oxygen consumption was significantly lower in leptin morphants early in development [<48 hours post-fertilization (hpf)], while acid production was significantly lower in morphants later in development (>48 hpf). Oxygen utilization rates in <48 hpf embryos and acid production in 72 hpf embryos could be rescued to that of wildtype embryos by recombinant leptin coinjected with antisense morpholino. Leptin is established to influence metabolic rate in mammals, and these data suggest leptin signaling also influences metabolic rate in fishes. PMID:23847542

  3. Pharmacometabonomic identification of a significant host-microbiome metabolic interaction affecting human drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, T. Andrew; Baker, David; Lindon, John C.; Everett, Jeremy R.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.

    2009-01-01

    We provide a demonstration in humans of the principle of pharmacometabonomics by showing a clear connection between an individual's metabolic phenotype, in the form of a predose urinary metabolite profile, and the metabolic fate of a standard dose of the widely used analgesic acetaminophen. Predose and postdose urinary metabolite profiles were determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The predose spectra were statistically analyzed in relation to drug metabolite excretion to detect predose biomarkers of drug fate and a human-gut microbiome cometabolite predictor was identified. Thus, we found that individuals having high predose urinary levels of p-cresol sulfate had low postdose urinary ratios of acetaminophen sulfate to acetaminophen glucuronide. We conclude that, in individuals with high bacterially mediated p-cresol generation, competitive O-sulfonation of p-cresol reduces the effective systemic capacity to sulfonate acetaminophen. Given that acetaminophen is such a widely used and seemingly well-understood drug, this finding provides a clear demonstration of the immense potential and power of the pharmacometabonomic approach. However, we expect many other sulfonation reactions to be similarly affected by competition with p-cresol and our finding also has important implications for certain diseases as well as for the variable responses induced by many different drugs and xenobiotics. We propose that assessing the effects of microbiome activity should be an integral part of pharmaceutical development and of personalized health care. Furthermore, we envisage that gut bacterial populations might be deliberately manipulated to improve drug efficacy and to reduce adverse drug reactions. PMID:19667173

  4. Selective defoliation affects plant growth, fruit transcriptional ripening program and flavonoid metabolism in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The selective removal of grapevine leaves around berry clusters can improve the quality of ripening fruits by influencing parameters such as the berry sugar and anthocyanin content at harvest. The outcome depends strongly on the timing of defoliation, which influences the source–sink balance and the modified microclimate surrounding the berries. We removed the basal leaves from Vitis vinifera L. cv Sangiovese shoots at the pre-bloom and veraison stages, and investigated responses such as shoot growth, fruit morphology and composition compared to untreated controls. Moreover, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis to explore the impact of these defoliation treatments on berry transcriptome. Results We found that pre-bloom defoliation improved berry quality traits such as sugar and anthocyanin content, whereas defoliation at veraison had a detrimental effect, e.g. less anthocyanin and higher incidence of sunburn damage. Genome-wide expression analysis during berry ripening revealed that defoliation at either stage resulted in major transcriptome reprogramming, which slightly delayed the onset of ripening. However, a closer investigation of individual gene expression profiles identified genes that were specifically modulated by defoliation at each stage, reflecting the uncoupling of metabolic processes such as flavonoid biosynthesis, cell wall and stress metabolism, from the general ripening program. Conclusions The specific transcriptional modifications we observed following defoliation at different time points allow the identification of the developmental or metabolic processes affected in berries thus deepening the knowledge of the mechanisms by which these agronomical practices impact the final berry ripening traits. PMID:23433030

  5. Spastin binds to lipid droplets and affects lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Chrisovalantis; Orso, Genny; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Herholz, Marija; Gumeni, Sentiljana; Tadepalle, Nimesha; Jüngst, Christian; Tzschichholz, Anne; Schauss, Astrid; Höning, Stefan; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Daga, Andrea; Rugarli, Elena I

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT)-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87). We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs). A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP. PMID:25875445

  6. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  7. Fusion and metabolism of plant cells as affected by microgravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rüdiger Hampp; Ellen Hoffmann; Kristina Schönherr; Patrick Johann; Luigi De Filippis

    1997-01-01

    .   Plant cell protoplasts derived from leaf tissue of two different tobacco species (Nicotiana tabacum L., N. rustica L.) were exposed to short-term (sounding rocket experiments) and long-term (spacelab) microgravity environments in order\\u000a to study both (electro) cell fusion and cell metabolism during early and later stages of tissue regeneration. The period of\\u000a exposure to microgravity varied from 10?min (sounding

  8. Stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes

    PubMed Central

    CAMPEAU, SERGE; LIBERZON, ISRAEL; MORILAK, DAVID; RESSLER, KERRY

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the major discussion points of a symposium on stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes, which was held during the 2010 workshop on the neurobiology of stress (Boulder, CO, USA). The four discussants addressed a number of specific cognitive and affective factors that are modulated by exposure to acute or repeated stress. Dr David Morilak discussed the effects of various repeated stress situations on cognitive flexibility, as assessed with a rodent model of attentional set-shifting task, and how performance on slightly different aspects of this test is modulated by different prefrontal regions through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Dr Serge Campeau summarized the findings of several studies exploring a number of factors and brain regions that regulate habituation of various autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to repeated audiogenic stress exposures. Dr Kerry Ressler discussed a body of work exploring the modulation and extinction of fear memories in rodents and humans, especially focusing on the role of key neurotransmitter systems including excitatory amino acids and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Dr Israel Liberzon presented recent results on human decision-making processes in response to exogenous glucocorticoid hormone administration. Overall, these discussions are casting a wider framework on the cognitive/affective processes that are distinctly regulated by the experience of stress and some of the brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with these effects. PMID:21790481

  9. Albumin Supplement Affects the Metabolism and Metabolism-Related Drug-Drug Interaction of Fenoprofen Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Wang, Feng; Meng, Yu; Yang, Guo-Hui; Chen, Ju-Wu; Wang, Jia-Xiang

    2015-07-01

    The influence of albumin towards the metabolism behavior of fenoprofen enantiomers and relevant drug-drug interaction was investigated in the present study. The metabolic behavior of fenoprofen enantiomers was compared in a phase II metabolic incubation system with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA). BSA supplement increased the binding affinity parameter (Km) of (R)-fenoprofen towards human liver microsomes (HLMs) from 148.3 to 214.4??M. In contrast, BSA supplement decreased the Km of (S)-fenoprofen towards HLMs from 218.2 to 123.5??M. For maximum reaction velocity (Vmax), the addition of BSA increased the Vmax of (R)-fenoprofen from 1.3 to 1.6?nmol/min/mg protein. In the contrast, BSA supplement decreased the Vmax value from 3.3 to 1.5?nmol/min/mg protein. Andrographolide-fenoprofen interaction was used as an example to investigate the influence of BSA supplement towards fenoprofen-relevant drug-drug interaction. The addition of 0.2% BSA in the incubation system significantly decreased the inhibition potential of andrographolide towards (R)-fenoprofen metabolism (P?metabolism of (S)-fenoprofen. BSA supplement also changed the inhibition kinetic type and parameter of andrographolide towards the metabolism of (S)-fenoprofen. In conclusion, albumin supplement changes the metabolic behavior of fenoprofen enantiomers and the fenoprofen-andrographolide interaction. Chirality 27:436-440, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26037509

  10. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    PubMed Central

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFMTM (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of ?-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  11. Metabolic differences in temperamental Brahman cattle can affect productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many factors may adversely affect the growth and productivity of livestock. These include stressors associated with management practices, such as weaning, handling relative to transportation, and vaccination, that can modulate growth through the production of stress-related hormones (i.e., cortisol,...

  12. Sex affects health: women are different I. Body composition & metabolism

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    Sex affects health Overview: n Males & females have different patterns of illness & health q Longevity Gap: 5.1 years (2007); highly dependent upon income: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/16/business/income-gap-meet-the-longevity serotonin q Smoking has a more negative effect on cardiovascular health in women than men. q Women are 2x

  13. SIRT1 stimulation by polyphenols is affected by their stability and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Vincent C J; de Goffau, Marcus C; Arts, Ilja C W; Hollman, Peter C H; Keijer, Jaap

    2006-07-01

    Silent information regulator two ortholog 1 (SIRT1) is the human ortholog of the yeast sir2 protein; one of the most important regulators of lifespan extension by caloric restriction in several organisms. Dietary polyphenols, abundant in vegetables, fruits, cereals, wine and tea, were reported to stimulate the deacetylase activity of recombinant SIRT1 protein and could therefore be potential regulators of aging associated processes. However, inconsistent data between effects of polyphenols on the recombinant SIRT1 and on in vivo SIRT1, led us to investigate the influence of (1) stability of polyphenols under experimental conditions and (2) metabolism of polyphenols in human HT29 cells, on stimulation of SIRT1. With an improved SIRT1 deacetylation assay we found three new polyphenolic stimulators. Epigallocatechin galate (EGCg, 1.76-fold), epicatechin galate (ECg, 1.85-fold) and myricetin (3.19-fold) stimulated SIRT1 under stabilizing conditions, whereas without stabilization, these polyphenols strongly inhibited SIRT1, probably due to H2O2 formation. Using metabolically active HT29 cells we were able to show that quercetin (a stimulator of recombinant SIRT1) could not stimulate intracellular SIRT1. The major quercetin metabolite in humans, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, slightly inhibited the recombinant SIRT1 activity which explains the lack of stimulatory action of quercetin in HT29 cells. This study shows that the stimulation of SIRT1 is strongly affected by polyphenol stability and metabolism, therefore extrapolation of in vitro SIRT1 stimulation results to physiological effects should be done with caution. PMID:16603228

  14. Water deficit alters differentially metabolic pathways affecting important flavor and quality traits in grape berries of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

    PubMed Central

    Deluc, Laurent G; Quilici, David R; Decendit, Alain; Grimplet, Jérôme; Wheatley, Matthew D; Schlauch, Karen A; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Cushman, John C; Cramer, Grant R

    2009-01-01

    Background Water deficit has significant effects on grape berry composition resulting in improved wine quality by the enhancement of color, flavors, or aromas. While some pathways or enzymes affected by water deficit have been identified, little is known about the global effects of water deficit on grape berry metabolism. Results The effects of long-term, seasonal water deficit on berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, a red-wine grape, and Chardonnay, a white-wine grape were analyzed by integrated transcript and metabolite profiling. Over the course of berry development, the steady-state transcript abundance of approximately 6,000 Unigenes differed significantly between the cultivars and the irrigation treatments. Water deficit most affected the phenylpropanoid, ABA, isoprenoid, carotenoid, amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways. Targeted metabolites were profiled to confirm putative changes in specific metabolic pathways. Water deficit activated the expression of numerous transcripts associated with glutamate and proline biosynthesis and some committed steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway that increased anthocyanin concentrations in Cabernet Sauvignon. In Chardonnay, water deficit activated parts of the phenylpropanoid, energy, carotenoid and isoprenoid metabolic pathways that contribute to increased concentrations of antheraxanthin, flavonols and aroma volatiles. Water deficit affected the ABA metabolic pathway in both cultivars. Berry ABA concentrations were highly correlated with 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED1) transcript abundance, whereas the mRNA expression of other NCED genes and ABA catabolic and glycosylation processes were largely unaffected. Water deficit nearly doubled ABA concentrations within berries of Cabernet Sauvignon, whereas it decreased ABA in Chardonnay at véraison and shortly thereafter. Conclusion The metabolic responses of grapes to water deficit varied with the cultivar and fruit pigmentation. Chardonnay berries, which lack any significant anthocyanin content, exhibited increased photoprotection mechanisms under water deficit conditions. Water deficit increased ABA, proline, sugar and anthocyanin concentrations in Cabernet Sauvignon, but not Chardonnay berries, consistent with the hypothesis that ABA enhanced accumulation of these compounds. Water deficit increased the transcript abundance of lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase in fatty metabolism, a pathway known to affect berry and wine aromas. These changes in metabolism have important impacts on berry flavor and quality characteristics. Several of these metabolites are known to contribute to increased human-health benefits. PMID:19426499

  15. Rumen metabolism and duodenal nutrient flow as affected by ration composition and antimicrobials in sheep

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the rumen was increased by F + AVO diet. Duodenal flow of total N, total AA, essential AA was unaffected by additives. Both non ammonia N passage and non essential AA flow were lower for F + SAL than F. SalinomycinRumen metabolism and duodenal nutrient flow as affected by ration composition and antimicrobials

  16. Factors affecting high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T elevation in Japanese metabolic syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Hitsumoto, Takashi; Shirai, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The blood concentration of cardiac troponin T (ie, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T [hs-cTnT]), measured using a highly sensitive assay, represents a useful biomarker for evaluating the pathogenesis of heart failure or predicting cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the clinical significance of hs-cTnT in metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to examine the factors affecting hs-cTnT elevation in Japanese metabolic syndrome patients. Patients and methods We enrolled 258 metabolic syndrome patients who were middle-aged males without a history of cardiovascular events. We examined relationships between hs-cTnT and various clinical parameters, including diagnostic parameters of metabolic syndrome. Results There were no significant correlations between hs-cTnT and diagnostic parameters of metabolic syndrome. However, hs-cTnT was significantly correlated with age (P<0.01), blood concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (P<0.01), reactive oxygen metabolites (markers of oxidative stress, P<0.001), and the cardio–ankle vascular index (marker of arterial function, P<0.01). Furthermore, multiple regression analysis revealed that these factors were independent variables for hs-cTnT as a subordinate factor. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that in vivo oxidative stress and abnormality of arterial function are closely associated with an increase in hs-cTnT concentrations in Japanese metabolic syndrome patients. PMID:25792848

  17. Organophosphorous and organochlorine pesticides affect human placental phosphoinositides metabolism and PI-4 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Souza, María S; Magnarelli de Potas, Gladis; Pechén de D'Angelo, Ana M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe the effect of organophosphorous and organochlorine pesticides on phosphoinositides metabolism in human placenta. Pesticides concentration (10 microM) was used for in vitro incubations of cell-free homogenates labelled with (32)P orthophosphate. Heptachlor (HC) and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (o-p' DDT) increased phosphatidyl-inositol, phosphatidylinositolphosphate, and phosphatidyl-inositolbiphosphate phosphorylation while azinphosmethyl (AM) increased phosphatidylinositolbiphosphate labeling. Decreased (32)P incorporation in phosphatidylinositol was found with phosmet (PM), AM, and chlorpyriphos (CHL). The effects of these xenobiotics on PI4-kinase activity using different subcellular fractions were also examined. Both type of pesticides affected the postmembrane supernatant enzyme activity. A biphasic effect on membrane and nuclear PI4-kinase activity was seen with HC. The strongest effect found was seen with o-p' DDT in nuclear kinase activity while substantial changes were also observed in membrane. These data demonstrate the sensitivity of human placental PI4-kinase to pesticides currently found in human tissues and suggest deleterious consequences in different processes regulated by 4-phosphoinositides. PMID:14994277

  18. Transcription Interference and ORF Nature Strongly Affect Promoter Strength in a Reconstituted Metabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carquet, Marie; Pompon, Denis; Truan, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Fine tuning of individual enzyme expression level is necessary to alleviate metabolic imbalances in synthetic heterologous pathways. A known approach consists of choosing a suitable combination of promoters, based on their characterized strengths in model conditions. We questioned whether each step of a multiple-gene synthetic pathway could be independently tunable at the transcription level. Three open reading frames, coding for enzymes involved in a synthetic pathway, were combinatorially associated to different promoters on an episomal plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We quantified the mRNA levels of the three genes in each strain of our generated combinatorial metabolic library. Our results evidenced that the ORF nature, position, and orientation induce strong discrepancies between the previously reported promoters’ strengths and the observed ones. We conclude that, in the context of metabolic reconstruction, the strength of usual promoters can be dramatically affected by many factors. Among them, transcriptional interference and ORF nature seem to be predominant. PMID:25767795

  19. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for ?-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and ?-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish. PMID:23656796

  20. Metabolic network modularity arising from simple growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-09-01

    Metabolic networks consist of linked functional components, or modules. The mechanism underlying metabolic network modularity is of great interest not only to researchers of basic science but also to those in fields of engineering. Previous studies have suggested a theoretical model, which proposes that a change in the evolutionary goal (system-specific purpose) increases network modularity, and this hypothesis was supported by statistical data analysis. Nevertheless, further investigation has uncovered additional possibilities that might explain the origin of network modularity. In this work we propose an evolving network model without tuning parameters to describe metabolic networks. We demonstrate, quantitatively, that metabolic network modularity can arise from simple growth processes, independent of the change in the evolutionary goal. Our model is applicable to a wide range of organisms and appears to suggest that metabolic network modularity can be more simply determined than previously thought. Nonetheless, our proposition does not serve to contradict the previous model; it strives to provide an insight from a different angle in the ongoing efforts to understand metabolic evolution, with the hope of eventually achieving the synthetic engineering of metabolic networks.

  1. Perinatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate affects glucose metabolism in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hin T; Zhao, Yin G; Leung, Pik Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are globally present in the environment and are widely distributed in human populations and wildlife. The chemicals are ubiquitous in human body fluids and have a long serum elimination half-life. The notorious member of PFAAs, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is prioritized as a global concerning chemical at the Stockholm Convention in 2009, due to its harmful effects in mammals and aquatic organisms. PFOS is known to affect lipid metabolism in adults and was found to be able to cross human placenta. However the effects of in utero exposure to the susceptibility of metabolic disorders in offspring have not yet been elucidated. In this study, pregnant CD-1 mice (F0) were fed with 0, 0.3 or 3 mg PFOS/kg body weight/day in corn oil by oral gavage daily throughout gestational and lactation periods. We investigated the immediate effects of perinatal exposure to PFOS on glucose metabolism in both maternal and offspring after weaning (PND 21). To determine if the perinatal exposure predisposes the risk for metabolic disorder to the offspring, weaned animals without further PFOS exposure, were fed with either standard or high-fat diet until PND 63. Fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured while HOMA-IR index and glucose AUCs were reported. Our data illustrated the first time the effects of the environmental equivalent dose of PFOS exposure on the disturbance of glucose metabolism in F1 pups and F1 adults at PND 21 and 63, respectively. Although the biological effects of PFOS on the elevated levels of fasting serum glucose and insulin levels were observed in both pups and adults of F1, the phenotypes of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were only evident in the F1 adults. The effects were exacerbated under HFD, highlighting the synergistic action at postnatal growth on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:24498028

  2. Dilution, Not Load, Affects Distractor Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Daryl E.; Muroi, Miya; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2011-01-01

    Lavie and Tsal (1994) proposed that spare attentional capacity is allocated involuntarily to the processing of irrelevant stimuli, thereby enabling interference. Under this view, when task demands increase, spare capacity should decrease and distractor interference should decrease. In support, Lavie and Cox (1997) found that increasing perceptual…

  3. Processing parameters affecting sorghum noodle qualities 

    E-print Network

    Kunetz, Christine Frances

    1997-01-01

    Processing variables of 100% sorghum noodles were investigated to determine effects on noodle quality. A dough was created by microwave heating a flour with 1 % salt (1 00 g): water (90 ml) mixture to 950C with a microwave. The dough was put through...

  4. How does emotional content affect lexical processing?

    PubMed Central

    Ponari, Marta; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Even single words in isolation can evoke emotional reactions, but the mechanisms by which emotion is involved in automatic lexical processing are unclear. Previous studies using extremely similar materials and methods have yielded apparently incompatible patterns of results. In much previous work, however, words' emotional content is entangled with other non-emotional characteristics such as frequency of occurrence, familiarity and age of acquisition, all of which have potential consequences for lexical processing themselves. In the present study, the authors compare different models of emotion using the British Lexicon Project, a large-scale freely available lexical decision database. After controlling for the potentially confounding effects of non-emotional variables, a variety of statistical approaches revealed that emotional words, whether positive or negative, are processed faster than neutral words. This effect appears to be categorical rather than graded; is not modulated by emotional arousal; and is not limited to words explicitly referring to emotions. The authors suggest that emotional connotations facilitate processing due to the grounding of words' meanings in emotional experience. PMID:24215294

  5. How does emotional content affect lexical processing?

    PubMed

    Vinson, David; Ponari, Marta; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Even single words in isolation can evoke emotional reactions, but the mechanisms by which emotion is involved in automatic lexical processing are unclear. Previous studies using extremely similar materials and methods have yielded apparently incompatible patterns of results. In much previous work, however, words' emotional content is entangled with other non-emotional characteristics such as frequency of occurrence, familiarity and age of acquisition, all of which have potential consequences for lexical processing themselves. In the present study, the authors compare different models of emotion using the British Lexicon Project, a large-scale freely available lexical decision database. After controlling for the potentially confounding effects of non-emotional variables, a variety of statistical approaches revealed that emotional words, whether positive or negative, are processed faster than neutral words. This effect appears to be categorical rather than graded; is not modulated by emotional arousal; and is not limited to words explicitly referring to emotions. The authors suggest that emotional connotations facilitate processing due to the grounding of words' meanings in emotional experience. PMID:24215294

  6. Sound Affects the Speed of Visual Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keetels, Mirjam; Vroomen, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of a task-irrelevant sound on visual processing. Participants were presented with revolving clocks at or around central fixation and reported the hand position of a target clock at the time an exogenous cue (1 clock turning red) or an endogenous cue (a line pointing toward 1 of the clocks) was presented. A…

  7. Evidence that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in tropical reef corals.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Peter J; Wall, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    Early life stages of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum were used to test the hypothesis that the depression of dark respiration in coral recruits by high pCO2 is caused by perturbed protein metabolism. First, the contribution of protein anabolism to respiratory costs under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the aerobic respiration of S. caliendrum recruits with and without the protein synthesis inhibitor emetine following 1 to 4 days at 45 Pa versus 77 Pa pCO2. Second, protein catabolism under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the flux of ammonium (NH4 (+)) from juvenile colonies of S. caliendrum incubated in darkness at 47 Pa and 90 Pa pCO2. Two days after settlement, respiration of recruits was affected by an interaction between emetine and pCO2, with emetine reducing respiration 63% at 45 Pa pCO2 and 27% at 77 Pa pCO2. The interaction disappeared 5 days after settlement, when respiration was reduced 27% by emetine under both pCO2 conditions. These findings suggest that protein anabolism accounted for a large proportion of metabolic costs in coral recruits and was affected by high pCO2, with consequences detected in aerobic respiration. Juvenile S. caliendrum showed net uptake of NH4 (+) at 45 Pa pCO2 but net release of NH4 (+) at 90 Pa pCO2, indicating that protein catabolism, NH4 (+) recycling, or both were affected by high pCO2. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in corals. PMID:25216504

  8. Circulatory and Metabolic Processes in Adipose Tissue in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Oro; Lars Wallenberg; Sune Rosell

    1965-01-01

    To permit the study in vivo of circulatory and metabolic processes in adipose tissue, a part of the dog's subcutaneous tissue was prepared with intact circulation and innervation. The preparation was found to be suitable for quantitative investigations on the nervous control of the blood flow and of the release of free fatty acids. We considered it to be of

  9. Uncinate Process Length in Birds Scales with Resting Metabolic Rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Tickle; Robert Nudds; Jonathan Codd; Alejandro Lucia

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental function of the respiratory system is the supply of oxygen to meet metabolic demand. Morphological constraints on the supply of oxygen, such as the structure of the lung, have previously been studied in birds. Recent research has shown that uncinate processes (UP) are important respiratory structures in birds, facilitating inspiratory and expiratory movements of the ribs and sternum.

  10. Metabolism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Metabolic Syndrome Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Your Child's ... System Thyroid Disorders Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Metabolic Syndrome Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel Blood Test: Comprehensive ...

  11. PPAR gene level differently affects lipid metabolism and inflammation in apolipoprotein E2 knock-in mice

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 PPAR gene level differently affects lipid metabolism and inflammation in apolipoprotein E2 knock metabolism and inflammation. PPAR is activated by fibrates, hypolipidemic drugs used in the treatment steatosis and inflammation compared to PPAR+/+ and PPAR+/- apoE2-KI mice, indicating a role of PPAR in liver

  12. Food restriction affects energy metabolism in rat liver mitochondria. Jean-Franois DUMAS, Damien ROUSSEL, Gilles SIMARD, Olivier DOUAY, Franoise

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Food restriction affects energy metabolism in rat liver mitochondria. Jean-François DUMAS, Damien metabolism, liver mitochondria were isolated from ad libitum and food restricted rats. Mitochondrial enzyme, in food restricted rats, liver mitochondria displayed diminished state 3 (-30%), state 4-oligomycin (-26

  13. Food chain transport of nanoparticles affects behaviour and fat metabolism in fish.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Tommy; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Lard, Mercy; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized (10(-9)-10(-7) m) particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides?cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level. PMID:22384193

  14. A photosynthetic process modelled by a metabolic P system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincenzo Manca; Roberto Pagliarini; Simone Zorzan

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process used by plants, algae and some bacteria to obtain biochemical energy from sunlight. It is the\\u000a most important process allowing life on earth. In this work, by applying the Log Gain theory of Metabolic P Systems, we define\\u000a a mathematical model of an important photosynthetic phenomenon, called Non Photochemical Quenching (shortly NPQ), that determines\\u000a the plant

  15. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  16. Implicit Processing of Visual Emotions Is Affected by Sound-Induced Affective States and Individual Affective Traits

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bertolino, Alessandro; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize emotions contained in facial expressions are affected by both affective traits and states and varies widely between individuals. While affective traits are stable in time, affective states can be regulated more rapidly by environmental stimuli, such as music, that indirectly modulate the brain state. Here, we tested whether a relaxing or irritating sound environment affects implicit processing of facial expressions. Moreover, we investigated whether and how individual traits of anxiety and emotional control interact with this process. 32 healthy subjects performed an implicit emotion processing task (presented to subjects as a gender discrimination task) while the sound environment was defined either by a) a therapeutic music sequence (MusiCure), b) a noise sequence or c) silence. Individual changes in mood were sampled before and after the task by a computerized questionnaire. Additionally, emotional control and trait anxiety were assessed in a separate session by paper and pencil questionnaires. Results showed a better mood after the MusiCure condition compared with the other experimental conditions and faster responses to happy faces during MusiCure compared with angry faces during Noise. Moreover, individuals with higher trait anxiety were faster in performing the implicit emotion processing task during MusiCure compared with Silence. These findings suggest that sound-induced affective states are associated with differential responses to angry and happy emotional faces at an implicit stage of processing, and that a relaxing sound environment facilitates the implicit emotional processing in anxious individuals. PMID:25072162

  17. Implicit processing of visual emotions is affected by sound-induced affective states and individual affective traits.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Tiziana; Blasi, Giuseppe; Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Bertolino, Alessandro; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize emotions contained in facial expressions are affected by both affective traits and states and varies widely between individuals. While affective traits are stable in time, affective states can be regulated more rapidly by environmental stimuli, such as music, that indirectly modulate the brain state. Here, we tested whether a relaxing or irritating sound environment affects implicit processing of facial expressions. Moreover, we investigated whether and how individual traits of anxiety and emotional control interact with this process. 32 healthy subjects performed an implicit emotion processing task (presented to subjects as a gender discrimination task) while the sound environment was defined either by a) a therapeutic music sequence (MusiCure), b) a noise sequence or c) silence. Individual changes in mood were sampled before and after the task by a computerized questionnaire. Additionally, emotional control and trait anxiety were assessed in a separate session by paper and pencil questionnaires. Results showed a better mood after the MusiCure condition compared with the other experimental conditions and faster responses to happy faces during MusiCure compared with angry faces during Noise. Moreover, individuals with higher trait anxiety were faster in performing the implicit emotion processing task during MusiCure compared with Silence. These findings suggest that sound-induced affective states are associated with differential responses to angry and happy emotional faces at an implicit stage of processing, and that a relaxing sound environment facilitates the implicit emotional processing in anxious individuals. PMID:25072162

  18. Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

    2011-02-01

    Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

  19. Evidence for efficacy of drugs affecting bone metabolism in preventing hip fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Johnell, O.; Gullberg, B.; Allander, E.; Dil?en, G.; Gennari, C.; Lopes Vaz, A. A.; Lyritis, G. P.; Mazzuoli, G.; Miravet, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of taking drugs affecting bone metabolism on the risk of hip fracture in women aged over 50 years. DESIGN--Retrospective, population based, case-control study by questionnaire. SETTING--14 centres in six countries in southern Europe. SUBJECTS--2086 women with hip fracture and 3532 control women matched for age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of drugs affecting bone metabolism taken and length taken for. RESULTS--Women taking drugs affecting bone metabolism had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture. After adjustment for differences in other risk factors, the relative risk of hip fractures was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.85) in women taking oestrogens, 0.75 (0.60 to 0.94) in those taking calcium, and 0.69 (0.51 to 0.92) in those taking calcitonin. The fall in risk was not significant for anabolic steroids (0.6 (0.29 to 1.22)). Neither vitamin D nor fluorides were associated with a significant decrease in the risk of hip fracture. The effect on hip fracture risk increased significantly with increasing duration of exposure (risk ratio 0.8 (0.61 to 1.05) for less than median exposure v 0.66 (0.5 to 0.88) for greater than median exposure). Drugs were equally effective in older and younger women, with the exception of oestrogen. CONCLUSIONS--Oestrogen, calcium, and calcitonins significantly decrease the risk of hip fracture. Short term intervention late in the natural course of osteoporosis may have significant effects on the incidence of hip fracture. PMID:1463947

  20. Studies of dynamical processes affecting global climate

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.; Cooper, D.; Eichinger, W. [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective was, by a combined theoretical and observational approach, to develop improved models of dynamic processes in the oceans and atmosphere and to incorporate them into large climate codes, chiefly in four main areas: numerical physics, chemistry, water vapor, and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Main areas of investigation included studies of: cloud parameterizations for global climate codes, Lidar and the planetary boundary layer, chemistry, climate variability using coupled ocean-atmospheric models, and numerical physical methods. This project employed a unique approach that included participation of a number of University of California faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students who collaborated with Los Alamos research staff on specific tasks, thus greatly enhancing the research output. Overall accomplishments during the sensing of the atmospheric planetary were: (1) first two- and three-dimensional remote sensing of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer using Lidars, (2) modeling of 20-year cycle in both pressure and sea surface temperatures in North Pacific, (3) modeling of low frequency internal variability, (4) addition of aerosols to stratosphere to simulate Pinatubo effect on ozone, (5) development of fast, comprehensive chemistry in the troposphere for urban pollution studies, (6) new prognostic cloud parameterization in global atmospheric code remedied problems with North Pacific atmospheric circulation and excessive equatorial precipitation, (7) development of a unique aerosol analysis technique, the aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), which allows real-time analysis of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, and (8) numerical physics applying Approximate Inertial Manifolds to ocean circulation. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  1. L-Carnosine Affects the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Metabolism-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Stephanie P.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Hipkiss, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (?-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose), 10–30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol), L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types. PMID:22984600

  2. Zea3: a pleiotropic mutation affecting cotyledon development, cytokinin resistance and carbon-nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Faure, J D; Jullien, M; Caboche, M

    1994-04-01

    When photomorphogenesis takes place during early plant development, the cotyledons undergo a metabolic transition from heterotrophic sink metabolism to autotrophic source metabolism. A mutant screen was devised for seedlings affected in the regulation of nitrate assimilation during this early sink-source transition in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. A mutant (EMS 203.6) was isolated for its inability to grow on low nitrate concentration. In contrast to wild-type (WT) plants, the mutant cotyledons remained tightly attached to each other throughout seedling development. It was found that a low carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N ratio) in the medium was required for mutant growth. The higher the ratio was, the more the growth was inhibited. Mutant EMS 203.6 accumulated all amino acids in permissive conditions (low C/N ratio), and all amino acids and sugars also in selective (high C/N ratio) conditions. In addition, sucrose in the medium repressed light-regulated genes involved in nitrate assimilation and in photosynthesis in the mutant but not in the WT plants. The mutation was mapped to the Zea3 complementation group which confers resistance to zeatin. This zeatin resistance was associated with a hypertrophy of mutant cotyledons in response to cytokinin. Both cytokinin resistance and sensitivity to a high C/N ratio were not observed in etiolated mutant seedlings and were restricted to the jointed-cotyledon developmental stage. Previous physiological studies showed evidence for a role of cytokinins in the expression of nitrate reductase. Here, the first genetic evidence for a link between carbohydrate/nitrogen metabolism and cytokinin action during early development is provided. PMID:8012402

  3. Unintentionality of affective attention across visual processing stages

    PubMed Central

    Uusberg, Andero; Uibo, Helen; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Tamm, Maria; Raidvee, Aire; Allik, Jüri

    2013-01-01

    Affective attention involves bottom-up perceptual selection that prioritizes motivationally significant stimuli. To clarify the extent to which this process is automatic, we investigated the dependence of affective attention on the intention to process emotional meaning. Affective attention was manipulated by presenting affective images with variable arousal and intentionality by requiring participants to make affective and non-affective evaluations. Polytomous rather than binary decisions were required from the participants in order to elicit relatively deep emotional processing. The temporal dynamics of prioritized processing were assessed using early posterior negativity (EPN, 175–300 ms) as well as P3-like (P3, 300–500 ms) and slow wave (SW, 500–1500 ms) portions of the late positive potential. All analyzed components were differentially sensitive to stimulus categories suggesting that they indeed reflect distinct stages of motivational significance encoding. The intention to perceive emotional meaning had no effect on EPN, an additive effect on P3, and an interactive effect on SW. We concluded that affective attention went from completely unintentional during the EPN to partially unintentional during P3 and SW where top-down signals, respectively, complemented and modulated bottom-up differences in stimulus prioritization. The findings were interpreted in light of two-stage models of visual perception by associating the EPN with large-capacity initial relevance detection and the P3 as well as SW with capacity-limited consolidation and elaboration of affective stimuli. PMID:24421772

  4. Plant maturity and nitrogen fertilization affected fructan metabolism in harvestable tissues of timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

    PubMed

    Ould-Ahmed, Marouf; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Lafrenière, Carole; Drouin, Pascal

    2014-10-15

    Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) is an important grass forage used for pasture, hay, and silage in regions with cool and humid growth seasons. One of the factors affecting the nutritive value of this grass is the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), mainly represented by fructans. NSC concentration depends on multiple factors, making it hardly predictable. To provide a better understanding of NSC metabolism in timothy, the effects of maturity stage and nitrogen (N) fertilization level on biomass, NSC and N-compound concentrations were investigated in the tissues used for forage (leaf blades and stems surrounded by leaf sheaths) of hydroponically grown plants. Moreover, activities and relative expression level of enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were measured in the same tissues. Forage biomass was not altered by the fertilization level but was strongly modified by the stage of development. It increased from vegetative to heading stages while leaf-to-stem biomass ratio decreased. Total NSC concentration, which was not altered by N fertilization level, increased between heading and anthesis due to an accumulation of fructans in leaf blades. Fructan metabolizing enzyme activities (fructosyltransferase-FT and fructan exohydrolase-FEH) were not or only slightly altered by both maturity stage and N fertilization level. Conversely, the relative transcript levels of genes coding for enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were modified by N supply (PpFT1 and Pp6-FEH1) or maturity stage (PpFT2). The relative transcript level of PpFT1 was the highest in low N plants while that of Pp6-FEH1 was the highest in high N plants. Morevoer, transcript level of PpFT1 was negatively correlated with nitrate concentration while that of PpFT2 was positively correlated with sucrose concentration. This distinct regulation of the two genes coding for 6-sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) may allow a fine adequation of C allocation towards fructan synthesis in response to carbon and N availability. Contrary to fructans, starch content increased in low N plants, suggesting different regulatory mechanisms and/or sensitivity of starch and fructan metabolism in relation to the N status. PMID:25105233

  5. Mercury exposure, nutritional deficiencies and metabolic disruptions may affect learning in children.

    PubMed

    Dufault, Renee; Schnoll, Roseanne; Lukiw, Walter J; Leblanc, Blaise; Cornett, Charles; Patrick, Lyn; Wallinga, David; Gilbert, Steven G; Crider, Raquel

    2009-01-01

    Among dietary factors, learning and behavior are influenced not only by nutrients, but also by exposure to toxic food contaminants such as mercury that can disrupt metabolic processes and alter neuronal plasticity. Neurons lacking in plasticity are a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and mental retardation. Essential nutrients help maintain normal neuronal plasticity. Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutritional deficiencies and mercury exposure have been shown to alter neuronal function and increase oxidative stress among children with autism. These dietary factors may be directly related to the development of behavior disorders and learning disabilities. Mercury, either individually or in concert with other factors, may be harmful if ingested in above average amounts or by sensitive individuals. High fructose corn syrup has been shown to contain trace amounts of mercury as a result of some manufacturing processes, and its consumption can also lead to zinc loss. Consumption of certain artificial food color additives has also been shown to lead to zinc deficiency. Dietary zinc is essential for maintaining the metabolic processes required for mercury elimination. Since high fructose corn syrup and artificial food color additives are common ingredients in many foodstuffs, their consumption should be considered in those individuals with nutritional deficits such as zinc deficiency or who are allergic or sensitive to the effects of mercury or unable to effectively metabolize and eliminate it from the body. PMID:19860886

  6. Mercury exposure, nutritional deficiencies and metabolic disruptions may affect learning in children

    PubMed Central

    Dufault, Renee; Schnoll, Roseanne; Lukiw, Walter J; LeBlanc, Blaise; Cornett, Charles; Patrick, Lyn; Wallinga, David; Gilbert, Steven G; Crider, Raquel

    2009-01-01

    Among dietary factors, learning and behavior are influenced not only by nutrients, but also by exposure to toxic food contaminants such as mercury that can disrupt metabolic processes and alter neuronal plasticity. Neurons lacking in plasticity are a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and mental retardation. Essential nutrients help maintain normal neuronal plasticity. Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutritional deficiencies and mercury exposure have been shown to alter neuronal function and increase oxidative stress among children with autism. These dietary factors may be directly related to the development of behavior disorders and learning disabilities. Mercury, either individually or in concert with other factors, may be harmful if ingested in above average amounts or by sensitive individuals. High fructose corn syrup has been shown to contain trace amounts of mercury as a result of some manufacturing processes, and its consumption can also lead to zinc loss. Consumption of certain artificial food color additives has also been shown to lead to zinc deficiency. Dietary zinc is essential for maintaining the metabolic processes required for mercury elimination. Since high fructose corn syrup and artificial food color additives are common ingredients in many foodstuffs, their consumption should be considered in those individuals with nutritional deficits such as zinc deficiency or who are allergic or sensitive to the effects of mercury or unable to effectively metabolize and eliminate it from the body. PMID:19860886

  7. Maternal Obesity Affects Fetal Neurodevelopmental and Metabolic Gene Expression: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Andrea G.; Vora, Neeta L.; Hui, Lisa; Wick, Heather C.; Cowan, Janet M.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective One in three pregnant women in the United States is obese. Their offspring are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental and metabolic morbidity. Underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed a global gene expression analysis of mid-trimester amniotic fluid cell-free fetal RNA in obese versus lean pregnant women. Methods This prospective pilot study included eight obese (BMI?30) and eight lean (BMI<25) women undergoing clinically indicated mid-trimester genetic amniocentesis. Subjects were matched for gestational age and fetal sex. Fetuses with abnormal karyotype or structural anomalies were excluded. Cell-free fetal RNA was extracted from amniotic fluid and hybridized to whole genome expression arrays. Genes significantly differentially regulated in 8/8 obese-lean pairs were identified using paired t-tests with the Benjamini-Hochberg correction (false discovery rate of <0.05). Biological interpretation was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the BioGPS gene expression atlas. Results In fetuses of obese pregnant women, 205 genes were significantly differentially regulated. Apolipoprotein D, a gene highly expressed in the central nervous system and integral to lipid regulation, was the most up-regulated gene (9-fold). Apoptotic cell death was significantly down-regulated, particularly within nervous system pathways involving the cerebral cortex. Activation of the transcriptional regulators estrogen receptor, FOS, and STAT3 was predicted in fetuses of obese women, suggesting a pro-estrogenic, pro-inflammatory milieu. Conclusion Maternal obesity affects fetal neurodevelopmental and metabolic gene expression as early as the second trimester. These findings may have implications for postnatal neurodevelopmental and metabolic abnormalities described in the offspring of obese women. PMID:24558408

  8. Unconscious associative memory affects visual processing before 100 ms

    E-print Network

    Gutkin, Boris

    that memory influences rather late steps of brain processing. In its simplest form, memory is seenUnconscious associative memory affects visual processing before 100 ms Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France, & CNRS, Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging Laboratory, Paris, France

  9. Plasticity and epistasis strongly affect bacterial fitness after losing multiple metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Glen; Waschina, Silvio; Kaleta, Christoph; Kost, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Many bacterial lineages lack seemingly essential metabolic genes. Previous work suggested selective benefits could drive the loss of biosynthetic functions from bacterial genomes when the corresponding metabolites are sufficiently available in the environment. However, the factors that govern this "genome streamlining" remain poorly understood. Here we determine the effect of plasticity and epistasis on the fitness of Escherichia coli genotypes from whose genome biosynthetic genes for one, two, or three different amino acids have been deleted. Competitive fitness experiments between auxotrophic mutants and prototrophic wild-type cells in one of two carbon environments revealed that plasticity and epistasis strongly affected the mutants' fitness individually and interactively. Positive and negative epistatic interactions were prevalent, yet on average cancelled each other out. Moreover, epistasis correlated negatively with the expected effects of combined auxotrophy-causing mutations, thus producing a pattern of diminishing returns. Moreover, computationally analyzing 1,432 eubacterial metabolic networks revealed that most pairs of auxotrophies co-occurred significantly more often than expected by chance, suggesting epistatic interactions and/or environmental factors favored these combinations. Our results demonstrate that both the genetic background and environmental conditions determine the adaptive value of a loss-of-biochemical-function mutation and that fitness gains decelerate, as more biochemical functions are lost. PMID:25765095

  10. Rice Protein Extracted by Different Methods Affects Cholesterol Metabolism in Rats Due to Its Lower Digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Chen, Jiahou; Xu, Tong; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Lanwei; Xu, Fuping; Liu, Hongbo

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate whether the digestibility is responsible for the hypocholesterolemic action of rice protein, the effects of rice proteins extracted by alkali (RP-A) and ?-amylase (RP-E) on cholesterol metabolism were investigated in 7-week-old male Wistar rats fed cholesterol-free diets for 3 weeks. The in vitro and in vivo digestibility was significantly reduced by RP-A and RP-E as compared to casein (CAS). The digestibility was lower in RP-E than that of RP-A. Compared with CAS, the significant cholesterol-lowering effects were observed in rats fed by RP-A and RP-E. Fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly stimulated by RP-E, but not by RP-A. The apparent cholesterol absorption was more effectively inhibited by RP-E than RP-A because more fecal neutral sterols were excreted in rats fed RP-E. There was a significant correlation between protein digestibility and cholesterol absorption (r = 0.8662, P < 0.01), resulting in a significant correlation between protein digestibility and plasma cholesterol level (r = 0.7357, P < 0.01) in this study. The present study demonstrates that the digestibility of rice protein affected by extraction method plays a major role in the modulation of cholesterol metabolism. Results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action induced by rice protein with lower digestibility primarily contribute to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption. PMID:22174619

  11. The effects of adrenaline and other drugs affecting carbohydrate metabolism on contractions of the rat diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W. C.; Raper, C.

    1964-01-01

    The ability of several drugs to restore directly elicited twitches of the rat diaphragm depressed by excess potassium chloride has been studied. The drugs found to be effective were sympathomimetic amines, insulin, glucagon, caffeine, theophylline, calcium chloride and hexosephosphates. The effects of the sympathomimetic amines and glucagon were blocked by ?-receptor blocking agents. Phloridzin blocked the effect of insulin and depressed that of glucagon. The increase in twitch tension still occurred under anaerobic conditions and was not abolished by the glycolytic inhibitor, iodoacetate. All of the effective drugs are known to affect carbohydrate metabolism and the suggestion by Ellis (1955) that the effect on contractions may be a result of increased intracellular hexosephosphate levels is discussed. PMID:14208194

  12. Fatty acid metabolism during maturation affects glucose uptake and is essential to oocyte competence.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, M; Schoolcraft, W B; Krisher, R L

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid ?-oxidation (FAO) is essential for oocyte maturation in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of etomoxir (a FAO inhibitor; 100??M), carnitine (1?mM), and palmitic acid (1 or 100??M) during maturation on metabolism and gene expression of the oocyte and cumulus cells, and subsequent embryo development in the mouse. Carnitine significantly increased embryo development, while there was a decrease in development following maturation with 100??M palmitic acid or etomoxir (P<0.05) treatment. Glucose consumption per cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) was decreased after treatment with carnitine and increased following etomoxir treatment (P<0.05). Intracellular oocyte lipid content was decreased after carnitine or etomoxir exposure (P<0.05). Abundance of Slc2a1 (Glut1) was increased after etomoxir treatment in the oocyte and cumulus cells (P<0.05), suggesting stimulation of glucose transport and potentially the glycolytic pathway for energy production when FAO is inhibited. Abundance of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2) tended to increase in oocytes (P=0.1) after treatment with 100??M palmitic acid and in cumulus cells after exposure to 1??M palmitic acid (P=0.07). Combined with carnitine, 1??M palmitic acid increased the abundance of Acsl3 (P<0.05) and Cpt2 tended to increase (P=0.07) in cumulus cells, suggesting FAO was increased during maturation in response to stimulators and fatty acids. In conclusion, fatty acid and glucose metabolism are related to the mouse COC, as inhibition of FAO increases glucose consumption. Stimulation of FAO decreases glucose consumption and lipid stores, positively affecting subsequent embryo development, while an overabundance of fatty acid or reduced FAO negatively affects oocyte quality. PMID:25062802

  13. Dietary L-carnitine affects periparturient nutrient metabolism and lactation in multiparous cows.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; McFadden, J W; D'Angelo, A; Woodworth, J C; Drackley, J K

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine supplementation on liver lipid accumulation, hepatic nutrient metabolism, and lactation in multiparous cows during the periparturient period. Cows were assigned to treatments at d -25 relative to expected calving date and remained on the experiment until 56 d in milk. Treatments were 4 amounts of supplemental dietary carnitine: control (0 g/d of L-carnitine; n = 14); low carnitine (LC, 6 g/d; n = 11); medium carnitine (MC, 50 g/d; n = 12); and high carnitine (HC, 100 g/d; n = 12). Carnitine was supplied by mixing a feed-grade carnitine supplement with 113.5 g of ground corn and 113.5 g of dried molasses, which was then fed twice daily as a topdress to achieve desired daily carnitine intakes. Carnitine supplementation began on d -14 relative to expected calving and continued until 21 d in milk. Liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were markedly increased by MC and HC treatments. Milk carnitine concentrations were elevated by all amounts of carnitine supplementation, but were greater for MC and HC than for LC during wk 2 of lactation. Dry matter intake and milk yield were decreased by the HC treatment. The MC and HC treatments increased milk fat concentration, although milk fat yield was unaffected. All carnitine treatments decreased liver total lipid and triacylglycerol accumulation on d 10 after calving. In addition, carnitine-supplemented cows had higher liver glycogen during early lactation. In general, carnitine supplementation increased in vitro palmitate beta-oxidation by liver slices, with MC and HC treatments affecting in vitro palmitate metabolism more potently than did LC. In vitro conversion of Ala to glucose by liver slices was increased by carnitine supplementation independent of dose. The concentration of nonesterified fatty acids in serum was not affected by carnitine. As a result of greater hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation, plasma beta-hydroxybutyric acid was higher for the MC and HC treatments. Serum insulin was greater for all carnitine treatments, although plasma glucose was unaffected. Plasma urea N was lower and plasma total protein was higher for the MC and HC treatments. By decreasing liver lipid accumulation and stimulating hepatic glucose output, carnitine supplementation might improve glucose status and diminish the risk of developing metabolic disorders during early lactation. PMID:17582127

  14. Relationship between auditory processing and affective prosody in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jahshan, Carol; Wynn, Jonathan K; Green, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have well-established deficits in their ability to identify emotion from facial expression and tone of voice. In the visual modality, there is strong evidence that basic processing deficits contribute to impaired facial affect recognition in schizophrenia. However, few studies have examined the auditory modality for mechanisms underlying affective prosody identification. In this study, we explored links between different stages of auditory processing, using event-related potentials (ERPs), and affective prosody detection in schizophrenia. Thirty-six schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy control subjects received tasks of affective prosody, facial emotion identification, and tone matching, as well as two auditory oddball paradigms, one passive for mismatch negativity (MMN) and one active for P300. Patients had significantly reduced MMN and P300 amplitudes, impaired auditory and visual emotion recognition, and poorer tone matching performance, relative to healthy controls. Correlations between ERP and behavioral measures within the patient group revealed significant associations between affective prosody recognition and both MMN and P300 amplitudes. These relationships were modality specific, as MMN and P300 did not correlate with facial emotion recognition. The two ERP waves accounted for 49% of the variance in affective prosody in a regression analysis. Our results support previous suggestions of a relationship between basic auditory processing abnormalities and affective prosody dysfunction in schizophrenia, and indicate that both relatively automatic pre-attentive processes (MMN) and later attention-dependent processes (P300) are involved with accurate auditory emotion identification. These findings provide support for bottom-up (e.g., perceptually based) cognitive remediation approaches. PMID:23276478

  15. Diet affects resting, but not basal metabolic rate of normothermic Siberian hamsters acclimated to winter.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Jakub P; Wojciechowski, Micha? S; Jefimow, Ma?gorzata

    2011-12-01

    We examined the effect of different dietary supplements on seasonal changes in body mass (m(b)), metabolic rate (MR) and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) capacity in normothermic Siberian hamsters housed under semi-natural conditions. Once a week standard hamster food was supplemented with either sunflower and flax seeds, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA), or mealworms, rich in saturated and monounsaturated FA. We found that neither of these dietary supplements affected the hamsters' normal winter decrease in m(b) and fat content nor their basal MR or NST capacity. NST capacity of summer-acclimated hamsters was lower than that of winter-acclimated ones. The composition of total body fat reflected the fat composition of the dietary supplements. Resting MR below the lower critical temperature of the hamsters, and their total serum cholesterol concentration were lower in hamsters fed a diet supplemented with mealworms than in hamsters fed a diet supplemented with seeds. These results indicate that in mealworm-fed hamsters energy expenditure in the cold is lower than in animals eating a seed-supplemented diet, and that the degree of FA unsaturation of diet affects energetics of heterotherms, not only during torpor, but also during normothermy. PMID:21889598

  16. Duodenal infusions of palmitic, stearic or oleic acids differently affect mammary gland metabolism of fatty acids in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, F; Nicot, M C; Bayourthe, C; Moncoulon, R

    1998-09-01

    The effect of dietary lipids on the fatty acid (FA) profile of cows' milk fat is mainly dependent on digestive processes and mammary gland uptake and metabolism of FA. The objective of this study was to determine the separate effects of high arterial concentrations of 16:0, 18:0 and cis-18:1(n-9) on uptake, synthesis and 18:0 desaturation rate in the mammary gland of lactating dairy cows, via arterio-venous differences and mammary gland balance of FA. In a 4 x 4 Latin square, four lactating Holstein cows with cannula in the proximal duodenum were infused duodenally with a mixture providing daily 0 (C treatment) or 500 g FA with mainly 16:0 (P treatment), 18:0 (S treatment) or cis-18:1(n-9) (O treatment). Significantly higher arterial concentrations of infused FA in arterial plasma nonesterified FA and triglycerides (NETGFA) were observed with P and O treatments, but the effect of the S treatment was much lower. Arterio-venous differences of NETGFA increased with arterial concentrations. The number of synthesized FA in the mammary gland was not significantly affected by duodenal infusion of FA. Mean chain length was significantly reduced by P and O treatments, suggesting an effect of mammary gland uptake of long-chain FA on the termination process of mammary gland synthesis of FA. Across all treatments, 4:0 mammary gland balance increased linearly (r = 0.67, P = 0.004) with mammary gland FA uptake. Mammary gland desaturation of 18:0 to cis-18:1(n-9) averaged 52% and was not significantly affected by treatments, but was reduced by trans-18:1 mammary gland uptake. Uptake, synthesis and desaturation of FA by the mammary gland of dairy cows are affected by arterial concentrations of 16:0, 18:0 and cis-18:1(n-9). PMID:9732314

  17. Diet-induced alterations of host cholesterol metabolism are likely to affect the gut microbiota composition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Inés; Perdicaro, Diahann J; Brown, Andrew W; Hammons, Susan; Carden, Trevor J; Carr, Timothy P; Eskridge, Kent M; Walter, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota affects the metabolism of the mammalian host and has consequences for health. However, the complexity of gut microbial communities and host metabolic pathways make functional connections difficult to unravel, especially in terms of causation. In this study, we have characterized the fecal microbiota of hamsters whose cholesterol metabolism was extensively modulated by the dietary addition of plant sterol esters (PSE). PSE intake induced dramatic shifts in the fecal microbiota, reducing several bacterial taxa within the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae. The abundance of these taxa displayed remarkably high correlations with host cholesterol metabolites. Most importantly, the associations between several bacterial taxa with fecal and biliary cholesterol excretion showed an almost perfect fit to a sigmoidal nonlinear model of bacterial inhibition, suggesting that host cholesterol excretion can shape microbiota structure through the antibacterial action of cholesterol. In vitro experiments suggested a modest antibacterial effect of cholesterol, and especially of cholesteryl-linoleate, but not plant sterols when included in model bile micelles. The findings obtained in this study are relevant to our understanding of gut microbiota-host lipid metabolism interactions, as they provide the first evidence for a role of cholesterol excreted with the bile as a relevant host factor that modulates the gut microbiota. The findings further suggest that the connections between Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae and host lipid metabolism, which have been observed in several studies, could be caused by a metabolic phenotype of the host (cholesterol excretion) affecting the gut microbiota. PMID:23124234

  18. Diet-Induced Alterations of Host Cholesterol Metabolism Are Likely To Affect the Gut Microbiota Composition in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Inés; Perdicaro, Diahann J.; Brown, Andrew W.; Hammons, Susan; Carden, Trevor J.; Carr, Timothy P.; Eskridge, Kent M.

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota affects the metabolism of the mammalian host and has consequences for health. However, the complexity of gut microbial communities and host metabolic pathways make functional connections difficult to unravel, especially in terms of causation. In this study, we have characterized the fecal microbiota of hamsters whose cholesterol metabolism was extensively modulated by the dietary addition of plant sterol esters (PSE). PSE intake induced dramatic shifts in the fecal microbiota, reducing several bacterial taxa within the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae. The abundance of these taxa displayed remarkably high correlations with host cholesterol metabolites. Most importantly, the associations between several bacterial taxa with fecal and biliary cholesterol excretion showed an almost perfect fit to a sigmoidal nonlinear model of bacterial inhibition, suggesting that host cholesterol excretion can shape microbiota structure through the antibacterial action of cholesterol. In vitro experiments suggested a modest antibacterial effect of cholesterol, and especially of cholesteryl-linoleate, but not plant sterols when included in model bile micelles. The findings obtained in this study are relevant to our understanding of gut microbiota-host lipid metabolism interactions, as they provide the first evidence for a role of cholesterol excreted with the bile as a relevant host factor that modulates the gut microbiota. The findings further suggest that the connections between Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae and host lipid metabolism, which have been observed in several studies, could be caused by a metabolic phenotype of the host (cholesterol excretion) affecting the gut microbiota. PMID:23124234

  19. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth's surface area, they have a profound influence on the biogeochemistry of the planet. This is evident from the observation that the O2 and CH4 content of Earth's atmosphere are in extreme disequilibrium (Sagan et al., 1993). The combination of high aerobic primary production and anoxic sediments provided the large deposits of fossil fuels that have become vital and contentious sources of energy for modern industrialized societies. Anaerobic metabolism is responsible for the abundance of N2 in the atmosphere; otherwise N2-fixing bacteria would have consumed most of the N2 pool long ago (Schlesinger, 1997). Anaerobic microorganisms are common symbionts of termites, cattle, and many other animals, where they aid digestion. Nutrient and pollutant chemistry are strongly modified by the reduced conditions that prevail in wetland and aquatic ecosystems.This review of anaerobic metabolism emphasizes aerobic oxidation, because the two processes cannot be separated in a complete treatment of the topic. It is process oriented and highlights the fascinating microorganisms that mediate anaerobic biogeochemistry. We begin this review with a brief discussion of CO2 assimilation by autotrophs, the source of most of the reducing power on Earth, and then consider the biological processes that harness this potential energy. Energy liberation begins with the decomposition of organic macromolecules to relatively simple compounds, which are simplified further by fermentation. Methanogenesis is considered next because CH4 is a product of acetate fermentation, and thus completes the catabolism of organic matter, particularly in the absence of inorganic electron acceptors. Finally, the organisms that use nitrogen, manganese, iron, and sulfur for terminal electron acceptors are considered in order of decreasing free-energy yield of the reactions.

  20. Affective picture processing: An integrative review of ERP findings

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jonas K.; Nordin, Steven; Sequeira, Henrique; Polich, John

    2008-01-01

    The review summarizes and integrates findings from 40 years of event-related potential (ERP) studies using pictures that differ in valence (unpleasant-to-pleasant) and arousal (low-to-high) and that are used to elicit emotional processing. Affective stimulus factors primarily modulate ERP component amplitude, with little change in peak latency observed. Arousal effects are consistently obtained, and generally occur at longer latencies. Valence effects are inconsistently reported at several latency ranges, including very early components. Some affective ERP modulations vary with recording methodology, stimulus factors, as well as task-relevance and emotional state. Affective ERPs have been linked theoretically to attention orientation for unpleasant pictures at earlier components (< 300 ms). Enhanced stimulus processing has been associated with memory encoding for arousing pictures of assumed intrinsic motivational relevance, with task-induced differences contributing to emotional reactivity at later components (> 300 ms). Theoretical issues, stimulus factors, task demands, and individual differences are discussed. PMID:18164800

  1. Developing Worksheet Based on Science Process Skills: Factors Affecting Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsli, Fethiye; Sahin, Cigdem

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a worksheet about the factors affecting solubility, which could be useful for the prospective science teachers (PST) to remind and regain their science process skills (SPS). The pilot study of the WS was carried out with 32 first grade PST during the 2007-2008 academic year in the education department at…

  2. REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity in permanent grasslands. A review delivered convincing findings on the effect of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning and humankind. Indeed evaluation of biodiversity benefits remains challenging. This issue is due to valuation methods, subjective

  3. Water deficit alters differentially metabolic pathways affecting important flavor and quality traits in grape berries of Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent G Deluc; David R Quilici; Alain Decendit; Jérôme Grimplet; Matthew D Wheatley; Karen A Schlauch; Jean-Michel Mérillon; John C Cushman; Grant R Cramer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water deficit has significant effects on grape berry composition resulting in improved wine quality by the enhancement of color, flavors, or aromas. While some pathways or enzymes affected by water deficit have been identified, little is known about the global effects of water deficit on grape berry metabolism. RESULTS: The effects of long-term, seasonal water deficit on berries of

  4. Biochem. J. (1999) 340, 621630 (Printed in Great Britain) 621 How aneuploidy affects metabolic control and causes cancer

    E-print Network

    Duesberg, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Biochem. J. (1999) 340, 621­630 (Printed in Great Britain) 621 How aneuploidy affects metabolic control and causes cancer David RASNICK1 and Peter H. DUESBERG Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and diversity of cancer-specific phenotypes, including de-differentiation, invasiveness, metastasis, abnormal

  5. Metabolism of Dairy Cows as Affected by Prepartum Dietary Carbohydrate Source and Supplementation with Chromium Throughout the Periparturient Period1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. Smith; M. R. Waldron; L. C. Ruzzi; J. K. Drackley; M. T. Socha; T. R. Overton

    2008-01-01

    Holstein cows (n = 72) entering second or later lacta- tion were used to determine whether metabolic indices and hepatic capacities for oxidation and gluconeogene- sis from propionate are affected by source of carbohy- drate in the prepartum diet and chromium-L-methio- nine (Cr-Met) supplementation throughout the peri- parturient period. Cows were fed prepartum diets as total mixed rations with the

  6. Conserved changes in the dynamics of metabolic processes during fruit development and ripening across species.

    PubMed

    Klie, Sebastian; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Drincovich, María F; Fait, Aaron; Giovannoni, James J; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Computational analyses of molecular phenotypes traditionally aim at identifying biochemical components that exhibit differential expression under various scenarios (e.g. environmental and internal perturbations) in a single species. High-throughput metabolomics technologies allow the quantification of (relative) metabolite levels across developmental stages in different tissues, organs, and species. Novel methods for analyzing the resulting multiple data tables could reveal preserved dynamics of metabolic processes across species. The problem we address in this study is 2-fold. (1) We derive a single data table, referred to as a compromise, which captures information common to the investigated set of multiple tables containing data on different fruit development and ripening stages in three climacteric (i.e. peach [Prunus persica] and two tomato [Solanum lycopersicum] cultivars, Ailsa Craig and M82) and two nonclimacteric (i.e. strawberry [Fragaria × ananassa] and pepper [Capsicum chilense]) fruits; in addition, we demonstrate the power of the method to discern similarities and differences between multiple tables by analyzing publicly available metabolomics data from three tomato ripening mutants together with two tomato cultivars. (2) We identify the conserved dynamics of metabolic processes, reflected in the data profiles of the corresponding metabolites that contribute most to the determined compromise. Our analysis is based on an extension to principal component analysis, called STATIS, in combination with pathway overenrichment analysis. Based on publicly available metabolic profiles for the investigated species, we demonstrate that STATIS can be used to identify the metabolic processes whose behavior is similarly affected during fruit development and ripening. These findings ultimately provide insights into the pathways that are essential during fruit development and ripening across species. PMID:24243932

  7. Necker's smile: Immediate affective consequences of early perceptual processes.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Erle, Thorsten M; Reber, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    Current theories assume that perception and affect are separate realms of the mind. In contrast, we argue that affect is a genuine online-component of perception instantaneously mirroring the success of different perceptual stages. Consequently, we predicted that the success (failure) of even very early and cognitively encapsulated basic visual processing steps would trigger immediate positive (negative) affective responses. To test this assumption, simple visual stimuli that either allowed or obstructed early visual processing stages without participants being aware of this were presented briefly. Across 5 experiments, we found more positive affective responses to stimuli that allowed rather than obstructed Gestalt completion at certain early visual stages (Experiments 1-3; briefest presentation 100ms with post-mask), and visual disambiguation in possible vs. impossible Necker cubes (Experiments 4 and 5; briefest presentation 100ms with post-mask). This effect was observed both on verbal preference ratings (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and as facial muscle responses occurring within 2-4s after stimulus onset (zygomaticus activity; Experiments 3 and 7). For instance, in participants unaware of spatial possibility we found affective discrimination between possible and impossible Necker cubes (the famous Freemish Crate) for 100ms presentation timings, although a conscious discrimination took more than 2000ms (Experiment 4). PMID:25855534

  8. Positive affect and psychobiological processes relevant to health.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Dockray, Samantha; Wardle, Jane

    2009-12-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that there are marked associations between positive psychological states and health outcomes, including reduced cardiovascular disease risk and increased resistance to infection. These observations have stimulated the investigation of behavioral and biological processes that might mediate protective effects. Evidence linking positive affect with health behaviors has been mixed, though recent cross-cultural research has documented associations with exercising regularly, not smoking, and prudent diet. At the biological level, cortisol output has been consistently shown to be lower among individuals reporting positive affect, and favorable associations with heart rate, blood pressure, and inflammatory markers such as interleukin-6 have also been described. Importantly, these relationships are independent of negative affect and depressed mood, suggesting that positive affect may have distinctive biological correlates that can benefit health. At the same time, positive affect is associated with protective psychosocial factors such as greater social connectedness, perceived social support, optimism, and preference for adaptive coping responses. Positive affect may be part of a broader profile of psychosocial resilience that reduces risk of adverse physical health outcomes. PMID:19796062

  9. Humans Process Dog and Human Facial Affect in Similar Ways

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Annett; Seow, Cui Shan; Penney, Trevor B.

    2013-01-01

    Humans share aspects of their facial affect with other species such as dogs. Here we asked whether untrained human observers with and without dog experience are sensitive to these aspects and recognize dog affect with better-than-chance accuracy. Additionally, we explored similarities in the way observers process dog and human expressions. The stimulus material comprised naturalistic facial expressions of pet dogs and human infants obtained through positive (i.e., play) and negative (i.e., social isolation) provocation. Affect recognition was assessed explicitly in a rating task using full face images and images cropped to reveal the eye region only. Additionally, affect recognition was assessed implicitly in a lexical decision task using full faces as primes and emotional words and pseudowords as targets. We found that untrained human observers rated full face dog expressions from the positive and negative condition more accurately than would be expected by chance. Although dog experience was unnecessary for this effect, it significantly facilitated performance. Additionally, we observed a range of similarities between human and dog face processing. First, the facial expressions of both species facilitated lexical decisions to affectively congruous target words suggesting that their processing was equally automatic. Second, both dog and human negative expressions were recognized from both full and cropped faces. Third, female observers were more sensitive to affective information than were male observers and this difference was comparable for dog and human expressions. Together, these results extend existing work on cross-species similarities in facial emotions and provide evidence that these similarities are naturally exploited when humans interact with dogs. PMID:24023954

  10. Differential opioid action on sensory and affective cerebral pain processing.

    PubMed

    Oertel, B G; Preibisch, C; Wallenhorst, T; Hummel, T; Geisslinger, G; Lanfermann, H; Lötsch, J

    2008-04-01

    Low doses of morphine, the most commonly used opioid analgesic, have been shown to significantly reduce the affective but not the sensory intensive dimension of pain. This suggests differential dose-response relationships of opioid analgesia on the sensory and affective components of pain. We investigated the effects of different alfentanil plasma concentration levels (0, 19.6+/-2.7, 47.2+/-7.6, and 76.6+/-11.3 ng/ml) on pain-related brain activation achieved by short pulses of gaseous CO(2) delivered to the nasal mucosa, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on a 3.0 T MRI scanner in 16 non-carriers and 9 homozygous carriers of the mu-opioid receptor gene variant OPRM1 118A>G. Increasing opioid concentrations had differential effects in brain regions processing the sensory and affective dimensions of pain. In brain regions associated with the processing of the sensory intensity of pain (primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, posterior insular cortex), activation decreased linearly in relation to alfentanil concentrations, which was significantly less pronounced in OPRM1 118G carriers. In contrast, in brain regions known to process the affective dimension of pain (parahippocampal gyrus, amygdala, anterior insula), pain-related activation disappeared at the lowest alfentanil dose, without genotype differences. PMID:18030306

  11. Cyanobacteria gene and protein sequences in diurnal oscillation metabolic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, George, Jr.; Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Dehipawala, S.; Gadura, N.; Golebiewska, U.; Valentin, K.; Smulczeski, M.; Satizabal, W.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2010-09-01

    Daytime photosynthesis and nighttime nitrogen fixation metabolic processes have been reported in the bacterium, Cyanothece 51142. The organism's auto-fluorescence with 532 nm excitation would place cyanobacteria at the forefront in the remote sensing of microbial activity in astrobiology. The sensitivity of nitrogenase to oxygen was studied in terms of sequence nucleotide fluctuation. A nucleotide sequence fractal dimension can be calculated from a numerical series consisting of the atomic numbers of each nucleotide. The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy form a two-dimensional measure that is useful in assessing evolutionary pressures. The studied sequences include nitrogenase iron protein NifH, nitrogenase molybdenum-iron protein alpha chain NifD and beta chain NifK. The photosynthesis-lacking UCYN-A cyanobacterium as reported recently in the journal, Nature, was observed to have the lowest entropy with relatively high fractal dimension values in the studied NifH, NifD and NifH sequences. The fractal dimension of NifH sequences correlates with the NifD sequence values with an R-square of 0.91 (N = 8). The Shannon mononucleotide entropy of NifD sequences correlates with the NifK sequence values with an R-square value of 0.92 (N = 8). The observed strong correlation suggests the presence of gradual evolutionary pressure among the studied cyanobacteria, and throws light on the reported paradox in evolution for the case of UCYN-A. The results show that diurnal oscillation metabolic processes in cyanobacteria (including the photosynthesis-deficient case) are not associated with extraordinary evolutionary pressures and thus are processes consistent with putative astrobiological organisms.

  12. Inhibitors of plant invertases do not affect the structurally related enzymes of fructan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Ute; Harms, Karsten; Rausch, Thomas; Greiner, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Plant fructan active enzymes (FAZYs), including the enzymes involved in inulin metabolism, namely sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; EC 2.4.1.99), fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT; EC 2.4.1.100) and fructan 1-exohydrolase (1-FEH; EC 3.2.1.153), are evolutionarily related to acid invertases (AIs), that is, plant cell wall invertase (CWI) and vacuolar invertase (VI). Acid invertases are post-translationally controlled by proteinaceous inhibitors. Whether FAZYs are subject to similar controls is not known. To probe their possible interactions with invertase inhibitors, we transiently expressed chicory (Cichorium intybus) FAZYs, as well as several previously characterized invertase inhibitors from nonfructan species, and the C. intybus cell wall/vacuolar inhibitor of fructosidase (CiC/VIF), a putative invertase inhibitor of a fructan-accumulating plant, in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Leaf extracts containing recombinant, enzymatically active FAZYs were used to explore the interaction with invertase inhibitors. Neither heterologous inhibitors nor CiC/VIF affected FAZY activities. CiC/VIF was confirmed as an AI inhibitor with a stronger effect on CWI than on VI. Its expression in planta was developmentally regulated (high in taproots, and undetectable in leaves and flowers). In agreement with its target specificities, CiC/VIF was associated with the cell wall. It is concluded that subtle structural differences between AIs and FAZYs result in pronounced selectivity of inhibitor action. PMID:19037899

  13. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. (Dept. of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  14. Water Deficit Affected Flavonoid Accumulation by Regulating Hormone Metabolism in Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Roots

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chong; Chen, Shunqin; Wang, Zhouyong; Yang, Zhaochun; Qin, Shuangshuang; Huang, Luqi

    2012-01-01

    The content of flavonoids especially baicalin and baicalein determined the medical quality of Scutellaria baicalensis which is a Chinese traditional medicinal plant. Here, we investigated the mechanism responsible for the content and composition of flavonoids in S. baicalensis under water deficit condition. The transcription levels of several genes which are involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were stimulated by water deficit. Under water deficit condition, fifteen up-regulated proteins, three down-regulated proteins and other six proteins were detected by proteomic analysis. The identified proteins include three gibberellin (GA)- or indoleacetic acid (IAA)-related proteins. Decreased endogenous GAs level and increased IAA level were observed in leaves of S. baicalensis which was treated with water deficit. Exogenous application of GA or ?-naphthalene acelic acid (NAA) to plants grown under water deficit conditions led to the increase of endogenous GAs and the decrease of IAA and flavonoids, respectively. When the synthesis pathway of GA or IAA in plants was inhibited by application with the inhibitors, flavonoid levels were recovered. These results indicate that water deficit affected flavonoid accumulation might through regulating hormone metabolism in S. baicalensis Georgi. PMID:23077481

  15. Alkyl-methylimidazolium ionic liquids affect the growth and fermentative metabolism of Clostridium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Nancharaiah, Y.V.; Francis, A.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the effect of ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [EMIM][Ac], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate [EMIM][DEP], and 1-methyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate [MMIM][DMP] on the growth and glucose fermentation of Clostridium sp. was investigated. Among the three ionic liquids tested, [MMIM][DMP] was found to be least toxic. Growth of Clostridium sp. was not inhibited up to 2.5, 4 and 4 g L{sup -1} of [EMIM][Ac], [EMIM][DEP] and [MMIM][DMP], respectively. [EMIM][Ac] at <2.5 g L{sup -1}, showed hormetic effect and stimulated the growth and fermentation by modulating medium pH. Total organic acid production increased in the presence of 2.5 and 2 g L{sup -1} of [EMIM][Ac] and [MMIM][DMP]. Ionic liquids had no significant influence on alcohol production at <2.5 g L{sup -1}. Total gas production was affected by ILs at {ge}2.5 g L{sup -1} and varied with type of methylimidazolium IL. Overall, the results show that the growth and fermentative metabolism of Clostridium sp. is not impacted by ILs at concentrations below 2.5 g L{sup -1}.

  16. Application of Pulsed Melodic Affective Processing to Stock Market Algorithmic Trading and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    ("melodies") for processing ­ capable of representing affective states. Affective processing and affectiveApplication of Pulsed Melodic Affective Processing to Stock Market Algorithmic Trading and Analysis.Kirke, Eduardo.Miranda}@Plymouth.ac.uk Abstract. The application of Pulsed Melodic Affective Processing (PMAP

  17. Free Fatty Acids and Their Metabolism Affect Function and Survival of Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Jonas; Jehle, Andreas Werner

    2014-01-01

    Podocyte injury and loss critically contribute to the pathogenesis of proteinuric kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy. Deregulated lipid metabolism with disturbed free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism is a characteristic of metabolically unhealthy obesity and type 2 diabetes and likely contributes to end-stage kidney disease irrespective of the underlying kidney disease. In the current review, we summarize recent findings related to FFAs and altered renal FFA metabolism with a special focus on podocytes. We will outline the opposing effects of saturated and monounsaturated FFAs and a particular emphasis will be given to the underlying molecular mechanisms involving insulin resistance and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. Finally, recent data suggesting a critical role of renal FFA metabolism to adapt to an altered lipid environment will be discussed. PMID:25386168

  18. Application of ultrasound processed images in space: assessing diffuse affectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Poch, A.; Bru, C.; Nicolau, C.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffuse affectations in the liver using texture image processing techniques. Ultrasound diagnose equipments are the election of choice to be used in space environments as they are free from hazardous effects on health. However, due to the need for highly trained radiologists to assess the images, this imaging method is mainly applied on focal lesions rather than on non-focal ones. We have conducted a clinical study on 72 patients with different degrees of chronic hepatopaties and a group of control of 18 individuals. All subjects' clinical reports and results of biopsies were compared to the degree of affectation calculated by our computer system , thus validating the method. Full statistical results are given in the present paper showing a good correlation (r=0.61) between pathologist's report and analysis of the heterogenicity of the processed images from the liver. This computer system to analyze diffuse affectations may be used in-situ or via telemedicine to the ground.

  19. Early life stress affects cerebral glucose metabolism in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.; Boudreau, Matthew; Hecht, Erin; Winslow, James T.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Sánchez, Mar M.

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for anxiety, mood disorders and alterations in stress responses. Less is known about the long-term neurobiological impact of ELS. We used [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) to assess neural responses to a moderate stress test in adult monkeys that experienced ELS as infants. Both groups of monkeys showed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-induced activations and cardiac arousal in response to the stressor. A whole brain analysis detected significantly greater regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in superior temporal sulcus, putamen, thalamus, and inferotemporal cortex of ELS animals compared to controls. Region of interest (ROI) analyses performed in areas identified as vulnerable to ELS showed greater activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of ELS compared to control monkeys, but greater hippocampal activity in the control compared to ELS monkeys. Together, these results suggest hyperactivity in emotional and sensory processing regions of adult monkeys with ELS, and greater activity in stress-regulatory areas in the controls. Despite these neural responses, no group differences were detected in neuroendocrine, autonomic or behavioral responses, except for a trend towards increased stillness in the ELS monkeys. Together, these data suggest hypervigilance in the ELS monkeys in the absence of immediate danger. PMID:22682736

  20. Agricultural management affects evolutionary processes in a migratory songbird.

    PubMed

    Perlut, Noah G; Freeman-Gallant, Corey R; Strong, Allan M; Donovan, Therese M; Kilpatrick, C William; Zalik, Nathan J

    2008-03-01

    Hay harvests have detrimental ecological effects on breeding songbirds, as harvesting results in nest failure. Importantly, whether harvesting also affects evolutionary processes is not known. We explored how hay harvest affected social and genetic mating patterns, and thus, the overall opportunity for sexual selection and evolutionary processes for a ground-nesting songbird, the Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis). On an unharvested field, 55% of females were in polygynous associations, and social polygyny was associated with greater rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP). In this treatment, synchrony explained variation in EPP rates, as broods by more synchronous females had more EPP than broods by asynchronous females. In contrast, on a harvested field, simultaneous nest failure caused by haying dramatically decreased the overall incidence of EPP by increasing the occurrence of social monogamy and, apparently, the ability of polygynous males to maintain paternity in their own nests. Despite increased social and genetic monogamy, these haying-mediated changes in mating systems resulted in greater than twofold increase in the opportunity for sexual selection. This effect arose, in part, from a 30% increase in the variance associated with within-pair fertilization success, relative to the unharvested field. This effect was caused by a notable increase (+110%) in variance associated with the quality of social mates following simultaneous nest failure. Because up to 40% of regional habitat is harvested by early June, these data may demonstrate a strong population-level effect on mating systems, sexual selection, and consequently, evolutionary processes. PMID:18302687

  1. Mutations and Polymorphisms in Genes Affecting Hemostasis Proteins and Homocysteine Metabolism in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Komitopoulou; H. Platokouki; Z. Kapsimali; H. Pergantou; E. Adamtziki; S. Aronis

    2006-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of thrombosis in childhood seems to be multifactorial implicating genetic and environmental factors. Aim: To compare the distributions of mutations\\/polymorphisms in genes affecting hemostasis (factor V Leiden – FVL, FV H1298R-FVR2, FII 20210A, b-Fib 455G>A, FXIII V34L, PAI-1 4G, HPA-1b) or homocysteine metabolism (MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C) among 90 children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) and 103

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Some metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum) . Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  3. Assessment of metabolic flux distribution in the thermophilic hydrogen producer Caloramator celer as affected by external pH and hydrogen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Caloramator celer is a strict anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium capable of converting glucose to hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide, acetate, ethanol and formate by a mixed acid fermentation. Depending on the growth conditions C. celer can produce H2 at high yields. For a biotechnological exploitation of this bacterium for H2 production it is crucial to understand the factors that regulate carbon and electron fluxes and therefore the final distribution of metabolites to channel the metabolic flux towards the desired product. Results Combining experimental results from batch fermentations with genome analysis, reconstruction of central carbon metabolism and metabolic flux analysis (MFA), this study shed light on glucose catabolism of the thermophilic alkalitolerant bacterium C. celer. Two innate factors pertaining to culture conditions have been identified to significantly affect the metabolic flux distribution: culture pH and partial pressures of H2 (PH2). Overall, at alkaline to neutral pH the rate of biomass synthesis was maximized, whereas at acidic pH the lower growth rate and the less efficient biomass formation are accompanied with more efficient energy recovery from the substrate indicating high cell maintenance possibly to sustain intracellular pH homeostasis. Higher H2 yields were associated with fermentation at acidic pH as a consequence of the lower synthesis of other reduced by-products such as formate and ethanol. In contrast, PH2 did not affect the growth of C. celer on glucose. At high PH2 the cellular redox state was balanced by rerouting the flow of carbon and electrons to ethanol and formate production allowing unaltered glycolytic flux and growth rate, but resulting in a decreased H2 synthesis. Conclusion C. celer possesses a flexible fermentative metabolism that allows redistribution of fluxes at key metabolic nodes to simultaneously control redox state and efficiently harvest energy from substrate even under unfavorable conditions (i.e. low pH and high PH2). With the H2 production in mind, acidic pH and low PH2 should be preferred for a high yield-oriented process, while a high productivity-oriented process can be achieved at alkaline pH and high PH2. PMID:24678972

  4. Carbon availability affects diurnally controlled processes and cell morphology of Cyanothece 51142.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Jana; Elvitigala, Thanura R; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142. PMID:23457634

  5. Magic electron affection in preparation process of silicon nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Dong, Ti-Ger; Wang, Gang; Qin, Cao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    It is very interesting that magic electron affection promotes growth of nanocrystals due to nanoscale characteristics of electronic de Broglie wave which produces resonance to transfer energy to atoms. In our experiment, it was observed that silicon nanocrystals rapidly grow with irradiation of electron beam on amorphous silicon film prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), and silicon nanocrystals almost occur in sphere shape on smaller nanocrystals with less irradiation time of electron beam. In the process, it was investigated that condensed structures of silicon nanocrystals are changed with different impurity atoms in silicon film, in which localized states emission was observed. Through electron beam irradiation for 15min on amorphous Si film doped with oxygen impurity atoms by PLD process, enhanced photoluminescence emission peaks are observed in visible light. And electroluminescence emission is manipulated into the optical communication window on the bigger Si-Yb-Er nanocrystals after irradiation of electron beam for 30min. PMID:25909481

  6. The “Musical Emotional Bursts”: a validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle; Belin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear) and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analog of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV)—a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 s) improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]), or a clarinet (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]). The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, non-linguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli [30 stimuli × 4 (3 emotions + neutral) × 2 instruments] by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task); 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80) was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0%) and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each) MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems. PMID:23964255

  7. Embryonic temperature affects metabolic compensation and thyroid hormones in hatchling snapping turtles.

    PubMed

    O'Steen, S; Janzen, F J

    1999-01-01

    Temperature acclimation of adult vertebrates typically induces changes in metabolic physiology. During early development, such metabolic compensation might have profound consequences, yet acclimation of metabolism is little studied in early life stages. We measured the effect of egg incubation temperature on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and blood thyroid hormone levels of hatchling snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina). Like many reptiles, snapping turtles have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), in which embryonic temperature determines sex. Therefore, we designed the experiments to separately measure effects of temperature and of sex on the response variables. We incubated eggs in the laboratory at 21. 5 degrees, 24.5 degrees, 27.5 degrees, and 30.5 degrees C, producing both sexes, all males, both sexes, and all females, respectively. Hatchling RMR, when measured at a common temperature (either 25 degrees or 31 degrees C), was negatively correlated with egg temperature in both males and females, such that RMR of turtles from 21.5 degrees C-incubated eggs averaged 160% that of turtles from 30.5 degrees C-incubated eggs. These results indicate that egg temperatures induced positive metabolic compensation in both sexes. Thyroid hormone levels of hatchlings showed similar correlations with egg temperature; thyroxine level of turtles from 21.5 degrees C-incubated eggs averaged 220% that of turtles from 30.5 degrees C-incubated eggs. To examine the possibility that thyroid hormones contribute to positive metabolic compensation, we added triiodothyronine to eggs during mid-incubation. RMR of hatchlings from these treated eggs averaged 131% that of controls, consistent with the previous possibility. Moreover, the effects of embryonic temperature on metabolic physiology, in combination with effects on sex, can result in differences in RMR and thyroid hormone levels between male and female hatchling turtles. Such differences may be important to the ecology and evolution of TSD. PMID:10521320

  8. Modulation of GR activity does not affect the in vitro metabolism of cortisol by rainbow trout ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Christie, Heather; Leatherland, John

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the study was to determine whether the metabolic clearance of cortisol from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) ovarian follicles is affected by the level of ovarian steroidogenesis, and whether it involves the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Ovarian follicles were incubated in vitro; the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, was used to stimulate ovarian steroidogenesis, and the modulation of GR activity was brought about using GR agonists (cortisol and dexamethasone) or the GR antagonist, mifepristone (RU486). The follicles were co-incubated with [2, 4, 6, 7 (3)H] cortisol, and the tritium-labelled steroid products were separated by HPLC. In addition, the rates of expression of genes encoding for the two forms of GR (gr1 and gr2) were measured. Cortisone, cortisol sulphate, and cortisone sulphate were the major glucocorticoid products of cortisol metabolism, indicative of the action of 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and glucocorticoid sulphotransferase in the follicular cells. There were no effects of RU486 or forskolin on the rates of [(3)H]cortisol metabolism suggesting that cortisol metabolism by ovarian follicles was independent of GR activation, and not influenced by increased activation of gonadal reproductive steroidogenesis. PMID:25148794

  9. Improvement of Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Cellfood Administration in Patients Affected by Neurodegenerative Diseases on Chelation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fulgenzi, Alessandro; Giuseppe, Rachele De; Bamonti, Fabrizia; Ferrero, Maria Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This prospective pilot study aimed at evaluating the effects of therapy with antioxidant compounds (Cellfood, and other antioxidants) on patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases (ND), who displayed toxic metal burden and were subjected to chelation treatment with the chelating agent calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaNa2EDTA or EDTA). Methods. Two groups of subjects were studied: (a) 39 patients affected by ND and (b) 11 subjects unaffected by ND (controls). The following blood parameters were analyzed before and after three months' treatment with chelation + Cellfood or chelation + other antioxidants: oxidative status (reactive oxygen species, ROS; total antioxidant capacity, TAC; oxidized LDL, oxLDL; glutathione), homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate. Results. After 3-months' chelation + Cellfood administration oxLDL decreased, ROS levels were significantly lower, and TAC and glutathione levels were significantly higher than after chelation + other antioxidants treatment, both in ND patients and in controls. Moreover, homocysteine metabolism had also improved in both groups. Conclusions. Chelation + Cellfood treatment was more efficient than chelation + other antioxidants improving oxidative status and homocysteine metabolism significantly in ND patients and controls. Although limited to a small number of cases, this study showed how helpful antioxidant treatment with Cellfood was in improving the subjects' metabolic conditions. PMID:25114898

  10. Chronic contamination with 137Cesium affects Vitamin D 3 metabolism in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Tissandie; Y. Guéguen; J. M. A. Lobaccaro; J. Aigueperse; P. Gourmelon; F. Paquet; M. Souidi

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years after Chernobyl disaster, many people are still chronically exposed to low dose of 137Cs, mainly through the food consumption. A large variety of diseases have been described in highly exposed people with 137Cs, which include bone disorders. The aim of this work was to investigate the biological effects of a chronic exposure to 137Cs on Vitamin D3 metabolism,

  11. Dietary plant-protein substitution affects hepatic metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oddur T. Vilhelmsson; Samuel A. M. Martin; Françoise Médale; Sadasivam J. Kaushik; Dominic F. Houlihan

    2004-01-01

    The high dietary protein requirements of salmonid fish are met with fishmeal-based feed in commercial aquaculture. The sustainability of this practice is questionable and, therefore, the feasibility of substituting fishmeal with plant-based products needs to be investigated. We investigated growth and metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a diet composed of a mixture of plant proteins compared with those

  12. How do heavy ions affect plasma entry and transport processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazerson, S. A.; Johnson, J.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.; Lin, Y.; Wing, S.; Kim, E.

    2010-12-01

    Recent ion composition measurements near the magnetopause have shown that heavy ionospheric ions can dominate the mass density as much as 30 percent of the time. Magnetopause transport processes, such as reconnection, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and kinetic-scale Alfvenic fluctuations, can all be significantly affected by the presence of heavy ions. We examine these processes using MHD, multifluid, and hybrid simulations. Heavy ions modify the onset and growth of the tearing mode as well as reduce the steady state reconnection rate by lowering the Alfven speed. Because increased mass density reduces the effect of magnetic tension, it lowers the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability threshold and increases the growth rate. In 3D MHD simulations, reconnection of the Kelvin-Helmholtz interchanged flux can lead to mass transport through competing processes (increased mass density leads to increased growth rate/vortex size but lower reconnection rate). However, we find that the reduced Alfven speed is compensated by increased shear in the boundary regions so that the reconnection rate adjusts as necessary to reconnect the interchanged flux, and transfer of flux is mostly determined by growth of the vortex (larger for heavier mass density and larger shear). We also examine the dependence of Kelvin-Helmholtz growth rate, nonlinear vortex development, and plasma mixing on heavy ion mass using hybrid simulations. We find that while heavier mass ions can increase growth rates when there is a gradient of the heavy ion population across the magnetopause boundary, that ion inertial effects can also play an important stabilizing role for ions with heavier mass. The presence of heavy ions can also increase the efficiency of mode conversion of compressional Pc3 waves to transverse, field-aligned Alfven modes with small-scale structure perpendicular the the magnetopause. We examine this process with hybrid simulations including heavy ions. We examine whether nonlinear heating and transport associated with mode converted waves will preferentially affect the heavy ions. Finally, we consider the implications of asymmetric distributions of heavy ions on plasma entry mechanisms.

  13. Spectral context affects temporal processing in awake auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Beitel, Ralph E.; Vollmer, Maike; Heiser, Marc A; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude modulation encoding is critical for human speech perception and complex sound processing in general. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a staple of auditory psychophysics, and has been shown to predict speech intelligibility performance in a range of adverse listening conditions and hearing impairments, including cochlear implant-supported hearing. Although both tonal and broadband carriers have been employed in psychophysical studies of modulation detection and discrimination, relatively little is known about differences in the cortical representation of such signals. We obtained MTFs in response to sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) for both narrowband tonal carriers and 2-octave bandwidth noise carriers in the auditory core of awake squirrel monkeys. MTFs spanning modulation frequencies from 4 to 512 Hz were obtained using 16 channel linear recording arrays sampling across all cortical laminae. Carrier frequency for tonal SAM and center frequency for noise SAM was set at the estimated best frequency for each penetration. Changes in carrier type affected both rate and temporal MTFs in many neurons. Using spike discrimination techniques, we found that discrimination of modulation frequency was significantly better for tonal SAM than for noise SAM, though the differences were modest at the population level. Moreover, spike trains elicited by tonal and noise SAM could be readily discriminated in most cases. Collectively, our results reveal remarkable sensitivity to the spectral content of modulated signals, and indicate substantial interdependence between temporal and spectral processing in neurons of the core auditory cortex. PMID:23719811

  14. Chronic unpredictable mild stress affects myocardial metabolic profiling of SD rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-yuan; Liu, Shao; Li, Huan-de; Cai, Hua-lin

    2012-11-01

    Depression is frequently comorbid with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), but a full understanding of the mechanisms is still on its way. Chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model is a commonly used model to mimic clinical depression, here we present a GC/MS-based metabolic profiling approach to investigate myocardial metabolic changes of CUMS SD rats. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were utilized to reveal differences between the model and control group. This study found that molecules proved cardioprotective involving glutamine (P=0.019) and inosine (P=0.013), fatty acid (9,12-octadecadienoic acid, P=0.002; hexadecanoic acid, P=0.006; octadecanoic acid, P=0.030) which serve as the major energy source of heart and collagen molecule precursor proline (P=0.036) had down-regulated in CUMS model group. PMID:22658902

  15. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of A. gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Gonçalves, Renata L.S.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that A. gambiae L35 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial State-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when State-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of P. berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  16. Vocal performance affects metabolic rate in dolphins: implications for animals communicating in noisy environments.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Dunkin, Robin C; Williams, Terrie M

    2015-06-01

    Many animals produce louder, longer or more repetitious vocalizations to compensate for increases in environmental noise. Biological costs of increased vocal effort in response to noise, including energetic costs, remain empirically undefined in many taxa, particularly in marine mammals that rely on sound for fundamental biological functions in increasingly noisy habitats. For this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that an increase in vocal effort would result in an energetic cost to the signaler by experimentally measuring oxygen consumption during rest and a 2 min vocal period in dolphins that were trained to vary vocal loudness across trials. Vocal effort was quantified as the total acoustic energy of sounds produced. Metabolic rates during the vocal period were, on average, 1.2 and 1.5 times resting metabolic rate (RMR) in dolphin A and B, respectively. As vocal effort increased, we found that there was a significant increase in metabolic rate over RMR during the 2 min following sound production in both dolphins, and in total oxygen consumption (metabolic cost of sound production plus recovery costs) in the dolphin that showed a wider range of vocal effort across trials. Increases in vocal effort, as a consequence of increases in vocal amplitude, repetition rate and/or duration, are consistent with behavioral responses to noise in free-ranging animals. Here, we empirically demonstrate for the first time in a marine mammal, that these vocal modifications can have an energetic impact at the individual level and, importantly, these data provide a mechanistic foundation for evaluating biological consequences of vocal modification in noise-polluted habitats. PMID:25852069

  17. Integrating the Affective Domain into the Instructional Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Robert G.

    This study begins with a definition of the affective domain and its importance to learning, outlining its impact both in achieving affective behaviors and in facilitating cognitive and psychomotor objectives. The study then develops a model of instructional design that incorporates the affective domain as an integral component. The model combines…

  18. Nitrogen-Sparing Mechanisms in Chlamydomonas Affect the Transcriptome, the Proteome, and Photosynthetic Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Schmollinger, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Boyle, Nanette R.; Blaby, Ian K.; Casero, David; Mettler, Tabea; Moseley, Jeffrey L.; Kropat, Janette; Sommer, Frederik; Strenkert, Daniela; Hemme, Dorothea; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur R.; Stitt, Mark; Schroda, Michael; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that limits global primary productivity; hence, N-use efficiency is of compelling interest in agriculture and aquaculture. We used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a reference organism for a multicomponent analysis of the N starvation response. In the presence of acetate, respiratory metabolism is prioritized over photosynthesis; consequently, the N-sparing response targets proteins, pigments, and RNAs involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast function over those involved in respiration. Transcripts and proteins of the Calvin-Benson cycle are reduced in N-deficient cells, resulting in the accumulation of cycle metabolic intermediates. Both cytosolic and chloroplast ribosomes are reduced, but via different mechanisms, reflected by rapid changes in abundance of RNAs encoding chloroplast ribosomal proteins but not cytosolic ones. RNAs encoding transporters and enzymes for metabolizing alternative N sources increase in abundance, as is appropriate for the soil environmental niche of C. reinhardtii. Comparison of the N-replete versus N-deplete proteome indicated that abundant proteins with a high N content are reduced in N-starved cells, while the proteins that are increased have lower than average N contents. This sparing mechanism contributes to a lower cellular N/C ratio and suggests an approach for engineering increased N-use efficiency. PMID:24748044

  19. Dim Light at Night Disrupts Molecular Circadian Rhythms and Affects Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fonken, Laura K.; Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Meléndez-Fernández, O. Hecmarie; Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms which are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electrical lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to nighttime light and investigated changes in the circadian system and body weight. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night attenuate core circadian clock rhythms in the SCN at both the gene and protein level. Moreover, circadian clock rhythms were perturbed in the liver by nighttime light exposure. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide mechanistic evidence for how mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. PMID:23929553

  20. Deletion of TRAAK Potassium Channel Affects Brain Metabolism and Protects against Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Laigle, Christophe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Viola, Angèle

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral stroke is a worldwide leading cause of disability. The two-pore domain K+ channels identified as background channels are involved in many functions in brain under physiological and pathological conditions. We addressed the hypothesis that TRAAK, a mechano-gated and lipid-sensitive two-pore domain K+ channel, is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia. We studied the effects of TRAAK deletion on brain morphology and metabolism under physiological conditions, and during temporary focal cerebral ischemia in Traak?/? mice using a combination of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We provide the first in vivo evidence establishing a link between TRAAK and neurometabolism. Under physiological conditions, Traak?/? mice showed a particular metabolic phenotype characterized by higher levels of taurine and myo-inositol than Traak+/+ mice. Upon ischemia, Traak?/? mice had a smaller infarcted volume, with lower contribution of cellular edema than Traak+/+ mice. Moreover, brain microcirculation was less damaged, and brain metabolism and pH were preserved. Our results show that expression of TRAAK strongly influences tissue levels of organic osmolytes. Traak?/? mice resilience to cellular edema under ischemia appears related to their physiologically high levels of myo-inositol and of taurine, an aminoacid involved in the modulation of mitochondrial activity and cell death. The beneficial effects of TRAAK deletion designate this channel as a promising pharmacological target for the treatment against stroke. PMID:23285272

  1. Process design for microbial plastic factories: metabolic engineering of polyhydroxyalkanoates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilana S Aldor; Jay D Keasling

    2003-01-01

    Implementing several metabolic engineering strategies, either individually or in combination, it is possible to construct microbial plastic factories to produce a variety of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biopolymers with desirable structures and material properties. Approaches include external substrate manipulation, inhibitor addition, recombinant gene expression, host cell genome manipulation and, most recently, protein engineering of PHA biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, mathematical models and

  2. SILICON NUTRITION AFFECTS URINARY AND PLASMA INDICATORS OF BONE AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was performed with the objectives of confirming that silicon status affects bone formation and turnover, and to test the hypothesis that silicon status can affect the interaction between one or more extracellular matrix glycoprotein/s and cell-surface receptors to alter the circulating...

  3. Metabolism of manganese in calves as affected by dietary manganese and intravenous or duodenal manganese-54 dosing.

    PubMed

    Miller, W J; Stake, P E; Neathery, M W; Gentry, R P; Blackmon, D M

    1987-10-01

    Fifteen intact male Holstein calves averaging 101 d of age were utilized to determine the effects of dietary Mn concentration and routes of administration on its metabolism. They were fed a practical grain diet containing 23 ppm Mn with 0, 100, or 1000 ppm supplemental Mn (MnSO4.H2O) for 7 d prior to intravenous or duodenal dosing with 54Mn. Animals were killed 4 h later. With added Mn there was a significant decrease in 54Mn content of some small intestine parts. However, in most tissue, including organs, bones, intestinal tract tissues, and blood, added Mn did not have a significant effect on 54Mn concentrations. Concentrations of 54Mn in tissues, except in small intestine, were far higher following intravenous dosing than with duodenal dosing. This further confirms that absorption of Mn is very low. Dosing method had a sizable effect on the relative amounts of 54Mn in different tissues. This suggests that intravenously administered Mn, at least initially, is not metabolized in the same way as that absorbed. In most tissues, unlabeled Mn was not affected greatly by supplemental Mn. This is in contrast to earlier results with very young calves and indicates that Mn metabolism changes sharply before 3 to 4 mo of calf age. PMID:3680726

  4. Metabolism of manganese in calves as affected by dietary manganese and intravenous or duodenal manganese-54 dosing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.J.; Stake, P.E.; Neathery, M.W.; Gentry, R.P.; Blackmon, D.M.

    1987-10-01

    Fifteen intact male Holstein calves averaging 101 d of age were utilized to determine the effects of dietary Mn concentration and routes of administration on its metabolism. They were fed a practical grain diet containing 23 ppm Mn with 0, 100, or 1000 ppm supplemental Mn (MnSO/sub 4/.H/sub 2/O) for 7 d prior to intravenous or duodenal dosing with /sup 54/Mn. Animals were killed 4 h later. With added Mn there was a significant decrease in /sup 54/Mn content of some small intestine parts. However, in most tissue, including organs, bones, intestinal tract tissues, and blood, added Mn did not have a significant effect on /sup 54/Mn concentrations. Concentrations of /sup 54/Mn in tissues, except in small intestine, were far higher following intravenous dosing than with duodenal dosing. This further confirms that absorption of Mn is very low. Dosing method had a sizable effect on the relative amounts of /sup 54/Mn in different tissues. This suggests that intravenously administered Mn, at least initially, is not metabolized in the same way as that absorbed. In most tissues, unlabeled Mn was not affected greatly by supplemental Mn. This is in contrast to earlier results with very young calves and indicates that Mn metabolism changes sharply before 3 to 4 mo of calf age.

  5. Brain Potentials During Affective Picture Processing in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hajcak, Greg; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2008-01-01

    In adults, emotional (e.g., both unpleasant and pleasant) compared to neutral pictures elicit an increase in the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP); modulation of these ERP components are thought to reflect the facilitated processing of, and increased attention to, motivationally salient stimuli. To determine whether the EPN and LPP are sensitive to emotional content in children, high-density EEG was recorded from 18 children who were 5 to 8 years of age (mean age = 77 months, SD = 11 months) while they viewed developmentally appropriate pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Self-reported ratings of valence and arousal were also obtained. An EPN was not evident following emotional compared to neutral pictures; however, a positivity maximal at occipital-parietal recording sites was increased from 500 to 1,000 ms following pleasant pictures and from 500 to 1,500 ms following unpleasant pictures. Comparisons between the EPN and LPP observed in children and adults, and implications for developmental studies of emotion, are discussed. PMID:19103249

  6. Heat exposure of Cannabis sativa extracts affects the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Martin; Spinedi, Luca; Unfer-Grauwiler, Sandra; Bodmer, Michael; Surber, Christian; Luedi, Markus; Drewe, Juergen

    2012-05-01

    The most important psychoactive constituent of CANNABIS SATIVA L. is ? (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol (CBD), another important constituent, is able to modulate the distinct unwanted psychotropic effect of THC. In natural plant extracts of C. SATIVA, large amounts of THC and CBD appear in the form of THCA-A (THC-acid-A) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), which can be transformed to THC and CBD by heating. Previous reports of medicinal use of cannabis or cannabis preparations with higher CBD/THC ratios and use in its natural, unheated form have demonstrated that pharmacological effects were often accompanied with a lower rate of adverse effects. Therefore, in the present study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of two different C. SATIVA extracts (heated and unheated) with a CBD/THC ratio > 1 were compared to synthetic THC (dronabinol) in a double-blind, randomized, single center, three-period cross-over study involving 9 healthy male volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of the cannabinoids was highly variable. The metabolic pattern was significantly different after administration of the different forms: the heated extract showed a lower median THC plasma AUC (24 h) than the unheated extract of 2.84 vs. 6.59 pmol h/mL, respectively. The later was slightly higher than that of dronabinol (4.58 pmol h/mL). On the other hand, the median sum of the metabolites (THC, 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH, CBN) plasma AUC (24 h) was higher for the heated than for the unheated extract. The median CBD plasma AUC (24 h) was almost 2-fold higher for the unheated than for the heated extract. These results indicate that use of unheated extracts may lead to a beneficial change in metabolic pattern and possibly better tolerability. PMID:22411724

  7. Glucose Metabolism in the Insula and Cingulate is affected by Systemic Inflammation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hannestad, Jonas; Subramanyam, Kalyani; DellaGioia, Nicole; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Weinzimmer, David; Pittman, Brian; Carson, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with systemic inflammation, and endotoxin administration, which causes systemic inflammation, elicits mild depressive symptoms, such as fatigue and reduced interest. The neural correlates of depressive symptoms that result from systemic inflammation are poorly defined. The aim of this study was to use FDG-PET to identify brain regions involved in the response to endotoxin administration in humans. Methods Nine healthy subjects received double-blind endotoxin (0.8 ng/kg) and placebo on different days. FDG-PET was used to measure differences in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in regions of interest: insula, cingulate, and amygdala. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 were used to gauge the systemic inflammatory response, and depressive symptoms were measured with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and other scales. Results Endotoxin administration was associated with an increase in MADRS score, increased fatigue, reduced social interest, increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, higher normalized glucose metabolism (NGM) in the insula and, at a trend level, lower NGM in the cingulate. Secondary analyses of insula and cingulate subregions indicated that these changes were driven by the right anterior insula and the right anterior cingulate. There was a negative correlation between peak cytokine levels and change in social interest, and between peak cytokine levels and change in insula NGM. There was a positive correlation between the change in NGM in the insula and change in social interest. Conclusion Systemic inflammation in humans causes an increase in depressive symptoms and concurrent changes in glucose metabolism in the insula and cingulate, brain regions that are involved in interoception, positive emotionality, and motivation. PMID:22414635

  8. Genetic manipulation of polyphosphate metabolism affects cadmium tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Keasling, J D; Hupf, G A

    1996-01-01

    The polyphosphate metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli were genetically manipulated to test the effect of polyphosphate on tolerance to cadmium. A polyphosphate kinase (ppk) and polyphosphatase (ppx) mutant strain produced no polyphosphate, whereas the same strain carrying multiple copies of ppk on a high-copy plasmid produced significant quantities. The doubling times of both strains increased with increasing cadmium concentrations. In contrast, the mutant strain carrying multiple copies of ppk and ppx produced 1/20 of the polyphosphate found in the strain carrying multiple copies of ppk only and showed no significant increase in doubling time over the same cadmium concentration range. PMID:8593078

  9. [Carbon source metabolic diversity of soil microbial community under different climate types in the area affected by Wenchuan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Lin, Yong-Ming; Ma, Rui-Feng; Deng, Hao-Jun; Du, Kun; Wu, Cheng-Zhen; Hong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 led to huge damage to land covers in northwest Sichuan, one of the critical fragile eco-regions in China which can be divided into Semi-arid dry hot climate zone (SDHC) and Subtropical humid monsoon climate zone (SHMC). Using the method of Bilog-ECO-microplate technique, this paper aimed to determine the functional diversity of soil microbial community in the earthquake-affected areas which can be divided into undamaged area (U), recover area (R) and damaged area without recovery (D) under different climate types, in order to provide scientific basis for ecological recovery. The results indicated that the average-well-color-development (AWCD) in undamaged area and recovery area showed SDHC > SHMC, which was contrary to the AWCD in the damaged area without recovery. The AWCD of damaged area without recovery was the lowest in both climate zones. The number of carbon source utilization types of soil microbial in SHMC zone was significantly higher than that in SDHC zone. The carbon source utilization types in both climate zones presented a trend of recover area > undamaged area > damaged area without recovery. The carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community was significantly different in different climate zones. The diversity index and evenness index both showed a ranking of undamaged area > recover area > damaged area without recovery. In addition, the recovery area had the highest richness index. The soil microbial carbon sources metabolism characteristic was affected by soil nutrient, aboveground vegetation biomass and vegetation coverage to some extent. In conclusion, earthquake and its secondary disasters influenced the carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community mainly through the change of aboveground vegetation and soil environmental factors. PMID:26031097

  10. Processes Affecting Nitrogen Speciation in a Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Musgrove, M.; Wong, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Like many karst aquifers, the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, in central Texas, is in an area undergoing rapid growth in population, and there is concern as to how increased amounts of wastewater might affect groundwater quality. We measured concentrations and estimated loads of nitrogen (N) species in recharge to and discharge from the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, central Texas, to evaluate processes affecting the transport and fate of N species in groundwater. Water samples were collected during 17 months (November 2008-March 2010) from five streams that contribute about 85% of recharge to the aquifer segment and from Barton Springs, the principal point of discharge from the segment. The sampling period spanned a range of climatic conditions from exceptional drought to above-normal rainfall. Samples were analyzed for N species (organic N + ammonia, ammonia, nitrate + nitrite, nitrite); loads of organic N and nitrate were estimated with LOADEST, a regression-based model that uses a time series of streamflow and measured constituent concentrations to estimate constituent loads. Concentrations of organic nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were higher and concentrations of nitrate were lower in surface water than in spring discharge, consistent with conversion of organic nitrogen to nitrate and associated consumption of dissolved oxygen in the aquifer. During the period of the study, the estimated load of organic N in recharge from streams (average daily load [adl] of 39 kg/d) was about 10 times that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 9.4 kg/d), whereas the estimated load of nitrate in recharge from streams (adl of 123 kg/d) was slightly less than that in Barton Springs discharge (adl of 148 kg/d). The total average N load in recharge from streams and discharge from Barton Springs was not significantly different (adl of 162 and 157 kg/d, respectively), indicating that surface-water recharge can account for all of the N in Barton Springs discharge. Differences in the timing of recharge and discharge of loads were marked, however: During the drought period, loads of total N in recharge from streams (adl 2.4 kg/d) were much less than those in Barton Springs discharge (adl 70 kg/d), and during the wet period those in recharge from streams exceeded those in Barton Springs discharge (average daily loads of 395 and 282 kg/d, respectively). This indicates that total N entering the aquifer during periods of high recharge likely goes into groundwater storage, then discharges gradually as water-level altitudes in the aquifer decrease.

  11. Cell metabolism affects selective vulnerability in PINK1-associated Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi; Gandhi, Sonia; Burchell, Victoria S; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Wood, Nicholas W; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2011-12-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in autosomal recessive forms of the disease caused by mutations encoding PINK1. Although mitochondrial pathology can be demonstrated in many cell types, it is neurons that bear the brunt of cell death in PD. We studied the mitochondrial physiology of neurons and muscle cells with loss of function of the nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein PINK1. PINK1 is widely expressed in many types of tissues, but deficiency selectively induces death in neurons. We report here that the same genetic defect results in opposing phenotypes in different cell types, depending on the metabolic properties of the cell. Thus, PINK1-deficient myocytes exhibit high basal mitochondrial membrane potential (??m), whereas PINK1-deficient neurons have been shown to exhibit a low ??m. PINK1 deficiency induces impaired respiration in both cell types, with a concomitant increase in glycolytic activity. We demonstrate that the high glycolytic capacity in myocytes compared with neurons enables them to produce more ATP and, therefore, compensates for the metabolic defects induced by PINK1 deficiency. Furthermore, the high ??m generated in PINK1 knockout (KO) muscle mitochondria enables them to buffer cytosolic Ca(2+) fluxes, rendering them resistant to Ca(2+) stress effectively. Conversely, PINK1 KO neurons were previously shown to develop mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarisation. Prevention of Ca(2+) dysregulation in myocytes might therefore account for the sparing of these cells in PD. PMID:22223879

  12. bZIP transcription factors affecting secondary metabolism, sexual development and stress responses in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Reinke, Aaron W.; Szilágyi, Melinda; Emri, Tamás; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Keating, Amy E.; Pócsi, István; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play critical roles in the organismal response to the environment. Recently, a novel YAP-like bZIP, restorer of secondary metabolism A (RsmA), was found in a suppressor screen of an Aspergillus nidulans secondary metabolism (SM) mutant in which overexpression of rsmA was found to partially remediate loss of SM in Velvet Complex mutants. The Velvet Complex is a conserved fungal transcriptional heteromer that couples SM with sexual development in fungi. Here we characterized and contrasted SM in mutants of RsmA and four other A. nidulans bZIP proteins (NapA, ZipA, ZipB and ZipC) with predicted DNA binding motifs similar to RsmA. Only two overexpression mutants exhibited both SM and sexual abnormalities that were noteworthy: OE?:?:?rsmA resulted in a 100-fold increase in sterigmatocystin and a near loss of meiotic spore production. OE?:?:?napA displayed decreased production of sterigmatocystin, emericellin, asperthecin, shamixanthone and epishamixanthone, coupled with a shift from sexual to asexual development. Quantification of bZIP homodimer and heterodimer formation using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) suggested that these proteins preferentially self-associate. PMID:23154967

  13. Environmental Stress Affects the Activity of Metabolic and Growth Factor Signaling Networks and Induces Autophagy Markers in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Pedro; Bilanges, Benoit; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoproteomic techniques are contributing to our understanding of how signaling pathways interact and regulate biological processes. This technology is also being used to characterize how signaling networks are remodeled during disease progression and to identify biomarkers of signaling pathway activity and of responses to cancer therapy. A potential caveat in these studies is that phosphorylation is a very dynamic modification that can substantially change during the course of an experiment or the retrieval and processing of cellular samples. Here, we investigated how exposure of cells to ambient conditions modulates phosphorylation and signaling pathway activity in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. About 1.5% of 3,500 sites measured showed a significant change in phosphorylation extent upon exposure of cells to ambient conditions for 15 min. The effects of this perturbation in modifying phosphorylation patterns did not involve random changes due to stochastic activation of kinases and phosphatases. Instead, exposure of cells to ambient conditions elicited an environmental stress reaction that involved a coordinated response to a metabolic stress situation, which included: (1) the activation of AMPK; (2) the inhibition of PI3K, AKT, and ERK; (3) an increase in markers of protein synthesis inhibition at the level of translation elongation; and (4) an increase in autophagy markers. We also observed that maintaining cells in ice modified but did not completely abolish this metabolic stress response. In summary, exposure of cells to ambient conditions affects the activity of signaling networks previously implicated in metabolic and growth factor signaling. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000472. PMID:24425749

  14. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling in mice affects energy metabolism, redox balance and longevity.

    PubMed

    Caldeira da Silva, Camille C; Cerqueira, Fernanda M; Barbosa, Lívea F; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2008-08-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective non-genetic intervention to enhance lifespan known to date. A major research interest has been the development of therapeutic strategies capable of promoting the beneficial results of this dietary regimen. In this sense, we propose that compounds that decrease the efficiency of energy conversion, such as mitochondrial uncouplers, can be caloric restriction mimetics. Treatment of mice with low doses of the protonophore 2,4-dinitrophenol promotes enhanced tissue respiratory rates, improved serological glucose, triglyceride and insulin levels, decrease of reactive oxygen species levels and tissue DNA and protein oxidation, as well as reduced body weight. Importantly, 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated animals also presented enhanced longevity. Our results demonstrate that mild mitochondrial uncoupling is a highly effective in vivo antioxidant strategy, and describe the first therapeutic intervention capable of effectively reproducing the physiological, metabolic and lifespan effects of caloric restriction in healthy mammals. PMID:18505478

  15. Combination of inositol and alpha lipoic acid in metabolic syndrome-affected women: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inositol has been reported to improve insulin sensitivity since it works as a second messenger achieving insulin-like effects on metabolic enzymes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inositol and alpha lipoic acid combination effectiveness on metabolic syndrome features in postmenopausal women at risk of breast cancer. Methods A six-month prospective, randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out on a total of 155 postmenopausal women affected by metabolic syndrome at risk of breast cancer, the INOSIDEX trial. All women were asked to follow a low-calorie diet and were assigned randomly to daily consumption of a combination of inositol and alpha lipoic acid (77 pts) or placebo (78 pts) for six months. Primary outcomes we wanted to achieve were both reduction of more than 20% of the HOMA-IR index and of triglycerides serum levels. Secondary outcomes expected were both the improvement of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the reduction of anthropometric features such as body mass index and waist-hip ratio. Results A significant HOMA-IR reduction of more than 20% was evidenced in 66.7% (P <0.0001) of patients, associated with a serum insulin level decrease in 89.3% (P <0.0000). A decrease in triglycerides was evidenced in 43.2% of patients consuming the supplement (P <0.0001). An increase in HDL cholesterol (48.6%) was found in the group consuming inositol with respect to the placebo group. A reduction in waist circumference and waist-hip ratio was found in the treated group with respect to the placebo group. Conclusions Inositol combined with alpha lipoic acid can be used as a dietary supplement in insulin-resistant patients in order to increase their insulin sensitiveness. Daily consumption of inositol combined with alpha lipoic acid has a significant bearing on metabolic syndrome. As metabolic syndrome is considered a modifiable risk factor of breast tumorigenesis, further studies are required to assess whether inositol combined with alpha lipoic acid can be administered as a dietary supplement in breast cancer primary prevention. Trial registration Current Controlled Trial ISRCTN74096908. PMID:23981814

  16. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele.

    PubMed

    Anders, Silke; Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons ('mirror neurons') in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger activity in the right ventrolateral premotor cortex during execution and perception of affective facial gestures than healthy controls. Furthermore, Parkin mutation carriers showed a slightly reduced ability to recognize facial emotions that was least severe in individuals who showed the strongest increase of ventrolateral premotor activity. In addition, Parkin mutation carriers showed a significantly weaker than normal increase of activity in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (inferior frontal gyrus pars orbitalis, Brodmann area 47), which was unrelated to facial emotion recognition ability. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that compensatory activity in the ventrolateral premotor cortex during processing of affective facial gestures can reduce impairments in facial emotion recognition in subclinical Parkin mutation carriers. A breakdown of this compensatory mechanism might lead to the impairment of facial expressivity and facial emotion recognition observed in manifest Parkinson's disease. PMID:22434215

  17. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons (‘mirror neurons’) in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger activity in the right ventrolateral premotor cortex during execution and perception of affective facial gestures than healthy controls. Furthermore, Parkin mutation carriers showed a slightly reduced ability to recognize facial emotions that was least severe in individuals who showed the strongest increase of ventrolateral premotor activity. In addition, Parkin mutation carriers showed a significantly weaker than normal increase of activity in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (inferior frontal gyrus pars orbitalis, Brodmann area 47), which was unrelated to facial emotion recognition ability. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that compensatory activity in the ventrolateral premotor cortex during processing of affective facial gestures can reduce impairments in facial emotion recognition in subclinical Parkin mutation carriers. A breakdown of this compensatory mechanism might lead to the impairment of facial expressivity and facial emotion recognition observed in manifest Parkinson's disease. PMID:22434215

  18. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  19. Differential Opioid Action on Sensory and Affective Cerebral Pain Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BG Oertel; C Preibisch; T Wallenhorst; T Hummel; G Geisslinger; H Lanfermann; J Lötsch

    2008-01-01

    Low doses of morphine, the most commonly used opioid analgesic, have been shown to significantly reduce the affective but not the sensory intensive dimension of pain. This suggests differential dose–response relationships of opioid analgesia on the sensory and affective components of pain. We investigated the effects of different alfentanil plasma concentration levels (0, 19.6±2.7, 47.2±7.6, and 76.6±11.3 ng\\/ml) on pain-related

  20. Neuroimaging and facial affect processing: implications for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Dawn; Keiski, Michelle A; McDonald, Brenna C; Wang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    The ability to recognize others' emotions is critical to successful interpersonal interactions. Given its importance, there has been an extensive amount of research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms associated with facial affect recognition in healthy individuals, and some in patient populations with affective disorders. Findings from these studies reveal that the underlying mechanisms involve a distributed neural network, engaging structures within limbic and subcortical regions, prefrontal cortex, temporal and parietal lobes, and occipital cortex. In the last several decades, researchers have become increasingly interested in how emotion recognition is affected after a traumatic brain injury (TBI), which often involves damage to these structures, as well as the neural circuitry connecting them. Not surprisingly, research has reliably demonstrated that facial affect recognition deficits are common after TBI. To date, however, no neuroimaging studies have investigated facial affect recognition deficits in the TBI population. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to consider how functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might inform our knowledge about affect recognition deficits after TBI, and potentially enhance treatment approaches. PMID:24363220

  1. Diet-induced hyperinsulinemia differentially affects glucose and protein metabolism: a high-throughput metabolomic approach in rats.

    PubMed

    Etxeberria, U; de la Garza, A L; Martínez, J A; Milagro, F I

    2013-09-01

    Metabolomics is a high-throughput tool that quantifies and identifies the complete set of biofluid metabolites. This "omics" science is playing an increasing role in understanding the mechanisms involved in disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a nontargeted metabolomic approach could be applied to investigate metabolic differences between obese rats fed a high-fat sucrose (HFS) diet for 9 weeks and control diet-fed rats. Animals fed with the HFS diet became obese, hyperleptinemic, hyperglycemic, hyperinsulinemic, and resistant to insulin. Serum samples of overnight-fasted animals were analyzed by (1)H NMR technique, and 49 metabolites were identified and quantified. The biochemical changes observed suggest that major metabolic processes like carbohydrate metabolism, ?-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, Kennedy pathway, and folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism were altered in obese rats. The circulating levels of most amino acids were lower in obese animals. Serum levels of docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, unsaturated n-6 fatty acids, and total polyunsaturated fatty acids also decreased in HFS-fed rats. The circulating levels of urea, six water-soluble metabolites (creatine, creatinine, choline, acetyl carnitine, formate, and allantoin), and two lipid compounds (phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelin) were also significantly reduced by the HFS diet intake. This study offers further insight of the possible mechanisms implicated in the development of diet-induced obesity. It suggests that the HFS diet-induced hyperinsulinemia is responsible for the decrease in the circulating levels of urea, creatinine, and many amino acids, despite an increase in serum glucose levels. PMID:23334844

  2. Personality interacts with implicit affect to predict performance in analytic versus holistic processing.

    PubMed

    Kazén, Miguel; Kuhl, Julius; Quirin, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Both theoretical approaches and empirical evidence suggest that negative affect fosters analytic processing, whereas positive affect fosters holistic processing, but these effects are inconsistent. We aim to show that (a) differences in affect regulation abilities ("action orientation") and (b) implicit more so than self-reported affect assessment need to be considered to advance our understanding of these processes. Forty participants were asked to verify whether a word was correctly or incorrectly spelled to measure analytic processing, as well as to intuitively assess whether sets of three words were coherent (remote associates task) to measure holistic processing. As expected, implicit but not explicit negative affect interacted with low action orientation ("state orientation") to predict higher d' performance in word spelling, whereas implicit but not explicit positive affect interacted with high action orientation to predict higher d' performance in coherence judgments for word triads. Results are interpreted according to personality systems interaction theory. These findings suggest that affect and affect changes should be measured explicitly and implicitly to investigate affect-cognition interactions. Moreover, they suggest that good affect regulators benefit from positive affect for holistic processing, whereas bad affect regulators benefit from negative affect for analytical processing. PMID:24725069

  3. Prepartal dietary energy level affects peripartal bovine blood neutrophil metabolic, antioxidant, and inflammatory gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Bu, D P; Vailati Riboni, M; Khan, M J; Graugnard, D E; Luo, J; Cardoso, F C; Loor, J J

    2015-08-01

    During the dry period, cows can easily overconsume higher-grain diets, a scenario that could impair immune function during the peripartal period. Objectives were to investigate the effects of energy overfeeding on expression profile of genes associated with inflammation, lipid metabolism, and neutrophil function, in 12 multiparous Holstein cows (n=6/dietary group) fed control [CON, 1.34 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM)] or higher-energy (HE, 1.62 Mcal/kg of DM) diets during the last 45 d of pregnancy. Blood was collected to evaluate 43 genes in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) isolated at -14, 7, and 14 d relative to parturition. We detected greater expression of inflammatory-related cytokines (IL1B, STAT3, NFKB1) and eicosanoid synthesis (ALOX5AP and PLA2G4A) in HE cows than in CON cows. Around parturition, all cows had a close balance in mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory IL1B and the anti-inflammatory IL10, with greater expression of both in cows fed HE than CON. The expression of CCL2, LEPR, TLR4, IL6, and LTC4S was undetectable. Cows in the HE group had greater expression of genes involved in PMNL adhesion, motility, migration, and phagocytosis, which was similar to expression of genes related to the pro-inflammatory cytokine. This response suggests that HE cows experienced a chronic state of inflammation. The greater expression of G6PD in HE cows could have been associated with the greater plasma insulin, which would have diverted glucose to other tissues. Cows fed the HE diet also had greater expression of transcription factors involved in metabolism of long-chain fatty acids (PPARD, RXRA), suggesting that immune cells might be predisposed to use endogenous ligands such as nonesterified fatty acids available in the circulation when glucose is in high demand for milk synthesis. The lower overall expression of SLC2A1 postpartum than prepartum supports this suggestion. Targeting interleukin-1? signaling might be of value in terms of controlling the inflammatory response around calving. The present study revealed that overfeeding cows during late pregnancy results in activation, ahead of parturition, of PMNL responses associated with stress and inflammation. These adaptations observed in PMNL did not seem to be detrimental for production. PMID:26026766

  4. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  5. Conserved Changes in the Dynamics of Metabolic Processes during Fruit Development and Ripening across Species1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Klie, Sebastian; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Drincovich, María F.; Fait, Aaron; Giovannoni, James J.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Computational analyses of molecular phenotypes traditionally aim at identifying biochemical components that exhibit differential expression under various scenarios (e.g. environmental and internal perturbations) in a single species. High-throughput metabolomics technologies allow the quantification of (relative) metabolite levels across developmental stages in different tissues, organs, and species. Novel methods for analyzing the resulting multiple data tables could reveal preserved dynamics of metabolic processes across species. The problem we address in this study is 2-fold. (1) We derive a single data table, referred to as a compromise, which captures information common to the investigated set of multiple tables containing data on different fruit development and ripening stages in three climacteric (i.e. peach [Prunus persica] and two tomato [Solanum lycopersicum] cultivars, Ailsa Craig and M82) and two nonclimacteric (i.e. strawberry [Fragaria × ananassa] and pepper [Capsicum chilense]) fruits; in addition, we demonstrate the power of the method to discern similarities and differences between multiple tables by analyzing publicly available metabolomics data from three tomato ripening mutants together with two tomato cultivars. (2) We identify the conserved dynamics of metabolic processes, reflected in the data profiles of the corresponding metabolites that contribute most to the determined compromise. Our analysis is based on an extension to principal component analysis, called STATIS, in combination with pathway overenrichment analysis. Based on publicly available metabolic profiles for the investigated species, we demonstrate that STATIS can be used to identify the metabolic processes whose behavior is similarly affected during fruit development and ripening. These findings ultimately provide insights into the pathways that are essential during fruit development and ripening across species. PMID:24243932

  6. Linking Automatic Evaluation to Mood and Information Processing Style: Consequences for Experienced Affect, Impression Formation,

    E-print Network

    Bargh, John A.

    Linking Automatic Evaluation to Mood and Information Processing Style: Consequences for Experienced showed that automatic evaluation affects information processing style. Experiment 4 showed information processing. Through automatic evaluation, then, people's moods signal the valence

  7. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, C B; McFadden, R-M T; Hill, F M; Schreiner, R; Ramalingam, R; Besselsen, D G; Ghishan, F K; Kiela, P R

    2013-07-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D? has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D? plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D? supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10-/- CD4? T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D? supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D? metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D? supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D? diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-?B ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D? group. Our data suggest that vitamin D?, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D? supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  8. Molybdate:sulfate ratio affects redox metabolism and viability of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum.

    PubMed

    Barros, M P; Hollnagel, H C; Glavina, A B; Soares, C O; Ganini, D; Dagenais-Bellefeuille, S; Morse, D; Colepicolo, P

    2013-10-15

    Molybdenum is a transition metal used primarily (90% or more) as an additive to steel and corrosion-resistant alloys in metallurgical industries and its release into the environment is a growing problem. As a catalytic center of some redox enzymes, molybdenum is an essential element for inorganic nitrogen assimilation/fixation, phytohormone synthesis, and free radical metabolism in photosynthesizing species. In oceanic and estuarine waters, microalgae absorb molybdenum as the water-soluble molybdate anion (MoO4(2-)), although MoO4(2-) uptake is thought to compete with uptake of the much more abundant sulfate anion (SO4(2-), approximately 25 mM in seawater). Thus, those aspects of microalgal biology impacted by molybdenum would be better explained by considering both MoO4(2-) and SO4(2-) concentrations in the aquatic milieu. This work examines toxicological, physiological and redox imbalances in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum that have been induced by changes in the molybdate:sulfate ratios. We prepared cultures of Lingulodinium polyedrum grown in artificial seawater containing eight different MoO4(2-) concentrations (from 0 to 200 ?M) and three different SO4(2-) concentrations (3.5 mM, 9.6 mM and 25 mM). We measured sulfur content in cells, the activities of the three major antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase), indexes of oxidative modifications in proteins (carbonyl content) and lipids (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS), the activities of the molybdenum-dependent enzymes xanthine oxidase and nitrate reductase, expression of key protein components of dinoflagellate photosynthesis (peridinin-chlorophyll a protein and ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxidase) and growth curves. We find evidence for Mo toxicity at relatively high [MoO4(2-)]:[SO4(2-)] ratios. We also find evidence for extensive redox adaptations at Mo levels well below lethal levels. PMID:24036534

  9. Processing of Affective Speech Prosody Is Impaired in Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpilahti, Pirjo; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kuusikko, Sanna; Suominen, Kalervo; Rytky, Seppo; Pauls, David L.; Moilanen, Irma

    2007-01-01

    Many people with the diagnosis of Asperger syndrome (AS) show poorly developed skills in understanding emotional messages. The present study addressed discrimination of speech prosody in children with AS at neurophysiological level. Detection of affective prosody was investigated in one-word utterances as indexed by the N1 and the mismatch…

  10. Political Expertise and AffectEffects on News Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MEI-LING HSU; VINCENT PRICE

    1993-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the various conditions under which political expertise (or prior knowledge in the general political domain) and affect (positive or negative feelings) might interact with each other in shaping the cognitive strategies that people employ in forming reactions to newspaper stories. Two hundred six subjects from a major midwestern university were randomly assigned to a

  11. Corticosterone metabolism by chicken follicle cells does not affect ovarian reproductive hormone synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rettenbacher, Sophie; Henriksen, Rie; Groothuids, Ton G.; Lepschy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect reproductive hormone production in many species. In chickens, elevated plasma corticosterone down-regulates testosterone and progesterone concentrations in plasma, but also in egg yolk. This suppression could be mediated via the hypothalamic-pituitary system but also via local inhibition of gonadal activity by glucocorticoids. As the latter has not been tested in birds yet, we tested if corticosterone directly inhibits ovarian steroid synthesis under in vitro conditions. We hypothesized that degradation of corticosterone by follicular cells impairs their ability to synthesize reproductive hormones due to either inhibition of enzymes or competition for common co-factors. Therefore, we first established whether follicles degrade corticosterone. Follicular tissue was harvested from freshly euthanized laying hens and incubated with radiolabelled corticosterone. Radioactive metabolites were visualized and quantified by autoradiography. Follicles converted corticosterone in a time-dependent manner into metabolites with a higher polarity than corticosterone. The predominant metabolite co-eluted with 20?-dihydrocorticosterone. Other chicken tissues mostly formed the same metabolite when incubated with corticosterone. In a second experiment, follicles were incubated with either progesterone or dehydroepiandrosterone. Corticosterone was added in increasing dosages up to 1000 ng per ml medium. Corticosterone did not inhibit the conversion of progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone into a number of different metabolites, including 17?-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and testosterone. In conclusion, avian tissues degrade corticosterone mostly to 20?-dihydrocorticosterone and even high corticosterone dosages do not affect follicular hormone production under in vitro conditions. PMID:23333751

  12. Affective context interferes with brain responses during cognitive processing in borderline personality disorder: fMRI evidence.

    PubMed

    Soloff, Paul H; White, Richard; Omari, Amro; Ramaseshan, Karthik; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2015-07-30

    Emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with loss of cognitive control in the face of intense negative emotion. Negative emotional context may interfere with cognitive processing through the dysmodulation of brain regions involved in regulation of emotion, impulse control, executive function and memory. Structural and metabolic brain abnormalities have been reported in these regions in BPD. Using novel fMRI protocols, we investigated the neural basis of negative affective interference with cognitive processing targeting these regions. Attention-driven Go No-Go and X-CPT (continuous performance test) protocols, using positive, negative and neutral Ekman faces, targeted the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), respectively. A stimulus-driven Episodic Memory task, using images from the International Affective Pictures System, targeted the hippocampus (HIP). Participants comprised 23 women with BPD, who were compared with 15 healthy controls. When Negative>Positive faces were compared in the Go No-Go task, BPD subjects had hyper-activation relative to controls in areas reflecting task-relevant processing: the superior parietal/precuneus and the basal ganglia. Decreased activation was also noted in the OFC, and increased activation in the amygdala (AMY). In the X-CPT, BPD subjects again showed hyper-activation in task-relevant areas: the superior parietal/precuneus and the ACC. In the stimulus-driven Episodic Memory task, BPD subjects had decreased activation relative to controls in the HIP, ACC, superior parietal/precuneus, and dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) (for encoding), and the ACC, dPFC, and HIP for retrieval of Negative>Positive pictures, reflecting impairment of task-relevant functions. Negative affective interference with cognitive processing in BPD differs from that in healthy controls and is associated with functional abnormalities in brain networks reported to have structural or metabolic abnormalities. Task demands exert a differential effect on the cognitive response to negative emotion in BPD compared with control subjects. PMID:25982488

  13. Thermal and metabolic factors affecting PCB uptake by adult brown trout

    SciTech Connect

    Spigarelli, S.A.; Thommes, M.M.; Prepejchal, W.

    1983-02-01

    The accumulation of PCBs from natural food and water by adult brown trout, Salmo trutta, were compared under three temperature treatments: (1) a diel temperature cycle simulating that selected by brown trout in thermal effluents; (2) a constant 13/sup 0/C, the optimum constant temperature for brown trout growth; (3) natural fluctuations in ambient inshore temperatures. Direct uptake from water accounted for approximately 10% of the uptake from food and water. Fish exposed to the diel cycle or the arhythmic ambient regime fed and grew as though they were acclimated to the maximum temperatures experienced and accumulated more PCBs than fish exposed to the constant 13/sup 0/C regime. Total food consumption or growth was the best correlate of PCB concentration in whole fish while lipid content of muscle was the best correlate of PCB concentration in muscle. PCB accumulation was affected by temperature magnitude and variation, because these factors controlled food consumption, growth, and lipid content of brown trout.

  14. Important role of autophagy in regulation of metabolic processes in health, disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Papá?ková, Z; Cahová, M

    2014-09-01

    Autophagy is the basic catabolic mechanism that involves degradation of dysfunctional cellular components through the action of lysosome as well as supplying energy and compounds for the synthesis of essential biomacromolecules. This process enables cells to survive stress from the external environment like nutrient deprivation. Autophagy is important in the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids as well. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that autophagy is critical in wide range of normal human physiological processes, and defective autophagy is associated with diverse diseases, including lysosomal storage disease, myopathies, neurodegeneration and various metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the most up-to-date findings on what role autophagy plays in metabolism. PMID:24702497

  15. Factors Affecting Location Decisions of Food Processing Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turhan, Sule; Canan Ozbag, Basak; Cetin, Bahattin

    The main aim of this study is to examine the determinants of location choices for food processing plants using the results of 59 personal surveys. The 61.3% of the food processing plants that were interviewed are small scale plants, 9.1% are large scale plants and 29.6% are medium scale plants. Sixteen of the firms process vegetables, 12 process poultry, 12 process dairy and 9 process seafood products. Business climate factors are divided into six categories (market, infrastructure, raw material, labor, personal and environmental) and 17 specific location factors are considered. The survey responses are analyzed by types of raw materials processed and by plant size. 43.7, 55.3 and 42.2% of the respondents cited categories of Market, Raw Material and Infrastructure respectively as important, while 44.3, 50.7 and 74.4% of the respondents cited, labor, personal and environmental regulation categories of as not important. Thus survey findings indicate that plant location choices are mainly driven by market, raw material and infra structural factors. Environmental factors such as environmental regulations and permissions are relatively insignificant.

  16. Stimulus characteristics affect humor processing in individuals with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samson, Andrea C; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS individuals did not differ to the control group in humor appreciation of visual puns. However, they had difficulty understanding and appreciating Theory of Mind cartoons and provided mentalistic explanations less frequently than controls suggesting that humor processing is strongly related to the cognitive requirements that the stimuli pose on the perceiver. Furthermore, AS individuals referred in all conditions more frequently to non-joke relevant details. Therefore, humor processing is also influenced by their detail-oriented processing style. PMID:19859795

  17. Heritability of Individual Differences in Cortical Processing of Facial Affect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrey P. Anokhin; Simon Golosheykin; Andrew C. Heath

    2010-01-01

    Facial expression of emotion is a key mechanism of non-verbal social communication in humans. Deficits in processing of facial\\u000a emotion have been implicated in psychiatric disorders characterized by abnormal social behavior, such as autism and schizophrenia.\\u000a Identification of genetically transmitted variability in the neural substrates of facial processing can elucidate the pathways\\u000a mediating genetic influences on social behavior and provide

  18. Ammonium-related metabolic changes affect somatic embryogenesis in pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.).

    PubMed

    Mihaljevi?, Snježana; Radi?, Sandra; Bauer, Nataša; Gari?, Rade; Mihaljevi?, Branka; Horvat, Gordana; Leljak-Levani?, Dunja; Jelaska, Sibila

    2011-11-01

    Somatic embryogenesis in pumpkin can be induced on auxin-containing medium and also on hormone-free medium containing 1mM ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as the sole source of nitrogen. Growth of NH(4)(+)-induced embryogenic tissue was slow and caused considerable acidification of the culture medium. Small spherical cells with dense cytoplasma formed proembryogenic cell clusters that could not develop into late stage embryos. Buffering of NH(4)(+) medium with 25mM 2-(N-morpholino)-ethane-sulfonic acid enhanced tissue proliferation, but no further differentiation was observed. Later stage embryos developed only after re-supply of nitrogen in form of nitrate or l-glutamine. Effects of nitrogen status and pH of culture media on ammonium assimilation were analyzed by following the activity of glutamine synthetase (GS) in relation to phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). Increased activity of GS and PAL in NH(4)(+) induced tissue coincided with significantly higher activity of stress-related enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and soluble peroxidase (POD), indicating oxidative stress response of embryogenic tissue to NH(4)(+) as the sole source of nitrogen. In addition, considerable increase was observed in callose accumulation and esterase activity, the early markers of somatic embryogenesis. Activity of stress-related enzymes decreased after the re-supply of nitrate (20mM) or Gln (10mM) in combination with NH(4)(+) (1mM), which subsequently triggered globular embryo development. Together, these results suggest that stress responses, as affected by nitrogen supply, contribute to the regulation of embryogenic competence in pumpkin. PMID:21807439

  19. Factors Affecting Development of Peroxisomes and Glycolate Metabolism among Algae of Different Evolutionary Lines of the Prasinophyceae.

    PubMed Central

    Kehlenbeck, P.; Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1995-01-01

    Leaf-type peroxisomes are not present in the primitive unicellular Prasinophycean line of algae but are present in the multicellular algae Mougeotia, Chara, and Nitella, which are in the one evolutionary line, Charophyceae, that led to higher plants. Processes related to glycolate metabolism that may have been modified or induced with the appearance of peroxisomes have been examined. The algal dissolved inorganic carbon-concentrating mechanism and alkalization of the medium during photosynthesis were not lost when peroxisomes appeared in the members of the Charophycean line of algae. Therefore, it is unlikely that lowering of the CO2 concentration in the environment was a major factor in the evolutionary appearance of peroxisomes. Multicellular Mougeotia, early members of the Charophycean line of algae, have peroxisomes, but they excrete excess glycolate into the medium. The cytosolic pyruvate reductase for D-lactate synthesis and the glycolate dehydrogenase activity almost disappeared when peroxisomal glycolate oxidase, which also oxidizes L-lactate, appeared. These biochemical changes do not indicate what caused the induction of leaf-type peroxisomes in this evolutionary line of algae. The oxygenase activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and glycolate oxidase require about 200 to 400 [mu]M O2 for 0.5 Vmax. These high-O2-requiring steps in glycolate metabolism would have functioned faster with increasing atmospheric O2, which might have been the causative factor in the induction of peroxisomes. PMID:12228674

  20. In Vitro Fertilization Affects Growth and Glucose Metabolism in a Sex-Specific Manner in an Outbred Mouse Model1

    PubMed Central

    Donjacour, Annemarie; Liu, Xiaowei; Lin, Wingka; Simbulan, Rhodel; Rinaudo, Paolo F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The preimplantation period is a time of reprogramming that may be vulnerable to disruption. This question has wide clinical relevance since the number of children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) is rising. To examine this question, outbred mice (CF1 × B6D2F1) conceived by IVF and cultured using Whitten medium and 20% O2 (IVFWM group, less optimal) or K simplex optimized medium with amino acids and 5% O2 (IVFKAA group, more optimal and similar to conditions used in human IVF) were studied postnatally. We found that flushed blastocysts transferred to recipient mice provided the best control group (FB group), as this accounted for the effects of superovulation, embryo transfer, and litter size. We observed that many physiological parameters were normal. Reassuringly, IVFKAA offspring did not differ significantly from FB offspring. However, male IVFWM mice (but not females) were larger during the first 19 wk of life and exhibited glucose intolerance. Male IVFWM mice also showed enlarged left heart despite normal blood pressure. Expression of candidate imprinted genes (H19, Igf2, and Slc38a4) in multiple adult tissues did not show differences among the groups; only Slc38a4 was down-regulated following IVF (in both culture conditions) in female adipose tissue. These studies demonstrate that adult metabolism is affected by the type of conditions encountered during the preimplantation stage. Further, the postnatal growth trajectory and glucose homeostasis following ex vivo manipulation may be sexual dimorphic. Future work on the long-term effects of IVF offspring should focus on glucose metabolism and the cardiovascular system. PMID:24621920

  1. Low temperature and defoliation affect fructan-metabolizing enzymes in different regions of the rhizophores of Vernonia herbacea.

    PubMed

    Portes, Maria Teresa; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia L; de Carvalho, Maria Angela M

    2008-10-01

    In addition to the storage function, fructans in Asteraceae from floras with seasonal growth have been associated with drought and freezing tolerance. Vernonia herbacea, native of the Brazilian Cerrado, bears underground reserve organs, rhizophores, accumulating inulin-type fructans. The rhizophore is a cauline branched system with positive geotropic growth, with the apex (distal region) presenting younger tissues; sprouting of new shoots occurs by development of buds located on the opposite end (proximal region). Plants induced to sprouting by excision of the aerial organs present increased 1-fructan exohydrolase (1-FEH) activity in the proximal region, while plants at the vegetative stage present high 1-sucrose:sucrose fructosyltransferase (1-SST) in the distal region. The aim of the present study was to analyze how low temperature (5 degrees C) could affect fructan-metabolizing enzymes and fructan composition in the different regions of the rhizophores of intact and excised plants. 1-SST and 1-fructan:fructan fructosyltransferase (1-FFT) were higher in the distal region decreasing towards the proximal region in intact plants at the vegetative phase, and were drastically diminished when cold and/or excision were imposed. In contrast, 1-FEH increased in the proximal region of treated plants, mainly in excised plants subjected to cold. The ratio fructo-oligo to fructo-polysaccharides was significantly higher in plants exposed to low temperature (1.17 in intact plants and 1.64 in excised plants) than in plants exposed to natural temperature conditions (0.84 in intact vegetative plants and 0.58 in excised plants), suggesting that oligosaccharides are involved in the tolerance of plants to low temperature via 1-FEH, in addition to 1-FFT. Principal component analysis indicated different response mechanisms in fructan metabolism under defoliation and low temperature, which could be interpreted as part of the strategies to undergo unfavorable environmental conditions prevailing in the Cerrado during winter. PMID:18342987

  2. Body condition score at calving affects systemic and hepatic transcriptome indicators of inflammation and nutrient metabolism in grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Akbar, H; Grala, T M; Vailati Riboni, M; Cardoso, F C; Verkerk, G; McGowan, J; Macdonald, K; Webster, J; Schutz, K; Meier, S; Matthews, L; Roche, J R; Loor, J J

    2015-02-01

    Calving body condition score (BCS) is an important determinant of early-lactation dry matter intake, milk yield, and disease incidence. The current study investigated the metabolic and molecular changes induced by the change in BCS. A group of cows of mixed age and breed were managed from the second half of the previous lactation to achieve mean group BCS (10-point scale) that were high (HBCS, 5.5; n=20), medium (MBCS, 4.5; n=18), or low (LBCS, 3.5; n=19). Blood was sampled at wk -4, -3, -2, 1, 3, 5, and 6 relative to parturition to measure biomarkers of energy balance, inflammation, and liver function. Liver was biopsied on wk 1, 3, and 5 relative to parturition, and 10 cows per BCS group were used for transcript profiling via quantitative PCR. Cows in HBCS and MBCS produced more milk and had greater concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and ?-hydroxybutyrate postpartum than LBCS. Peak concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and ?-hydroxybutyrate and greater hepatic triacylglycerol concentrations were recorded in HBCS at wk 3. Consistent with blood biomarkers, HBCS and MBCS had greater expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation (CPT1A, ACOX1), ketogenesis (HMGCS2), and hepatokines (FGF21, ANGPTL4), whereas HBCS had the lowest expression of APOB (lipoprotein transport). Greater expression during early lactation of BBOX1 in MBCS and LBCS suggested greater de novo carnitine synthesis. The greater BCS was associated with lower expression of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling axis genes (GHR1A, IGF1, and IGFALS) and greater expression of gluconeogenic genes. These likely contributed to the higher milk production and greater gluconeogenesis. Despite greater serum haptoglobin around calving, cows in HBCS and MBCS had greater blood albumin. Cows in MBCS, however, had a higher albumin:globulin ratio, probably indicating a less pronounced inflammatory status and better liver function. The marked decrease in expression of NFKB1, STAT3, HP, and SAA3 coupled with the increase in ALB on wk 3 in MBCS cows were consistent with blood measures. Overall, results suggest that the greater milk production of cows with higher calving BCS is associated with a proinflammatory response without negatively affecting expression of genes related to metabolism and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis. Results highlight the sensitivity of indicators of metabolic health and inflammatory state to subtle changes in calving BCS and, collectively, indicate a suboptimal health status in cows calving at either BCS 3.5 or 5.5 relative to BCS 4.5. PMID:25497809

  3. Centrifugal inhibitory processes affecting neurones in the cat cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Comis, S. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the lateral part of the olivary S-segment in the cat inhibited neurones in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. A smaller number of neurones located in the ventral division of the cochlear nucleus were excited. 2. It is suggested that inhibition in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus may be mediated directly by fibres making synaptic connexions on the cochlear nucleus neurones, or indirectly by inhibitory fibres acting at the cochlea. 3. The direct inhibitory process at the cochlear nucleus is unaffected by strychnine, whereas the inhibitory process at the cochlea is abolished by strychnine. 4. A cochlear nucleus neurone can be influenced simultaneously by excitatory and inhibitory processes. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5499823

  4. PROCESSES AFFECTING THE FATE OF OIL IN THE SEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using research results reported from oil spills, laboratory experiments and microcosm studies, this review outlines the many processes controlling the behavior of petroleum in marine waters. The fate of oil spilled at sea depends on the composition of the oil, and on such externa...

  5. Distal Prosodic Context Affects Word Segmentation and Lexical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, Laura C.; McAuley, J. Devin

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the role of distal (i.e., nonlocal) prosody in word segmentation and lexical processing. In Experiment 1, prosodic characteristics of the initial five syllables of eight-syllable sequences were manipulated; the final portions of these sequences were lexically ambiguous (e.g., "note bookworm", "notebook worm"). Distal…

  6. Feedstock and Processes Affect Environmental Properties of Biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar, a byproduct of the pyrolysis process of biomass-to-energy conversion, can be used as a soil amendment to improve soil health, providing beneficial use for biochar. The quality of the biochar as soil amendment and its environmental impact are likely to depend on feedstock source and processi...

  7. Can Process Portfolios Affect Students' Writing Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaidou, Iolie

    2012-01-01

    Can process portfolios that support students in goal setting, reflection, self-evaluation and feedback have a positive impact on students' writing self-efficacy? This article presents the findings of a yearlong study conducted in three 4th grade elementary classes in Cyprus where paper-based and web-based portfolios were implemented to help…

  8. Antioxidant Properties of Tea Extracts as Affected by Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Manzocco; M Anese; M. C Nicoli

    1998-01-01

    The changes in the antioxidant properties of green and black tea extracts as a consequence of processing and storage conditions were evaluated through measurements of chain-breaking activity, oxygen scavenging capacity and redox potential. Pasteurisation and storage as well as forced oxygenation in both tea extracts caused an increase in the optical density and a decrease in the reducing power of

  9. Neural, Parallel, and Scientific Computations 20 (2012) 227-240 PULSED MELODIC AFFECTIVE PROCESSING -USING MUSIC FOR

    E-print Network

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    2012-01-01

    ­ capable of representing the arousal and valence of affective states. Affective processing and affectiveNeural, Parallel, and Scientific Computations 20 (2012) 227-240 PULSED MELODIC AFFECTIVE PROCESSING - USING MUSIC FOR NATURAL AFFECTIVE COMPUTATION AND INCREASED PROCESSING TRANSPARENCY ALEXIS KIRKE

  10. Factors affecting the rheology and processability of highly filled suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kalyon, Dilhan M; Akta?, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Suspensions filled with rigid particles at volume-loading levels that approach their maximum packing fraction are widely encountered, especially in the energetics, ceramics, pharmaceutical, magnetics, composites, food, and personal care industries. Highly filled suspensions, regardless of industrial application, exhibit a number of common rheological and processability traits, including viscoplasticity and wall slip, that necessitate special rheometers and appropriate characterization and numerical simulation methods. Furthermore, various factors, including the dispersion and distribution of the particles and their agglomerates, the entrainment of air, the filtration-based migration of the binder phase, and the shear-induced migration of particles, play important roles and must be considered in the design and optimization of manufacturing operations for processing of highly filled suspensions. PMID:24910916

  11. Heritability of individual differences in cortical processing of facial affect.

    PubMed

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Heath, Andrew C

    2010-03-01

    Facial expression of emotion is a key mechanism of non-verbal social communication in humans. Deficits in processing of facial emotion have been implicated in psychiatric disorders characterized by abnormal social behavior, such as autism and schizophrenia. Identification of genetically transmitted variability in the neural substrates of facial processing can elucidate the pathways mediating genetic influences on social behavior and provide useful endophenotypes for psychiatric genetic research. This study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) evoked by changes in facial expression in adolescent twins (age 12, 47 monozygotic and 51 dizygotic pairs). Facial images with happy, fearful, and neutral expressions were administered in a continuous mode, such that different expressions of the same face instantaneously replaced each other. This experimental design allowed us to isolate responses elicited by changes in emotional expression that were not confounded with responses elicited by image onset. Changes of emotional expression elicited a N240 wave with a right temporoparietal maximum and a P300 wave with a centropariatal midline maximum. Genetic analyses using a model fitting approach showed that a substantial proportion of the observed individual variation in these ERP responses can be attributed to genetic factors (36-64% for N250 and 42-62% for P300 components, respectively). This study provides the first evidence for heritability of neuroelectric indicators of face processing and suggests that ERP components sensitive to emotional expressions can potentially serve as endophenotypes for psychpathology characterized by abnormalities in social cognition and behavior. PMID:20127403

  12. Lycopene in tomatoes: chemical and physical properties affected by food processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Le Maguer, M

    2000-01-01

    Lycopene is the pigment principally responsible for the characteristic deep-red color of ripe tomato fruits and tomato products. It has attracted attention due to its biological and physicochemical properties, especially related to its effects as a natural antioxidant. Although it has no provitamin A activity, lycopene does exhibit a physical quenching rate constant with singlet oxygen almost twice as high as that of beta-carotene. This makes its presence in the diet of considerable interest. Increasing clinical evidence supports the role of lycopene as a micronutrient with important health benefits, because it appears to provide protection against a broad range of epithelial cancers. Tomatoes and related tomato products are the major source of lycopene compounds, and are also considered an important source of carotenoids in the human diet. Undesirable degradation of lycopene not only affects the sensory quality of the final products, but also the health benefit of tomato-based foods for the human body. Lycopene in fresh tomato fruits occurs essentially in the all-trans configuration. The main causes of tomato lycopene degradation during processing are isomerization and oxidation. Isomerization converts all-trans isomers to cis-isomers due to additional energy input and results in an unstable, energy-rich station. Determination of the degree of lycopene isomerization during processing would provide a measure of the potential health benefits of tomato-based foods. Thermal processing (bleaching, retorting, and freezing processes) generally cause some loss of lycopene in tomato-based foods. Heat induces isomerization of the all-trans to cis forms. The cis-isomers increase with temperature and processing time. In general, dehydrated and powdered tomatoes have poor lycopene stability unless carefully processed and promptly placed in a hermetically sealed and inert atmosphere for storage. A significant increase in the cis-isomers with a simultaneous decrease in the all-trans isomers can be observed in the dehydrated tomato samples using the different dehydration methods. Frozen foods and heat-sterilized foods exhibit excellent lycopene stability throughout their normal temperature storage shelf life. Lycopene bioavailability (absorption) can be influenced by many factors. The bioavailability of cis-isomers in food is higher than that of all-trans isomers. Lycopene bioavailability in processed tomato products is higher than in unprocessed fresh tomatoes. The composition and structure of the food also have an impact on the bioavailability of lycopene and may affect the release of lycopene from the tomato tissue matrix. Food processing may improve lycopene bioavailability by breaking down cell walls, which weakens the bonding forces between lycopene and tissue matrix, thus making lycopene more accessible and enhancing the cis-isomerization. More information on lycopene bioavailability, however, is needed. The pharmacokinetic properties of lycopene remain particularly poorly understood. Further research on the bioavalability, pharmacology, biochemistry, and physiology must be done to reveal the mechanism of lycopene in human diet, and the in vivo metabolism of lycopene. Consumer demand for healthy food products provides an opportunity to develop lycopene-rich food as new functional foods, as well as food-grade and pharmaceutical-grade lycopene as new nutraceutical products. An industrial scale, environmentally friendly lycopene extraction and purification procedure with minimal loss of bioactivities is highly desirable for the foods, feed, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. High-quality lycopene products that meet food safety regulations will offer potential benefits to the food industry. PMID:10674200

  13. Lycopene in tomatoes: chemical and physical properties affected by food processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Le Maguer, M

    2000-01-01

    Lycopene is the pigment principally responsible for the characteristic deep-red color of ripe tomato fruits and tomato products. It has attracted attention due to its biological and physicochemical properties, especially related to its effects as a natural antioxidant. Although it has no provitamin A activity, lycopene does exhibit a physical quenching rate constant with singlet oxygen almost twice as high as that of beta-carotene. This makes its presence in the diet of considerable interest. Increasing clinical evidence supports the role of lycopene as a micronutrient with important health benefits, because it appears to provide protection against a broad range of epithelial cancers. Tomatoes and related tomato products are the major source of lycopene compounds, and are also considered an important source of carotenoids in the human diet. Undesirable degradation of lycopene not only affects the sensory quality of the final products, but also the health benefit of tomato-based foods for the human body. Lycopene in fresh tomato fruits occurs essentially in the all-trans configuration. The main causes of tomato lycopene degradation during processing are isomerization and oxidation. Isomerization converts all-trans isomers to cis-isomers due to additional energy input and results in an unstable, energy-rich station. Determination of the degree of lycopene isomerization during processing would provide a measure of the potential health benefits of tomato-based foods. Thermal processing (bleaching, retorting, and freezing processes) generally cause some loss of lycopene in tomato-based foods. Heat induces isomerization of the all-trans to cis forms. The cis-isomers increase with temperature and processing time. In general, dehydrated and powdered tomatoes have poor lycopene stability unless carefully processed and promptly placed in a hermetically sealed and inert atmosphere for storage. A significant increase in the cis-isomers with a simultaneous decrease in the all-trans isomers can be observed in the dehydrated tomato samples using the different dehydration methods. Frozen foods and heat-sterilized foods exhibit excellent lycopene stability throughout their normal temperature storage shelf life. Lycopene bioavailability (absorption) can be influenced by many factors. The bioavailability of cis-isomers in food is higher than that of all-trans isomers. Lycopene bioavailability in processed tomato products is higher than in unprocessed fresh tomatoes. The composition and structure of the food also have an impact on the bioavailability of lycopene and may affect the release of lycopene from the tomato tissue matrix. Food processing may improve lycopene bioavailability by breaking down cell walls, which weakens the bonding forces between lycopene and tissue matrix, thus making lycopene more accessible and enhancing the cis-isomerization. More information on lycopene bioavailability, however, is needed. The pharmacokinetic properties of lycopene remain particularly poorly understood. Further research on the bioavalability, pharmacology, biochemistry, and physiology must be done to reveal the mechanism of lycopene in human diet, and the in vivo metabolism of lycopene. Consumer demand for healthy food products provides an opportunity to develop lycopene-rich food as new functional foods, as well as food-grade and pharmaceutical-grade lycopene as new nutraceutical products. An industrial scale, environmentally friendly lycopene extraction and purification procedure with minimal loss of bioactivities is highly desirable for the foods, feed, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. High-quality lycopene products that meet food safety regulations will offer potential benefits to the food industry. PMID:11192026

  14. Leucine affects the metabolism of valine by isolated perfused rat hearts: relation to branched-chain amino acid antagonism.

    PubMed

    Torres, N; Tovar, A R; Harper, A E

    1995-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of different concentrations of leucine on the transport, transamination and oxidation of valine and on incorporation of valine into heart proteins in the isolated perfused rat heart. Valine metabolism was studied in rat hearts perfused with medium containing glucose and graded levels of L-leucine. In transport studies L-phenylalanine was also tested. Uptake of L-[1-14C]valine (0.2 mmol/L) was significantly reduced (-50%) by inclusion of 0.2 mmol/L phenylalanine or leucine, and by -70% by inclusion of 1.0 mmol/L phenylalanine or leucine in the perfusate. Transamination of valine decreased by 37 and 48%, and oxidation of valine by 53 and 71%, respectively, when 0.2 or 1.0 mmol/L leucine was included in the perfusate. Tissue concentrations of valine decreased by 43, 48 and 62% in the presence of 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/L leucine, respectively; tissue concentrations of leucine, glutamate and alanine increased approximately 11-fold, 1.2-fold and 0.5-fold, respectively, when 1.0 mmol/L leucine was present in the perfusate. Addition of 0.2-1.0 mmol/L leucine did not affect incorporation of valine into heart proteins. We conclude that 1) competition among large neutral amino acids for transport into heart occurs at physiological concentrations of these amino acids in plasma; 2) inhibition of valine uptake by leucine can limit the rate of valine catabolism in heart; and 3) depletion of tissue valine concentration by an excess of leucine did not affect the rate of protein synthesis. PMID:7616305

  15. Epilithic community metabolism as an indicator of impact and recovery in streams affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    DeNicola, Dean M; Layton, Lee; Czapski, Tiffaney R

    2012-12-01

    We measured biomass and metabolism of epilithic communities on five dates in different seasons at four sites in a watershed that has received extensive restoration for acid mine drainage (AMD) through the construction of passive treatment systems. Chlorophyll a biomass and productivity directly corresponded to AMD stress from coal mining. The site downstream of extensive passive treatment had significantly greater biomass and gross primary productivity rates than the site receiving only untreated AMD, but values were below those for two reference sites, indicating incomplete recovery. The degree of difference in these metrics among sites varied seasonally, primarily related to differences in canopy cover changes, but the ranking of sites in terms of stress generally was consistent. Reference sites had a significantly greater chlorophyll a/pheophytin ratio than untreated and treated sites, also indicating AMD stressed the communities. Community respiration was less affected by AMD stress than productivity or chlorophyll a. Productivity measures are not widely used to assess AMD impacts, and have been shown to both increase and decrease with AMD stress. The elimination of herbivores in AMD-impacted streams can increase productivity in the benthic algal community. Our study found productivity decreased with increasing AMD stress. Although sites with AMD stress had reduced herbivore populations, light, nutrients and metal precipitates appear to have limited growth of AMD-tolerant algal taxa. Therefore, it appears changes in food web structure due to AMD stress had less of an effect on epilithic productivity than environmental conditions within the stream. PMID:22961617

  16. Epilithic Community Metabolism as an Indicator of Impact and Recovery in Streams Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNicola, Dean M.; Layton, Lee; Czapski, Tiffaney R.

    2012-12-01

    We measured biomass and metabolism of epilithic communities on five dates in different seasons at four sites in a watershed that has received extensive restoration for acid mine drainage (AMD) through the construction of passive treatment systems. Chlorophyll a biomass and productivity directly corresponded to AMD stress from coal mining. The site downstream of extensive passive treatment had significantly greater biomass and gross primary productivity rates than the site receiving only untreated AMD, but values were below those for two reference sites, indicating incomplete recovery. The degree of difference in these metrics among sites varied seasonally, primarily related to differences in canopy cover changes, but the ranking of sites in terms of stress generally was consistent. Reference sites had a significantly greater chlorophyll a/pheophytin ratio than untreated and treated sites, also indicating AMD stressed the communities. Community respiration was less affected by AMD stress than productivity or chlorophyll a. Productivity measures are not widely used to assess AMD impacts, and have been shown to both increase and decrease with AMD stress. The elimination of herbivores in AMD-impacted streams can increase productivity in the benthic algal community. Our study found productivity decreased with increasing AMD stress. Although sites with AMD stress had reduced herbivore populations, light, nutrients and metal precipitates appear to have limited growth of AMD-tolerant algal taxa. Therefore, it appears changes in food web structure due to AMD stress had less of an effect on epilithic productivity than environmental conditions within the stream.

  17. A premature termination codon within an alternative exon affecting only the metabolism of transcripts that retain this exon.

    PubMed

    Maillet, P; Dalla Venezia, N; Lorenzo, F; Morinière, M; Bozon, M; Noël, B; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    1999-01-01

    Protein 4.1 pre-mRNA splicing is regulated in tissue- and development-specific manners. Exon 16, which encodes the N-terminal region of the spectrin/actin-binding domain, is one of the alternatively spliced sequence motifs. It is present in late differentiated erythroid cells but absent from early erythroblasts and from lymphoid cells. We describe a single nucleotide deletion of the erythroid protein 4.1 gene associated with hereditary elliptocytosis. The deletion located in exon 16 leads to a frameshift and a premature termination codon within the same exon. In an effort to examine the premature stop codon effect in relationship with exon 16 alternative splicing, we analyzed erythroid and lymphoid protein 4.1 mRNAs using the mutation and a linked downstream polymorphism as markers. We found that the premature stop codon does not affect the tissue-specific alternative splicing among the two cell types analyzed and that the resulting alteration of mRNA metabolism correlates with the retention of exon 16 in reticulocytes. Conversely, skipping of exon 16 in lymphoid cells converts the mutant mRNA to a normal lymphoid-specific mRNA isoform, hence bypassing the nonsense codon. Consistent with data obtained on constitutive nonsense exons, our observations argue in favor of a stop codon recognition mechanism that occurs after the regulated splicing status of the nonsense exon has been achieved. PMID:10425037

  18. Processes affecting greenhouse gas production in experimental boreal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkiteswaran, Jason J.; Schiff, Sherry L.; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Matthews, Cory J. D.; Boudreau, Natalie M.; Joyce, Elizabeth M.; Beaty, Kenneth G.; Bodaly, R. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Flooding land for water reservoir creation has many environmental impacts including the production of the greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). To assess processes governing GHG emissions from the flooding of terrestrial carbon, three experimental reservoirs were constructed in upland boreal forest areas of differing carbon stores as part of the Flooded Upland Dynamics Experiment (FLUDEX). We calculated process-based GHG budgets for these reservoirs over 5 years following the onset of flooding. Stable isotopic budgets of carbon were necessary to separate community respiration (CR), which produces CO2, from net primary production (NPP), which consumes CO2, and to separate CH4 production from CH4 consumption via oxidation. NPP removed up to 44% of the CO2 produced from CR. CR and NPP exhibited different year-after-year trends. CH4 flux to the atmosphere increased about twofold over 3 years, yet isotopic budgets showed CH4 production in flooded soils increased nearly tenfold. CH4 oxidation near the flooded soil-water interface greatly decreased the CH4 flux from the water column to the atmosphere. Ebullition was the most important conduit of CH4 to the atmosphere after 3 years. Although CH4 production increased with time, the total GHG flux, in CO2 equivalents, declined. Contrary to expectations, neither CR nor total GHG fluxes were directly related to the quantity of organic carbon flooded. Instead, these reservoirs produced a strikingly similar amount of CO2 equivalents over 5 years.

  19. Approaches to Optimizing Animal Cell Culture Process: Substrate Metabolism Regulation and Protein Expression Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanxing

    Some high value proteins and vaccines for medical and veterinary applications by animal cell culture have an increasing market in China. In order to meet the demands of large-scale productions of proteins and vaccines, animal cell culture technology has been widely developed. In general, an animal cell culture process can be divided into two stages in a batch culture. In cell growth stage a high specific growth rate is expected to achieve a high cell density. In production stage a high specific production rate is stressed for the expression and secretion of qualified protein or replication of virus. It is always critical to maintain high cell viability in fed-batch and perfusion cultures. More concern has been focused on two points by the researchers in China. First, the cell metabolism of substrates is analyzed and the accumulation of toxic by-products is decreased through regulating cell metabolism in the culture process. Second, some important factors effecting protein expression are understood at the molecular level and the production ability of protein is improved. In pace with the rapid development of large-scale cell culture for the production of vaccines, antibodies and other recombinant proteins in China, the medium design and process optimization based on cell metabolism regulation and protein expression improvement will play an important role. The chapter outlines the main advances in metabolic regulation of cell and expression improvement of protein in animal cell culture in recent years.

  20. Lipid mobilisation and oxidative stress as metabolic adaptation processes in dairy heifers during transition period.

    PubMed

    Turk, R; Podpe?an, O; Mrkun, J; Kosec, M; Flegar-Meštri?, Z; Perkov, S; Stari?, J; Robi?, M; Beli?, M; Zrimšek, P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate metabolic disorders and oxidative stress in dairy heifers during the transition period. Possible relationships between lipid mobilisation indicators and oxidative stress markers were investigated as well. Nineteen dairy heifers were included in the study. Blood samples were collected at the time of estrus synchronisation in heifers, at insemination, three weeks after insemination, one week before calving, at calving and 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks postpartum. Common metabolic parameters, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), free fatty acids (FFA), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and total antioxidative status (TAS) were analysed. Around insemination, no significant difference was observed in the majority of tested parameters (P>0.05). However, the transition period markedly affected the concentration of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, BHB, FFA, TAS and PON1activity. Positive correlations between PON1 activity and total cholesterol, HDL-C and triglycerides were noted but inverse correlations with FFA, BHB and bilirubin were found indicating that PON1 activity changed with lipid metabolism and was influenced by negative energy balance. These findings suggest that lipid mobilisation and oxidative stress are part of a complex metabolic adaptation to low energy balance which reaches equilibrium later in advanced lactation. PMID:23998495

  1. Processes affecting coastal wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Penland, Shea; Roberts, Harry H.

    1993-01-01

    Nowhere are the problems of coastal wetland loss more serious and dramatic than in the Mississippi River deltaic plain region of south-central Louisiana. In that area, rates of shoreline erosion of 20 m.yr and loss of land area of up to 75 km/yr result from a complex combination of natural (delta switching, subsidence, sea-level rise, storms) and human (flood control, navigation, oil and gas development, land reclamation) factors. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Coastal Geology Program, has undertaken joint filed investigations with Federal, State, and university partners. The objective of these long-term studies is to gather and interpret baseline information in order to improve our scientific understanding of the critical processes and responses responsible for creation, maintenance, and deterioration of coastal wetlands.

  2. Modeling Central Carbon Metabolic Processes in Soil Microbial Communities: Comparing Measured With Modeled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Fairbanks, D.; Miller, E.; Salpas, E.; Hagerty, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating C cycling is hindered by our inability to directly observe and measure the biochemical processes of glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and TCA cycle in intact and complex microbial communities. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracer probing is proposed as a new way to study microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the quantification of C fluxes through the central C metabolic network processes (Dijkstra et al 2011a,b). We determined the 13CO2 production from U-13C, 1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, and 6-13C labeled glucose and 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate in parallel incubations in three soils along an elevation gradient. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the results indicate a high pentose phosphate pathway activity in soils. Agreement between modeled and measured CO2 production rates for the six C-atoms of 13C-labeled glucose indicate that the metabolic model used is appropriate for soil community processes, but that improvements can be made. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and (eco)physiology of intact microbial communities. Dijkstra, P., Blankinship, J.C., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011a. Probing C flux patterns of soil microbial metabolic networks using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 126-132. Dijkstra, P., Dalder, J.J., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011b. Modeling soil metabolic processes using isotopologue pairs of position-specific 13C-labeled glucose and pyruvate. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 1848-1857.

  3. Placebo analgesia affects brain correlates of error processing.

    PubMed

    Koban, Leonie; Brass, Marcel; Lynn, Margaret T; Pourtois, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Placebo analgesia (PA) is accompanied by decreased activity in pain-related brain regions, but also by greater prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation, which has been suggested to reflect increases in top-down cognitive control and regulation of pain. Here we test whether PA is associated with altered prefrontal monitoring functions that could adjust nociceptive processing to a mismatch between expected and experienced pain. We recorded event-related potentials to response errors in a go/nogo task during placebo vs. a matched control condition. Error commission was associated with two well-described components, the error-related negativity (ERN) and the error positivity (Pe). Results show that the Pe, but not the ERN, was amplified during placebo analgesia compared to the control condition, with neural sources in the lateral and medial PFC. This Pe increase was driven by participants showing a placebo-induced change in pain tolerance, but was absent in the group of non-responders. Our results shed new light on the possible functional mechanisms underlying PA, suggesting a placebo-induced transient change in prefrontal error monitoring and control functions. PMID:23185436

  4. Preliminary investigation of processes that affect source term identification

    SciTech Connect

    Wickliff, D.S.; Solomon, D.K.; Farrow, N.D.

    1991-09-01

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 is known to be a significant source of contaminants, especially tritium ({sup 3}H), to the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. For example, Solomon et al. (1991) estimated the total {sup 3}H discharge in Melton Branch (most of which originates in SWSA 5) for the 1988 water year to be 1210 Ci. A critical issue for making decisions concerning remedial actions at SWSA 5 is knowing whether the annual contaminant discharge is increasing or decreasing. Because (1) the magnitude of the annual contaminant discharge is highly correlated to the amount of annual precipitation (Solomon et al., 1991) and (2) a significant lag may exist between the time of peak contaminant release from primary sources (i.e., waste trenches) and the time of peak discharge into streams, short-term stream monitoring by itself is not sufficient for predicting future contaminant discharges. In this study we use {sup 3}H to examine the link between contaminant release from primary waste sources and contaminant discharge into streams. By understanding and quantifying subsurface transport processes, realistic predictions of future contaminant discharge, along with an evaluation of the effectiveness of remedial action alternatives, will be possible. The objectives of this study are (1) to characterize the subsurface movement of contaminants (primarily {sup 3}H) with an emphasis on the effects of matrix diffusion; (2) to determine the relative strength of primary vs secondary sources; and (3) to establish a methodology capable of determining whether the {sup 3}H discharge from SWSA 5 to streams is increasing or decreasing.

  5. Global transcriptomic analysis of Cyanothece 51142 reveals robust diurnal oscillation of central metabolic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh V.; Aurora, Rajeev; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-04-22

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and the only prokaryotes known to have a circadian cycle. Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece 51142 can fix atmospheric nitrogen, a process exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. Thus, the intracellular environment of Cyanothece oscillates between aerobic and anaerobic conditions during a day-night cycle. This is accomplished by temporal separation of two processes: photosynthesis during the day, and nitrogen fixation at night. While previous studies have examined periodic changes transcript levels for a limited number of genes in Cyanothece and other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, a comprehensive study of transcriptional activity in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium is necessary to understand the impact of the temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation on global gene regulation and cellular metabolism. We have examined the expression patterns of nearly 5000 genes in Cyanothece 51142 during two consecutive diurnal periods. We found that ~30% of these genes exhibited robust oscillating expression profiles. Interestingly, this set included genes for almost all central metabolic processes in Cyanothece. A transcriptional network of all genes with significantly oscillating transcript levels revealed that the majority of genes in numerous individual pathways, such as glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and glycogen metabolism, were co-regulated and maximally expressed at distinct phases during the diurnal cycle. Our analyses suggest that the demands of nitrogen fixation greatly influence major metabolic activities inside Cyanothece cells and thus drive various cellular activities. These studies provide a comprehensive picture of how a physiologically relevant diurnal light-dark cycle influences the metabolism in a photosynthetic bacterium

  6. Counter-regulation triggered by emotions: positive/negative affective states elicit opposite valence biases in affective processing.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Susanne; Rothermund, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether counter-regulation in affective processing is triggered by emotions. Automatic attention allocation to valent stimuli was measured in the context of positive and negative affective states. Valence biases were assessed by comparing the detection of positive versus negative words in a visual search task (Experiment 1) or by comparing interference effects of positive and negative distractor words in an emotional Stroop task (Experiment 2). Imagining a hypothetical emotional situation (Experiment 1) or watching romantic versus depressing movie clips (Experiment 2) increased attention allocation to stimuli that were opposite in valence to the current emotional state. Counter-regulation is assumed to reflect a basic mechanism underlying implicit emotion regulation. PMID:23237331

  7. Maize Source Leaf Adaptation to Nitrogen Deficiency Affects Not Only Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism But Also Control of Phosphate Homeostasis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Urte; Mascher, Martin; Colmsee, Christian; Scholz, Uwe; Bräutigam, Andrea; Fahnenstich, Holger; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Crop plant development is strongly dependent on the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil and the efficiency of N utilization for biomass production and yield. However, knowledge about molecular responses to N deprivation derives mainly from the study of model species. In this article, the metabolic adaptation of source leaves to low N was analyzed in maize (Zea mays) seedlings by parallel measurements of transcriptome and metabolome profiling. Inbred lines A188 and B73 were cultivated under sufficient (15 mm) or limiting (0.15 mm) nitrate supply for up to 30 d. Limited availability of N caused strong shifts in the metabolite profile of leaves. The transcriptome was less affected by the N stress but showed strong genotype- and age-dependent patterns. N starvation initiated the selective down-regulation of processes involved in nitrate reduction and amino acid assimilation; ammonium assimilation-related transcripts, on the other hand, were not influenced. Carbon assimilation-related transcripts were characterized by high transcriptional coordination and general down-regulation under low-N conditions. N deprivation caused a slight accumulation of starch but also directed increased amounts of carbohydrates into the cell wall and secondary metabolites. The decrease in N availability also resulted in accumulation of phosphate and strong down-regulation of genes usually involved in phosphate starvation response, underlining the great importance of phosphate homeostasis control under stress conditions. PMID:22972706

  8. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. PMID:25421565

  9. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production. PMID:25771944

  10. Limbic abnormalities in affective processing by criminal psychopaths as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent A. Kiehl; Andra M. Smith; Robert D. Hare; Adrianna Mendrek; Bruce B. Forster; Johann Brink; Peter F. Liddle

    2001-01-01

    Background: Psychopathy is a complex personality disorder of unknown etiology. Central to the disorder are anomalies or difficulties in affective processing.Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of these anomalies in criminal psychopaths during performance of an affective memory task.Results: Compared with criminal nonpsychopaths and noncriminal control participants, criminal psychopaths showed significantly less affect-related activity

  11. The Low-Frequency Encoding Disadvantage: Word Frequency Affects Processing Demands

    E-print Network

    Reder, Lynne

    The Low-Frequency Encoding Disadvantage: Word Frequency Affects Processing Demands Rachel A. Diana-frequency disadvantage during encoding. That is, low-frequency words require more processing resources to be encoded episodically than high-frequency words. Under encoding conditions in which processing resources are limited

  12. 10 years of BAWLing into affective and aesthetic processes in reading: what are the echoes?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Arthur M.; Võ, Melissa L.-H.; Briesemeister, Benny B.; Conrad, Markus; Hofmann, Markus J.; Kuchinke, Lars; Lüdtke, Jana; Braun, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Reading is not only “cold” information processing, but involves affective and aesthetic processes that go far beyond what current models of word recognition, sentence processing, or text comprehension can explain. To investigate such “hot” reading processes, standardized instruments that quantify both psycholinguistic and emotional variables at the sublexical, lexical, inter-, and supralexical levels (e.g., phonological iconicity, word valence, arousal-span, or passage suspense) are necessary. One such instrument, the Berlin Affective Word List (BAWL) has been used in over 50 published studies demonstrating effects of lexical emotional variables on all relevant processing levels (experiential, behavioral, neuronal). In this paper, we first present new data from several BAWL studies. Together, these studies examine various views on affective effects in reading arising from dimensional (e.g., valence) and discrete emotion features (e.g., happiness), or embodied cognition features like smelling. Second, we extend our investigation of the complex issue of affective word processing to words characterized by a mixture of affects. These words entail positive and negative valence, and/or features making them beautiful or ugly. Finally, we discuss tentative neurocognitive models of affective word processing in the light of the present results, raising new issues for future studies. PMID:26089808

  13. Metabolic processes sustaining the reviviscence of lichen Xanthoria elegans (Link) in high mountain environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serge Aubert; Christine Juge; Anne-Marie Boisson; Elisabeth Gout; Richard Bligny

    2007-01-01

    To survive in high mountain environments lichens must adapt themselves to alternating periods of desiccation and hydration.\\u000a Respiration and photosynthesis of the foliaceous lichen, Xanthoria elegans, in the dehydrated state were below the threshold of CO2-detection by infrared gas analysis. Following hydration, respiration totally recovered within seconds and photosynthesis\\u000a within minutes. In order to identify metabolic processes that may contribute

  14. Proteomic Profile of Cryptococcus neoformans Biofilm Reveals Changes in Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, a pathogenic yeast, causes meningoencephalitis, especially in immunocompromised patients, leading in some cases to death. Microbes in biofilms can cause persistent infections, which are harder to treat. Cryptococcal biofilms are becoming common due to the growing use of brain valves and other medical devices. Using shotgun proteomics we determine the differences in protein abundance between biofilm and planktonic cells. Applying bioinformatic tools, we also evaluated the metabolic pathways involved in biofilm maintenance and protein interactions. Our proteomic data suggest general changes in metabolism, protein turnover, and global stress responses. Biofilm cells show an increase in proteins related to oxidation–reduction, proteolysis, and response to stress and a reduction in proteins related to metabolic process, transport, and translation. An increase in pyruvate-utilizing enzymes was detected, suggesting a shift from the TCA cycle to fermentation-derived energy acquisition. Additionally, we assign putative roles to 33 proteins previously categorized as hypothetical. Many changes in metabolic enzymes were identified in studies of bacterial biofilm, potentially revealing a conserved strategy in biofilm lifestyle. PMID:24467693

  15. MOVING AHEAD: INTEGRATING INFLUENCES OF AFFECTIVE PROCESSES FOR DEVELOPMENT AND FOR PSYCHOANALYSIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert N. Emde

    1999-01-01

    Abstract ,Psychoanalytic clinical thinking has evolved toward an organizational model of affect and multidisciplinary research broadens,this thinking. Integrative influences ofaffective processes have been given little attention in psychoanalytic theory. Such influences are reviewed using examples,from research in early development. Affective processes,are shown,to provide integrative influences across systems in an individual’s development, facilitating developmental change, as well as developmentalcontinuity. In a

  16. Positive Affect and Processes of Recovery among Treatment-Seeking Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Adam W.; Woods, William J.; Siever, Michael D.; Discepola, Michael V.; Dilwort, Samantha E.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Miller, Nicole; Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie

    2015-01-01

    Background Revised Stress and Coping Theory proposes that positive affect serves adaptive functions, independent of negative affect. However, scant research has examined whether, how, and under what circumstances positive affect is associated with decreased substance use. Methods Eighty-eight methamphetamine-using men who have sex with men (MSM) completed the baseline assessment for substance abuse treatment outcome study which included measures of positive and negative affect, cognitive-behavioral change processes (i.e., approach-oriented coping, self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers, and abstinence-related action tendencies), abstinence-specific social support, and self-reported substance use. Participants also provided a urine sample for toxicology screening. Results After controlling for demographic characteristics and negative affect, higher positive affect was independently associated with greater approach-oriented coping, abstinence-related action tendencies, and abstinence-specific social support. Positive affect was also independently associated with greater self-efficacy for managing methamphetamine triggers, but only at lower levels of negative affect. Through these cognitive-behavioral and social pathways, positive affect was indirectly associated with lower frequency of stimulant use in the past 30 days, lower odds of reporting stimulant use two or more days in a row, and lower odds of providing a urine sample that was reactive for stimulant metabolites. On the other hand, negative affect was not indirectly associated with any measure of stimulant use. Conclusions Clinical research is needed to examine the pathways whereby positive affect may predict better substance abuse treatment outcomes. PMID:23684632

  17. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low ?-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-?-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans was found to be limited by UDP-Gal biosynthesis, which was observed to be both cell line and cultivation condition-dependent. Extracellular glucose and glutamine concentrations and uptake rates were positively correlated with intracellular UDP-Gal availability. All these findings are important for optimization of fed-batch culture for improving IgG production and directing glycosylation quality. PMID:25220616

  18. Evolution of Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Rye, R.

    2003-12-01

    This chapter is devoted to the discussion of the evolution of metabolism, with a particular focus towards redox metabolism and the utilization of redox energy by life. We will deal with various aspects of metabolism that involve direct interaction with, and the extraction of energy from, the environment (catabolic metabolism) and will talk briefly of the reactions that affect mineral formation and dissolution. However, we will de-emphasize the aspects related to the formation of complex molecules and organisms. To some, it will be refreshingly brief; to others, somewhat superficial. This is unavoidable, as our knowledge of the details of the evolution of metabolism is at best slim. However, by piecing together aspects of the properties and history of the Earth and coupling these with what we know of today's metabolism, it is possible to at least frame several different hypotheses that, with time, should be possible to test and modify so that the next writing of this chapter might contain some intellectual entrees and not just the appetizers. Any discussion of metabolic evolution must occur in concert with a consideration of the Earth - the understanding of the forces that drove the co-evolution of life and Earth can be achieved only by considering them together. This theme will pervade this chapter, and any real understanding of the evolution of metabolism must be inexorably coupled to, and consistent with, the geological record of the Earth.The first aspect of evolution concerns the metabolic participants as we know them now (i.e., a definition of metabolic diversity), and the second concerns the sequence of events that have led to this remarkable metabolic diversity. The first part is fairly straightforward: a discussion of the domains of life, and the metabolic achievements that are expressed in the various domains, and relating metabolism to biogeochemical processes whenever possible. The second part is much more problematic. While it is possible to make up nearly any story regarding the evolution of metabolism (and nearly all have been attempted!), the starting point of life is not known (great debates still rage as to the nature and origin of the first living systems), and it is not a trivial matter to specify the sequence and timing of metabolic innovations. As will be discussed below, genetic and genomic data have revealed that genetic exchange between organisms has been so pervasive that it has essentially uncoupled the evolution of taxonomic groups from the evolution of metabolic processes, thus, obscuring the evolutionary trail with blurred signals. Given these challenges, it may be prudent at this time to admit what we do not know, and lay out the challenges for the coming years.

  19. Improved Release and Metabolism of Flavonoids by Steered Fermentation Processes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Thai, Huynh; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy; Raes, Katleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on steered fermentation processes to release phenolic compounds from plant-based matrices, as well as on their potential application to convert phenolic compounds into unique metabolites. The ability of fermentation to improve the yield and to change the profile of phenolic compounds is mainly due to the release of bound phenolic compounds, as a consequence of the degradation of the cell wall structure by microbial enzymes produced during fermentation. Moreover, the microbial metabolism of phenolic compounds results in a large array of new metabolites through different bioconversion pathways such as glycosylation, deglycosylation, ring cleavage, methylation, glucuronidation and sulfate conjugation, depending on the microbial strains and substrates used. A whole range of metabolites is produced, however metabolic pathways related to the formation and bioactivities, and often quantification of the metabolites are highly underinvestigated. This strategy could have potential to produce extracts with a high-added value from plant-based matrices. PMID:25347275

  20. Resilience-as-process: negative affect, stress, and coupled dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Montpetit, Mignon A; Bergeman, C S; Deboeck, Pascal R; Tiberio, Stacey S; Boker, Steven M

    2010-09-01

    Resilience is often considered both a trait and a process. The current study proposes a new way to conceptualize resilience-as-process based on dynamical systems modeling, which allows researchers to capture the process of stress management in real time. Coupled damped linear oscillator models succinctly describe daily stress and negative affect in terms of developmental forces (e.g., velocity, acceleration). Models were fit to 56-day daily response data from 42 aging adults (M(age) = 78.8 years; SD(age) = 6.6 years) to observe and understand linkages between daily stress and affect. It was speculated that individuals with greater resilience would experience stress as less coupled to changes in negative affect (less stress reactivity), and would recover their affective equilibrium more quickly following a given exogenous stressor (greater stress recovery). To identify resilience resources related to reliable interindividual differences in coupling and damping between stress and negative affect, we examined possible protective factors. Aspects of personality and social support predicted both the strength and nature of this coupling, such that higher levels of these resources resulted in greater protection from the cost to negative affect from stress, as observed in damping of negative affect and decreased coupling between systems. PMID:20853969

  1. RARE EARTH ELEMENTS AFFECTING THE BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES AND YIELDING ABILITIES OF CULTIVATED CROPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rare earth elements affecting the biological processes and yielding abilities of cultivated crops. The research work was conducted at the Estonian Research Institute of Agriculture in 1997-2002. For the trials a high- concentration original solution of rare earth elements (REE), resulting from the production process of AS Silmet, was used. REE solutions of different concentrations were used to treat the

  2. Peanut skin procyanidins: Composition and antioxidant activities as affected by processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianmei Yu; Mohamed Ahmedna; Ipek Goktepe; Jian Dai

    2006-01-01

    Peanut skin was removed by direct peeling, blanching, and roasting. Total phenolics (TPs), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and free radical scavenging capacity of peanut skin extracts were determined. The composition of ethanolic extracts of peanut skin obtained from each processing method was determined by LC-MS and HPLC. Peanut skin processing methods significantly affected total extractable phenolics and their composition. Roasting

  3. EVIDENCE FOR PHONETIC PROCESSING OF CUES TO PLACE OF ARTICULATION: PERCEIVED MANNER AFFECTS PERCEIVED PLACE

    E-print Network

    EVIDENCE FOR PHONETIC PROCESSING OF CUES TO PLACE OF ARTICULATION: PERCEIVED MANNER AFFECTS of place of articulation involves phonetic processing, and could not be purely auditory. It is clear of the system. and speech- specific phonetic or phonological mechanisms at the output end where segments

  4. Deletion of Sirt3 does not affect atherosclerosis but accelerates weight gain and impairs rapid metabolic adaptation in LDL receptor knockout mice: implications for cardiovascular risk factor development.

    PubMed

    Winnik, Stephan; Gaul, Daniel S; Preitner, Frédéric; Lohmann, Christine; Weber, Julien; Miranda, Melroy X; Liu, Yilei; van Tits, Lambertus J; Mateos, José María; Brokopp, Chad E; Auwerx, Johan; Thorens, Bernard; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    Sirt3 is a mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that governs mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. Sirt3 deficiency has been reported to accelerate the development of the metabolic syndrome. However, the role of Sirt3 in atherosclerosis remains enigmatic. We aimed to investigate whether Sirt3 deficiency affects atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability, and metabolic homeostasis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) and LDLR/Sirt3 double-knockout (Sirt3(-/-)LDLR(-/-)) mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet (1.25 % w/w) for 12 weeks. Atherosclerosis was assessed en face in thoraco-abdominal aortae and in cross sections of aortic roots. Sirt3 deletion led to hepatic mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation. Unexpectedly, though plasma malondialdehyde levels were elevated in Sirt3-deficient mice, Sirt3 deletion affected neither plaque burden nor features of plaque vulnerability (i.e., fibrous cap thickness and necrotic core diameter). Likewise, plaque macrophage and T cell infiltration as well as endothelial activation remained unaltered. Electron microscopy of aortic walls revealed no difference in mitochondrial microarchitecture between both groups. Interestingly, loss of Sirt3 was associated with accelerated weight gain and an impaired capacity to cope with rapid changes in nutrient supply as assessed by indirect calorimetry. Serum lipid levels and glucose tolerance were unaffected by Sirt3 deletion in LDLR(-/-) mice. Sirt3 deficiency does not affect atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice. However, Sirt3 controls systemic levels of oxidative stress, limits expedited weight gain, and allows rapid metabolic adaptation. Thus, Sirt3 may contribute to postponing cardiovascular risk factor development. PMID:24370889

  5. 40 CFR 60.5400 - What equipment leak standards apply to affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? 60.5400...of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? This...

  6. 40 CFR 60.5400 - What equipment leak standards apply to affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? 60.5400...of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? This...

  7. Muscle or liver-specific Sirt3 deficiency induces hyperacetylation of mitochondrial proteins without affecting global metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Jeninga, Ellen H; Canto, Carles; Harach, Taoufiq; de Boer, Vincent C J; Andreux, Penelope; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Houten, Sander M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Sirt3 is a mitochondrial sirtuin, predominantly expressed in highly metabolic tissues. Germline ablation of Sirt3 has major metabolic consequences, including increased susceptibility to metabolic damage and oxidative stress after high fat feeding. In order to determine the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to these phenotypes, we generated muscle-specific Sirt3 (Sirt3(skm-/-)) and liver-specific Sirt3 (Sirt3(hep-/-)) knock-out mice. Despite a marked global hyperacetylation of mitochondrial proteins, Sirt3(skm-/-) and Sirt3(hep-/-) mice did not manifest any overt metabolic phenotype under either chow or high fat diet conditions. Similarly, there was no evidence for increased oxidative stress in muscle or liver when Sirt3 was ablated in a tissue-specific manner. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial hyperacetylation induced by Sirt3-deletion in a tissue specific manner is not necessarily linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and does not recapitulate the metabolic abnormalities observed in the germline Sirt3 knock-out mice. PMID:22645641

  8. Muscle or liver-specific Sirt3 deficiency induces hyperacetylation of mitochondrial proteins without affecting global metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Jeninga, Ellen H.; Canto, Carles; Harach, Taoufiq; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Andreux, Penelope; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Houten, Sander M.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Sirt3 is a mitochondrial sirtuin, predominantly expressed in highly metabolic tissues. Germline ablation of Sirt3 has major metabolic consequences, including increased susceptibility to metabolic damage and oxidative stress after high fat feeding. In order to determine the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to these phenotypes, we generated muscle-specific Sirt3 (Sirt3skm?/?) and liver-specific Sirt3 (Sirt3hep?/?) knock-out mice. Despite a marked global hyperacetylation of mitochondrial proteins, Sirt3skm?/? and Sirt3hep?/? mice did not manifest any overt metabolic phenotype under either chow or high fat diet conditions. Similarly, there was no evidence for increased oxidative stress in muscle or liver when Sirt3 was ablated in a tissue-specific manner. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial hyperacetylation induced by Sirt3-deletion in a tissue specific manner is not necessarily linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and does not recapitulate the metabolic abnormalities observed in the germline Sirt3 knock-out mice. PMID:22645641

  9. Malate plays a crucial role in starch metabolism, ripening, and soluble solid content of tomato fruit and affects postharvest softening.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Danilo C; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L F; Carneiro, Raphael T; Araújo, Wagner L; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species. PMID:21239646

  10. Cognitive Processes in Response to Goal Failure: A Study of Ruminative Thought and its Affective Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Neil P.; Papadakis, Alison A.; Orr, Caroline A.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Failure to make progress toward personal goals can lead to negative affective states, such as depression and anxiety. Past research suggests that rumination in response to goal failure may prolong and intensify those acute emotional responses, but that process remains unclear. We examined ruminative thought processes following experimentally manipulated exposure to past failures to attain advancement (promotion) goals and safety (prevention) goals. We predicted that priming of past promotion and prevention goal failures would lead individuals to think repetitively about these failures and that negative affect would be evoked by their recognition of their failures. Further, we predicted that when people experience a sufficient magnitude of negative affect, ruminative thought would intensify and prolong the negative affect associated with that type of goal failure. Results yielded strong support for our predictions regarding promotion goal failure and modest support for those regarding prevention goal failure. PMID:24353371

  11. Ultrasonic Vocalizations: evidence for an affective opponent process during cocaine self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Barker, David J.; Simmons, Steven J.; Servilio, Lisa C.; Bercovicz, Danielle; Ma, Sisi; Root, David H.; Pawlak, Anthony P.; West, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Preclinical models of cocaine addiction in the rodent have shown that cocaine induces both positive and negative affective states. These observations have led to the notion that the initial positive/euphoric state induced by cocaine administration may be followed by an opposing, negative process. In the rodent, one method for inferring positive and negative affective states involves measuring their ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Previous USV recordings from our laboratory suggested that the transition between positive and negative affect might involve decaying or sub-satiety levels of selfadministered cocaine. Objectives In order to explicitly test the role of cocaine levels on these affective states, the present study examined USVs when calculated body levels of cocaine were clamped (i.e. held at a constant level via experimenter- controlled infusions) at, below, or above subjects’ self-determined drug satiety thresholds. Results USVs indicated that 1) positive affect was predominantly observed during the drug loading period, but declined quickly to near zero during maintenance and exhibited little relation to calculated drug level, and 2) in contrast, negative affect was observed at sub-satiety cocaine levels, but was relatively absent when body levels of cocaine were clamped at or above subjects’ satiety thresholds. Conclusions The results reinforce the opponent-process hypothesis of addiction and suggest that an understanding of the mechanisms underlying negative affect might serve to inform behavioral and pharmacological therapies. PMID:24197178

  12. No effect of inversion on attentional and affective processing of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Ottmar V; Price, Sarah M; Tellegen, Cassandra L

    2009-04-01

    The decrease in recognition performance after face inversion has been taken to suggest that faces are processed holistically. Three experiments, 1 with schematic and 2 with photographic faces, were conducted to assess whether face inversion also affected visual search for and implicit evaluation of facial expressions of emotion. The 3 visual search experiments yielded the same differences in detection speed between different facial expressions of emotion for upright and inverted faces. Threat superiority effects, faster detection of angry than of happy faces among neutral background faces, were evident in 2 experiments. Face inversion did not affect explicit or implicit evaluation of face stimuli as assessed with verbal ratings and affective priming. Happy faces were evaluated as more positive than angry, sad, or fearful/scheming ones regardless of orientation. Taken together these results seem to suggest that the processing of facial expressions of emotion is not impaired if holistic processing is disrupted. PMID:19348536

  13. Cytosolic Phosphorylating Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Affect Arabidopsis Cellular Metabolism and Promote Seed Oil Accumulation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Ma, Fangfang; Wei, Fang; Fanella, Brian; Allen, Doug K.; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-01-01

    The cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, but its contribution to plant metabolism and growth are not well defined. Here, we show that two cytosolic GAPCs play important roles in cellular metabolism and seed oil accumulation. Knockout or overexpression of GAPCs caused significant changes in the level of intermediates in the glycolytic pathway and the ratios of ATP/ADP and NAD(P)H/NAD(P). Two double knockout seeds had ?3% of dry weight decrease in oil content compared with that of the wild type. In transgenic seeds under the constitutive 35S promoter, oil content was increased up to 42% of dry weight compared with 36% in the wild type and the fatty acid composition was altered; however, these transgenic lines exhibited decreased fertility. Seed-specific overexpression lines had >3% increase in seed oil without compromised seed yield or fecundity. The results demonstrate that GAPC levels play important roles in the overall cellular production of reductants, energy, and carbohydrate metabolites and that GAPC levels are directly correlated with seed oil accumulation. Changes in cellular metabolites and cofactor levels highlight the complexity and tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana cells to the metabolic perturbation. Further implications for metabolic engineering of seed oil production are discussed. PMID:24989043

  14. Competitive as well as uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists affect cortical neuronal morphology and cerebral glucose metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Hargreaves; Michael Rigby; David Smith; Raymond G. Hill; Leslie L. Iversen

    1993-01-01

    The studies examined the effects of three antagonists (CPP, CGS 19755, and CGP 37849) that act competitively at the glutamate recognition site of the NMDA receptor complex on cortical neuronal morphology and cerebral limbic glucose metabolism. Responses were compared to the effects of dizocilpine, an uncompetitive NMDA receptor ion channel antagonist as a positive control. CGS 19755 and CGP 37849

  15. Reduction of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate affects the overall phosphoinositol pathway and leads to modifications in light signalling and secondary metabolism in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; de Silva, Kanishka; Ballu, Clarisse; Ali, Nawab; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositol pathway is one of the major eukaryotic signalling pathways. The metabolite of the phosphoinositol pathway, inositol- (1,4,5) trisphosphate (InsP(3)), is a regulator of plant responses to a wide variety of stresses, including light, drought, cold, and salinity. It was found that the expression of InsP 5-ptase, the enzyme that hydrolyses InsP(3), also dramatically affects the levels of inositol phosphate metabolites and the secondary metabolites in transgenic tomato plants. Tomato plants expressing InsP 5-ptase exhibited a reduction in the levels of several important inositol phosphates, including InsP(1), InsP(2), InsP(3), and InsP(4). Reduced levels of inositol phosphates accompanied an increase in the accumulation of phenylpropanoids (rutin, chlorogenic acid) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in the transgenic fruits of tomato plants. The enhanced accumulation of these metabolites in transgenic tomato plants was in direct correspondence with the observed up-regulation of the genes that express the key enzymes of ascorbic acid metabolism (myo-inositol oxygenase, MIOX; L-galactono-?-lactone dehydrogenase, GLDH) and phenylpropanoid metabolism (chalcone synthase, CHS1; cinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate transferase, HCT). To understand the molecular links between the activation of different branches of plant metabolism and InsP(3) reduction in tomato fruits, the expression of transcription factors known to be involved in light signalling was analysed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression of LeHY5, SIMYB12, and LeELIP was found to be higher in fruits expressing InsP 5-ptase. These results suggest possible interconnections between phosphoinositol metabolism, light signalling, and secondary metabolism in plants. Our study also revealed the biotechnological potential for the genetic improvement of crop plants by the manipulation of the phosphoinositol pathway. PMID:21994174

  16. Altered sucrose synthase and invertase expression affects the local and systemic sugar metabolism of nematode-infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes of plants induce highly specific feeding cells in the root central cylinder. From these, the obligate parasites withdraw all required nutrients. The feeding cells were described as sink tissues in the plant’s circulation system that are supplied with phloem-derived solutes such as sugars. Currently, there are several publications describing mechanisms of sugar import into the feeding cells. However, sugar processing has not been studied so far. Thus, in the present work, the roles of the sucrose-cleaving enzymes sucrose synthases (SUS) and invertases (INV) in the development of Heterodera schachtii were studied. Gene expression analyses indicate that both enzymes are regulated transcriptionally. Nematode development was enhanced on multiple INV and SUS mutants. Syncytia of these mutants were characterized by altered enzyme activity and changing sugar pool sizes. Further, the analyses revealed systemically affected sugar levels and enzyme activities in the shoots of the tested mutants, suggesting changes in the source–sink relationship. Finally, the development of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was studied in different INV and SUS mutants and wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Similar effects on the development of both sedentary endoparasitic nematode species (root-knot and cyst nematode) were observed, suggesting a more general role of sucrose-degrading enzymes during plant–nematode interactions. PMID:24187419

  17. Phosphorus Effects on Metabolic Processes in Monoxenic Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Cultures1

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Pål Axel; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Allaway, William G.; Ashford, Anne E.; Rouhier, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    The influence of external phosphorus (P) on carbon (C) allocation and metabolism as well as processes related to P metabolism was studied in monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhiza cultures of carrot (Daucus carota). Fungal hyphae of Glomus intraradices proliferated from the solid minimal medium containing the colonized roots into C-free liquid minimal medium with different P treatments. The fungus formed around three times higher biomass in P-free liquid medium than in medium with 2.5 mm inorganic P (high-P). Mycelium in the second experiment was harvested at an earlier growth stage to study metabolic processes when the mycelium was actively growing. P treatment influenced the root P content and [13C]glucose administered to the roots 7 d before harvest gave a negative correlation between root P content and 13C enrichment in arbuscular mycorrhiza fungal storage lipids in the extraradical hyphae. Eighteen percent of the enriched 13C in extraradical hyphae was recovered in the fatty acid 16:1?5 from neutral lipids. Polyphosphate accumulated in hyphae even in P-free medium. No influence of P treatment on fungal acid phosphatase activity was observed, whereas the proportion of alkaline-phosphatase-active hyphae was highest in high-P medium. We demonstrated the presence of a motile tubular vacuolar system in G. intraradices. This system was rarely seen in hyphae subjected to the highest P treatment. We concluded that the direct responses of the extraradical hyphae to the P concentration in the medium are limited. The effects found in hyphae seemed instead to be related to increased availability of P to the host root. PMID:12427983

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Filiano, Ashley N; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including ?-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erb?, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase) knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis, disrupts the core hepatic clock as well as the diurnal rhythms of key lipid metabolism genes. PMID:23951220

  19. TNF? altered inflammatory responses, impaired health and productivity, but did not affect glucose or lipid metabolism in early-lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Farney, Jaymelynn K; Mamedova, Laman K; Sordillo, Lorraine M; Bradford, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation may be a major contributing factor to peripartum metabolic disorders in dairy cattle. We tested whether administering an inflammatory cytokine, recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-? (rbTNF?), affects milk production, metabolism, and health during this period. Thirty-three Holstein cows (9 primiparous and 24 multiparous) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition. Treatments were 0 (Control), 1.5, or 3.0 µg/kg body weight rbTNF?, which were administered once daily by subcutaneous injection for the first 7 days of lactation. Statistical contrasts were used to evaluate the treatment and dose effects of rbTNF? administration. Plasma TNF? concentrations at 16 h post-administration tended to be increased (P<0.10) by rbTNF? administration, but no dose effect (P>0.10) was detected; rbTNF? treatments increased (P<0.01) concentrations of plasma haptoglobin. Most plasma eicosanoids were not affected (P>0.10) by rbTNF? administration, but 6 out of 16 measured eicosanoids changed (P<0.05) over the first week of lactation, reflecting elevated inflammatory mediators in the days immediately following parturition. Dry matter and water intake, milk yield, and milk fat and protein yields were all decreased (P<0.05) by rbTNF? treatments by 15 to 18%. Concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, ?-hydroxybutyrate, non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride, 3-methylhistidine, and liver triglyceride were unaffected (P>0.10) by rbTNF? treatment. Glucose turnover rate was unaffected (P=0.18) by rbTNF? administration. The higher dose of rbTNF? tended to increase the risk of cows developing one or more health disorders (P=0.08). Taken together, these results indicate that administration of rbTNF? daily for the first 7 days of lactation altered inflammatory responses, impaired milk production and health, but did not significantly affect liver triglyceride accumulation or nutrient metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:24260367

  20. TNF? Altered Inflammatory Responses, Impaired Health and Productivity, but Did Not Affect Glucose or Lipid Metabolism in Early-Lactation Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Mamedova, Laman K.; Sordillo, Lorraine M.; Bradford, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation may be a major contributing factor to peripartum metabolic disorders in dairy cattle. We tested whether administering an inflammatory cytokine, recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-? (rbTNF?), affects milk production, metabolism, and health during this period. Thirty-three Holstein cows (9 primiparous and 24 multiparous) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at parturition. Treatments were 0 (Control), 1.5, or 3.0 µg/kg body weight rbTNF?, which were administered once daily by subcutaneous injection for the first 7 days of lactation. Statistical contrasts were used to evaluate the treatment and dose effects of rbTNF? administration. Plasma TNF? concentrations at 16 h post-administration tended to be increased (P<0.10) by rbTNF? administration, but no dose effect (P>0.10) was detected; rbTNF? treatments increased (P<0.01) concentrations of plasma haptoglobin. Most plasma eicosanoids were not affected (P>0.10) by rbTNF? administration, but 6 out of 16 measured eicosanoids changed (P<0.05) over the first week of lactation, reflecting elevated inflammatory mediators in the days immediately following parturition. Dry matter and water intake, milk yield, and milk fat and protein yields were all decreased (P<0.05) by rbTNF? treatments by 15 to 18%. Concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, ?-hydroxybutyrate, non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride, 3-methylhistidine, and liver triglyceride were unaffected (P>0.10) by rbTNF? treatment. Glucose turnover rate was unaffected (P?=?0.18) by rbTNF? administration. The higher dose of rbTNF? tended to increase the risk of cows developing one or more health disorders (P?=?0.08). Taken together, these results indicate that administration of rbTNF? daily for the first 7 days of lactation altered inflammatory responses, impaired milk production and health, but did not significantly affect liver triglyceride accumulation or nutrient metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:24260367

  1. Information-Processing and Perceptions of Control: How Attribution Style Affects Task-Relevant Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeigh, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of perceived controllability on information processing within Weiner's (1985, 1986) attributional model of learning. Attributional style was used to identify trait patterns of controllability for 37 university students. Task-relevant feedback on an information-processing task was then manipulated to test for…

  2. Subliminal Processing of Smoking-Related and Affective Stimuli in Tobacco Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Waters, Andrew J.; Breitmeyer, Bruno G.; Tapia, Evelina; Miller, Elizabeth; Li, Yisheng

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive processing biases toward smoking-related and affective cues may play a role in tobacco dependence. Because processing biases may occur outside conscious awareness, the current study examined processing of smoking-related and affective stimuli presented at subliminal conditions. A pictorial subliminal repetition priming task was administered to three groups: (1) Nonsmokers (n = 56); (2) Smokers (?10 cigarettes/day) who had been deprived from smoking for 12 h (n = 47); and (3) Nondeprived smokers (n = 66). Prime stimuli were presented briefly (17 ms) and were followed by a mask (to render them unavailable to conscious awareness) and then a target. Participants were required to make a speeded classification to the target. A posttask awareness check was administered to ensure that participants could not consciously perceive the briefly presented primes (i.e., smoking paraphernalia, neutral office supplies, and happy, angry, and neutral facial expressions). The groups differed in the degree to which they exhibited a processing bias for smoking-related stimuli, F(2, 166) = 4.99, p = .008. Deprived smokers exhibited a bias toward processing smoking (vs. neutral office supply) stimuli, F(1, 46) = 5.67, p = .02, whereas nondeprived smokers and nonsmokers did not (ps > .22). The three groups did not differ in the degree to which they exhibited a subliminal processing bias for affective stimuli. Tobacco deprivation appears to increase smokers’ subliminal processing of smoking-related (vs. neutral) stimuli but does not influence subliminal processing of affective stimuli. Future research should investigate whether subliminal biases toward smoking-related stimuli influence relapse. PMID:18729684

  3. Mineral absorption and excretion as affected by microbial phytase and their effect on energy metabolism in young piglets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Kies; W. J. J. Gerrits; J. W. Schrama; M. J. W. Heetkamp; Linden van der K. L; T. Zandstra; M. W. A. Verstegen

    2005-01-01

    Positive effects of dietary phytase supplementation on pig performance are observed not only when phosphorus is limiting. Improved energy utilization might be one explanation. Using indirect calorimetry, phytase-induced changes in energy metabolism were evaluated in young piglets with adequate phosphorus intake. Eight replicates of 8 group-housed barrows each were assigned to either a control or a phytase-supplemented diet [1500 phytase

  4. Apple favourably affects parameters of cholesterol metabolism and of anti-oxidative protection in cholesterol-fed rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Aprikian; Marie-Anne Levrat-Verny; Catherine Besson; Jérôme Busserolles; Christian Rémésy; Christian Demigné

    2001-01-01

    The effects of apples on lipid metabolism were studied on 40 male Wistar rats adapted to semi-purified diets containing 0.3% cholesterol. In the experimental ‘apple’ diet, a part of starch (15%) was replaced by lyophilized apple (Gala variety). In the control diet, 13% of carbohydrate was replaced by a mixture of fructose\\/glucose\\/saccharose to match the sugar supply from the apples.

  5. Metabolism of manganese in calves as affected by dietary manganese and intravenous or duodenal manganese-54 dosing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Miller; P. E. Stake; M. W. Neathery; R. P. Gentry; D. M. Blackmon

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen intact male Holstein calves averaging 101 d of age were utilized to determine the effects of dietary Mn concentration and routes of administration on its metabolism. They were fed a practical grain diet containing 23 ppm Mn with 0, 100, or 1000 ppm supplemental Mn (MnSOâ.HâO) for 7 d prior to intravenous or duodenal dosing with ⁵⁴Mn. Animals were

  6. Cadmium causes oxidative stress in mung bean by affecting the antioxidant enzyme system and ascorbate-glutathione cycle metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. A. Anjum; S. Umar; M. Iqbal; N. A. Khan

    2011-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA)-glutathione (GSH) cycle metabolism is an essential mechanism for the resistance of plants under stress conditions.\\u000a In a greenhouse pot experiment, the influence of cadmium (Cd) (25, 50, and 100 mg\\/kg soil) on plant dry weight and leaf area,\\u000a photosynthetic parameters (net photosynthetic rate (PN) and chlorophyll (Chl) content) and oxidative stress, and the possible protective role of AsA-GSH

  7. A large decrease of cytosolic triosephosphate isomerase in transgenic potato roots affects the distribution of carbon in primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dorion, Sonia; Clendenning, Audrey; Jeukens, Julie; Salas, Joaquín J; Parveen, Nanhi; Haner, Andrea A; Law, R David; Force, Enrique Martínez; Rivoal, Jean

    2012-10-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1) catalyzes the interconversion of dihydroxyacetone-P and glyceraldehyde 3-P in the glycolytic pathway. A constitutively expressed antisense construct for cytosolic TPI was introduced into potato (Solanum tuberosum) using Agrobacterium rhizogenes to examine the metabolic effects of a reduction in cytosolic TPI in roots. We obtained a population of transgenic root clones displaying ~36 to 100 % of the TPI activity found in control clones carrying an empty binary vector. Ion exchange chromatography and immunoblot analysis showed that the antisense strategy significantly decreased the cytosolic TPI isoform, while levels of plastidial TPI activity remained apparently unaffected. Transgenic roots were characterized with respect to the activity of glycolytic enzymes, their metabolite contents and carbon fluxes. Metabolite profiling of sugars, organic acids, amino acids and lipids showed elevated levels of sucrose, glucose, fructose, fumarate, isocitrate, 4-aminobutyrate, alanine, glycine, aromatic amino acids and saturated long chain fatty acids in roots containing the lowest TPI activity. Labelings with (14)C-glucose, (14)C-sucrose and (14)C-acetate indicated that a reduction of cytosolic TPI activity in roots increased carbon metabolism through the pentose phosphate pathway, O(2) uptake and catabolism of sucrose to CO(2), and capacity for lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate that a large reduction of cytosolic TPI alters the distribution of carbon in plant primary metabolism. PMID:22678033

  8. A short-term high-dose administration of sodium pivalate impairs pyruvate metabolism without affecting cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Kuka, Janis; Makrecka, Marina; Grinberga, Solveiga; Pugovics, Osvalds; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija

    2012-12-01

    The pivalate moiety of some oral antibiotics enhances their intestinal absorption, but liberated pivalic acid decreases tissue carnitine concentration and could lead to impaired energy metabolism. The present study investigated the effects of short-term sodium pivalate administration on cardiac functionality and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Wistar rats received sodium pivalate (40 mM) in their drinking water for 14 days, and the carnitine content was measured in heart tissues. The activities of carnitine-dependent enzymes, including carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), and the mitochondrial respiration rate were also measured. The isolated rat heart ischemia-reperfusion injury assay was performed based on the Langendorff technique through the reversible occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The administration of sodium pivalate decreased carnitine concentration in the myocardium by 37 %. Sodium pivalate significantly decreased mitochondrial respiration on pyruvate/malate by 28 %. The activities of CrAT and CPT I in sodium pivalate-treated animals were decreased by 34 and 30 %, respectively. No differences were observed in the infarct size or in the heart functional parameters between the groups. Together, these results indicate that the short-term administration of a high dose of sodium pivalate impairs cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism without depressing cardiac function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:22539084

  9. Yeast genes involved in sulfur and nitrogen metabolism affect the production of volatile thiols from Sauvignon Blanc musts.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Michael J; Gardner, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Two volatile thiols, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH), and 3-mercaptohexyl-acetate (3MHA), reminiscent of grapefruit and passion fruit respectively, are critical varietal aroma compounds in Sauvignon Blanc (SB) wines. These aromatic thiols are not present in the grape juice but are synthesized and released by the yeast during alcoholic fermentation. Single deletion mutants of 67 candidate genes in a laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were screened using gas chromatography mass spectrometry for their thiol production after fermentation of SB grape juice. None of the deletions abolished production of the two volatile thiols. However, deletion of 17 genes caused increases or decreases in production by as much as twofold. These 17 genes, mostly related to sulfur and nitrogen metabolism in yeast, may act by altering the regulation of the pathway(s) of thiol production or altering substrate supply. Deleting subsets of these genes in a wine yeast strain gave similar results to the laboratory strain for sulfur pathway genes but showed strain differences for genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of two nitrogen sources, urea and di-ammonium phosphate, as well as two sulfur compounds, cysteine and S-ethyl-L-cysteine, increased 3MH and 3MHA concentrations in the final wines. Collectively these results suggest that sulfur and nitrogen metabolism are important in regulating the synthesis of 3MH and 3MHA during yeast fermentation of grape juice. PMID:22684328

  10. An affective BCI using multiple ERP components associated to facial emotion processing

    E-print Network

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    An affective BCI using multiple ERP components associated to facial emotion processing Qibin Zhao-related potential (ERP) time-locked to this event. This study examined ERP responses to objects, faces target and non-target ERPs for each mental task. In addition, the significant differences among the three

  11. City living and urban upbringing affect neural social stress processing in humans.

    PubMed

    Lederbogen, Florian; Kirsch, Peter; Haddad, Leila; Streit, Fabian; Tost, Heike; Schuch, Philipp; Wüst, Stefan; Pruessner, Jens C; Rietschel, Marcella; Deuschle, Michael; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2011-06-23

    More than half of the world's population now lives in cities, making the creation of a healthy urban environment a major policy priority. Cities have both health risks and benefits, but mental health is negatively affected: mood and anxiety disorders are more prevalent in city dwellers and the incidence of schizophrenia is strongly increased in people born and raised in cities. Although these findings have been widely attributed to the urban social environment, the neural processes that could mediate such associations are unknown. Here we show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in three independent experiments, that urban upbringing and city living have dissociable impacts on social evaluative stress processing in humans. Current city living was associated with increased amygdala activity, whereas urban upbringing affected the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex, a key region for regulation of amygdala activity, negative affect and stress. These findings were regionally and behaviourally specific, as no other brain structures were affected and no urbanicity effect was seen during control experiments invoking cognitive processing without stress. Our results identify distinct neural mechanisms for an established environmental risk factor, link the urban environment for the first time to social stress processing, suggest that brain regions differ in vulnerability to this risk factor across the lifespan, and indicate that experimental interrogation of epidemiological associations is a promising strategy in social neuroscience. PMID:21697947

  12. Altered Emotional Interference Processing in Affective and Cognitive-Control Brain Circuitry in Major

    E-print Network

    . However, it is not yet clear whether this bias represents 1) impaired top-down cognitive control over, this bias may reflect an enhanced bottom-up response to emotional stimuli that dysregulates cognitiveAltered Emotional Interference Processing in Affective and Cognitive-Control Brain Circuitry

  13. Instinctual Affective Forces in the Internalization Process: Contributions of Hans Loewald.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Anne L.

    1994-01-01

    Focuses on the role of instinctual and affective forces in internalization, a process identified by Piaget and Vygotsky as the primary mechanism underlying the development of higher mental structures and functions. Discusses the theory of contemporary psychoanalyst Hans Loewald, who shares Piaget's and Vygotsky's emphasis on internalization but…

  14. Affect and non-uniform characteristics of predictive processing in musical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Rebecca S; Overy, Katie; Nelson, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The important roles of prediction and prior experience are well established in music research and fit well with Clark's concept of unified perception, cognition, and action arising from hierarchical, bidirectional predictive processing. However, in order to fully account for human musical intelligence, Clark needs to further consider the powerful and variable role of affect in relation to prediction error. PMID:23663552

  15. Approaching the Affective Factors of Information Seeking: The Viewpoint of the Information Search Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savolainen, Reijo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The article contributes to the conceptual studies of affective factors in information seeking by examining Kuhlthau's information search process model. Method: This random-digit dial telephone survey of 253 people (75% female) living in a rural, medically under-serviced area of Ontario, Canada, follows-up a previous interview study…

  16. Facial Affect Processing and Depression Susceptibility: Cognitive Biases and Cognitive Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistricky, Steven L.; Ingram, Rick E.; Atchley, Ruth Ann

    2011-01-01

    Facial affect processing is essential to social development and functioning and is particularly relevant to models of depression. Although cognitive and interpersonal theories have long described different pathways to depression, cognitive-interpersonal and evolutionary social risk models of depression focus on the interrelation of interpersonal…

  17. Semantic and affective processing in psychopaths: An event-related potential (ERP) study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENT A. KIEHL; ROBERT D. HARE; JOHN J. MCDONALD; JOHANN BRINK

    1999-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that psychopathy is associated with abnormal processing of semantic and affective verbal information. In Task 1, a lexical decision task, and in Task 2, a word identification task, participants responded faster to concrete than to abstract words. In Task 2, psychopaths made more errors identifying abstract words than concrete words. In Task 3, a word identification

  18. Automatic Processing of Emotional Faces in High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders: An Affective Priming Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamio, Yoko; Wolf, Julie; Fein, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study examined automatic processing of emotional faces in individuals with high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (HFPDD) using an affective priming paradigm. Sixteen participants (HFPDD and matched controls) were presented with happy faces, fearful faces or objects in both subliminal and supraliminal exposure conditions, followed…

  19. Transactional Distance among Open University Students: How Does it Affect the Learning Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassandrinou, Amanda; Angelaki, Christina; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the presence of transactional distance among students, the factors affecting it, as well as the way it influences the learning process of students in a blended distance learning setting in Greece. The present study involved 12 postgraduate students of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). A qualitative research was conducted,…

  20. Abnormal, affect-specific modulatory effects on early auditory processing in schizophrenia: magnetoencephalographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Junghöfer, Markus; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Küppers, Kerstin; Ohrmann, Patricia; Pedersen, Anya

    2015-02-01

    Abnormalities in the perception and identification of emotions have frequently been reported in schizophrenia. Hemodynamic neuroimaging studies found functional abnormalities in cortical and subcortical brain circuits that are involved in normal affective processing, but the temporal dynamics of abnormal emotion processing in schizophrenia remain largely elusive. To investigate this issue, we recorded early auditory evoked field components by means of whole-head magnetoencephalography that were in response to emotion-associated tones in seventeen patients with schizophrenia and in seventeen healthy, matched controls. Forty-two click-like tones (conditioned stimuli; CS) acquired differential emotional meaning through an affective associative learning procedure by pairing each CS three times with either pleasant, unpleasant or neutral auditory scenes. As expected, differential affect-specific modulation in patients vs. controls was evident, starting at the auditory N1m onset latency of approximately 70ms, extending to 230ms. While controls showed the expected enhanced processing of emotion associated CS, patients revealed an inverted pattern with reduced processing of arousal, when compared to neutral stimuli, in the right prefrontal cortex. The present finding suggests impairments in the prioritization of emotionally salient vs. non-salient stimuli in patients with schizophrenia. Dysfunction in higher cognitive processes and behavior in schizophrenia may therefore reflect dysfunction in fundamental, early emotion processing stages. PMID:25497223

  1. Process engineering for bioflavour production with metabolically active yeasts - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Carlquist, Magnus; Gibson, Brian; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Sandell, Mari; Angelov, Angel I; Gotcheva, Velitchka; Angelov, Angel D; Etschmann, Marlene; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Lidén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Flavours are biologically active molecules of large commercial interest in the food, cosmetics, detergent and pharmaceutical industries. The production of flavours can take place by either extraction from plant materials, chemical synthesis, biological conversion of precursor molecules or de novo biosynthesis. The latter alternatives are gaining importance through the rapidly growing fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering, giving efficient production hosts for the so-called 'bioflavours', which are natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds obtained with cell factories or enzymatic systems. Yeasts are potential production hosts for bioflavours. In this mini-review, we give an overview of bioflavour production in yeasts from the process-engineering perspective. Two specific examples, production of 2-phenylethanol and vanillin, are used to illustrate the process challenges and strategies used. PMID:25400136

  2. Teaching creativity involves both cognitive and affective learning processes organized as 3D cases on The Creative Platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Hansen; C. Byrge

    Teaching creativity involves both a cognitive and an affective learning process. Creativity can be defined as our ability to perceive and respond to stimuli in a new way. Teaching creativity therefore involves both cognitive and affective learning processes. Cognitive because our thinking is cognitive and affective because our thinking is close related to our body movements and attitude in a

  3. Perinatal protein restriction affects milk free amino acid and fatty acid profile in lactating rats: potential role on pup growth and metabolic status.

    PubMed

    Martin Agnoux, Aurore; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Boquien, Clair-Yves; David, Agnes; Desnots, Emmanuelle; Ferchaud-Roucher, Veronique; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia; Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie-Cécile

    2015-07-01

    Perinatal undernutrition affects not only fetal and neonatal growth but also adult health outcome, as suggested by the metabolic imprinting concept. Although maternal milk is the only channel through which nutrients are transferred from mother to offspring during the postnatal period, the impact of maternal undernutrition on milk composition is poorly understood. The present study investigates, in a rat model of nutritional programming, the effects of feeding an isocaloric, low-protein diet throughout gestation and lactation on milk composition and its possible consequences on offspring's growth and metabolic status. We used an integrated methodological approach that combined targeted analyses of macronutrients, free amino acid and fatty acid content throughout lactation, with an untargeted mass-spectrometric-based metabolomic phenotyping. Whereas perinatal dietary protein restriction failed to alter milk protein content, it dramatically decreased the concentration of most free amino acids at the end of lactation. Interestingly, a decrease of several amino acids involved in insulin secretion or gluconeogenesis was observed, suggesting that maternal protein restriction during the perinatal period may impact the insulinotrophic effect of milk, which may, in turn, account for the slower growth of the suckled male offspring. Besides, the decrease in sulfur amino acids may alter redox status in the offspring. Maternal undernutrition was also associated with an increase in milk total fatty acid content, with modifications in their pattern. Altogether, our results show that milk composition is clearly influenced by maternal diet and suggest that alterations in milk composition may play a role in offspring growth and metabolic programming. PMID:25935308

  4. Affective ERP Processing in a Visual Oddball Task: Arousal, Valence, and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Rozenkrants, Bella; Polich, John

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess affective event-related brain potentials (ERPs) using visual pictures that were highly distinct on arousal level/valence category ratings and a response task. Methods Images from the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) were selected to obtain distinct affective arousal (low, high) and valence (negative, positive) rating levels. The pictures were used as target stimuli in an oddball paradigm, with a visual pattern as the standard stimulus. Participants were instructed to press a button whenever a picture occurred and to ignore the standard. Task performance and response time did not differ across conditions. Results High-arousal compared to low-arousal stimuli produced larger amplitudes for the N2, P3, early slow wave, and late slow wave components. Valence amplitude effects were weak overall and originated primarily from the later waveform components and interactions with electrode position. Gender differences were negligible. Conclusion The findings suggest that arousal level is the primary determinant of affective oddball processing, and valence minimally influences ERP amplitude. Significance Affective processing engages selective attentional mechanisms that are primarily sensitive to the arousal properties of emotional stimuli. The application and nature of task demands are important considerations for interpreting these effects. PMID:18783987

  5. The sleeping beauty: how reproductive diapause affects hormone signaling, metabolism, immune response and somatic maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kubrak, Olga I; Ku?erová, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich; Nässel, Dick R

    2014-01-01

    Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with this dormancy, and the genes involved in its regulation. We induced diapause in D. melanogaster and monitored effects over 12 weeks on dynamics of ovary development, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as expression of genes involved in endocrine signaling, metabolism and innate immunity. During diapause food intake diminishes drastically, but circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids are elevated. Gene transcripts of glucagon- and insulin-like peptides increase, and expression of several target genes of these peptides also change. Four key genes in innate immunity can be induced by infection in diapausing flies, and two of these, drosomycin and cecropin A1, are upregulated by diapause independently of infection. Diapausing flies display very low mortality, extended lifespan and decreased aging of the intestinal epithelium. Many phenotypes induced by diapause are reversed after one week of recovery from diapause conditions. Furthermore, mutant flies lacking specific insulin-like peptides (dilp5 and dilp2-3) display increased diapause incidence. Our study provides a first comprehensive characterization of reproductive diapause in D. melanogaster, and evidence that glucagon- and insulin-like signaling are among the key regulators of the altered physiology during this dormancy. PMID:25393614

  6. The Sleeping Beauty: How Reproductive Diapause Affects Hormone Signaling, Metabolism, Immune Response and Somatic Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Ku?erová, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich; Nässel, Dick R.

    2014-01-01

    Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with this dormancy, and the genes involved in its regulation. We induced diapause in D. melanogaster and monitored effects over 12 weeks on dynamics of ovary development, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as expression of genes involved in endocrine signaling, metabolism and innate immunity. During diapause food intake diminishes drastically, but circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids are elevated. Gene transcripts of glucagon- and insulin-like peptides increase, and expression of several target genes of these peptides also change. Four key genes in innate immunity can be induced by infection in diapausing flies, and two of these, drosomycin and cecropin A1, are upregulated by diapause independently of infection. Diapausing flies display very low mortality, extended lifespan and decreased aging of the intestinal epithelium. Many phenotypes induced by diapause are reversed after one week of recovery from diapause conditions. Furthermore, mutant flies lacking specific insulin-like peptides (dilp5 and dilp2-3) display increased diapause incidence. Our study provides a first comprehensive characterization of reproductive diapause in D. melanogaster, and evidence that glucagon- and insulin-like signaling are among the key regulators of the altered physiology during this dormancy. PMID:25393614

  7. Low protein provision during the first year of life, but not during foetal life, affects metabolic traits, organ mass development and growth in male mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Vesterdorf, K; Blache, D; Harrison, A; Matthiesen, C F; Tauson, A-H

    2014-04-01

    Low protein provision in utero and post-partum may induce metabolic disorders in adulthood. Studies in mink have mainly focused on short-term consequences of low protein provision in utero whereas the long-term responses to low protein (LP) provision in metabolically programmed mink are unknown. We investigated whether low protein provision in utero affects the long-term response to adequate (AP) or LP provision after weaning in male mink. Eighty-six male mink were exposed to low (19% of ME from CP; crude protein) or adequate (31% of ME from CP) protein provision in utero, and to LP (~20% of ME from CP) or AP (30-42% of ME from CP) provision post-weaning. Being metabolically programmed by low protein provision in utero did not affect the response to post-weaning diets. Dietary protein content in the LP feed after weaning was below requirements; evidenced by lower nitrogen retention (p < 0.001) preventing LP mink from attaining their growth potential (p < 0.02). LP mink had a lower liver, pancreas and kidney weight (p < 0.05) as well as lower plasma IGF-1 concentrations at 8 and 25 (p < 0.05) weeks, and a higher incidence of hepatic lipidosis at 25 weeks (p < 0.05). Furthermore, LP mink had a higher body fat (p < 0.05) and lower body CP content (p < 0.05) at 50 weeks of age. It is concluded that some effects of low protein provision in utero can be alleviated by an adequate nutrient supply post-partum. However, long-term exposure to low protein provision in mink reduces their growth potential and induces transient hepatic lipidosis and modified body composition. PMID:23909380

  8. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  9. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  10. Stressful events and information processing dispositions moderate the relationship between positive and negative affect: Implications for pain patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip T. Potter; Alex J. Zautra; John W. Reich

    2000-01-01

    Relationships between positive affect, negative affect, and pain were analyzed as a prospective function of stressful events\\u000a in a sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients and as a cross-sectional function of an information processing disposition in\\u000a persons with fibromyalgia. Positive affect and negative affect were statistically separate factors overall in both samples.\\u000a In addition, negative affect and pain were related across

  11. Analysis of urban metabolic processes based on input-output method: model development and a case study for Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Bin; Zheng, Hongmei; Li, Yating

    2014-06-01

    Discovering ways in which to increase the sustainability of the metabolic processes involved in urbanization has become an urgent task for urban design and management in China. As cities are analogous to living organisms, the disorders of their metabolic processes can be regarded as the cause of "urban disease". Therefore, identification of these causes through metabolic process analysis and ecological element distribution through the urban ecosystem's compartments will be helpful. By using Beijing as an example, we have compiled monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007 and calculated the intensities of the embodied ecological elements to compile the corresponding implied physical input-output tables. We then divided Beijing's economy into 32 compartments and analyzed the direct and indirect ecological intensities embodied in the flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes. Based on the combination of input-output tables and ecological network analysis, the description of multiple ecological elements transferred among Beijing's industrial compartments and their distribution has been refined. This hybrid approach can provide a more scientific basis for management of urban resource flows. In addition, the data obtained from distribution characteristics of ecological elements may provide a basic data platform for exploring the metabolic mechanism of Beijing.

  12. Holoprosencephaly in RSH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: Does abnormal cholesterol metabolism affect the function of sonic hedgehog?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.I. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Roessler, E.; Muenke, M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others] [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    1996-12-30

    The RAH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (RAH/SLOS) is an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome associated with increased levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) and a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis at the level of 3{beta}-hydroxy-steroid-{Delta}{sup 7}-reductase (7-DHC reductase). Because rats exposed to inhibitors of 7-DHC reductase during development have a high frequency of holoprosencephaly (HPE), we have undertaken a search for biochemical evidence of RSH/SLOS and other possible defects of sterol metabolism among patients with various forms of HPE. We describe 4 patients, one with semilobar HPE and three others with less complete forms of the HPE sequence, in whom we have made a biochemical diagnosis of RAH/SLOS. The clinical and biochemical spectrum of these and other patients with RAH/SLOS suggests a role of abnormal sterol metabolism in the pathogenesis of their malformations. The association of HPE and RAH/SLOS is discussed in light of the recent discoveries that mutations in the embryonic patterning gene, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), can cause HPE in humans and that the sonic hedgehog protein product undergoes autoproteolysis to form a cholesterol-modified active product. These clinical, biochemical, and molecular studies suggest that HPE and other malformations in SLOS may be caused by incomplete or abnormal modification of the sonic hedgehog protein and, possibly, other patterning proteins of the hedgehog class, a hypothesis testable in somatic cell systems. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Peroxisome Protein Transportation Affects Metabolism of Branched-Chain Fatty Acids That Critically Impact Growth and Development of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rencheng; Kniazeva, Marina; Han, Min

    2013-01-01

    The impact of specific lipid molecules, including fatty acid variants, on cellular and developmental regulation is an important research subject that remains under studied. Monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) are commonly present in multiple organisms including mammals, however our understanding of mmBCFA functions is very limited. C. elegans has been the premier model system to study the functions of mmBCFAs and their derived lipids, as mmBCFAs have been shown to play essential roles in post-embryonic development in this organism. To understand more about the metabolism of mmBCFAs in C. elegans, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the L1 developmental arrest phenotype caused by mmBCFA depletion. Extensive characterization of one suppressor mutation identified prx-5, which encodes an ortholog of the human receptor for the type-1 peroxisomal targeting signal protein. Our study showed that inactivating prx-5 function compromised the peroxisome protein import, resulting in an increased level of branched-chain fatty acid C17ISO in animals lacking normal mmBCFA synthesis, thereby restoring wild-type growth and development. This work reveals a novel connection between peroxisomal functions and mmBCFA metabolism. PMID:24086720

  14. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25943760

  15. Ablation of the GNB3 gene in mice does not affect body weight, metabolism or blood pressure, but causes bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuanchao; Sun, Zhizeng; Guo, Ang; Song, Long-Sheng; Grobe, Justin L; Chen, Songhai

    2014-11-01

    G protein ?3 (G?3) is an isoform of heterotrimeric G protein ? subunits involved in transducing G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Polymorphisms in G?3 (GNB3) are associated with many human disorders (e.g. hypertension, diabetes and obesity) but the role of GNB3 in these pathogeneses remains unclear. Here, G?3-null mice (GNB3(-/-)) were characterized to determine how G?3 functions to regulate blood pressure, body weight and metabolism. We found G?3 expression restricted to limited types of tissues, including the retina, several regions of the brain and heart ventricles. G?3-deficient mice were normal as judged by body weight gain by age or by feeding with high-fat diet (HFD); glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity; baseline blood pressure and angiotensin II infusion-induced hypertension. During tail-cuff blood pressure measurements, however, G?3-null mice had slower heart rates (~450 vs ~500 beats/min). This bradycardia was not observed in isolated and perfused G?3-null mouse hearts. Moreover, mouse hearts isolated from GNB3(-/-) and controls responded equivalently to muscarinic receptor- and ?-adrenergic receptor-stimulated bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. Since no difference was seen in isolated hearts, G?3 is unlikely to be involved directly in the GPCR signaling activity that controls heart pacemaker activity. These results demonstrate that although G?3 appears dispensable in mice for the regulation of blood pressure, body weight and metabolic features associated with obesity and diabetes, G?3 may regulate heart rate. PMID:25093805

  16. Searching for Judy: How small mysteries affect narrative processes and memory

    PubMed Central

    Love, Jessica; McKoon, Gail; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Current theories of text processing say little about how author’s narrative choices, including the introduction of small mysteries, can affect readers’ narrative experiences. Gerrig, Love, and McKoon (2009) provided evidence that one type of small mystery—a character introduced without information linking him or her to the story—affects readers’ moment-by-moment processing. For that project, participants read stories that introduced characters by proper name alone (e.g., Judy) or with information connecting the character to the rest of the story (e.g., our principal Judy). In an on-line recognition probe task, responses to the character’s name three lines after his or her introduction were faster when the character had not been introduced with connecting information, suggesting that the character remained accessible awaiting resolution. In the four experiments in this paper, we extended our theoretical analysis of small mysteries. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found evidence that trait information (e.g., daredevil Judy) is not sufficient to connect a character to a text. In Experiments 3 and 4, we provide evidence that the moment-by-moment processing effects of such small mysteries also affect readers’ memory for the stories. We interpret the results in terms of Kintsch’s Construction-Integration model (1988) of discourse processing. PMID:20438273

  17. Light intensity affects chlorophyll synthesis during greening process by metabolite signal from mitochondrial alternative oxidase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, DA-Wei; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Zhu, Feng; Yuan, Ming; Ye, Hua-Xun; Guo, Hong-Qing; Lv, Xin; Yin, Yanhai; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2014-08-27

    Although mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) has been proposed to play essential roles in high light stress tolerance, the effects of AOX on chlorophyll synthesis are unclear. Previous studies indicated that during greening, chlorophyll accumulation was largely delayed in plants whose mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was inhibited by knocking out nuclear encoded AOX gene. Here, we showed that this delay of chlorophyll accumulation was more significant under high light condition. Inhibition of cyanide-resistant respiration was also accompanied by the increase of plastid NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, especially under high light treatment which subsequently blocked the import of multiple plastidial proteins, such as some components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and malate/oxaloacetate shuttle components. Overexpression of AOX1a rescued the aox1a mutant phenotype, including the chlorophyll accumulation during greening and plastidial protein import. It thus suggests that light intensity affects chlorophyll synthesis during greening process by a metabolic signal, the AOX-derived plastidial NADPH/NADP(+) ratio change. Further, our results thus revealed a molecular mechanism of chloroplast-mitochondria interactions. PMID:25158995

  18. Metabolic processes sustaining the reviviscence of lichen Xanthoria elegans (Link) in high mountain environments.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Serge; Juge, Christine; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Gout, Elisabeth; Bligny, Richard

    2007-10-01

    To survive in high mountain environments lichens must adapt themselves to alternating periods of desiccation and hydration. Respiration and photosynthesis of the foliaceous lichen, Xanthoria elegans, in the dehydrated state were below the threshold of CO2-detection by infrared gas analysis. Following hydration, respiration totally recovered within seconds and photosynthesis within minutes. In order to identify metabolic processes that may contribute to the quick and efficient reactivation of lichen physiological processes, we analysed the metabolite profile of lichen thalli step by step during hydration/dehydration cycles, using 31P- and 13C-NMR. It appeared that the recovery of respiration was prepared during dehydration by the accumulation of a reserve of gluconate 6-P (glcn-6-P) and by the preservation of nucleotide pools, whereas glycolytic and photosynthetic intermediates like glucose 6-P and ribulose 1,5-diphosphate were absent. The large pools of polyols present in both X. elegans photo- and mycobiont are likely to contribute to the protection of cell constituents like nucleotides, proteins, and membrane lipids, and to preserve the integrity of intracellular structures during desiccation. Our data indicate that glcn-6-P accumulated due to activation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, in response to a need for reducing power (NADPH) during the dehydration-triggered down-regulation of cell metabolism. On the contrary, glcn-6-P was metabolised immediately after hydration, supplying respiration with substrates during the replenishment of pools of glycolytic and photosynthetic intermediates. Finally, the high net photosynthetic activity of wet X. elegans thalli at low temperature may help this alpine lichen to take advantage of brief hydration opportunities such as ice melting, thus favouring its growth in harsh high mountain climates. PMID:17574473

  19. Molecular spectroscopic investigation on fractionation-induced changes on biomacromolecule of co-products from bioethanol processing to explore protein metabolism in ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Beltranena, Eduardo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Fractionation processing is an efficient technology which is capable to redesign/redevelop a new food or feed product with a specified chemical and nutrient profile. This processing technique was able to produce four different fractions (called "A", "B", "C", "D" fractions/treatments) with different nutrient profile form a co-product of bioethanol processing [wheat dried distillers grains with soluble (DDGS)]. To date, there is no study on the effect of fractionation processing on inherent molecular structure of different fractions and how the processing-induced structural change affect the metabolic characteristics of protein and nutrient availability. The objectives of this experiment were to: (1) investigate the effect of fractionation processing on changes of protein functional groups (amide I, amide II, and their ratio) and molecular structure (modeled ?-helix, ?-sheet, and their ratio), and (2) study the relationship between the fractionation processing-induced changes of protein molecular structure and nutrients availability as well as the metabolic characteristics of protein. The hypothesis of this study was that the fractionation processing changes the molecular structure and such changes affect the metabolic characteristics of protein. The protein molecular structure spectral profile of the fractions A, B, C and D were identified by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FT/IR-ATR). The results showed that the fractionation processing significantly affected the protein molecular spectral profiles. The differences in amide I to amide II peak area and height ratios were strongly significant (P < 0.01) among the treatment fractions, ranging from 4.98 to 6.33 and 3.28 to 4.00, respectively. The difference in the modeled protein ?-helix to ?-sheet ratio was also strongly significant (P < 0.01) among the treatment fractions. Multivariate molecular spectral analysis with cluster (CLA) and principal component analyses (PCA) showed that there are no clear distinguished clusters and ellipses among the fractions (A, B, C and D) in the protein amide I and II region ca. 1726-1485 cm-1. The correlation study showed that the modeled ?-helix to ?-sheet ratio tended to have a negative correlation with truly absorbed rumen undegraded protein (ARUPDVE: r = -0.944, P = 0.056 < 0.10) and total truly absorbed protein in the small intestine (DVE: r = -0.946, P = 0.054 < 0.10), but there was no correlation between the ?-helix to ?-sheet ratio and the degraded protein balance (DPBOEB: P = 0.267 < 0.10). In conclusion, the fractionation processing changed the molecular structural spectral profiles in terms of amide I to II ratio and ?-helix to ?-sheet ratio. These changes negatively affected the metabolic characteristics of protein and true protein supply. These results indicated that spectral features of different fractions could be used as a potential tool to predict true protein nutritive value.

  20. Reflections on public sector-based integrative collective bargaining : Conditions affecting cooperation within the negotiation process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natasha Caverley; Bart Cunningham; Lari Mitchell

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to understand better how specific conditions such as the degree of trust developed from previous negotiations, the level of expertise\\/style demonstrated by the negotiators, the clarity of the bargaining issues and the ability of facilitators to use problem solving-based techniques affect the success of an integrative collective bargaining process. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

  1. The Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Cognitive Processes and Affect in Patients with Past Depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wiveka Ramel; Philippe R. Goldin; Paula E. Carmona; John R. McQuaid

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the effects of an 8-week course in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR; J. Kabat-Zinn, 1982, 1990) on affective symptoms (depression and anxiety), dysfunctional attitudes, and rumination. Given the focus of mindfulness meditation (MM) in modifying cognitive processes, it was hypothesized that the primary change in MM practice involves reductions in ruminative tendencies. We studied a sample of individuals

  2. Institutional processes affecting the provision of water resources for public recreational use in Texas

    E-print Network

    Richardson, William Earl

    1975-01-01

    the provision of two particular water resources for public recreational use in Texas. These water resources include navigable rivers and coastal beaches along the Gulf of Mexico in Texas. Such institutional processes affecting the allocation of... out-of-state visitors listed the coastal area, Houston, Galvestion, Corpus Christi or Brownsville as their destination, which was at least twice as high as any other destination in Texas. Ingram (1973:105) concluded that the Texas Coastal Zone has...

  3. Factors affecting the selection of search tactics: Tasks, knowledge, process, and systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iris Xie; Soohyung Joo

    This study investigated whether and how different factors in relation to task, user-perceived knowledge, search process, and system affect users’ search tactic selection. Thirty-one participants, representing the general public with their own tasks, were recruited for this study. Multiple methods were employed to collect data, including pre-questionnaire, verbal protocols, log analysis, diaries, and post-questionnaires. Statistical analysis revealed that seven factors

  4. Long-term dietary habits affect soy isoflavone metabolism and accumulation in prostatic fluid in caucasian men.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Tammy E; Maroni, Paul D; Ferucci, Paul G; Dayton, Robert; Barnes, Stephen; Jones, Kenneth; Moore, Ray; Ogden, Lorraine G; Wähälä, Kristiina; Sackett, Holly M; Gray, Karen J

    2005-06-01

    The soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein are believed to reduce prostate cancer risk in soy consumers. However, daidzein can be metabolized by the intestinal flora to form a variety of compounds with different bioactivities. In the current study, we investigated the influence of long-term dietary habits on daidzein metabolism in healthy Caucasian men (19-65 y old). A secondary goal was to compare plasma and prostatic fluid concentrations of 5 isoflavonoids: genistein, daidzein, equol, dihydrodaidzein, and O-desmethylangolensin. Baseline plasma levels of isoflavonoids were quantitated in 45 men by HPLC-electrospray ionization-MS. Participants then consumed a soy beverage daily for 1 wk, and post-soy isoflavonoid levels were quantitated in plasma and prostatic fluid. Equol was the only metabolite that appeared to be influenced by routine dietary habits. Stratified analyses revealed that men who had consumed > or =30 mg soy isoflavones/d for at least 2 y had 5.3-times the probability of producing equol than men who had consumed < or =5 mg/d (P = 0.014). Additionally, those men who consumed animal meat regularly had 4.7-times the probability of producing equol than men who did not consume meat (P = 0.023). Equol production was not linked to age, BMI, or the consumption of yogurt, dairy, fruit, or American-style fast food. Daidzein and its metabolites (but not genistein) were typically present at higher levels in prostate fluid than plasma (median = 4-13 times that in plasma). In conclusion, our data suggest that the ability of Caucasian men to produce equol is favorably influenced by the long-term consumption of high amounts of soy and the consumption of meat. Last, the high concentrations of isoflavonoids in prostatic fluid increases the potential for these compounds to have direct effects in the prostate. PMID:15930444

  5. Is the processing of affective prosody influenced by spatial attention? an ERP study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study asked whether the processing of affective prosody is modulated by spatial attention. Pseudo-words with a neutral, happy, threatening, and fearful prosody were presented at two spatial positions. Participants attended to one position in order to detect infrequent targets. Emotional prosody was task irrelevant. The electro-encephalogram (EEG) was recorded to assess processing differences as a function of spatial attention and emotional valence. Results Event-related potentials (ERPs) differed as a function of emotional prosody both when attended and when unattended. While emotional prosody effects interacted with effects of spatial attention at early processing levels (< 200 ms), these effects were additive at later processing stages (> 200 ms). Conclusions Emotional prosody, therefore, seems to be partially processed outside the focus of spatial attention. Whereas at early sensory processing stages spatial attention modulates the degree of emotional voice processing as a function of emotional valence, emotional prosody is processed outside of the focus of spatial attention at later processing stages. PMID:23360491

  6. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  7. Early neural activation during facial affect processing in adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Rachel C.; Pang, Elizabeth W.; Cassel, Daniel; Brian, Jessica A.; Smith, Mary Lou; Taylor, Margot J.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired social interaction is one of the hallmarks of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Emotional faces are arguably the most critical visual social stimuli and the ability to perceive, recognize, and interpret emotions is central to social interaction and communication, and subsequently healthy social development. However, our understanding of the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying emotional face processing in adolescents with ASD is limited. We recruited 48 adolescents, 24 with high functioning ASD and 24 typically developing controls. Participants completed an implicit emotional face processing task in the MEG. We examined spatiotemporal differences in neural activation between the groups during implicit angry and happy face processing. While there were no differences in response latencies between groups across emotions, adolescents with ASD had lower accuracy on the implicit emotional face processing task when the trials included angry faces. MEG data showed atypical neural activity in adolescents with ASD during angry and happy face processing, which included atypical activity in the insula, anterior and posterior cingulate and temporal and orbitofrontal regions. Our findings demonstrate differences in neural activity during happy and angry face processing between adolescents with and without ASD. These differences in activation in social cognitive regions may index the difficulties in face processing and in comprehension of social reward and punishment in the ASD group. Thus, our results suggest that atypical neural activation contributes to impaired affect processing, and thus social cognition, in adolescents with ASD. PMID:25610782

  8. Transcriptional control of monolignol biosynthesis in Pinus taeda: factors affecting monolignol ratios and carbon allocation in phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anterola, Aldwin M; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2002-05-24

    Transcriptional profiling of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Pinus taeda cell suspension cultures was carried out using quantitative real time PCR analyses of all known genes involved in the biosynthesis of the two monolignols, p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols (lignin/lignan precursors). When the cells were transferred to a medium containing 8% sucrose and 20 mm potassium iodide, the monolignol/phenylpropanoid pathway was induced, and transcript levels for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase were coordinately up-regulated. Provision of increasing levels of exogenously supplied Phe to saturating levels (40 mm) to the induction medium resulted in further up-regulation of their transcript levels in the P. taeda cell cultures; this in turn was accompanied by considerable increases in both p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohol formation and excretion. By contrast, transcript levels for both cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase were only slightly up-regulated. These data, when considered together with metabolic profiling results and genetic manipulation of various plant species, reveal that carbon allocation to the pathway and its differential distribution into the two monolignols is controlled by Phe supply and differential modulation of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase activities, respectively. The coordinated up-regulation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in the presence of increasing concentrations of Phe also indicates that these steps are not truly rate-limiting, because they are modulated according to metabolic demand. Finally, the transcript profile of a putative acid/ester O-methyltransferase, proposed as an alternative catalyst for O-methylation leading to coniferyl alcohol, was not up-regulated under any of the conditions employed, suggesting that it is not, in fact, involved in monolignol biosynthesis. PMID:11891223

  9. Waterlogging during flowering and boll forming stages affects sucrose metabolism in the leaves subtending the cotton boll and its relationship with boll weight.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Jie; Liu, Zhaowei; Wang, Youhua; Meng, Yali; Chen, Binglin; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo; Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2014-06-01

    The work explored sucrose metabolism in the leaves subtending the cotton boll (SBL) and its role in boll weight after waterlogging in cotton. Results showed that net photosynthesis rate (Pn), relative water content, contents of Chlorophyll a and Chlorophyll b, initial ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and cytosolic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (cy-FBPase) activity decreased with waterlogging in the SBL on fruiting branches 2-3 (FB2-3) and FB6-7. Activities of sucrose synthase (SuSy) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) increased to the maximum up to 6 days of waterlogging then decreased with prolonged waterlogging. Rubisco activation and specific leaf weight increased and gene expressions of SuSy, SPS and rubisco activase (RCA) were all up-regulated with the duration of waterlogging, especially for the SBL on FB6-7. The induction of activity and gene expression of SuSy was most significant indicating its crucial role in sucrose metabolism after waterlogging. For the SBL in the later period of boll development on upper FB10-11 and FB14-15, the pattern seemed opposite to that of FB2-3 and FB6c7 as compensation effect in vegetative growth existed. Correlation analysis revealed that initial Rubisco activity and cy-FBPase activity were the main limitation to Pn reduction after waterlogging. Reduction in Pn, sucrose transformation rate and initial Rubisco activity directly decrease boll weight in waterlogged cotton. Besides the role in sucrose metabolism after waterlogging, SuSy also had a positive significant correlation with the duration of rapid-accumulation period for seed fiber weight (P<0.05). These findings elucidated mechanisms to waterlogging that affected seed fiber weight, which resulted from alteration in carbohydrates, enzymes and genes. PMID:24767118

  10. Drastically Abnormal Gluco- and Galactosylceramide Composition Does Not Affect Ganglioside Metabolism in the Brain of Mice Deficient in Galactosylceramide Synthase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kunihiko Suzuki; Marie T. Vanier; Timothy Coetzee; Brian Popko

    1999-01-01

    Mice that are genetically deficient in UDP-galactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase are unable to synthesize galactosylceramide. Consequently, sulfatide, which can be synthesized only by sulfation of galactosylceramide, is also totally absent in affected mouse brain. a-Hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide partially replaces the missing galactosylceramide. A substantial proportion of sphingomyelin, which normally contains only non-hydroxy fatty acids, also contains a-hydroxy fatty acids. These

  11. Rhizospheric NO affects N uptake and metabolism in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings depending on soil N availability and N source.

    PubMed

    Simon, Judy; Dong, Fang; Buegger, Franz; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the interaction of rhizospheric nitric oxide (NO) concentration (i.e. low, ambient or high) and soil nitrogen (N) availability (i.e. low or high) with organic and inorganic N uptake by fine roots of Pinus sylvestris?L. seedlings by (15) N feeding experiments under controlled conditions. N metabolites in fine roots were analysed to link N uptake to N nutrition. NO affected N uptake depending on N source and soil N availability. The suppression of nitrate uptake in the presence of ammonium and glutamine was overruled by high NO. The effects of NO on N uptake with increasing N availability showed different patterns: (1) increasing N uptake regardless of NO concentration (i.e. ammonium); (2) increasing N uptake only with high NO concentration (i.e. nitrate and arginine); and (3) decreasing N uptake (i.e. glutamine). At low N availability and high NO nitrate accumulated in the roots indicating insufficient substrates for nitrate reduction or its storage in root vacuoles. Individual amino acid concentrations were negatively affected with increasing NO (i.e. asparagine and glutamine with low N availability, serine and proline with high N availability). In conclusion, this study provides first evidence that NO affects N uptake and metabolism in a conifer. PMID:23146102

  12. Metabolic processes sustaining the reviviscence of lichen Xanthoria elegans (Link) in high mountain environments

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Serge; Juge, Christine; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Gout, Elisabeth; Bligny, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Adaptation to alternating periods of desiccation and hydration is one of the lichen’s requirements for survival in high mountain environment. In the dehydrated state, respiration and photosynthesis of the foliaceous lichen Xanthoria elegans were below the threshold of CO2-detection by infrared gas analysis. Following hydration, respiration totally recovered within seconds and photosynthesis within minutes. In order to identify metabolic processes that may contribute to restart so quickly and efficiently lichen physiological activity, we analysed the metabolite profile of lichen thalli step by step during hydration/dehydration cycles, using 31P-and 13C-NMR. It appeared that the recovery of respiration was anticipated during dehydration by the accumulation of important stores of gluconate 6-P (glcn-6-P) and by the preservation of the nucleotide pools, whereas glycolysis and photosynthesis intermediates like glucose 6-P and ribulose 1,5-diphosphate disappeared. The important pools of polyols present in both X. elegans photo- and mycobiont likely contributed to protect cells constituents like nucleotides, proteins, and membrane lipids, and to preserve the intactness of intracellular structures during desiccation. Our data indicate that glcn-6-P accumulated due to the activation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, in response to cell need for reducing power (NADPH) during the dehydration-triggered down regulation of metabolism. On the contrary, glcn-6-P was metabolised immediately after hydration, supplying respiration with substrates during the recovery of the pools of glycolysis and photosynthesis intermediates. Finally, the high net photo synthetic activity of wet X. elegans thalli at low temperature may help this alpine lichen to take advantage of short hydration opportunities such as ice melting, thus favouring its growth in the harsh high mountain climate. PMID:17574473

  13. Metabolic engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Nielsen

    2001-01-01

    Metabolic engineering has developed as a very powerful approach to optimising industrial fermentation processes through the introduction of directed genetic changes using recombinant DNA technology. Successful metabolic engineering starts with a careful analysis of cellular function; based on the results of this analysis, an improved strain is designed and subsequently constructed by genetic engineering. In recent years some very powerful

  14. The Investment in Scent: Time-Resolved Metabolic Processes in Developing Volatile-Producing Nigella sativa L. Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, David; Botnick, Ilan; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Nikoloski, Zoran; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Fait, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of processes in central and specialized metabolisms during seed development of Nigella sativa L. was studied by using a high-throughput metabolomics technology and network-based analysis. Two major metabolic shifts were identified during seed development: the first was characterized by the accumulation of storage lipids (estimated as total fatty acids) and N-compounds, and the second by the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and a 30% average decrease in total fatty acids. Network-based analysis identified coordinated metabolic processes during development and demonstrated the presence of five network communities. Enrichment analysis indicated that different compound classes, such as sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids, are largely separated and over-represented in certain communities. One community displayed several terpenoids and the central metabolites, shikimate derived amino acids, raffinose, xylitol and glycerol–3-phosphate. The latter are related to precursors of the mevalonate-independent pathway for VOC production in the plastid; also plastidial fatty acid 18?3n-3 abundant in “green” seeds grouped with several major terpenes. The findings highlight the interplay between the components of central metabolism and the VOCs. The developmental regulation of Nigella seed metabolism during seed maturation suggests a substantial re-allocation of carbon from the breakdown of fatty acids and from N-compounds, probably towards the biosynthesis of VOCs. PMID:24019893

  15. The power of emotional valence—from cognitive to affective processes in reading

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Ulrike; Bohrn, Isabel C.; Lubrich, Oliver; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of stories requires the reader to imagine the cognitive and affective states of the characters. The content of many stories is unpleasant, as they often deal with conflict, disturbance or crisis. Nevertheless, unpleasant stories can be liked and enjoyed. In this fMRI study, we used a parametric approach to examine (1) the capacity of increasing negative valence of story contents to activate the mentalizing network (cognitive and affective theory of mind, ToM), and (2) the neural substrate of liking negatively valenced narratives. A set of 80 short narratives was compiled, ranging from neutral to negative emotional valence. For each story mean rating values on valence and liking were obtained from a group of 32 participants in a prestudy, and later included as parametric regressors in the fMRI analysis. Another group of 24 participants passively read the narratives in a three Tesla MRI scanner. Results revealed a stronger engagement of affective ToM-related brain areas with increasingly negative story valence. Stories that were unpleasant, but simultaneously liked, engaged the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which might reflect the moral exploration of the story content. Further analysis showed that the more the mPFC becomes engaged during the reading of negatively valenced stories, the more coactivation can be observed in other brain areas related to the neural processing of affective ToM and empathy. PMID:22754519

  16. Transient effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) exposure on some metabolic and free radical processes in goldfish white muscle.

    PubMed

    Kubrak, Olga I; Atamaniuk, Tetiana M; Husak, Viktor V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to assess effects of 96 h goldfish exposure to 1, 10 and 100 mg/L of the herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), on metabolic indices and free radical process markers in white muscle of a commercial fish, the goldfish Carassius auratus L. Most oxidative stress markers and antioxidant enzymes were not affected at 2,4-D fish treatment. 2,4-D fish exposure induced the elevated levels of total (by 46% and 40%) and reduced (by 77% and 73%) glutathione in muscles of goldfish of 10 mg/L 2,4-D and recovery (after 100 mg/L of 2,4-D exposure) groups, respectively. However, in muscles of 100 mg/L 2,4-D exposed goldfish these parameters were depleted (by 47% and 64%). None of investigated parameters of protein and carbohydrate metabolisms changed in white muscles of 2,4-D exposed fish, with exception of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which was slightly (by 11-15%) elevated in muscles of goldfish exposed to 10-100 mg/L of 2,4-D, but also recovered. Thus, the short term exposure of goldfish to the selected concentrations of 2,4-D does not substantially affect their white muscle, suggesting the absence of any effect under the environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:23806294

  17. Endogenous Enzymes, Heat, and pH Affect Flavone Profiles in Parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum) and Celery (Apium graveolens) during Juice Processing

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Gregory L.; Riedl, Ken M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Flavones are abundant in parsley and celery and possess unique anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in animal models. However, their bioavailability and bioactivity depend in part on the conjugation of sugars and other functional groups to the flavone core. The effects of juice extraction, acidification, thermal processing, and endogenous enzymes on flavone glycoside profile and concentration in both parsley and celery were investigated. Parsley yielded 72% juice with 64% of the total flavones extracted, whereas celery yielded 79% juice with 56% of flavones extracted. Fresh parsley juice averaged 281 mg flavones/100 g and fresh celery juice, 28.5 mg/100 g. Flavones in steamed parsley and celery were predominantly malonyl apiosylglucoside conjugates, whereas those in fresh samples were primarily apiosylglucoside conjugates; this was apparently the result of endogenous malonyl esterases. Acidification and thermal processing of celery converted flavone apiosylglucosides to flavone glucosides, which may affect the intestinal absorption and metabolism of these compounds. PMID:22224550

  18. Unrefined and refined black raspberry seed oils significantly lower triglycerides and moderately affect cholesterol metabolism in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Wolford, Kate A; Carden, Trevor J; Hwang, Keum Taek; Carr, Timothy P

    2011-09-01

    Unrefined and refined black raspberry seed oils (RSOs) were examined for their lipid-modulating effects in male Syrian hamsters fed high-cholesterol (0.12% g/g), high-fat (9% g/g) diets. Hamsters fed the refined and the unrefined RSO diets had equivalently lower plasma total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in comparison with the atherogenic coconut oil diet. The unrefined RSO treatment group did not differ in liver total and esterified cholesterol from the coconut oil-fed control animals, but the refined RSO resulted in significantly elevated liver total and esterified cholesterol concentrations. The unrefined RSO diets significantly lowered plasma triglycerides (46%; P=.0126) in comparison with the coconut oil diet, whereas the refined RSO only tended to lower plasma triglyceride (29%; P=.1630). Liver triglyceride concentrations were lower in the unrefined (46%; P=.0002) and refined (36%; P=.0005) RSO-fed animals than the coconut oil group, with the unrefined RSO diet eliciting a lower concentration than the soybean oil diet. Both RSOs demonstrated a null or moderate effect on cholesterol metabolism despite enrichment in linoleic acid, significantly lowering HDL cholesterol but not non-HDL cholesterol. Dramatically, both RSOs significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia, most likely due to enrichment in ?-linolenic acid. As a terrestrial source of ?-linolenic acid, black RSOs, both refined and unrefined, provide a promising alternative to fish oil supplementation in management of hypertriglyceridemia, as demonstrated in hamsters fed high levels of dietary triglyceride and cholesterol. PMID:21548801

  19. Modulation of Vitamin D Status and Dietary Calcium Affects Bone Mineral Density and Mineral Metabolism in Göttingen Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina E.; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Bronner, Felix; Delling, Günter; Açil, Yahya; Hahne, Hans-Jürgen; Hassenpflug, Joachim; Timm, Wolfram; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D deficiency impairs bone health and may cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Large animal models are useful to study experimental osteopathies and associated metabolic changes. We intended to modulate vitamin D status and induce nutritional osteomalacia in minipigs. The control group (n = 9) was fed a semisynthetic reference diet with 6?g calcium and 6,500?IU vitamin D3/kg and the experimental group (n = 10) the same diet but with only 2?g calcium/kg and without vitamin D. After 15 months, the deficient animals were in negative calcium balance, having lost bone mineral density significantly (means ± SEM) with ?51.2 ± 14.7?mg/cm3 in contrast to controls (?2.3 ± 11.8?mg/cm3), whose calcium balance remained positive. Their osteoid surface was significantly higher, typical of osteomalacia. Their plasma 25(OH)D dropped significantly from 60.1 ± 11.4?nmol/L to 15.3 ± 3.4?nmol/L within 10 months, whereas that of the control group on the reference diet rose. Urinary phosphorus excretion and plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations were significantly higher and final plasma calcium significantly lower than in controls. We conclude that the minipig is a promising large animal model to induce nutritional osteomalacia and to study the time course of hypovitaminosis D and associated functional effects. PMID:24062955

  20. SLO2, a mitochondrial pentatricopeptide repeat protein affecting several RNA editing sites, is required for energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Dugardeyn, Jasper; Zhang, Chunyi; Takenaka, Mizuki; Kühn, Kristina; Craddock, Christian; Smalle, Jan; Karampelias, Michael; Denecke, Jurgen; Peters, Janny; Gerats, Tom; Brennicke, Axel; Eastmond, Peter; Meyer, Etienne H; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2012-09-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins belong to a family of approximately 450 members in Arabidopsis, of which few have been characterized. We identified loss of function alleles of SLO2, defective in a PPR protein belonging to the E+ subclass of the P-L-S subfamily. slo2 mutants are characterized by retarded leaf emergence, restricted root growth, and late flowering. This phenotype is enhanced in the absence of sucrose, suggesting a defect in energy metabolism. The slo2 growth retardation phenotypes are largely suppressed by supplying sugars or increasing light dosage or the concentration of CO?. The SLO2 protein is localized in mitochondria. We identified four RNA editing defects and reduced editing at three sites in slo2 mutants. The resulting amino acid changes occur in four mitochondrial proteins belonging to complex I of the electron transport chain. Both the abundance and activity of complex I are highly reduced in the slo2 mutants, as well as the abundance of complexes III and IV. Moreover, ATP, NAD+, and sugar contents were much lower in the mutants. In contrast, the abundance of alternative oxidase was significantly enhanced. We propose that SLO2 is required for carbon energy balance in Arabidopsis by maintaining the abundance and/or activity of complexes I, III, and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:22540321

  1. Chronic Electromagnetic Exposure at Occupational Safety Level Does Not Affect the Metabolic Profile nor Cornea Healing after LASIK Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dabouis, Vincent; Gentilhomme, Edgar; Vignal, Rodolphe; Bourbon, Fréderic; Fauvelle, Florence; Debouzy, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    LASIK eye surgery has become a very common practice for myopic people, especially those in the military. Sometimes undertaken by people who need to keep a specific medical aptitude, this surgery could be performed in secret from the hierarchy and from the institute medical staff. However, even though the eyes have been previously described as one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic fields in the human body, no data exist on the potential deleterious effects of electromagnetic fields on the healing eye. The consequences of chronic long-lasting radar exposures at power density, in accordance with the occupational safety standards (9.71?GHz, 50?W/m2), were investigated on cornea healing. The metabolic and clinical statuses after experimental LASIK keratotomy were assessed on the different eye segments in a New Zealand rabbit model. The analysis methods were performed after 5 months of exposure (1?hour/day, 3 times/week). Neither clinical or histological examinations, nor experimental data, such as light scattering, 1H-NMR HRMAS metabolomics, 13C-NMR spectra of lipidic extracts, and antioxidant status, evidenced significant modifications. It was concluded that withdrawing the medical aptitude of people working in electromagnetic field environments (i.e., radar operators in the navy) after eye surgery was not justified. PMID:24757560

  2. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  3. The mental health of children affected by armed conflict: protective processes and pathways to resilience.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Khan, Kashif Tanveer

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the concept of resilience in the context of children affected by armed conflict. Resilience has been frequently viewed as a unique quality of certain 'invulnerable' children. In contrast, this paper argues that a number of protective processes contribute to resilient mental health outcomes in children when considered through the lens of the child's social ecology. While available research has made important contributions to understanding risk factors for negative mental health consequences of war-related violence and loss, the focus on trauma alone has resulted in inadequate attention to factors associated with resilient mental health outcomes. This paper presents key studies in the literature that address the interplay between risk and protective processes in the mental health of war-affected children from an ecological, developmental perspective. It suggests that further research on war-affected children should pay particular attention to coping and meaning making at the individual level; the role of attachment relationships, caregiver health, resources and connection in the family, and social support available in peer and extended social networks. Cultural and community influences such as attitudes towards mental health and healing as well as the meaning given to the experience of war itself are also important aspects of the larger social ecology. PMID:18569183

  4. Application of ultrasound processed images in space: Quanitative assessment of diffuse affectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Poch, A.; Bru, C.; Nicolau, C.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffuse affectations in the liver using texture image processing techniques. Ultrasound diagnose equipments are the election of choice to be used in space environments as they are free from hazardous effects on health. However, due to the need for highly trained radiologists to assess the images, this imaging method is mainly applied on focal lesions rather than on non-focal ones. We have conducted a clinical study on 72 patients with different degrees of chronic hepatopaties and a group of control of 18 individuals. All subjects' clinical reports and results of biopsies were compared to the degree of affectation calculated by our computer system , thus validating the method. Full statistical results are given in the present paper showing a good correlation (r=0.61) between pathologist's report and analysis of the heterogenicity of the processed images from the liver. This computer system to analyze diffuse affectations may be used in-situ or via telemedicine to the ground.

  5. Reactive Metabolites and AGE\\/RAGE-Mediated Cellular Dysfunction Affect the Aging Process – A Mini-Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas H. Fleming; Per M. Humpert; Peter P. Nawroth; Angelika Bierhaus

    2011-01-01

    Aging is a dynamic process in which its rate and subsequent longevity of an organism are dependent upon the balance between the reactive intermediates of normal cellular metabolism and the ability of the body to reduce these by-products through a multifaceted antioxidant defence system. Every disturbance of this balance constitutes a clear and present danger to the macromolecular integrity of

  6. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands? 3602.12 Section 3602.12 Public Lands...does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands? (a) When BLM designates tracts for...

  7. Detection of naphthenic acids in fish exposed to commercial naphthenic acids and oil sands process-affected water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. F. Young; E. A. Orr; G. G. Goss; P. M. Fedorak

    2007-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are a complex mixture of carboxylic acids that occur naturally in petroleum. During the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands in northeastern Alberta, Canada, naphthenic acids are released into the aqueous phase and these acids become the most toxic components in the process-affected water. Although previous studies have exposed fish to naphthenic acids or oil sands process-affected

  8. Selective effects of social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and negative affectivity on the neural bases of emotional face processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tali Manber Ball; Sarah Sullivan; Taru Flagan; Carla A. Hitchcock; Alan Simmons; Martin P. Paulus; Murray B. Stein

    Individuals with high anxiety show heightened neural activation in affective processing regions, including the amygdala and insula. Activations have been shown to be correlated with anxiety severity, but although anxiety is a heterogeneous state, prior studies have not systematically disentangled whether neural activity in affective processing circuitry is uniquely related to specific domains of anxiety. Forty-five young adults were tested

  9. Assessment of quality of life of the children and parents affected by inborn errors of metabolism with restricted diet: preliminary results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development in therapeutic strategies has increased survival of children affected by inborn errors of metabolism with restricted diet (IEMRD). These diseases have mild- and long-term consequences on the health. Little is known about the impact on the quality of life (QoL) of children and their families. The aims of this study were: to compare the QoL of the children and parents affected by IEMRD with the QoL of the general population and one pathology associated with long-term consequences. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study was performed at the French Reference Center for inborn metabolic disorders (Marseille, France). Inclusion criteria were: a child with a diagnosis of organic aciduria, urea cycle defect, or maple syrups urine disease (MSUD). Socio-demographics, clinical data, and QoL were recorded. Results Twenty-one of 32 eligible families were included during a planned routine visit. Ten (47%, 95% CI 27-69%) children were affected by organic aciduria, six (29%, 95% CI 10-48%) by urea cycle defects, and five (24%, 95% CI 6-42%) by MSUD. Among the younger children, the general well-being was significantly lower in the children with IEMRD than in the leukemia children (58?±?16 versus 76?±?15, p = 0.012), and among the older children, the leisure activities were significantly lower in the children with IEMRD than in the leukemia children (29?±?18 versus 62?±?22, p < 10-3), while the relationships with teachers were better (76?±?23 versus 60?±?23, p = 0.01). The physical QoL score was lower in the parents than in the French norms (66?±?21 versus 75?±?1, p = 0.05). Factors modulating QoL were: eating and neurologic disorders, enteral nutrition, and feeding modalities. Conclusion The children and the parents of children affected presented altered ‘physical’ and ‘social’ QoL scores compared with the norms and patients with leukemia and their families. Future studies based on larger cohort studies should determine the different weights of potential predictive factors of QoL. PMID:24050652

  10. Transcranial Electrical Stimulation over Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Processing of Social Cognitive and Affective Information

    PubMed Central

    Conson, Massimiliano; Errico, Domenico; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Giordano, Marianna; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Recent neurofunctional studies suggested that lateral prefrontal cortex is a domain-general cognitive control area modulating computation of social information. Neuropsychological evidence reported dissociations between cognitive and affective components of social cognition. Here, we tested whether performance on social cognitive and affective tasks can be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). To this aim, we compared the effects of tDCS on explicit recognition of emotional facial expressions (affective task), and on one cognitive task assessing the ability to adopt another person’s visual perspective. In a randomized, cross-over design, male and female healthy participants performed the two experimental tasks after bi-hemispheric tDCS (sham, left anodal/right cathodal, and right anodal/left cathodal) applied over DLPFC. Results showed that only in male participants explicit recognition of fearful facial expressions was significantly faster after anodal right/cathodal left stimulation with respect to anodal left/cathodal right and sham stimulations. In the visual perspective taking task, instead, anodal right/cathodal left stimulation negatively affected both male and female participants’ tendency to adopt another’s point of view. These findings demonstrated that concurrent facilitation of right and inhibition of left lateral prefrontal cortex can speed-up males’ responses to threatening faces whereas it interferes with the ability to adopt another’s viewpoint independently from gender. Thus, stimulation of cognitive control areas can lead to different effects on social cognitive skills depending on the affective vs. cognitive nature of the task, and on the gender-related differences in neural organization of emotion processing. PMID:25951227

  11. Metabolic Induction and Early Responses of Mouse Blastocyst Developmental Programming following Maternal Low Protein Diet Affecting Life-Long Health

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Judith J.; Porter, Richard; Watkins, Adam J.; Burt, Elizabeth; Brooks, Suzanne; Leese, Henry J.; Humpherson, Peter G.; Cameron, Iain T.; Fleming, Tom P.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that a maternal low protein diet, fed exclusively during the preimplantation period of mouse development (Emb-LPD), is sufficient to induce by the blastocyst stage a compensatory growth phenotype in late gestation and postnatally, correlating with increased risk of adult onset cardiovascular disease and behavioural dysfunction. Here, we examine mechanisms of induction of maternal Emb-LPD programming and early compensatory responses by the embryo. Emb-LPD induced changes in maternal serum metabolites at the time of blastocyst formation (E3.5), notably reduced insulin and increased glucose, together with reduced levels of free amino acids (AAs) including branched chain AAs leucine, isoleucine and valine. Emb-LPD also caused reduction in the branched chain AAs within uterine fluid at the blastocyst stage. These maternal changes coincided with an altered content of blastocyst AAs and reduced mTORC1 signalling within blastocysts evident in reduced phosphorylation of effector S6 ribosomal protein and its ratio to total S6 protein but no change in effector 4E-BP1 phosphorylated and total pools. These changes were accompanied by increased proliferation of blastocyst trophectoderm and total cells and subsequent increased spreading of trophoblast cells in blastocyst outgrowths. We propose that induction of metabolic programming following Emb-LPD is achieved through mTORC1signalling which acts as a sensor for preimplantation embryos to detect maternal nutrient levels via branched chain AAs and/or insulin availability. Moreover, this induction step associates with changes in extra-embryonic trophectoderm behaviour occurring as early compensatory responses leading to later nutrient recovery. PMID:23300778

  12. Nitric oxide affects immune cells bioenergetics: long-term effects of nitric-oxide derivatives on leukaemic Jurkat cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Ines; Bertrand, Marie; Chen, Jingkui; Bronte, Vincenzo; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2012-08-01

    Major advances in dissecting mechanisms of NO-induced down-regulation of the anti-tumour specific T-cell function have been accomplished during the last decade. In this work, we studied the effects of a NO donor (AT38) on leukaemic Jurkat cell bioenergetics. Culturing Jurkat cells in the presence of AT38 triggered irreversible inhibition of cell respiration, led to the depletion of 50% of the intracellular ATP content and induced the arrest of cell proliferation and the loss of cell viability. Although a deterioration of the overall metabolic activity has been observed, glycolysis was stimulated, as revealed by the increase of glucose uptake and lactate accumulation rates as well as by the up-regulation of GLUT-1 and PFK-1 mRNA levels. In the presence of NO, cell ATP was rapidly consumed by energy-requiring apoptosis mechanisms; under a glucose concentration of about 12.7mM, cell death was switched from apoptosis into necrosis. Exposure of Jurkat cells to DMSO (1%, v/v), SA and AT55, the non-NO releasing moiety of AT38, failed to modulate neither cell proliferation nor bioenergetics. Thus, as for all NSAIDs, beneficial effects of AT38 on tumour regression are accompanied by the suppression of the immune system. We then showed that pre-treating Jurkat cells with low concentration of cyclosporine A, a blocker of the mitochondrial transition pore, attenuates AT38-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and suppresses cell death. Finally, we have studied and compared the effects of nitrite and nitrate on Jurkat cells to those of NO and we are providing evidence that nitrate, which is considered as a biologically inert anion, has a concentration and time-dependent immunosuppressive potential. PMID:22656888

  13. Polymorphism in one-carbon metabolism pathway affects survival of gastric cancer patients: Large and comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Gu, Dongying; Xu, Zhi; Huo, Xinying; Shen, Lili; Wang, Chun; Tang, Yongfei; Wu, Peng; He, Jason; Gong, Weida; He, Ming-Liang; Chen, Jinfei

    2015-04-20

    Although it has been shown that polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism (OCM) pathway are associated with gastric cancer (GC), their interactions and contributions for patients' survival are elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of polymorphisms and their interactions on the survival of GC patients, including genes of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C > T, 1298A > C), Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR 66A > G), Methionine synthase (MTR 2756A > G), and Thymidylate synthase (TS 3'-UTR ins6 > del6, 5'-UTR 2R > 3R). We recruited 919 GC patients from 1998 to 2006. The Kaplan-Meier plots, Cox regression analyses and the log-rank tests were carried out in this study. MTHFR 1298CC genotype showed protective effect (HR = 0.444, 95% CI = 0.210-0.940). MTRR 66 GA + GG genotypes decreased the risk of death (HR = 0.793, 95% CI = 0.651-0.967) in general, and in subgroups with more pronounced diffuse type, greater depth of invasion (T2/T3/T4), higher level lymph node metastasis (N1/N2/N3), advanced TNM stages (II/III level) and 5-Fu treatment. However, the improved survival disappeared when GC patients simultaneously had MTR 2756 GA + GG genotypes (HR = 1.063, 95% CI = 0.750-1.507). Although MTRR 66GA genotype was not associated with the survival of GC patients, patients with simultaneous MTRR 66GA and MTR 2756AA genotypes exhibited significant risk reduction of death (HR = 0.773, 95% CI = 0.609-0.981). MTHFR 1298 CA + CC combined with TS 5-UTR 2R3R + 3R3R genotypes (HR = 0.536, 95% CI = 0.315-0.913) also increased patient survival rates. Our results suggest that the MTRR 66A > G and MTHFR 1298A > C polymorphisms may be useful prognostic biomarkers for GC patients. PMID:25840420

  14. 17-? Oestradiol prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in post-menopausal metabolic syndrome by affecting SIRT1/AMPK/H3 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bendale, Dhaval Sharad; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Chhabra, Richa; Shete, Sachin Prabhakarrao; Shah, Heta; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oestrogen therapy is known to induce cardioprotection in post-menopausal metabolic syndrome (PMS). Hence, we investigated the effect of 17-? oestradiol (E2) on functional responses to angiotensin II and cardiovascular dysfunction in a rat model of PMS. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PMS was induced in ovariectomized rats by feeding a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. Isometric tension responses of aortic rings to angiotensin II were recorded using an isometric force transducer. TUNEL assay and immunoblotting was performed to assess apoptosis and protein expression respectively in PMS. KEY RESULTS Endothelial dysfunction in PMS was characterized by enhanced angiotensin II-induced contractile responses and impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation. This was associated with an increased protein expression of AT1 receptors in the aorta and heart in PMS. PMS induced cardiac apoptosis by activating Bax and PARP protein expression. These changes were associated with a down-regulation in the expression of silent information regulation 2 homologue (SIRT1)/P-AMP-activated PK (AMPK) and increased H3 acetylation in aorta and heart. E2 partially suppressed angiotensin II-induced contractions, restored the protein expression of SIRT1/P-AMPK and suppressed H3 acetylation. The role of SIRT1/AMPK was further highlighted by administration of sirtinol and compound C (ex vivo), which enhanced angiotensin II contractile responses and ablated the protective effect of E2 on PMS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results provide novel mechanisms for PMS-induced cardiovascular dysfunction involving SIRT1/AMPK/ histone H3 acetylation, which was prevented by E2. The study suggests that therapies targeting SIRT1/AMPK/epigenetic modifications may be beneficial in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:23826814

  15. Polymorphism in one-carbon metabolism pathway affects survival of gastric cancer patients: Large and comprehensive study

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xinying; Shen, Lili; Wang, Chun; Tang, Yongfei; Wu, Peng; He, Jason; Gong, Weida; He, Ming-Liang; Chen, Jinfei

    2015-01-01

    Although it has been shown that polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism (OCM) pathway are associated with gastric cancer (GC), their interactions and contributions for patients’ survival are elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of polymorphisms and their interactions on the survival of GC patients, including genes of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C > T, 1298A > C), Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR 66A > G), Methionine synthase (MTR 2756A > G), and Thymidylate synthase (TS 3?-UTR ins6 > del6, 5?-UTR 2R > 3R). We recruited 919 GC patients from 1998 to 2006. The Kaplan–Meier plots, Cox regression analyses and the log-rank tests were carried out in this study. MTHFR 1298CC genotype showed protective effect (HR = 0.444, 95% CI = 0.210–0.940). MTRR 66 GA + GG genotypes decreased the risk of death (HR = 0.793, 95% CI = 0.651–0.967) in general, and in subgroups with more pronounced diffuse type, greater depth of invasion (T2/T3/T4), higher level lymph node metastasis (N1/N2/N3), advanced TNM stages (II/III level) and 5-Fu treatment. However, the improved survival disappeared when GC patients simultaneously had MTR 2756 GA + GG genotypes (HR = 1.063, 95% CI = 0.750–1.507). Although MTRR 66GA genotype was not associated with the survival of GC patients, patients with simultaneous MTRR 66GA and MTR 2756AA genotypes exhibited significant risk reduction of death (HR = 0.773, 95% CI = 0.609–0.981). MTHFR 1298 CA + CC combined with TS 5-UTR 2R3R + 3R3R genotypes (HR = 0.536, 95% CI = 0.315–0.913) also increased patient survival rates. Our results suggest that the MTRR 66A > G and MTHFR 1298A > C polymorphisms may be useful prognostic biomarkers for GC patients. PMID:25840420

  16. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations affecting the ability of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to metabolize D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.P.; Zahab, D.M.; Mahmourides, G.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-11-01

    Induced mutants, selected for their defective growth on D-xylose while retaining the ability to grow normally on D-glucose, were studied in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast capable of converting D-xylose to ethanol. Fourteen of the mutations were found to occur at nine distinct loci, and data indicated that many more loci remain to be detected. Most of the mutations were pleiotropic in character, and the expression of some of them was much affected by nutritional conditions and by genetic background. Mutations at several loci resulted in poor growth on at least one compound that was either an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, succinate or {alpha}-ketoglutarate, or on compounds metabolizable via this cycle, ethanol or glycerol. An initial biochemical characterization of the mutants was undertaken. Analysis for xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase activity showed that one or more of these activities was affected in 12 of 13 mutants. However, drastic reduction in activity of a single enzyme was confined to that of xylitol dehydrogenase by mutations at three different loci and to that of D-xylose reductase by mutation at another locus. Growth of these latter four mutants was normal on all carbon sources tested that were not five-carbon sugars.

  17. A suppressor of temperature-sensitive rna mutations that affect mRNA metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, N J; Thorburn, P C; Haber, J E

    1982-01-01

    We have isolated a dominant suppressor of rna mutation (SRN1) that relieves the temperature-sensitive inhibition of mRNA synthesis of ribosomal protein genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The suppressor was selected for its ability to alleviate simultaneously the temperature-sensitive growth phenotypes of rna2 and rna6. Several independently isolated suppressors appeared to be recessive lethal mutations. One suppressor, SRN1, was recovered as viable in haploid strains. SRN1 can suppress rna2, rna3, rna4, rna5, rna6, and rna8 singly or in pairs, although some combinations of rna mutations are less well suppressed than others. The suppressor allows strains with rna mutations to grow at 34 degrees C but is unable to suppress at 37 degrees C; however, SRN1 does not, by itself, prevent growth at 37 degrees C. In addition, SRN1 suppresses the rna1 mutation which affects general mRNA levels and also leads to the accumulation of precursor tRNA for those tRNAs that have intervening sequences. SRN1 can suppress the rna1 mutation as well as the rna1 rna2 double mutation at 34 degrees C. The suppressor does not affect the temperature-sensitive growth of two unrelated temperature-sensitive mutations, cdc4 and cdc7. PMID:7050675

  18. Application of a solar UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to oil sands process-affected water remediation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Li, Chao; Belosevic, Miodrag; Bolton, James R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2014-08-19

    The solar UV/chlorine process has emerged as a novel advanced oxidation process for industrial and municipal wastewaters. Currently, its practical application to oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) remediation has been studied to treat fresh OSPW retained in large tailings ponds, which can cause significant adverse environmental impacts on ground and surface waters in Northern Alberta, Canada. Degradation of naphthenic acids (NAs) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW was investigated. In a laboratory-scale UV/chlorine treatment, the NAs degradation was clearly structure-dependent and hydroxyl radical-based. In terms of the NAs degradation rate, the raw OSPW (pH ? 8.3) rates were higher than those at an alkaline condition (pH = 10). Under actual sunlight, direct solar photolysis partially degraded fluorophore organic compounds, as indicated by the qualitative synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) of the OSPW, but did not impact NAs degradation. The solar/chlorine process effectively removed NAs (75-84% removal) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW in the presence of 200 or 300 mg L(-1) OCl(-). The acute toxicity of OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was reduced after the solar/chlorine treatment. However, the OSPW toxicity toward goldfish primary kidney macrophages after solar/chlorine treatment showed no obvious toxicity reduction versus that of untreated OSPW, which warrants further study for process optimization. PMID:25051215

  19. Pearl millet: parboiling methods and factors affecting the process and cooked product 

    E-print Network

    Clegg, Chally Joel

    1991-01-01

    the Process and Cooked Product. (August 1991) Chally Joel Clegg, B. S. , University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lloyd Rooney Pearl millet Pennisetum american m) was parboiled by boil-soak-boil (BSB), soak-boil (SB), or soak... not significantly affect the level of broken kernels compared to nonparboiled pearl millet. BSB, SB, and SBS methods dried slowly were similar in milling properties. Otherwise, rapid drying of BSB method milled best, followed by SB, then SBS method. Sun and oven...

  20. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 ?mol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  1. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 ?mol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  2. Low-quality roughages in high-concentrate pelleted diets for sheep: digestion and metabolism characteristics as affected by corncob and(or) rice hull additions.

    PubMed

    Kinser, A R; Fahey, G C; Berger, L L

    1988-02-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine effects of feeding corncobs, rice hulls or a combination of both on nutrient digestion and flow of digesta through the gastrointestinal tract of multiple-cannulated sheep (55-kg Rambouillet X Dorset rams; trial 1; 4 X 4 Latin square) as well as ruminal, digestive and metabolic characteristics of early-weaned lambs (24.1-kg crossbred rams; trial 2; randomized complete block design; 3 periods) fed pelleted 75% concentrate-25% roughage diets. In trial 1, apparent total tract dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibilities decreased and N digestibility increased as percentage of dietary corncobs decreased and percentage of rice hulls increased. Site of NDF digestion appeared to shift from the upper to the lower digestive tract as percentage of corncobs decreased and percentage of rice hulls increased. In trial 2, apparent DM digestibility decreased as corncobs were replaced with rice hulls in the diet. Neutral detergent fiber digestibility was not affected by diet except in larger lambs at higher intakes, with NDF digestibility generally decreasing as percentage of dietary rice hulls increased. Nitrogen digestibility was not affected by replacing corncobs with rice hulls in the diet. Ruminal pH decreased as rice hulls replaced corncobs in the diet. These data are interpreted to indicate that rice hulls can be effectively substituted for corncobs in sheep diets when added at levels up to 25% of the total diet. PMID:2836352

  3. Biomechanical organization of gait initiation depends on the timing of affective processing.

    PubMed

    Stins, John F; van Gelder, Linda M A; Oudenhoven, Laura M; Beek, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) from a quiet bipedal posture has been shown to be influenced by the emotional state of the actor. The literature suggests that the biomechanical organization of forward GI is facilitated when pleasant pictures are shown, as compared to unpleasant pictures. However, there are inconsistencies in the literature, which could be due to the neural dynamics of affective processing. This study aimed to test this hypothesis, using a paradigm whereby participants initiated a step as soon as they saw an affective picture (i.e., onset), or as soon as the picture disappeared from the screen (i.e., offset). Pictures were a priori categorized as pleasant or unpleasant, and could also vary in their arousing properties. We analyzed center-of-pressure and center-of-gravity dynamics as a function of emotional content. We found that gait was initiated faster with pleasant images at onset, and faster with unpleasant images at offset. Also, with offset GI the peak velocity of the COG was reduced, and subjects took smaller steps, with unpleasant images relative to pleasant images. The results are discussed in terms of current knowledge regarding temporal processing of emotions, and its effects on GI. PMID:25455703

  4. Health of domestic mallards (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) following exposure to oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Beck, Elizabeth M; Smits, Judit E G; St Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2014-01-01

    Bitumen extraction from the oil sands of northern Alberta produces large volumes of process-affected water that contains substances toxic to wildlife. Recent monitoring has shown that tens of thousands of birds land on ponds containing this water annually, creating an urgent need to understand its effects on bird health. We emulated the repeated, short-term exposures that migrating water birds are thought to experience by exposing pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) to recycled oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). As indicators of health, we measured a series of physiological (electrolytes, metabolites, enzymes, hormones, and blood cells) and toxicological (metals and minerals) variables. Relative to controls, juvenile birds exposed to OSPW had higher potassium following the final exposure, and males had a higher thyroid hormone ratio (T3/T4). In adults, exposed birds had higher vanadium, and, following the final exposure, higher bicarbonate. Exposed females had higher bile acid, globulin, and molybdenum levels, and males, higher corticosterone. However, with the exception of the metals, none of these measures varied from available reference ranges for ducks, suggesting OSPW is not toxic to juvenile or adult birds after three and six weekly, 1 h exposures, but more studies are needed to know the generality of this result. PMID:25003652

  5. Physical processes affecting circulation and hydrography in the Sable Gully of Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shiliang; Sheng, Jinyu; Greenan, Blair J. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Sable Gully is the largest submarine canyon along the shelf break off the east coast of North America. The circulation and hydrography in the Gully have significant temporal and spatial variability. This paper presents a numerical study of the three-dimensional circulation and hydrography in the Gully using a multi-nested ocean circulation model. The model is forced by tides, wind stress and surface heat/freshwater fluxes. Model results are in fair agreement with the current and hydrographic observations made in the Gully in 2006 and 2007. A process study is conducted to examine the main physical processes affecting the circulation and hydrography, including tide-topography interaction, wind forcing, and the shelf-scale circulation over the eastern Canadian Shelf. The model results demonstrate that the circulation and hydrography above the canyon rim are influenced significantly by wind, particularly during storm events, while the subsurface flow over the shelf slope is affected by the shelf-scale circulation. There is also significant tide-topography interaction inside the Gully.

  6. PTA1, an essential gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting pre-tRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, J P; Peebles, C L

    1992-01-01

    We have identified an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, PTA1, that affects pre-tRNA processing. PTA1 was initially defined by a UV-induced mutation, pta1-1, that causes the accumulation of all 10 end-trimmed, intron-containing pre-tRNAs and temperature-sensitive but osmotic-remedial growth. pta1-1 does not appear to be an allele of any other known gene affecting pre-tRNA processing. Extracts prepared from pta1-1 strains had normal pre-tRNA splicing endonuclease activity. pta1-1 was suppressed by the ochre suppressor tRNA gene SUP11, indicating that the pta1-1 mutation creates a termination codon within a protein reading frame. The PTA1 gene was isolated from a genomic library by complementation of the pta1-1 growth defect. Episome-borne PTA1 directs recombination to the pta1-1 locus. PTA1 has been mapped to the left arm of chromosome I near CDC24; the gene was sequenced and could encode a protein of 785 amino acids with a molecular weight of 88,417. No other protein sequences similar to that of the predicted PTA1 gene product have been identified within the EMBL or GenBank data base. Disruption of PTA1 near the carboxy terminus of the putative open reading frame was lethal. Possible functions of the PTA1 gene product are discussed. Images PMID:1508188

  7. Identification of a novel unpaired histidine sensor kinase affecting secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces acidiscabies ATCC 49003.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Min; Choi, Sun-Uk

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are an important signaling transduction pathway that adapt to changing environments. Commonly, a TCS comprises a sensor kinase that is usually an integral membrane histidine sensor kinase and a response regulator that mediates the cellular responses. Presently, however, we cloned a novel sensor kinase gene (tcsK) that is not adjacent to its cognate response regulator from Streptomyces acidiscabies that produces two secondary metabolites, thaxtomin A and WS5995B, and identified its functional involvement in the production of secondary metabolites and morphological differentiation. The elevated expression and disruption of the tcsK gene enhanced 7.1-fold and almost abolished WS5995B production in S. acidiscabies, respectively, but did not affect the production of thaxtomin A. In addition, spore formation of S. acidiscabies was decreased 120-fold by the disruption of tcsK, and the actinorhodin production of Streptomyces lividans TK24 was increased 5.7-fold by the high expression of tcsK. These results indicate that the novel unpaired tcsK gene may be related to the control of secondary metabolite production and spore formation in actinomycetes. PMID:25821125

  8. The effect of an in situ-produced oil shale processing water on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K F; North, D S; Payne, G R; Anderson, A D; Poulson, R E; Farrier, D S

    1978-01-01

    The effects of in situ-produced oil shale retort water on the metabolism of various substrates was studied both in vivo and in vitro. The induction observed in rats was classified as Type I due to an increase in metabolism of hexobarbital and ethylmorphine without subsequent increases in zoxazolamine metabolism. The maximal absorption of the cytochrome-P450-CO complex was observed to be 450 millimicron, also consistent with Type I inducers. Cytochrome P-450 levels were also significantly increased over controls. PMID:727825

  9. Changes of pathological and physiological indicators affecting drug metabolism in rats after acute exposure to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    LI, WENBIN; WANG, RONG; XIE, HUA; ZHANG, JUANHONG; JIA, ZHENGPING

    2015-01-01

    High altitude environments cause the human body to undergo a series of pathological, physiological and biochemical changes, which have a certain effect on drug pharmacokinetics. The objective of the present study was to observe changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in rats following acute exposure to high altitude and return to low altitude. A total of 21 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups. The rats in group A were maintained at low altitude in Shanghai, 55 m above sea level; those in group B were acutely exposed to high altitude in Maqu, Gansu, 4,010 m above sea level; and those in group C were acutely exposed to high altitude and then returned to low altitude. Blood was collected from the orbit for the analysis of significant biochemical indicators and from the abdominal aorta for blood gas analysis. Brain, lung and kidney tissues were removed to observe pathological changes. In group B, the pH, buffer base (BB), base excess (BE), total carbon dioxide content (ctCO2), oxygen saturation of arterial blood (sO2), oxygen tension of arterial blood (pO2), serum sodium (Na+) concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and total protein (TP) level were significantly reduced, and the carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood (pCO2), serum chloride (Cl?) concentration, serum total bilirubin (TBIL) level and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were significantly increased compared with those in group A (P<0.05). In group C, the pH, BB, BE, sO2, pO2, hemoglobin (Hb) level, serum Na+ concentration, LDH activity and TP level were significantly reduced, and the pCO2, serum Cl? concentration, alanine transaminase activity, TBIL and urea levels were significantly increased (P<0.05) compared with those in group A. The Hb and ALP levels in group C were significantly lower than those in group B (P<0.05); and the TP, TBIL and urea levels in group C were significantly higher than those in group B (P<0.05). Pathological observation revealed that the alveolar wall was hyperemic, edematous and incrassate, the alveolar epithelium was hyperplastic and infiltrated with neutrophilic granulocytes and the alveolar septum was widened; brain neurons were edematous with enlarged perivascular spaces, and hippocampal neurons were metamorphic and karyopyknotic; and kidney mesangial cells were hyperplastic, both following acute exposure to high altitude and after returning to low altitude. In conclusion, blood gas indices, biochemical indicators and functions of the heart, liver, kidney were significantly changed, and marked pathological changes occurred in the brain, liver and kidney following acute exposure to high altitude and also after returning to low altitude. These changes are likely to seriously affect the pharmacokinetics of drugs. PMID:25452782

  10. Insecticide use in hybrid onion seed production affects pre- and postpollination processes.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Sandra; Long, Rachael; Seitz, Nicola; Williams, Neal

    2014-02-01

    Research on threats to pollination service in agro-ecosystems has focused primarily on the negative impacts of land use change and agricultural practices such as insecticide use on pollinator populations. Insecticide use could also affect the pollination process, through nonlethal impacts on pollinator attraction and postpollination processes such as pollen viability or pollen tube growth. Hybrid onion seed (Allium cepa L., Alliaceae) is an important pollinator-dependent crop that has suffered yield declines in California, concurrent with increased insecticide use. Field studies suggest that insecticide use reduces pollination service in this system. We conducted a field experiment manipulating insecticide use to examine the impacts of insecticides on 1) pollinator attraction, 2) pollen/stigma interactions, and 3) seed set and seed quality. Select insecticides had negative impacts on pollinator attraction and pollen/stigma interactions, with certain products dramatically reducing pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Decreased pollen germination was not associated with reduced seed set; however, reduced pollinator attraction was associated with lower seed set and seed quality, for one of the two female lines examined. Our results highlight the importance of pesticide effects on the pollination process. Overuse may lead to yield reductions through impacts on pollinator behavior and postpollination processes. Overall, in hybrid onion seed production, moderation in insecticide use is advised when controlling onion thrips, Thrips tabaci, on commercial fields. PMID:24665681

  11. Processing Conditions Affecting Grain Size and Mechanical Properties in Nanocomposites Produced via Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2014-10-01

    Cold spray is a coating technology based on aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. In this process, spray particles (usually 1-50 ?m in diameter) are accelerated to a high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (pre-heated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval-type nozzle. A coating is formed through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on a substrate at a temperature below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper the main processing parameters affecting the microstructural and mechanical behavior of metal-metal cold spray deposits are described. The effect of process parameters on grain refinement and mechanical properties were analyzed for composite particles of Al-Al2O3, Ni-BN, Cu-Al2O3, and Co-SiC. The properties of the formed nanocomposites were compared with those of the parent materials sprayed under the same conditions. The process conditions, leading to a strong grain refinement with an acceptable level of the deposit mechanical properties such as porosity and adhesion strength, are discussed.

  12. Short-term nutritional supplementation of ewes in low body condition affects follicle development due to an increase in glucose and metabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Viñoles, C; Forsberg, M; Martin, G B; Cajarville, C; Repetto, J; Meikle, A

    2005-03-01

    This study tested whether the effects of a short period of nutritional supplementation given to ewes during the luteal phase on follicle development and ovulation rate is associated with an increase in circulating concentrations of FSH, glucose or metabolic hormones. Oestrus was synchronised with two prostaglandin injections given 9 days apart and the supplement consisted of corn grain and soybean meal. Corriedale ewes with low body condition were randomly assigned to 2 groups: the control group (C; n = 10) received a maintenance diet while the short-term supplemented group (STS; n = 10) received double the maintenance diet over days 9 to 14 of the oestrous cycle (day 0 = ovulation). Ovaries were examined daily by ultrasound and blood was sampled three times a day during the inter-ovulatory interval for measuring reproductive and metabolic hormones. On days 9, 11 and 14 of the oestrous cycle, half of the ewes from each group (n = 5) were bled intensively to determine the concentrations of glucose, insulin, IGF-I and leptin. Plasma FSH, progesterone, oestradiol and androstenedione concentrations were similar among groups. Dietary supplementation increased plasma insulin concentrations from the first to the sixth day of supplementation and increased glucose concentrations on the third day, compared with control ewes. Plasma leptin concentrations were higher in STS ewes from the second to the fifth day of supplementation. The pattern of IGF-I concentrations was similar among groups. In STS ewes, the nutritional treatment prolonged the lifespan of the last non-ovulatory follicle, so fewer follicular waves developed during the cycle. In STS ewes, increased concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin one day before ovulatory wave emergence were associated with increased numbers of follicles growing from 2 to 3 mm and with stimulation of the dominant follicle to grow for a longer period. We suggest that the mechanism by which short-term nutritional supplementation affects follicle development does not involve an increase in FSH concentrations, but may involve responses to increased concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin, acting directly at the ovarian level. This effect is acute, since concentrations of all three substances decrease after reaching peak values on the third day of supplementation. The status of follicle development at the time of maximum concentrations of glucose and metabolic hormones may be one of the factors that determines whether ovulation rate increases or not. PMID:15749957

  13. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below uranyl phosphate saturation there is evidence of uranyl-phosphate ternary complexes. These species may prove to be of substantial importance in reducing aqueous uranium concentrations when uranyl phosphate solubility is greater than water quality standards, as occurs in calcite-saturated fluids because of the formation of aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes. Uranyl-phosphate ternary surface complexes may also represent precursors required for the nucleation of uranyl phosphate minerals; similar processes may occur in the uranyl silicate system. Major knowledge gaps still exist in our understanding of how these processes occur in complex subsurface materials rather than controlled laboratory systems and the dominant chemical controls on specific adsorption and precipitation processes in contaminated soils and sediments. In addition, contaminated sediments in contact with aqueous uranium concentrations near water quality standards often have solid phase concentrations in ranges that make characterization of sorption mechanisms challenging. Novel combinations of analytical methods are needed to overcome this challenge to understanding the mineral-water interface processes that control uranium fate in the environment.

  14. Effects of conditioning temperature and time during the pelleting process on feed molecular structure, pellet durability index, and metabolic features of co-products from bio-oil processing in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuewei; Christensen, Colleen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to systematically determine effects of conditioning temperature (70, 80, and 90°C), time (50 and 75 s), and interaction (temperature × time) during the pelleting process on co-products from bio-oil processing (canola meal) in terms of processing-induced changes on (1) protein molecular structure, (2) pellet durability index, (3) detailed chemical profile, (4) metabolic features and fractions of protein and carbohydrate, (5) total digestible nutrients and energy values, and (6) rumen degradable and undegradable content. Pellet durability was increased with increasing conditioning time. Chemical and carbohydrate profiles of co-products were not altered by pelleting process under different conditioning temperatures and times. With regard to protein fraction profiles, pellets conditioned for 50 s had higher soluble crude protein (SCP) and lower neutral detergent insoluble crude protein (NDICP) contents than those conditioned for 75 s (21.7 vs. 20.1% SCP, 16.0 vs. 16.5% NDICP, respectively). Total digestible nutrients and energy values were not altered by processing. Samples conditioned for 50 s had a higher content of rapidly degradable protein fraction (PA2) than those conditioned for 75 s (21.7 vs. 21.1% crude protein). In addition, the slowly degradable true protein fraction (PB2) was affected by the interaction of conditioning temperature and time. However, carbohydrate fractions did not differ with different conditioning temperatures and time. Different temperatures and time of conditioning during pelleting process greatly affect protein profiles without altering carbohydrate profiles. Molecular structure analyses also showed that pelleting altered inherent protein molecular structures of the co-products from bio-oil processing. Future study is needed to detect how molecular structure changes affect nutrient availability in dairy cattle. PMID:25958276

  15. Inhibition of GM3 Synthase Attenuates Neuropathology of Niemann-Pick Disease Type C by Affecting Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Lee, Jong Kil; Bae, Yong Chul; Yang, Song Hyun; Okino, Nozomu; Schuchman, Edward H.; Yamashita, Tadashi; Bae, Jae-sung; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2014-01-01

    In several lysosomal storage disorders, including Niemann-Pick disease Type C (NP-C), sphingolipids, including glycosphingolipids, particularly gangliosides, are the predominant storage materials in the brain, raising the possibility that accumulation of these lipids may be involved in the NP-C neurodegenerative process. However, correlation of these accumulations and NP-C neuropathology has not been fully characterized. Here we derived NP-C mice with complete and partial deletion of the Siat9 (encoding GM3 synthase) gene in order to investigate the role of ganglioside in NP-C pathogenesis. According to our results, NPC mice with homozygotic deletion of GM3 synthase exhibited an enhanced neuropathological phenotype and died significantly earlier than NP-C mice. Notably, in contrast to complete depletion, NP-C mice with partial deletion of the GM3 synthase gene showed ameliorated NP-C neuropathology, including motor disability, demyelination, and abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids. These findings indicate the crucial role of GM3 synthesis in the NP-C phenotype and progression of CNS pathologic abnormality, suggesting that well-controlled inhibition of GM3 synthesis could be used as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:24599001

  16. Inhibition of GM3 synthase attenuates neuropathology of Niemann-Pick disease Type C. by affecting sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Lee, Jong Kil; Bae, Yong Chul; Yang, Song Hyun; Okino, Nozomu; Schuchman, Edward H; Yamashita, Tadashi; Bae, Jae-Sung; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2014-02-01

    In several lysosomal storage disorders, including Niemann-Pick disease Type C (NP-C), sphingolipids, including glycosphingolipids, particularly gangliosides, are the predominant storage materials in the brain, raising the possibility that accumulation of these lipids may be involved in the NP-C neurodegenerative process. However, correlation of these accumulations and NP-C neuropathology has not been fully characterized. Here we derived NP-C mice with complete and partial deletion of the Siat9 (encoding GM3 synthase) gene in order to investigate the role of ganglioside in NP-C pathogenesis. According to our results, NPC mice with homozygotic deletion of GM3 synthase exhibited an enhanced neuropathological phenotype and died significantly earlier than NP-C mice. Notably, in contrast to complete depletion, NP-C mice with partial deletion of the GM3 synthase gene showed ameliorated NP-C neuropathology, including motor disability, demyelination, and abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids. These findings indicate the crucial role of GM3 synthesis in the NP-C phenotype and progression of CNS pathologic abnormality, suggesting that well-controlled inhibition of GM3 synthesis could be used as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:24599001

  17. Gas transport processes in sea ice: How convection and diffusion processes might affect biological imprints, a challenge for modellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tison, J.-L.; Zhou, J.; Thomas, D. N.; Rysgaard, S.; Eicken, H.; Crabeck, O.; Deleu, F.; Delille, B.

    2012-04-01

    Recent data from a year-round survey of landfast sea ice growth in Barrow (Alaska) have shown how O2/N2 and O2/Ar ratios could be used to pinpoint primary production in sea ice and derive net productivity rates from the temporal evolution of the oxygen concentration at a given depth within the sea ice cover. These rates were however obtained surmising that neither convection, nor diffusion had affected the gas concentration profiles in the ice between discrete ice core collections. This paper discusses examples from three different field surveys (the above-mentioned Barrow experiment, the INTERICE IV tank experiment in Hamburg and a short field survey close to the Kapisilit locality in the South-East Greenland fjords) where convection or diffusion processes have clearly affected the temporal evolution of the gas profiles in the ice, therefore potentially affecting biological signatures. The INTERICE IV and Barrow experiment show that the initial equilibrium dissolved gas entrapment within the skeletal layer basically governs most of the profiles higher up in the sea ice cover during the active sea ice growth. However, as the ice layers age and cool down under the temperature gradient, bubble nucleation occurs while the concentration in the ice goes well above the theoretical one, calculated from brine equilibrium under temperature and salinity changes and observed brine volumes. This phase change locks the gases within the sea ice structure, preventing "degassing" of the ice, as is observed for salts under the mushy layer brine convection process. In some cases, mainly in the early stages of the freezing process (first 10-20 cm) where temperature gradients are strong and the ice still permeable on its whole thickness, repeated convection and bubble nucleation can actually increase the gas concentration in the ice above the one initially acquired within the skeletal layer. Convective processes will also occur on ice decay, when ice permeability is restored and the Rayleigh number reaches a critical value. The Barrow data set shows that these events, can be strong enough to redistribute the gases within the sea ice cover, including in the gaseous form. Diffusive processes will become dominant once internal melting is strong enough to stratify the brine network within the ice. In the Kapisilit case, the regular decrease of an internal gas peak intensity due to external forcing during ice growth (change of water type) has allowed us to deduce gas diffusivities from the temporal evolution of the peak. The values fit to the few previous estimates from experimental work, and lie close to diffusivity values in water. Finally, at the end of the decay phase, when the temperature profile is isothermal, the whole ice cover returns to ice concentrations equivalent to those calculated using gas solubility in water and observed brine volumes, to the exception of the very surface layer, generally for textural reasons.

  18. An Intact Social Cognitive Process in Schizophrenia: Situational Context Effects on Perception of Facial Affect

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junghee; Kern, Robert S.; Harvey, Philippe-Olivier; Horan, William P.; Kee, Kimmy S.; Ochsner, Kevin; Penn, David L.; Green, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Impaired facial affect recognition is the most consistent social cognitive finding in schizophrenia. Although social situations provide powerful constraints on our perception, little is known about how situational context modulates facial affect recognition in schizophrenia. Methods Study 1 was a single-site study with 34 schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls. Study 2 was a 2-site study with 68 schizophrenia patients and 28 controls. Both studies administered a Situational Context Facial Affect Recognition Task with 2 conditions: a situational context condition and a no-context condition. For the situational context condition, a briefly shown face was preceded by a sentence describing either a fear- or surprise-inducing event. In the no-context condition, a face was presented without a sentence. For both conditions, subjects rated how fearful or surprised the face appeared on a 9-point Likert scale. Results For the situational context condition of study 1, both patients and controls rated faces as more afraid when they were paired with fear-inducing sentences and as more surprised when they were paired with surprise-inducing sentences. The degree of modulation was comparable across groups. For the no-context condition, patients rated faces comparably to controls. The findings of study 2 replicated those from study 1. Conclusions Despite previous abnormalities in other types of context paradigms, this study found intact situational context processing in schizophrenia, suggesting that patients benefit from situational context when interpreting ambiguous facial expression. This area of relative social cognitive strength in schizophrenia has implications for social cognitive training programs. PMID:22532704

  19. General anesthesia as a possible GABAergic modulator affects visual processing in children

    PubMed Central

    Van den Boomen, C.; de Graaff, J. C.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.; Kalkman, C. J.; Kemner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) inhibitory interneurons play an important role in visual processing, as is revealed by studies administering drugs in human and monkey adults. Investigating this process in children requires different methodologies, due to ethical considerations. The current study aimed to investigate whether a new method, being general anesthesia using Sevoflurane, can be used to trace the effects of GABAergic modulation on visual brain functioning in children. To this aim, visual processing was investigated in children aged 4–12 years who were scheduled for minor urologic procedures under general anesthesia in day-care treatment. In a visual segmentation task, the difference in Event-Related Potential (ERP) response to homogeneous and textured stimuli was investigated. In addition, psychophysical performance on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Results were compared between before and shortly after anesthesia. In two additional studies, effects at 1 day after anesthesia and possible effects of task-repetition were investigated. ERP results showed longer latency and lower amplitude of the Texture Negativity (TN) component shortly after compared to before anesthesia. No effects of anesthesia on psychophysical measurements were found. No effects at 1 day after anesthesia or of repetition were revealed either. These results show that GABAergic modulation through general anesthesia affects ERP reflections of visual segmentation in a similar way in children as benzodiazepine does in adults, but that effects are not permanent. This demonstrates that ERP measurement after anesthesia is a successful method to study effects of GABAergic modulation in children. PMID:23630461

  20. Benzo[a]pyrene affects Jurkat T cells in the activated state via the antioxidant response element dependent Nrf2 pathway leading to decreased IL-2 secretion and redirecting glutamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Rockstroh, Maxie; Wagner, Juliane [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Baumann, Sven [Department of Metabolomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Schorsch, Katrin [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina [Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Bergen, Martin von [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Tomm, Janina M., E-mail: Janina.tomm@ufz.de [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    There is a clear evidence that environmental pollutants, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), can have detrimental effects on the immune system, whereas the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Jurkat T cells share many properties with native T lymphocytes and therefore are an appropriate model to analyze the effects of environmental pollutants on T cells and their activation. Since environmental compounds frequently occur at low, not acute toxic concentrations, we analyzed the effects of two subtoxic concentrations, 50 nM and 5 ?M, on non- and activated cells. B[a]P interferes directly with the stimulation process as proven by an altered IL-2 secretion. Furthermore, B[a]P exposure results in significant proteomic changes as shown by DIGE analysis. Pathway analysis revealed an involvement of the AhR independent Nrf2 pathway in the altered processes observed in unstimulated and stimulated cells. A participation of the Nrf2 pathway in the change of IL-2 secretion was confirmed by exposing cells to the Nrf2 activator tBHQ. tBHQ and 5 ?M B[a]P caused similar alterations of IL-2 secretion and glutamine/glutamate metabolism. Moreover, the proteome changes in unstimulated cells point towards a modified regulation of the cytoskeleton and cellular stress response, which was proven by western blotting. Additionally, there is a strong evidence for alterations in metabolic pathways caused by B[a]P exposure in stimulated cells. Especially the glutamine/glutamate metabolism was indicated by proteome pathway analysis and validated by metabolite measurements. The detrimental effects were slightly enhanced in stimulated cells, suggesting that stimulated cells are more vulnerable to the environmental pollutant model compound B[a]P. - Highlights: • B[a]P affects the proteome of Jurkat T cells also at low concentrations. • Exposure to B[a]P (50 nM, 5 ?M) did not change Jurkat T cell viability. • Both B[a]P concentrations altered the IL-2 secretion of stimulated cells. • 608 different protein spots of Jurkat T cells were quantified using 2-DE-DIGE. • Pathway analysis identified Nrf2 and AhR pathway as regulated.

  1. Combined enzymatic and high-pressure processing affect cell wall polysaccharides in berries.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Hauke; Lille, Martina; Poutanen, Kaisa; Schols, Henk A; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2006-02-22

    The effect of high-pressure processing (HPP) on cell wall polysaccharides in berries was investigated. HPP decreased the degree of methyl esterification (DM), probably by activation of pectin methyl esterase (PME), and improved the extractability of pectins. When commercial enzyme mixtures were added to mashed berries, a synergistic effect was observed between treatment with commercial enzymes and HPP. Compared to treatment at atmospheric pressure, pectic polysaccharides were degraded to a larger extent when HPP was used. In contrast, hemicelluloses were hardly affected by the added enzymes when HPP was included, although they were degraded during similar treatment at atmospheric pressure. Additionally, the activity of rhamnose-releasing enzymes present in minor quantities might be enhanced after HPP, resulting in a decrease of rhamnose in the polymeric cell wall material. These results exploring the effect of HPP at representative conditions clearly point out the potential of HPP for polysaccharide modification. PMID:16478255

  2. Patterns of endogenous gangliosides and metabolic processing of exogenous gangliosides in cerebellar granule cells during differentiation in culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Riboni; Alessandro Prinetti; Marina Pitto; Guido Tettamanti

    1990-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative pattern of endogenous gangliosides and the routes of metabolic processing of exogenous GM1,3H labeled in the sphingosine moiety (Sph-3H GM1) were studied in cerebellar granule cells during differentiation in vitro. During the first 7–8 days in culture the ganglioside content markedly increased, and the qualitative pattern showed, in percentage terms, a drastic decrease of GD3 and

  3. Inhibition of glucose metabolism sensitizes tumor cells to death receptor-triggered apoptosis through enhancement of death-inducing signaling complex formation and apical procaspase-8 processing.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Ruiz-Ruiz, Carmen; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Palacios, Carmen; López-Rivas, Abelardo

    2003-04-11

    Tumors display a high rate of glucose uptake and glycolysis. We investigated how inhibition of glucose metabolism could affect death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human tumor cells of diverse origin. We show that both substitution of glucose for pyruvate and treatment with 2-deoxyglucose enhanced apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, CD95 agonistic antibody, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Inhibition of glucose metabolism enhanced killing of myeloid leukemia U937, cervical carcinoma HeLa, and breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells upon death receptor ligation. Caspase activation, mitochondrial depolarization, and cytochrome c release were increased under these conditions. Glucose deprivation-mediated sensitization to apoptosis was prevented in MCF-7 cells overexpressing BCL-2. Interestingly, the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line SKW6.4, a prototype for mitochondria-independent death receptor-induced apoptosis, was also sensitized to anti-CD95 and TRAIL-induced apoptosis under glucose-free conditions. Changes in c-FLIP(L) and cFLIPs levels were observed in some but not all the cell lines studied following glucose deprivation. Glucose deprivation enhanced death receptor-triggered formation of death-inducing signaling complex and early processing of procaspase-8. Altogether, these results suggest that the glycolytic pathway may be an important target for therapeutic intervention to sensitize tumor cells to selectively toxic soluble death ligands or death ligand-expressing cells of the immune system by facilitating the activation of initiator caspase-8. PMID:12556444

  4. Equine Metabolic Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Frank

    2009-01-01

    Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is important because of its association with laminitis. Obesity and insulin resistance are two important components of EMS, and the underlying cause of this syndrome is likely to be enhanced metabolic efficiency. Affected horses are often referred to as “easy keepers” because they require fewer calories to maintain body condition, and enhanced metabolic efficiency is an

  5. Reproductive and stress hormone levels in goldfish ( Carassius auratus) exposed to oil sands process-affected water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lister; V. Nero; A. Farwell; D. G. Dixon; G. Van Der Kraak

    2008-01-01

    Athabasca oil sands mining in northern Alberta produces process-affected waters that are characterized by the presence of naphthenic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high salinity. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of these process-affected waters on reproductive and stress related endpoints in mature goldfish, Carassius auratus. In two separate studies, testosterone and 17?-estradiol levels in the

  6. Lipid metabolism in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyu; Daniels, Garrett; Lee, Peng; Monaco, Marie E

    2014-01-01

    The malignant transformation of cells requires adaptations across multiple metabolic processes to satisfy the energy required for their increased rate of proliferation. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism has been a hallmark of the malignant phenotype; increased lipid accumulation secondary to changes in the levels of a variety of lipid metabolic enzymes has been documented in a variety of tumors, including prostate. Alterations in prostate lipid metabolism include upregulation of several lipogenic enzymes as well as of enzymes that function to oxidize fatty acids as an energy source. Cholesterol metabolism and phospholipid metabolism are also affected. With respect to lipogenesis, most studies have concentrated on increased expression and activity ofthe de novo fatty acid synthesis enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FASN), with suggestions that FASN might function as an oncogene. A central role for fatty acid oxidation in supplying energy to the prostate cancer cell is supported by the observation that the peroxisomal enzyme, ?-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), which facilitates the transformation of branched chain fatty acids to a form suitable for ?-oxidation, is highly overexpressed in prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Exploitation of the alterations in lipid metabolic pathways in prostate cancer could result in the development of new therapeutic modalities as well as provide candidates for new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AMACR has already proven to be a valuable biomarker in distinguishing normal from malignant prostate tissue, and is used routinely in clinical practice. PMID:25374912

  7. Dietary strawberry seed oil affects metabolite formation in the distal intestine and ameliorates lipid metabolism in rats fed an obesogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Jurgo?ski, Adam; Fotschki, Bartosz; Ju?kiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To answer the question whether dietary strawberry seed oil rich in ?-linolenic acid and linoleic acid (29.3 and 47.2% of total fatty acids, respectively) can beneficially affect disorders induced by the consumption of an obesogenic diet. Design Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of eight animals each and fed with a basal or obesogenic (high in fat and low in fiber) diet that contained either strawberry seed oil or an edible rapeseed oil. A two-way analysis of variance was then applied to assess the effects of diet and oil and the interaction between them. Results After 8 weeks of feeding, the obesogenic diet increased the body weight and the liver mass and fat content, whereas decreased the cecal acetate and butyrate concentration. This diet also altered the plasma lipid profile and decreased the liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) content. However, the lowest liver SREBP-1c content was observed in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Moreover, dietary strawberry seed oil decreased the cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) regardless of the diet type, whereas the cecal ?-glucuronidase activity was considerably increased only in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Dietary strawberry seed oil also lowered the liver fat content, the plasma triglyceride level and the atherogenic index of plasma. Conclusions Strawberry seed oil has a potent lipid-lowering activity but can unfavorably affect microbial metabolism in the distal intestine. The observed effects are partly due to the synergistic action of the oil and the obesogenic diet. PMID:25636326

  8. Faces in Context: A Review and Systematization of Contextual Influences on Affective Face Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Brosch, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Facial expressions are of eminent importance for social interaction as they convey information about other individuals’ emotions and social intentions. According to the predominant “basic emotion” approach, the perception of emotion in faces is based on the rapid, automatic categorization of prototypical, universal expressions. Consequently, the perception of facial expressions has typically been investigated using isolated, de-contextualized, static pictures of facial expressions that maximize the distinction between categories. However, in everyday life, an individual’s face is not perceived in isolation, but almost always appears within a situational context, which may arise from other people, the physical environment surrounding the face, as well as multichannel information from the sender. Furthermore, situational context may be provided by the perceiver, including already present social information gained from affective learning and implicit processing biases such as race bias. Thus, the perception of facial expressions is presumably always influenced by contextual variables. In this comprehensive review, we aim at (1) systematizing the contextual variables that may influence the perception of facial expressions and (2) summarizing experimental paradigms and findings that have been used to investigate these influences. The studies reviewed here demonstrate that perception and neural processing of facial expressions are substantially modified by contextual information, including verbal, visual, and auditory information presented together with the face as well as knowledge or processing biases already present in the observer. These findings further challenge the assumption of automatic, hardwired categorical emotion extraction mechanisms predicted by basic emotion theories. Taking into account a recent model on face processing, we discuss where and when these different contextual influences may take place, thus outlining potential avenues in future research. PMID:23130011

  9. Early Affective Processing in Patients with Acute Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Magnetoencephalographic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Wrenger, Marco; Kandil, Judith; Heuft, Gereon; Steinberg, Christian; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Background In chronic PTSD, a preattentive neural alarm system responds rapidly to emotional information, leading to increased prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation at early processing stages (<100 ms). Enhanced PFC responses are followed by a reduction in occipito-temporal activity during later processing stages. However, it remains unknown if this neuronal pattern is a result of a long lasting mental disorder or if it represents changes in brain function as direct consequences of severe trauma. Methodology The present study investigates early fear network activity in acutely traumatized patients with PTSD. It focuses on the question whether dysfunctions previously observed in chronic PTSD patients are already present shortly after trauma exposure. We recorded neuromagnetic activity towards emotional pictures in seven acutely traumatized PTSD patients between one and seven weeks after trauma exposure and compared brain responses to a balanced healthy control sample. Inverse modelling served for mapping sources of differential activation in the brain. Principal Findings Compared to the control group, acutely traumatized PTSD patients showed an enhanced PFC response to high-arousing pictures between 60 to 80 ms. This rapid prefrontal hypervigilance towards arousing pictorial stimuli was sustained during 120–300 ms, where it was accompanied by a reduced affective modulation of occipito-temporal neural processing. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the hypervigilance-avoidance pattern seen in chronic PTSD is not necessarily a product of an endured mental disorder, but arises as an almost immediate result of severe traumatisation. Thus, traumatic experiences can influence emotion processing strongly, leading to long-lasting changes in trauma network activation and expediting a chronic manifestation of maladaptive cognitive and behavioral symptoms. PMID:23977010

  10. A High-Fat Diet Differentially Affects the Gut Metabolism and Blood Lipids of Rats Depending on the Type of Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Jurgo?ski, Adam; Ju?kiewicz, Jerzy; Zdu?czyk, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this model study was to investigate how selected gut functions and serum lipid profile in rats on high-fat diets differed according to the type of fat (saturated vs. unsaturated) and carbohydrate (simple vs. complex). The experiment was conducted using 32 male Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups of 8 animals each. For 4 weeks, the animals were fed group-specific diets that were either rich in lard or soybean oil (16% of the diet) as the source of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, respectively; further, each lard- and soybean oil-rich diet contained either fructose or corn starch (45.3% of the diet) as the source of simple or complex carbohydrates, respectively. Both dietary factors contributed to changes in the caecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, especially to the butyrate concentration, which was higher in rats fed lard- and corn starch-rich diets compared to soybean oil- and fructose-rich diets, respectively. The lowest butyrate concentration was observed in rats fed the soybean oil- and fructose-rich diet. On the other hand, the lard- and fructose-rich diet vs. the other dietary combinations significantly increased serum total cholesterol concentration, to more than two times serum triglyceride concentration and to more than five times the atherogenic index. In conclusion, a high-fat diet rich in fructose can unfavorably affect gut metabolism when unsaturated fats are predominant in the diet or the blood lipids when a diet is rich in saturated fats. PMID:24496299

  11. Do Problems with Information Processing Affect the Process of Psychotherapy for Adults with Learning Disabilities or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosden, Merith; Patz, Sarah; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Problems in processing information can affect psychosocial functioning. Psychotherapy can be used to address psychosocial problems; however, the same information-processing problems that contribute to disabilities, such as learning disabilities (LD) or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly deficits in auditory processing…

  12. Pseudomonads biodegradation of aromatic compounds in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-07-15

    Aromatic naphthenic acids (NAs) have been shown to be more toxic than the classical NAs found in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). To reduce this toxicity, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida were used to determine their ability to biodegrade aromatic compounds including treatments considering the impacts of external carbon and iron addition. Results showed that with added carbon P. fluorescens and P. putida have the capability of biodegrading these aromatics. In the presence of external carbon, gene expression of a functional PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD?) was determined through reverse transcription real-time PCR, suggesting active degradation of OSPW aromatic compounds. Although no significant classical NAs removal was observed during this process, toxicity was reduced by 49.3% under optimal conditions. OSPW toxicity was eliminated with the combination of ozonation at a dose of 80 mg/L followed by biodegradation, indicating that it is a promising combined OSPW treatment approach for the safe discharge to the aquatic environment. PMID:25828413

  13. Petroleum coke adsorption as a water management option for oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Zubot, Warren; MacKinnon, Michael D; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Smith, Daniel W; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2012-06-15

    Water is integral to both operational and environmental aspects of the oil sands industry. A water treatment option based on the use of petroleum coke (PC), a by-product of bitumen upgrading, was examined as an opportunity to reduce site oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) inventories and net raw water demand. Changes in OSPW quality when treated with PC included increments in pH levels and concentrations of vanadium, molybdenum, and sulphate. Constituents that decreased in concentration after PC adsorption included total acid-extractable organics (TAO), bicarbonate, calcium, barium, magnesium, and strontium. Changes in naphthenic acids (NAs) speciation were observed after PC adsorption. A battery of bioassays was used to measure the OSPW toxicity. The results indicated that untreated OSPW was toxic towards Vibrio fischeri and rainbow trout. However, OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not acutely toxic towards these test organisms. Removal of TAO was found to be an adsorption process, fitting the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models. For TAO concentrations of 60 mg/L, adsorption capacities ranged between 0.1 and 0.46 mg/g. This study demonstrates that freshly produced PC from fluid cokers provides an effective treatment of OSPW in terms of key constituents' removal and toxicity reduction. PMID:22575375

  14. Discourse Goals Affect the Process and Product of Nominal Metaphor Production.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Akira; Sakamoto, Maki

    2014-06-13

    Although a large number of studies have addressed metaphor comprehension, only a few attempts have so far been made at exploring the process of metaphor production. Therefore, in this paper, we address the problem of how people generate nominal metaphors or identify an apt vehicle for a given topic of nominal metaphors. Specifically, we examine how the process and product of metaphor production differ between two discourse goals of metaphor, namely an explanatory purpose (e.g., to clarify) and a literary purpose (e.g., to aesthetically pleasing). Experiment 1 analyzed the metaphors (or vehicles) generated in the metaphor production task, and demonstrated that people identified more prototypical exemplars of the property to be attributed to the topic as a vehicle for explanatory metaphors than for literary metaphors. In addition, it was found that metaphors generated for the explanatory purpose were more apt and conventional, and had high topic-vehicle similarity than those generated for the literary purpose, while metaphors generated for the literary purpose were more familiar and imageable than those for the explanatory purpose. Experiment 2 used a priming paradigm to assess the online availability of prototypical and less prototypical members of the topic property during metaphor production. The result was that both prototypical and less prototypical members were activated in producing literary metaphors, while neither members were activated in the production of explanatory metaphors. These findings indicate that the process of metaphor production is affected by discourse goals of metaphor; less prototypical members of the category are searched for a vehicle during the production of literary metaphors, and thus literary metaphors are generated with less prototypical vehicles than explanatory metaphors. PMID:24924472

  15. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of extracellular matrix products and bioscaffolds of tissue engineering. PMID:24555005

  16. Generic plasmid DNA production platform incorporating low metabolic burden seed-stock and fed-batch fermentation processes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Langtry, Sarah; Anderson, Sheryl; Hodgson, Clague P; Carnes, Aaron E

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccines have tremendous potential for rapid deployment in pandemic applications, wherein a new antigen is ‘plugged’ into a validated vector, and rapidly produced in a validated, fermentation - purification process. For this application, it is essential that the vector and fermentation process function with a variety of different antigen genes. However, many antigen genes are unpredictably ‘toxic’ or otherwise low yielding in standard fermentation processes. We report cell bank and fermentation process unit operation innovations that reduce plasmid-mediated metabolic burden, enabling successful production of previously known toxic influenza hemagglutinin antigen genes. These processes, combined with vector backbone modifications, doubled fermentation productivity compared to existing high copy vectors, such as pVAX1 and gWIZ, resulting in high plasmid yields (up to 2220 mg/L, 5% of total dry cell weight) even with previously identified toxic or poor producing inserts. PMID:19408315

  17. Advances in Understanding Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapanagioti, H. K.; Werner, D.; Werth, C.

    2012-04-01

    The results of a call for a special issue that is now in press by the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology will be presented. This special issue is edited by the authors and is entitled "Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface". A short abstract of each paper will be presented along with the most interesting results. Nine papers were accepted. Pollutants studied include: biocolloids, metals (arsenic, chromium, nickel), organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, micropollutants (PAHs, PCBs), pesticides (glyphosate, 2,4-D). Findings presented in the papers include a modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive transport problems of metals. Column studies along with theoretical approximations evaluate the combined effects of grain size and pore water velocity on the transport in water saturated porous media of three biocolloids. A polluted sediment remediation method is evaluated considering site-specific conditions through monitoring results and modelling. A field study points to glogging and also sorption as mechanisms affecting the effectiveness of sub-surface flow constructed wetlands. A new isotherm model combining modified traditionally used isotherms is proposed that can be used to simulate pH-dependent metal adsorption. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) demonstrate ability to predict slight isotope shifts into the groundwater due to sorption. Possible modifications that improve the reliability of kinetic models and parameter values during the evaluation of experiments that assess the sorption of pesticides on soils are tested. Challenges in selecting groundwater pollutant fate and transport models that account for the effect of grain-scale sorption rate limitations are evaluated based on experimental results and are discussed based on the Damköhler number. Finally, a thorough review paper presents the impact of mineral micropores on the transport and fate of organic contaminants especially when the porous geological media have very low organic carbon contents.

  18. Cholinesterase-Targeting microRNAs Identified in silico Affect Specific Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hanin, Geula; Soreq, Hermona

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as important gene silencers affecting many target mRNAs. Here, we report the identification of 244 miRs that target the 3?-untranslated regions of different cholinesterase transcripts: 116 for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), 47 for the synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) splice variant, and 81 for the normally rare splice variant AChE-R. Of these, 11 and 6 miRs target both AChE-S and AChE-R, and AChE-R and BChE transcripts, respectively. BChE and AChE-S showed no overlapping miRs, attesting to their distinct modes of miR regulation. Generally, miRs can suppress a number of targets; thereby controlling an entire battery of functions. To evaluate the importance of the cholinesterase-targeted miRs in other specific biological processes we searched for their other experimentally validated target transcripts and analyzed the gene ontology enriched biological processes these transcripts are involved in. Interestingly, a number of the resulting categories are also related to cholinesterases. They include, for BChE, response to glucocorticoid stimulus, and for AChE, response to wounding and two child terms of neuron development: regulation of axonogenesis and regulation of dendrite morphogenesis. Importantly, all of the AChE-targeting miRs found to be related to these selected processes were directed against the normally rare AChE-R splice variant, with three of them, including the neurogenesis regulator miR-132, also directed against AChE-S. Our findings point at the AChE-R splice variant as particularly susceptible to miR regulation, highlight those biological functions of cholinesterases that are likely to be subject to miR post-transcriptional control, demonstrate the selectivity of miRs in regulating specific biological processes, and open new venues for targeted interference with these specific processes. PMID:22007158

  19. Positive affect and health-related neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, and inflammatory processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Steptoe; Jane Wardle; Michael Marmot

    2005-01-01

    Negative affective states such as depression are associated with premature mortality and increased risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and disability. It has been suggested that positive affective states are protective, but the pathways through which such effects might be mediated are poorly understood. Here we show that positive affect in middle-aged men and women is associated with

  20. Speech anxiety affects how people prepare speeches: A protocol analysis of the preparation processes of speakers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Daly; Anita L. Vangelisti; David J. Weber

    1995-01-01

    Why does public speaking anxiety lead people to present speeches of judged lower quality? Prior research suggests a number of variables that might detrimentally affect the performance of highly anxious speakers when they present speeches. But does speech anxiety affect only presentation behavior, or does it also affect the ways in which people prepare their speeches? Measures of public speaking

  1. Suspense, curiosity, and surprise: How discourse structure influences the affective and cognitive processing of a story

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Hoeken; Mario van Vliet

    2000-01-01

    The structural affect theory (Brewer and Lichtenstein, 1982) states that different affective responses can be evoked by manipulating the order in which a story's events are narrated. Suspense is evoked by postponing the story's outcome, curiosity is evoked by presenting the outcome before the preceding events, and surprise is evoked by an unexpected event. Apart from evoking different affective responses,

  2. Oviposition in land snails requires the successful completion of several metabolically costly processes, including oogenesis,

    E-print Network

    Chase, Ronald

    the optimized conditions of a breeding farm, only 13% of snails Helix aspersa oviposit more than once every of Biologists Ltd doi:10.1242/jeb.00625 Because oviposition in the land snail Helix aspersa is a metabolically). Clutch sizes in H. aspersa vary considerably between populations and under different conditions

  3. Family-Based Processes Associated with Adolescent Distress, Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior in Families Affected by Maternal HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A.; Bursch, Brenda; Rice, Eric; Green, Sara; Penniman, Typhanye; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated how maternal HIV and mediating family processes are associated with adolescent distress, substance use, and risky sexual behavior. Mother-adolescent (ages 12-21) dyads (N = 264) were recruited from neighborhoods where the HIV-affected families resided (161 had mothers with HIV). Mediating family processes were youth…

  4. The effects of pretreatment on nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membrane filtration for desalination of oil sands process-affected water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun-Sik Kim; Yang Liu; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

    2011-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is largely produced from the oil sands operational process and requires the removal of toxicants for reuse. Nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane applications can be used to remove salt ions from OSPW. However, membrane treatments of OSPW are impeded by membrane fouling due to suspended solids; therefore, feed water must be pretreated to

  5. Soil biota can change after exotic plant invasion: Does this affect ecosystem processes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Sherrod, S.K.; Moldenke, A.

    2005-01-01

    Invasion of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum into stands of the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii significantly reduced the abundance of soil biota, especially microarthropods and nematodes. Effects of invasion on active and total bacterial and fungal biomass were variable, although populations generally increased after 50+ years of invasion. The invasion of Bromus also resulted in a decrease in richness and a species shift in plants, microarthropods, fungi, and nematodes. However, despite the depauperate soil fauna at the invaded sites, no effects were seen on cellulose decomposition rates, nitrogen mineralization rates, or vascular plant growth. When Hilaria was planted into soils from not-invaded, recently invaded, and historically invaded sites (all currently or once dominated by Hilaria), germination and survivorship were not affected. In contrast, aboveground Hilaria biomass was significantly greater in recently invaded soils than in the other two soils. We attributed the Hilaria response to differences in soil nutrients present before the invasion, especially soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as these nutrients were elevated in the soils that produced the greatest Hilaria biomass. Our data suggest that it is not soil biotic richness per se that determines soil process rates or plant productivity, but instead that either (1) the presence of a few critical soil food web taxa can keep ecosystem function high, (2) nutrient loss is very slow in this ecosystem, and/or (3) these processes are microbially driven. However, the presence of Bromus may reduce key soil nutrients over time and thus may eventually suppress native plant success. ?? 2005 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Power generation and oil sands process-affected water treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongdong; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), a product of bitumen isolation in the oil sands industry, is a source of pollution if not properly treated. In present study, OSPW treatment and voltage generation were examined in a single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) under the effect of inoculated carbon source and temperature. OSPW treatment with an anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFC (AS-MFC) generated 0.55 ± 0.025 V, whereas an MFC inoculated with mature-fine tailings (MFT-MFC) generated 0.41 ± 0.01 V. An additional carbon source (acetate) significantly improved generated voltage. The voltage detected increased to 20-23% in MFCs when the condition was switched from ambient to mesophilic. The mesophilic condition increased OSPW treatment efficiency in terms of lowering the chemical oxygen demand and acid-extractable organics. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbial consortia revealed that Proteobacteria were the most abundant in MFCs and microbial communities in the AS-MFC were more diverse than those in the MFT-MFC. PMID:25103035

  7. Exercise testing in metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic myopathies are a group of genetic disorders specifically affecting glucose/glycogen, lipid, and mitochondrial metabolism. The main metabolic myopathies that are evaluated in this article are the mitochondrial myopathies, fatty acid oxidation defects, and glycogen storage disease. This article focuses on the usefulness of exercise in the evaluation of genetic metabolic myopathies. PMID:22239882

  8. Trait-based affective processes in alcohol-involved "risk behaviors".

    PubMed

    Wray, Tyler B; Simons, Jeffrey S; Dvorak, Robert D; Gaher, Raluca M

    2012-11-01

    This study tested a theoretical model of alcohol use, markers of extreme intoxication, and risk behavior as a function of trait affect, distress tolerance, and affect-based behavior dysregulation. Positive affective pathways to risk behavior were primarily expected to be indirect via high levels of alcohol use, while negative affect paths were expected to be more directly associated with engagement in risk behavior. In addition, we expected trait affectivity and distress tolerance would primarily exhibit relationships with alcohol use and problems through behavioral dysregulation occurring during extreme affective states. To evaluate these hypotheses, we tested a SEM with three alcohol-related outcomes: "Typical" alcohol use, "blackout" drinking, and risk behavior. High trait negative affect and low tolerance for affective distress contribute to difficulty controlling behavior when negatively aroused and this is directly associated with increased risk behavior when drinking. In contrast, associations between positive urgency and risk behaviors are indirect via increased alcohol consumption. Positive affectivity exhibited both inverse and positive effects in the model, with the net effect on alcohol outcomes being insignificant. These findings contribute important information about the distinct pathways between affect, alcohol use, and alcohol-involved risk behavior among college students. PMID:22770825

  9. Quality of mini-peeled carrots as affected by genotype, minimal processing and edible coating 

    E-print Network

    Dewi, Tjin Tjin

    1995-01-01

    , soluble phenolics, carotenoids, headspace gases, and sugar content of mini-peeled carrots as affected by genotype and storage in modified atmosphere packages. 25 Volatile terpenoid levels (ppm x 500) in mini-peeled carrots as affected by genotype... and storage in modified atmosphere packages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sensory attributes of mini-peeled carrots as affected by genotype and storage in modified atmosphere packages. . 39 Effects of Nature Seal edible coating...

  10. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  11. Dendritic cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Edward J.; Everts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The past 15 years have seen enormous advances in our understanding of the receptor and signalling systems that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to respond to pathogens or other danger signals and initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. We are now beginning to appreciate that many of these pathways not only stimulate changes in the expression of genes that control DC immune functions, but also affect metabolic pathways, thereby integrating the cellular requirements of the activation process. In this Review, we focus on this relatively new area of research and attempt to describe an integrated view of DC immunometabolism. PMID:25534620

  12. EBPR using crude glycerol: assessing process resiliency and exploring metabolic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Coats, Erik R; Dobroth, Zachary T; Brinkman, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is predicated on exposing bacteria to cyclical anaerobic/aerobic environments while providing volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Combined, this environment enriches for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and induces metabolisms to ensure excess phosphorus removal. Crude glycerol (CG), a byproduct of biodiesel manufacturing, is an alternate waste stream that could be substituted to achieve excess phosphorus removal; research into the use of CG yielded unexpected findings. While CG was an excellent substrate to accomplish and/or help achieve excess phosphorus removal, CG-fed bacteria did not consistently exhibit theoretical EBPR metabolisms. Specifically, anaerobic phosphorus release was not required for successful EBPR; however, carbon cycling patterns were consistent with theory. Analysis of results suggests that PAOs will first leverage carbon to generate energy anaerobically; only as needed will the bacteria utilize polyphosphate reserves anaerobically. Results also demonstrated that excess phosphorus removal can be achieved with a small fraction of PAOs. PMID:25630129

  13. Cortico-subcortical metabolic correlates of olfactory processing in healthy resting subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Marco; Micarelli, Alessandro; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio; Pagani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A wide network of interconnected areas was previously found in neuroimaging studies involving normal as well as pathological subjects; however literature seems to suffer from a lack of investigation in glucose metabolism behaviour under olfactory condition. Thus, the present work describe for the first time a pure olfactory related brain response of metabolism by using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computer Tomography in eleven resting subjects undergoing a neutral and a pure olfactory condition. By contrasting these experimental phases, it was possible to depict a re-organization pattern of default mode network structures in a relatively ecological environment. Moreover, by correlating such pattern with a battery of validated olfactory and neuropsychological tests, our work allowed in showing peculiar correlation data that could cluster the subjects sample in a certain range of normality. We believe the present study could integrate the current knowledge in olfactory research and could be a start-up for future contributions. PMID:24888510

  14. Composite chemical wastewater treatment by biofilm configured periodic discontinuous batch process operated in anaerobic metabolic function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Venkata Mohan; N. Chandrasekhara Rao; P. N. Sarma

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm configured system with sequencing\\/periodic discontinuous batch mode operation was studied in anaerobic metabolic function for the treatment of composite chemical wastewater (low-biodegradable [low BOD\\/COD ratio ?0.31] and sulfate content, 1.75g\\/l). Inert stone chips were used as biofilm supporting material. Reactor was operated with a total cycle period of 24h (FILL: 15min; REACT (aeration with recirculation): 23h; SETTLE: 30min; DECANT:

  15. The influence of hypoxia and metabolic inhibitors on the excitation process in atrio ventricular node

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kohlhardt; K. Haap

    1980-01-01

    Summary In small specimens prepared from the atrioventricular node of rabbits, the influence of hypoxia and metabolic inhibitors (Na-cyanide, 2.4 dinitrophenol, 2-desoxyglucose) on the av-node action potential was studied. The action potentials in these specimens proved to be of slow response type regardless of their origin, either the N or the NH-region of the node.1.Following superfusion with O2-poor Tyrode solution,

  16. Selective Processing and Metabolism of Disease-Causing Mutant Prion Proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aarthi Ashok; Ramanujan S. Hegde

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by aberrant metabolism of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). In genetic forms of these diseases, mutations in the globular C-terminal domain are hypothesized to favor the spontaneous generation of misfolded PrP conformers (including the transmissible PrPSc form) that trigger downstream pathways leading to neuronal death. A mechanistic understanding of these diseases therefore requires

  17. Latent Differential Equation Modeling of Self-Regulatory and Coregulatory Affective Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Joel S.; Ferrer, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    We examine emotion self-regulation and coregulation in romantic couples using daily self-reports of positive and negative affect. We fit these data using a damped linear oscillator model specified as a latent differential equation to investigate affect dynamics at the individual level and coupled influences for the 2 partners in each couple.…

  18. Rapid assessment of the toxicity of oil sands process-affected waters using fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Bryan; Vo, Nguyen T K; Kavanagh, Richard; Hanner, Robert; Mackinnon, Michael; Dixon, D George; Lee, Lucy E J

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable toxicity assessment of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) is needed to support oil sands reclamation projects. Conventional toxicity tests using whole animals are relatively slow, costly, and often subjective, while at the same time requiring the sacrifice of test organisms as is the case with lethal dosage/concentration assays. A nonlethal alternative, using fish cell lines, has been developed for its potential use in supporting oil sands reclamation planning and to help predict the viability of aquatic reclamation models such as end-pit lakes. This study employed six fish cell lines (WF-2, GFSk-S1, RTL-W1, RTgill-W1, FHML, FHMT) in 24 h viability assays for rapid fluorometric assessment of cellular integrity and functionality. Forty-nine test water samples collected from the surface of oil sands developments in the Athabasca Oil Sands deposit, north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, were evaluated in blind. Small subsample volumes (8 ml) were mixed with 2 ml of 5× concentrated exposure media and used for direct cell exposures. All cell line responses in terms of viability as measured by Alamar blue assay, correlated well with the naphthenic acids (NA) content in the samples (R (2) between 0.4519 and 0.6171; p<0.0001) when data comparisons were performed after the bioassays. NA or total acid-extractable organics group has been shown to be responsible for most of the acute toxicity of OSPW and our results further corroborate this. The multifish cell line bioassay provides a strong degree of reproducibility among tested cell lines and good relative sensitivity of the cell line bioassay as compared to available in vivo data that could lead to cost effective, high-throughput screening assays. PMID:23263937

  19. Characterization of oil sands process-affected waters by liquid chromatography orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alberto S; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Martin, Jonathan W

    2013-05-21

    Recovery of bitumen from oil sands in northern Alberta, Canada, occurs by surface mining or in situ thermal recovery, and both methods produce toxic oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). A new characterization strategy for surface mining OSPW (sm-OSPW) and in situ OSPW (is-OSPW) was achieved by combining liquid chromatography with orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS). In electrospray positive and negative ionization modes (ESI(+)/ESI(-)), mass spectral data were acquired with high resolving power (RP > 100,000-190,000) and mass accuracy (<2 ppm). The additional chromatographic resolution allowed for separation of various isomers and interference-free MS(n) experiments. Overall, ?3000 elemental compositions were revealed in each OSPW sample, corresponding to a range of heteroatom-containing homologue classes: Ox (where x = 1-6), NOx (where x = 1-4), SOx (where x = 1-4), NO?S, N, and S. Despite similarities between the OSPW samples at the level of heteroatom class, the two samples were very different when considering isomer patterns and double-bond equivalent profiles. The chromatographic separations also allowed for confirmation that, in both OSPW samples, the O? species detected in ESI(-) (i.e., naphthenic acids) were chemically distinct from the corresponding O? species detected in ESI(+). In comparison to model compounds, tandem MS spectra of these new O? species suggested a group of non-acidic compounds with dihydroxy, diketo, or ketohydroxy functionality. In light of the known endocrine-disrupting potential of sm-OSPW, the toxicity of these O? species deserves attention and the method should be further applied to environmental forensic analysis of water in the region. PMID:23607765

  20. Management type affects composition and facilitative processes in altoandine dry grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catorci, Andrea; Cesaretti, Sabrina; Velasquez, Jose Luis; Burrascano, Sabina; Zeballos, Horacio

    2013-10-01

    We performed our study in the Dry Puna of the southern Peruvian Andes. Through a comparative approach we aimed to assess the effects of the two management systems, low grazing pressure by wild camelids vs. high grazing pressure by domestic livestock and periodic burning. Our general hypothesis was that the traditional high disturbance regime affects the dry Puna species diversity and composition through modifications of the magnitude of plant-plant-interactions and changes of the community structure due to shifts in species dominance. In 40 plots of 10 × 10 m, the cover value of each species was recorded and the species richness, floristic diversity, and community similarity of each treatment were compared. For each disturbance regime, differences of soil features (organic matter, carbon/nitrogen ratio, and potassium content) were tested. To evaluate plant-plant interactions, 4 linear transect divided into 500 plots of 10 × 10 cm were laid out and co-occurrence analysis was performed. We found that different disturbance regimes were associated with differences in the floristic composition, and that the high disturbance condition had lower species diversity and evenness. A decrease of tall species such as Festuca orthophylla and increase of dwarf and spiny Tetraglochin cristatum shrubs was observed as well. In addition, different disturbance intensities caused differences in the functional composition of the plant communities, since species with avoidance strategies are selected by high grazing pressure. High disturbance intensity was also associated to differences of soil features and to different clumped spatial structure of the dry Puna. Our results indicate also that: positive interactions are often species-specific mainly depending on the features of nurse and beneficiary species; the importance of positive interaction is higher at low grazing pressure than at high disturbance intensity; the magnitude and direction of the herbivory-mediated facilitation processes may be traced back to the grazing pressure of wild camelids.

  1. Processing of Hand-Related Verbs Specifically Affects the Planning and Execution of Arm Reaching Movements

    PubMed Central

    Spadacenta, Silvia; Federico, Paolo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Even though a growing body of research has shown that the processing of action language affects the planning and execution of motor acts, several aspects of this interaction are still hotly debated. The directionality (i.e. does understanding action-related language induce a facilitation or an interference with the corresponding action?), the time course, and the nature of the interaction (i.e. under what conditions does the phenomenon occur?) are largely unclear. To further explore this topic we exploited a go/no-go paradigm in which healthy participants were required to perform arm reaching movements toward a target when verbs expressing either hand or foot actions were shown, and to refrain from moving when abstract verbs were presented. We found that reaction times (RT) and percentages of errors increased when the verb involved the same effector used to give the response. This interference occurred very early, when the interval between verb presentation and the delivery of the go signal was 50 ms, and could be elicited until this delay was about 600 ms. In addition, RTs were faster when subjects used the right arm than when they used the left arm, suggesting that action–verb understanding is left-lateralized. Furthermore, when the color of the printed verb and not its meaning was the cue for movement execution the differences between RTs and error percentages between verb categories disappeared, unequivocally indicating that the phenomenon occurs only when the semantic content of a verb has to be retrieved. These results are compatible with the theory of embodied language, which hypothesizes that comprehending verbal descriptions of actions relies on an internal simulation of the sensory–motor experience of the action, and provide a new and detailed view of the interplay between action language and motor acts. PMID:22536380

  2. Natural and anthropogenic sources and processes affecting water chemistry in two South Korean streams.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Mayer, Bernhard; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Lee, Sin-Woo

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) in a watershed provides potential sources of pollutants for surface and subsurface waters that can deteriorate water quality. Between March and early August 2011, water samples were collected from two streams in South Korea, one dominantly draining a watershed with carbonate bedrock affected by coal mines and another draining a watershed with silicate bedrock and a relatively undisturbed catchment area. The objective of the study was to identify the sources and processes controlling water chemistry, which was dependent on bedrock and land use. In the Odae stream (OS), the stream in the silicate-dominated catchment, Ca, Na, and HCO3 were the dominant ions and total dissolved solids (TDS) was low (26.1-165 mg/L). In the Jijang stream (JS), in the carbonate-dominated watershed, TDS (224-434 mg/L) and ion concentrations were typically higher, and Ca and SO4 were the dominant ions due to carbonate weathering and oxidation of pyrite exposed at coal mines. Dual isotopic compositions of sulfate (?(34)SSO4 and ?(18)OSO4) verified that the SO4 in JS is derived mainly from sulfide mineral oxidation in coal mines. Cl in JS was highest upstream and decreased progressively downstream, which implies that pollutants from recreational facilities in the uppermost part of the catchment are the major source governing Cl concentrations within the discharge basin. Dual isotopic compositions of nitrate (?(15)NNO3 and ?(18)ONO3) indicated that NO3 in JS is attributable to nitrification of soil organic matter but that NO3 in OS is derived mostly from manure. Additionally, the contributions of potential anthropogenic sources to the two streams were estimated in more detail by using a plot of ?(34)SSO4 and ?(15)NNO3. This study suggests that the dual isotope approach for sulfate and nitrate is an excellent additional tool for elucidating the sources and processes controlling the water chemistry of streams draining watersheds having different lithologies and land-use patterns. PMID:24727045

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... applies to a condition known as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome Is an Early Warning Sign Metabolic syndrome isn' ... 2 diabetes down the road. What Exactly Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is a collection of problems that ...

  4. Inorganic deterioration affecting the Altamira Cave, N Spain: quantitative approach to wall-corrosion (solutional etching) processes induced by visitors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moral, S; Soler, V; Cañaveras, J C; Sanz-Rubio, E; Van Grieken, R; Gysels, K

    1999-12-15

    In order to study the wall corrosion processes induced by visitors in the Altamira Cave (northern Spain), a multidisciplinary study was conducted in the cave. For a period of 1 year, a microclimate monitoring system, measuring the temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and 222Rn concentrations was operated. Host rock samples were collected as well as indoor and outdoor atmospheric particulate matter. These data are used for a quantitative assessment of the wall corrosion processes. The presence of visitors was found to enhance the corrosion processes up to 78 times in comparison with the natural processes. Outdoor air pollution did not have a significant affect. PMID:10635591

  5. Processing conditions affect nutrient digestibility of cold-pressed canola cake for grower pigs.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, R W; Beltranena, E; Newkirk, R W; Goonewardene, L A; Zijlstra, R T

    2011-08-01

    Cold-pressed canola cake is a coproduct of biodiesel production that contains more residual oil than expeller-pressed and solvent-extracted canola meal. Cold-pressed canola cake might be an attractive feedstuff for swine due to local availability from small plants. However, the nutritional quality and content of anti-nutritional factors of cold-pressed canola cake are poorly defined and vary with processing conditions. This experiment evaluated cold-pressed canola cake processed using 4 different conditions: a nonheated and heated barrel at slow and fast screw speed in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Seven ileally cannulated barrows (26 kg of BW) were fed twice daily at 2.8 × maintenance diets containing either 44% of 1 of the 4 cold-pressed canola cake samples, expeller-pressed canola meal, canola seed, or an N-free diet in a 7 × 7 Latin square. The objectives were to measure the energy and AA digestibility and to calculate standardized ileal digestible (SID) AA and NE content. Each 9-d experimental period consisted of a 5-d diet adaptation, followed by 2-d feces and 2-d ileal digesta collections, and 7 observations per diet were obtained. Cold-pressed canola cake contained 41% CP, 16% ether extract, and 5 µmol of total glucosinolates/g (DM basis). Both apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and total tract energy digestibility of energy in cold-pressed canola cake was 36% greater (P < 0.05) in heated vs. nonheated conditions and 8% greater (P < 0.05) in fast vs. slow screw speed without interaction, indicating that heat enhanced energy digestibility. The AID of energy of cold-pressed canola cake was 13 and 118% greater (P < 0.01) than expeller-pressed canola meal and canola seed, respectively. Heat and speed interacted (P < 0.05) for SID of AA of test ingredients, but effects were not consistent among AA. The DE and calculated NE content of cold-pressed canola cake was 0.73 and 0.52 Mcal/kg greater (P=0.001; DM basis), respectively, than expeller-pressed canola meal and did not differ from canola seed. Cold-pressed canola cake averaged 4.17 Mcal of DE/kg, 2.84 Mcal of NE/kg, 0.87% SID Lys, 0.46% SID Met, and 0.79% SID Thr (DM basis). In conclusion, processing conditions greatly affected the digestible nutrient content of cold-pressed canola cake. Content of residual ether extract was an important determinant of the energy value of cold-press canola cake, whereas residual glucosinolates did not seem to hamper nutrient digestibility. PMID:21421830

  6. The Role of the Parent Compound Vitamin D with Respect to Metabolism and Function: Why Clinical Dose Intervals Can Affect Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: There is no doubt that vitamin D must be activated to the hormonal form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to achieve full biological activity or that many tissues participate in this activation process—be it endocrine or autocrine. We believe that not only is 25-hydroxyvitamin D important to tissue delivery for this activation process, but also that intact vitamin D has a pivotal role in this process. Objective: In this review, evidence on the vitamin D endocrine/autocrine system is presented and discussed in relation to vitamin D-binding protein affinity, circulating half-lives, and enzymatic transformations of vitamin D metabolites, and how these affect biological action in any given tissue. Conclusions: Circulating vitamin D, the parent compound, likely plays an important physiological role with respect to the vitamin D endocrine/autocrine system, as a substrate in many tissues, not originally thought to be important. Based on emerging data from the laboratory, clinical trials, and data on circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D amassed during many decades, it is likely that for the optimal functioning of these systems, significant vitamin D should be available on a daily basis to ensure stable circulating concentrations, implying that variation in vitamin D dosing schedules could have profound effects on the outcomes of clinical trials because of the short circulating half-life of intact vitamin D. PMID:24106283

  7. Study of Trichoderma viride metabolism under conditions of the restriction of oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Chovanec, Peter; Kalinák, Michal; Liptaj, Tibor; Pronayová, Nad'a; Jakubík, Tibor; Hudecová, Daniela; Varecka, L'udovít

    2005-10-01

    Trichoderma viride was capable of growth and conidiation in the presence of high concentrations of the uncoupler 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (up to 100 micromol x L(-1) and of the respiration inhibitor mucidin (up to 100 micromol x L(-1) ) in both submerged and surface cultivation. When vegetative mycelia were cultivated on the solid Czapek-Dox medium with yeast autolysate under an anaerobic and CO2-containing atmosphere, the growth was observed only rarely but the microorganism survived as long as 3 months under these conditions. Major products of metabolism of both aerobic and anaerobic submerged mycelia were identified by means of 1H-NMR measurements. Major products excreted to the medium under aerobic conditions were succinic and citric acids. Major metabolites present in the submerged mycelia were gamma-aminobutyric (and glutamic) acid and alanine. Under anaerobic conditions, citric acid was not excreted into the medium but ethanol appeared. Its production could not be increased upon increasing the sugar concentration. The appearance of secondary metabolites was found to be modified by oxygen availability during the mycelial growth. Results suggest that the vegetative form of T. viride is capable of fermentative metabolism characterized by the production of ethanol and succinate and that the excretion of carboxylic acids is developmentally regulated and modified by oxygen availability. PMID:16333345

  8. Screening blood spots for inborn errors of metabolism by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with a microplate batch process and a computer algorithm for automated flagging of abnormal profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed S. Rashed; Martin P. Bucknall; Douglas Little; Amin Awad; Minnie Jacob; Mohamed Alamoudi; Mona Alwattar; Pinar T. Ozand

    Metabolic profiling of amino acids and acylcarnitines from blood spots by automated electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS\\/MS) is a powerful diagnos- tic tool for inborn errors of metabolism. New ap- proaches to sample preparation and data interpretation have helped establish the methodology as a robust, high-throughput neonatal screening method. We intro- duce an efficient 96-well-microplate batch process for blood-spot sample

  9. Selecting process quality indicators for the integrated care of vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edeltraut Kröger; André Tourigny; Diane Morin; Lise Côté; Marie-Jeanne Kergoat; Paule Lebel; Line Robichaud; Shirley Imbeault; Solange Proulx; Zohra Benounissa

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed at evaluating face and content validity, feasibility and reliability of process quality indicators developed previously in the United States or other countries. The indicators can be used to evaluate care and services for vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia within an integrated service system in Quebec, Canada. METHODS: A total of 33 clinical

  10. Impaired Neurocognitive Functions Affect Social Learning Processes in Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthys, Walter; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.; Schutter, Dennis J. L. G.; Lochman, John E.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, a conceptualization of oppositional defiant (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) is presented according to which social learning processes in these disorders are affected by neurocognitive dysfunctions. Neurobiological studies in ODD and CD suggest that the ability to make associations between behaviors and negative and positive…

  11. The Time Course of the Influence of Valence and Arousal on the Implicit Processing of Affective Pictures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunliang Feng; Lili Wang; Chao Liu; Xiangru Zhu; Ruina Dai; Xiaoqin Mai; Yue-Jia Luo

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the time course of the implicit processing of affective pictures with an orthogonal design of valence (negative vs. positive) by arousal (low vs. high). Previous studies with explicit tasks suggested that valence mainly modulates early event-related potential (ERP) components, whereas arousal mainly modulates late components. However, in this study with an implicit task, we

  12. Affective and Deliberative Processes in Risky Choice: Age Differences in Risk Taking in the Columbia Card Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figner, Bernd; Mackinlay, Rachael J.; Wilkening, Friedrich; Weber, Elke U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated risk taking and underlying information use in 13- to 16- and 17- to 19-year-old adolescents and in adults in 4 experiments, using a novel dynamic risk-taking task, the Columbia Card Task (CCT). The authors investigated risk taking under differential involvement of affective versus deliberative processes with 2 versions of…

  13. Indigenous microbes survive in situ ozonation improving biodegradation of dissolved organic matter in aged oil sands process-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lisa D; Pérez-Estrada, Leonidas; Wang, Nan; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Martin, Jonathan W; Fedorak, Phillip M; Ulrich, Ania C

    2013-11-01

    The oil sands industry faces significant challenges in developing effective remediation technologies for process-affected water stored in tailings ponds. Naphthenic acids, a complex mixture of cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids, have been of particular concern because they concentrate in tailings ponds and are a component of the acutely toxic fraction of process water. Ozone treatment has been demonstrated as an effective means of rapidly degrading naphthenic acids, reducing process water toxicity, and increasing its biodegradability following seeding with the endogenous process water bacteria. This study is the first to examine subsequent in situ biodegradation following ozone pretreatment. Two aged oil sands process-affected waters from experimental reclamation tailings ponds were ozonated to reduce the dissolved organic carbon, to which naphthenic acids contributed minimally (<1mgL(-1)). Treatment with an ozone dose of 50mgL(-1) improved the 84d biodegradability of remaining dissolved organic carbon during subsequent aerobic incubation (11-13mgL(-1) removed from aged process-affected waters versus 5mgL(-1) when not pretreated with ozone). The ozone-treated indigenous microbial communities were as capable of degrading organic matter as the same community not exposed to ozone. This supports ozonation coupled with biodegradation as an effective and feasible treatment option. PMID:24112657

  14. Assessing Factors Affecting Implementation of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Kristy

    2010-01-01

    The capability of organizations to operate on the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) framework is reliant on ITIL process measurements. Appropriate ITIL process measurements help ensure desired outcomes, enable corrective actions to take place prior to process failure, and direct process activities towards continuous improvement.…

  15. Extracellular and Intracellular Esterase Processing of SCFA-Hexosamine Analogs: Implications for Metabolic Glycongineering and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Mohit P.; Tan, Elaine; Shah, Shivam; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Meledeo, M. Adam; Huang, Jun; Espinoza, Freddy A.; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a synopsis of the esterase processing of short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-derivatized hexosamine analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering by demonstrating that the extracellular hydrolysis of these compounds is comparatively slow (e.g., with a t1/2 of ~ 4 hours to several days) in normal cell culture as well as in high serum concentrations intended to mimic in vivo conditions. Structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis of common sugar analogs revealed that O-acetylated and N-azido ManNAc derivatives were more refractory against extracellular inactivation by FBS than their butanoylated counterparts consistent with in silico docking simulations of Ac4ManNAc and Bu4ManNAc to human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). By contrast, all analogs tested supported increased intracellular sialic acid production within two hours establishing that esterase processing once the analogs are taken up by cells is not rate limiting. PMID:23041156

  16. Interrelation between metabolic processes in blood and its sedimentation dynamics revealed by the method of ESR-graphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boularguina, Yulia; Bouravleva, Ekaterina; Gurfinkel, Youri I.; Voeikov, Vladimir L.

    2002-07-01

    An automatic device for high-temporal resolution of the process of red blood sedimentation was designed. The position of the boundary between red blood and plasma may be registered each 30 sec in several pipettes simultaneously with +/- 10 mkm precision. Fractional rates of the boundary movement are deduced with high accuracy. Data are processed by a PC and presented as velocity-time curves and the curves describing time evolution of the boundary position. The results obtained with this equipment demonstrate non- monotonous character of the rate of red blood sedimentation and revealed several peculiarities of macroscopic stages and microkinetic of the process. Changes of biophysical-chemical state of blood related to changes in physiological state of a donor or under the action of different substances may result either in improving, or in worsening of studied parameters of blood sedimentation dynamics. A slight dilution of blood with saline in vitro leads as a rule to decreasing of sedimentation rate and improving of microkinetic parameters of the process of the red blood sedimentation. Adding of highly diluted hydrogen peroxide to blood samples of patients provides for the oxygenation of the system, and result in the improving of sedimentation dynamics: decreasing of average sedimentation rate and prolonging of macrokinetic states. The parameters of this reaction depend upon the metabolic potential of blood, the functional state of all its cellular and plasma elements, and in complex they reflect the physiological state of the individual Any changes in parameters of macro- and microkinetics may reflect the pattern of oxygen release- delivery-consumption in blood. ESR-graphy may give much more information in comparison to the routine ESR-test and allows to consider blood sedimentation not from the viewpoint of separate physico-chemical parameters, but treating it as a metabolically active system.

  17. Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure - Implications beyond ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Doenst, Torsten; Nguyen, T. Dung; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The heart has a high rate of ATP production and turnover which is required to maintain its continuous mechanical work. Perturbations in ATP generating processes may therefore affect contractile function directly. Characterizing cardiac metabolism in heart failure revealed several metabolic alterations termed metabolic remodeling, ranging from changes in substrate utilization to mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and impaired contractility. However, ATP depletion is not the only relevant consequence of metabolic remodeling during heart failure. By providing cellular building blocks and signaling molecules, metabolic pathways control essential processes such as cell growth and regeneration. Thus, alterations in cardiac metabolism may also affect the progression to heart failure by mechanisms beyond ATP supply. Our aim is therefore to highlight that metabolic remodeling in heart failure not only results in impaired cardiac energetics, but also induces other processes implicated in the development of heart failure such as structural remodeling and oxidative stress. Accordingly, modulating cardiac metabolism in heart failure may have significant therapeutic relevance that goes beyond the energetic aspect. PMID:23989714

  18. Dissociating motivational direction and affective valence: specific emotions alter central motor processes.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Stephen A; Cauraugh, James H; Janelle, Christopher M

    2007-11-01

    We aimed to clarify the relation between affective valence and motivational direction by specifying how central and peripheral components of extension movements are altered according to specific unpleasant affective states. As predicted, premotor reaction time was quicker for extension movements initiated during exposure to attack than for extension movements initiated during exposure to all other valence categories (mutilation, erotic couples, opposite-sex nudes, neutral humans, household objects, blank). Exposure to erotic couples and mutilations yielded greater peak force than exposure to images of attack, neutral humans, and household objects. Finally, motor reaction time and peak electromyographic amplitude were not altered by valence. These findings indicate that unpleasant states do not unilaterally prime withdrawal movements, and that the quick execution of extension movements during exposure to threatening images is due to rapid premotor, rather than motor, reaction time. Collectively, our findings support the call for dissociating motivational direction and affective valence. PMID:17958705

  19. Malate Plays a Crucial Role in Starch Metabolism, Ripening, and Soluble Solid Content of Tomato Fruit and Affects Postharvest Softening[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Danilo C.; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L.F.; Carneiro, Raphael T.; Araújo, Wagner L.; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N.; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species. PMID:21239646

  20. Changes in Inflammatory Processes Associated With Selective Vulnerability Following Mild Impairment of Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Shi, Qingli; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in oxidative metabolism and reductions of thiamine-dependent enzymes accompany many age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Thiamine deficiency (TD) produces a cascade of events including mild impairment of oxidative metabolism, activation of microglia, astrocytes and endothelial cells that leads to neuronal loss in select brain regions. The earliest changes occur in a small, well-defined brain region, the submedial thalamic nucleus (SmTN). In the present study, a micropunch technique was used to evaluate quantitatively the selective regional changes in mRNA and protein levels. To test whether this method can distinguish between changes in vulnerable and non-vulnerable regions, markers for neuronal loss (NeuN) and endothelial cells (eNOS) and inflammation (IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-?) in SmTN and cortex of control and TD mice were assessed. TD significantly reduced NeuN and increased CD11b, GFAP and ICAM-1 immunoreactivity in SmTN as revealed by immunocytochemistry. When assessed on samples obtained by the micropunch method, NeuN protein declined (-49%), while increased mRNA levels were observed for eNOS (3.7 fold), IL-1? (43 fold), IL-6 (44 fold) and TNF-? (64 fold) in SmTN with TD. The only TD-induced change that occurred in cortex with TD was an increase in TNF-? (22 fold) mRNA levels. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? protein levels increased in TD brains and colocalized with glial markers. The consistency of these quantitative results with immunocytochemical measurements validates the micropunch technique. The results demonstrate that TD induces quantitative, distinct inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in vulnerable and non-vulnerable regions that may underlie selective vulnerability. PMID:17398105

  1. Reduction of the excess sludge production by biological alternating process: real application results and metabolic uncoupling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Anna Laura; Battistoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The biological solution proposed to reduce the wasted sludge production is based on a process of alternating phases realized in a specific reactor (alternate cycles in sludge line (ACSL)) where a quote of the recycle sludge is treated and sent back to the main activated sludge process. The ACSL process was applied in two urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The reduction was tested by changing the hydraulic retention time and the conditions of oxidation reduction potential. The main mechanism of the process is recognized in the metabolic uncoupling. In fact, an increase in the specific oxygen uptake rate in the biological reactors was recorded (up to 20 mg/g VSS/h), which was stimulated by the fasting condition in the ACSL. The process is able to reduce the observed sludge yield on average of 25-30% with final average values reaching 0.179 kg VSS/kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) for WWTP1 and 0.117 kg VSS/kg COD for WWTP2. PMID:25413108

  2. Relative Saliency in Change Signals Affects Perceptual Comparison and Decision Processes in Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Change detection requires perceptual comparison and decision processes on different features of multiattribute objects. How relative salience between two feature-changes influences the processes has not been addressed. This study used the systems factorial technology to investigate the processes when detecting changes in a Gabor patch with visual…

  3. The Eagle and the Circle of Gold Stars: Does the Bologna Process Affect US Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Marilyn; Huisman, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    The Bologna Process is almost at its end and European policy-makers currently reflect on appropriate objectives and policies for the next decade. Given that the Bologna Process is generally seen as an example of unprecedented change in European higher education and that the major overarching objective of the Process was to increase the…

  4. The Relationship between Gender, Comprehension, Processing Strategies, and Cognitive and Affective Response in Foreign Language Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of adult learners' reports on comprehension strategies, comprehension level, confidence, and affective response to two authentic Spanish radio broadcasts found gender differences in comprehension strategy use and perceived confidence level, suggesting the need for instruction about the evaluation of strategy effectiveness and about…

  5. Worry: A Cognitive Phenomenon Intimately Linked to Affective, Physiological, and Interpersonal Behavioral Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Borkovec; William J. Ray; Joachim Stober

    1998-01-01

    Research on worry during the past 15 years hasrevealed a remarkable amount of knowledge about thispervasive human phenomenon. Worry involves apredominance of verbal thought activity, functions as atype of cognitive avoidance, and inhibits emotionalprocessing. Worry also produces not only anxiousexperience but depressive affect as well. Recentevidence suggests that the very private experience ofworry is developmentally connected to enmeshedchildhood relationships with

  6. Marital Conflict and Child Outcomes: The Role of Children's Affect and Coping Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah E.; Clements, Mari L.

    This study examined young children's affective distress and behavioral responses to parental marital conflict. Forty-eight 4-year-olds and their parents participated in the study. Mothers and fathers independently completed measures of marital conflict, children's reactions to marital conflict, and child behavior problems, while the children…

  7. Inhibition of Ceramide De Novo Synthesis with Myriocin Affects Lipid Metabolism in the Liver of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wiesio?ek-Kurek, Patrycja; Piotrowska, Dominika M.; ?ukaszuk, Bart?omiej; Chabowski, Adrian; ?endzian-Piotrowska, Ma?gorzata

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases. Sphingolipids, which are vitally important constituents of intracellular signal transduction pathways, may be among the most pathogenic lipid moieties intermingled in the origin and development of diabetes. It is now well established that inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis with myriocin exerts positive effects on lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus animal models. However, its influence on type I diabetes still remains unknown. Therefore, the scope of this paper is to fulfill that particular gap in our knowledge. PMID:24701589

  8. Probing metabolic processes of intact soil microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.; Dijkstra, P.

    2012-12-01

    Soils represent one of the largest carbon pools in the terrestrial biosphere and fluxes into or out of this pool may feedback to current climate change. Understanding the mechanisms behind microbial processes regulating C cycling, microbial turnover, and soil organic matter stabilization is hindered by our lack of understanding of the details of microbial physiology in soils. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracers are proposed as a new way to probe microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the determination of C fluxes through the various C metabolic pathways. We determined the 13CO2 production from microbial communities within a one hour time frame by adding six isotopomers (1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, 6-13C) of glucose in parallel incubations using a young volcanic soil (Pinyon-juniper wood, near Sunset Crater, Flagstaff, Arizona). We compared the measured rates of position-specific 13CO2 production with modeled results based on glucose (1-13C and U-13C) and pyruvate (1-13C and 2,3-13C) incubations. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and ecophysiology of intact soil microbial communities.

  9. Unconscious affective processing and empathy: an investigation of subliminal priming on the detection of painful facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Makiko; Decety, Jean

    2009-05-01

    Results from recent functional neuroimaging studies suggest that facial expressions of pain trigger empathic mimicry responses in the observer, in the sense of an activation in the pain matrix. However, pain itself also signals a potential threat in the environment and urges individuals to escape or avoid its source. This evolutionarily primitive aspect of pain processing, i.e., avoidance from the threat value of pain, seems to conflict with the emergence of empathic concern, i.e., a motivation to approach toward the other. The present study explored whether the affective values of targets influence the detection of pain at the unconscious level. We found that the detection of pain was facilitated by unconscious negative affective processing rather than by positive affective processing. This suggests that detection of pain is primarily influenced by its inherent threat value, and that empathy and empathic concern may not rely on a simple reflexive resonance as generally thought. The results of this study provide a deeper understanding of how fundamental the unconscious detection of pain is to the processes involved in the experience of empathy and sympathy. PMID:19254825

  10. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A; Karpen, Saul J

    2015-06-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  11. Dietary cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry affects the development of dyslipidemia and insulin insensitivity associated with metabolic syndrome in high fructose fed rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of feeding cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry powder on selected parameters of metabolic syndrome were investigated in 40 growing male Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were divided into five dietary treatments of 1) control AIN93G diet, 2) high fructose (65% by weight, HF) diet, and 3-5) ...

  12. LOW-QUALITY ROUGHAGES IN HIGH-CONCENTRATE PELLETED DIETS FOR SHEEP:DIGESTION AND METABOLISM OF NITROGEN AND ENERGY AS AFFECTED BY DIETARY FIBER CONCENTRATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Kinser; G. C. Fahey; L. L. Berger; N. R. Merchen

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate effects of, and interactions between, level and source of fiber in the diet on ruminal environment, microbial protein synthesis, nutrient digestion and flow of digesta through the gastrointestinal tract of multiple-fistulated sheep (trial 1 ; 4  4 Latin square design) and on ruminal, digestive and metabolic characteristics of early-weaned lambs (trial 2; randomized

  13. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic (met-ah-BOL-ik) syndrome is the ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  14. The affect system has parallel and integrative processing components: Form follows function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John T. Cacioppo; Wendi L. Gardner; Gary G. Berntson

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT The affect system has been shaped by the hammer,and chisel of adaptation and natural selection such that form follows function. The characteristics of the system thus differ across the nervous system as a function of the unique constraints existent at each level. For instance, although physical limitations constrain behavioral expressions and incline behavioral predispositions toward a bipolar (good—bad, approach—withdraw)

  15. Affective Change Processes in Therapy for PTSD Stemming from Childhood Abuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra C. Paivio; Lana N. Shimp

    1998-01-01

    This article presents an integrative, affectively focused therapy for the effects of childhood abuse. Emotion-focused therapy for adult survivors (EFT-AS) is an empirically supported, brief but comprehensive treatment that addresses symptomatology, and interpersonal and self-related disturbances. EFT-AS integrates the principles of exposure with construction of new meaning, and emphasizes both the role of adaptive emotion and the therapeutic relationship in

  16. Effects of starvation, refeeding, and insulin on energy-linked metabolic processes in catfish (Rhamdia hilarii) adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C.R.; Garofalo, M.A.; Roselino, J.E.; Kettelhut, I.C.; Migliorini, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of starvation and of a short period of refeeding on energy-linked metabolic processes, as well as the effects of insulin administration, were investigated in an omnivorous fish (catfish, Rhamdia hilarii) previously adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet. Following food deprivation blood sugar levels declined progressively to about 50% of fed values after 30 days. During the same period plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration increased twofold. Starvation resulted in reduced concentrations of lipid and glycogen in the liver and of glycogen, lipid, and protein in white muscle. However, taking into account the initial and final concentrations of tissue constituents, the liver weight, and the large fractions of body weight represented by muscle, it could be estimated that most of the energy utilized during starvation derived from the catabolism of muscle lipid and protein. Refeeding starved fishes for 48 hr induced several-fold increases in the rates of in vivo and in vitro incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver and muscle lipid and of (14C)glycine into liver and muscle protein. Incorporation of (14C)glucose into liver glycogen was also increased. However; refeeding did not affect the incorporation of labeled glucose into muscle glycogen, neither in vivo nor in vitro. Administration of pharmacological doses of insulin to normally fed catfishes resulted in marked increases in the in vivo incorporation of 14C from glucose into lipid and protein in both liver and muscle. In contrast, labeled glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen was not affected by insulin and label incorporation into liver glycogen was actually lower than that in noninjected controls.

  17. A new nano-enhanced technology proposed to quantify intracellular detection of radiation-induced metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Malak, Henryk; Richmond, Robert; Dicello, J F

    2011-02-01

    A new approach to intracellular detection and imaging of metabolic processes and pathways is presented that uses surface plasmon resonance to enhance interactions between photon-absorbing metabolites and metal nanoparticles in contact with cells in vitro or in vivo. Photon absorption in the nanoparticles creates plasmon fields, enhancing intrinsic metabolite fluorescence, thereby increasing absorption and emission rates, creating new spectral emission bands, shortening fluorescence lifetimes, becoming more photo-stable and increasing fluorescent resonance energy transfer efficiency. Because the cells remain viable, it is proposed that the method may be used to interrogate cells prior to and after irradiation, with the potential for automated analyses of intracellular interactive pathways associated with radiation exposures at lower doses than existing technologies. The design and concepts of the instrument are presented along with data for unexposed cells. PMID:21196462

  18. Loss of Cytosolic Phosphoglucose Isomerase Affects Carbohydrate Metabolism in Leaves and Is Essential for Fertility of Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Hans-Henning; Zamani-Nour, Shirin; Häusler, Rainer E.; Ludewig, Katja; Schroeder, Julian I.; Malinova, Irina; Fettke, Joerg; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Gierth, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism in plants is tightly linked to photosynthesis and is essential for energy and carbon skeleton supply of the entire organism. Thus, the hexose phosphate pools of the cytosol and the chloroplast represent important metabolic resources that are maintained through action of phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) and phosphoglucose mutase interconverting glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 1-phosphate. Here, we investigated the impact of disrupted cytosolic PGI (cPGI) function on plant viability and metabolism. Overexpressing an artificial microRNA targeted against cPGI (amiR-cpgi) resulted in adult plants with vegetative tissue essentially free of cPGI activity. These plants displayed diminished growth compared with the wild type and accumulated excess starch in chloroplasts but maintained low sucrose content in leaves at the end of the night. Moreover, amiR-cpgi plants exhibited increased nonphotochemical chlorophyll a quenching during photosynthesis. In contrast to amiR-cpgi plants, viable transfer DNA insertion mutants disrupted in cPGI function could only be identified as heterozygous individuals. However, homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutants could be isolated among plants ectopically expressing cPGI. Intriguingly, these plants were only fertile when expression was driven by the ubiquitin10 promoter but sterile when the seed-specific unknown seed protein promoter or the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were employed. These data show that metabolism is apparently able to compensate for missing cPGI activity in adult amiR-cpgi plants and indicate an essential function for cPGI in plant reproduction. Moreover, our data suggest a feedback regulation in amiR-cpgi plants that fine-tunes cytosolic sucrose metabolism with plastidic starch turnover. PMID:25104722

  19. How Need for Cognition Affects the Processing of Achievement-Related Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickhauser, Oliver; Reinhard, Marc-Andre; Diener, Claudia; Bertrams, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The present article analyzed, how need for cognition (NFC) influences the formation of performance expectancies. When processing information, individuals with lower NFC often rely on salient information and shortcuts compared to individuals higher in NFC. We assume that these preferences of processing will also make individuals low in NFC more…

  20. ALTERNATIVE PIGLET PROCESSING PROCEDURES GIVEN SINGLY AFFECT CORTISOL, BEHAVIOR AND GROWTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of piglet processing procedures on behavior, growth and cortisol: Soon after birth, piglets undergo procedures that are a likely source of stress. Our aim was to evaluate stress responses evoked by two alternative methods for performing the following processing procedures: 1) teeth rese...

  1. Dyads and triads at 35,000 feet: Factors affecting group process and aircrew performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Clayton Foushee

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the small-group performance situation involved in the task of flying a multipilot transport aircraft and research psychology's problems in defining the nature of the group process. Input variables (e.g., task characteristics, reward structure, position power, stress levels) have been identified and related to the flightcrew process. There have been suggestions that leader and member personality profiles are important predictors

  2. HOW WIND EROSION PROCESSES AFFECT SELECTION AND PERFORMANCE OF EROSION CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Even though new models, such as WEPS, simulate wind erosion processes, one must still rely upon the model user to optimize the design of control systems. In this report, we suggest how processes can influence selection and design of erosion controls. When macro roughness is not fully armored, larg...

  3. Process dissociation of familiarity and recollection in children: response deadline affects recollection but not familiarity.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Laura; Wimmer, Marina C; Hollins, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    According to dual-process theories, recollection (slow and associated with contextual details) and familiarity (fast and automatic) are two independent processes underlying recognition memory. An adapted version of the process dissociation paradigm was used to measure recognition memory in 5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds and adults. In Experiment 1, it was found that 5-year-olds already recollect details of items (i.e., number). Recollection increased particularly between 5 and 7 years. Familiarity differed between 5 years and adulthood. In Experiment 2, under limited response time during retrieval, recollection was eliminated in 5-year-olds and reduced across all ages, whereas familiarity was left unaffected. Together, these findings are consistent with dual-process theories of recognition memory and provide support for two processes underlying recognition memory from a developmental perspective. PMID:25544395

  4. Characterisation and modification of the heat affected zone during laser material processing of wood and wood composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Barcikowski; G. Koch; J. Odermatt

    2006-01-01

    The heat affected zones (HAZ) at laser cut and laser joint wooden material surfaces were characterised measuring the temperature\\u000a profile of the process within the cut kerf of particleboard and plywood, as well as the HAZ of the CO2 laser cut and Nd:YAG laser joint pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) surface using microscopy, UV microspectrophotometry and pyrolysis-GC\\/MS.\\u000a \\u000a The width of the

  5. Reproductive and stress hormone levels in goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Lister, A; Nero, V; Farwell, A; Dixon, D G; Van Der Kraak, G

    2008-05-01

    Athabasca oil sands mining in northern Alberta produces process-affected waters that are characterized by the presence of naphthenic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high salinity. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of these process-affected waters on reproductive and stress related endpoints in mature goldfish, Carassius auratus. In two separate studies, testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels in the plasma were significantly reduced in both male and female goldfish caged for 19 days in process-affected waters relative to controls. This effect was most pronounced in goldfish caged at a site containing mature fine tailing and tailings pond water (P5). Ovarian and testicular tissues from fish in the caging studies were incubated in vitro to evaluate potential differences in basal steroid production levels and responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Basal levels of testosterone were reduced significantly in males and females from P5 compared with the control pond (P1) demonstrating that the gonads from exposed fish had a diminished steroidogenic capacity. Gonadal tissues of fish from all ponds responded similarly to hCG suggesting that the steroid biosynthetic pathway remained functionally intact. Plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in male goldfish caged in a pond containing mature fine tailings and capped with uncontaminated water (P3) and in P5 compared with P1. Collectively, these studies suggest that waste products of oil sands mining have the potential to disrupt the normal endocrine functioning in exposed fish through alterations to both reproductive and glucocorticoid hormone biosynthesis. In additional laboratory studies, exposure of goldfish to a naphthenic acid extract for 7 days failed to replicate the effects of processes-affected waters on plasma steroid levels and the causative agent(s) responsible for the effects on steroid biosynthesis remains to be identified. PMID:18336931

  6. Development of capability for microtopography-resolving simulations of hydrologic processes in permafrost affected regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.; Moulton, J. D.; Berndt, M.; Coon, E.; Garimella, R.; Lewis, K. C.; Manzini, G.; Mishra, P.; Travis, B. J.; Wilson, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The frozen soils of the Arctic and subarctic regions contain vast amounts of stored organic carbon. This carbon is vulnerable to release to the atmosphere as temperatures warm and permafrost degrades. Understanding the response of the subsurface and surface hydrologic system to degrading permafrost is key to understanding the rate, timing, and chemical form of potential carbon releases to the atmosphere. Simulating the hydrologic system in degrading permafrost regions is challenging because of the potential for topographic evolution and associated drainage network reorganization as permafrost thaws and massive ground ice melts. The critical process models required for simulating hydrology include subsurface thermal hydrology of freezing/thawing soils, thermal processes within ice wedges, mechanical deformation processes, overland flow, and surface energy balances including snow dynamics. A new simulation tool, the Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is being developed to simulate these coupled processes. The computational infrastructure must accommodate fully unstructured grids that track evolving topography, allow accurate solutions on distorted grids, provide robust and efficient solutions on highly parallel computer architectures, and enable flexibility in the strategies for coupling among the various processes. The ATS is based on Amanzi (Moulton et al. 2012), an object-oriented multi-process simulator written in C++ that provides much of the necessary computational infrastructure. Status and plans for the ATS including major hydrologic process models and validation strategies will be presented. Highly parallel simulations of overland flow using high-resolution digital elevation maps of polygonal patterned ground landscapes demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Simulations coupling three-phase subsurface thermal hydrology with a simple thaw-induced subsidence model illustrate the strong feedbacks among the processes. D. Moulton, M. Berndt, M. Day, J. Meza, et al., High-Level Design of Amanzi, the Multi-Process High Performance Computing Simulator, Technical Report ASCEM-HPC-2011-03-1, DOE Environmental Management, 2012.

  7. Subliminal cues bias perception of facial affect in patients with social phobia: evidence for enhanced unconscious threat processing

    PubMed Central

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit altered processing of facial affect, especially expressions signaling threat. Enhanced unaware processing has been suggested an important mechanism which may give rise to anxious conscious cognition and behavior. This study investigated whether individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are perceptually more vulnerable to the biasing effects of subliminal threat cues compared to healthy controls. In a perceptual judgment task, 23 SAD and 23 matched control participants were asked to rate the affective valence of parametrically manipulated affective expressions ranging from neutral to angry. Each trial was preceded by subliminal presentation of an angry/neutral cue. The SAD group tended to rate target faces as “angry” when the preceding subliminal stimulus was angry vs. neutral, while healthy participants were not biased by the subliminal stimulus presentation. The perceptual bias in SAD was also associated with higher reaction time latencies in the subliminal angry cue condition. The results provide further support for enhanced unconscious threat processing in SAD individuals. The implications for etiology, maintenance, and treatment of SAD are discussed. PMID:25136307

  8. The influence of left and right hemisphere brain damage on configural and featural processing of affective faces.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jacenta D; Wijeratne, Tissa; Hughes, Andrew; Perre, Diana; Lindell, Annukka K

    2014-01-01

    The literature about the lateralization of facial emotion perception according to valence (positive, negative) is conflicting; investigating the underlying processes may shed light on why some studies show right-hemisphere dominance across valence and other studies demonstrate hemispheric differences according to valence. This is the first clinical study to examine whether the use of configural and featural cues underlies hemispheric differences in affective face perception. Right brain-damaged (RBD; n = 17), left brain-damaged (LBD; n = 17) and healthy control (HC; n = 34) participants completed an affective face discrimination task that tested configural processing using whole faces and featural processing using partial faces. No group differences in expression perception according to valence or processing strategy were found. Across emotions, the RBD group was less accurate than the HC group in discriminating whole faces, whilst the RBD and LBD groups were less accurate than HCs in discriminating partial faces. This suggests that the right hemisphere processes facial expressions from configural and featural information, whereas the left hemisphere relies more heavily on featural facial information. PMID:24313800

  9. Quality of mini-peeled carrots as affected by genotype, minimal processing and edible coating

    E-print Network

    Dewi, Tjin Tjin

    1995-01-01

    of genotype, minimal processing and edible coating treatment on quality of mini-peeled carrots. Genotypic variations in total terpenoids, sugars, phenolics, total carotenoids and sensory attributes were observed (P>0.05). Among experimental hybrids evaluated...

  10. Isoflavone profile in soymilk as affected by soybean variety, grinding, and heat-processing methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chang, Sam K C; Liu, Zhisheng

    2015-05-01

    Isoflavones impart health benefits and their overall content and profile in foods are greatly influenced at each step during processing. In this study, 2 soybean varieties (Prosoy and black soybean) were processed with 3 different grinding (ambient, cold, and hot grinding) and heating methods (traditional stove cooking, 1-phase UHT, and 2-phase UHT) for soymilk making. The results showed after cold, ambient, and hot grinding, the total isoflavones were 3917, 5013, and 5949 nmol/g for Prosoy; the total isoflavones were 4073, 3966, and 4284 nmol/g for black soybean. Grinding could significantly increase isoflavone extraction. The grinding process had a destructive effect on isoflavones and this effect varied with grinding temperature. Different heating methods had different effects on different isoflavone forms. Two soybean varieties showed distinct patterns with respect to the change of isoflavone profile during processing. PMID:25827234

  11. A study of specific visual stimuli that affect the learning process

    E-print Network

    Godkin, Blake Steven

    2013-02-22

    scholars of education believe that the process of learning only centers around the curriculum and instruction delivered by the education and received by the student. Recent thinking, however, now supports the need for creative design of school facilities...

  12. Effects of grain processing and bovine somatotropin on metabolism and ovarian activity of dairy cows during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Santos, J E; Huber, J T; Theurer, C B; Nussio, C B; Nussio, L G; Tarazon, M; Fish, D

    2000-05-01

    This study compared the effects of exogenous bovine somatotropin (bST) on the metabolism and ovarian activity of cows fed diets differing in ruminally degradable starch. Twenty-four multiparous and eight primiparous Holstein cows in early lactation were divided into four groups and fed diets containing 39% grain as steam-flaked sorghum or steam-rolled corn with or without bST for 90 d in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Flaked sorghum improved energy status of cows during early lactation, tending to increase plasma glucose and insulin. Administration of bST decreased plasma urea nitrogen and increased nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). Plasma levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) and hepatic concentrations of triglycerides were not altered by treatments. Temporal changes in plasma glucose, urea nitrogen, NEFA, and BHBA were detected in a quadratic manner and insulin increased linearly with time, but treatments did not affect postpartum changes in these metabolites. There were greater decreases in body weight and net energy balance in cows on bST during the first 7 wk of treatment. Cows receiving bST took longer to reach the nadir of negative energy balance, and bST tended to delay the period to reach a positive energy balance. Follicular populations and incidence of cystic ovaries were not affected by treatments, but cows receiving bST had fewer double ovulations. Flaked sorghum increased plasma progesterone during the early luteal phase of the first two postpartum estrous cycles. Feeding more ruminally degradable starch improved the energy status and luteal activity of cows in early lactation. PMID:10821576

  13. Institutional processes affecting the provision of water resources for public recreational use in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Richardson, William Earl

    1975-01-01

    resources. The allocation of navigable rivers and coastal beaches in Texas for public recreation- al use are subject to such institutional processes. In order to determine the effects of such institu- tional processes on the allocation of water resources... of common and civil law systems concerning public use of water resources was examined. The allocation of coastal beaches for public recreational use was a result of the Texas Open Beaches Act of 1959 which allowed free and unrestricted lateral access...

  14. Gene expression signatures in motor neurone disease fibroblasts reveal dysregulation of metabolism, hypoxia-response and RNA processing functions

    PubMed Central

    Raman, R; Allen, S P; Goodall, E F; Kramer, S; Ponger, L-L; Heath, P R; Milo, M; Hollinger, H C; Walsh, T; Highley, J R; Olpin, S; McDermott, C J; Shaw, P J; Kirby, J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are two syndromic variants within the motor neurone disease spectrum. As PLS and most ALS cases are sporadic (SALS), this limits the availability of cellular models for investigating pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic targets. The aim of this study was to use gene expression profiling to evaluate fibroblasts as cellular models for SALS and PLS, to establish whether dysregulated biological processes recapitulate those seen in the central nervous system and to elucidate pathways that distinguish the clinically defined variants of SALS and PLS. Methods Microarray analysis was performed on fibroblast RNA and differentially expressed genes identified. Genes in enriched biological pathways were validated by quantitative PCR and functional assays performed to establish the effect of altered RNA levels on the cellular processes. Results Gene expression profiling demonstrated that whilst there were many differentially expressed genes in common between SALS and PLS fibroblasts, there were many more expressed specifically in the SALS fibroblasts, including those involved in RNA processing and the stress response. Functional analysis of the fibroblasts confirmed a significant decrease in miRNA production and a reduced response to hypoxia in SALS fibroblasts. Furthermore, metabolic gene changes seen in SALS, many of which were also evident in PLS fibroblasts, resulted in dysfunctional cellular respiration. Conclusions The data demonstrate that fibroblasts can act as cellular models for ALS and PLS, by establishing the transcriptional changes in known pathogenic pathways that confer subsequent functional effects and potentially highlight targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24750211

  15. Pulmonary metabolism of foreign compounds: its role in metabolic activation.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G M

    1990-01-01

    The lung has the potential of metabolizing many foreign chemicals to a vast array of metabolites with different pharmacological and toxicological properties. Because many chemicals require metabolic activation in order to exert their toxicity, the cellular distribution of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in a heterogeneous tissue, such as the lung, and the balance of metabolic activation and deactivation pathways in any particular cell are key factors in determining the cellular specificity of many pulmonary toxins. Environmental factors such as air pollution, cigarette smoking, and diet markedly affect the pulmonary metabolism of some chemicals and, thereby, possibly affect their toxicity. PMID:2200668

  16. Flexible and fast: linguistic shortcut affects both shallow and deep conceptual processing.

    PubMed

    Connell, Louise; Lynott, Dermot

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has shown that people use linguistic distributional information during conceptual processing, and that it is especially useful for shallow tasks and rapid responding. Using two conceptual combination tasks, we showed that this linguistic shortcut extends to the processing of novel stimuli, is used in both successful and unsuccessful conceptual processing, and is evident in both shallow and deep conceptual tasks. Specifically, as predicted by the ECCo theory of conceptual combination, people use the linguistic shortcut as a "quick-and-dirty" guide to whether the concepts are likely to combine into a coherent conceptual representation, in both shallow sensibility judgment and deep interpretation generation tasks. Linguistic distributional frequency predicts both the likelihood and the time course of rejecting a novel word compound as nonsensical or uninterpretable. However, it predicts the time course of successful processing only in shallow sensibility judgment, because the deeper conceptual process of interpretation generation does not allow the linguistic shortcut to suffice. Furthermore, the effects of linguistic distributional frequency are independent of any effects of conventional word frequency. We discuss the utility of the linguistic shortcut as a cognitive triage mechanism that can optimize processing in a limited-resource conceptual system. PMID:23307559

  17. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields. PMID:25102927

  18. Tuning to the significant: neural and genetic processes underlying affective enhancement of visual perception and memory.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Jelena; Anderson, Adam K; Todd, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    Emotionally arousing events reach awareness more easily and evoke greater visual cortex activation than more mundane events. Recent studies have shown that they are also perceived more vividly and that emotionally enhanced perceptual vividness predicts memory vividness. We propose that affect-biased attention (ABA) - selective attention to emotionally salient events - is an endogenous attentional system tuned by an individual's history of reward and punishment. We present the Biased Attention via Norepinephrine (BANE) model, which unifies genetic, neuromodulatory, neural and behavioural evidence to account for ABA. We review evidence supporting BANE's proposal that a key mechanism of ABA is locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) activity, which interacts with activity in hubs of affective salience networks to modulate visual cortex activation and heighten the subjective vividness of emotionally salient stimuli. We further review literature on biased competition and look at initial evidence for its potential as a neural mechanism behind ABA. We also review evidence supporting the role of the LC-NE system as a driving force of ABA. Finally, we review individual differences in ABA and memory including differences in sensitivity to stimulus category and valence. We focus on differences arising from a variant of the ADRA2b gene, which codes for the alpha2b adrenoreceptor as a way of investigating influences of NE availability on ABA in humans. PMID:24269973

  19. Familiarity differentially affects right hemisphere contributions to processing metaphors and literals

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Vicky T.; van Dam, Wessel; Conant, Lisa L.; Binder, Jeffrey R.; Desai, Rutvik H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the two hemispheres in processing metaphoric language is controversial. While some studies have reported a special role of the right hemisphere (RH) in processing metaphors, others indicate no difference in laterality relative to literal language. Some studies have found a role of the RH for novel/unfamiliar metaphors, but not conventional/familiar metaphors. It is not clear, however, whether the role of the RH is specific to metaphor novelty, or whether it reflects processing, reinterpretation or reanalysis of novel/unfamiliar language in general. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the effects of familiarity in both metaphoric and non-metaphoric sentences. A left lateralized network containing the middle and inferior frontal gyri, posterior temporal regions in the left hemisphere (LH), and inferior frontal regions in the RH, was engaged across both metaphoric and non-metaphoric sentences; engagement of this network decreased as familiarity decreased. No region was engaged selectively for greater metaphoric unfamiliarity. An analysis of laterality, however, showed that the contribution of the RH relative to that of LH does increase in a metaphor-specific manner as familiarity decreases. These results show that RH regions, taken by themselves, including commonly reported regions such as the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), are responsive to increased cognitive demands of processing unfamiliar stimuli, rather than being metaphor-selective. The division of labor between the two hemispheres, however, does shift towards the right for metaphoric processing. The shift results not because the RH contributes more to metaphoric processing. Rather, relative to its contribution for processing literals, the LH contributes less. PMID:25713522

  20. Familiarity differentially affects right hemisphere contributions to processing metaphors and literals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vicky T; van Dam, Wessel; Conant, Lisa L; Binder, Jeffrey R; Desai, Rutvik H

    2015-01-01

    The role of the two hemispheres in processing metaphoric language is controversial. While some studies have reported a special role of the right hemisphere (RH) in processing metaphors, others indicate no difference in laterality relative to literal language. Some studies have found a role of the RH for novel/unfamiliar metaphors, but not conventional/familiar metaphors. It is not clear, however, whether the role of the RH is specific to metaphor novelty, or whether it reflects processing, reinterpretation or reanalysis of novel/unfamiliar language in general. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the effects of familiarity in both metaphoric and non-metaphoric sentences. A left lateralized network containing the middle and inferior frontal gyri, posterior temporal regions in the left hemisphere (LH), and inferior frontal regions in the RH, was engaged across both metaphoric and non-metaphoric sentences; engagement of this network decreased as familiarity decreased. No region was engaged selectively for greater metaphoric unfamiliarity. An analysis of laterality, however, showed that the contribution of the RH relative to that of LH does increase in a metaphor-specific manner as familiarity decreases. These results show that RH regions, taken by themselves, including commonly reported regions such as the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), are responsive to increased cognitive demands of processing unfamiliar stimuli, rather than being metaphor-selective. The division of labor between the two hemispheres, however, does shift towards the right for metaphoric processing. The shift results not because the RH contributes more to metaphoric processing. Rather, relative to its contribution for processing literals, the LH contributes less. PMID:25713522

  1. Environmental and Nutritional Factors That Affect Growth and Metabolism of the Pneumococcal Serotype 2 Strain D39 and Its Nonencapsulated Derivative Strain R6

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandra M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Links between carbohydrate metabolism and virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been recurrently established. To investigate these links further we developed a chemically defined medium (CDM) and standardized growth conditions that allowed for high growth yields of the related pneumococcal strains D39 and R6. The utilization of the defined medium enabled the evaluation of different environmental and nutritional factors on growth and fermentation patterns under controlled conditions of pH, temperature and gas atmosphere. The same growth conditions impacted differently on the nonencapsulated R6, and its encapsulated progenitor D39. A semi-aerobic atmosphere and a raised concentration of uracil, a fundamental component of the D39 capsule, improved considerably D39 growth rate and biomass. In contrast, in strain R6, the growth rate was enhanced by strictly anaerobic conditions and uracil had no effect on biomass. In the presence of oxygen, the difference in the growth rates was mainly attributed to a lower activity of pyruvate oxidase in strain D39. Our data indicate an intricate connection between capsule production in strain D39 and uracil availability. In this study, we have also successfully applied the in vivo NMR technique to study sugar metabolism in S. pneumoniae R6. Glucose consumption, end-products formation and evolution of intracellular metabolite pools were monitored online by 13C-NMR. Additionally, the pools of NTP and inorganic phosphate were followed by 31P-NMR after a pulse of glucose. These results represent the first metabolic profiling data obtained non-invasively for S. pneumoniae, and pave the way to a better understanding of regulation of central metabolism. PMID:23505518

  2. High or low dietary carbohydrate:protein ratios during first-feeding affect glucose metabolism and intestinal microbiota in juvenile rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Geurden, I; Mennigen, J; Plagnes-Juan, E; Veron, V; Cerezo, T; Mazurais, D; Zambonino-Infante, J; Gatesoupe, J; Skiba-Cassy, S; Panserat, S

    2014-10-01

    Based on the concept of nutritional programming in mammals, we tested whether an acute hyperglucidic-hypoproteic stimulus during first feeding could induce long-term changes in nutrient metabolism in rainbow trout. Trout alevins received during the five first days of exogenous feeding either a hyperglucidic (40% gelatinized starch + 20% glucose) and hypoproteic (20%) diet (VLP diet) or a high-protein (60%) glucose-free diet (HP diet, control). Following a common 105-day period on a commercial diet, both groups were then challenged (65 days) with a carbohydrate-rich diet (28%). Short- and long-term effects of the early stimuli were evaluated in terms of metabolic marker gene expressions and intestinal microbiota as initial gut colonisation is essential for regulating the development of the digestive system. In whole alevins (short term), diet VLP relative to HP rapidly increased gene expressions of glycolytic enzymes, while those involved in gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism decreased. However, none of these genes showed persistent molecular adaptation in the liver of challenged juveniles (long term). By contrast, muscle of challenged juveniles subjected previously to the VLP stimulus displayed downregulated expression of markers of glycolysis and glucose transport (not seen in the short term). These fish also had higher plasma glucose (9 h postprandial), suggesting impaired glucose homeostasis induced by the early stimulus. The early stimulus did not modify the expression of the analysed metabolism-related microRNAs, but had short- and long-term effects on intestinal fungi (not bacteria) profiles. In summary, our data show that a short hyperglucidic-hypoproteic stimulus during early life may have a long-term influence on muscle glucose metabolism and intestinal microbiota in trout. PMID:25274323

  3. Uncoupling Protein2 and -3 Messenger Ribonucleic Acids in Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle of Healthy Males: Variability, Factors Affecting Expression, and Relation to Measures of Metabolic Rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHEL BOIVIN; ANNE CAMIRAND; FRANCESCO CARLI; L. JOHN HOFFER; J. ENRIQUE SILVA

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 and -3 (UCP2 and UCP3) may be involved in the modulation of resting metabolic rate and energy balance. To investigate their variability, the influence of this on the variability of energy expenditure, and potential regulatory factors of the expression of the corresponding genes, we measured their mes- senger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in muscle and white adipose tissue

  4. Seasonal variations in energy levels and metabolic processes of two dominant Acropora species ( A. spicifera and A. digitifera) at Ningaloo Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, S.; Patten, N. L.; Allcock, R. J. N.; Saunders, S. M.; Strickland, D.; Waite, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    Seasonal variations in coral health indices reflecting autotrophic activity (chlorophyll a and zooxanthellae density), metabolic rates (RNA/DNA ratio and protein) and energy storage (ratio of storage: structural lipids or lipid ratios) were examined for two dominant Acropora species [ Acropora digitifera ( AD) and Acropora spicifera ( AS)] at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia). Such detailed investigation of metabolic processes is important background, with regard to understanding the vulnerability of corals to environmental change. Health indices in AD and AS were measured before and after spawning in austral autumn and winter 2010, and austral summer 2011 at six stations. Health indices showed seasonal and species-specific differences but negligible spatial differences across a reef section. For AD, autotrophic indices were negatively correlated with lipid ratios and metabolic indices. Metabolic indices were significantly higher in AS than AD. No correlation was observed between RNA/DNA ratios and lipid ratios with any autotrophic indices for AS. Lipid ratios were stable throughout the year for AS while they changed significantly for AD. For both species, indices of metabolic activity were highest during autumn, while autotrophic indices were highest in winter and summer. Results suggest that the impact of the broadcast spawning event on coral health indices at Ningaloo Reef occurred only as a backdrop to massive seasonal changes in coral physiology. The La Niña summer pattern resulted in high autotrophic indices and low metabolic indices and energy stores. Our results imply different metabolic processes in A. digitifera and A. spicifera as well as a strong impact of extreme events on coral physiology.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation can selectively affect different processing channels in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thiago L; Hamer, Russell D; Nagy, Balázs V; Barboni, Mirella T S; Gualtieri, Mirella; Boggio, Paulo S; Ventura, Dora F

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can modulate cortical activity. Nonetheless, information regarding its functional specificity and the extent by which visual performance can be modulated is still lacking. Here, we used vision as model to address if it differentially affects different cell groups in the stimulated area. We applied tDCS to the occiput and performed a series of visual tests in a sham-controlled repeated-measures design. Achromatic contrast sensitivity was assessed psychophysically during tDCS, with tasks designed to target specific spatial frequency (SF) channels, inferred ON, OFF channels and inferred magnocellular and parvocellular pathways of the visual system. Sweep visual evoked potential (sVEP) for contrast sensitivity and Vernier acuity was recorded before and after tDCS. Anodal tDCS significantly increased thresholds for luminance decrements (OFF) only for the inferred magnocellular thresholds. Although tDCS had no significant effects on Vernier or contrast sVEP thresholds, it modulated suprathreshold amplitudes for both tasks. Cathodal tDCS increased sVEP amplitudes at a low SF, decreased it at a medium, and had no effect at a high SF. Cathodal tDCS increased sVEP phase lags for low and decreased it for high SF (maximum change corresponding to change in apparent latency >6 ms). Cathodal and anodal stimulation decreased amplitudes of sVEP Vernier responses. Exclusive tDCS effects on magnocellular thresholds agree with reports of pathway-specific tDCS effects. The dependence of tDCS effects on SF and contrast levels further suggests that tDCS differentially affects different cell groups in the visual cortex. PMID:25600818

  6. Interactivity of Visual Mathematical Representations: Factors Affecting Learning and Cognitive Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedig, Kamran; Liang, Hai-Ning

    2006-01-01

    Computer-based mathematical cognitive tools (MCTs) are a category of external aids intended to support and enhance learning and cognitive processes of learners. MCTs often contain interactive visual mathematical representations (VMRs), where VMRs are graphical representations that encode properties and relationships of mathematical concepts. In…

  7. E-Mail and Word Processing in the ESL Classroom: How the Medium Affects the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun; Weasenforth, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Examines whether electronic mail writing will improve academic writing abilities. Nonnative students in an intermediate pre-academic English-as-a-Second-Language course responded to writing prompts using electronic mail and word processing. Their writing was examined for differences in uses of cohesive features, length of text produced in each…

  8. The harmful factors affect human health and preventive measures in welding process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Le Shen

    2010-01-01

    The harmful substances produced in welding process have seriously endangered the health of welders and had a great impact on the environment. The harmful substances can be divided into physical hazards and chemical hazards. The physical hazards include welding arc, electromagnetic wave, thermal radiation and so on. The chemical hazards include welding fumes, harmful gases and so forth. The paper

  9. PROGRESS REPORT. INVESTIGATION OF PORE-SCALE PROCESSES THAT AFFECT SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research aims to determine the pore-scale processes that limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. The specific objectives are to: 1) determine the effect of unswept zones on DNAPL removal during SVE, 2) determine the effect of retarded ...

  10. ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT. INVESTIGATION OF PORE-SCALE PROCESSES THAT AFFECT SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research aims to determine the pore-scale processes that limit the removal of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. The specific objectives are to: 1) determine the effect of unswept zones on DNAPL removal during SVE, 2) d...

  11. Inferential Judgments Affecting the Decision-Making Process in the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouran, Dennis S.

    Although the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography, also known as the Meese Commission, has been criticized excessively at times for threatening freedom of speech and press and individual rights to privacy, an analysis of its "Final Report" reveals numerous deficiencies in the Commission's decision-making process. These deficiencies,…

  12. Arts Integration Parallels Between Music and Reading: Process, Product and Affective Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrion, Margaret Dee

    The process of aesthetic education is not limited to the fine arts. Parallels may be identified in the language arts and particularly in the art of creative reading. As in a musical experience, a creative reader will apprehend the content of the literature and couple personal feelings with the events of the reading experience. Parallel brain…

  13. Factors affecting degradation of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by fluidized-bed Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Bellotindos, Luzvisminda M; Lu, Meng-Hsuan; Methatham, Thanakorn; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the target compound is dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which is used as a photoresist stripping solvent in the semiconductor and thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) manufacturing processes. The effects of the operating parameters (pH, Fe(2+) and H2O2 concentrations) on the degradation of DMSO in the fluidized-bed Fenton process were examined. This study used the Box-Behnken design (BBD) to investigate the optimum conditions of DMSO degradation. The highest DMSO removal was 98 % for pH 3, when the H2O2 to Fe(2+) molar ratio was 12. At pH 2 and 4, the highest DMSO removal was 82 %, when the H2O2 to Fe(2+) molar ratio was 6.5. The correlation of DMSO removal showed that the effect of the parameters on DMSO removal followed the order Fe(2+)?> H2O2 > pH. From the BBD prediction, the optimum conditions were pH 3, 5 mM of Fe(2+), and 60 mM of H2O2. The difference between the experimental value (98 %) and the predicted value (96 %) was not significant. The removal efficiencies of DMSO, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), and iron in the fluidized-bed Fenton process were higher than those in the traditional Fenton process. PMID:25056747

  14. How Explicit Knowledge Affects Online L2 Processing: Evidence from Differential Object Marking Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andringa, Sible; Curcic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Form-focused instruction studies generally report larger gains for explicit types of instruction over implicit types on measures of controlled production. Studies that used online processing measures--which do not readily allow for the application of explicit knowledge--however, suggest that this advantage occurs primarily when the target…

  15. From Specificity to Sensitivity: How Acute Stress Affects Amygdala Processing of Biologically Salient Stimuli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hein J. F. van Marle; Erno J. Hermans; Shaozheng Qin; Guillén Fernández

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A vital component of an organism's response to acute stress is a surge in vigilance that serves to optimize the detection and assessment of threats to its homeostasis. The amygdala is thought to regulate this process, but in humans, acute stress and amygdala function have up to now only been studied in isolation. Hence, we developed an integrated design

  16. Metaproteomic Analysis of a Chemosynthetic Hydrothermal Vent Community Reveals Insights into Key-Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, I.; Stokke, R.; Lanzen, A.; Pedersen, R.; Øvreås, L.; Urich, T.

    2010-12-01

    In 2005 researchers at the Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, Norway, discovered two active vent fields at the southwestern Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. The fields harbours both low-temperature iron deposits and high-temperature white smoker vents. Distinct microbial mats were abundantly present and located in close vicinity to the hydrothermal vent sites. Characteristics of the mat environment were steep physical and chemical gradients with temperatures ranging from 10°C in the top layer to 90°C at 10 cm bsf and high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane. The work presented here focus on the In situ community activities, and is part of an integrated strategy combining metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics to in-depth characterise these newly discovered hydrothermal vent communities. Extracted proteins were separated via SDS-PAGE. Peptides extracted after In-gel tryptic digest was injected into an Ultimate 3000 nanoLC system connected to a linear quadropole ion trap-orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap XL) mass spectrometer equipped with a nanoelectrospray ion source. A custom database of open reading frames (ORFs) from the combined metatranscriptome and metagenome datasets was implemented and searched against using Mascot 2.2; the IRMa tool box [1] was used in peptide validation. Validated ORFs were subjected to a Blastp search against Refseq with an E-value cut-off of 0.001. A total of 1097 proteins with ? 2 peptides were identified of which 921 gave a hit against Refseq, containing 519 unique proteins. Key enzymes of the sulfur oxidation pathway (sox) were found, which were taxonomically affiliated to Epsilonproteobacteria. In addition, this group actively expressed hydrogenases and membrane proteins involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chains. Enzymes of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction (APS-reductase, AprAB and DsrA2) were found with closest hit to members of the Deltaproteobacteria. These findings indicate an internal sulfur cycle within the community. The community contained expressed enzymes of a variety of carbon metabolism pathways. Key enzymes of the reverse TCA cycle for fixation of CO2 and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for oxidation of acetyl-CoA and / or the fixation of CO2 were found. Key enzymes of aerobic and anaerobic methane-oxidation pathways were identified as well, namely particulate methane monooxygenase and methyl-Coenzyme M reductase. Various house-keeping gene-products, like cold- and heat shock proteins as well as ribosomal proteins and ATP synthases were identified. This approach has a future potential of broadening our understanding of environmental complexity and regulation in response to geochemical constraints. [1] Dupierris, V., Masselon, C., Court, M., Kieffer-Jaquinod, S., and Bruley, C. (2009) A toolbox for validation of mass spectrometry peptides identification and generation of database: IRMa. Bioinformatics 25, 1980-1981.

  17. Changes in specific metabolic pathways are essential steps in the early apoptotic process in the liver S. Gottschalk1,2

    E-print Network

    Changes in specific metabolic pathways are essential steps in the early apoptotic process in the liver S. Gottschalk1,2 , T. Chan1 , V-A. Raymond1 , M. Bilodeau1 , D. Leibfritz2 , C. Zwingmann1,2 1 Centre de Recherche, Hospital Saint-Luc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 2 Department of Organic Chemistry

  18. N-Squad Episode 2. Students learn about alcohol metabolism, the role of the circulatory system in processing alcohol, blood alcohol concentration (BAC), and headspace gas chromatography.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning

    2011-09-28

    In N-Squad Episode 2 students work with forensic scientists to solve an alcohol related crime. Along the way, they will learn about alcohol metabolism, the role of the the circulatory system in processing alcohol, blood alcohol concentration (BAC), and headspace gas chromatography.

  19. Affective Functioning Among Early Adolescents at High and Low Familial Risk for Depression and Their Mothers: A Focus on Individual and Transactional Processes across Contexts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana L. McMakin; Katie L. Burkhouse; Thomas M. Olino; Greg J. Siegle; Ronald E. Dahl; Jennifer S. Silk

    This study aimed to characterize affective functioning in families of youth at high familial risk for depression, with particular\\u000a attention to features of affective functioning that appear to be critical to adaptive functioning but have been underrepresented\\u000a in prior research including: positive and negative affect across multiple contexts, individual and transactional processes, and affective flexibility. Interactions among early adolescents (ages

  20. Confirmation of conjugation processes during TNT metabolism by axenic plant roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bhadra; D. G. Wayment; J. B. Hughes; J. V. Shanks

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines processes in plants for the formation of fate products of TNT beyond its animated reduction products, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. TNT metabolites were isolated and characterized in combination with temporal analyses of production profiles and ¹⁴C distribution, in microbe-free, axenic root cultures of Catharanthus roseus. Four unique TNT-derived compounds were isolated. Using evidence from ¹H NMR, mass spectroscopy,

  1. The impacts of ozonation on oil sands process-affected water biodegradability and biofilm formation characteristics in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geelsu; Dong, Tao; Islam, Md Sahinoor; Sheng, Zhiya; Pérez-Estrada, Leónidas A; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of the ozonation process (as an oxidation treatment for water and wastewater treatment applications) on microbial biofilm formation and biodegradability of organic compounds present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), biofilm reactors were operated continuously for 6weeks. Two types of biofilm substrate materials: polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC), and two types of OSPW-fresh and ozonated OSPWs-were tested. Endogenous microorganisms, in OSPW, quickly formed biofilms in the reactors. Without ozonation, the bioreactor (using endogenous microorganisms) removed 13.8% of the total acid-extractable organics (TAO) and 18.5% of the parent naphthenic acids (NAs) from fresh OSPW. The combined ozonation and biodegradation process removed 87.2% of the OSPW TAO and over 99% of the OSPW parent NAs. Further UPLC/HRMS analysis showed that NA biodegradability decreased as the NA cyclization number increased. Microbial biofilm formation was found to depend on the biofilm substrate type. PMID:23313671

  2. Maf1 protein, repressor of RNA polymerase III, indirectly affects tRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Karkusiewicz, Iwona; Turowski, Tomasz W; Graczyk, Damian; Towpik, Joanna; Dhungel, Nripesh; Hopper, Anita K; Boguta, Magdalena

    2011-11-11

    Maf1 is negative regulator of RNA polymerase III in yeast. We observed high levels of both primary transcript and end-matured, intron-containing pre-tRNAs in the maf1? strain. This pre-tRNA accumulation could be overcome by transcription inhibition, arguing against a direct role of Maf1 in tRNA maturation and suggesting saturation of processing machinery by the increased amounts of primary transcripts. Saturation of the tRNA exportin, Los1, is one reason why end-matured intron-containing pre-tRNAs accumulate in maf1? cells. However, it is likely possible that other components of the processing pathway are also limiting when tRNA transcription is increased. According to our model, Maf1-mediated transcription control and nuclear export by Los1 are two major stages of tRNA biosynthesis that are regulated by environmental conditions in a coordinated manner. PMID:21940626

  3. Perceptual processing affects the reactivation of a sensory dimension during a categorization task.

    PubMed

    Riou, Benoit; Rey, Amandine E; Vallet, Guillaume T; Cuny, Caroline; Versace, Rémy

    2015-06-01

    According to grounded theories of cognition, knowledge is grounded in its sensory-motor features. Therefore, perceptual and conceptual processing should be based on the same distributed system so that conceptual and perceptual processes should interact. The present study assesses whether gustatory stimulation (participants tasted a sweet or a nonsweet yoghurt) could influence performance on a categorization task that involves the reactivation of the same sensory dimension. The results indicate that participants were slower (Experiment 1) or faster (Experiment 2), respectively, at categorizing pictures as representing edible sweet stimuli when they either simultaneously or had previously tasted a sweet yoghurt as compared to a nonsweet yoghurt. These results confirm the significant overlap between perceptual and memory mechanisms and suggest the functional equivalence between perceptually present and perceptually absent (memory reactivated) dimensions. PMID:25409625

  4. Potential for in situ chemical oxidation of acid extractable organics in oil sands process affected groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, V; Ross, M S; Martin, J W; Barker, J F

    2013-11-01

    The process of bitumen extraction from oil sands in Alberta, Canada leads to an accumulation of toxic acid-extractable organics (AEOs) in oil sands process water (OSPW). Infiltration of OSPW from tailings ponds and from their retaining sand dykes and subsequent transport towards surface water has occurred. Given the apparent lack of significant natural attenuation of AEOs in groundwater, remediation may be required. This laboratory study evaluates the potential use of unactivated persulfate and permanganate as in situ oxidation agents for remediation of AEOs in groundwater. Naphthenic acids (NAs; CnH2n+zO2), which are a component of the acutely toxic AEOs, were degraded by both oxidants in OSPW samples. Permanganate oxidation yielded some residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC) whereas persulfate mineralized the AEO compounds with less residual DOC. Acid-extractable organics from oxidized OSPW had essentially no Microtox toxicity. PMID:24054134

  5. Neurophysiological processing of emotion and parenting interact to predict inhibited behavior: an affective-motivational framework

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Ellen M.; Huselid, Rebecca F.; DeCicco, Jennifer M.; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2013-01-01

    Although inhibited behavior problems are prevalent in childhood, relatively little is known about the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predict a child's ability to regulate inhibited behavior during fear- and anxiety-provoking tasks. Inhibited behavior may be linked to both disruptions in avoidance-related processing of aversive stimuli and in approach-related processing of appetitive stimuli, but previous findings are contradictory and rarely integrate consideration of the socialization context. The current exploratory study used a novel combination of neurophysiological and observation-based methods to examine whether a neurophysiological measure sensitive to approach- and avoidance-oriented emotional processing, the late positive potential (LPP), interacted with observed approach- (promotion) and avoidance- (prevention) oriented parenting practices to predict children's observed inhibited behavior. Participants were 5- to 7-year-old (N = 32) typically-developing children (M = 75.72 months, SD = 6.01). Electroencephalography was continuously recorded while children viewed aversive, appetitive, or neutral images, and the LPP was generated to each picture type separately. Promotion and prevention parenting were observed during an emotional challenge with the child. Child inhibited behavior was observed during a fear and a social evaluation task. As predicted, larger LPPs to aversive images predicted more inhibited behavior during both tasks, but only when parents demonstrated low promotion. In contrast, larger LPPs to appetitive images predicted less inhibited behavior during the social evaluative task, but only when parents demonstrated high promotion; children of high promotion parents showing smaller LPPs to appetitive images showed the greatest inhibition. Parent-child goodness-of-fit and the LPP as a neural biomarker for emotional processes related to inhibited behavior are discussed. PMID:23847499

  6. Soil pH affects the processes reducing nitrate to nitrous oxide and di-nitrogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Stevens; R. J. Laughlin; J. P. Malone

    1998-01-01

    Nitrous oxide can be produced by nitrification, denitrification or dissimilatory NO3? reduction to NH4+ (DNRA), whereas N2 can only be produced by denitrification. Nitrite is a common intermediate in all three processes, high pH favouring NO2? accumulation and DNRA. During denitrification the mole fraction of N2O decreases as pH increases, but little is known about the effect of soil pH

  7. Phenolic Profile and Antioxidant Capacity of Chickpeas ( Cicer arietinum L.) as Affected by a Dehydration Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yolanda Aguilera; Montserrat Dueñas; Isabel Estrella; Teresa Hernández; Vanesa Benitez; Rosa María Esteban; María A. Martín-Cabrejas

    This study presents the effects of soaking, cooking and industrial dehydration on the phenolic profile, and antioxidant capacity\\u000a in two chickpea varieties (Sinaloa and Castellano). Chromatographic analysis identified a total of 24 phenolic components,\\u000a being isoflavones the main phenolics in raw and processed Sinaloa and Castellano flours. The impact of the industrial dehydration\\u000a was different depending on the chickpea variety.

  8. Cajal body proteins differentially affect the processing of box C/D scaRNPs.

    PubMed

    Enwerem, Isioma I; Wu, Guowei; Yu, Yi Tao; Hebert, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are required for pre-mRNA splicing, contain extensively modified snRNA. Small Cajal body-specific ribonucleoproteins (scaRNPs) mediate these modifications. It is unknown how the box C/D class of scaRNPs localizes to Cajal Bodies (CBs). The processing of box C/D scaRNA is also unclear. Here, we explore the processing of box C/D scaRNA 2 and 9 by coilin. We also broaden our investigation to include WRAP53 and SMN, which accumulate in CBs, play a role in RNP biogenesis and associate with coilin. These studies demonstrate that the processing of an ectopically expressed scaRNA2 is altered upon the reduction of coilin, WRAP53 or SMN, but the extent and direction of this change varies depending on the protein reduced. We also show that box C/D scaRNP activity is reduced in a cell line derived from coilin knockout mice. Collectively, the findings presented here further implicate coilin as being a direct participant in the formation of box C/D scaRNPs, and demonstrate that WRAP53 and SMN may also play a role, but the activity of these proteins is divergent to coilin. PMID:25875178

  9. Quality of carrots as affected by pre- and postharvest factors and processing.

    PubMed

    Seljåsen, Randi; Kristensen, Hanne L; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Wyss, Gabriela S; Kretzschmar, Ursula; Birlouez-Aragone, Inès; Kahl, Johannes

    2013-08-30

    The aim of this review is to provide an update on factors contributing to quality of carrots, with special focus on the role of pre- and postharvest factors and processing. The genetic factor shows the highest impact on quality variables in carrots, causing a 7-11-fold difference between varieties in content of terpenes, ?-carotene, magnesium, iron and phenolics as well as a 1-4-fold difference in falcarindiol, bitter taste and sweet taste. Climate-related factors may cause a difference of up to 20-fold for terpenes, 82% for total sugars and 30-40% for ?-carotene, sweet taste and bitter taste. Organic farming in comparison with conventional farming has shown 70% higher levels for magnesium and 10% for iron. Low nitrogen fertilisation level may cause up to 100% increase in terpene content, minor increase in dry matter (+4 to +6%) and magnesium (+8%) and reduction in ?-carotene content (-8 to -11%). Retail storage at room temperature causes the highest reduction in ?-carotene (-70%) and ascorbic acid (-70%). Heat processing by boiling reduces shear force (-300 to -1000%) and crispiness (-67%) as well as content of phenolics (-150%), terpenes (-85%) and total carotenes (-20%) and increases the risk of furan accumulation. Sensory and chemical quality parameters of carrots are determined mainly by genetic and climate-related factors and to a minor extent by cultivation method. Retail temperature and storage atmosphere as well as heating procedure in processing have the highest impact in quality reduction. PMID:23744724

  10. Waiting is the hardest part: anticipating medical test results affects processing and recall of important information.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, David B

    2010-07-01

    Waiting for medical test results that signal physical harm can be a stressful and potentially psychologically harmful experience. Despite this, interventionists and physicians often use this wait time to deliver behavior change messages and other important information about the test, possible results and its implications. This study examined how "bracing" for a medical test result impacts cognitive processing, as well as recall of information delivered during this period. Healthy U.S. university students (N = 150) were tested for a deficiency of a fictitious saliva biomarker that was said to be predictive of long-term health problems using a 2 (Test Result) x 2 (Expected immediacy of result: 10 min, 1 month) factorial design. Participants expecting to get the test result shortly should have been bracing for the result. While waiting for the test results participants completed measures of cognitive processing. After participants received the test result, recall of information about the biomarker was tested in addition to cognitive measures. One week later, participants who were originally told they did not have the deficiency had their recall assessed again. Results showed that anticipating an imminent test result increased cognitive distraction in the processing of information and lowered recall of information about the test and the biomarker. These results suggest that delivering critical information to patients after administering a test and immediately before giving the results may not be optimal. PMID:20556876

  11. Waiting is the hardest part: Anticipating medical test results affects processing and recall of important information.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, David B

    2010-05-01

    Waiting for medical test results that signal physical harm can be a stressful and potentially psychologically harmful experience. Despite this, interventionists and physicians often use this wait time to deliver behavior change messages and other important information about the test, possible results and its implications. This study examined how "bracing" for a medical test result impacts cognitive processing, as well as recall of information delivered during this period. Healthy U.S. university students (N = 150) were tested for a deficiency of a fictitious saliva biomarker that was said to be predictive of long-term health problems using a 2 (Test Result) x 2 (Expected immediacy of result: 10 min, 1 month) factorial design. Participants expecting to get the test result shortly should have been bracing for the result. While waiting for the test results participants completed measures of cognitive processing. After participants received the test result, recall of information about the biomarker was tested in addition to cognitive measures. One week later, participants who were originally told they did not have the deficiency had their recall assessed again. Results showed that anticipating an imminent test result increased cognitive distraction in the processing of information and lowered recall of information about the test and the biomarker. These results suggest that delivering critical information to patients after administering a test and immediately before giving the results may not be optimal. PMID:20570029

  12. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Ito, Taka; Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Valett, Jackie; Deutsch, Curtis

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  13. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  14. Chemical inhibition of potato ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity alters in vitro and in vivo ABA metabolism and endogenous ABA levels but does not affect potato microtuber dormancy duration.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Abrams, Suzanne R; De Stefano-Beltrán, Luis; Huckle, Linda L

    2012-09-01

    The effects of azole-type P450 inhibitors and two metabolism-resistant abscisic acid (ABA) analogues on in vitro ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity, in planta ABA metabolism, endogenous ABA content, and tuber meristem dormancy duration were examined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Russet Burbank). When functionally expressed in yeast, three potato CYP707A genes were demonstrated to encode enzymatically active ABA-8'-hydroxylases with micromolar affinities for (+)-ABA. The in vitro activity of the three enzymes was inhibited by the P450 azole-type inhibitors ancymidol, paclobutrazol, diniconazole, and tetcyclasis, and by the 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA analogues, with diniconazole and tetcyclasis being the most potent inhibitors. The in planta metabolism of [(3)H](±)-ABA to phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid in tuber meristems was inhibited by diniconazole, tetcyclasis, and to a lesser extent by 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA. Continuous exposure of in vitro generated microtubers to diniconazole resulted in a 2-fold increase in endogenous ABA content and a decline in dihydrophaseic acid content after 9 weeks of development. Similar treatment with 8'-acetylene-ABA had no effects on the endogenous contents of ABA or phaseic acid but reduced the content of dihydrophaseic acid. Tuber meristem dormancy progression was determined ex vitro in control, diniconazole-, and 8'-acetylene-ABA-treated microtubers following harvest. Continuous exposure to diniconazole during microtuber development had no effects on subsequent sprouting at any time point. Continuous exposure to 8'-acetylene-ABA significantly increased the rate of microtuber sprouting. The results indicate that, although a decrease in ABA content is a hallmark of tuber dormancy progression, the decline in ABA levels is not a prerequisite for dormancy exit and the onset of tuber sprouting. PMID:22664582

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is elevated in metabolically unhealthy obesity and affects lipid deposition, adipogenesis, and adipokine secretion of human abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Lucia; Irmler, Martin; Zdichavsky, Marty; Meile, Tobias; Böhm, Anja; Stefan, Norbert; Fritsche, Andreas; Beckers, Johannes; Königsrainer, Alfred; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Staiger, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objective Serum concentrations of the hepatokine fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 are elevated in obesity, type-2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. We asked whether FGF21 levels differ between subjects with metabolically healthy vs. unhealthy obesity (MHO vs. MUHO), opening the possibility that FGF21 is a cross-talker between liver and adipose tissue in MUHO. Furthermore, we studied the effects of chronic FGF21 treatment on adipocyte differentiation, lipid storage, and adipokine secretion. Methods In 20 morbidly obese donors of abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsies discordant for their whole-body insulin sensitivity (hereby classified as MHO or MUHO subjects), serum FGF21 was quantified. The impact of chronic FGF21 treatment on differentiation, lipid accumulation, and adipokine release was assessed in isolated preadipocytes differentiated in vitro. Results Serum FGF21 concentrations were more than two-fold higher in MUHO as compared to MHO subjects (457 ± 378 vs. 211 ± 123 pg/mL; p < 0.05). FGF21 treatment of human preadipocytes for the entire differentiation period was modestly lipogenic (+15%; p < 0.05), reduced the expression of key adipogenic transcription factors (PPARG and CEBPA, ?15% and ?40%, respectively; p < 0.01 both), reduced adiponectin expression (?20%; p < 0.05), markedly reduced adiponectin release (?60%; p < 0.01), and substantially increased leptin (+60%; p < 0.01) and interleukin-6 (+50%; p < 0.001) release. Conclusions The hepatokine FGF21 exerts weak lipogenic and anti-adipogenic actions and marked adiponectin-suppressive and leptin and interleukin-6 release-promoting effects in human differentiating preadipocytes. Together with the higher serum concentrations in MUHO subjects, our findings reveal FGF21 as a circulating factor promoting the development of metabolically unhealthy adipocytes.

  16. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodan, Lance H.; Wells, Greg D.; Banks, Laura; Thompson, Sara; Schneiderman, Jane E.; Tein, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome. Methods We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNAleu(UUR) in MTTL1 gene) with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine. Results At baseline (no L-Arg), MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001). On 31P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr) (p = 0.05), decreased ATP (p = 0.018), and decreased intracellular Mg2+ (p = 0.0002) when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1) increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT) (2) increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3) small increase in VO2peak. On 31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1) A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis) (2) increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP) suggesting increased work capacity (3) a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity) following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4) increase in torque. Significance These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study. Classification of Evidence Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446. PMID:25993630

  17. Blockage of the Neonatal Leptin Surge Affects the Gene Expression of Growth Factors, Glial Proteins, and Neuropeptides Involved in the Control of Metabolism and Reproduction in Peripubertal Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Mela, Virginia; Díaz, Francisca; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Vázquez, María Jesús; Gertler, Arieh; Argente, Jesús; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Viveros, María-Paz; Chowen, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Leptin (Lep) is important in the development of neuroendocrine circuits involved in metabolic control. Because both Lep and metabolism influence pubertal development, we hypothesized that early changes in Lep signaling could also modulate hypothalamic (HT) systems involved in reproduction. We previously demonstrated that a single injection of a Lep antagonist (Antag) on postnatal day (PND)9, coincident with the neonatal Lep peak, induced sexually dimorphic modifications in trophic factors and markers of cell turnover and neuronal maturation in the HT on PND13. Here, our aim was to investigate whether the alterations induced by Lep antagonism persist into puberty. Accordingly, male and female rats were treated with a pegylated super Lep Antag from PND5 to PND9 and killed just before the normal appearance of external signs of puberty (PND33 in females and PND43 in males). There was no effect on body weight, but in males food intake increased, subcutaneous adipose tissue decreased and HT neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related peptide mRNA levels were reduced, with no effect in females. In both sexes, the Antag increased HT mRNA levels of the kisspeptin receptor, G protein-coupled recepter 54 (Gpr54). Expression of the Lep receptor, trophic factors, and glial markers were differently affected in the HT of peripubertal males and females. Lep production in adipose tissue was decreased in Antag-treated rats of both sexes, with production of other cytokines being differentially regulated between sexes. In conclusion, in addition to the long-term effects on metabolism, changes in neonatal Lep levels modifies factors involved in reproduction that could possibly affect sexual maturation. PMID:25856428

  18. Confirmation of conjugation processes during TNT metabolism by axenic plant roots

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadra, R.; Wayment, D.G.; Hughes, J.B.; Shanks, J.V. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)] [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1999-02-01

    This paper examines processes in plants for the formation of fate products of TNT beyond its animated reduction products, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. TNT metabolites were isolated and characterized in combination with temporal analyses of production profiles and {sup 14}C distribution, in microbe-free, axenic root cultures of Catharanthus roseus. Four unique TNT-derived compounds were isolated. Using evidence from {sup 1}H NMR, mass spectroscopy, HPLC, acid hydrolysis, and enzymatic hydrolysis with {beta}-glucuronidase and {beta}-glucosidase, they were established as conjugates formed by reactions of the amine groups of 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. From the mass spectral evidence, at least a six-carbon unit from the plant intracellular milleu was involved in conjugate formation. Mass balance analysis indicated that, by 75 h after TNT amendment of the initial TNT radiolabel, extractable conjugates comprised 22%, bound residues comprised another 29%, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene was 4%, and the rest remained unidentified. Isolates from TNT-amended roots versus monoamino-dinitrotoluene-amended roots were not identical, suggesting numerous possible outcomes for the plant-based conjugation of 2-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene or 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. This study is the first direct evidence for the involvement of the primary reduction products of TNT--2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene ad 4-amino--2,6-dinitrotoluene--in conjugation process in plant detoxification of TNT.

  19. Factors Affecting the Evolution of Hurricane Erin and the Distributions of Hydrometeors: Role of Microphysical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Zhang, Henian; Dudhia, Jimy; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Hood, Robbie; Marks, Frank, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Fine-resolution simulations of Hurricane Erin 2001 are conducted using the Penn State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model version 3.5 to investigate the role of thermodynamic, boundary layer and microphysical processes in Erin's growth and maintenance, and their effects on the horizontal and vertical distributions of hydrometeors. Through comparison against radar, radiometer, and dropsonde data collected during the Convection and Moisture Experiment 4, it is seen that realistic simulations of Erin are obtained provided that fine resolution simulations with detailed representations of physical processes are conducted. The principle findings of the study are as follows: 1) a new iterative condensation scheme, which limits the unphysical increase of equivalent potential temperature associated with most condensation schemes, increases the horizontal size of the hurricane, decreases its maximum rainfall rate, reduces its intensity, and makes its eye more moist; 2) in general, microphysical parameterization schemes with more categories of hydrometeors produce more intense hurricanes, larger hydrometeor mixing ratios, and more intense updrafts and downdrafts; 3) the choice of coefficients describing hydrometeor fall velocities has as big of an impact on the hurricane simulations as does choice of microphysical parameterization scheme with no clear relationship between fall velocity and hurricane intensity; and 4) in order for a tropical cyclone to adequately intensify, an advanced boundary layer scheme (e.g., Burk-Thompson scheme) must be used to represent boundary layer processes. The impacts of varying simulations on the horizontal and vertical distributions of different categories of hydrometeor species, on equivalent potential temperature, and on storm updrafts and downdrafts are examined to determine how the release of latent heat feedbacks upon the structure of Erin. In general, all simulations tend to overpredict precipitation rate and hydrometeor mixing ratios. The ramifications of these findings for quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) of tropical cyclones are discussed.

  20. ["Progressive acalculia": a variety of focal degenerative atrophy affecting number processing].

    PubMed

    Verstichel, P; Masson, C

    2003-04-01

    A 72-year-old man experienced increasing difficulties in calculating and processing numbers. He made many syntactic errors when he read and wrote numbers, both in arabic and number-word forms. Transcoding between arabic numerals and number-words was severely impaired. His calculation abilities were grossly impaired. He could not perform even simple multiplications, but additions and subtractions were preserved. He was unable to recite multiplication tables or the alphabet. In contrast, numerosity judgment, magnitude comparisons,and semantic evaluation of numbers were intact. The patient's deficit could be summarized as an Impairment in all tasks involving numbers in a verbal format, corresponding to the so-called "verbal anarithmetia'." It was noteworthy that verification of operations, including multiplications, was accurately performed. For example, the patient could not solve a multiplication like 8 x 9, but could estimate that 9 x 2=1 1 was closer to the exact result than 9 X 2=17, or could state that 8 x 2=16 was exact even though, at the same time, he expressed verbally the terms of the corresponding addition "eight plus two is ten." Other cognitive deficits were detected by neuropsychological tests which demonstrated mainly anomic aphasia, dysorthographic agraphia without alexia, impairment of short term and episodic memory, digital agnosia. However, the patient could not be considered to have demon-eti due to preserved self-sufficiency, except for tasks requiring calculation abilities. During the two years of follow-up, the impairment in processing numbers and calculation remained predominant over other deficits. Cerebral MRI showed an atrophy of the left temporal and parietal lobes, and SPECT study showed a reduction of regional cerebral blood flow of the left hemisphere. This original clinical presentation of a cerebral degenerative disease could be described as "primary progressive acalculia" whatever the underlying primary pathological process. PMID:12773870

  1. Final Technical Report EMSP 70045 Investigation of Pore Scale Processes That Affect Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles W.; Webb, Andrew W.

    2004-12-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination in the vadose zone is a significant problem at Department of Energy sites. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate DNAPLs from the vadose zone. In most cases, a period of high recovery has been followed by a sustained period of low recovery. This behavior has been attributed to multiple processes including slow interphase mass transfer, retarded vapor phase transport, and diffusion from unswept zones of low permeability. This research project used a combination of laboratory experimentation and mathematical modeling to determine how these various processes interact to limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. Our results were applied to scenarios typical of the carbon tetrachloride spill zone at the Hanford Site. Our results indicate that: (a) the initial distribution of the spilled DNAPL (i.e., the spill-zone architecture) has a major influence upon the performance of any subsequent SVE operations; (b) while the pattern of higher and lower conductivity soil zones has an important impact upon spill zone architecture, soil moisture distribution plays an even larger role when there are large quantities of co-disposed waste-water (as in the Hanford scenario); (c) depending upon soil moisture dynamics, liquid DNAPL that is trapped by surrounding water is extremely difficult to remove by SVE; (d) natural barometric pumping can remove a large amount of the initial DNAPL mass for spills occurring close to the land surface, and hence the initial spilled inventory will be over-estimated if this process is neglected.

  2. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting dataset was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  3. Lessons learned from the decommissioning process affected by an accident during operation. The case of A1 NPP in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Daniska, Vladimir [DECONTA, a.s., Sibirska 1, Trnava, SK 917 01 (Slovakia); Timulak, Jan [DECOM Slovakia, Jana Bottu, 2. SK-91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Pekar, Anton [VUJE Trnava, Inc. (Slovakia); Niznansky, Vojtech [Javys - Jadrova a vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s. - Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, plc., Tomasikova 22, 821 02 Bratislava (Slovakia); Konecny, Ladislav [UJD SR - Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic, Bajkalska 27, P.O.BOX 24, 820 07 Bratislava 27 (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning of NPP's with standard shutdown is currently well known process. The A1 NPP in Slovakia was shutdown in 1977 after the accident in the core which caused the damage of the fuel and contamination of systems. Long period from 1977 to 2008 was needed to manage issues resulting from affecting the systems and structures of A1 NPP and the environment by the accident. Management of the damaged spent fuel, decontamination of the primary circuit and other processes generated large amounts of alpha bearing waste, mostly liquid, having sludge phases with specific physical-chemical and radiological properties. Up to 1994, the approach for eliminating the consequences of the accident was based on safety priorities. The systematic approach, which includes also the rehabilitation of the affected environment, was implemented in the period 1994-2008. The process includes also establishing of the decommissioning infrastructure, legislative and funding system with the aim to implement the standard decommissioning procedures after 2008. However, the specific aspects, especially the level and radio-nuclide composition of contamination of systems and structures will remain. For final decommissioning 2008-2033, the approach was selected which foresees four licensed phases. This approach enables proper planning and performing of individual decommissioning phases. (authors)

  4. Dyads and triads at 35,000 feet - Factors affecting group process and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The task of flying a multipilot transport aircraft is a classic small-group performance situation where a number of social, organizational, and personality factors are relevant to important outcome variables such as safety. The aviation community is becoming increasingly aware of the importance of these factors but is hampered in its efforts to improve the system because of research psychology's problems in defining the nature of the group process. This article identifies some of the problem areas as well as methods used to address these issues. It is argued that high fidelity flight simulators provide an environment that offers unique opportunities for work meeting both basic and applied research criteria.

  5. Dyads and triads at 35,000 feet: Factors affecting group process and aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The task of flying a multipilot transport aircraft is a classic small-group performance situation where a number of social, organizational, and personality factors are relevant to important outcome variables such as safety. The aviation community is becoming increasingly aware of the importance of these factors but is hampered in its efforts to improve the system because of research psychology's problems in defining the nature of the group process. This article identifies some of the problem areas as well as methods used to address these issues. It is argued that high fidelity flight simulators provide an environment that offers unique opportunities for work meeting both basic and applied research criteria.

  6. Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism Aerobic = oxidative metabolism

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    and lizards · Anaerobic metabolism may supply 50-90% of energy during activity · As with many other processes flight is positively related to drag and velocity #12;Laysan Albatross Horned Puffin AspectRatio Red

  7. Folate: metabolism, genes, polymorphisms and the associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Nazki, Fakhira Hassan; Sameer, Aga Syed; Ganaie, Bashir Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Folate being an important vitamin of B Complex group in our diet plays an important role not only in the synthesis of DNA but also in the maintenance of methylation reactions in the cells. Folate metabolism is influenced by several processes especially its dietary intake and the polymorphisms of the associated genes involved. Aberrant folate metabolism, therefore, affects both methylation as well as the DNA synthesis processes, both of which have been implicated in the development of various diseases. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the processes involved in folate metabolism and consequences of deviant folate metabolism, particular emphasis is given to the polymorphic genes which have been implicated in the development of various diseases in humans, like vascular diseases, Down's syndrome, neural tube defects, psychiatric disorders and cancers. PMID:24091066

  8. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities.

    PubMed

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  9. Short formalin fixation and rapid microwave processing do not affect HER2 testing.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Isabella; Invernizzi, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Correct and consistent results in estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 and Ki67 proliferation rate testing are a basic prerequisite for selecting therapy and individualizing prognosis in patients with breast carcinoma. Preanalytic factors, including time from excision to fixation and time and type of fixation, are critical to obtain reproducible and reliable results in these immunohistochemical assays and their relevance has long been stressed. The ASCO-CAP guidelines on HER2 testing indicated that histologic material including both biopsies and surgical specimens must be fixed for at least 6 h in order to obtain reliable results; however, there is a very limited scientific support regarding the setting at 6 h the minimum fixation time. We demonstrate that with a short fixation time (30') and rapid processing with MW technology (69'), it is possible to achieve an adequate and reproducible assessment of HER2 status. We obtained similar results in HER2 evaluation in breast carcinoma biopsies treated with this short protocol and in the corresponding surgical specimens processed routinely with a 24 h formalin fixation time-i.e., within the guidelines interval time. PMID:25636429

  10. The influence of affective states on the process of lie detection.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Marc-André; Schwarz, Norbert

    2012-12-01

    Lay theories about the tell tale signs of deception include numerous nonverbal cues; empirically, however, a focus on message content results in better lie detection than a focus on nonverbal elements. Feelings-as-information theory (Schwarz, 1990, 2012) predicts that systematic processing of message content is more likely under sad than happy moods, whereas reliance on salient cues is more likely under happy than sad moods. If so, perceivers who are asked to evaluate the veracity of a message should (a) attend more to message content when they are in a negative mood, but (b) more to nonverbal cues when they are in a positive mood. This should (c) result in more accurate identification of true as well as false messages under sad mood, mediated by (d) mood-induced differences in processing style. Three experiments tested these predictions. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants in a negative mood achieved higher accuracy in classifying truthful as well as deceptive messages than participants in a positive mood. Experiment 3 crossed nonverbal cues (fidgety vs. calm movements) and message characteristics (low vs. high plausibility). Only the plausibility of the message influenced participants' credibility judgments under sad mood conditions, whereas only the nonverbal cues influenced participants' judgments of credibility under happy mood conditions. Implications for lie detection and the interplay of feeling and thinking are discussed. PMID:23148455

  11. The cognitive processes underlying affective decision-making predicting adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Koritzky, Gilly; Johnson, C. Anderson; Bechara, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between three different cognitive processes underlying the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study. We conducted a longitudinal study of 181 Chinese adolescents in Chengdu City, China. The participants were followed from 10th to 11th grade. When they were in the 10th grade (Time 1), we tested these adolescents' decision-making using the IGT and working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess school academic performance and smoking behaviors. The same questionnaires were completed again at the 1-year follow-up (Time 2). The Expectancy-Valence (EV) Model was applied to distill the IGT performance into three different underlying psychological components: (i) a motivational component which indicates the subjective weight the adolescents assign to gains vs. losses; (ii) a learning-rate component which indicates the sensitivity to recent outcomes vs. past experiences; and (iii) a response component which indicates how consistent the adolescents are between learning and responding. The subjective weight to gains vs. losses at Time 1 significantly predicted current smokers and current smoking levels at Time 2, controlling for demographic variables and baseline smoking behaviors. Therefore, by decomposing the IGT into three different psychological components, we found that the motivational process of weight gain vs. losses may serve as a neuropsychological marker to predict adolescent smoking behaviors in a general youth population. PMID:24101911

  12. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities

    PubMed Central

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  13. The cognitive processes underlying affective decision-making predicting adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Koritzky, Gilly; Johnson, C Anderson; Bechara, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between three different cognitive processes underlying the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study. We conducted a longitudinal study of 181 Chinese adolescents in Chengdu City, China. The participants were followed from 10th to 11th grade. When they were in the 10th grade (Time 1), we tested these adolescents' decision-making using the IGT and working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess school academic performance and smoking behaviors. The same questionnaires were completed again at the 1-year follow-up (Time 2). The Expectancy-Valence (EV) Model was applied to distill the IGT performance into three different underlying psychological components: (i) a motivational component which indicates the subjective weight the adolescents assign to gains vs. losses; (ii) a learning-rate component which indicates the sensitivity to recent outcomes vs. past experiences; and (iii) a response component which indicates how consistent the adolescents are between learning and responding. The subjective weight to gains vs. losses at Time 1 significantly predicted current smokers and current smoking levels at Time 2, controlling for demographic variables and baseline smoking behaviors. Therefore, by decomposing the IGT into three different psychological components, we found that the motivational process of weight gain vs. losses may serve as a neuropsychological marker to predict adolescent smoking behaviors in a general youth population. PMID:24101911

  14. Assessing the potential for unintended effects in genetically modified potatoes perturbed in metabolic and developmental processes. Targeted analysis of key nutrients and anti-nutrients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise V. T. Shepherd; James W. McNicol; Ruth Razzo; Mark A. Taylor; Howard V. Davies

    2006-01-01

    Targeted compositional analysis was carried out on transgenic potato tubers of either cultivar (cv.) Record or cv. Desirée\\u000a to assess the potential for unintended effects caused by the genetic modification process. The range of transgenic lines analysed\\u000a included those modified in primary carbohydrate metabolism, polyamine biosynthesis and glycoprotein processing. Controls included\\u000a wildtype tubers, tubers produced from plants regenerated through tissue

  15. Detection of QTL for metabolic and agronomic traits in wheat with adjustments for variation at genetic loci that affect plant phenology.

    PubMed

    Hill, Camilla B; Taylor, Julian D; Edwards, James; Mather, Diane; Langridge, Peter; Bacic, Antony; Roessner, Ute

    2015-04-01

    Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with levels of individual metabolites (mQTL) was combined with the mapping of agronomic traits to investigate the genetic basis of variation and co-variation in metabolites, agronomic traits, and plant phenology in a field-grown bread wheat population. Metabolome analysis was performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry resulting in identification of mainly polar compounds, including secondary metabolites. A total of 558 metabolic features were obtained from the flag leaves of 179 doubled haploid lines, of which 197 features were putatively identified, mostly as alkaloids, flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Coordinated genetic control was observed for several groups of metabolites, such as organic acids influenced by two loci on chromosome 7A. Five major phenology-related loci, which were introduced as cofactors in the analyses, differed in their impact upon metabolic and agronomic traits with QZad-aww-7A having more impact on the expression of both metabolite and agronomic QTL than Ppd-B1, Vrn-A1, Eps, and QZad-aww-7D. This QTL study validates the utility of combining agronomic and metabolomic traits as an approach to identify potential trait enhancement targets for breeding selection and reinforces previous results that demonstrate the importance of including plant phenology in the assessment of useful traits in this wheat mapping population. PMID:25711822

  16. PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT?4 affects reactive oxygen species metabolism, cell wall and wood properties in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula?L.?×?tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Slesak, Ireneusz; Szechy?ska-Hebda, Magdalena; Fedak, Halina; Sidoruk, Natalia; D?browska-Bronk, Joanna; Wito?, Damian; Rusaczonek, Anna; Antczak, Andrzej; Dro?d?ek, Micha?; Karpi?ska, Barbara; Karpi?ski, Stanis?aw

    2014-06-18

    The PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT?4 (PAD4) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAD4) is involved in the regulation of plant - pathogen interactions. The role of PAD4 in woody plants is not known; therefore, we characterized its function in hybrid aspen and its role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signalling and wood development. Three independent transgenic lines with different suppression levels of poplar PAD expression were generated. All these lines displayed deregulated ROS metabolism, which was manifested by an increased H2 O2 level in the leaves and shoots, and higher activities of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) in the leaves in comparison to the wild-type plants. However, no changes in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) between the transgenic lines and wild type were observed in the leaves. Moreover, changes in the ROS metabolism in the pad4 transgenic lines positively correlated with wood formation. A higher rate of cell division, decreased tracheid average size and numbers, and increased cell wall thickness were observed. The results presented here suggest that the Populus tremula?×?tremuloides?PAD gene might be involved in the regulation of cellular ROS homeostasis and in the cell division - cell death balance that is associated with wood development. PMID:24943986

  17. Structural Features of Cytochromes P450 and Ligands that Affect Drug Metabolism as Revealed by X-ray Crystallography and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Sean C.; Roberts, Arthur G.; Halpert, James R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytochromes P450 (P450s) play a major role in the clearance of drugs, toxins, and environmental pollutants. Additionally, metabolism by P450s can result in toxic or carcinogenic products. The metabolism of pharmaceuticals by P450s is a major concern during the design of new drug candidates. Determining the interactions between P450s and compounds of very diverse structures is complicated by the variability in P450-ligand interactions. Understanding the protein structural elements and the chemical attributes of ligands that dictate their orientation in the P450 active site will aid in the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents. The goal of this review is to describe P450-ligand interactions from two perspectives. The first is the various structural elements that microsomal P450s have at their disposal to assume the different conformations observed in X-ray crystal structures. The second is P450-ligand dynamics analyzed by NMR relaxation studies. PMID:21103389

  18. [Medical simulation as a professional tool which affect the safety of the patient used in the learning process].

    PubMed

    Czekajlo, Michael; D?browski, Marek; D?browska, Agata; Torres, Kamil; Torres, Anna; Witt, Magdalena; G?siorowski, ?ukasz; Szuka?a, Magdalena

    2015-06-22

    Simulation is the methodology of teaching, learning process using educational equipment from simple simulators, designed to study individual tasks, through advanced mannequins called human patient stimulators faithfully mimic the human and its parameters. The medical simulation's main task is education and improvement patients' safety. Advanced human simulators can realistically cough, vomit with artificial chyme and bleed with artificial blood causing a real stress of medical personnel and the need for immediate action. Medical simulation gives the opportunity to prepare medical personnel to the profession more effectively, in less time than traditional education and also clearly affects the patients' safety. PMID:26098659

  19. Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody.

    PubMed

    Lima, César F; Garrett, Carolina; Castro, São Luís

    2013-01-01

    Does emotion processing in music and speech prosody recruit common neurocognitive mechanisms? To examine this question, we implemented a cross-domain comparative design in Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-four patients and 25 controls performed emotion recognition tasks for music and spoken sentences. In music, patients had impaired recognition of happiness and peacefulness, and intact recognition of sadness and fear; this pattern was independent of general cognitive and perceptual abilities. In speech, patients had a small global impairment, which was significantly mediated by executive dysfunction. Hence, PD affected differently musical and prosodic emotions. This dissociation indicates that the mechanisms underlying the two domains are partly independent. PMID:23477505

  20. Processing method and corn cultivar affected anthocyanin concentration from dried distillers grains with solubles.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Wang, Zhaoqin; West, Megan; Singh, Vijay; West, Leslie; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanins are water-soluble pigments with health benefits and potential use as food colorants. The objectives of this work were to (1) determine optimum parameters for the extraction of anthocyanins from dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS), (2) develop a method of anthocyanin extraction from DDGS, (3) quantify and identify the extracted anthocyanins, and (4) determine the effect of processing methods and corn cultivars on anthocyanin concentration. DDGS samples were prepared from purple (PC) and dark (DC) corn and processed using conventional enzymes (C) and granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GC). Three independent variables (ethanol concentration (0, 12.5, and 25%); liquid-to-solid ratio (30:1, 40:1, 50:1 mL/g); and extraction temperature (4, 22, and 40 °C)) and two dependent variables (anthocyanin concentration and a-value (redness)) were used. Results showed that dark corn DDGS gave anthocyanin concentration higher than that of purple corn. The GC process showed total anthocyanin concentration higher than that of the conventional method of DDGS production. The maximum anthocyanin concentration was obtained at 12.5% ethanol, 40:1 liquid-to-solid ratio, and 22 °C for C-PC [321.0 ± 37.3 ?g cyanidin-3 glucoside (C3G) equivalent/g DDGS]. For GC-PC, 25% ethanol, 30:1 liquid-to-solid ratio, and 22 °C gave 741.4 ± 12.8 ?g C3G equivalent/g DDGS. For GC-DC, 12.5% ethanol, 40:1 liquid-to-solid ratio, and 40 °C extraction gave 1573.4 ± 84.0 ?g C3G equivalent/g DDGS. LC/MS-MS analysis showed that the major anthocyanins were cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-(6?-malonyl) glucoside, and peonidin-3-(6?malonyl) glucoside. In conclusion, anthocyanin extraction from colored corn DDGS can be optimized using 12.5% ethanol, 40:1 mL/g ratio, and 22 °C. PMID:25760759

  1. Structural Features Affecting Trafficking, Processing, and Secretion of Trypanosoma cruzi Mucins*

    PubMed Central

    Cánepa, Gaspar E.; Mesías, Andrea C.; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is wrapped by a dense coat of mucin-type molecules encoded by complex gene families termed TcSMUG and TcMUC, which are expressed in the insect- and mammal-dwelling forms of the parasite, respectively. Here, we dissect the contribution of distinct post-translational modifications on the trafficking of these glycoconjugates. In vivo tracing and characterization of tagged-variants expressed by transfected epimastigotes indicate that although the N-terminal signal peptide is responsible for targeting TcSMUG products to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor likely functions as a forward transport signal for their timely progression along the secretory pathway. GPI-minus variants accumulate in the ER, with only a minor fraction being ultimately released to the medium as anchorless products. Secreted products, but not ER-accumulated ones, display several diagnostic features of mature mucin-type molecules including extensive O-type glycosylation, Galf-based epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies, and terminal Galp residues that become readily sialylated upon addition of parasite trans-sialidases. Processing of N-glycosylation site(s) is dispensable for the overall TcSMUG mucin-type maturation and secretion. Despite undergoing different O-glycosylation elaboration, TcMUC reporters yielded quite similar results, thus indicating that (i) molecular trafficking signals are structurally and functionally conserved between mucin families, and (ii) TcMUC and TcSMUG products are recognized and processed by a distinct repertoire of stage-specific glycosyltransferases. Thus, using the fidelity of a homologous expression system, we have defined some biosynthetic aspects of T. cruzi mucins, key molecules involved in parasite protection and virulence. PMID:22707724

  2. Methane-related microbial processes and metabolic stratification in a terrestrial mud volcano, southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Lin, L.; Wang, P.; Chu, P.; Wu, J.

    2009-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are distinct geological features with fluid, sediment and hydrocarbon-enriched gas mixtures emitted from deep sedimentary environments. Without microbial attenuation in the water column, methane emission to atmosphere from terrestrial mud volcanoes constitutes a significant proportion to the global methane inventory. Microorganisms mediating methane transformation would be particularly enriched in such environments. Their activity, distribution, and diversity involved remain not well-constrained. At Shin-Yan-Ny-Hu Mud Volcanoes (SYNHMV) of southwestern Taiwan, we performed series of measurements and analyses on the pore water and eruptive water samples using geochemical and molecular approaches, in order to determine microbial processes and community assemblages responsible for methane transformation. Geochemical measurements indicated that sulfate depletion was companied with methane increase as the depth increased. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) more depleted in 13C was observed at the depth of sulfate-methane transition zone (SMT, at ~12cm depth) than at other depth intervals. These characteristics of methane, sulfate, and DIC isotope profiles and the presence of ANME-1 sequences showed a high similarity with those of marine sediments, indicating the existence of active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). From bottom to top, the increasing ?13C values of methane with the greatest value occurring in the eruptive surface water suggests methanogenesis and/or methane oxidation over the entire depth range. The contribution of microbial methane could be supported by molecular data of which methanogen-related archaea distributed throughout the entire depths, and the community structures were characterized by Methanosarcinales dominating at shallow depths and Methanomicrobiales dominating in deep sediments. The affinities and activities to substrate addition for methanogenesis appeared to be depth-dependent. Bacterial sequences affiliated with methane-oxidizing gamma-proteobacteria members were mainly observed in the uppermost sediment samples. Delta-proteobacteria 16S sequences including Desulfuromonadales, Syntrophus, and Desulfomonales constituted significant proportions along the entire depth range. These findings concluded that methanogens were ubiquitously dispersed and actively expressed in the near-surface sediment of the terrestrial mud volcano while aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation accounted for the methane consumption above SMT. Methane ascending from deep-reservoir would be altered substantially by microbial processes in both isotope compositions and abundances.

  3. Granular activated carbon for simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation of toxic oil sands process-affected water organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) released into oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) during bitumen processing in Northern Alberta are problematic for oil sands industries due to their toxicity in the environment and resistance to degradation during conventional wastewater treatment processes. Granular activated carbon (GAC) has shown to be an effective media in removing biopersistent organics from wastewater using a combination of adsorption and biodegradation removal mechanisms. A simultaneous GAC (0.4 g GAC/L) adsorption and biodegradation (combined treatment) study was used for the treatment of raw and ozonated OSPW. After 28 days of batch treatment, classical and oxidized NAs removals for raw OSPW were 93.3% and 73.7%, and for ozonated OSPW were 96.2% and 77.1%, respectively. Synergetic effects of the combined treatment process were observed in removals of COD, the acid extractable fraction, and oxidized NAs, which indicated enhanced biodegradation and bioregeneration in GAC biofilms. A bacteria copy number >10(8) copies/g GAC on GAC surfaces was found using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction after treatment for both raw and ozonated OSPW. A Microtox(®) acute toxicity test (Vibrio fischeri) showed effective toxicity removal (>95.3%) for the combined treatments. Therefore, the simultaneous GAC adsorption and biodegradation treatment process is a promising technology for the elimination of toxic OSPW NAs. PMID:25617868

  4. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk of ...

  5. Metabolic Fluxes and Metabolic Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search