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Sample records for metabolism neurological functions

  1. Metabolic phenotyping and systems biology approaches to understanding neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput metabolic profiling and the study of the metabolome are particularly important in brain research where small molecules or metabolites play fundamental signalling roles: neurotransmitters, signalling lipids, osmolytes and even ions. Metabolic profiling has shown that metabolic perturbations in the brain go beyond alterations of neurotransmission and that variations in brain metabolic homeostasis are associated with neurological disorders. In this report, we will focus on recent developments in the field of metabolic phenotyping that have contributed to unravelling the pathophysiology of neurological diseases. Also, we will highlight the necessity of implementing systems biology approaches to integrate metabolic data and tackle the structural and functional complexity of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23755365

  2. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  3. Metabolic Disturbances in Diseases with Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Schuck, Patrícia F.; Wenk, Gary L.; Ferreira, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses. PMID:25110608

  4. Functional symptoms in neurology: mimics and chameleons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Reuber, Markus; Carson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The mimics and chameleons of functional symptoms in neurology could be a whole textbook of neurology. Nevertheless, there are some recurring themes when things go wrong, notably diagnostic bias introduced by the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity or life events, neurological diseases that look 'weird' and lack of appreciation of the more unusual features of functional symptoms themselves. PMID:23468561

  5. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  6. Functional neurological disorders: mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Alexander; Gelauff, Jeannette; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Ludwig, Lea; McWhirter, Laura; Williams, Stevie; Gardiner, Paula; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2016-03-01

    Functional neurological disorders are common problems in neurologic practice. In the past decade there has been an increasing interest in this group of disorders both from a clinical as well as research point of view. In this review, we highlight some of the most salient and exciting publications from recent years focusing especially on new findings illuminating mechanism and studies examining treatment. PMID:26410744

  7. Reptilian neurology: anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Wyneken, Jeanette

    2007-09-01

    The reptilian nervous system is relatively simple in structure yet is characterized by great functional diversity. This article describes the reptilian nervous system, highlighting the similarities and differences among species in structures and functions. PMID:17765850

  8. Functional neurological disorders: the neurological assessment as treatment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon

    2016-02-01

    The neurologist's role in patients with functional disorders has traditionally been limited to making the diagnosis, excluding a 'disease' and pronouncing the symptoms to be 'non-organic' or 'psychogenic'. In this article, I argue that there are multiple opportunities during routine assessment of a patient with a functional disorder for the neurologist to take the lead with treatment. These opportunities occur throughout history taking, during the examination and, with greatest potential for treatment, at the end of the consultation. Elements of the neurologist's discussion that may be most useful include (a) emphasis that symptoms are genuine, common and potentially reversible; (b) explanation of the positive nature of the diagnosis (ie, not a diagnosis of exclusion); (c) simple advice about distraction techniques, self-help techniques and sources of information; (d) referral on to appropriate physiotherapy and/or psychological services; and (e) offering outpatient review. I also discuss how new diagnostic criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 and changes proposed for International Classification of Diseases may facilitate changes that allow neurologists to bring their management of patients with functional disorders in line with other multidisciplinary neurological disorders in the outpatient clinic. PMID:26715762

  9. Update on 3-iodothyronamine and its neurological and metabolic actions.

    PubMed

    Zucchi, Riccardo; Accorroni, Alice; Chiellini, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is an endogenous amine, that has been detected in many rodent tissues, and in human blood. It has been hypothesized to derive from thyroid hormone metabolism, but this hypothesis still requires validation. T1AM is not a ligand for nuclear thyroid hormone receptors, but stimulates with nanomolar affinity trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a G protein-coupled membrane receptor. With a lower affinity it interacts with alpha2A adrenergic receptors. Additional targets are represented by apolipoprotein B100, mitochondrial ATP synthase, and membrane monoamine transporters, but the functional relevance of these interactions is still uncertain. Among the effects reported after administration of exogenous T1AM to experimental animals, metabolic and neurological responses deserve special attention, because they were obtained at low dosages, which increased endogenous tissue concentration by about one order of magnitude. Systemic T1AM administration favored fatty acid over glucose catabolism, increased ketogenesis and increased blood glucose. Similar responses were elicited by intracerebral infusion, which inhibited insulin secretion and stimulated glucagon secretion. However, T1AM administration increased ketogenesis and gluconeogenesis also in hepatic cell lines and in perfused liver preparations, providing evidence for a peripheral action, as well. In the central nervous system, T1AM behaved as a neuromodulator, affecting adrenergic and/or histaminergic neurons. Intracerebral T1AM administration favored learning and memory, modulated sleep and feeding, and decreased the pain threshold. In conclusion T1AM should be considered as a component of thyroid hormone signaling and might play a significant physiological and/or pathophysiological role. T1AM analogs have already been synthetized and their therapeutical potential is currently under investigation. 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is a biogenic amine whose structure is closely related to that of

  10. Sparring and neurological function in professional boxers.

    PubMed

    Stiller, John W; Yu, Steven S; Brenner, Lisa A; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B; Roberts, Darryl W; Monsell, Ray M T; Binks, Sidney W; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer's physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

  11. Sparring and Neurological Function in Professional Boxers

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Yu, Steven S.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B.; Roberts, Darryl W.; Monsell, Ray M. T.; Binks, Sidney W.; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

  12. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes. PMID:26900733

  13. Functional neurological disorders in outpatient practice: An Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Omar; Ahmad, Kate E

    2016-06-01

    Functional disorders are defined as neurological symptoms without causative organic pathology identified. They are a diverse and often neglected group of disorders. The aim of this was to determine the incidence and outcome of functional neurological disorders in an Australian neurology practice. Over a 17month period, all patients presenting to a single outpatient neurology service were evaluated to determine the incidence and outcome of these disorders. A total of 884 patients were assessed and of these, 137 had a final diagnosis of functional neurological illness, equating to an incidence of 15% of all patients seen. Functional disorders were the third most common presentation overall. Patients with functional disorders were younger, more likely to be female and had a higher rate of current psychiatric comorbidity compared to other neurology patients. Sensory symptoms were the most common manifestation (48%) followed by limb weakness (37%) and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (14%). Outcome information was available for 49% of patients at an average of 3months follow-up. 45% had some improvement in their symptoms, 43% had static symptoms and 12% had worsening of symptoms. This study confirms the high incidence of functional disorders in outpatient neurology practice. Early improvement was seen in a substantial proportion of patients and is influenced by duration of symptoms. PMID:26754851

  14. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: Review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2009-09-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 {mu}g/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 {mu}g/L, mean 99 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  15. Exosomal Protein Deficiencies: How Abnormal RNA Metabolism Results in Childhood-Onset Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Juliane S.; Giunta, Michele; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Defects of RNA metabolism have been increasingly identified in various forms of inherited neurological diseases. Recently, abnormal RNA degradation due to mutations in human exosome subunit genes has been shown to cause complex childhood onset neurological presentations including spinal muscular atrophy, pontocerebellar hypoplasia and myelination deficiencies. This paper summarizes our current knowledge about the exosome in human neurological disease and provides some important insights into potential disease mechanisms. PMID:27127732

  16. Functional (Psychogenic) Cognitive Disorders: A Perspective from the Neurology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Pal, Suvankar; Blackburn, Daniel; Reuber, Markus; Thekkumpurath, Parvez; Carson, Alan

    2015-09-24

    Cognitive symptoms such as poor memory and concentration represent a common cause of morbidity among patients presenting to general practitioners and may result in referral for a neurological opinion. In many cases, these symptoms do not relate to an underlying neurological disease or dementia. In this article we present a personal perspective on the differential diagnosis of cognitive symptoms in the neurology clinic, especially as this applies to patients who seek advice about memory problems but have no neurological disease process. These overlapping categories include the following 'functional' categories: 1) cognitive symptoms as part of anxiety or depression; 2) "normal" cognitive symptoms that become the focus of attention; 3) isolated functional cognitive disorder in which symptoms are outwith 'normal' but not explained by anxiety; 4) health anxiety about dementia; 5) cognitive symptoms as part of another functional disorder; and 6) retrograde dissociative (psychogenic) amnesia. Other 'non-dementia' diagnoses to consider in addition are 1) cognitive symptoms secondary to prescribed medication or substance misuse; 2) diseases other than dementia causing cognitive disorders; 3) patients who appear to have functional cognitive symptoms but then go on to develop dementia/another neurological disease; and finally 4) exaggeration/malingering. We discuss previous attempts to classify the problem of functional cognitive symptoms, the importance of making a positive diagnosis for the patient, and the need for large cohort studies to better define and manage this large group of patients. PMID:26445274

  17. [Neurological lower torso function test. A new assessment].

    PubMed

    Merkert, J; Butz, S; Nieczaj, R; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Eckardt, R

    2013-02-01

    The neurological lower torso function test was developed in addition to the Berg Balance Scale as an assessment for diagnosis and follow-up of lower torso stability and functioning in neurological patients, used for example in subjects in the early rehabilitation phase or still showing low motoric recovery after suffering a stroke. Due to the ground effect for changes in severely affected neurological patients, other tests currently available do not provide an adequate level of sensitivity. The neurological function test was integrated into the study "Combined whole body vibration and balance training using Vibrosphere" with 66 inpatient/partial inpatient neurological subjects ≥ 60 years. Based on six tasks, a qualitative assessment of the selective function of movement and posture tone of the lower extremity, the muscular system around the hip, and the lower torso are performed. Analogous to the Berg Balance Scale, a 5 point scale is used. It shows a high degree of reliability and responsiveness and can be performed with little effort of time and personnel. PMID:22733479

  18. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  19. Plasticity and functional recovery in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on patients with phantom limbs suggest that neural connections in the adult human brain are much more malleable than previously assumed. Three weeks after amputation of an arm, sensations from the ipsilateral face are referred to the phantom; this effect is caused by the sensory input from the face skin 'invading' and activating deafferented hand zones in the cortex and thalamus. Many phantom arms are 'paralysed' in a painful position. If a mirror is propped vertically in the sagittal plane and the patient looks at the reflection of his/her normal hand, this reflection appears superimposed on the 'felt' position of the phantom. Remarkably, if the real arm is moved, the phantom is felt to move as well and this sometimes relieves the painful cramps in the phantom. Mirror visual feedback (MVF) has shown promising results with chronic regional pain syndrome and hemiparesis following stroke. These results suggest two reasons for a paradigm shift in neurorehabilitation. First, there appears to be tremendous latent plasticity even in the adult brain. Second, the brain should be thought of, not as a hierarchy of organised autonomous modules, each of which delivers its output to the next level, but as a set of complex interacting networks that are in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the brain's environment. Both principles can be potentially exploited in a clinical context to facilitate recovery of function. PMID:16138492

  20. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  1. Neurological and neurocognitive functions from intrauterine methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kado, Yoko; Diez, Midory Higa; Kishikawa, Toshihiro; Sanada, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    In the 1950s, large-scale food poisoning caused by methylmercury was identified in Minamata, Japan. Although severe intrauterine exposure cases (ie, congenital Minamata disease patients) are well known, possible impacts of methylmercury exposure in utero among residents, which is likely at lower levels than in congenital Minamata disease patients, are rarely explored. In 2014, the authors examined neurological and neurocognitive functions among 18 exposed participants in Minamata, focusing on fine motor, visuospatial construction, and executive functions. More than half of the participants had some fine motor and coordination difficulties. In addition, several participants had lower performance for neurocognitive function tests (the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test and Keio version of the Wisconsin card sorting test). These deficits imply diffuse brain damage. This study suggests possible neurological and neurocognitive impacts of prenatal exposure to methylmercury among exposed residents of Minamata. PMID:26267674

  2. Functions of noncoding RNAs in neural development and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Shan; Sun, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The development of the central nervous system (CNS) relies on precisely orchestrated gene expression regulation. Dysregualtion of both genetic and environmental factors can affect proper CNS development and results in neurological diseases. Recent studies have shown that similar to protein coding genes, noncoding RNA molecules have a significant impact on normal CNS development and on causes and progression of human neurological disorders. In this review, we have highlighted discoveries of functions of noncoding RNAs, in particular microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in neural development and neurological diseases. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs play an essential role in many aspects of neural development, such as proliferation of neural stem cells and progenitors, neuronal differentiation, maturation and synaptogenesis. Misregulation of microRNAs is associated with some mental disorders and neurodegeneration diseases. In addition, long noncoding RNAs are found to play a role in neural development by regulating expression of protein coding genes. Therefore, examining noncoding RNA-mediated gene regulations has revealed novel mechanisms of neural development and provided new insights into the etiology of human neurological diseases. PMID:21969146

  3. Leigh Syndrome in Childhood: Neurologic Progression and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Sook; Kim, Hunmin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies have analyzed the clinical course and functional outcome in Leigh syndrome (LS). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, radiological, biochemical, and genetic features of patients with LS, and identify prognostic indicators of the disease progression and neurological outcome. Methods Thirty-nine patients who had been diagnosed with LS at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital were included. Their medical records, neuroimaging findings, and histological/biochemical findings of skeletal muscle specimens were reviewed. Targeted sequencing of mitochondrial DNA was performed based on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme defects. Results Isolated complex I deficiency was the most frequently observed MRC defect (in 42% of 38 investigated patients). Mitochondrial DNA mutations were identified in 11 patients, of which 81.8% were MT-ND genes. The clinical outcome varied widely, from independent daily activity to severe disability. Poor functional outcomes and neurological deterioration were significantly associated with early onset (before an age of 1 year) and the presence of other lesions additional to basal ganglia involvement in the initial neuroimaging. Conclusions The neurological severity and outcome of LS may vary widely and be better than those predicted based on previous studies. We suggest that age at onset and initial neuroimaging findings are prognostic indicators in LS. PMID:27074294

  4. Endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-related mediators: Targets, metabolism and role in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Petrosino, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is composed of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, and the two main endogenous lipid ligands of such receptors (also known as the "endocannabinoids"), anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol. The ECS is a pleiotropic signalling system involved in all aspects of mammalian physiology and pathology, and for this reason it represents a potential target for the design and development of new therapeutic drugs. However, the endocannabinoids as well as some of their congeners also interact with a much wider range of receptors, including members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs), and other GPCRs. Indeed, following the discovery of the endocannabinoids, endocannabinoid-related lipid mediators, which often share the same metabolic pathways of the endocannabinoids, have also been identified or rediscovered. In this review article, we discuss the role of endocannabinoids and related lipids during physiological functions, as well as their involvement in some of the most common neurological disorders. PMID:26965148

  5. Neurologic Factors in Female Sexual Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Mike B.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction affects both men and women, involving organic disorders, psychological problems, or both. Overall, the state of our knowledge is less advanced regarding female sexual physiology in comparison with male sexual function. Female sexual dysfunction has received little clinical and basic research attention and remains a largely untapped field in medicine. The epidemiology of female sexual dysfunction is poorly understood because relatively few studies have been done in community settings. In the United States, female sexual dysfunction has been estimated to affect 40% of women in the general population. Among the elderly, however, it has been reported that up to 87% of women complain of sexual dissatisfaction. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of female sexual arousal disorders correlates significantly with increasing age. These studies have shown that sexual arousal and frequency of coitus in the female decreases with increasing age. The pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction appears more complex than that of males, involving multidimensional hormonal, neurological, vascular, psychological, and interpersonal aspects. Organic female sexual disorders may include a wide variety of vascular, neural, or neurovascular factors that lead to problems with libido, lubrication, and orgasm. However, the precise etiology and mechanistic pathways of age-related female sexual arousal disorders are yet to be determined. In the past two decades, some advances have been made in exploring the basic hemodynamics and neuroregulation of female sexual function and dysfunction in both animal models and in human studies. In this review, we summarize neural regulation of sexual function and neurological causes of sexual dysfunction in women. PMID:20664775

  6. How aluminum, an intracellular ROS generator promotes hepatic and neurological diseases: the metabolic tale.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungwon; Lemire, Joseph; Appanna, Varun P; Auger, Christopher; Castonguay, Zachary; Appanna, Vasu D

    2013-04-01

    Metal pollutants are a global health risk due to their ability to contribute to a variety of diseases. Aluminum (Al), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant is implicated in anemia, osteomalacia, hepatic disorder, and neurological disorder. In this review, we outline how this intracellular generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggers a metabolic shift towards lipogenesis in astrocytes and hepatocytes. This Al-evoked phenomenon is coupled to diminished mitochondrial activity, anerobiosis, and the channeling of α-ketoacids towards anti-oxidant defense. The resulting metabolic reconfiguration leads to fat accumulation and a reduction in ATP synthesis, characteristics that are common to numerous medical disorders. Hence, the ability of Al toxicity to create an oxidative environment promotes dysfunctional metabolic processes in astrocytes and hepatocytes. These molecular events triggered by Al-induced ROS production are the potential mediators of brain and liver disorders. PMID:23463459

  7. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  8. Neurologic function among termiticide applicators exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, K; Dick, R B; Howell, R J; Chrislip, D W; Hines, C J; Reid, T M; Lehman, E; Laber, P; Krieg, E F; Knott, C

    2000-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a moderately toxic organophosphate pesticide. Houses and lawns in the United States receive a total of approximately 20 million annual chlorpyrifos treatments, and 82% of U.S. adults have detectable levels of a chlorpyrifos metabolite (3,5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol; TCP) in the urine. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that there are 5,000 yearly reported cases of accidental chlorpyrifos poisoning, and approximately one-fourth of these cases exhibit symptoms. Organophosphates affect the nervous system, but there are few epidemiologic data on chlorpyrifos neurotoxicity. We studied neurologic function in 191 current and former termiticide applicators who had an average of 2.4 years applying chlorpyrifos and 2.5 years applying other pesticides, and we compared them to 189 nonexposed controls. The average urinary TCP level for 65 recently exposed applicators was 629.5 microg/L, as compared to 4.5 microg/L for the general U.S. population. The exposed group did not differ significantly from the nonexposed group for any test in the clinical examination. Few significant differences were found in nerve conduction velocity, arm/hand tremor, vibrotactile sensitivity, vision, smell, visual/motor skills, or neurobehavioral skills. The exposed group did not perform as well as the nonexposed group in pegboard turning tests and some postural sway tests. The exposed subjects also reported significantly more symptoms, including memory problems, emotional states, fatigue, and loss of muscle strength; our more quantitative tests may not have been adequate to detect these symptoms. Eight men who reported past chlorpyrifos poisoning had a pattern of low performance on a number of tests, which is consistent with prior reports of chronic effects of organophosphate poisoning. Overall, the lack of exposure effects on the clinical examination was reassuring. The findings for self-reported symptoms raise some concern, as does the finding of low performance

  9. Central nervous system structure and function in Sturge-Weber syndrome: evidence of neurologic and radiologic progression.

    PubMed

    Maria, B L; Neufeld, J A; Rosainz, L C; Drane, W E; Quisling, R G; Ben-David, K; Hamed, L M

    1998-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is characterized by the presence of a port-wine nevus, epilepsy, stroke-like episodes, headache, and developmental delay. We studied 20 cases to test the hypothesis that decreased cerebral blood flow alters neurologic function by affecting cellular glucose metabolism. Group A consisted of 10 patients with a mean age of 1.75 years and early seizure onset (6.8 months), whereas group B was composed of older patients (mean age, 15.3 years) with later onset of seizures (3.7 years). Neurologic disease was more severe in group A, but group B had more widespread structural brain defects - shown on computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging - and metabolic brain defects shown on hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose single photon emission computed tomographic scans. Six group A cases had hypoperfusion at baseline and five of nine had worsening of perfusion and glucose metabolism 1 year later. A total of 119 stroke-like episodes occurred in six group A cases and eight group B cases; there were 65% fewer strokes in children treated with aspirin. The data suggest that progressive hypoperfusion and glucose hypometabolism are associated with neurologic deterioration in Sturge-Weber syndrome. Longitudinal studies are needed to better define the natural history of disease and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of aspirin therapy. PMID:9881531

  10. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  11. Differentiating cerebral ischemia from functional neurological symptom disorder: a psychosomatic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The differential diagnosis of pseudo-neurological symptoms often represents a clinical challenge. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM-5, made an attempt to improve diagnostic criteria of conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder). Incongruences of the neurological examination, i.e. positive neurological signs, indicate a new approach - whereas psychological factors are not necessary anymore. As the DSM-5 will influence the International Classification of Diseases, ICD-11, this is of importance. In the case presented, a history of psychological distress and adverse childhood experiences coexisted with a true neurological disorder. We discuss the relevance of an interdisciplinary assessment and of operationalized diagnostic criteria. Case presentation A 32-year-old man presented twice with neurological symptoms without obvious pathological organic findings. A conversion disorder was considered early on at the second admission by the neurology team. Sticking to ICD-10, this diagnosis was not supported by a specialist for psychosomatic medicine, due to missing hints of concurrent psychological distress in temporal association with neurological symptoms. Further investigations then revealed a deep vein thrombosis (though D-dimers had been negative), which had probably resulted in a crossed embolus. Conclusion The absence of a clear proof of biological dysfunction underlying neurological symptoms should not lead automatically to the diagnosis of a conversion disorder. In contrast, at least in more complex patients, the work-up should include repeated psychological and neurological assessments in close collaboration. According to ICD-10 positive signs of concurrent psychological distress are required, while DSM-5 emphasizes an incongruity between neurological symptoms and neurophysiological patterns of dysfunction. In the case presented, an extensive medical work-up was initially negative, and neither positive

  12. Mammalian aquaglyceroporin function in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laforenza, Umberto; Bottino, Cinzia; Gastaldi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are integral membrane proteins that are permeable to glycerol as well as water. The movement of glycerol from a tissue/organ to the plasma and vice versa requires the presence of different aquaglyceroporins that can regulate the entrance or the exit of glycerol across the plasma membrane. Actually, different aquaglyceroporins have been discovered in the adipose tissue, small intestine, liver, kidney, heart, skeletal muscle, endocrine pancreas and capillary endothelium, and their differential expression could be related to obesity and the type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the expression and function of different aquaglyceroporins in physiological condition and in obesity and type 2 diabetes, suggesting they are potential therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. PMID:26456554

  13. Effects of CDP-choline on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, M.; Fukuda, N.; Suno, M.; Nagaoka, A.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on neurologic deficits and cerebral glucose metabolism were studied in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries for 20 or 30 minutes 24 hours after the vertebral arteries were permanently occluded by electrocautery. CDP-choline was administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days after reestablishing carotid blood flow. CDP-choline at two dosages (50 and 250 mg/kg) shortened the time required for recovery of spontaneous motor activity in a dose-related manner; recovery time was measured early after reperfusion. Neurologic signs were observed for 10 days. High-dose CDP-choline improved neurologic signs in the rats within 20-30 minutes of ischemia. When cerebral glucose metabolism was assessed on Day 4, increases in the levels of glucose and pyruvate were accompanied by decreases in the synthesis of labeled acetylcholine from uniformly labeled (/sup 14/C)glucose measured in the cerebral cortex of rats with 30 minutes of ischemia. High-dose CDP-choline also attenuated changes in these variables. CDP-(1,2-/sup 14/C)choline injected intravenously 10 minutes after reperfusion was used for membrane lipid biosynthesis. These results indicate that CDP-choline has beneficial effects on brain dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia, which may be due in part to the restorative effects of CDP-choline on disturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, probably by stimulating phospholipid biosynthesis.

  14. The Assessment of Neurological Systems with Functional Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidelberg, David

    2007-01-01

    In recent years a number of multivariate approaches have been introduced to map neural systems in health and disease. In this review, we focus on spatial covariance methods applied to functional imaging data to identify patterns of regional activity associated with behavior. In the rest state, this form of network analysis can be used to detect…

  15. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS AS A THREAT TO NEUROLOGICAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disruption is a concept and principle whose origins can be traced to the beginnings of the environmental movement in the 1960s. It began with puzzlement about and the flaring of research on the decline of wildlife, particularly avian species. The proposed causes accented pesticides, especially persistent organochlorines such as DDT. Its scope gradually widened beyond pesticides, and, as endocrine disruption offered an explanation for the wildlife phenomena, it seemed to explain, as well, changes in fertility and disorders of male reproduction such as testicular cancer. Once disturbed gonadal hormone function became the most likely explanation, it provoked other questions. The most challenging arose because of how critical gonadal hormones are to brain function, especially as determinants of brain sexual differentiation. Pursuit of such connections has generated a robust literature embracing a broad swath of chemical classes. How endocrine disrupting chemicals influence the adult and aging brain is a question, so far mostly ignored because of the emphasis on early development, that warrants vigorous investigation. Gonadal hormones are crucial to optimal brain function during maturity and even senescence. They are pivotal to the processes of neurogenesis. They exert protective actions against neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia and support smoothly functioning cognitive activities. The limited research conducted so far on endocrine disruptors, aging, and neurogenesis argues that they should be overlooked no longer. PMID:21474148

  16. Clinical assessment of social cognitive function in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Molenberghs, Pascal; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information in the brain that underlies abilities such as the detection of others' emotions and responding appropriately to these emotions. Social cognitive skills are critical for successful communication and, consequently, mental health and wellbeing. Disturbances of social cognition are early and salient features of many neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and often occur after acute brain injury. Its assessment in the clinic is, therefore, of paramount importance. Indeed, the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced social cognition as one of six core components of neurocognitive function, alongside memory and executive control. Failures of social cognition most often present as poor theory of mind, reduced affective empathy, impaired social perception or abnormal social behaviour. Standard neuropsychological assessments lack the precision and sensitivity needed to adequately inform treatment of these failures. In this Review, we present appropriate methods of assessment for each of the four domains, using an example disorder to illustrate the value of these approaches. We discuss the clinical applications of testing for social cognitive function, and finally suggest a five-step algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of impairments, providing quantitative evidence to guide the selection of social cognitive measures in clinical practice. PMID:26670297

  17. [Development of motoricity as functional-neurologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Göllnitz, G

    1970-01-01

    Movement is one of the characteristic features of a living organism. The movements of human beings are controlled by the brain via the nervous system. Disturbances in the development of the brain therefore also manifest themselves in the organization and course of motoricity. The normal and pathological development of the child--from birth through to maturation--therefore also shows itself in the differentiation of motoricity and psychomotoricity. In the first three years of life the organization of motor coordination is even the most reliable indicator of normal somatic and psychic development and of the functional capacity of the central nervous system. The author discuss at length: The development of tonicity. The diagnostically most significant reflex mechanisms of neonates; time of occurrence and disappearance within the framework of the integration of voluntary movements. Motometric studies for determining the various coordinative capacities, the discussion centering on: The motor functions of the maturation test. Examinations of small children using the methods developed by Griffith, Brunet-Lézine. Metric scale according to Oseretzky, mimic scale according to Kwint. Disturbances of writing motoricity. Coordinative examinations on juveniles and adolescents. The motor diagnosis may be carried out without the need for using a larger number of apparatus and instruments and--provided broad methods of examination and longitudinal-section controls are employed--permits to obtain results, the reliability of which is not at present surpassed by those obtained using any other method. PMID:5006291

  18. Neurologic deficit

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologic deficit refers to abnormal function of a body area due to weaker function of the brain, spinal cord, muscles, or nerves. Examples include: Abnormal reflexes Inability to speak Decreased sensation Loss of balance ...

  19. Activated spinal cord ependymal stem cells rescue neurological function.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; García-Roselló, Mireia; Laínez, Sergio; Erceg, Slaven; Calvo, Maria Teresa; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Lloret, Maria; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Sánchez-Puelles, Jose María; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2009-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major cause of paralysis. Currently, there are no effective therapies to reverse this disabling condition. The presence of ependymal stem/progenitor cells (epSPCs) in the adult spinal cord suggests that endogenous stem cell-associated mechanisms might be exploited to repair spinal cord lesions. epSPC cells that proliferate after SCI are recruited by the injured zone, and can be modulated by innate and adaptive immune responses. Here we demonstrate that when epSPCs are cultured from rats with a SCI (ependymal stem/progenitor cells injury [epSPCi]), these cells proliferate 10 times faster in vitro than epSPC derived from control animals and display enhanced self renewal. Genetic profile analysis revealed an important influence of inflammation on signaling pathways in epSPCi after injury, including the upregulation of Jak/Stat and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways. Although neurospheres derived from either epSPCs or epSPCi differentiated efficiently to oligodendrocites and functional spinal motoneurons, a better yield of differentiated cells was consistently obtained from epSPCi cultures. Acute transplantation of undifferentiated epSPCi or the resulting oligodendrocyte precursor cells into a rat model of severe spinal cord contusion produced a significant recovery of motor activity 1 week after injury. These transplanted cells migrated long distances from the rostral and caudal regions of the transplant to the neurofilament-labeled axons in and around the lesion zone. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of endogenous epSPCs represents a viable cell-based strategy for restoring neuronal dysfunction in patients with spinal cord damage. PMID:19259940

  20. Interoceptive awareness in patients with functional neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Demartini, Benedetta; Crucianelli, Laura; Krahé, Charlotte; Edwards, Mark J; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Historically, emotional factors, such as trauma or psychological conflict, have been suggested as causal factors of functional motor disorders (FMD). More recent approaches have instead stressed potential neural and cognitive abnormalities in the allocation and maintenance of attention. Yet these studies have mostly focused on how attention is allocated to exteroceptive signals about the state of the body. Given the proposed important role of interoception for emotion, the study of FMD patients' ability to monitor their interoceptive signals may serve as a useful, mechanistic link between studies that aim to identify key emotional factors in FMD, and those that examine specific sensorimotor or cognitive abnormalities. In the current study, we compared the interoceptive awareness of a group of individuals with FMD (N=16) with a group of healthy controls (N=17). We employed a commonly used heartbeat detection task which tracks the level of concordance between one's heart rate and its subjective perception, as a proxy for interoceptive awareness more generally. We found that FMD patients have lower interoceptive accuracy than healthy subjects, and such reduced interoceptive accuracy was predictive of their depressive symptoms, as well as their tendency to focus on the external features of their body (self-objectification). Contary to our predictions, interoceptive accuracy was not predictive of alexithymia. These results suggest a potental trade-off between the allocation of attention to internal versus external aspects of the body in FMD. More generally, they warrant further investigation of interoceptive awareness in this population, as a means to understand their emotional abnormalities at a more mechanistic level than studies concentrating on traumatic life events and related risk factors. PMID:26528552

  1. The concept of technology transfer. [for neurologically handicapped persons with impairment of sensorimotor functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, L.

    1974-01-01

    Potential benefits from aerospace technology applications are elaborated that will enable the neurologically handicapped to recapture and upgrade some of their motor and sensor functions. Considered are all individuals whose sensorimotor communication systems have been damaged as a result of disease, trauma, or aging.

  2. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Burgess, R J; Agathocleous, M; Morrison, S J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic mechanisms, such as transcriptional and epigenetic regulators, as well as extrinsic mechanisms, such as short-range signals from the niche and long-range humoral signals. Interactions between these regulatory mechanisms and cellular metabolism are just beginning to be identified. In multiple systems, differentiation is accompanied by changes in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation and the levels of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, metabolic pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation by regulating energy production and the generation of substrates for biosynthetic pathways. Some metabolic pathways appear to function differently in stem cells as compared with restricted progenitors and differentiated cells. They also appear to influence stem cell function by regulating signal transduction, epigenetic marks and oxidative stress. Studies to date illustrate the importance of metabolism in the regulation of stem cell function and suggest complex cross-regulation likely exists between metabolism and other stem cell regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24697828

  3. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  4. KTX 0101: a potential metabolic approach to cytoprotection in major surgery and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sharon L; Heal, David J; Martin, Keith F

    2005-01-01

    KTX 0101 is the sodium salt of the physiological ketone, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate (betaOHB). This neuroprotectant, which has recently successfully completed clinical Phase IA evaluation, is being developed as an intravenous infusion fluid to prevent the cognitive deficits caused by ischemic foci in the brain during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. KTX 0101 maintains cellular viability under conditions of physiological stress by acting as a "superfuel" for efficient ATP production in the brain and peripheral tissues. Unlike glucose, this ketone does not require phosphorylation before entering the TCA cycle, thereby sparing vital ATP stores. Although no reliable models of CPB-induced ischemia exist, KTX 0101 is powerfully cytoprotectant under the more severe ischemic conditions of global and focal cerebral ischemia, cardiac ischemia and lung hemorrhage. Neuroprotection has been demonstrated by reductions in infarct volume, edema, markers of apoptosis and functional impairment. One significant difference between KTX 0101 and other potential neuroprotectants in development is that betaOHB is a component of human metabolic physiology which exploits the body's own neuroprotective mechanisms. KTX 0101 also protects hippocampal organotypic cultures against early and delayed cell death in an in vitro model of status epilepticus, indicating that acute KTX 0101 intervention in this condition could help prevent the development of epileptiform foci, a key mechanism in the etiology of intractable epilepsy. In models of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, KTX 0101 protects neurons against damage caused by dopaminergic neurotoxins and by the fragment of beta-amyloid, Abeta(1-42), implying possible therapeutic applications for ketogenic strategies in treating Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Major obstacles to the use of KTX 0101 for long term therapy in chronic disorders, e.g., Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, are the sodium loading problem and the need to administer

  5. The use of a battery of tracking tests in the quantitative evaluation of neurological function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.; Albers, J. W.; Potvin, A. R.; Tourtellotte, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    A tracking test battery has been applied in a drug trail designed to compare the efficacy of L-DOPA and amantadine to that of L-DOPA and placebo in the treatment of 28 patients with Parkinson's disease. The drug trial provided an ideal opportunity for objectively evaluating the usefulness of tracking tests in assessing changes in neurologic function. Evaluating changes in patient performance resulting from disease progression and controlled clinical trials is of great importance in establishing effective treatment programs.

  6. Atorvastatin activates autophagy and promotes neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Zhong-ming; Shen, Zhao-liang; Gao, Kai; Chang, Liang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ai-mei

    2016-01-01

    Atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering medication, provides neuroprotective effects, although the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our previous studies confirmed activated autophagy following spinal cord injury, which was conducive to recovery of neurological functions. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could also activate autophagy after spinal cord injury, and subsequently improve recovery of neurological functions. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established based on the Allen method. Atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected at 1 and 2 days after spinal cord injury. At 7 days post-injury, western blot assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining results showed increased Beclin-1 and light chain 3B gene and protein expressions in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group. Additionally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 expression was decreased, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells was reduced. Compared with the spinal cord injury + saline group, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale scores significantly increased in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group at 14–42 days post-injury. These findings suggest that atorvastatin activated autophagy after spinal cord injury, inhibited apoptosis, and promoted recovery of neurological function. PMID:27482228

  7. Anti-VEGF treatment improves neurological function and augments radiation response in NF2 schwannoma model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xing; Zhao, Yingchao; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Liu, Hao; Huang, Peigen; Chin, ShanMin; Selig, Martin K.; Plotkin, Scott R.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is the main limitation of radiation therapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS), and identifying treatment options that minimize hearing loss are urgently needed. Treatment with bevacizumab is associated with tumor control and hearing improvement in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients; however, its effect is not durable and its mechanism of action on nerve function is unknown. We modeled the effect anti-VEGF therapy on neurological function in the sciatic nerve model and found that it improves neurological function by alleviating tumor edema, which may further improve results by decreasing muscle atrophy and increasing nerve regeneration. Using a cranial window model, we showed that anti-VEGF treatment may achieve these effects via normalizing the tumor vasculature, improving vessel perfusion, and delivery of oxygenation. It is known that oxygen is a potent radiosensitizer; therefore, we further demonstrated that combining anti-VEGF with radiation therapy can achieve a better tumor control and help lower the radiation dose and, thus, minimize radiation-related neurological toxicity. Our results provide compelling rationale for testing combined therapy in human VS. PMID:26554010

  8. Atorvastatin activates autophagy and promotes neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Shen, Zhao-Liang; Gao, Kai; Chang, Liang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ai-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering medication, provides neuroprotective effects, although the precise mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our previous studies confirmed activated autophagy following spinal cord injury, which was conducive to recovery of neurological functions. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could also activate autophagy after spinal cord injury, and subsequently improve recovery of neurological functions. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established based on the Allen method. Atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected at 1 and 2 days after spinal cord injury. At 7 days post-injury, western blot assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining results showed increased Beclin-1 and light chain 3B gene and protein expressions in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group. Additionally, caspase-9 and caspase-3 expression was decreased, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells was reduced. Compared with the spinal cord injury + saline group, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale scores significantly increased in the spinal cord injury + atorvastatin group at 14-42 days post-injury. These findings suggest that atorvastatin activated autophagy after spinal cord injury, inhibited apoptosis, and promoted recovery of neurological function. PMID:27482228

  9. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  10. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-01-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful. PMID:26487881

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in blood: function, metabolism, and fate.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Andreas V; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Gräler, Markus H

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite and a ligand of five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors S1PR1 to S1PR5. These receptors are expressed on various cells and cell types of the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic, reproductive, and neurologic systems, and S1P has an impact on many different pathophysiological conditions including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, deafness, osteogenesis, and reproduction. While these diverse signalling properties of S1P have been extensively reviewed, the particular role of S1P in blood is still a matter of debate. Blood contains the highest S1P concentration of all body compartments, and several questions are still not sufficiently answered: Where does it come from and how is it metabolized? Why is the concentration of S1P in blood so high? Are minor changes of the high blood S1P concentrations physiologically relevant? Do blood cells and vascular endothelial cells that are constantly exposed to high blood S1P levels still respond to S1P via S1P receptors? Recent data reveal new insights into the functional role and the metabolic fate of blood-borne S1P. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge regarding the source, secretion, transportation, function, metabolism, and fate of S1P in blood. PMID:24977489

  12. Soft Neurological Signs and Cognitive Function in Obsessive-compulsive Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhuri, Chetali Vijay; Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Modern research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) indicates that the primary cause of OCD, which was earlier explained only on basis of psychoanalytical theories, is biological. Our study attempts to investigate the neurobiological signs in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive function in OCD. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at psychiatric facility of Seth G.S. Medical College and KEM Hospital. Materials and Method: 50 OCD patients and age- and education-matched controls were selected for the study. Established instruments were used to assess the neurological soft signs (NSS) and the cognitive deficits. Results: OCD patients had significant more NSS in tests for motor coordination, sensory integration, complex motor tasks, hard signs, and right/left and spatial orientation. Cognitive deficits in the domains of visuospatial ability, executive function, attention, and working memory were significantly more in OCD patients compared to controls. Conclusion: Our study highlights the role of biological factors in form of soft neurological signs and cognitive dysfunction in the development of the OCD. PMID:27570338

  13. Neurological, Metabolic, and Psychiatric Adverse Events in Children and Adolescents Treated With Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Klaus Damgaard; Bruhn, Christina Hedegaard; Pagsberg, Anne-Katrine; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2016-10-01

    Aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist with only minor neurological and psychiatric adverse effects, making it a potential first-line drug for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, the evidence of its use in children and adolescents is rather sparse. The aim of this case study is to discuss adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports concerning aripiprazole-associated neurological and psychiatric events in children and adolescents. The ADR report database at Danish Medicines Agency was searched for all ADRs involving children and adolescents (<18 years) reported by the search term [aripiprazole] AND all spontaneous reports since the introduction of aripiprazole in 2003 until December 31, 2015. Nineteen case reports were included in the study and included both patients with psychotic disorders (PS group) and nonpsychotic disorders (non-PS group). The PS group consisted of 5 patients with schizophrenia and psychoses, not otherwise specified; and the non-PS group consisted of fourteen cases including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The main reported adverse effects in the non-PS group were chronic insomnia, Parkinsonism, behavioral changes psychoses, and weight gain, whereas the adverse effects in the PS group was predominantly anxiety, convulsions, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Although aripiprazole is considered safe and well tolerated in children and adolescents, severe adverse events as neuroleptic malignant syndrome, extreme insomnia, and suicidal behavior has been reported to health authorities. Clinicians should pay attention to these possible hazards when prescribing aripiprazole to this vulnerable group of patients. PMID:27504593

  14. Neurological Gait Abnormalities Moderate the Functional Brain Signature of the Posture First Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Holtzer, Roee; Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Wang, Cuiling; Mahoney, Jeannette R

    2016-03-01

    The posture first hypothesis suggests that under dual-task walking conditions older adults prioritize gait over cognitive task performance. Functional neural confirmation of this hypothesis, however, is lacking. Herein, we determined the functional neural correlates of the posture first hypothesis and hypothesized that the presence of neurological gait abnormalities (NGA) would moderate associations between brain activations, gait and cognitive performance. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy we assessed changes in oxygenated hemoglobin levels in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) during normal walk and walk while talk (WWT) conditions in a large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 236; age = 75.5 ± 6.49 years; female = 51.7 %). NGA were defined as central (due to brain diseases) or peripheral (neuropathic gait) following a standardized neurological examination protocol. Double dissociations between brain activations and behavior emerged as a function of NGA. Higher oxygenation levels during WWT were related to better cognitive performance (estimate = 0.145; p < 0.001) but slower gait velocity (estimate = -6.336, p < 0.05) among normals. In contrast, higher oxygenation levels during WWT among individuals with peripheral NGA were associated with worse cognitive performance (estimate = -0.355; p < 0.001) but faster gait velocity (estimate = 14.855; p < 0.05). Increased activation in the PFC during locomotion may have a compensatory function that is designed to support gait among individuals with peripheral NGA. PMID:26613725

  15. Immune responses at brain barriers and implications for brain development and neurological function in later life

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Helen B.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Sá-Pereira, Inês; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    For a long time the brain has been considered an immune-privileged site due to a muted inflammatory response and the presence of protective brain barriers. It is now recognized that neuroinflammation may play an important role in almost all neurological disorders and that the brain barriers may be contributing through either normal immune signaling or disruption of their basic physiological mechanisms. The distinction between normal function and dysfunction at the barriers is difficult to dissect, partly due to a lack of understanding of normal barrier function and partly because of physiological changes that occur as part of normal development and ageing. Brain barriers consist of a number of interacting structural and physiological elements including tight junctions between adjacent barrier cells and an array of influx and efflux transporters. Despite these protective mechanisms, the capacity for immune-surveillance of the brain is maintained, and there is evidence of inflammatory signaling at the brain barriers that may be an important part of the body's response to damage or infection. This signaling system appears to change both with normal ageing, and during disease. Changes may affect diapedesis of immune cells and active molecular transfer, or cause rearrangement of the tight junctions and an increase in passive permeability across barrier interfaces. Here we review the many elements that contribute to brain barrier functions and how they respond to inflammation, particularly during development and aging. The implications of inflammation–induced barrier dysfunction for brain development and subsequent neurological function are also discussed. PMID:23986663

  16. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26657326

  17. Is there an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lisa M; Mills, Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Dangour, Alan D

    2015-08-28

    Low vitamin B12 status is common in older people; however, its public health significance in terms of neurological manifestations remains unclear. The present systematic review evaluated the association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function and clinically relevant neurological outcomes in adults aged 50+ years. A systematic search of nine bibliographic databases (up to March 2013) identified twelve published articles describing two longitudinal and ten cross-sectional analyses. The included study populations ranged in size (n 28-2287) and mean/median age (range 65-81 years). Studies reported various neurological outcomes: nerve function; clinically measured signs and symptoms of nerve function; self-reported neurological symptoms. Studies were assessed for risk of bias, and results were synthesised qualitatively. Among the general population groups of older people, one longitudinal study reported no association, and four of seven cross-sectional studies reported limited evidence of an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes. Among groups with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of low vitamin B12 status, one longitudinal study reported an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes and three cross-sectional analyses reported no association. Overall, there is limited evidence from observational studies to suggest an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people. The heterogeneity and quality of the evidence base preclude more definitive conclusions, and further high-quality research is needed to better inform understanding of public health significance in terms of neurological function of vitamin B12 status in older people. PMID:26202329

  18. The use of a tracking test battery in the quantitative evaluation of neurological function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.

    1973-01-01

    A number of tracking tasks that have proven useful to control engineers and psychologists measuring skilled performance have been evaluated for clinical use. Normal subjects as well as patients with previous diagnoses of Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy were used in the evaluation. The tests that were studied included step tracking, random tracking, and critical tracking. The results of the present experiments encourage the continued use of tracking tasks as assessment precedures in a clinical environment. They have proven to be reliable, valid, and sensitive measures of neurological function.

  19. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  20. Metabolic hormones in saliva: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The salivary proteome consists of thousands of proteins, which include, among others, hormonal modulators of energy intake and output. Although the functions of this prominent category of hormones in whole body energy metabolism are well characterized, their functions in the oral cavity, whether as a salivary component, or when expressed in taste cells, are less studied and poorly understood. The respective receptors for the majority of salivary metabolic hormones have been also shown to be expressed in salivary glands, taste cells, or other cells in the oral mucosa. This review provides a comprehensive account of the gastrointestinal hormones, adipokines, and neuropeptides identified in saliva, salivary glands, or lingual epithelium, as well as their respective cognate receptors expressed in the oral cavity. Surprisingly, few functions are assigned to salivary metabolic hormones, and these functions are mostly associated with the modulation of taste perception. Because of the well-characterized correlation between impaired oral nutrient sensing and increased energy intake and body mass index, a conceptually provocative point of view is introduced, whereupon it is argued that targeted changes in the composition of saliva could affect whole body metabolism in response to the activation of cognate receptors expressed locally in the oral mucosa. PMID:22994880

  1. Early prediction of neurological outcome after falls in children: metabolic and clinical markers.

    PubMed Central

    Paret, G; Tirosh, R; Lotan, D; Stein, M; Ben-Abraham, R; Vardi, A; Harel, R; Barzilay, Z

    1999-01-01

    Falls are the foremost reason for non-fatal injuries and are second only to motor vehicle accidents in causing accidental death. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical and metabolic predictors of the outcome of head injury caused by falls from a height. Medical records of 61 children who had been admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit from 1990 to 1993 after falling from a height were reviewed retrospectively. Outcomes were categorised as good, moderate, severe, and poor. Glasgow coma scores, pupillary responses, brain oedema, and midline shift are significantly associated with poor outcome (p < 0.05). Metabolic markers associated with poor outcome included hyperglycaemia and hypokalaemia. Children with a poor outcome had, at admission, significantly higher glucose concentrations compared with children with good outcomes (mean SD): 20.0 (7.1) v 9.31 (4.0) mmol/l, p < 0.01), and lower potassium concentrations compared with children with good, moderate, and severe outcomes (mean (SD): 2.8 (0.4) v 3.7 (0.4) mmol/l, p < 0.001, 3.5 (0.3) mmol/l, p < 0.01, and 3.41 (0.3) mmol/l, p < 0.05, respectively). These findings allow for an early allocation of effort and resources to children injured from such falls. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10353044

  2. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  3. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  4. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  5. Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Gardiner, James C; Holmberg, Dawn; Horwitz, Javan; Kent, Luanne; Andrews, Garrett; Donelan, Beth; McIntosh, Gerald R

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the immediate effects of neurologic music therapy (NMT) on cognitive functioning and emotional adjustment with brain-injured persons. Four treatment sessions were held, during which participants were given a pre-test, participated in 30 min of NMT that focused on one aspect of rehabilitation (attention, memory, executive function, or emotional adjustment), which was followed by post-testing. Control participants engaged in a pre-test, 30 min of rest, and then a post-test. Treatment participants showed improvement in executive function and overall emotional adjustment, and lessening of depression, sensation seeking, and anxiety. Control participants improved in emotional adjustment and lessening of hostility, but showed decreases in measures of memory, positive affect, and sensation seeking. PMID:19673815

  6. Altered white matter metabolism in delayed neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was recently used to examine altered metabolism in the white matter (WM) of patients experiencing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning; however, only a small number of patients with delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) were analyzed. We aimed to detect altered metabolism in the WM of patients with DNS using (1)H-MRS; to explore its clinical relevance in the management of patients experiencing CO poisoning. Patients experiencing acute CO poisoning underwent (1)H-MRS and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination within 1week and at 1month after acute poisoning. Metabolites including choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate were measured from the periventricular WM. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentrations were measured in CSF. Fifty-two patients experiencing acute CO poisoning (15 with DNS, 37 without DNS; median age, 49years; 65% males) underwent (1)H-MRS. Within 1week, NAA/Cr ratios, reflecting neuroaxonal viability, were lower in patients with DNS than in those without DNS (P<0.05). At 1month, when 9 of 15 patients (60%) developed DNS, Cho/Cr ratios were higher, and NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios lower in patients with DNS (P=0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively), indicating increased membrane metabolism and decreased neuroaxonal viability. (1)H-MRS parameter abnormalities correlated with the elevation of MBP in CSF. The presence of a lactate peak was a predictor for a poor long-term outcome. (1)H-MRS within 1week may be useful for predicting DNS development; (1)H-MRS at 1month may be useful for discriminating patients with DNS and predicting long-term outcomes. PMID:26723994

  7. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG). Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY), Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Results. In women with PD, Kendall's tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Conclusion. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration. PMID:26586928

  8. Testosterone replacement in 49,XXXXY syndrome: andrological, metabolic and neurological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Michele; Elia, Jlenia; Benedetti, Francesco; Alesi, Laura; Chessa, Luciana; Mazzilli, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a 19-year-old boy, presenting several congenital malformations (facial dysmorphisms, cardiac and musculoskeletal abnormalities), mental retardation, recurrent respiratory infections during growth and delayed puberty. Although previously hospitalised in other medical centres, only psychological support had been recommended for this patient. In our department, genetic, biochemical/hormonal and ultrasound examinations were undertaken. The karyotype was 49,XXXXY, a rare aneuploidy with an incidence of 1/85 000–100 000, characterised by the presence of three extra X chromosomes in phenotypically male subjects. The hormonal/biochemical profile showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency. The patient was then treated with testosterone replacement therapy. After 12 months of treatment, we observed the normalisation of testosterone levels. There was also an increase in pubic hair growth, testicular volume and penis size, weight loss, homeostatic model assessment index reduction and the normalisation of vitamin D values. Moreover, the patient showed greater interaction with the social environment and context. Learning points In cases of plurimalformative syndrome, cognitive impairment, recurrent infections during growth and, primarily, delayed puberty, it is necessary to ascertain as soon as possible whether the patient is suffering from hypogonadism or metabolic disorders due to genetic causes. In our case, the diagnosis of hypogonadism, and then of 49,XXXXY syndrome, was unfortunately made only at the age of 19 years.The testosterone replacement treatment, even though delayed, induced positive effects on: i) development of the reproductive system, ii) regulation of the metabolic profile and iii) interaction with the social environment and context.However, earlier and timely hormonal replacement treatment could probably have improved the quality of life of this subject and his family. PMID:26767114

  9. Synchrotron-Generated Microbeam Sensorimotor Cortex Transections Induce Seizure Control without Disruption of Neurological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Pantaleo; Fardone, Erminia; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Prezado, Yolanda; Requardt, Herwig; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Anschel, David J.; Spiga, Jenny; Bravin, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-generated X-ray microplanar beams (microbeams) are characterized by the ability to deliver extremely high doses of radiation to spatially restricted volumes of tissue. Minimal dose spreading outside the beam path provides an exceptional degree of protection from radio-induced damage to the neurons and glia adjacent to the microscopic slices of tissue irradiated. The preservation of cortical architecture following high-dose microbeam irradiation and the ability to induce non-invasively the equivalent of a surgical cut over the cortex is of great interest for the development of novel experimental models in neurobiology and new treatment avenues for a variety of brain disorders. Microbeams (size 100 µm/600 µm, center-to-center distance of 400 µm/1200 µm, peak entrance doses of 360-240 Gy/150-100 Gy) delivered to the sensorimotor cortex of six 2-month-old naïve rats generated histologically evident cortical transections, without modifying motor behavior and weight gain up to 7 months. Microbeam transections of the sensorimotor cortex dramatically reduced convulsive seizure duration in a further group of 12 rats receiving local infusion of kainic acid. No subsequent neurological deficit was associated with the treatment. These data provide a novel tool to study the functions of the cortex and pave the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy and other neurological diseases. PMID:23341950

  10. A test of the 1992 International Standards for Neurological and Functional Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M E; Ditunno, J F; Donovan, W H; Maynard, F M

    1998-08-01

    This study was designed to test the 1992 International Standards for Neurological and Functional Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. One hundred and six professionals in the field of spinal cord injury attending an instructional course at the 1994 ASIA Meeting participated in the test. Participants completed a pretest and posttest in which they classified two patients who had a spinal cord injury (one with complete tetraplegia and one with incomplete paraplegia) by sensory and motor levels, zone of partial preservation (ZPP), ASIA Impairment Scale and completeness of injury. Between tests, three members of the ASIA Standards Executive Committee gave presentations on the neurological assessment, scoring, scaling and classification of spinal cord injury and a video of the actual examinations of the two cases was viewed. Percent 'correct' (as defined by the ASIA Standards Committee) was calculated for sensory and motor levels, ZPP, ASIA Impairment and completeness. Overall, the analyses showed that participants had very little difficulty in correctly classifying the patient with complete tetraplegia. Pretests scores ranged from 72% (left motor level) to 96% (complete injury), posttest scores from 73% (left motor level) to 100% correct (complete injury). For the patient with incomplete paraplegia (Case 2), scores were considerably lower. Pretest scores ranged from 16% (right motor level) to 95% correct (incomplete injury); posttest scores from 21% (right motor level) to 97% correct (incomplete injury). The results showed that further revisions of the 1992 Standards and more training is needed to ensure accurate classification of spinal cord injury. PMID:9713924

  11. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  12. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  13. Wharton's jelly transplantation improves neurologic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tian; Yang, Bo; Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Tian, Yi; Qu, Ruina; Zhang, Wenjin; Zhang, Yanting; Hu, Kai; Guan, Fangxia; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to disability, dysfunction, and even death, is a prominent health problem worldwide. Effective therapy for this serious and debilitating condition is needed. Human umbilical cord matrix, known as Wharton's jelly (WJ), provides a natural, interface scaffold that is enriched in mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we tested the efficacy of WJ tissue transplantation in a weight drop model of TBI in rats. WJ tissue was cultured and transplanted into the injury site 24h after TBI. The modified neurologic severity score, body weight, brain edema, and lesion volume were evaluated at various time points after TBI. Cognitive behavior was assessed by the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the perilesional brain area was measured at day 14 after TBI. We found that WJ tissue transplantation lessened TBI-induced brain edema (day 3), reduced lesion volume (day 28), improved neurologic function (days 21 to 28), and promoted memory and cognitive recovery. Additionally, expression of BDNF mRNA and protein was higher in WJ tissue-treated rats than in sham-operated or vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that WJ tissue transplantation can reduce TBI-induced brain injury and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of TBI. PMID:25638565

  14. Impaired functional default mode network in patients with mild neurological Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Yongsheng; Cheng, Hewei; Toledo, Jon B; Wang, Xun; Li, Bo; Han, Yongzhu; Wang, Kai; Fan, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by cognitive, psychiatric and motor signs and symptoms that are associated with structural and pathological brain abnormalities, in addition to liver changes. However, functional brain connectivity pattern of WD patients remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated functional brain connectivity pattern of WD patients using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Particularly, we studied default mode network (DMN) using posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) based seed functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretic functional brain network analysis tools, and investigated the relationship between the DMN's functional connectivity pattern of WD patients and their attention functions examined using the attention network test (ANT). Our results demonstrated that WD patients had altered DMN's functional connectivity and lower local and global network efficiency compared with normal controls (NCs). In addition, the functional connectivity between left inferior temporal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex was correlated with altering function, one of the attention functions, across WD and NC subjects. These findings indicated that the DMN's functional connectivity was altered in WD patients, which might be correlated with their attention dysfunction. PMID:27372239

  15. Neurological function following intra-neural injection of fluorescent neuronal tracers in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yanping; Shen, Zhongyi; Gu, Tianwen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent neuronal tracers should not be toxic to the nervous system when used in long-term labeling. Previous studies have addressed tracer toxicity, but whether tracers injected into an intact nerve result in functional impairment remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the functions of motor, sensory and autonomic nerves following the application of 5% Fluoro-Gold, 4% True Blue and 10% Fluoro-Ruby (5 μL) to rat tibial nerves via pressure injection. A set of evaluation methods including walking track analysis, plantar test and laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used to determine the action of the fluorescent neuronal tracers. Additionally, nerve pathology and ratio of muscle wet weight were also observed. Results showed that injection of Fluoro-Gold significantly resulted in loss of motor nerve function, lower plantar sensibility, increasing blood flow volume and higher neurogenic vasodilatation. Myelinated nerve fiber degeneration, unclear boundaries in nerve fibers and high retrograde labeling efficacy were observed in the Fluoro-Gold group. The True Blue group also showed obvious neurogenic vasodilatation, but less severe loss of motor function and degeneration, and fewer labeled motor neurons were found compared with the Fluoro-Gold group. No anomalies of motor and sensory nerve function and no myelinated nerve fiber degeneration were observed in the Fluoro-Ruby group. Experimental findings indicate that Fluoro-Gold tracing could lead to significant functional impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic nerves, while functional impairment was less severe following True Blue tracing. Fluoro-Ruby injection appears to have no effect on neurological function. PMID:25206419

  16. Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers Predict Lung Function Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Bushra; Weiden, Michael D.; Kwon, Sophia; Gracely, Edward J.; Comfort, Ashley L.; Ferrier, Natalia; Kasturiarachchi, Kusali J.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Rom, William N.; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cross-sectional studies demonstrate an association between metabolic syndrome and impaired lung function. Objectives: To define if metabolic syndrome biomarkers are risk factors for loss of lung function after irritant exposure. Methods: A nested case-control study of Fire Department of New York personnel with normal pre–September 11th FEV1 and who presented for subspecialty pulmonary evaluation before March 10, 2008. We correlated metabolic syndrome biomarkers obtained within 6 months of World Trade Center dust exposure with subsequent FEV1. FEV1 at subspecialty pulmonary evaluation within 6.5 years defined disease status; cases had FEV1 less than lower limit of normal, whereas control subjects had FEV1 greater than or equal to lower limit of normal. Measurements and Main Results: Clinical data and serum sampled at the first monitoring examination within 6 months of September 11, 2001, assessed body mass index, heart rate, serum glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), leptin, pancreatic polypeptide, and amylin. Cases and control subjects had significant differences in HDL less than 40 mg/dl with triglycerides greater than or equal to 150 mg/dl, heart rate greater than or equal to 66 bpm, and leptin greater than or equal to 10,300 pg/ml. Each increased the odds of abnormal FEV1 at pulmonary evaluation by more than twofold, whereas amylin greater than or equal to 116 pg/ml decreased the odds by 84%, in a multibiomarker model adjusting for age, race, body mass index, and World Trade Center arrival time. This model had a sensitivity of 41%, a specificity of 86%, and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.77. Conclusions: Abnormal triglycerides and HDL and elevated heart rate and leptin are independent risk factors of greater susceptibility to lung function impairment after September 11, 2001, whereas elevated amylin is protective. Metabolic biomarkers are predictors of lung disease, and may be useful for assessing

  17. [Metabolic therapy in neurology].

    PubMed

    Zhivolupov, S A; Samartsev, I N; Rashidov, N A; Bodrova, T V; Vorob'eva, M N

    2013-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of rheosorbilact, an original infusion drug based on polyalcohols, in the complex therapy of patients with brain ischemia and diabetic neuropathy. Reosorbilact was used intravenously indrops 200-400 ml in day - 20 days. The primary endpoint of the study was the improvement of quality of life assessed with the SF-36 scale after 1 month of treatment. Patients with brain ischemia underwent neuropsychological tests and ultrasound duplex scanning of the carotid and vertebral arteries. In the group of patients with diabetic neuropathy, we evaluated the intensity of pain syndrome with the NRS, blood glucose level and electroneuromyography parameters of low extremities nerves. Some characteristics of acid-base balance were studied in patients of both groups. The results obtained in the study indicate the significant clinical effect of reosorbilact in patients with brain ischemia and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23994919

  18. Metabolic Regulation of Regulatory T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Coe, David John; Kishore, Madhav; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2014-01-01

    It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff) response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require adenosine triphosphate-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg) are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses. PMID:25477880

  19. Neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is improved by the Ruyi Zhenbao pill in a rats

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TIAN; DUAN, SIJIN; WANG, HAIPING; SUN, SHAN; HAN, BING; FU, FENGHUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill on neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion following reperfusion. The rats received intragastrically either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (control and model groups) or Ruyi Zhenbao pill at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 g/kg. Neurological function was assessed by cylinder, adhesive and beam-walking tests after 14-day Ruyi Zhenbao pill treatment. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis were detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Treatment with 0.4 and 0.8 g/kg Ruyi Zhenbao for 14 days significantly improved neurological function, and increased the number of von Willebrand Factor- and neuronal nuclear antigen-positive cells in the ischemic hemisphere of rats. Ruyi Zhenbao pill treatment also significantly enhanced the expression levels of BDNF, NGF and VEGF in the ischemic hemisphere. The results demonstrated that the Ruyi Zhenbao pill improved neurological function following ischemia in rats. The mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill are associated with increasing the expression levels of BDNF, NGF and VEGF, and subsequently promoting neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the ischemic zone. PMID:26893831

  20. [Non-invasive brain stimulation in neurology : Transcranial direct current stimulation to enhance cognitive functioning].

    PubMed

    Antonenko, D; Flöel, A

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been successfully used in neuroscientific research to modulate cognitive functions. Recent studies suggested that improvement of behavioral performance is associated with tDCS-induced modulation of neuronal activity and connectivity. Thus, tDCS may also represent a promising tool for reconstitution of cognitive functions in the context of memory decline related to Alzheimer's disease or aphasia following stroke; however, evidence from randomized sham-controlled clinical trials is still scarce. Initial results of tDCS-induced behavioral improvement in patients with Alzheimer's dementia and its precursors indicated that an intense memory training combined with tDCS may be effective. Early interventions in the stage of mild cognitive impairment could be crucial but further evidence is needed to substantiate this. In patients with aphasia following stroke tDCS was applied to the left and right hemispheres, with varying results depending on the severity of the symptoms and polarity of the stimulation. Patients with mild aphasia can benefit from tDCS of the language dominant hemisphere while in patients with severe aphasia tDCS of right hemispheric homologous brain language areas may be particularly relevant. Moreover, recent studies suggested that an intervention in the subacute phase of aphasia could be most promising. In summary, tDCS could provide the exciting possibility to reconstitute cognitive functions in patients with neurological disorders. Future studies have to elucidate whether tDCS can be used in the clinical routine to prevent further cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases and whether beneficial effects from experimental studies translate into long-term improvement in activities of daily life. PMID:27167887

  1. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. Results The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Conclusions Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than “manual” test about functional reach.

  2. Molecular underpinnings of Aprataxin RNA/DNA deadenylase function and dysfunction in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Tumbale, Percy P; Williams, R Scott

    2015-03-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases seal DNA breaks in the final step of DNA replication and repair transactions via a three-step reaction mechanism that can abort if DNA ligases encounter modified DNA termini, such as the products and repair intermediates of DNA oxidation, alkylation, or the aberrant incorporation of ribonucleotides into genomic DNA. Such abortive DNA ligation reactions act as molecular checkpoint for DNA damage and create 5'-adenylated nucleic acid termini in the context of DNA and RNA-DNA substrates in DNA single strand break repair (SSBR) and ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). Aprataxin (APTX), a protein altered in the heritable neurological disorder Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1), acts as a DNA ligase "proofreader" to directly reverse AMP-modified nucleic acid termini in DNA- and RNA-DNA damage responses. Herein, we survey APTX function and the emerging cell biological, structural and biochemical data that has established a molecular foundation for understanding the APTX mediated deadenylation reaction, and is providing insights into the molecular bases of APTX deficiency in AOA1. PMID:25637650

  3. Perimenopause as a neurological transition state.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Roberta D; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Mack, Wendy J; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Perimenopause is a midlife transition state experienced by women that occurs in the context of a fully functioning neurological system and results in reproductive senescence. Although primarily viewed as a reproductive transition, the symptoms of perimenopause are largely neurological in nature. Neurological symptoms that emerge during perimenopause are indicative of disruption in multiple estrogen-regulated systems (including thermoregulation, sleep, circadian rhythms and sensory processing) and affect multiple domains of cognitive function. Estrogen is a master regulator that functions through a network of estrogen receptors to ensure that the brain effectively responds at rapid, intermediate and long timescales to regulate energy metabolism in the brain via coordinated signalling and transcriptional pathways. The estrogen receptor network becomes uncoupled from the bioenergetic system during the perimenopausal transition and, as a corollary, a hypometabolic state associated with neurological dysfunction can develop. For some women, this hypometabolic state might increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. The perimenopausal transition might also represent a window of opportunity to prevent age-related neurological diseases. This Review considers the importance of neurological symptoms in perimenopause in the context of their relationship to the network of estrogen receptors that control metabolism in the brain. PMID:26007613

  4. The colon: Absorptive, seccretory and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J G

    1975-01-01

    The role which the human colon fulfils in digestion and metabolism remains largely undocumented. Its capacity to conserve water and electrolytes is well known although how this is controlled is uncertain. In the animal kingdom, calcium and magnesium absorption from the colon are improtant as are absorption and synthesis of vitamins. The abundant microflora of the human colon gives it unique properties. Dietary residue is metabolised forming short-chain fatty acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane; whilst 20% of urea synthesised in man is broken down in the colon to ammonia, which is reabsorbed, and carbonic acid. The microflora also degrades a wide variety of organic compounds including food additives, drugs, bile salts, and cholesterol which may be relevant to the development of colon cancer. Regional differences in colonic function also exist making interpretation of data from this relatively inaccessible organ more difficult. PMID:1205009

  5. Quantitative measures of sympathetic skin response in diabetes: relation to sudomotor and neurological function.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D M; Reid, G; Rowley, D A; Abraham, R R

    1992-01-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR) at the foot to a deep inspiration was measured in 68 randomly selected diabetic patients and 46 age matched normal subjects and compared with other quantitative measures of neurological and sudomotor function. SSR was obtained in all but three diabetic patients. The upper limit of normal for the onset latency was 2202 ms and the lower limit for the amplitude of the first wave 92 microV. Ten diabetic patients had measurable but prolonged latencies, and 11 had measurable but low amplitudes. There were no significant associations between latency, height, and age, but in insulin dependent patients there was a significant diminution of response amplitude with increasing duration of diabetes. Latency was weakly associated with Marstock thermal thresholds, respiratory RR variation, and common peroneal nerve conduction velocity. SSR amplitude was associated with the density of pilocarpine activatable sweatspots in the same region of the foot. Patients with abnormal latencies were significantly older and had reduced thermal sensation than those with normal latencies. Median coefficients of variation for repeat testing in diabetic patients were 9% for latency and 13% for amplitude. The test is objective and reproducible, but latency measurements reflect conduction in a long multineuronal pathway and are not purely a measure of peripheral C fibre function; amplitude measurements reflect the density of spontaneously activable sweat glands and are therefore a valid measure of peripheral sympathetic activity, though they depend more on temperature than do latencies (mean change over the range 32-34 degrees C; 8.5% degrees C for amplitude, -2.5%/degrees C for latency). Images PMID:1331334

  6. Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates neurological deficit, neuroinflammation and cerebral metabolism in rats with diffuse traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The combination of diffuse brain injury with a hypoxic insult is associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of post-traumatic hypoxia in amplifying secondary brain damage using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Rats were examined for behavioral and sensorimotor deficits, increased brain production of inflammatory cytokines, formation of cerebral edema, changes in brain metabolism and enlargement of the lateral ventricles. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to diffuse TAI using the Marmarou impact-acceleration model. Subsequently, rats underwent a 30-minute period of hypoxic (12% O2/88% N2) or normoxic (22% O2/78% N2) ventilation. Hypoxia-only and sham surgery groups (without TAI) received 30 minutes of hypoxic or normoxic ventilation, respectively. The parameters examined included: 1) behavioural and sensorimotor deficit using the Rotarod, beam walk and adhesive tape removal tests, and voluntary open field exploration behavior; 2) formation of cerebral edema by the wet-dry tissue weight ratio method; 3) enlargement of the lateral ventricles; 4) production of inflammatory cytokines; and 5) real-time brain metabolite changes as assessed by microdialysis technique. Results TAI rats showed significant deficits in sensorimotor function, and developed substantial edema and ventricular enlargement when compared to shams. The additional hypoxic insult significantly exacerbated behavioural deficits and the cortical production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF but did not further enhance edema. TAI and particularly TAI+Hx rats experienced a substantial metabolic depression with respect to glucose, lactate, and glutamate levels. Conclusion Altogether, aggravated behavioural deficits observed in rats with diffuse TAI combined with hypoxia may be induced by enhanced neuroinflammation, and a prolonged period of metabolic dysfunction. PMID

  7. Effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on neurologic and cognitive function in older people: a randomized controlled trial12

    PubMed Central

    Dangour, Alan D; Allen, Elizabeth; Clarke, Robert; Elbourne, Diana; Fletcher, Astrid E; Letley, Louise; Richards, Marcus; Whyte, Ken; Uauy, Ricardo; Mills, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Moderate vitamin B-12 deficiency is relatively common in older people. However, there is little robust evidence on the effect of vitamin B-12 supplementation on neurologic and cognitive outcomes in later life. Objective: We investigated whether vitamin B-12 supplementation benefits neurologic and cognitive function in moderately vitamin B-12–deficient older people. Design: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 7 general practices in South East England, United Kingdom. Study participants were aged ≥75 y and had moderate vitamin B-12 deficiency (serum vitamin B-12 concentrations: 107–210 pmol/L) in the absence of anemia and received 1 mg crystalline vitamin B-12 or a matching placebo as a daily oral tablet for 12 mo. Peripheral motor and sensory nerve conduction, central motor conduction, a clinical neurologic examination, and cognitive function were assessed before and after treatment. Results: A total of 201 participants were enrolled in the trial, and 191 subjects provided outcome data. Compared with baseline, allocation to vitamin B-12 was associated with a 177% increase in serum concentration of vitamin B-12 (641 compared with 231 pmol/L), a 331% increase in serum holotranscobalamin (240 compared with 56 pmol/L), and 17% lower serum homocysteine (14.2 compared with 17.1 μmol/L). In intention-to-treat analysis of covariance models, with adjustment for baseline neurologic function, there was no evidence of an effect of supplementation on the primary outcome of the posterior tibial compound muscle action potential amplitude at 12 mo (mean difference: −0.2 mV; 95% CI: –0.8, 0.3 mV). There was also no evidence of an effect on any secondary peripheral nerve or central motor function outcome, or on cognitive function or clinical examination. Conclusion: Results of the trial do not support the hypothesis that the correction of moderate vitamin B-12 deficiency, in the absence of anemia and of neurologic and cognitive

  8. Associations among treatment-related neurological risk factors and neuropsychological functioning in survivors of childhood brain tumor.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Mark D; Rane, Shruti; Daly, Brian P; Jacobson, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    Adverse neurological side effects associated with childhood brain tumors and their treatments contribute to long-term neurocognitive morbidity. Measures designed to quantify tumor-related risk factors are lacking. The neurological predictor scale (NPS) is designed to assess treatment-related neurological risks. Preliminary validation established associations between the NPS and global cognitive functioning in this population, though its associations with specific neurobehavioral domains has yet to be addressed. Participants referred for outpatient neuropsychological assessment completed performance-based measures of intellectual, attentional, working memory, motor speed, and executive abilities. Caregivers completed ratings of adaptive functioning. Neuropsychological and adaptive data were available for 100 brain tumor survivors (51 % female), ages 6 to 22 years (M = 12.83, SD = 4.37). Total NPS scores were generated via retrospective medical record review. Total NPS scores were significantly associated with several neurocognitive composite scores including verbal reasoning and working memory, after controlling for years post-diagnosis (ps < .05). NPS scores also were significantly associated with performance-based measures of attention, executive functioning, and cognitive efficiency (ps < .05). No significant relationship was demonstrated between NPS scores and caregiver-reported adaptive behavior skills (ps > .05). Results indicate that the NPS is associated with performance-based neurocognitive functioning and executive skills but not with functioning in specific caregiver-reported adaptive behavior domains. The NPS offers some value as a resource for understanding associations between treatment-related neurological risks and select aspects of neurocognitive morbidity. Future studies should examine whether the NPS can aid in planning appropriate therapeutic intervention as survivors progress into early adulthood. PMID:26725098

  9. Factors Associated With Neurological Recovery of Brainstem Function Following Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Infratentorial Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Chitti, Ramana M.; Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Sanford, Robert A.; Khan, Raja B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To identify risk factors associated with incomplete neurological recovery in pediatric patients with infratentorial ependymoma treated with postoperative conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods: The study included 68 patients (median age +- standard deviation of 2.6 +- 3.8 years) who were followed for 5 years after receiving CRT (54-59.4 Gy) and were assessed for function of cranial nerves V to VII and IX to XII, motor weakness, and dysmetria. The mean (+- standard deviation) brainstem dose was 5,487 (+-464) cGy. Patients were divided into four groups representing those with normal baseline and follow-up, those with abnormal baseline and full recovery, those with abnormal baseline and partial or no recovery, and those with progressive deficits at 12 (n = 62 patients), 24 (n = 57 patients), and 60 (n = 50 patients) months. Grouping was correlated with clinical and treatment factors. Results: Risk factors (overall risk [OR], p value) associated with incomplete recovery included gender (male vs. female, OR = 3.97, p = 0.036) and gross tumor volume (GTV) (OR/ml = 1.23, p = 0.005) at 12 months, the number of resections (>1 vs. 1; OR = 23.7, p = 0.003) and patient age (OR/year = 0.77, p = 0.029) at 24 months, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting (Yes vs. No; OR = 21.9, p = 0.001) and GTV volume (OR/ml = 1.18, p = 0.008) at 60 months. An increase in GTV correlated with an increase in the number of resections (p = 0.001) and CSF shunting (p = 0.035); the number of resections correlated with CSF shunting (p < 0.0001), and male patients were more likely to undergo multiple tumor resections (p = 0.003). Age correlated with brainstem volume (p < 0.0001). There were no differences in outcome based on the absolute or relative volume of the brainstem that received more than 54 Gy. Conclusions: Incomplete recovery of brainstem function after CRT for infratentorial ependymoma is related to surgical morbidity and the volume and the extent of tumor.

  10. Neurologic Functional and Quality of Life Outcomes after TBI: Clinic Attendees versus Non-Attendees.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur B; Wilson, Laura D; Bregman, Jana A; Leath, Taylor C; Humble, Stephen S; Davidson, Mario A; de Riesthal, Michael R; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2015-07-01

    This investigation describes the relationship between TBI patient demographics, quality of life outcome, and functional status outcome among clinic attendees and non-attendees. Of adult TBI survivors with intracranial hemorrhage, 63 attended our TBI clinic and 167 did not attend. All were telephone surveyed using the Extended-Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) scale, and a post-discharge therapy questionnaire. To determine risk factors for GOSE and QOLIBRI outcomes, we created multivariable regression models employing covariates of age, injury characteristics, clinic attendance, insurance status, post-discharge rehabilitation, and time from injury. Compared with those with severe TBI, higher GOSE scores were identified in individuals with both mild (odds ratio [OR]=2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-3.6) and moderate (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.6-14.1) TBIs. In addition, survivors with private insurance had higher GOSE scores, compared with those with public insurance (OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.6), workers' compensation (OR=8.4; 95% CI: 2.6-26.9), and no insurance (OR=3.1; 95% CI: 1.6-6.2). Compared with those with severe TBI, QOLIBRI scores were 11.7 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.7) higher in survivors with mild TBI and 17.3 points (95% CI: 3.2-31.5) higher in survivors with moderate TBI. In addition, survivors who received post-discharge rehabilitation had higher QOLIBRI scores by 11.4 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.1) than those who did not. Survivors with private insurance had QOLIBRI scores that were 25.5 points higher (95% CI: 11.3-39.7) than those with workers' compensation and 16.8 points higher (95% CI: 7.4-26.2) than those without insurance. Because neurologic injury severity, insurance status, and receipt of rehabilitation or therapy are independent risk factors for functional and quality of life outcomes, future directions will include improving earlier access to post-TBI rehabilitation, social work services, affordable insurance

  11. Quantitative sleep stage analyses as a window to neonatal neurologic function

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Joseph W.; Barks, John D.E.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that neonatal sleep physiology reflects cerebral dysfunction, we compared neurologic examination scores to the proportions of recorded sleep/wake states, sleep depth, and sleep fragmentation in critically ill neonates. Methods: Newborn infants (≥35 weeks gestation) who required intensive care and were at risk for seizures were monitored with 8- to 12-hour polysomnograms (PSGs). For each infant, the distribution of sleep-wake states, entropy of the sequence of state transitions, and delta power from the EEG portion of the PSG were quantified. Standardized neurologic examination (Thompson) scores were calculated. Results: Twenty-eight infants participated (mean gestational age 39.0 ± 1.6 weeks). An increased fraction of quiet sleep correlated with worse neurologic examination scores (Spearman rho = 0.54, p = 0.003), but the proportion of active sleep did not (p > 0.1). Higher state entropy corresponded to better examination scores (rho = −0.43, p = 0.023). Decreased delta power during quiet sleep, but not the power at other frequencies, was also associated with worse examination scores (rho = −0.48, p = 0.009). These findings retained significance after adjustment for gestational age or postmenstrual age at the time of the PSG. Sleep stage transition probabilities were also related to examination scores. Conclusions: Among critically ill neonates at risk for CNS dysfunction, several features of recorded sleep—including analyses of sleep stages, depth, and fragmentation—showed associations with neurologic examination scores. Quantitative PSG analyses may add useful objective information to the traditional neurologic assessment of critically ill neonates. PMID:24384644

  12. Potential Interactions between the Autonomic Nervous System and Higher Level Functions in Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Andrea; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) maintains the internal homeostasis by continuously interacting with other brain structures. Its failure is commonly observed in many neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative and vascular brain diseases, spinal cord injury, and peripheral neuropathies. Despite the different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, ANS failure associates with various forms of higher level dysfunctions, and may also negatively impact on patients’ clinical outcome. In this review, we will discuss potential relationships between ANS and higher level dysfunctions in a selection of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, we will focus on the effect of a documented fall in blood pressure fulfilling the criteria for orthostatic hypotension and/or autonomic-reflex impairment on cognitive performances. Some evidence supports the hypothesis that cardiovascular autonomic failure may play a negative prognostic role in most neurological disorders. Despite a clear causal relationship between ANS involvement and higher level dysfunctions that is still controversial, this might have implications for neuro-rehabilitation strategies aimed at improving patients’ clinical outcome. PMID:26388831

  13. Neurological, neuropsychological, and functional outcome following treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Towgood, Karren; Ogden, Jenni A; Mee, Edward

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a detailed investigation of the neurological, neuropsychological, and return-to-work status of treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). A prospective design was used to evaluate the outcome of UIA treatment in a group of 26 UIA patients. Over a 24-month period UIA patients were assessed prior to treatment, during hospitalization, at three months and at six months following treatment. Their performance was compared to a group of 20 matched controls. Neurological morbidity as a result of the UIA treatment was 5%, as assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or Rankin at 3 months. The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) proved to be unreliable as a measure of cognitive change. Reliability of change analysis was more sensitive than group analysis, and revealed a pattern of cognitive deficits in 10% of patients as a result of the UIA treatment. In addition, 25% of patients reported a change in work role as a result of the UIA treatment. While 10% of patients sustained mild to moderate neurological and cognitive impairments 3 to 6 months following UIA treatment, their deficits were not as wide-ranging nor as severe as those sustained by patients who survive a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). PMID:16212679

  14. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    PubMed

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding. PMID:19892141

  15. Metabolic control of regulatory T cell development and function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance and play an important role in immunological diseases and cancers. Recent studies have revealed an intricate relationship between Treg biology and host and microbial metabolism. Various metabolites or nutrients produced by host and commensal microbes, such as vitamins and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), regulate Treg generation, trafficking, and function. Furthermore, cell intrinsic metabolic programs, orchestrated by mTOR and other metabolic sensors, modulate Foxp3 induction and Treg suppressive activity. Conversely, Tregs are crucial in regulating obesity-associated inflammation and host metabolic balance, and in shaping homeostasis of gut microbiota. We review here the interplay between Tregs and metabolism, with a particular focus on how host, commensal, and cellular metabolism impinge upon Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25248463

  16. Fueling Immunity: Insights into Metabolism and Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L.; Poffenberger, Maya C.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Jones, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes face major metabolic challenges upon activation. They must meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of increased cell proliferation and also adapt to changing environmental conditions, in which nutrients and oxygen may be limiting. An emerging theme in immunology is that metabolic reprogramming and lymphocyte activation are intricately linked. However, why T cells adopt specific metabolic programs and the impact that these programs have on T cell function and, ultimately, immunological outcome remain unclear. Research on tumor cell metabolism has provided valuable insight into metabolic pathways important for cell proliferation and the influence of metabolites themselves on signal transduction and epigenetic programming. In this Review, we highlight emerging concepts regarding metabolic reprogramming in proliferating cells and discuss their potential impact on T cell fate and function. PMID:24115444

  17. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:25808503

  18. Vinpocetine modulates metabolic activity and function during retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; O'Brien, Brendan J; Truong, Mai; Guo, Cindy X; Kalloniatis, Michael; Acosta, Monica L

    2015-05-01

    Vinpocetine protects against a range of degenerative conditions and insults of the central nervous system via multiple modes of action. Little is known, however, of its effects on metabolism. This may be highly relevant, as vinpocetine is highly protective against ischemia, a process that inhibits normal metabolic function. This study uses the ischemic retina as a model to characterize vinpocetine's effects on metabolism. Vinpocetine reduced the metabolic demand of the retina following ex vivo hypoxia and ischemia to normal levels based on lactate dehydrogenase activity. Vinpocetine delivered similar effects in an in vivo model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion, possibly through increasing glucose availability. Vinpocetine's effects on glucose also appeared to improve glutamate homeostasis in ischemic Müller cells. Other actions of vinpocetine following ischemia-reperfusion, such as reduced cell death and improved retinal function, were possibly a combination of the drug's actions on metabolism and other retinal pathways. Vinpocetine's metabolic effects appeared independent of its other known actions in ischemia, as it recovered retinal function in a separate metabolic model where the glutamate-to-glutamine metabolic pathway was inhibited in Müller cells. The results of this study indicate that vinpocetine mediates ischemic damage partly through altered metabolism and has potential beneficial effects as a treatment for ischemia of neuronal tissues. PMID:25696811

  19. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  20. Knockout of silent information regulator 2 (SIRT2) preserves neurological function after experimental stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Krey, Lea; Lühder, Fred; Kusch, Kathrin; Czech-Zechmeister, Bozena; Könnecke, Birte; Fleming Outeiro, Tiago; Trendelenburg, George

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin-2 (Sirt2) is a member of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase family. Various members of the sirtuin class have been found to be involved in processes related to longevity, regulation of inflammation, and neuroprotection. Induction of Sirt2 mRNA was found in the whole hemisphere after experimental stroke in a recent screening approach. Moreover, Sirt2 protein is highly expressed in myelin-rich brain regions after stroke. To examine the effects of Sirt2 on ischemic stroke, we induced transient focal cerebral ischemia in adult male Sirt2-knockout and wild-type mice. Two stroke models with different occlusion times were applied: a severe ischemia (45 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)) and a mild one (15 minutes of MCAO), which was used to focus on subcortical infarcts. Neurological deficit was determined at 48 hours after 45 minutes of MCAO, and up to 7 days after induction of 15 minutes of cerebral ischemia. In contrast to recent data on Sirt1, Sirt2(-/-) mice showed less neurological deficits in both models of experimental stroke, with the strongest manifestation after 48 hours of reperfusion. However, we did not observe a significant difference of stroke volumes or inflammatory cell count between Sirt2-deficient and wild-type mice. Thus we postulate that Sirt2 mediates myelin-dependent neuronal dysfunction during the early phase after ischemic stroke. PMID:26219598

  1. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kozol, Robert A.; Abrams, Alexander J.; James, David M.; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  2. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  3. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  4. Steviol glycosides: chemical diversity, metabolism, and function.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-06-28

    Steviol glycosides are a group of highly sweet diterpene glycosides discovered in only a few plant species, most notably the Paraguayan shrub Stevia rebaudiana. During the past few decades, the nutritional and pharmacological benefits of these secondary metabolites have become increasingly apparent. While these properties are now widely recognized, many aspects related to their in vivo biochemistry and metabolism and their relationship to the overall plant physiology of S. rebaudiana are not yet understood. Furthermore, the large size of the steviol glycoside pool commonly found within S. rebaudiana leaves implies a significant metabolic investment and poses questions regarding the benefits S. rebaudiana might gain from their accumulation. The current review intends to thoroughly discuss the available knowledge on these issues. PMID:23713723

  5. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; Orwoll, Shiela; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  6. The Edinburgh human metabolic network reconstruction and its functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwu; Sorokin, Anatoly; Mazein, Alexander; Selkov, Alex; Selkov, Evgeni; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A better understanding of human metabolism and its relationship with diseases is an important task in human systems biology studies. In this paper, we present a high-quality human metabolic network manually reconstructed by integrating genome annotation information from different databases and metabolic reaction information from literature. The network contains nearly 3000 metabolic reactions, which were reorganized into about 70 human-specific metabolic pathways according to their functional relationships. By analysis of the functional connectivity of the metabolites in the network, the bow-tie structure, which was found previously by structure analysis, is reconfirmed. Furthermore, the distribution of the disease related genes in the network suggests that the IN (substrates) subset of the bow-tie structure has more flexibility than other parts. PMID:17882155

  7. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BIDAKI, Reza; ZAREPUR, Ehsan; AKRAMI, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse’s trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  8. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bidaki, Reza; Zarepur, Ehsan; Akrami, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse's trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  9. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  10. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  11. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R.; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates. PMID:25540776

  12. Improved differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neurological function after spinal cord injury in rats by oscillating field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jing, J-H; Qian, J; Zhu, N; Chou, W-B; Huang, X-J

    2015-09-10

    Oscillating field stimulation (OFS) has been used in attempts to treat spinal cord injury (SCI) and has been shown to improve remyelination after SCI in rats. However, some controversies regarding the effects of OFS have been presented in previous papers. Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the main cell for remyelination and are derived from the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). To date, it has been unclear whether the differentiation of OPCs can be regulated by OFS. The goal of this study was to determine if OFS can improve the differentiation of OPCs and promote the recovery of neurological function after SCI in rats. Immature and mature OLs were observed in spinal cord slices through immunofluorescence staining. Levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) scores and transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) were used to evaluate the locomotor outcomes of rats after SCI. Our results showed a significant improvement in the differentiation of OPCs and the content of ATP and LIF in the injured spinal cord in the OFS group. Furthermore, BBB scores and tcMMEPs were significantly improved in the rats stimulated by OFS. These findings suggest that OFS can improve the differentiation of OPCs and promote the recovery of neurological function following SCI in rats. PMID:26166729

  13. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  14. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  15. [Energy metabolism and myocardial function in myocardiodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Temirova, K V; Kurlygina, L A; Zavodskaia, I S; Novikova, N A

    1976-09-01

    A total of 92 patients with chronic tonsilitis and cardiovascular changes were subjected to clinical observations, ECG analysis, potassium and nitroglycerine tests, and studies of the lactic acid level and creatinekinase activity as indces of myocardial metabolism. The examinations were conducted prior to and following tonsillectomy. In a majority of patients a correlation was revealed between the degree of ECG changes and the serum lactic acid level, as well as between the ECG improvement and a reduction of the lactic acid level following tonsillectomy. Three stages of tonsillogenic myocardiodystrophy were distinguished. The obtained data indicate the rationale of the used tests for the evaluation of the myocardial meabolism alterations and of the efficacy of treatment of chronic tonsillitis patients. PMID:1011536

  16. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  17. Dependence of hippocampal function on ERRγ-regulated mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pei, Liming; Mu, Yangling; Leblanc, Mathias; Alaynick, William; Barish, Grant D; Pankratz, Matthew; Tseng, Tiffany W; Kaufman, Samantha; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Pfaff, Samuel L; Auwerx, Johan; Gage, Fred H; Evans, Ronald M

    2015-04-01

    Neurons utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to generate energy essential for survival, function, and behavioral output. Unlike most cells that burn both fat and sugar, neurons only burn sugar. Despite its importance, how neurons meet the increased energy demands of complex behaviors such as learning and memory is poorly understood. Here we show that the estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) orchestrates the expression of a distinct neural gene network promoting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism that reflects the extraordinary neuronal dependence on glucose. ERRγ(-/-) neurons exhibit decreased metabolic capacity. Impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) in ERRγ(-/-) hippocampal slices can be fully rescued by the mitochondrial OxPhos substrate pyruvate, functionally linking the ERRγ knockout metabolic phenotype and memory formation. Consistent with this notion, mice lacking neuronal ERRγ in cerebral cortex and hippocampus exhibit defects in spatial learning and memory. These findings implicate neuronal ERRγ in the metabolic adaptations required for memory formation. PMID:25863252

  18. Lactate preserves neuronal metabolism and function following antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Raimund I.; Jiang, Lihong; Herman, Peter; Zhao, Chen; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Mason, Graeme F.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia occurs frequently during intensive insulin therapy in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and remains the single most important obstacle in achieving tight glycemic control. Using a rodent model of hypoglycemia, we demonstrated that exposure to antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia leads to adaptations of brain metabolism so that modest increments in circulating lactate allow the brain to function normally under acute hypoglycemic conditions. We characterized 3 major factors underlying this effect. First, we measured enhanced transport of lactate both into as well as out of the brain that resulted in only a small increase of its contribution to total brain oxidative capacity, suggesting that it was not the major fuel. Second, we observed a doubling of the glucose contribution to brain metabolism under hypoglycemic conditions that restored metabolic activity to levels otherwise only observed at euglycemia. Third, we determined that elevated lactate is critical for maintaining glucose metabolism under hypoglycemia, which preserves neuronal function. These unexpected findings suggest that while lactate uptake was enhanced, it is insufficient to support metabolism as an alternate substrate to replace glucose. Lactate is, however, able to modulate metabolic and neuronal activity, serving as a “metabolic regulator” instead. PMID:23543056

  19. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  20. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  1. Pathways and functions of gut microbiota metabolism impacting host physiology.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Smitha; Alden, Nicholas; Lee, Kyongbum

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial populations in the human intestine impact host physiological functions through their metabolic activity. In addition to performing essential catabolic and biotransformation functions, the gut microbiota produces bioactive small molecules that mediate interactions with the host and contribute to the neurohumoral axes connecting the intestine with other parts of the body. This review discusses recent progress in characterizing the metabolic products of the gut microbiota and their biological functions, focusing on studies that investigate the responsible bacterial pathways and cognate host receptors. Several key areas are highlighted for future development: context-based analysis targeting pathways; integration of analytical approaches; metabolic modeling; and synthetic systems for in vivo manipulation of microbiota functions. Prospectively, these developments could further our mechanistic understanding of host-microbiota interactions. PMID:26340103

  2. Neurological Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Musial, Maryann K

    2016-01-01

    Reasons for completing a neurological exam include: detecting life-threatening conditions, identifying nervous system dysfunction and the effects of this dysfunction on activities of daily living, comparing current data to previous exams to determine trends, and to provide a database upon which to base collaborative care across disciplines. In this third article of a four-part series, subjective and objective assessment of the neurological exam is reviewed. PMID:26645839

  3. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  4. Neurological assessment.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  5. Carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da; Huang, Ying; Li, Bin; Jia, Changqing; Liang, Feng; Fu, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to permanent functional deficits via mechanical injury and secondary mechanisms, but the therapeutic strategy for SCI is limited. Carvedilol has been shown to possess multiple biological and pharmacological properties. The of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of carvedilol in SCI rats. An acute SCI rat model was established and neurological function was tested. After carvedilol (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) treatment for 21 days, the status of osteoporosis, neuron damage, astrocyte activation, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated in rats. Carvedilol significantly improved locomotor activity that was decreased by SCI. In addition, carvedilol promoted bone growth by regulating the expression of nuclear factor-κB ligand (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand; RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inactivating osteoclasts and thereby increasing bone mineral density in tibias. In addition, carvedilol reduced SCI-induced neural damage, increased neuron number and reduced astrocyte activation in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the production and mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were significantly reduced, reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase activity were markedly increased and malondialdehyde content was markedly decreased in the spinal cords of carvedilol-treated rats. These results indicate that carvedilol exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects in SCI rats. In addition, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand was reduced by carvedilol treatment, which, in turn, reduced cleaved caspase 3 expression and finally decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. In conclusion, carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute SCI in rats. PMID:25424914

  6. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids robustly promotes neurovascular restorative dynamics and improves neurological functions after stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Hui; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; Hu, Xiaoming; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurological disease with no satisfactory therapies to preserve long-term neurological function, perhaps due to the sole emphasis on neuronal survival in most preclinical studies. Recent studies have revealed the importance of protecting multiple cell types in the injured brain, such as oligodendrocytes and components of the neurovascular unit, before long-lasting recovery of function can be achieved. For example, revascularization in the ischemic penumbra is critical to provide various neurotrophic factors that enhance the survival and activity of neurons and other progenitor cells, such as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that chronic dietary supplementation with fish oil promotes post-stroke angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis, thereby leading to long-term functional improvements. Mice received dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA-enriched fish oil for three months before and up to one month after stroke. As expected, dietary n-3 PUFAs significantly increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the brain and improved long-term behavioral outcomes after cerebral ischemia. n-3 PUFAs also robustly improved revascularization and angiogenesis and boosted the survival of NeuN/BrdU labeled newborn neurons up to 35days after stroke injury. Furthermore, these pro-neurogenic effects were accompanied by robust oligodendrogenesis. Thus, this is the first study to demonstrate that chronic dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs is an effective prophylactic measure not only to protect against ischemic injury for the long term but also to actively promote neurovascular restorative dynamics and brain repair. PMID:25771800

  7. Effect of Dance Exercise on Cognitive Function in Elderly Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key points Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music. In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word

  8. Effect of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-Hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key pointsMetabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment.Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music.In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word list

  9. Metabolism and epigenetics in the nervous system: Creating cellular fitness and resistance to neuronal death in neurological conditions via modulation of oxygen-, iron-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Kumar, Amit; Shao, Diana S; Zille, Marietta; Bourassa, Megan W; Caulfield, Joseph T; Alim, Ishraq; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2015-12-01

    Modern definitions of epigenetics incorporate models for transient but biologically important changes in gene expression that are unrelated to DNA code but responsive to environmental changes such as injury-induced stress. In this scheme, changes in oxygen levels (hypoxia) and/or metabolic co-factors (iron deficiency or diminished 2-oxoglutarate levels) are transduced into broad genetic programs that return the cell and the organism to a homeostatic set point. Over the past two decades, exciting studies have identified a superfamily of iron-, oxygen-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that sit in the nucleus as modulators of transcription factor stability, co-activator function, histone demethylases, and DNA demethylases. These studies have provided a concrete molecular scheme for how changes in metabolism observed in a host of neurological conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's disease, could be transduced into adaptive gene expression to protect the nervous system. We will discuss these enzymes in this short review, focusing primarily on the ten eleven translocation (TET) DNA demethylases, the jumonji (JmJc) histone demethylases, and the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (HIF PHDs). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26232572

  10. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  11. Common Polymorphisms in the Solute Carrier SLC30A10 are Associated With Blood Manganese and Neurological Function

    PubMed Central

    Kippler, Maria; Alhamdow, Ayman; Rahman, Syed Moshfiqur; Smith, Donald R.; Vahter, Marie; Lucchini, Roberto G.; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient in humans, but excessive exposure to Mn may cause neurotoxicity. Despite homeostatic regulation, Mn concentrations in blood vary considerably among individuals. We evaluated if common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SLC30A10, which likely encodes an Mn transporter, influence blood Mn concentrations and neurological function. We measured blood Mn concentrations by ICP-MS or atomic absorption spectroscopy and genotyped 2 SLC30A10 non-coding SNPs (rs2275707 and rs12064812) by TaqMan PCR in cohorts from Bangladesh (N = 406), the Argentinean Andes (N = 198), and Italy (N = 238). We also measured SLC30A10 expression in whole blood by TaqMan PCR in a sub-group (N = 101) from the Andean cohort, and neurological parameters (sway velocity and finger-tapping speed) in the Italian cohort. The rs2275707 variant allele was associated with increased Mn concentrations in the Andes (8%, P = .027) and Italy (10.6%, P = .012), but not as clear in Bangladesh (3.4%, P = .21; linear regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and plasma ferritin). This allele was also associated with increased sway velocity (15%, P = .033; adjusted for age and sex) and reduced SLC30A10 expression (−24.6%, P = .029). In contrast, the rs12064812 variant homozygous genotype was associated with reduced Mn concentrations, particularly in the Italian cohort (−18.4%, P = .04), and increased finger-tapping speed (8.7%, P = .025). We show that common SNPs in SLC30A10 are associated with blood Mn concentrations in 3 unrelated cohorts and that their influence may be mediated by altered SLC30A10 expression. Moreover, the SNPs appeared to influence neurological functions independent of blood Mn concentrations, suggesting that SLC30A10 could regulate brain Mn levels. PMID:26628504

  12. Functional-metabolic imaging of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sharp, S E; Parisi, M T; Gelfand, M J; Yanik, G A; Shulkin, B L

    2013-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common malignant solid tumor of childhood. It originates from primitive neural crest cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Many imaging procedures help guide therapy and predict outcomes. Anatomic imaging methods, such as CT and MRI, are most useful for evaluation of the primary tumor mass and nearby involved lymph nodes. Functional imaging tracers, such as [123I]MIBG, [18F]FDG, and [99mTc]MDP, are used to assess the extent of disease and to search for distant metastases. [123I]MIBG is the principal functional imaging tracer for the detection and monitoring of neuroblastoma. [18F]FDG PET/CT is an alternative that is valuable in tumors with poor or no MIBG-uptake. [99mTc]MDP bone scans may be useful to assess cortical bone metastases. This article will review the use of [123I]MIBG and other functional imaging agents for the management of patients with neuroblastoma. PMID:23474631

  13. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  14. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  15. Phosphatidylserine in the Brain: Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X.; Spector, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine in reactions are catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear. PMID:24992464

  16. Positron emission tomographic scan investigations of Huntington's disease: cerebral metabolic correlates of cognitive function

    SciTech Connect

    Berent, S.; Giordani, B.; Lehtinen, S.; Markel, D.; Penney, J.B.; Buchtel, H.A.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Hichwa, R.; Young, A.B.

    1988-06-01

    Fifteen drug-free patients with early to mid-stage Huntington's disease (HD) were evaluated with positron emission tomographic (PET) scans of /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and quantitative measures of neurological function, learning, memory, and general intelligence. In comparison with a group of normal volunteers, the HD patients showed lower metabolism in both caudate (p less than 0.001) and putamen (p less than 0.001) on PET scans. A significant and positive relationship was found between neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory and caudate metabolism in the patient group but not in the normal group. Visual-spatial learning did not reflect a similar pattern, but performance intelligence quotient was positively related to both caudate and putamen metabolism in the HD group. Vocabulary level was unrelated to either brain structure. Discussion focuses on these and other observed brain-behavior relationships and on the implications of these findings for general behaviors such as those involved in coping and adaptation.

  17. Neurology of Affective Prosody and Its Functional-Anatomic Organization in Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Elliott D.; Monnot, Marilee

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the aphasic syndromes, the organization of affective prosody in brain has remained controversial because affective-prosodic deficits may occur after left or right brain damage. However, different patterns of deficits are observed following left and right brain damage that suggest affective prosody is a dominant and lateralized function of…

  18. Left Brain vs. Right Brain: Findings on Visual Spatial Capacities and the Functional Neurology of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalbfleisch, M. Layne; Gillmarten, Charles

    2013-01-01

    As neuroimaging technologies increase their sensitivity to assess the function of the human brain and results from these studies draw the attention of educators, it becomes paramount to identify misconceptions about what these data illustrate and how these findings might be applied to educational contexts. Some of these "neuromyths" have…

  19. Dose–effect relationships between manganese exposure and neurological, neuropsychological and pulmonary function in confined space bridge welders

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Roels, Harry A; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Diamond, Emily; Park, Robert; Koller, William; Bowler, Russell P; Mergler, Donna; Bouchard, Maryse; Smith, Donald; Gwiazda, Roberto; Doty, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Background Although adverse neuropsychological and neurological health effects are well known among workers with high manganese (Mn) exposures in mining, ore‐processing and ferroalloy production, the risks among welders with lower exposures are less well understood. Methods Confined space welding in construction of a new span of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge without adequate protection was studied using a multidisciplinary method to identify the dose–effect relationship between adverse health effects and Mn in air or whole blood. Bridge welders (n = 43) with little or no personal protection equipment and exposed to a welding fume containing Mn, were administered neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and pulmonary tests. Outcome variables were analysed in relation to whole blood Mn (MnB) and a Cumulative Exposure Index (CEI) based on Mn‐air, duration and type of welding. Welders performed a mean of 16.5 months of welding on the bridge, were on average 43.8 years of age and had on average 12.6 years of education. Results The mean time weighted average of Mn‐air ranged from 0.11–0.46 mg/m3 (55% >0.20 mg/m3). MnB >10 µg/l was found in 43% of the workers, but the concentrations of Mn in urine, lead in blood and copper and iron in plasma were normal. Forced expiratory volume at 1s: forced vital capacity ratios (FEV1/FVC) were found to be abnormal in 33.3% of the welders after about 1.5 years of welding at the bridge. Mean scores of bradykinesia and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale exceeded 4 and 6, respectively. Computer assisted tremor analysis system hand tremor and body sway tests, and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test showed impairment in 38.5/61.5, 51.4 and 88% of the welders, respectively. Significant inverse dose–effect relationships with CEI and/or MnB were found for IQ (p⩽0.05), executive function (p⩽0.03), sustaining concentration and sequencing (p⩽0.04), verbal learning (p

  20. Long-term outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset spinal cord injuries as a function of neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lawrence C.; Chlan, Kathleen M.; Zebracki, Kathy; Anderson, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify outcomes of participation, life satisfaction, and medical complications as a function of impairment in adults with pediatric-onset spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Study participants were adults who sustained SCI at age 18 years or younger and were interviewed at age 24 years or older (M = 26.9, SD = 3.5). The telephone interview included a questionnaire and several standardized measures: FIM® instrument (FIM®), Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART), SF-12® Health Survey, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Using the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury and the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), subjects were grouped into four impairment categories: C1–C4 ABC, C5–C8 ABC, T1–L4 ABC, and AIS D. Results Of the 410 participants, 62% were male, 54% had tetraplegia, 70% had AIS A lesions, and average age at injury was 14 years (SD = 4.3). Of the 407 subjects who had complete neurological information, 59 had C1–C4 ABC, 140 had C5–C8 ABC, 168 had T1–L4 ABC, and 40 had AIS D lesions. The outcomes were delineated for education, employment, independent living and driving, marriage, participation, medical complications, health-related quality of life, and global life satisfaction, in addition to the ASIA motor score and FIM® motor scores, for each of the four impairment groups. Conclusions This information should help focus interventions that facilitate positive outcomes in relationship to the severity of impairment. In addition, these data can provide a level of expectation about long-term outcomes for newly injured children and their parents. PMID:21528628

  1. GABAA receptor complex function in frontal cortex membranes from control and neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G K; Lowenthal, A; Javoy-Agid, F; Constantidinis, J

    1991-05-01

    The functional integrity of the GABAA receptor-benzodiazepine (BZ) recognition site-Cl- ionophore complex was assessed by means of [35S]TBPS (t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate) binding to frontal cortex membranes prepared from frozen postmortem brain tissue taken from control (n = 4), Alzheimer (n = 7), Parkinson (n = 3) and Huntington's chorea (n = 2) patients. Specific [35S]TBPS binding was similar in control, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea brains, but was significantly reduced (78% control, P less than 0.01) in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients. The linkage between the BZ recognition sites and the GABAA receptor-linked Cl- ionophore was functionally intact in these membranes as BZ site agonists (zolpidem, alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam) enhanced [35S]TBPS binding under the conditions used (well-washed membranes in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl). Zolpidem (BZ1 selective) exhibited a biphasic enhancement in control membranes whereas the other compounds induced a bell-shaped concentration-response curve. The enhancement of [35S]TBPS binding by alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam was greater in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients than in controls whereas it tended to be reduced in membranes from the brains of Huntington's chorea patients. These studies demonstrate the functional integrity of the GABAA receptor macromolecular complex and also the usefulness of [35S]TBPS binding in the study of human postmortem tissue. PMID:1654259

  2. Functional neuroimaging of human central auditory processing in normal subjects and patients with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Engelien, A; Stern, E; Silbersweig, D

    2001-02-01

    Auditory sensory processing in the human cerebral cortex is disturbed in several neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from devastating perceptual deficits in neuropsychological syndromes such as cortical deafness and auditory agnosia to the problem of involuntary hallucinatory perception in schizophrenia. With modern non-invasive functional imaging techniques (e.g., PET, fMRI, and MEG), the normal auditory cortical functional anatomy can now be studied in humans in vivo, as well as its disruption in pathological conditions. This article will summarize current knowledge on human central auditory perception in health and disease, with an emphasis on recent functional neuroimaging studies, in the context of clinical and basic neuroscientific knowledge. New strategies include a focus on the role of other, non-temporal brain areas for auditory processing, particularly in the frontal lobes, and the combined use of techniques offering both precise spatial and temporal resolution. One step towards this goal has been the recent development of a silent, event-related fMRI scanning technique. PMID:11320447

  3. The body electric: a long view of electrical therapy for functional neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Laura; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2015-04-01

    The use of electricity in medical treatment has always been technology-driven, rather than aetiology-driven; as new techniques have appeared, clinicians have quickly looked to try them in the treatment of all sorts of conditions where existing treatment options are limited. Functional disorders--as identified anachronistically in our analysis--have been key contenders for emerging electrical treatments: with Leyden jars, with galvanic and electromagnetic machines, and more recently with TMS and TENS. Parallels can be drawn with the history of electrical treatments for migraine and headache (Koehler and Boes, 2010). Regardless of the mode of delivery of electricity, stimulating a limb to produce movement has repeatedly been found to aid and assist recovery in functional motor disorders. This may also be true of non-electrical methods: we have found benefits using both therapeutic sedation and explanatory demonstration of a positive Hoover's sign as therapeutic methods of demonstrating normal movement in functionally weak limbs (Stone et al., 2014). Each surge in enthusiasm for new electrical treatments has been followed by questions about the nature of the disorder and validity of the treatment response. Physicians have tended to attribute therapeutic success initially to powerful biological or even metaphysical effects, but with time and experience these explanations have been replaced by views that the treatment works through suggestion and placebo. Discomfort with these conclusions has in the past discouraged ongoing development of electrical treatments, even if the end result for patients has been encouraging. In Edwards's Bayesian model, functional motor and sensory symptoms are hypothesized to arise when 'pathologically precise prior beliefs' mediated by attentional processes cause experience of symptoms via a hierarchy of false inferences (Edwards, 2012). It can be argued that use of TMS or peripheral stimulation to produce movement of a functionally weak

  4. Metabolic Syndrome Augments the Risk of Early Neurological Deterioration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Independent of Inflammatory Mediators: A Hospital-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohao; Sun, Zhiguang; Ding, Caixia; Tang, Yinyan; Jiang, Xuemei; Xie, Yi; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Lankun; Hu, Dan; Li, Tingting; Xu, Gelin; Sheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with occurrence and prognosis of ischemic stroke. This study aimed to evaluate whether an association exists between MetS and early neurological deterioration (END) following acute ischemic stroke and the possible role inflammatory biomarkers play. Methods and Results. We conducted a prospective cohort investigation that involved 208 stroke patients within 48 hours from symptom onset. MetS was determined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. END was defined as an increase of ⩾1 point in motor power or ⩾2 points in the total National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score within 7 days. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with MetS had a 125% increased risk of END (OR 2.25; 95% CI 1.71–4.86, P = 0.005). After adjustment for fibrinogen and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, MetS remained significantly correlated to END (OR 2.20; 95% CI 1.10–4.04, P = 0.026) with a 77% elevated risk per additional MetS trait (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.23–2.58, P = 0.002). Conclusions. This study demonstrated that MetS may be a potential predictor for END after ischemic stroke, which was independent of raised inflammatory mediators. PMID:27119010

  5. A newly recognized autosomal recessive syndrome affecting neurologic function and vision.

    PubMed

    Salih, Mustafa A; Tzschach, Andreas; Oystreck, Darren T; Hassan, Hamdy H; AlDrees, Abdulmajeed; Elmalik, Salah A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Wienker, Thomas F; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Genetic factors represent an important etiologic group in the causation of intellectual disability. We describe a Saudi Arabian family with closley related parents in which four of six children were affected by a congenital cognitive disturbance. The four individuals (aged 18, 16, 13, and 2 years when last examined) had motor and cognitive delay with seizures in early childhood, and three of the four (sparing only the youngest child) had progressive, severe cognitive decline with spasticity. Two affected children had ocular malformations, and the three older children had progressive visual loss. The youngest had normal globes with good functional vision when last examined but exhibited the oculodigital sign, which may signify a subclinical visual deficit. A potentially deleterious nucleotide change (c.1A>G; p.Met1Val) in the C12orf57 gene was homozygous in all affected individuals, heterozygous in the parents, and absent in an unaffected sibling and >350 normal individuals. This gene has no known function. This family manifests a autosomal recessive syndrome with some phenotypic variability that includes abnormal development of brain and eyes, delayed cognitive and motor milestones, seizures, and a severe cognitive and visual decline that is associated with a homozygous variant in a newly identified gene. PMID:23633300

  6. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  7. Rare diseases: matching wheelchair users with rare metabolic, neuromuscular or neurological disorders to electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchairs (EPIOCs)

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Lorraine H.; Frank, Andrew O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To describe the clinical features of electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchair (EPIOC) users with rare diseases (RD) impacting on EPIOC provision and seating. Method: Retrospective review by a consultant in rehabilitation medicine of electronic and case note records of EPIOC recipients with RDs attending a specialist wheelchair service between June 2007 and September 2008. Data were systematically extracted, entered into a database and analysed under three themes; demographic, diagnostic/clinical (including comorbidity and associated clinical features (ACFs) of the illness/disability) and wheelchair factors. Results: Fifty-four (27 male) EPIOC users, mean age 37.3 (SD 18.6, range 11–70) with RDs were identified and reviewed a mean of 64 (range 0–131) months after receiving their wheelchair. Diagnoses included 27 types of RDs including Friedreich’s ataxia, motor neurone disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, arthrogryposis, cerebellar syndromes and others. Nineteen users had between them 36 comorbidities and 30 users had 44 ACFs likely to influence the prescription. Tilt-in-space was provided to 34 (63%) users and specialised seating to 17 (31%). Four users had between them complex control or interfacing issues. Conclusions: The complex and diverse clinical problems of those with RDs present unique challenges to the multiprofessional wheelchair team to maintain successful independent mobility and community living.Implications for RehabilitationPowered mobility is a major therapeutic tool for those with rare diseases enhancing independence, participation, reducing pain and other clinical features.The challenge for rehabilitation professionals is reconciling the physical disabilities with the individual’s need for function and participation whilst allowing for disease progression and/or growth.Powered wheelchair users with rare diseases with a (kypho) scoliosis require a wheelchair system that balances spine stability and movement to maximise

  8. Metabolic functions of FABPs— mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular interactions with proteins enables the functional and mechanistic diversity of lipids. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) were originally described as intracellular proteins that can affect lipid fluxes, metabolism and signalling within cells. As the functions of this protein family have been further elucidated, it has become evident that they are critical mediators of metabolism and inflammatory processes, both locally and systemically, and therefore are potential therapeutic targets for immunometabolic diseases. In particular, genetic deficiency and small molecule-mediated inhibition of FABP4 (also known as aP2) and FABP5 can potently improve glucose homeostasis and reduce atherosclerosis in mouse models. Further research has shown that in addition to their intracellular roles, some FABPs are found outside the cells, and FABP4 undergoes regulated, vesicular secretion. The circulating form of FABP4 has crucial hormonal functions in systemic metabolism. In this Review we discuss the roles and regulation of both intracellular and extracellular FABP actions, highlighting new insights that might direct drug discovery efforts and opportunities for management of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:26260145

  9. Determinants of Neurological Functional Recovery Potential after Stroke in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haselbach, Daniel; Renggli, Anastasia; Carda, Stefano; Croquelois, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Despite recent progress in stroke prevention and acute treatment, neurorehabilitation remains one of the main methods of treatment in the management of stroke patients. The aim of this study is to point out some important predicting factors of in-hospital neurorehabilitation outcomes. Methods A rehabilitation registry including all patients who had undergone a standardized program of neurorehabilitation at the neurorehabilitation unit of the Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland, was created. Patients aged <65 years and having experienced a first ever nontraumatic stroke from 2005 to 2010 were admitted. Using logistical regression models, predicting factors for each patient were compared to the exit Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score. Results Age >55 years, gender, aphasia, hemilateral spatial neglect, spasticity, complications, length of stay >70 days, entry FIM >100 and relative possible FIM gain/week of >10% were considered to be significant and independent predicting factors of the neurorehabilitation outcome. Discussion/Conclusion Some factors of the in-hospital rehabilitation period have been identified before (spasticity, complications, length of stay, relative possible FIM gain/week) and should be considered for a better management of the neurorehabilitation therapy. In addition, a personalized rehabilitation strategy based on the patient's individual needs should be aimed at. The question of resource allocation can also be addressed with regard to the present findings. PMID:24847344

  10. Simple topological properties predict functional misannotations in a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Pinney, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Misannotation in sequence databases is an important obstacle for automated tools for gene function annotation, which rely extensively on comparison with sequences with known function. To improve current annotations and prevent future propagation of errors, sequence-independent tools are, therefore, needed to assist in the identification of misannotated gene products. In the case of enzymatic functions, each functional assignment implies the existence of a reaction within the organism’s metabolic network; a first approximation to a genome-scale metabolic model can be obtained directly from an automated genome annotation. Any obvious problems in the network, such as dead end or disconnected reactions, can, therefore, be strong indications of misannotation. Results: We demonstrate that a machine-learning approach using only network topological features can successfully predict the validity of enzyme annotations. The predictions are tested at three different levels. A random forest using topological features of the metabolic network and trained on curated sets of correct and incorrect enzyme assignments was found to have an accuracy of up to 86% in 5-fold cross-validation experiments. Further cross-validation against unseen enzyme superfamilies indicates that this classifier can successfully extrapolate beyond the classes of enzyme present in the training data. The random forest model was applied to several automated genome annotations, achieving an accuracy of in most cases when validated against recent genome-scale metabolic models. We also observe that when applied to draft metabolic networks for multiple species, a clear negative correlation is observed between predicted annotation quality and phylogenetic distance to the major model organism for biochemistry (Escherichia coli for prokaryotes and Homo sapiens for eukaryotes). Contact: j.pinney@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  11. Muscle microvasculature's structural and functional specializations facilitate muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Yvo H A M; Barrett, Eugene J

    2016-03-15

    We review the evolving findings from studies that examine the relationship between the structural and functional properties of skeletal muscle's vasculature and muscle metabolism. Unique aspects of the organization of the muscle microvasculature are highlighted. We discuss the role of vasomotion at the microscopic level and of flowmotion at the tissue level as modulators of perfusion distribution in muscle. We then consider in some detail how insulin and exercise each modulate muscle perfusion at both the microvascular and whole tissue level. The central role of the vascular endothelial cell in modulating both perfusion and transendothelial insulin and nutrient transport is also reviewed. The relationship between muscle metabolic insulin resistance and the vascular action of insulin in muscle continues to indicate an important role for the microvasculature as a target for insulin action and that impairing insulin's microvascular action significantly affects body glucose metabolism. PMID:26714849

  12. Effect of metabolic syndrome on mitsugumin 53 expression and function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hanley; Liu, Jason; Bian, Zehua; Cui, Yuqi; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Bo; Adesanya, T M Ayodele; Yi, Frank; Park, Ki Ho; Tan, Tao; Chen, Zhishui; Zhu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia that increases the individual's likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases. Patients inflicted with metabolic disorders also suffer from tissue repair defect. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53) is a protein essential to cellular membrane repair. It facilitates the nucleation of intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane disruption to create repair patches, contributing to the regenerative capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues upon injury. Since individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome possess tissue regeneration deficiency and MG53 plays a crucial role in restoring membrane integrity, we studied MG53 activity in mice models exhibiting metabolic disorders induced by a 6 month high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Western blotting showed that MG53 expression is not altered within the skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice with metabolic syndrome. Rather, we found that MG53 levels in blood circulation were actually reduced. This data directly contradicts findings presented by Song et. al that indict MG53 as a causative factor for metabolic syndrome (Nature 494, 375-379). The diminished MG53 serum level observed may contribute to the inadequate tissue repair aptitude exhibited by diabetic patients. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses reveal that skeletal muscle fibers of mice with metabolic disorders experience localization of subcellular MG53 around mitochondria. This clustering may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress resulting from HFD feeding and may implicate MG53 as a guardian to protect damaged mitochondria. Therapeutic approaches that elevate MG53 expression in serum circulation may be a novel method to treat the degenerative tissue repair function of diabetic patients. PMID:25950605

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INSULIN-RESISTANCE PROCESSING SPEED AND SPECIFIC EXECUTIVE FUNCTION PROFILES IN NEUROLOGICALLY-INTACT OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Darvis T.; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Dutt, Shubir; Patel, Nihar; Mungas, Dan; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Kramer, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the relationship between insulin-resistance and constituent components of executive function in a sample of neurologically-intact older adult subjects using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and latent factors of working memory, cognitive control and processing speed derived from confirmatory factor analysis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), along with body mass index (BMI) and white matter hypointensity (WMH) were used to control for vascular risk factors, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury. Methods The study included 119 elderly subjects recruited from the University of California, San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. Subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment, fasting blood draw and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the HOMA-IR-executive function relationship. Results Pearson correlation adjusting for age showed a significant relationship between HOMA-IR and working memory (rp=−.18, p=.047), a trend with cognitive control (rp=−.17, p=.068), and no relationship with processing speed (rp=.013, p=.892). Linear regression models adjusting for demographic factors (age, education and gender), LDL, MAP, BMI and WMH indicated that HOMA-IR was negatively associated with cognitive control (r=−.256; p=.026) and working memory (r=−.234; p=.054). Conclusions These results suggest a greater level of peripheral insulin-resistance is associated with decreased cognitive control and working memory. After controlling for demographic factors, vascular risk, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury, HOMA-IR remained significantly associated with cognitive control, with working memory showing a trend. These findings substantiate the insulin-resistance-executive function hypothesis and suggest a complex interaction, demonstrated by the differential impact of insulin-resistance on processing speed and specific aspects of

  14. Relationship between Insulin-Resistance Processing Speed and Specific Executive Function Profiles in Neurologically Intact Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Darvis T; Bettcher, Brianne M; Dutt, Shubir; Patel, Nihar; Mungas, Dan; Miller, Joshua; Green, Ralph; Kramer, Joel H

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship between insulin-resistance and constituent components of executive function in a sample of neurologically intact older adult subjects using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and latent factors of working memory, cognitive control and processing speed derived from confirmatory factor analysis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), along with body mass index (BMI) and white matter hypointensity (WMH) were used to control for vascular risk factors, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury. The study included 119 elderly subjects recruited from the University of California, San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. Subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment, fasting blood draw and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the HOMA-IR-executive function relationship. Pearson correlation adjusting for age showed a significant relationship between HOMA-IR and working memory (rp = -.18; p = .047), a trend with cognitive control (rp = -.17; p = .068), and no relationship with processing speed (rp = .013; p = .892). Linear regression models adjusting for demographic factors (age, education, and gender), LDL, MAP, BMI, and WMH indicated that HOMA-IR was negatively associated with cognitive control (r = -.256; p = .026) and working memory (r = -.234; p = .054). These results suggest a greater level of peripheral insulin-resistance is associated with decreased cognitive control and working memory. After controlling for demographic factors, vascular risk, adiposity and cerebrovascular injury, HOMA-IR remained significantly associated with cognitive control, with working memory showing a trend. These findings substantiate the insulin-resistance-executive function hypothesis and suggest a complex interaction, demonstrated by the differential impact of insulin-resistance on processing speed and specific aspects of executive function. PMID

  15. Dependence of Hippocampal Function on ERRγ Regulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Liming; Mu, Yangling; Leblanc, Mathias; Alaynick, William; Barish, Grant D.; Pankratz, Matthew; Tseng, Tiffany W.; Kaufman, Samantha; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Auwerx, Johan; Gage, Fred H.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurons utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to generate energy essential for survival, function and behavioral output. Unlike most cells that burn both fat and sugar, neurons only burn sugar. Despite its importance, how neurons meet the increased energy demands of complex behaviors such as learning and memory is poorly understood. Here we show that the estrogen related receptor gamma (ERRγ) orchestrates the expression of a distinct neural gene network promoting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism that reflects the extraordinary neuronal dependence on glucose. ERRγ−/− neurons exhibit decreased metabolic capacity. Impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) in ERRγ−/− hippocampal slices can be fully rescued by the mitochondrial OxPhos substrate pyruvate, functionally linking the ERRγ knockout metabolic phenotype and memory formation. Consistent with this notion, mice lacking neuronal ERRγ in cerebral cortex and hippocampus exhibit defects in spatial learning and memory. These findings implicate neuronal ERRγ in the metabolic adaptations required for memory formation. PMID:25863252

  16. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  17. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  18. Wearable accelerometry-based technology capable of assessing functional activities in neurological populations in community settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating rehabilitation services through wearable systems has the potential to accurately assess the type, intensity, duration, and quality of movement necessary for procuring key outcome measures. Objectives This review aims to explore wearable accelerometry-based technology (ABT) capable of assessing mobility-related functional activities intended for rehabilitation purposes in community settings for neurological populations. In this review, we focus on the accuracy of ABT-based methods, types of outcome measures, and the implementation of ABT in non-clinical settings for rehabilitation purposes. Data sources Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and IEEE Xplore. The search strategy covered three main areas, namely wearable technology, rehabilitation, and setting. Study selection Potentially relevant studies were categorized as systems either evaluating methods or outcome parameters. Methods Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by two customized checklists, depending on their categorization and rated independently by three blinded reviewers. Results Twelve studies involving ABT met the eligibility criteria, of which three studies were identified as having implemented ABT for rehabilitation purposes in non-clinical settings. From the twelve studies, seven studies achieved high methodological quality scores. These studies were not only capable of assessing the type, quantity, and quality measures of functional activities, but could also distinguish healthy from non-healthy subjects and/or address disease severity levels. Conclusion While many studies support ABT’s potential for telerehabilitation, few actually utilized it to assess mobility-related functional activities outside laboratory settings. To generate more appropriate outcome measures, there is a clear need to translate research findings and novel methods into practice. PMID:24625308

  19. Bedside saccadometry as an objective and quantitative measure of hemisphere-specific neurological function in patients undergoing cranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Y; Marcus, H J; Iorga, R; Nouraei, R; Carpenter, R H; Nandi, D

    2015-02-01

    Cranial surgery continues to carry a significant risk of neurological complications. New bedside tools that can objectively and quantitatively evaluate cerebral function may allow for earlier detection of such complications, more rapid initiation of therapy, and improved patient outcomes. We assessed the potential of saccadic eye movements as a measure of cerebral function in patients undergoing cranial surgery peri-operatively. Visually evoked saccades were measured in 20 patients before (-12 hours) and after (+2 and +5 days) undergoing cranial surgery. Hemisphere specific saccadic latencies were measured using a simple step-task and saccadic latency distributions were compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Saccadic latency values were incorporated into an empirically validated mathematical model (Linear Approach to Threshold with Ergodic Rate [LATER] model) for further analysis (using Wilcoxon signed rank test). Thirteen males and seven females took part in our study (mean age 55 ± 4.9 years). Following cranial surgery, saccades initiated by the cerebral hemisphere on the operated side demonstrated significant deteriorations in function after 2 days (p < 0.01) that normalised after 5 days. Analysis using the LATER model confirmed these findings, highlighting decreased cerebral information processing as a potential mechanism for noted changes (p < 0.05). No patients suffered clinical complications after surgery. To conclude, bedside saccadometry can demonstrate hemisphere-specific changes after surgery in the absence of clinical symptoms. The LATER model confirms these findings and offers a mechanistic explanation for this change. Further work will be necessary to assess the practical validity of these changes in relation to clinical complications after surgery. PMID:25282394

  20. The Cognition Battery of the NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function: Validation in an Adult Sample

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya S.; Heaton, Robert K.; Tulsky, David S.; Zelazo, Philip David; Slotkin, Jerry; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Bauer, Patricia J.; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Fox, Nathan; Havlik, Richard; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Mungas, Dan; Manly, Jennifer J.; Moy, Claudia; Conway, Kevin; Edwards, Emmeline; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Gershon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a special series on validity studies of the Cognition Battery (CB) from the U.S. National Institutes of Health Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIHTB) (R. C. Gershon et al., 2013) in an adult sample. This first paper in the series describes the sample, each of the seven instruments in the NIHTB-CB briefly, and the general approach to data analysis. Data are provided on test-retest reliability and practice effects, and raw scores (mean, standard deviation, range) are presented for each instrument and the gold standard instruments used to measure construct validity. Accompanying papers provide details on each instrument, including information about instrument development, psychometric properties, age and education effects on performance, and convergent and discriminant construct validity. One paper in the series is devoted to a factor analysis of the NIHTB-CB in adults and another describes the psychometric properties of three composite scores derived from the individual measures representing fluid and crystallized abilities and their combination. The NIHTB-CB is designed to provide a brief, comprehensive, common set of measures to allow comparisons among disparate studies and to improve scientific communication. PMID:24959840

  1. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  2. Mutant p53 exerts oncogenic functions by modulating cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ge; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic function of p53 is important for its oncosuppressive function. Mutant p53 (mutp53) with gain of oncogenic function can regulate cell metabolism. Our recent study revealed a novel transcription-independent mechanism for a gain-of-function mutp53 that directly inhibits activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to promote cancer cell metabolism. PMID:27308343

  3. Hypothalamic inflammation in the control of metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Valdearcos, Martin; Xu, Allison W; Koliwad, Suneil K

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity leads to devastating and common chronic diseases, fueling ongoing interest in determining new mechanisms underlying both obesity and its consequences. It is now well known that chronic overnutrition produces a unique form of inflammation in peripheral insulin target tissues, and efforts to limit this inflammation have met with some success in preserving insulin sensitivity in obese individuals. Recently, the activation of inflammatory pathways by dietary excess has also been observed among cells located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, a brain area that exerts central control over peripheral glucose, fat, and energy metabolism. Here we review progress in the field of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, drawing key distinctions between metabolic inflammation in the hypothalamus and that occurring in peripheral tissues. We focus on specific stimuli of the inflammatory response, the roles of individual hypothalamic cell types, and the links between hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic function under normal and pathophysiological circumstances. Finally, we explore the concept of controlling hypothalamic inflammation to mitigate metabolic disease. PMID:25668019

  4. Norepinephrine transporter function and autonomic control of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boschmann, Michael; Schroeder, Christoph; Christensen, Niels Juel; Tank, Jens; Krupp, Goetz; Biaggioni, Italo; Klaus, Susanne; Sharma, Arya M; Luft, Friedrich C; Jordan, Jens

    2002-11-01

    Genetic variability, numerous medications, and some illicit drugs influence norepinephrine transporter (NET) function; however, the metabolic consequences of NET inhibition are poorly understood. We performed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial in 15 healthy subjects who ingested 8 mg of the selective NET inhibitor reboxetine or placebo. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry before and during iv infusion of 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 micro g isoproterenol/min. Adipose tissue metabolism was studied by microdialysis before and during local isoproterenol perfusion. At rest, energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates did not differ between reboxetine and placebo treatment. At 1 micro g/min isoproterenol, energy expenditure was significantly increased in men (+15%) and women (+20%) with both reboxetine and placebo treatment. However, carbohydrate oxidation rate was significantly higher with reboxetine compared with placebo. Baseline and isoproterenol-stimulated adipose tissue blood flow was about 2-fold higher with reboxetine vs. placebo. Furthermore, glucose supply and metabolism was significantly increased and lipid mobilization much more stimulated in adipose tissue under reboxetine when compared with placebo at all isoproterenol concentrations used. We conclude that acute NET inhibition increases adipose tissue glucose uptake and metabolism. While lipid mobilization is increased, overall lipid oxidation is decreased during beta-adrenergic stimulation. This effect cannot be explained by increased systemic or adipose tissue norepinephrine concentrations. Instead, NET inhibition may sensitize adipose tissue to beta-adrenergic stimulation. PMID:12414883

  5. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A.; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals’ survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics. PMID:23523565

  6. New insights on glucosylated lipids: metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Ceramide, cholesterol, and phosphatidic acid are major basic structures for cell membrane lipids. These lipids are modified with glucose to generate glucosylceramide (GlcCer), cholesterylglucoside (ChlGlc), and phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), respectively. Glucosylation dramatically changes the functional properties of lipids. For instance, ceramide acts as a strong tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, while GlcCer has an opposite effect, downregulating ceramide activities. All glucosylated lipids are enriched in lipid rafts or microdomains and play fundamental roles in a variety of cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and metabolism of these three glucosylated lipids. PMID:23770033

  7. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS's regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. "Epigenetics", introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and

  9. Ravel's neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed. PMID:10718529

  10. Creativity and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  11. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  12. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. PMID:26345360

  13. Triacylglycerol Metabolism, Function, and Accumulation in Plant Vegetative Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changcheng; Shanklin, John

    2016-04-29

    Oils in the form of triacylglycerols are the most abundant energy-dense storage compounds in eukaryotes, and their metabolism plays a key role in cellular energy balance, lipid homeostasis, growth, and maintenance. Plants accumulate oils primarily in seeds and fruits. Plant oils are used for food and feed and, increasingly, as feedstocks for biodiesel and industrial chemicals. Although plant vegetative tissues do not accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerols, they possess a high capacity for their synthesis, storage, and metabolism. The development of plants that accumulate oil in vegetative tissues presents an opportunity for expanded production of triacylglycerols as a renewable and sustainable bioenergy source. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of triacylglycerol synthesis, turnover, storage, and function in leaves and discuss emerging genetic engineering strategies targeted at enhancing triacylglycerol accumulation in biomass crops. Such plants could potentially be modified to produce oleochemical feedstocks or nutraceuticals. PMID:26845499

  14. Regulation of cardiac metabolism and function by lipogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Tomasz; Pyrkowska, Aleksandra; Opasińska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyń, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited capacity for lipogenesis and de novo lipid synthesis. However, expression of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes is unexpectedly high. Recent studies showed that lipogenic genes are important factors regulating cardiac metabolism and function. Long chain fatty acids are a major source of ATP required for proper heart function, and under aerobic conditions, the heart derives 60-90% of the energy necessary for contractile function from fatty acid oxidation. On the other hand, cardiac lipid over-accumulation (e.g. ceramides, diacylglycerols) leads to heart dysfunction. Downregulation of the lipogenic genes' expression (e.g. sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, acetyl-CoA kwacarboxylase) decreased heart steatosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, improving systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Lipogenic factors also regulate fatty acids and glucose utilization in the heart, underlining their important role in maintaining energetic homeostasis in pathological states. Fatty acid synthase, the enzyme catalyzing fatty acids de novo synthesis, affects cardiac calcium signaling through regulation of L-type calcium channel activity. Thus, a growing body of evidence suggests that the role of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes may be distinct from other tissues. Here, we review recent advances made in understanding the role of lipogenic genes in the control of heart metabolism and its involvement in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27333934

  15. Functional genomics of Plasmodium falciparum using metabolic modelling and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Rebecca D.; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite and the leading cause of severe malaria responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Successful completion of the P. falciparum genome sequencing project in 2002 provided a comprehensive foundation for functional genomic studies on this pathogen in the following decade. Over this period, a large spectrum of experimental approaches has been deployed to improve and expand the scope of functionally annotated genes. Meanwhile, rapidly evolving methods of systems biology have also begun to contribute to a more global understanding of various aspects of the biology and pathogenesis of malaria. Herein we provide an overview on metabolic modelling, which has the capability to integrate information from functional genomics studies in P. falciparum and guide future malaria research efforts towards the identification of novel candidate drug targets. PMID:23793264

  16. Skeletal Muscle Phospholipid Metabolism Regulates Insulin Sensitivity and Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Funai, Katsuhiko; Lodhi, Irfan J; Spears, Larry D; Yin, Li; Song, Haowei; Klein, Samuel; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is an early defect in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lipid overload induces insulin resistance in muscle and alters the composition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle phospholipid metabolism regulates systemic glucose metabolism, we perturbed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase 1 (CEPT1), the terminal enzyme in the Kennedy pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In C2C12 cells, CEPT1 knockdown altered SR phospholipid composition and calcium flux. In mice, diet-induced obesity, which decreases insulin sensitivity, increased muscle CEPT1 expression. In high-fat diet-fed mice with skeletal muscle-specific knockout of CEPT1, systemic and muscle-based approaches demonstrated increased muscle insulin sensitivity. In CEPT1-deficient muscles, an altered SR phospholipid milieu decreased sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-dependent calcium uptake, activating calcium-signaling pathways known to improve insulin sensitivity. Altered muscle SR calcium handling also rendered these mice exercise intolerant. In obese humans, surgery-induced weight loss increased insulin sensitivity and decreased skeletal muscle CEPT1 protein. In obese humans spanning a spectrum of metabolic health, muscle CEPT1 mRNA was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that high-fat feeding and obesity induce CEPT1, which remodels the SR to preserve contractile function at the expense of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26512026

  17. From Elements to Metabolism: Linking Organismal Stoichiometry to Ecosystem Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolism is an integrative metric of ecosystem function and energetics, synthesizing the relative contributions of multiple inputs, processes, and interactions. Stoichiometry is a framework based on elemental ratios for understanding how organisms interact within ecosystems. Linking the two has the potential to yield fresh insight about how ecosystems utilize elements and energy. We sought to quantify the link between the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism, specifically the C:N:P ratios of integrated autotrophic assimilation, and the stoichiometric tissue ratios observed in the dominant autotrophs. Using high frequency in situ nutrient sensors we estimated the assimilatory fluxes of C, N, and P in multiple spring-fed rivers of varying autotrophic species composition. We measured autotroph cover in each spring river, collected composite vegetation samples, and evaluated tissue stoichiometry; as expected, we observed large differences in C:N and N:P between algal and vascular plant taxa. We observed associations between measured tissue stoichiometry and elemental ratios at the ecosystem scale, suggesting that aggregated assimilatory fluxes may be useful for partitioning primary production and linking organismal nutrient content to the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism.

  18. Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

  19. Voluntary exercise improves hypothalamic and metabolic function in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Laing, Brenton T; Do, Khoa; Matsubara, Tomoko; Wert, David W; Avery, Michael J; Langdon, Erin M; Zheng, Donghai; Huang, Hu

    2016-05-01

    Exercise plays a critical role in regulating glucose homeostasis and body weight. However, the mechanism of exercise on metabolic functions associated with the CNS has not been fully understood. C57BL6 male mice (n=45) were divided into three groups: normal chow diet, high-fat diet (HFD) treatment, and HFD along with voluntary running wheel exercise training for 12 weeks. Metabolic function was examined by the Comprehensive Lab Animal Monitoring System and magnetic resonance imaging; phenotypic analysis included measurements of body weight, food intake, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as insulin and leptin sensitivity studies. By immunohistochemistry, the amount changes in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, neuronal proliferative maker Ki67, apoptosis positive cells as well as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons in the arcuate area of the hypothalamus was identified. We found that 12 weeks of voluntary exercise training partially reduced body weight gain and adiposity induced by an HFD. Insulin and leptin sensitivity were enhanced in the exercise training group verses the HFD group. Furthermore, the HFD-impaired POMC-expressing neuron is remarkably restored in the exercise training group. The restoration of POMC neuron number may be due to neuroprotective effects of exercise on POMC neurons, as evidenced by altered proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that voluntary exercise training improves metabolic symptoms induced by HFD, in part through protected POMC-expressing neuron from HFD and enhanced leptin signaling in the hypothalamus that regulates whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:26931136

  20. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  1. Physical, metabolic and developmental functions of the seed coat

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2014-01-01

    The conventional understanding of the role of the seed coat is that it provides a protective layer for the developing zygote. Recent data show that the picture is more nuanced. The seed coat certainly represents a first line of defense against adverse external factors, but it also acts as channel for transmitting environmental cues to the interior of the seed. The latter function primes the seed to adjust its metabolism in response to changes in its external environment. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the structure and functionality of the seed coat, and to expose its hidden interaction with both the endosperm and embryo. Any breeding and/or biotechnology intervention seeking to increase seed size or modify seed features will have to consider the implications on this tripartite interaction. PMID:25346737

  2. Improved neurologic prognosis for a patient with propionic acidemia who received early living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Toju; Morii, Mayuko; Wakai, Shuji; Horikawa, Reiko; Kasahara, Mureo

    2013-01-01

    Despite medical therapy, patients with propionic academia (PA) still display a tendency to develop epilepsy. Patients with neonatal-onset PA who have received early living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) are limited in number, and the effect on neurologic prognosis, including epilepsy, is not clear. We report a patient with PA whose EEG findings improved dramatically after undergoing LDLT at age 7 months. The patient's neurologic development and brain MRI findings were quite satisfactory at age 2 years and 3 months. LDLT is effective not only in preventing metabolic decompensation, but also in improving neurologic function to ensure better quality of life. PMID:23151386

  3. Aflatoxicosis alters avian renal function, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Beers, K W; Bottje, W G; Wideman, R F; Huff, W E; Thomas, W

    1991-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of aflatoxicosis on avian renal function, calcium (CA), inorganic phosphorous (Pi), and vitamin D metabolism, and to determine if the effects of aflatoxin are reversible upon discontinuation of toxin administration. Three-week-old male broiler chickens (n = 12 per treatment) received aflatoxin (AF; 2 mg/kg po) or an equal volume of corn oil, the AF carrier vehicle, for 10 consecutive days. After 10 d of treatment, half of the birds from each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis, which included a 2-h phosphate loading period. Ten days after discontinuation of AF treatment, the remaining birds in each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis. AF decreased plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] levels after 5 d of treatment. After 10 d of treatment, urine flow rate (V), fractional sodium excretion (FENa), and fractional potassium excretion (FEK) were lower in AF-treated birds. In addition, total plasma Ca tended to be lower (p = .10) and fractional Ca excretion (FECa) tended to be higher (p = .10) in the AF-treated birds. Intravenous phosphate loading produced a sharp increase in urine hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the AF-treated birds. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was reduced and plasma osmolality was increased in AF-treated birds 10 d after discontinuation of toxin administration. The results indicate that AF directly or indirectly affects Ca and Pi metabolism in avians. At the present time, the effects may be related to altered vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) metabolism. Aflatoxicosis may decrease endogenous PTH synthesis and the renal sensitivity to PTH. The AF-related increase in urine [H+] during phosphate loading is probably due to increased Na+/H+ counterport, suggesting that AF stimulates sodium reabsorption. Also, the decrease in GFR exhibited 10 d after toxin removal indicates

  4. Exploring Metabolic Pathways and Regulation through Functional Chemoproteomic and Metabolomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing efforts have revealed a strikingly large number of uncharacterized genes, including poorly or uncharacterized metabolic enzymes, metabolites, and metabolic networks that operate in normal physiology, and also those enzymes and pathways that may be rewired under pathological conditions. Though deciphering the functions of the uncharacterized metabolic genome is a challenging prospect, it also presents an opportunity for identifying novel metabolic nodes that may be important in disease therapy. In this review, we will discuss the chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms employed in identifying, characterizing, and targeting nodal metabolic pathways important in physiology and disease, describing an integrated workflow for functional mapping of metabolic enzymes. PMID:25237861

  5. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity. PMID:24924745

  6. The neurology of folic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, E H

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of folic acid and the metabolism of vitamin B12 are intimately linked such that deficiency of either vitamin leads to an identical megaloblastic anemia. The neurologic manifestations of folate deficiency overlap with those of vitamin B12 deficiency and include cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, and, less commonly, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. In both deficiency states there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications. There is a similar overlap and dissociation between neurologic and hematologic manifestations of inborn errors of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Low folate and raised homocysteine levels are risk factors for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Even when folate deficiency is secondary to psychiatric illness due to apathy or poor diet it may eventually aggravate the underlying disorder in a vicious circle effect. Clinical responses to treatment with folates are usually slow over weeks and months, probably due to the efficient blood-brain barrier mechanism for the vitamin, perhaps in turn related to the experimentally demonstrated excitatory properties of folate derivatives. The inappropriate administration of folic acid in the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency may lead to both neurologic and, later, hematologic relapse. Impaired maternal folate intake and status increases the risk of neural tube defects. Periconceptual prophylactic administration of the vitamin reduces, but does not eliminate the risk of neural tube defects even in the absence of folate deficiency. Folates and vitamin B12 have fundamental roles in central nervous system function at all ages, especially in purine, thymidine, neucleotide, and DNA synthesis, genomic and nongenomic methylation and, therefore, in tissue growth, differentiation and repair. There is interest in the potential role of both vitamins in the prevention of disorders of central

  7. Is there more to learn about functional vitamin D metabolism?

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Hector F

    2015-04-01

    The state of information on the enzymes responsible for the conversion of vitamin D3 to 1α,25-dhydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), the metabolic active form responsible for the well-known function of vitamin D on calcium metabolism and bone mineralization has been briefly reviewed. There remains an unidentified enzyme responsible for 25% of the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3, while 75% of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3) arises from CYP2R1. The well-established suppression of multiple sclerosis (MS) by sunlight has been confirmed using the mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This suppression results from a narrow band of ultraviolet light (300-315nm) that does not increase serum 25-OH-D3. Thus, UV light suppresses EAE by a mechanism not involving vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency unexpectedly suppresses the development of EAE. Further, vitamin D receptor knockout in susceptible mice also prevents the development of EAE. On the other hand, deletion of CYP2R1 and the 1α-hydroxylase, CYP27B1, does not impair the development of EAE. Thus, either vitamin D itself or a heretofore-unknown metabolite is needed for the development of a component of the immune system necessary for development of EAE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25194637

  8. Silibinin Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Differentiation in Functional Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Vanella, Luca; Cambria, Maria T.; Tibullo, Daniele; Godos, Justyna; Guarnaccia, Laura; Zappalà, Agata; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a natural plant flavonolignan is the main active constituent found in milk thistle (Silybum marianum). It is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-neoplastic effect, and suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silibinin on adipogenic differentiation and thermogenic capacity of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Silibinin (10 μM) treatment, either at the beginning or at the end of adipogenic differentiation, resulted in an increase of SIRT-1, PPARα, Pgc-1α, and UCPs gene expression. Moreover, silibinin administration resulted in a decrease of PPARγ, FABP4, FAS, and MEST/PEG1 gene expression during the differentiation, confirming that this compound is able to reduce fatty acid accumulation and adipocyte size. Our data showed that silibinin regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism, inducing thermogenesis and promoting a brown remodeling in adipocyte. Taken together, our findings suggest that silibinin increases UCPs expression by stimulation of SIRT1, PPARα, and Pgc-1α, improved metabolic parameters, decreased lipid mass leading to the formation of functional adipocytes. PMID:26834634

  9. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  10. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  11. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  12. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  13. Maternal blood metal levels and fetal markers of metabolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Fisher, Mandy; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Fraser, William D.

    2015-01-15

    Exposure to metals commonly found in the environment has been hypothesized to be associated with measures of fetal growth but the epidemiological literature is limited. The Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2001 women during the first trimester of pregnancy from 10 Canadian sites. Our objective was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury) and fetal metabolic function. Average maternal metal concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester blood samples were used to represent prenatal metals exposure. Leptin and adiponectin were measured in 1363 cord blood samples and served as markers of fetal metabolic function. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between metals and both high (≥90%) and low (≤10%) fetal adiponectin and leptin levels. Leptin levels were significantly higher in female infants compared to males. A significant relationship between maternal blood cadmium and odds of high leptin was observed among males but not females in adjusted models. When adjusting for birth weight z-score, lead was associated with an increased odd of high leptin. No other significant associations were found at the top or bottom 10th percentile in either leptin or adiponectin models. This study supports the proposition that maternal levels of cadmium influence cord blood adipokine levels in a sex-dependent manner. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and to determine how such findings at birth will translate into childhood anthropometric measures. - Highlights: • We determined relationships between maternal metal levels and cord blood adipokines. • Cord blood leptin levels were higher among female than male infants. • Maternal cadmium was associated with elevated leptin in male, not female infants. • No significant associations were observed between metals and

  14. PIPs in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Phosphoinositide (PIP) lipids regulate many aspects of cell function in the nervous system including receptor signalling, secretion, endocytosis, migration and survival. Levels of PIPs such as PI4P, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 are normally tightly regulated by phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. Deregulation of these biochemical pathways leads to lipid imbalances, usually on intracellular endosomal membranes, and these changes have been linked to a number of major neurological diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer and a range of rarer inherited disorders including brain overgrowth syndromes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies and neurodevelopmental conditions such as Lowe's syndrome. This article analyses recent progress in this area and explains how PIP lipids are involved, to varying degrees, in almost every class of neurological disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. PMID:25680866

  15. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  16. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  17. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  18. Metabolism alteration in follicular niche: The nexus among intermediary metabolism, mitochondrial function, and classic polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongcui; Zhao, Yue; Li, Tianjie; Li, Min; Li, Junsheng; Li, Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Classic polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a high-risk phenotype accompanied by increased risks of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities; however, the local metabolism characteristics of the ovaries and their effects on germ cell development are unclear. The present study used targeted metabolomics to detect alterations in the intermediate metabolites of follicular fluid from classic PCOS patients, and the results indicated that hyperandrogenism but not obesity induced the changed intermediate metabolites in classic PCOS patients. Regarding the direct contact, we identified mitochondrial function, redox potential, and oxidative stress in cumulus cells which were necessary to support oocyte growth before fertilization, and suggested dysfunction of mitochondria, imbalanced redox potential, and increased oxidative stress in cumulus cells of classic PCOS patients. Follicular fluid intermediary metabolic profiles provide signatures of classic PCOS ovary local metabolism and establish a close link with mitochondria dysfunction of cumulus cells, highlighting the role of metabolic signal and mitochondrial cross talk involved in the pathogenesis of classic PCOS. PMID:26057937

  19. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    PubMed

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described. PMID:11808201

  20. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollmann, Robert; Ferguson, David JP; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, William F; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap), effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase), synapse remodeling (Complement 1q), and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection) and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease). Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus

  1. Neurologic manifestations of Kanzaki disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, F; Matsumuro, K; Kurono, Y; Arimura, K; Osame, M; Kanzaki, T

    2004-05-11

    We describe the neurologic findings in a patient with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Kanzaki disease). Clinical and electrophysiologic studies revealed sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and sural nerve pathology showed decreased density of myelinated fibers with axonal degeneration. The patient had mildly impaired intellectual function with abnormal brain MRI and sensory-neuronal hearing impairment with repeated episodes of vertigo attacks. These findings suggest that Kanzaki disease may develop neurologic complications in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. PMID:15136691

  2. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  3. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Honnorat, Jérôme; Antoine, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) can be defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumor and its metastasis, or by infection, ischemia or metabolic disruptions. PNS are rare, affecting less than 1/10,000 patients with cancer. Only the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is relatively frequent, occurring in about 1% of patients with small cell lung cancer. PNS can affect any part of the central and peripheral nervous system, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. They can be isolated or occur in association. In most patients, the neurological disorder develops before the cancer becomes clinically overt and the patient is referred to the neurologist who has the charge of identifying a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic. PNS are usually severely disabling. The most common PNS are Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), subacute cerebellar ataxia, limbic encephalitis (LE), opsoclonus-myoclonus (OM), retinopathies (cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) and melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), Stiff-Person syndrome (SPS), chronic gastrointestinal pseudoobstruction (CGP), sensory neuronopathy (SSN), encephalomyelitis (EM) and dermatomyositis. PNS are caused by autoimmune processes triggered by the cancer and directed against antigens common to both the cancer and the nervous system, designated as onconeural antigens. Due to their high specificity (> 90%), the best way to diagnose a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic is to identify one of the well-characterized anti-onconeural protein antibodies in the patient's serum. In addition, as these antibodies are associated with a restricted range of cancers, they can guide the search for the underlying tumor at a stage when it is frequently not clinically overt. This is a critical point as, to date, the best way to stabilize PNS is to treat the cancer as soon as possible. Unfortunately, about one-third of patients do not have detectable antibodies and 5% to 10% have an atypical antibody

  4. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  5. Updated knowledge about polyphenols: functions, bioavailability, metabolism, and health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols are important constituents of food products of plant origin. Fruits, vegetables, and beverages are the main sources of phenolic compounds in the human diet. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavor, astringency and color. Polyphenols are extensively metabolized both in tissues and by the colonic microbiota. Normally, the circulating polyphenols are glucuronidated and/or sulphated and no free aglycones are found in plasma. The presence of phenolic compounds in the diet is beneficial to health due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilating properties. The health effects of polyphenols depend on the amount consumed and their bioavailability. Moreover, polyphenols are able to kill or inhibit the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Some dietary polyphenols may have significant effects on the colonic flora providing a type of prebiotic effect. The anti-nutrient properties of polyphenols are also discussed in this paper. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, vasodilating, and prebiotic properties of polyphenols make them potential functional foods. PMID:22747081

  6. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  7. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  8. Recovery of Neurological Function Despite Immediate Sleep Disruption Following Diffuse Brain Injury in the Mouse: Clinical Relevance to Medically Untreated Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Harrison, Jordan L.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: We investigated the relationship between immediate disruption of posttraumatic sleep and functional outcome in the diffuse brain-injured mouse. Design: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to moderate midline fluid percussion injury (n = 65; 1.4 atm; 6-10 min righting reflex time) or sham injury (n = 44). Cohorts received either intentional sleep disruption (minimally stressful gentle handling) or no sleep disruption for 6 h following injury. Following disruption, serum corticosterone levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and posttraumatic sleep (noninvasive piezoelectric sleep cages) were measured. For 1-7 days postinjury, sensorimotor outcome was assessed by Rotarod and a modified Neurological Severity Score (NSS). Cognitive function was measured using Novel Object Recognition (NOR) and Morris water maze (MWM) in the first week postinjury. Setting: Neurotrauma research laboratory. Measurements and Results: Disrupting posttraumatic sleep for 6 h did not affect serum corticosterone levels or functional outcome. In the hour following the first dark onset, sleep-disrupted mice exhibited a significant increase in sleep; however, this increase was not sustained and there was no rebound of lost sleep. Regardless of sleep disruption, mice showed a time-dependent improvement in Rotarod performance, with brain-injured mice having significantly shorter latencies on day 7 compared to sham. Further, brain-injured mice, regardless of sleep disruption, had significantly higher NSS scores postinjury compared with sham. Cognitive behavioral testing showed no group differences among any treatment group measured by MWM and NOR. Conclusion: Short-duration disruption of posttraumatic sleep did not affect functional outcome, measured by motor and cognitive performance. These data raise uncertainty about posttraumatic sleep as a mechanism of recovery from diffuse brain injury. Citation: Rowe RK; Harrison JL; O'Hara BF; Lifshitz J. Recovery of neurological

  9. Neurological Symptoms of Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a bone metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPL), which encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). This disease is characterized by disrupted bone and tooth mineralization, and reduced serum AP activity. Along with bone and tooth symptoms, many neurological symptoms, seizure, encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, mental retardation, deafness, and growth hormone deficiency (GHD), are frequently found in HPP patients. Seizure occurs in severe HPP types soon after birth, and responds to pyridoxine, but is an indicator of lethal prognosis. Encephalopathy rarely presents in severe HPP types, but has severe sequelae. Intracranial hypertension complicated in mild HPP types develops after the age of 1 year and sometimes need neurosurgical intervention. Mental retardation, deafness and GHD are more frequently found in Japanese HPP patients. Mental retardation occurs in all HPP types. Deafness in perinatal lethal type is both conductive and sensorineural. GHD develops in all but perinatal lethal type and the diagnosis tends to delay. The pathogenesis of these neural features of HPP might be due to impairment of both vitamin B6 metabolism and central nervous system development by ALPL mutations. PMID:26219717

  10. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  11. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R

    2012-02-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  12. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  13. Neurology and neurologic practice in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

  14. Fly model causes neurological rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K

    2013-01-01

    A Drosophila model for a neurological disorder called type 2B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease reveals that it has its origins in a partial loss of function, rather than a gain of function, which points to the need for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24336781

  15. DHA but Not EPA Emulsions Preserve Neurological and Mitochondrial Function after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sosunov, Sergey A.; Williams, Jill J.; Zirpoli, Hylde; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Deckelbaum, Richard J.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with triglyceride emulsions of docosahexaenoic acid (tri-DHA) protected neonatal mice against hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury. The mechanism of this neuroprotection remains unclear. We hypothesized that administration of tri-DHA enriches HI-brains with DHA/DHA metabolites. This reduces Ca2+-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and attenuates brain injury. Methods 10-day-old C57BL/6J mice following HI-brain injury received tri-DHA, tri-EPA or vehicle. At 4–5 hours of reperfusion, mitochondrial fatty acid composition and Ca2+ buffering capacity were analyzed. At 24 hours and at 8–9 weeks of recovery, oxidative injury, neurofunctional and neuropathological outcomes were evaluated. In vitro, hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ buffering capacity were measured in the presence or absence of DHA or EPA. Results Only post-treatment with tri-DHA reduced oxidative damage and improved short- and long-term neurological outcomes. This was associated with increased content of DHA in brain mitochondria and DHA-derived bioactive metabolites in cerebral tissue. After tri-DHA administration HI mitochondria were resistant to Ca2+-induced membrane permeabilization. In vitro, hyperoxia increased mitochondrial ROS production and reduced Ca2+ buffering capacity; DHA, but not EPA, significantly attenuated these effects of hyperoxia. Conclusions Post-treatment with tri-DHA resulted in significant accumulation of DHA and DHA derived bioactive metabolites in the HI-brain. This was associated with improved mitochondrial tolerance to Ca2+-induced permeabilization, reduced oxidative brain injury and permanent neuroprotection. Interaction of DHA with mitochondria alters ROS release and improves Ca2+ buffering capacity. This may account for neuroprotective action of post-HI administration of tri-DHA. PMID:27513579

  16. Integrative functional genomic analysis unveils the differing dysregulated metabolic processes across hepatocellular carcinoma stages.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vignesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease and the development of targeted therapeutics is still at an early stage. The 'omics' based genome-wide profiling comprising the transcriptome, miRNome and proteome are highly useful in identifying the deregulated molecular processes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. One of the end products and processes of the central dogma being the metabolites and metabolic processes mediate the cellular functions. In recent years, metabolomics based investigations have revealed the major deregulated metabolic processes involved in carcinogenesis. However, the integrative analysis of the holistic metabolic processes with genomics is at an early stage. Since the gene-sets are highly useful in assessing the biological processes and pathways, we made an attempt to infer the deregulated cellular metabolic processes involved in HCC by employing metabolism associated gene-set enrichment analysis. Further, the metabolic process enrichment scores were integrated with the transcriptome profiles of HCC. Integrative analysis shows three distinct metabolic deregulations: i) hepatocyte function related molecular processes involving lipid/fatty acid/bile acid synthesis, ii) inflammatory processes with cytokine, sphingolipid & chondriotin sulphate metabolism and iii) enriched nucleotide metabolic process involving purine/pyrimidine & glucose mediated catabolic process, in hepatocarcinogenesis. The three distinct metabolic processes were found to occur both in tumor and liver cancer cell line profiles. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the metabolic processes along with clinical sample information has identified two major clusters based on AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) and metastasis. The study reveals the three major regulatory processes involved in HCC stages. PMID:27107678

  17. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  18. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction is an important cause of neurological deficits in an inflammatory model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Mona; Mastrolia, Vincenzo; Rezaei Haddad, Ali; Mosley, Angelina; Mullali, Gizem; Schiza, Dimitra; Sajic, Marija; Hargreaves, Iain; Heales, Simon; Duchen, Michael R; Smith, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation can cause major neurological dysfunction, without demyelination, in both multiple sclerosis (MS) and a mouse model of the disease (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; EAE), but the mechanisms remain obscure. Confocal in vivo imaging of the mouse EAE spinal cord reveals that impaired neurological function correlates with the depolarisation of both the axonal mitochondria and the axons themselves. Indeed, the depolarisation parallels the expression of neurological deficit at the onset of disease, and during relapse, improving during remission in conjunction with the deficit. Mitochondrial dysfunction, fragmentation and impaired trafficking were most severe in regions of extravasated perivascular inflammatory cells. The dysfunction at disease onset was accompanied by increased expression of the rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-2 in activated astrocytes, and by selective reduction in spinal mitochondrial complex I activity. The metabolic changes preceded any demyelination or axonal degeneration. We conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major cause of reversible neurological deficits in neuroinflammatory disease, such as MS. PMID:27624721

  20. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function in tissue homeostasis and organismal ageing.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Navdeep S; Jasper, Heinrich; Ho, Theodore T; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Many tissues and organ systems in metazoans have the intrinsic capacity to regenerate, which is driven and maintained largely by tissue-resident somatic stem cell populations. Ageing is accompanied by a deregulation of stem cell function and a decline in regenerative capacity, often resulting in degenerative diseases. The identification of strategies to maintain stem cell function and regulation is therefore a promising avenue to allay a wide range of age-related diseases. Studies in various organisms have revealed a central role for metabolic pathways in the regulation of stem cell function. Ageing is associated with extensive metabolic changes, and interventions that influence cellular metabolism have long been recognized as robust lifespan-extending measures. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the metabolic control of stem cell function, and how stem cell metabolism relates to homeostasis and ageing. PMID:27428307

  1. Allophanate hydrolase, not urease, functions in bacterial cyanuric acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Shapir, Nir; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2005-08-01

    Growth substrates containing an s-triazine ring are typically metabolized by bacteria to liberate 3 mol of ammonia via the intermediate cyanuric acid. Over a 25-year period, a number of original research papers and reviews have stated that cyanuric acid is metabolized in two steps to the 2-nitrogen intermediate urea. In the present study, allophanate, not urea, was shown to be the 2-nitrogen intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism in all the bacteria examined. Six different experimental results supported this conclusion: (i) synthetic allophanate was shown to readily decarboxylate to form urea under acidic extraction and chromatography conditions used in previous studies; (ii) alkaline extraction methods were used to stabilize and detect allophanate in bacteria actively metabolizing cyanuric acid; (iii) the kinetic course of allophanate formation and disappearance was consistent with its being an intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism, and no urea was observed in those experiments; (iv) protein extracts from cells grown on cyanuric acid contained allophanate hydrolase activity; (v) genes encoding the enzymes AtzE and AtzF, which produce and hydrolyze allophanate, respectively, were found in several cyanuric acid-metabolizing bacteria; and (vi) TrzF, an AtzF homolog found in Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and shown to have allophanate hydrolase activity. In addition, we have observed that there are a large number of genes homologous to atzF and trzF distributed in phylogenetically distinct bacteria. In total, the data indicate that s-triazine metabolism in a broad class of bacteria proceeds through allophanate via allophanate hydrolase, rather than through urea using urease. PMID:16085834

  2. A high fat diet alters metabolic and bioenergetic function in the brain: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Raider, Kayla; Ma, Delin; Harris, Janna L; Fuentes, Isabella; Rogers, Robert S; Wheatley, Joshua L; Geiger, Paige C; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M; Stanford, John A

    2016-07-01

    Diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic effects can lead to neurological dysfunction and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite these risks, the effects of a high-fat diet on the central nervous system are not well understood. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the effects of high fat consumption on brain regions affected by AD and PD, we used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to measure neurochemicals in the hippocampus and striatum of rats fed a high fat diet vs. normal low fat chow. We detected lower concentrations of total creatine (tCr) and a lower glutamate-to-glutamine ratio in the hippocampus of high fat rats. Additional effects observed in the hippocampus of high fat rats included higher N-acetylaspartylglutamic acid (NAAG), and lower myo-inositol (mIns) and serine (Ser) concentrations. Post-mortem tissue analyses revealed lower phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) in the striatum but not in the hippocampus of high fat rats. Hippocampal pAMPK levels correlated significantly with tCr, aspartate (Asp), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and taurine (Tau), indicating beneficial effects of AMPK activation on brain metabolic and energetic function, membrane turnover, and edema. A negative correlation between pAMPK and glucose (Glc) indicates a detrimental effect of brain Glc on cellular energy response. Overall, these changes indicate alterations in neurotransmission and in metabolic and bioenergetic function in the hippocampus and in the striatum of rats fed a high fat diet. PMID:27125544

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Cellular Vectors for Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Phinney, Donald G.; Isakova, Iryna A.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are a heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders characterized by a deficiency in lysosomal function. Although these disorders differ in their etiology and phenotype those that affect the nervous system generally manifest as a profound deterioration in neurologic function with age. Over the past several decades implementation of various treatment regimens including bone marrow and cord blood cell transplantation, enzyme replacement, and substrate reduction therapy have proved effective for managing some clinical manifestations of these diseases but their ability to ameliorate neurologic complications remains unclear. Consequently, there exists a need to develop alternative therapies that more effectively target the central nervous system. Recently, direct intracranial transplantation of tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells has been explored as a means to reconstitute metabolic deficiencies in the CNS. In this chapter we discuss the merits of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for this purpose. Originally identified as progenitors of connective tissue cell lineages, recent findings have revealed several novel aspects of MSC biology that make them attractive as therapeutic agents in the CNS. We relate these advances in MSC biology to their utility as cellular vectors for treating neurologic sequelae associated with pediatric neurologic disorders. PMID:24858930

  4. Identification of Functional Differences in Metabolic Networks Using Comparative Genomics and Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  5. Effect of pretreatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (PP1) on brain oedema and neurological function in an automated cortical cryoinjury model in mice.

    PubMed

    Turel, Mazda K; Moorthy, Ranjith K; Sam, Gift Ajay; Samuel, Prasanna; Murthy, Muthukumar; Babu, K Srinivas; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2013-04-01

    Cerebral oedema is a significant cause of morbidity in neurosurgical practice. To our knowledge, there is no ideal drug for prevention or treatment of brain oedema. Based on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of brain oedema, tyrosine kinase inhibitors could have a role in reducing brain oedema but preclinical studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. We evaluated the role of pretreatment with 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidine (PP1), an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in reducing cerebral oedema and preserving neurological function measured 24hours after an automated cortical cryoinjury in mice. Sixteen adult male Swiss albino mice were subjected to an automated cortical cryoinjury using a dry ice-acetone mixture. The experimental group (n=8) received an intraperitoneal injection of PP1 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at a dose of 1.5mg/kg body weight 45minutes prior to the injury. The control group (n=8) received an intraperitoneal injection of DMSO alone. A further eight mice underwent sham injury. The animals were evaluated using the neurological severity score (NSS) at 24hours post-injury, after which the animals were sacrificed and their brains removed, weighed, dehydrated for 48hours and weighed again. The percentage of brain water content was calculated as: {[(wet weight - dry weight)/wet weight] × 100}. The mean (standard deviation, SD) NSS was 11.7 (1.8) in the experimental group and 10.5 (1.3) in the control group (p=0.15). The mean (SD) percentage water content of the brain was 78.6% (1.3%) in the experimental group and 77.2% (1.1%) in the control group (p=0.03). The percentage water content in the experimental and control groups were both significantly higher than in the sham injury group. The immediate pre-injury administration of PP1 neither reduced cerebral oedema (water content %) nor preserved neurological function (NSS) when compared to a control group in this model of cortical cryoinjury

  6. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®. PMID:27014700

  7. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  8. NEUROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN GLYCOSYLATION DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Eklund, Erik A.; Ng, Bobby G.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    This review will present principles of glycosylation, describe the relevant glycosylation pathways and their related disorders, and highlight some of the neurological aspects and issues that continue to challenge researchers. Over 100 rare human genetic disorders that result from deficiencies in the different glycosylation pathways are known today. Most of these disorders impact the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Patients typically have developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, seizures, neuropathy, and metabolic abnormalities in multiple organ systems. Between these disorders there is great clinical diversity because all cell types differentially glycosylate proteins and lipids. The patients have hundreds of mis-glycosylated products afflicting a myriad of processes including cell signaling, cell-cell interaction and cell migration. This vast complexity in glycan composition and function, along with limited analytic tools has impeded the identification of key glycosylated molecules that cause pathologies, and to date few critical target proteins have been pinpointed. PMID:25840006

  9. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  10. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential coordinators of cardiac metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M; Patel, Vickas V; Pei, Liming

    2015-04-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  11. Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  12. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  13. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

  14. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  15. Mechanisms Linking Energy Substrate Metabolism to the Function of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Carley, Andrew N.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic signaling mechanisms are increasingly recognized to mediate the cellular response to alterations in workload demand, as a consequence of physiological and pathophysiological challenges. Thus, an understanding of the metabolic mechanisms coordinating activity in the cytosol with the energy-providing pathways in the mitochondrial matrix becomes critical for deepening our insights into the pathogenic changes that occur in the stressed cardiomyocyte. Processes that exchange both metabolic intermediates and cations between the cytosol and mitochondria enable transduction of dynamic changes in contractile state to the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Disruption of such metabolic transduction pathways has severe consequences for the energetic support of contractile function in the heart and is implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Deficiencies in metabolic reserve and impaired metabolic transduction in the cardiomyocyte can result from inherent deficiencies in metabolic phenotype or maladaptive changes in metabolic enzyme expression and regulation in the response to pathogenic stress. This review examines both current and emerging concepts of the functional linkage between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix with a specific focus on metabolic reserve and energetic efficiency. These principles of exchange and transport mechanisms across the mitochondrial membrane are reviewed for the failing heart from the perspectives of chronic pressure overload and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24526677

  16. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  17. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  18. The brown fat secretome: metabolic functions beyond thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Xiao; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2015-01-01

    Brown fat is highly active in fuel oxidation and dissipates chemical energy through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-mediated heat production. Activation of brown fat leads to increased energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and lower plasma glucose and lipid levels, thus contributing to better homeostasis. Uncoupled respiration and thermogenesis have been considered to be responsible for the metabolic benefits of brown adipose tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated that brown adipocytes also secrete factors that act locally and systemically to influence fuel and energy metabolism. This review discusses the evidence supporting a thermogenesis-independent role of brown fat, particularly through its release of secreted factors, and their implications in physiology and therapeutic development. PMID:25843910

  19. The functions of cardiolipin in cellular metabolism-potential modifiers of the Barth syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Raja, Vaishnavi; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-04-01

    The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) plays a role in many cellular functions and signaling pathways both inside and outside of mitochondria. This review focuses on the role of CL in energy metabolism. Many reactions of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, the transport of metabolites required for these processes, and the stabilization of electron transport chain supercomplexes require CL. Recent studies indicate that CL is required for the synthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) co-factors, which are essential for numerous metabolic pathways. Activation of carnitine shuttle enzymes that are required for fatty acid metabolism is CL dependent. The presence of substantial amounts of CL in the peroxisomal membrane suggests that CL may be required for peroxisomal functions. Understanding the role of CL in energy metabolism may identify physiological modifiers that exacerbate the loss of CL and underlie the variation in symptoms observed in Barth syndrome, a genetic disorder of CL metabolism. PMID:24445246

  20. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  1. Mice with mutations of Dock7 have generalized hypopigmentation and white-spotting but show normal neurological function.

    PubMed

    Blasius, Amanda L; Brandl, Katharina; Crozat, Karine; Xia, Yu; Khovananth, Kevin; Krebs, Philippe; Smart, Nora G; Zampolli, Antonella; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Beutler, Bruce A

    2009-02-24

    The classical recessive coat color mutation misty (m) arose spontaneously on the DBA/J background and causes generalized hypopigmentation and localized white-spotting in mice, with a lack of pigment on the belly, tail tip, and paws. Here we describe moonlight (mnlt), a second hypopigmentation and white-spotting mutation identified on the C57BL/6J background, which yields a phenotypic copy of m/m coat color traits. We demonstrate that the 2 mutations are allelic. m/m and mnlt/mnlt phenotypes both result from mutations that truncate the dedicator of cytokinesis 7 protein (DOCK7), a widely expressed Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Although Dock7 is transcribed at high levels in the developing brain and has been implicated in both axon development and myelination by in vitro studies, we find no requirement for DOCK7 in neurobehavioral function in vivo. However, DOCK7 has non-redundant role(s) related to the distribution and function of dermal and follicular melanocytes. PMID:19202056

  2. Microvesicles from brain-extract-treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  3. Microvesicles from brain-extract—treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  4. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate "classic KD", as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  5. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  6. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic ‘brain-thyroid’ disorders. PMID:24665922

  7. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  8. Imaging vertebrate digestive function and lipid metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Jessica P.; Farber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Challenges in imaging lipid-processing events in live, intact vertebrate models have historically led to reliance on cultured cell studies, thus hampering our understanding of lipid metabolism and gastrointestinal physiology. Fluorescently-labeled molecules, such as BODIPY-labeled lipids, can reveal lipid-processing events in live zebrafish (Danio rerio) and has expanded our understanding of digestive physiology. This review will cover recent advances from the past two to three years in the use of fluorescence-based imaging techniques in live zebrafish to characterize gastrointestinal physiology in health and disease and to conduct small molecule screens to discover therapeutic compounds. PMID:24187571

  9. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Comparison of Neurological Function in Males and Females from Two Substrains of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Amy; Bardgett, Mark E.; Fowler, Jocelyn; Garber, Helen; Griffith, Molly; Curran, Christine Perdan

    2016-01-01

    The C57BL/6 (B6) mouse is the background strain most frequently used for genetically-modified mice. Previous studies have found significant behavioral and genetic differences between the B6J (The Jackson Laboratory) and B6N substrains (National Institutes of Health); however, most studies employed only male mice. We performed a comprehensive battery of motor function and learning and memory tests on male and female mice from both substrains. The B6N male mice had greater improvement in the rotarod test. In contrast, B6J female mice had longer latencies to falling from the rotarod. In the Morris water maze (MWM), B6J males had significantly shorter latencies to finding the hidden platform. However, B6N females had significantly shorter path lengths in the reversal and shifted-reduced phases. In open field locomotor activity, B6J males had higher activity levels, whereas B6N females took longer to habituate. In the fear conditioning test, B6N males had a significantly longer time freezing in the new context compared with B6J males, but no significant differences were found in contextual or cued tests. In summary, our findings demonstrate the importance of testing both males and females in neurobehavioral studies. Both factors (sex and substrain) must be taken into account when designing developmental neurotoxicology studies. PMID:27081652