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Sample records for metal alloy thin

  1. Metallic Thin-Film Bonding and Alloy Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor); Campbell, Geoff (Inventor); Peotter, Brian S. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion bonding a stack of aluminum thin films is particularly challenging due to a stable aluminum oxide coating that rapidly forms on the aluminum thin films when they are exposed to atmosphere and the relatively low meting temperature of aluminum. By plating the individual aluminum thin films with a metal that does not rapidly form a stable oxide coating, the individual aluminum thin films may be readily diffusion bonded together using heat and pressure. The resulting diffusion bonded structure can be an alloy of choice through the use of a carefully selected base and plating metals. The aluminum thin films may also be etched with distinct patterns that form a microfluidic fluid flow path through the stack of aluminum thin films when diffusion bonded together.

  2. Nobel metal alloyed thin-films with optical properties on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chen; Leite, Marina S.

    Metallic materials with tunable optical responses can enable the unprecedented control of optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices with enhanced performance, such as thin-film solar cells, metamaterials and metasurfaces for tunable absorbers and optical filters, among others. Here we present the alloying of noble metals, Ag, Au and Cu, to develop a novel class of material with optical response not achieved by pure metals. We fabricate binary mixtures with controlled chemical composition by co-sputtering. Ellipsometry and surface plasmon polariton coupling angle measurements are in excellent agreement when determining the real part of the dielectric function (ɛ1). Surprisingly, in some cases, a mixture provides a material with higher surface plasmon polariton quality factor than the corresponding pure metals. Our approach paves the way to implement metallic nanostructures with tunable absorption/transmission, overcoming the current limitation of the dielectric function of noble metals.

  3. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  4. Magnesium Alloy Precursor Thin Films for Efficient, Practical Fabrication of Nanoporous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Briot, Nicolas J.; Swartzentruber, Phillip D.; Balk, T. John

    2014-01-01

    An improved approach to fabrication of nanoporous (np) metals is demonstrated for several metallic systems that were successfully created by dealloying magnesium-based precursor alloys (also containing iridium, nickel, gold, or osmium-ruthenium). A significant advantage is that magnesium alloys can be dealloyed effectively using water or, if needed, dilute acetic acid. The crystal structures of magnesium-based precursor films were significantly different from those of alloys commonly used as precursors. This approach should be generally applicable to np metal synthesis.

  5. Ion-induced grain growth in multilayer and coevaporated metal alloy thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E.; Was, G.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Rehn, L.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Irradiation experiments were conducted on multilayer (ML) and coevaporated (CO) thin films in order to examine the role that the heat of mixing ({Delta}H{sub mix}) has in ion-induced grain growth. Room temperature irradiations using 1.7 MeV Xe were performed in the High Voltage Electron Microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. The alloys studied (Pt-Ti, Pt-V, Pt-Ni, Au-Co and Ni-Al) spanned a large range of {Delta}H{sub mix} values. Comparison of grain growth rates between ML and CO films of a given alloy confirmed a heat of mixing effect. Differences in grain growth rates between ML and CO films scaled according to the sign and magnitude of {Delta}H{sub mix} of the system (with exception of the Pt-V system). Substantial variations in growth rates among CO alloy films experiencing similar irradiation damage demonstrated that a purely collisional approach is inadequate for describing ion-induced grain growth and consideration must also be given to material-specific properties. Results from CO alloy films were consistent with a thermal spike model of ion-induced grain growth. The grain boundary mobility was observed to be proportional to the thermal spike-related parameter, (F{sub D}{sup 2})/({Delta}H{sub coh}{sup 3}), where F{sub D} is the deposited damage energy and {Delta}H{sub coh} is the cohesive energy.

  6. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  7. Making Thin Laminae Of Frozen Alloy Slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, A. K.; Holmes, L. M.; Houston, R. B.; Ecer, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    In new technique, primary objective to develop method to distribute uniformly-thin powder-metal-alloy layers between alternate fiber layers prior to consolidation. Involves use of sheets of frozen alloy powder. These laminae, interspersed with fiber mats, used to make metal/fiber composites. In addition to aerospace applications, this technique, appropriately modified, has potential in the manufacture of future automobile engines or components including molded ceramics.

  8. The fabrication of thin-walled steel alloys through the gas carburization of reduced metal oxide extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, Laura B.

    Investigations of the production of thin-walled steel alloys through the reduction and subsequent gas carburization of structures made from metal oxide powders were performed. Batch compositions, as well as the heat treatment parameters necessary for the formation of structures with the compositions of 4140 and 316 steel without carbon, were determined through the use of thermogravimetric analysis, dilatometric measurements, and microstructural investigation. Parameters for the high temperature carburization of thin tape of 250-300 mum thickness, as well as hollow metal spheres with 4140 composition, in a CO/CO2 atmosphere were determined using thermodynamic data and experimental work. The research has shown that the amount of carbon in the walls of the structures can be controlled and uniform carbon contents across the cross-sections can be achieved in less than 30 minutes. Heat treatments for carburized samples of 4140 composition were carried out using oil quench and salt bath furnaces. Mechanical property testing of heat-treated samples was carried out using Vickers microhardness testing, resulting in values similar to conventionally produced 4140 steel. Compression testing of carburized 4140 spheres was also performed, showing that crush strength of the spheres has been significantly improved through the carburization process. Studies on the decarburization behavior of similar alloys under various conditions were also performed in order to aid in the prediction of the microstructural behavior of samples during carburization and subsequent heat treatment. Low temperature gas carburization of structures with 316 steel composition without carbon, has also been performed. Hardness variations present through the cross-section of the part after carburization suggest some transfer of carbon, though contents are not as high as anticipated. Suggestions for future work in this area are presented. The results of these investigations yield a novel method for the

  9. Thin-film palladium and silver alloys and layers for metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. C.; Schubert, W. K.; Zipperian, T. E.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Plut, T. A.

    1987-08-01

    The addition of Ag to Pd in the gate metal of a metal-insulator-semiconductor gas sensing diode can improve the performance and change the selectivity of the sensors for a variety of reactions. Data on the response of diodes with 12 different ratios of Ag to Pd in alloys and layers of Pd and Ag to hydrogen and other gases are reported. Diodes with as much as 32% Ag respond very well to H2 gas and the films are much more durable to high hydrogen exposure than pure Pd films. Improvements in the rate of response and aging behavior are found for certain Ag combinations; others give poorer performance. The presence of Ag on the surface changes the catalytic activity in some cases and examples of H2 mixed with O2 and/or NO2, propylene oxide, ethylene, and formic acid are given. Such selectivity forms the basis for miniature chemical sensor arrays which could analyze complex gas mixtures.

  10. Punching Holes in Thin Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Richard; Foster, Derrell; Miranda, Valentino

    1987-01-01

    Simple punching tool used to make holes in thin metal sheets, without burrs and edge deformations. Tool used on such materials as stainless steel, nickel alloys, beryllium, copper, and aluminum, in thicknesses of 0.002 to 0.010 in. With new punch, hole size held to tolerance of 0.025 mm. Includes rubber punch extruding into hole in top plate, pushing out exposed portion of clamped metal sheet.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Characterization of Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films and yttria-stabilized zirconia intermediate layers on metal alloys grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, R. P.; Mao, X. L.; Russo, R. E.

    1991-08-01

    The use of an intermediate layer is necessary for the growth of YBaCuO thin films on polycrystalline metallic alloys for tape conductor applications. A pulsed laser deposition process to grow controlled-orientation yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films as intermediate layers on Haynes Alloy No. 230 was developed and characterized. YBaCuO films deposited on these YSZ-coated substrates are primarily c-axis oriented and superconducting as deposited. The best YBaCuO films grow on (001)-oriented YSZ intermediate layers and have Tc (R = 0) = 86.0 K and Jc about 3000 A/sq cm at 77 K.

  13. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  14. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  15. Characterization of Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films and yttria-stabilized zirconia intermediate layers on metal alloys grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Reade, R.P.; Mao, X.L.; Russo, R.E. )

    1991-08-05

    The use of an intermediate layer is necessary for the growth of YBaCuO thin films on polycrystalline metallic alloys for tape conductor applications. A pulsed laser deposition process to grow controlled-orientation yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films as intermediate layers on Haynes Alloy No. 230 was developed and characterized. YBaCuO films deposited on these YSZ-coated substrates are primarily {ital c}-axis oriented and superconducting as deposited. The best YBaCuO films grow on (001) oriented YSZ intermediate layers and have {ital T}{sub {ital c}} ({ital R}=0) = 86.0 K and {ital J}{sub {ital c}} {similar to} 3{times}10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K.

  16. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Room temperature magnetism and metal to semiconducting transition in dilute Fe doped Sb1-xSex semiconducting alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Naveen; Sarkar, Mitesh; Chawda, Mukesh; Ganesan, V.; Bodas, Dhananjay

    2015-02-01

    The magnetism was observed in very dilute Fe doped alloy thin film Fe0.008Sb1-xSex, for x = 0.01 to 0.10. These thin films were grown on silicon substrate using thermal evaporation technique. Structural, electrical, optical, charge carrier concentration measurement, surface morphology and magnetic properties were observed using glancing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), four probe resistivity, photoluminescence, Hall measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) techniques, respectively. No peaks of iron were seen in GIXRD. The resistivity results show that activation energy increases with increase in selenium (Se) concentration. The Arrhenius plot reveals metallic behavior below room temperature. The low temperature conduction is explained by variable range-hopping mechanism, which fits very well in the temperature range 150-300 K. The decrease in density of states has been observed with increasing selenium concentration (x = 0.01 to 0.10). There is a metal-to-semiconductor phase transition observed above room temperature. This transition temperature is Se concentration dependent. The particle size distribution ˜47-61 nm is evaluated using AFM images. These thin films exhibit ferromagnetic interactions at room temperature.

  19. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  20. Thin-film diffusion brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikus, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    A thin film diffusion brazing technique for joining titanium alloys by use of a Cu intermediate is described. The method has been characterized in terms of static and dynamic mechanical properties on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. These include tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, shear, corrosion fatigue, mechanical fatigue and acoustic fatigue. Most of the properties of titanium joints formed by thin film diffusion brazing are equal or exceed base metal properties. The advantages of thin film diffusion brazing over solid state diffusion bonding and brazing with conventional braze alloys are discussed. The producibility advantages of this process over others provide the potential for producing high efficiency joints in structural components of titanium alloys for the minimum cost.

  1. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  2. Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid-Liquid) Thin Metal Films.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Arthur; Michaud, Hadrien O; Gerratt, Aaron P; de Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable biphasic conductors are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying metal film. The properties of the photolithography-compatible thin metal films are highlighted by low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω sq(-1) ) and large stretchability (400%). This novel approach to deposit and pattern liquid metals enables extremely robust, multilayer and soft circuits, sensors, and actuators. PMID:26923313

  3. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  4. Supported metal alloy catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Barrera, Joseph; Smith, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

  5. Metallic alloy stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The dimensional stability of candidate cryogenic wind tunnel model materials was investigated. Flat specimens of candidate materials were fabricated and cryo-cycled to assess relative dimensional stability. Existing 2-dimensional airfoil models as well as models in various stages of manufacture were also cryo-cycled. The tests indicate that 18 Ni maraging steel offers the greatest dimensional stability and that PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel is the most stable of the stainless steels. Dimensional stability is influenced primarily by metallurgical transformations (austenitic to martensitic) and manufacturing-induced stresses. These factors can be minimized by utilization of stable alloys, refinement of existing manufacturing techniques, and incorporation of new manufacturing technologies.

  6. Cooled thin metal liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, George P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A first metal sheet (34) has openings (46) in registration with depressions (40) in a second contacting metal sheet (36). Each depression has a downstream wall (42) at an angle of 24.degree. from the plane of the sheets. A metering hole (56) in the depression amidst cooling air in a direction to first impinge against an overlaying portion (48) of the first plate, before it diffuses along the downstream wall.

  7. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  8. Self-disintegrating Raney metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Laurance L.; Russell, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing a Raney metal alloy which is capable of self-disintegrating when contacted with water vapor. The self-disintegrating property is imparted to the alloy by incorporating into the alloy from 0.4 to 0.8 weight percent carbon. The alloy is useful in forming powder which can be converted to a Raney metal catalyst with increased surface area and catalytic activity.

  9. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  10. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  11. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  12. Dissociation of dilute immiscible copper alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, K.; Lucadamo, G. A.; Cabral, C.; Lavoie, C.; Harper, J. M. E.

    2000-03-01

    The dissociation behavior of dilute, immiscible Cu-alloy thin films is found to fall into three broad categories that correlate most closely with the form of the Cu-rich end of the binary alloy phase diagrams. Available thermodynamic and tracer diffusion data shed further light on alloy behavior. Eight alloying elements were selected for these studies, with five elements from groups 5 and 6, two from group 8, and one from group 11 of the periodic table. They are respectively V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, Fe, Ru, and Ag. The progress of precipitation in approximately 500-nm-thick alloy films, containing 2.5-3.8 at. % solute, was followed with in situ resistance and stress measurements as well as with in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. In addition, texture analysis and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the evolution of microstructure and texture of Cu(Ta) and Cu(Ag). For all eight alloys, dissociation occurred upon heating, with the rejection of solute and evolution of microstructure often occurring in multiple steps that range over several hundred degrees between approximately 100 and 900 °C. However, in most cases, substantial reductions in resistivity of the films took place below 400 °C, at temperatures of interest to copper metallization schemes for silicon chip technology.

  13. PDTI metal alloy as a hydrogen or hydrocarbon sensitive metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A hydrogen sensitive metal alloy contains palladium and titanium to provide a larger change in electrical resistance when exposed to the presence of hydrogen. The alloy can be used for improved hydrogen detection.

  14. Thin Nanoporous Metal-Insulator-Metal Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aramesh, Morteza; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-02-01

    Insulating nanoporous materials are promising platforms for soft-ionizing membranes; however, improvement in fabrication processes and the quality and high breakdown resistance of the thin insulator layers are needed for high integration and performance. Here, scalable fabrication of highly porous, thin, silicon dioxide membranes with controlled thickness is demonstrated using plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition. The fabricated membranes exhibit good insulating properties with a breakdown voltage of 1 × 10(7) V/cm. Our calculations suggest that the average electric field inside a nanopore of the membranes can be as high as 1 × 10(6) V/cm; sufficient for ionization of wide range of molecules. These metal-insulator-metal nanoporous arrays are promising for applications such soft ionizing membranes for mass spectroscopy. PMID:26846250

  15. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  16. Metal dusting of nickel-containing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1998-12-31

    Metal dusting is a catastrophic form of carburization which leads to pitting and grooves as the affected metal disintegrates into a mixture of powdery carbon, metallic particles, and possibly oxides and carbides. This high temperature carburization mode is not yet well understood and while relatively infrequent, can be economically disastrous when it does occur in large and complex chemical and petrochemical process streams. References in the literature show that all classes of heat resistant alloys are prone to metal dusting, given the necessary and specific environmental conditions. These same references describe the environments that plague nickel-containing alloys and are used as the basis for postulation on the probable corrosion mechanisms responsible for metal dusting. Using alloy 800 and other nickel-containing alloys and metal dusting atmospheres, an effort is made to examine the steps in the metal dusting process and the temperature ranges over which metal dusting occurs.

  17. Thin metal electrode for AMTEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Wheeler, Bob L. (Inventor); Jefferies-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Lamb, James L. (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor); Cole, Terry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electrode having higher power output is formed of a thin, porous film (less than 1 micrometer) applied to a beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). The electrode includes an open grid, current collector such as a series of thin, parallel, grid lines applied to the thin film and a plurality of cross-members such as loop of metal wire surrounding the BASE tube. The loops are electrically connected by a bus wire. The overall impedance of the electrode considering both the contributions from the bulk BASE and the porous electrode BASE interface is low, about 0.5 OHM/cm.sup.2 and power densities of over 0.3 watt/cm.sup.2 for extended periods.

  18. Exchange stiffness in thin film Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrich, C.; Huttema, W.; Arora, M.; Montoya, E.; Rashidi, F.; Burrowes, C.; Kardasz, B.; Girt, E.; Heinrich, B.; Mryasov, O. N.; From, M.; Karis, O.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange stiffness (Aex) is one of the key parameters controlling magnetization reversal in magnetic materials. We used a method based on the spin spiral formation in two ferromagnetic films antiferromagnetically coupled across a non-magnetic spacer layer and Brillouin scattering to measure Aex for a series of Co1-δXδ (X = Cr, Ni, Ru, Pd, Pt) thin film alloys. The results show that Aex of Co alloys does not necessarily scale with Ms; Aex approximately decreases at the rate of 1.1%, 1.5%, 2.1%, 3.5%, and 5.6%, while Ms decreases at the rate of 1.1%, 0.5%, 1.1%, 3.7%, and 2.5% per addition of 1 at % of Pt, Ni, Pd, Cr, and Ru, respectively.

  19. Joining lead wires to thin platinum alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A two step process of joining a lead wire to .000002 m thick platinum alloy film which rests upon an equally thin alumina insulating layer which is adhered to a metal substrate is described. Typically the platinum alloy film forms part of a thermocouple for measuring the surface temperature of a gas turbine airfoil. In the first step the lead wire is deformed 30 to 60% at room temperature while the characteristic one million ohm resistance of the alumina insulating layer is monitored for degradation. In the second step the cold pressed assembly is heated at 865 to 1025 C for 4 to 75 hr in air. During the heating step any degradation of insulating layer resistance may be reversed, provided the resistance was not decreased below 100 ohm in the cold pressing.

  20. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in Co-Based Full Heusler Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Xu, X. G.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full Heusler alloys have been qualified as promising functional materials in spintronic devices due to their high spin polarization. The lack of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is one of the biggest obstacles restricting their application in next generation ultrahigh density storage such as magnetic random access memory (MARM). How to induce the PMA in Co-based full Heusler alloy thin films has attracted much research interest of scientists. This paper presents an overview of recent progress in this research area. We hope that this paper would provide some guidance and ideas to develop highly spin-polarized Co-based Heusler alloy thin films with PMA.

  1. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  2. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  3. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin Film Preparation from a Cu(In,Ga) Metallic Alloy and Se Nanoparticles by an Intense Pulsed Light Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhage, Sanjay R.; Kim, Hak-Sung; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2011-02-01

    The main contribution of this paper is the development of a novel process for the formation of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) films. CIGS films with a thickness of 4 μm and grain size from 0.3 μm to 1 μm were prepared from a Cu(In0.7Ga0.3) (CIG) metallic alloy and Se nanoparticles by the intense pulsed light (IPL) technique. The melting of the CIG and Se nanoparticles and nucleation of CIGS occurred in a very short reaction time of 2 ms. It is believed that the Se diffuses into the CIG lattice to form the CIGS chalcopyrite crystal structure. The tetragonal chalcopyrite crystal structure was confirmed by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), while the microstructure and composition were determined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy.

  4. Flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Donald L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system is provided. A self-metallized polymeric film has a polymeric film region and a metal surface disposed thereon. A layer of electrically-conductive metal is deposited directly onto the self-metallized polymeric film's metal surface. Coupled to at least one of the metal surface and the layer of electrically-conductive metal is a device/system for measuring an electrical characteristic associated therewith as an indication of temperature.

  5. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  6. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  7. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  8. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  9. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  10. Method and Apparatus for the Detection of Hydrogen Using a Metal Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen sensitive metal alloy contains palladium and titanium to provide a larger change in electrical resistance when exposed to the presence of hydrogen. The alloy is deposited on a substrate and a thin film and connected across electrical circuitry to provide a sensor device that can be used for improved sensitivity and accuracy of hydrogen detection.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal... “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Noble Metal Alloys.” The devices are exempt from...

  12. The interaction of hydrogen with metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured for several alloys, and these were determined to be about the same at 25 C for all alloys investigated. The relation of structure, both metallurgical and crystallographic, to the observed hydrogen distribution on charging was investigated, as well as the role of hydride formation in the hydrogen resistance of metal alloys. An attempt was made to correlate the structures and compositions of metal alloys as well as other parameters with the ratios of their notched tensile strengths in hydrogen to that in helium, R(H2/He), which are believed to represent a measure of their hydrogen resistance. Evidence supports the belief that hydrogen permeability and hydrogen resistance are increased by smaller grain sizes for a given alloy composition.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  2. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOEpatents

    Merz, Martin D.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  3. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  4. Metallic alloy targets for high Tc superconducting film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, P.; Nigro, A.; Romano, P.; Vaglio, R.

    1989-02-01

    Many experiments are nowadays conducting worldwide on superconducting films based on the recently developed high Tc superconductor materials (YBCO, BISCO, etc). There are different ways to produce these films, among which sputtering and evaporation are most popular. Normally, use is made of oxides, pure metals or compounds as material sources. In the present paper we describe the fabrication process and the physico-chemical characteristics of various metallic alloy components for both sputtering and evaporation processes which show various advantages in terms of stability, easiness of use, purity, flexibility in composition and shape and allow good process control. Deposition techniques and experimental results obtained on thin films of the new superconductors realized starting from these alloys are also reported.

  5. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  6. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide alloys: preparation, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, L M

    2015-11-28

    Engineering electronic structure of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials is of great importance to their potential applications. In comparison to numerous other approaches, such as strain and chemical functionization, alloying can continuously tune the band gaps in a wide energy range. Atomically thin 2D alloys have been prepared and studied recently due to their potential use in electronic and optoelectronic applications. In this review, we first summarize the preparation methods of 2D alloys (mainly on transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer alloys), including mechanical exfoliation, physical vapor deposition (PVD), chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chalcogen exchange. Then, atomic-resolution imaging, Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy characterization of 2D alloys are reviewed, in which band gap tuning is discussed in detail based on the PL experiments and theoretical calculations. Finally, applications of 2D alloys in field-effect transistors (FETs), photocurrent generation and hydrogen evolution catalysis are reviewed. PMID:26508084

  7. Properties of test metal ceramic titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Akagi, K; Okamoto, Y; Matsuura, T; Horibe, T

    1992-09-01

    Four test alloys were prepared using a high frequency centrifugal casting machine and a ceramic crucible for the development of titanium bonding alloys that can be cast in the ordinary atmosphere. Of these alloys, 10.06% Ti, 78.79% Ni, 9.02% Pd, 1.77% Sn and 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir could be cast by the conventional high frequency centrifugal method; however, 89.18% Ti, 8.75% Ni, 1.03% Pd, 0.28% Sn and 89.81% Ti, 8.15% Ni, 1.01% Pd, 0.18% Sn, 0.67% Ir could be cast only by the argon are melting method. The alloys 10.06% Ti, 78.95% Ni, 9.02% Pd, 1.77% Sn and 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir showed excellent physical and mechanical properties and bonding strengths, surpassing those of the commercial alloys TPW and Unimetal. Concerning the elution of component elements, the amounts of titanium eluted from these alloys were far smaller than those from pure titanium or a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and nickel elution, which has become an issue in relation to metal allergy, was almost nil in contrast to Unimetal (Ni-Cr alloy). The alloy 9.91% Ti, 78.56% Ni, 9.07% Pd, 1.86% Sn, 0.65% Ir showed properties that indicated its favorable use as an alloy for the bonding of dental porcelain. PMID:1432762

  8. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  9. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  10. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  11. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  12. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  13. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  14. Thermal expansion: Metallic elements and alloys. [Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Kirby, R. K.; Taylor, R. E.; Desai, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The introductory sections of the work are devoted to the theory of thermal expansion of solids and to methods for the measurement of the linear thermal expansion of solids (X-ray methods, high speed methods, interferometry, push-rod dilatometry, etc.). The bulk of the work is devoted to numerical data on the thermal linear expansion of all the metallic elements, a large number of intermetallics, and a large number of binary alloy systems and multiple alloy systems. A comprehensive bibliography is provided along with an index to the materials examined.

  15. Misfit stabilized embedded nanoparticles in metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gornostyrev, Yu N; Katsnelson, M I

    2015-11-01

    Nanoscale inhomogeneities are typical for numerous metallic alloys and crucially important for their practical applications. At the same time, stabilization mechanisms of such a state are poorly understood. We present a general overview of the problem, together with a more detailed discussion of the prototype example, namely, Guinier-Preston zones in Al-based alloys. It is shown that coherent strain due to a misfit between inclusion and host crystal lattices plays a decisive role in the emergence of the inhomogeneous state. We suggest a model explaining the formation of ultrathin plates (with the thickness of a few lattice constants) typical for Al-Cu alloys. Discreteness of the array of misfit dislocations and long-ranged elastic interactions between them are the key ingredients of the model. This opens a way for a general understanding of the nature of (meta)stable embedded nanoparticles in practically important systems. PMID:26431075

  16. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  17. Method for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  18. Chemical resistance guide for metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This guide contains data for 29,000 combinations of corrodents vs. metals, metal alloys, and carbon. Features and specifications include: (1) 963 liquid or dry chemicals, gases, lubricants, household fluids, foods, atmospheres, and other environments are covered; (2) 70 chemical trade names are covered; (3) 500 synonyms of covered chemicals, gases, etc. are indexed to page numbers; (4) corrodents are listed in alphabetical order; (5) data are presented in symbolic format (A, B, C, NR); (6) where known chemical resistance varies with concentration and temperature, data are presented in descending order of concentration and temperature; (7) mechanical, physical, and electrical properties data for each metal are provided; (8) a flex thumb index is provided at the right-hand margin of the right-hand pages to facilitate quick access to the desired data; (9) an electromotive or galvanic series list covering 120 metals, alloys, and carbon is included; (10) machinability ratings for most metals, including some specific S.F.M. rates, is included; (11) creep or stress relaxation rates at various levels of stress, temperature, and time are included; and (12) printed on semigloss, 70 pound, plastic-coated bond paper that last through years of reference.

  19. Alloy metal nanoparticles for multicolor cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Pedro V.; Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is a multigenic complex disease where multiple gene loci contribute to the phenotype. The ability to simultaneously monitor differential expression originating from each locus results in a more accurate indicator of degree of cancerous activity than either locus alone. Metal nanoparticles have been thoroughly used as labels for in vitro identification and quantification of target sequences. We have synthesized nanoparticles with assorted noble metal compositions in an alloy format and functionalized them with thiol-modified ssDNA (nanoprobes). These nanoprobes were then used for the simultaneous specific identification of several mRNA targets involved in cancer development - one pot multicolor detection of cancer expression. The different metal composition in the alloy yield different "colors" that can be used as tags for identification of a given target. Following a non-cross-linking hybridization procedure previously developed in our group for gold nanoprobes, these multicolor nanoprobes were used for the molecular recognition of several different targets including differently spliced variants of relevant genes (e.g. gene products involved in chronic myeloid leukemia BCR, ABL, BCR-ABL fusion product). Based on the spectral signature of mixtures, before and after induced aggregation of metal nanoparticles, the correct identification could be made. Further application to differentially quantify expression of each locus in relation to another will be presented. The differences in nanoparticle stability and labeling efficiency for each metal combination composing the colloids, as well as detection capability for each nanoprobe will be discussed. Additional studies will be conducted towards allele specific expression studies.

  20. Flexible Thin Metal Film Thermal Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Donald Laurence (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system is provided. A thermally-conductive film made from a thermally-insulating material is doped with thermally-conductive material. At least one layer of electrically-conductive metal is deposited directly onto a surface of the thermally-conductive film. One or more devices are coupled to the layer(s) to measure an electrical characteristic associated therewith as an indication of temperature.

  1. Vanadium Oxide Thin Films Alloyed with Ti, Zr, Nb, and Mo for Uncooled Infrared Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Adem; Cabarcos, Orlando; Allara, David L.; Horn, Mark W.

    2013-05-01

    Microbolometer-grade vanadium oxide (VO x ) thin films with 1.3 < x < 2.0 were prepared by pulsed direct-current (DC) sputtering using substrate bias in a controlled oxygen and argon environment. These films were systematically alloyed with Ti, Nb, Mo, and Zr using a second gun and radiofrequency (RF) reactive co-sputtering to probe the effects of the transition metals on the film charge transport characteristics. The results reveal that the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and resistivity are unexpectedly similar for alloyed and unalloyed films up to alloy compositions in the ˜20 at.% range. Analysis of the film structures for the case of the 17% Nb-alloyed film by glancing-angle x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy shows that the microstructure remains even with the addition of high concentrations of alloy metal, demonstrating the robust character of the VO x films to maintain favorable electrical transport properties for bolometer applications. Postdeposition thermal annealing of the alloyed VO x films further reveals improvement of electrical properties compared with unalloyed films, indicating a direction for further improvements in the materials.

  2. Coalescence and percolation in thin metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Duxbury, P.M.; Jeffers, G.; Dubson, M.A. Center for Fundamental Materials Research, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1116 )

    1991-12-15

    Metals thermally evaporated onto warm insulating substrates evolve to the thin-film state via the morphological sequence: compact islands, elongated islands, percolation, hole filling, and finally the thin-film state. The coverage at which the metal percolates ({ital p}{sub {ital c}}) is often considerably higher than that predicted by percolation models, such as inverse swiss cheese or lattice percolation. Using a simple continuum model, we show that high-{ital p}{sub {ital c}}'s arise naturally in thin films that exhibit a crossover from full coalescence of islands at early stages of growth to partial coalescence at later stages. In this interrupted-coalescence model, full coalescence of islands occurs up to a critical island radius {ital R}{sub {ital c}}, after which islands overlap, but do not fully coalesce. We present the morphology of films and the critical area coverages generated by this model.

  3. Deriving the Metal and Alloy Networks of Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hajime; Nuss, Philip; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    Metals have strongly contributed to the development of the human society. Today, large amounts of and various metals are utilized in a wide variety of products. Metals are rarely used individually but mostly together with other metals in the form of alloys and/or other combinational uses. This study reveals the intersectoral flows of metals by means of input-output (IO) based material flow analysis (MFA). Using the 2007 United States IO table, we calculate the flows of eight metals (i.e., manganese, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, tungsten, and cobalt) and simultaneously visualize them as a network. We quantify the interrelationship of metals by means of flow path sharing. Furthermore, by looking at the flows of alloys into metal networks, the networks of the major metals iron, aluminum, and copper together with those of the eight alloying metals can be categorized into alloyed-, nonalloyed-(i.e., individual), and both mixed. The result shows that most metals are used primarily in alloy form and that functional recycling thereby requires identification, separation, and alloy-specific reprocessing if the physical properties of the alloys are to be retained for subsequent use. The quantified interrelation of metals helps us consider better metal uses and develop a sustainable cycle of metals. PMID:26927531

  4. The Characterization of Thin Film Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris Odum, Nicole Latrice

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are able to recover their original shape through the appropriate heat or stress exposure after enduring mechanical deformation at a low temperature. Numerous alloy systems have been discovered which produce this unique feature like TiNb, AgCd, NiAl, NiTi, and CuZnAl. Since their discovery, bulk scale SMAs have undergone extensive material property investigations and are employed in real world applications. However, its thin film counterparts have been modestly investigated and applied. Researchers have introduced numerous theoretical microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices; yet, the research community's overall unfamiliarity with the thin film properties has delayed growth in this area. In addition, it has been difficult to outline efficient thin film processing techniques. In this dissertation, NiTi thin film processing and characterization techniques will be outlined and discussed. NiTi thin films---1 mum thick---were produced using sputter deposition techniques. Substrate bound thin films were deposited to analysis the surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy; the film composition was obtained using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy; the phases were identified using X-ray diffraction; and the transformation temperatures acquired using resistivity testing. Microfabrication processing and sputter deposition were employed to develop tensile membranes for membrane deflection experimentation to gain insight on the mechanical properties of the thin films. The incorporation of these findings will aid in the movement of SMA microactuation devices from theory to fruition and greatly benefit industries such as medicinal and aeronautical.

  5. Growth morphology of thin films on metallic and oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Krupski, Aleksander

    2014-02-01

    In this work we briefly review recent investigations concerning the growth morphology of thin metallic films on the Mo(110) and Ni3Al(111) surfaces, and Fe and copper phthalocyanine (C32H16N8Cu) on the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) surface. Comparison of Ag, Au, Sn, and Pb growth on the Mo(110) surface has shown a number of similarities between these adsorption systems, except that surface alloy formation has only been observed in the case of Sn and Au. In the Pb/Mo(110) and Pb/Ni3Al(111) adsorption systems selective formation of uniform Pb island heights during metal thin film growth has been observed and interpreted in terms of quantum size effects. Furthermore, our studies showed that Al2O3 on Ni3Al(111) exhibits a large superstructure in which the unit cell has a commensurate relation with the substrate lattice. In addition, copper phthalocyanine chemisorbed weakly onto an ultra-thin Al2O3 film on Ni3Al(111) and showed a poor template effect of the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) system. In the case of iron cluster growth on Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) the nucleation sites were independent of deposition temperature, yet the cluster shape showed a dependence. In this system, Fe clusters formed a regular hexagonal lattice on the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111). PMID:24445588

  6. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  7. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  8. Ultrahigh stability of atomically thin metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, C. R.; Huang, K. Q.; Zhao, N. J.; Sun, Y. T.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, L. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Zheng, D. N. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Wang, W. H. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-07-07

    We report the fabrication and study of thermal stability of atomically thin ZrCu-based metallic glass films. The ultrathin films exhibit striking dynamic properties, ultrahigh thermal stability, and unique crystallization behavior with discrete crystalline nanoparticles sizes. The mechanisms for the remarkable high stability and crystallization behaviors are attributed to the dewetting process of the ultrathin film. We demonstrated a promising avenue for understanding some fundamental issues such as glassy structure, crystallization, deformation, and glass formation through atomic resolution imaging of the two dimensional like metallic glasses.

  9. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  10. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  11. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyea, Dustin D; Lucas, M S; Michel, E; Horwath, J; Miller, Casey W

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based "high entropy alloys" in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  12. [Alloys for metal-ceramics 3].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A; Barceló Santana, F; Palma Calero, M

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:1946199

  13. Noble metal/vanadium alloy catalyst and method for making

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, V.M.

    1980-05-13

    A novel catalyst comprises an alloy of a noble metal and vanadium. The catalyst is particularly useful in an electrochemical cell cathode electrode. The method for making the alloy involves reacting a vanadium compound with sodium dithionite to form a sol of a finely dispersed vanadium sulfite complex, and then reacting noble metal particles with the complex in a reducing environment.

  14. Full electroresistance modulation in a mixed-phase metallic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zhiqi; Li, L.; Gai, Zheng; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, Anthony T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Ward, Thomas Zac; et al

    2016-03-03

    We report a giant, ~22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Furthermore, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systemsmore » with phase instability therein.« less

  15. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Li, L; Gai, Z; Clarkson, J D; Hsu, S L; Wong, A T; Fan, L S; Lin, M-W; Rouleau, C M; Ward, T Z; Lee, H N; Sefat, A S; Christen, H M; Ramesh, R

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ∼22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2  kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO_{3} heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein. PMID:26991197

  16. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Li, L.; Gai, Z.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, A. T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, M.-W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lee, H. N.; Sefat, A. S.; Christen, H. M.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ˜22 %, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV /cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh /BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein.

  17. The Burning of Metals and Alloys in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A.; Wilson, Donald B.; Benz, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis 2.2-sec drop tower has been used to characterize the oxygen-atmosphere burning of several representative spacecraft environment metallic materials in microgravity; these included rods of 2219 Al alloy, 316 stainless steel, Fe, and Ti, as well as sheets and meshes of 316 stainless steel. The absence of buoyant forces does not preclude extinguishment of the combustion process, and the regression rate of the melting interface of the cylindrical rods is significantly greater than in normal gravity. The flammability of such sample shapes as thin sheets, which are known to extinguish in normal gravity, is enhanced. Volatile combustion products are generated, in contrast to the normal gravity regime.

  18. Bioaccessibility of metals in alloys: Evaluation of three surrogate biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Hillwalker, Wendy E.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Bioaccessibility in vitro tests measure the solubility of materials in surrogate biofluids. However, the lack of uniform methods and the effects of variable test parameters on material solubility limit interpretation. One aim of this study was to measure and compare bioaccessibility of selected economically important alloys and metals in surrogate physiologically based biofluids representing oral, inhalation and dermal exposures. A second aim was to experimentally test different biofluid formulations and residence times in vitro. A third aim was evaluation of dissolution behavior of alloys with in vitro lung and dermal biofluid surrogates. This study evaluated the bioaccessibility of sixteen elements in six alloys and 3 elemental/metal powders. We found that the alloys/metals, the chemical properties of the surrogate fluid, and residence time all had major impacts on metal solubility. The large variability of bioaccessibility indicates the relevancy of assessing alloys as toxicologically distinct relative to individual metals. PMID:24212234

  19. Ion beam sputter deposition of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sam T.; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    1999-08-01

    The development of functional or smart materials for integration into microsystem is of increasing interest. An example is the shape memory effect exhibited by certain metal alloys which, in principle, can be exploited in the fabrication of micro-scale manipulators or actuators, thereby providing on-chip micromechanical functionality. We have investigated an ion beam sputter deposition process for the growth of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films and demonstrated the required control to produce equiatomic composition, uniform coverage and atomic layer-by-layer growth rates on engineering surfaces. The process uses argon ions at intermediate energy produced by a Kaufman-type ion source to sputter non-alloyed targets of high purity titanium and nickel. Precise measurements of deposition rates allows compositional control during thin film growth. As the sputtering targets and substrates are remote from the discharge plasma, deposition occurs under good vacuum of approximately 10-6 mtorr thus promoting high quality films. Furthermore, the ion beam energetics allow deposition at relatively low substrate temperatures of < 150 degrees C with as-deposited films exhibiting shape memory properties without post-process high temperature annealing. Thermal imagin is used to monitor changes which are characteristic of the shape memory effect and is indicative of changes in specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity as the TiNi shape memory alloy undergoes martensitic to austenitic phase transformations.

  20. Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    A process for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere.

  1. Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Sadoway, D.R.

    1997-05-27

    A process is described for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere. 2 figs.

  2. Joining of Thin Metal Sheets by Shot Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    In shot peening the substrate undergoes large plastic deformation near the surface due to the hit with shots. The plastic flow areas formed by cold working may form the surface layer. Authors have recently proposed new joining methods using shot peening, shot lining and shot caulking. Our approach has been applied to the butt joining of the dissimilar metal sheets. In the present study, joining of thin metal sheets using a shot peening process was investigated to improve the joinability. In the joined section, the edge of sheets is the equally-spaced slits. In this method, the convex edges of the sheet are laid on top of the other sheet. Namely, the two sheets are superimposed in the joining area. When the connection is shot-peened, the material of the convex area undergoes large plastic deformation near the surface due to the collision of shots. In this process, particularly noteworthy is the plastic flow near surface layer. The convex edges of the sheet can be joined to the other sheet, thus two sheets are joined each other. In the experiment, the shot peening treatment was performed by using an air-type peening machine. The shots used were made of high carbon cast steel. Air pressure was 0.6 MPa and peening time was in the range of 30-150s. The peening conditions were controlled in the experiment. The thin sheets were commercial low-carbon steel, stainless steel, pure aluminum, and aluminium alloy. The effects of processing conditions on the joinability were mainly examined. The joint strength increased with the kinetic energy of shots. It was found that the present method was effective for joining of thin metal sheets.

  3. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing

    PubMed Central

    Mattiucci, N.; Bloemer, M. J.; Aközbek, N.; D'Aguanno, G.

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  4. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  5. Elastic Metal Alloy Refrigerants: Thermoelastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UMD is developing an energy-efficient cooling system that eliminates the need for synthetic refrigerants that harm the environment. More than 90% of the cooling and refrigeration systems in the U.S. today use vapor compression systems which rely on liquid to vapor phase transformation of synthetic refrigerants to absorb or release heat. Thermoelastic cooling systems, however, use a solid-state material—an elastic shape memory metal alloy—as a refrigerant and a solid to solid phase transformation to absorb or release heat. UMD is developing and testing shape memory alloys and a cooling device that alternately absorbs or creates heat in much the same way as a vapor compression system, but with significantly less energy and a smaller operational footprint.

  6. Low temperature photochemical vapor deposition of alloy and mixed metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for formation of an alloy thin film, or a mixed metal oxide thin film, on a substrate at relatively low temperatures. Precursor vapor(s) containing the desired thin film constituents is positioned adjacent to the substrate and irradiated by light having wavelengths in a selected wavelength range, to dissociate the gas(es) and provide atoms or molecules containing only the desired constituents. These gases then deposit at relatively low temperatures as a thin film on the substrate. The precursor vapor(s) is formed by vaporization of one or more precursor materials, where the vaporization temperature(s) is selected to control the ratio of concentration of metals present in the precursor vapor(s) and/or the total precursor vapor pressure.

  7. Low temperature photochemical vapor deposition of alloy and mixed metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Liu, D.K.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are described for formation of an alloy thin film, or a mixed metal oxide thin film, on a substrate at relatively low temperatures. Precursor vapor(s) containing the desired thin film constituents is positioned adjacent to the substrate and irradiated by light having wavelengths in a selected wavelength range, to dissociate the gas(es) and provide atoms or molecules containing only the desired constituents. These gases then deposit at relatively low temperatures as a thin film on the substrate. The precursor vapor(s) is formed by vaporization of one or more precursor materials, where the vaporization temperature(s) is selected to control the ratio of concentration of metals present in the precursor vapor(s) and/or the total precursor vapor pressure. 7 figs.

  8. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  9. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  10. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-10-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  11. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  12. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  13. Investigation of thermally evaporated high resistive B-doped amorphous selenium alloy films and metal contact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oner, Cihan; Nguyen, Khai V.; Pak, Rahmi O.; Mannan, Mohammad A.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) alloy materials with arsenic, chlorine, boron, and lithium doping were synthesized for room temperature nuclear radiation detector applications using an optimized alloy composition for enhanced charge transport properties. A multi-step synthetic process has been implemented to first synthesize Se-As and Se-Cl master alloys from zone-refined Se (~ 7N), and then synthesized the final alloys for thermally evaporated large-area thin-film deposition on oxidized aluminum (Al/Al2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates. Material purity, morphology, and compositional characteristics of the alloy materials and films were examined using glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive analysis by x-rays (EDAX). Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements were carried out to confirm very high resistivity of the alloy thin-films. We have further investigated the junction properties of the alloy films with a wide variety of metals with different work functions (Au, Ni, W, Pd, Cu, Mo, In, and Sn). The aim was to investigate whether the choice of metal can improve the performance of fabricated detectors by minimizing the dark leakage current. For various metal contacts, we have found significant dependencies of metal work functions on current transients by applying voltages from -800 V to +1000 V.

  14. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  15. Thin film reactions on alloy semiconductor substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.A.

    1990-11-01

    The interactions between Pt and In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As have been studied. In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As substrates with 70nm Pt films were encapsulated in SiO{sub 2}, and annealed up to 600{degree}C in flowing forming gas. The composition and morphology of the reaction product phases were studied using x-ray diffraction, Auger depth profiling, and transmission electron microscopy. The reaction kinetics were examined with Rutherford Backscattering. Results show that Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reacts to form many of the reaction products encountered in the Pt/GaAs and Pt/InP reactions: PtGa, Pt{sub 3}Ga, and PtAs{sub 2}. In addition, a ternary phase, Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}, develops, which is a solid solution between PtIn{sub 2} and PtGa{sub 2}. The amount of Ga in the ternary phase increases with annealing temperature, which causes a decrease in the lattice parameter of the phase. The reaction products show a tendency to form layered structures, especially for higher temperatures and longer annealing times. Unlike the binary case, the PtAs{sub 2}, phase is randomly oriented on the substrate, and is intermingle with a significant amount of Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}. Following Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reactions, two orientation relationships between the Pt(In:Ga){sub 2} product phase and the substrate were observed, despite the large mismatch with the substrate ({approximately}8%). For many metal/compound semiconductor interactions, the reaction rate is diffusion limited, i.e. exhibits a parabolic dependence on time. An additional result of this study was the development of an In-rich layer beneath the reacted layer. The Auger depth profile showed a substantial increase in the sample at this layer. This is a significant result for the production of ohmic contacts, as the Schottky barrier height in this system lower for higher In concentrations. 216 refs.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Base Metal Alloys with Conductive Native Oxides for Electrical Contact Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturk, Bilge Seda

    Metallic contacts are a ubiquitous method of connecting electrical and electronic components/systems. These contacts are usually fabricated from base metals because they are inexpensive, have high bulk electrical conductivities and exhibit excellent formability. Unfortunately, such base metals oxidize in air under ambient conditions, and the characteristics of the native oxide scales leads to contact resistances orders of magnitude higher than those for mating bare metal surface. This is a critical technological issue since the development of unacceptably high contact resistances over time is now by far the most common cause of failure in electrical/electronic devices and systems. To overcome these problems, several distinct approaches are developed for alloying base metals to promote the formation of self-healing inherently conductive native oxide scales. The objective of this dissertation study is to demonstrate the viability of these approaches through analyzing the data from Cu-9La (at%) and Fe-V binary alloy systems. The Cu-9 La alloy structure consists of eutectic colonies tens of microns in diameter wherein a rod-like Cu phase lies within a Cu6La matrix phase. The thin oxide scale formed on the Cu phase was found to be Cu2O as expected while the thicker oxide scale formed on the Cu6La phase was found to be a polycrystalline La-rich Cu2O. The enhanced electrical conductivity in the native oxide scale of the Cu-9La alloy arises from heavy n-type doping of the Cu2O lattice by La3+. The Fe-V alloy structures consist of a mixture of large elongated and equiaxed grains. A thin polycrystalline Fe3O4 oxide scale formed on all of the Fe-V alloys. The electrical conductivities of the oxide scales formed on the Fe-V alloys are higher than that formed on pure Fe. It is inferred that this enhanced conductivity arises from doping of the magnetite with V+4 which promotes electron-polaron hopping. Thus, it has been demonstrated that even in simple binary alloy systems one

  17. Modeling of thermodiffusion in liquid metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Morteza; Sabzi, Fatemeh; Saghir, M Ziad

    2010-11-01

    In this paper following the linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach, an expression is derived for the calculation of the thermodiffusion factor in binary liquid metal alloys. The expression is comprised of two terms; the first term accounts for the thermally driven interactions between metal ions, a phenomenon similar to that of the non-ionic binary mixtures, such as hydrocarbons; the second term is called the electronic contribution and is the mass diffusion due to an internal electric field that is induced as a result of the imposed thermal gradient. Both terms are formulated as functions of the net heats of transport. The ion-ion net heat of transport is simulated by the activation energy of viscous flow and the electronic net heat of transport is correlated with the force acting on the ions by the rearrangement of the conduction electrons and ions. A methodology is presented and used to estimate the liquid metal properties, such as the partial molar internal energies, enthalpies, volumes and the activity coefficients used for model validation. The prediction power of the proposed expression along with some other existing thermodiffusion models for liquid mixtures, such as the Haase, Kempers, Drickamer and Firoozabadi formulas are examined against available experimental data obtained on ground or in microgravity environment. The proposed model satisfactorily predicts the thermodiffusion data of mixtures that are composed of elements with comparable melting points. It is also potentially and qualitatively able to predict a sign change in thermodiffusion factor of Na-K liquid mixture. With some speculation, the sign change is attributed to an anomalous change in thermoelectric power of Na-K mixture with composition. PMID:20856973

  18. Reducing inadvertent alloying of metal/ceramic brazes

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.; Hlava, P.F.

    1992-12-31

    Inadvertent alloying of Cu braze metal can compromise metal/ceramic seals. Electron microprobe analyses have quantified alloying of Cu brazes in metal/ceramic feedthroughs. Pin material and processing parameters above 1084C both affect alloying levels. Using either Kovar or Ni-plated 316L stainless steel pins limits alloying compared to Palco pins. Minimizing the time during which the braze is molten also avoids excessive alloying. The original thickness of the Ni plating on the Mo-Mn metallization of the ceramic also influences the alloying content of these brazes. Metal/ceramic brazes made with long brazing cycles, Mo-Mn metallization, and Kovar components grow a layer of Mo{sub 6}(Fe{sub 3.5}CO{sub 3.5}){sub 7} on the metallization. Layer thicknesses observed do not appear to compromise joint integrity. Ni additions of approximately 10 and 20 wt.% to Cu apparently increases the stress required for stress relaxation during cooldown. to maintain creep rates required for stress relaxation during cooldown. Relative to unalloyed Cu, this strengthening effect tends to increase as temperature is decreased.

  19. Intermolecular bonding of metals or alloys by thermochemical decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.

    1970-01-01

    Various metals and alloys are bonded at temperatures below their recrystallization temperature with a Ni-Fe-C alloy grown by thermochemical vapor deposition from organometallic plating compounds. Process time is short, the joints are strong, and microthrowing power is good.

  20. Electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. N.; Korostelev, A. B.

    2012-06-01

    The electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys is studied, and the obtained results demonstrate that the chemical composition and the physicomechanical and service properties of the ingots meet the requirements of the specifications for these alloys. The electroslag remelting ingots are then used as a charge for remelting in a vacuum induction furnace according to a standard technology.

  1. Electroslag remelting of the metal wastes of nickel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. N.; Korostelev, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The electroslag remelting (ESR) of the metal wastes of nickel alloys is studied. It is shown that the chemical composition, physicomechanical properties, and service properties of the formed castings meet the requirements of the specifications for these alloys. ESR workpieces are used as a charge for remelting in a vacuum induction furnace according to a standard technology.

  2. Nanostructured Zr-Pd Metallic Glass Thin Film for Biochemical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketov, Sergey V.; Shi, Xuetao; Xie, Guoqiang; Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Churyumov, Alexander Yu.; Bazlov, Andrey I.; Chen, Na; Ishikawa, Yoshifumi; Asao, Naoki; Wu, Hongkai; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.

    2015-01-01

    Zr-Pd metallic glassy thin films with a hierarchical nano-scale structure, produced by magnetron sputtering of the Zr and Pd powder mixture, demonstrate a unique combination of physical and biochemical properties. Thermal stability of the nano-structured glassy samples, their resistance to oxidation in dry air and phase transformation behavior are discussed in the present work. These binary alloy samples also show exceptionally high corrosion resistance and spontaneous passivation in a simulated body fluid. Experiments on the catalytic activity and biocompatibility of this nanostructured metallic glass indicate that this is a very suitable material for biochemical applications. Compared to the multicomponent alloys studied earlier this binary alloy has much simpler chemical composition, which makes preparation of the sample with defined stoichiometry easier, especially when the elements have different sputtering rates.

  3. Soldering of Thin Film-Metallized Glass Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.; Glass, S.J.

    1999-03-31

    The ability to produce reliable electrical and structural interconnections between glass and metals by soldering was investigated. Soldering generally requires premetallization of the glass. As a solderable surface finish over soda-lime-silicate glass, two thin films coatings, Cr-Pd-Au and NiCr-Sn, were evaluated. Solder nettability and joint strengths were determined. Test samples were processed with Sn60-Pb40 solder alloy at a reflow temperature of 210 C. Glass-to-cold rolled steel single lap samples yielded an average shear strength of 12 MPa. Solder fill was good. Control of the Au thickness was critical in minimizing the formation of AuSn{sub 4} intermetallic in the joint, with a resulting joint shear strength of 15 MPa. Similar glass-to-glass specimens with the Cr-Pd-Au finish failed at 16.5 MPa. The NiCr-Sn thin film gave even higher shear strengths of 20-22.5 MPa, with failures primarily in the glass.

  4. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, David

    2000-01-01

    A method of preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A .beta.-metal .beta.-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  5. Thin, porous metal sheets and methods for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2015-07-14

    Thin, porous metal sheets and methods for forming them are presented to enable a variety of applications and devices. The thin, porous metal sheets are less than or equal to approximately 200 .mu.m thick, have a porosity between 25% and 75% by volume, and have pores with an average diameter less than or equal to approximately 2 .mu.m. The thin, porous metal sheets can be fabricated by preparing a slurry having between 10 and 50 wt % solvent and between 20 and 80 wt % powder of a metal precursor. The average particle size in the metal precursor powder should be between 100 nm and 5 .mu.m.

  6. Theoretical study on the alloying behavior of γ-uranium metal: γ-uranium alloy with 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masayoshi; Hirata, Masaru; Sekine, Rika; Onoe, Jun; Nakamatsu, Hirohide

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the alloying behavior of γ-uranium with 3d transition metals (TMs) using the relativistic discrete-variational Dirac-Fock-Slater (DV-DFS) method. The d-orbital energy (Md) as an alloying parameter well reproduces the alloying behavior of γ-uranium metal with TMs: (1) in the case of a large Md value (Ti, V, Cr), the solubility of these TM elements in γ-uranium becomes large; (2) in the case of a middle Md value (Mn, Fe, Co), the tendency to form a uranium intermetallic compound with these elements becomes stronger; (3) in the case of a small Md value (Cu), the alloying element is insoluble in γ-uranium. The alloying behavior of γ-uranium with TMs is also discussed in terms of other parameters such as electronegativity and metallic radius.

  7. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  8. The Growth and Characterization of Germanium-Carbon Alloy Thin Films and Solid Phase Equilibria for Metal-Silicon - Ternary Systems: Magnesium, Calcium, Strontium, Barium, Scandium, Yttrium, Lanthanum, Titanium, Zirconium and Hafnium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haojie

    1992-09-01

    Thin films of pure germanium-carbon alloys (Ge _{rm x}C _{rm 1-x} with 0 <=q x <=q 1) have been grown on Si and Al_2O_3 substrates by pulsed laser ablation in a high vacuum chamber. The films were analyzed by x-ray 0-20 diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), conductivity measurements and optical absorption spectroscopy. The analyses of these new materials showed that films of all compositions were amorphous, free of contamination and uniform in composition. By changing the film composition, the optical band gap of these semiconducting films was varied from 0.00 eV to 0.85 eV for x = 0.0 to 1.0 respectively. According to the AES results, the carbon atoms in the Ge-C alloy thin film samples have a bonding structure that is a mixture of sp^2 and sp^3 hybridizations. The presence of the sp^2 C is apparently what causes the bandgap of amorphous Ge-C alloys to decrease with increasing carbon concentration. The solidus portion of the ternary phase diagrams of the type M-Si-O, where M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Sc, Y, La, Ti, Zr and Hf have been derived at 298K and 1 atm oxygen partial pressure by investigating the bulk reactions possible in these systems. These phase diagrams, which have been determined by experiments and by calculations using thermodynamic data available, can be used to predict the occurrence of the reaction products or the stability of the phases present at the interfaces between different solid materials. Hence, they provide guides in designing thin film structures and in selecting candidate materials to form chemically stable interfaces. A research effort has been made on the investigation of the growth of diamond thin films from a carbon containing solid-CI_4, using laser ablation technique. The film grown by laser ablation from CI _4 is mainly composed of carbon with very small amount of oxygen and iodine as indicated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data. The Auger electron spectroscopy result shows

  9. Electrical and materials characterization of tungsten-titanium diffusion barrier layers and alloyed silver metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Shekhar Kumar

    With the constant miniaturization of semiconductor devices, research is always ongoing to obtain the best materials and/or materials systems which fulfill all the requirements of an ideal interconnect. Silver (Ag) and silver based alloys are front runners among other metals and alloys being investigated. Ag has a low electrical resistivity (1.59 micro-ohm-centimeters for bulk), very high thermal conductivity (4.25 Watt per centimeters per Kelvin), and has better electromigration resistance than aluminum (Al). In the pure form, however, it has several drawbacks (e.g., a tendency to diffuse in silicon substrate at higher temperatures, inadequate adhesion to silicon dioxide, poor corrosion resistance, and agglomeration at higher temperatures). These drawbacks can be circumvented by the addition of diffusion barrier layers and/or alloying in silver. The present study investigates both routes to make silver a legitimate interconnect material. Initially this study focuses on thermal stability and behavior of tungsten-titanium (W-Ti) barrier layers for Ag metallization. It is shown that Ag thin films are thermally stable up to 650 degrees centigrade with the presence of W-Ti under layers. The effect of a W-Ti layer on the {111} texture formation in Ag thin film is also evaluated in detail. Insertion of a thin W-Ti over layer on Ag thin films is investigated with respect to their thermal stability. This research also evaluates the diffusion of Ag into silicon dioxide and W-Ti barriers. This project shows that W-Ti is an effective barrier layer for silver metallization. Later, the study investigates the effect of Cu addition in silver metallization and its impact on electromigration resistance. It is shown that Cu addition enhances the electromigration lifetime for silver metallization.

  10. Electron impinging on metallic thin film targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouabah, Z.; Bouarissa, N.; Champion, C.

    2010-03-01

    Based on the Vicanek and Urbassek theory [M. Vicanek, H.M. Urbassek, Phys. Rev. B 44 (1991) 7234] combined to a home-made Monte Carlo simulation, the present work deals with backscattering coefficients, mean penetration depths and stopping profiles for 1-4 keV electrons normally incident impinging on Al and Cu thin film targets. The cross-sections used to describe the electron transport are calculated via the appropriate analytical expression given by Jablonski [A. Jablonski, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16470] whose new improved version has been recently given [Z. Rouabah, N. Bouarissa, C. Champion, N. Bouaouadja, Appl. Surf. Sci. 255 (2009) 6217]. The behavior of the backscattering coefficient, mean penetration depth and stopping profiles versus the metallic film thickness at the nanometric scale and beyond is here analyzed and discussed.

  11. Deformation behavior of metallic glass thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. H.; Zhao, F.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, M. W.

    2012-09-01

    We report room-temperature deformation behavior of damage-free metallic glass films characterized by nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. The glass films with thicknesses ranging from 5 μm down to ˜60 nm plastically deform by shear bands when subjected to both spherical and sharp Berkovich indenters. Importantly, we found that gallium contamination from focus ion beam (FIB) milling significantly suppresses shear band formation, indicating that the absence of shear bands in FIB milled samples may be caused by gallium irradiation damage, rather than sample size effect. Finite element simulation reveals that a high stress gradient at the film/substrate interface promotes the plastic deformation of the thin films but does not give rise to significant strain inhomogeneity.

  12. Exchange Stiffness in Thin-Film Cobalt Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrich, Charles

    The exchange stiffness, Aex, is one of the key parameters controlling magnetization reversal in magnetic materials but is very difficult to measure, especially in thin films. We developed a new technique for measuring the exchange stiffness of a magnetic material based on the formation of a spin spiral within two antiferromagnetically coupled ferromagnetic films [1]. Using this method, I was able to measure the exchange stiffness of thin film Co alloyed with Cr, Fe, Ni, Pd, Pt and Ru. The results of this work showed that the rate at which a substituent element reduces the exchange stiffness is not directly related to its effect on the magnetization of the alloy. These measured trends have been understood by combining measurements of element specific magnetic moments obtained using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and material specific modeling based on density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA). The experimental results also hint at significant reduction of the exchange stiffness at the interface that can account for the difference between our results and those obtained on bulk materials.

  13. Weak crystallization theory of metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ivar; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Demler, Eugene A.

    2016-06-01

    Crystallization is one of the most familiar, but hardest to analyze, phase transitions. The principal reason is that crystallization typically occurs via a strongly first-order phase transition, and thus rigorous treatment would require comparing energies of an infinite number of possible crystalline states with the energy of liquid. A great simplification occurs when crystallization transition happens to be weakly first order. In this case, weak crystallization theory, based on unbiased Ginzburg-Landau expansion, can be applied. Even beyond its strict range of validity, it has been a useful qualitative tool for understanding crystallization. In its standard form, however, weak crystallization theory cannot explain the existence of a majority of observed crystalline and quasicrystalline states. Here we extend the weak crystallization theory to the case of metallic alloys. We identify a singular effect of itinerant electrons on the form of weak crystallization free energy. It is geometric in nature, generating strong dependence of free energy on the angles between ordering wave vectors of ionic density. That leads to stabilization of fcc, rhombohedral, and icosahedral quasicrystalline (iQC) phases, which are absent in the generic theory with only local interactions. As an application, we find the condition for stability of iQC that is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules known empirically for the majority of stable iQC; namely, the length of the primary Bragg-peak wave vector is approximately equal to the diameter of the Fermi sphere.

  14. A simple approach to metal hydride alloy optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.; Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Hildebrand-Scott (1950) solubility parameters can be obtained for metals and alloys by calculating the cohesive energy density (CED), equal to the square of the solubility parameter, and a function of the heat of sublimation and the atomic volume. It is suggested that the solubility parameter permits estimation of the hydrogen storage capacity of an alloy and that alloys with a solubility parameter approximately equal to the parameter for hydrogen will have greater hydrogen storage capacity than other alloys. Equilibrium pressure - temperature relationships for some metal hydrides are presented in conjunction with the calculated solubility parameter and correlated with characteristics which would be useful in hydrogen-powered vehicles. Alloy properties which increase the amount of nonstoichiometric reversible hydrogen absorption are discussed.

  15. First principles investigation of the activity of thin film Pt, Pd and Au surface alloys for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-05-01

    Further advances in fuel cell technologies are hampered by kinetic limitations associated with the sluggish cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. We have investigated a range of different formulations of binary and ternary Pt, Pd and Au thin films as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction. The most active binary thin films are near-surface alloys of Pt with subsurface Pd and certain PdAu and PtAu thin films with surface and/or subsurface Au. The most active ternary thin films are with pure metal Pt or Pd skins with some degree of Au in the surface and/or subsurface layer and the near-surface alloys of Au with mixed Pt-Pd skins. The activity of the binary and ternary catalysts is explained through weakening of the OH binding energy caused by solute elements. However, given the low alloy formation energies it may be difficult to tune and retain the composition under operating conditions. This is particularly challenging for alloys containing Au due to a high propensity of Au to segregate to the surface. We also show that once Au is on the surface it will diffuse to defect sites, explaining why small amounts of Au retard dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. For the PtPd thin films there is no pronounced driving force for surface segregation, diffusion to defects or surface self-assembling. On the basis of stability and activity analysis we conclude that the near surface alloy of Pd in Pt and some PdAu binary and PtPdAu ternary thin films with a controlled amount of Au are the best catalysts for oxygen reduction. PMID:25865333

  16. Growth mechanism of GaAs1-xSbx ternary alloy thin film on MOCVD reactor using TMGa, TDMAAs and TDMASb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandi, A.; Tayubi, Y. R.; Arifin, P.

    2016-04-01

    Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) is a method for growing a solid material (in the form of thin films, especially for semiconductor materials) using vapor phase metal organic sources. Studies on the growth mechanism of GaAs1-xSbx ternary alloy thin solid film in the range of miscibility-gap using metal organic sources trimethylgallium (TMGa), trisdimethylaminoarsenic (TDMAAs), and trisdimethylaminoantimony (TDMASb) on MOCVD reactor has been done to understand the physical and chemical processes involved. Knowledge of the processes that occur during alloy formation is very important to determine the couple of growth condition and growth parameters are appropriate for yield high quality GaAs1-xSbx alloy. The mechanism has been studied include decomposition of metal organic sources and chemical reactions that may occur, the incorporation of the alloy elements forming and the contaminants element that are formed in the gown thin film. In this paper presented the results of experimental data on the growth of GaAs1-xSbx alloy using Vertical-MOCVD reactor to demonstrate its potential in growing GaAs1-xSbx alloy in the range of its miscibility gap.

  17. Novel tribological systems using shape memory alloys and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijun

    Shape memory alloys and thin films are shown to have robust indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. Loading conditions that are similar to indentations are very common in tribological systems. Therefore novel tribological systems that have better wear resistance and stronger coating to substrate adhesion can be engineered using indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. By incorporating superelastic NiTi thin films as interlayers between chromium nitride (CrN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) hard coatings and aluminum substrates, it is shown that the superelasticity can improve tribological performance and increase interfacial adhesion. The NiTi interlayers were sputter deposited onto 6061 T6 aluminum and M2 steel substrates. CrN and DLC coatings were deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Temperature scanning X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation were used to characterize NiTi interlayers. Temperature scanning wear and scratch tests showed that superelastic NiTi interlayers improved tribological performance on aluminum substrates significantly. The two-way shape memory effect under contact loading conditions is demonstrated for the first time, which could be used to make novel tribological systems. Spherical indents in NiTi shape memory alloys and thin films had reversible depth changes that were driven by temperature cycling, after thermomechanical cycling, or one-cycle slip-plasticity deformation training. Reversible surface topography was realized after the indents were planarized. Micro- and nano- scale circular surface protrusions arose from planarized spherical indents in bulk and thin film NiTi alloy; line surface protrusions appeared from planarized scratch tracks. Functional surfaces with reversible surface topography can potentially result in novel tribological systems with reversible friction coefficient. A three dimensional constitutive model was developed to describe shape memory effects with slip

  18. Reversible surface morphology in shape-memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. J.; Huang, W. M.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chollet, F.; Hu, Y. Y.; Cai, M.

    2009-02-01

    Reversible surface morphology can be used for significantly changing many surface properties such as roughness, friction, reflection, surface tension, etc. However, it is not easy to realize atop metals at micron scale around ambient temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that TiNi and TiNi based (e.g., TiNiCu) shape-memory thin films, which are sputter-deposited atop a silicon wafer, may have different types of thermally-induced reversible surface morphologies. Apart from the well-known surface relief phenomenon, irregular surface trenches may appear in the fully crystallized thin films, but disappear upon heating. On the other hand, in partially crystallized thin films, the crystalline structures (islands) appear in chrysanthemum-shape at high temperature; while at room temperature, the surface morphology within the islands changes to standard martensite striations. Both phenomena are fully repeatable upon thermal cycling. The mechanisms behind these phenomena are investigated.

  19. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  20. Mechanical properties of metallic thin films: theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong, Duong Dai; Hoa, Nguyen Thi; Van Hung, Vu; Khoa, Doan Quoc; Hieu, Ho Khac

    2016-03-01

    The statistical moment method in statistical mechanics was developed to investigate the mechanical properties of free-standing metallic thin films at ambient conditions including the anharmonicity effects of thermal lattice vibrations. Analytical expressions of isothermal areal modulus B T , Young's modulus E and shear modulus G were derived in terms of the power moments of the atomic displacements. Numerical calculations have been performed for metallic Ni, Au and Al thin films, and compared with those of bulk metals. This method is physically transparent and it successfully described the temperature effects on mechanical properties of metallic thin films.

  1. Thin-film thermomechanical sensors embedded in metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnas, Anastasios M.

    2000-10-01

    The ability to monitor in real time the thermo-mechanical responses of tools, equipment, and structural components has been very appealing to the aerospace, automotive, drilling, and manufacturing industries. So far, the challenge has been to instrument the tools, equipment, or structural components with a number of sensors in an economical way and also protect the sensors from the environment which the tools, etc. are exposed to. In this work, a sequence of manufacturing processes that can be used to build thin-film temperature and strain sensors on internal surfaces of metallic structures is proposed and demonstrated. The use of thin-film techniques allows the parallel fabrication of sensor arrays, whereas a layered manufacturing scheme permits the creation of sensors on the internal surfaces of metallic parts and their subsequent embedding. Thin-film sensors are deposited on an aluminum oxide film, which is grown on a stainless steel substrate. The oxide is deposited by reactive sputtering. The sensors are sputter-deposited from alloy targets, shaped via micromachining and partially covered with a passivation layer of aluminum oxide. The thin-film structure is then covered by two protective electroplated layers of copper and nickel for protection during the deposition of the embedding layers. Embedding is accomplished by using a high-power infrared laser to melt an invar powder bed on top of the protective layers. Among the issues that emerged during the definition of the fabrication sequence were: the long-term stability of reactive deposition, the presence of pinholes in the dielectric layers, the optimal combination of materials and thickness of the protective layers, the bonding at the various interfaces, and the heat input and residual stresses resulting from the high-temperature embedding process. Finally, a finite element model was constructed in order to simulate the high-temperature embedding process. The heat transfer analysis performed on the model

  2. Electrodeposition and electrochemical reduction of epitaxial metal oxide thin films and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhen

    The focus of this dissertation is the electrodeposition and electrochemical reduction of epitaxial metal oxide thin films and superlattices. The electrochemical reduction of metal oxides to metals has been studied for decades as an alternative to pyrometallurgical processes for the metallurgy industry. However, the previous work was conducted on bulk polycrystalline metal oxides. Paper I in this dissertation shows that epitaxial face-centered cubic magnetite (Fe3O4 ) thin films can be electrochemically reduced to epitaxial body-centered cubic iron (Fe) thin films in aqueous solution on single-crystalline Au substrates at room temperature. This technique opens new possibilities to produce special epitaxial metal/metal oxide heterojunctions and a wide range of epitaxial metallic alloy films from the corresponding mixed metal oxides. Electrodeposition, like biomineralization, is a soft solution processing method which can produce functional materials with special properties onto conducting or semiconducting solid surfaces. Paper II in this dissertation presents the electrodeposition of cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe3-xO4, 0 of cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe3-xO4, 0thin films and superlattices on Au single-crystalline substrates, which can be potentially used in spintronics and memory devices. Paper III in this dissertation reports the electrodeposition of crystalline cobalt oxide (Co3O4) thin films on stainless steel and Au single-crystalline substrates. The crystalline Co3O4 thin films exhibit high catalytic activity towards the oxygen evolution reaction in an alkaline solution. A possible application of the electrodeposited Co 3O4 is the fabrication of highly active and low-cost photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells.

  3. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  4. Hydrogen storage characteristics of mechanically alloyed amorphous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Curtin, W.A.; Schultz, L.

    1988-09-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a series of mechanically alloyed (MA) amorphous Ni/sub 1//sub --//sub x/Zr/sub x/ alloys are studied, using both gas phase and electrochemical techniques, and are compared to H storage of rapidly quenched (RQ) amorphous Ni/sub 1-//sub x/Zr/sub x/. In the MA alloys, hydrogen resides in the Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ (n = 4,3,2) tetrahedral interstitial sites, with a maximum hydrogen-to-metal ratio of 1.9(/sup 4//sub n/)x/sup n/(1-x)/sup 4-//sup n/. These features are identical to those of the RQ alloys and indicate that the topological and chemical order of the MA and RQ materials are essentially the same. However, the typical binding energy of hydrogen in a Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ site, E/sub n/, is shifted in the MA alloys relative to the RQ alloys and the distribution of binding energies centered on E/sub n/ is significantly broader in the MA samples. Thus, the MA and RQ alloys are not identical and sample annealing does not alter this subtle distinction. The sensitivity of H storage to the presence of chemical order in binary alloys are analyzed theoretically and the data is found to be most consistent with little or no chemical order (random alloys).

  5. Functionalization of Titanium Alloy Surface by Graphene Nanoplatelets and Metal Oxides: Corrosion Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Aarik, Lauri; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Niilisk, Ahti; Mändar, Hugo; Mäeorg, Uno; Simões, Alda; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Corrosion inhibition of metallic substrates is an important and crucial step for great economical as well as environmental savings. In this paper, we introduce an extra thin effective corrosion inhibitive material having layered structure designed for protection and functionalization of Ti Grade 5 alloy substrates. The coating consists of a first layer made of thin graphene nanoplatelets, on top of which a multilayer Al2O3 and TiO2 films is applied by low-temperature atomic layer deposition. The amorphous structure of the metal oxide films was confirmed by micro-Raman and X-ray diffraction analysis. Corrosion inhibition ability of the prepared coatings was analyzed by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic plot and by voltammetric analysis, in aqueous potassium bromide solution. The open circuit potential of the graphene-metal oxide coated substrate showed much passive nature than bare substrate or graphene coated or only metal oxide coated substrates. The localized corrosion potential of the graphene-metal oxide coated, only metal oxide coated, and bare substrates were found 5.5, 3.0, and 1.1 V, respectively. In addition, corrosion current density values of the graphene-metal oxide and only metal oxide coated substrates showed much more passive nature than the bare and graphene coated substrates. Long immersion test in the salt solution further clarified the effective corrosion inhibition of the graphene-metal oxide coated substrate. The analyzed results reflect that the graphene-metal oxide films can be used to prepare better and effective corrosion inhibition coatings for the Ti Grade 5 alloy to increase their lifetime. PMID:26716209

  6. Multiscale theory of thin film magnetic shape memory alloy microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilov, Vesselin

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the nano-macro transition in magnetic shape memory alloy(MSMA) thin films using a recently developed sharp phase front-based three-dimensional (3D) constitutive model outlined by Stoilov (JSMS 2007), and originally proposed in the 1D context by Stoilov and Bhattacharyya (Acta Mat 2002). The key ingredient in the model is the recognition of martensitic variants as separate phases in a MSMA domain. Evolution of the interface between these phases is taken as an indicator of the process of reorientation in progress. A formulation of the Helmholtz free energy potential based on Ising model has been derived. The implications of the external magnetic field on the initiation of phase transformation are studied for various mechanical loading modes.

  7. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  8. Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-08-01

    Graded glass and glass-hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been prepared using a simple enameling technique. The composition of the glasses has been tailored to match the thermal expansion of the alloys. By controlling the firing time, and temperature, it has been possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25 to 150 mu m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate, resistant to corrosion and able to precipitate hydroxyapatite during in vitro tests in simulated body fluid.

  9. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  10. A simple approach to metal hydride alloy optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C.; Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Certain metals and related alloys can combine with hydrogen in a reversible fashion, so that on being heated, they release a portion of the gas. Such materials may find application in the large scale storage of hydrogen. Metal and alloys which show high dissociation pressure at low temperatures, and low endothermic heat of dissociation, and are therefore desirable for hydrogen storage, give values of the Hildebrand-Scott solubility parameter that lie between 100-118 Hildebrands, (Ref. 1), close to that of dissociated hydrogen. All of the less practical storage systems give much lower values of the solubility parameter. By using the Hildebrand solubility parameter as a criterion, and applying the mixing rule to combinations of known alloys and solid solutions, correlations are made to optimize alloy compositions and maximize hydrogen storage capacity.

  11. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying

    PubMed Central

    Alfè, D.; Pozzo, M.; Miniussi, E.; Günther, S.; Lacovig, P.; Lizzit, S.; Larciprete, R.; Burgos, B. Santos; Menteş, T. O.; Locatelli, A.; Baraldi, A.

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction. PMID:23938361

  12. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying.

    PubMed

    Alfè, D; Pozzo, M; Miniussi, E; Günther, S; Lacovig, P; Lizzit, S; Larciprete, R; Santos Burgos, B; Menteş, T O; Locatelli, A; Baraldi, A

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction. PMID:23938361

  13. Alloy decomposition and surface instabilities in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Francois

    1998-12-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the growth of thin alloy layers by slow deposition techniques. We propose microscopic and mesoscopic descriptions of the phenomena, from which composition modulations in the thin film emerge, coupled with surface undulations. We obtain excellent agreement between these two approaches and are able to predict analytically the wavelength of the modulation as a function of the deposition rate and the temperature, which is confirmed numerically. The important non-equilibrium nature of the growth process is shown to lead to the experimentally observed structures, the patterning of the film for device applications is discussed, and we calculate scattering functions that can be compared with experiments. We explore the effects of stress and strain on the composition modulations in lattice-matched films, when phase separation is the driving force for the composition inhomogeneities. It is found that the lamellar structures seen without elastic effects can become dynamically unstable to the formation of hexagonal structures, due to long-ranged elastic interactions. The hexagonal order is found to consist of elastically undeformed droplets of the hard component in an elastically deformed matrix of the soft component. The wavelength of the composition modulation is calculated numerically and is always smaller than the wavelength in the absence of elastic effects. We also discuss the effects of crystal anisotropy in our system. The stability of mismatched alloy layers is studied with emphasis on the non-equilibrium nature of the growth and the coupling between the surface morphology and the film composition. We consider static and growing films at temperatures and mean compositions inside and outside of the phase diagram miscibility gap. Stability diagram are presented in terms of the mismatch between the film and the substrate and the growth velocity. It is shown that the experimentally observed difference in stability between tensile and

  14. Electrochemical characteristics of encapsulated metal-hydride-alloy electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.H.; Zhang, D.J.; Ke, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Metal hydride electrodes with copper-encapsulated alloys and non-coated alloys were fabricated using suitable conductive and binding agents. The charge-discharge characteristics of three kinds of hydride electrodes were comparatively investigated. The encapsulated alloy electrode is remarkably superior to the non-coated LaNi{sub 5}-based one, discharging at a high rate and exhibiting a smaller capacity decay at the stage of cycle tests. The hydride alloy quality of hydride electrodes can be effectively determined by measuring rate capability. The results of vented cell experiments confirm that the capacity decay of non-coated alloy electrodes in sealed cells is not due to the oxidation of oxygen from the nickel hydroxide positive electrodes. The relationship between the equilibrium potential of hydride electrode and the equilibrium hydrogen pressure has been deduced by a succinct thermodynamic method, without consideration of the unknown activity of water and fugacity coefficient of hydrogen.

  15. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  16. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  17. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.; Fernando, G.W.; Bennett, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions & band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund`s rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  18. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W. ); Fernando, G.W. . Dept. of Physics); Bennett, L.H. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1992-01-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund's rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  19. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  20. Tuning the Band Gap of Cu₂ZnSn(S,Se)₄ Thin Films via Lithium Alloying.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2016-03-01

    Alkali metal doping plays a crucial role in fabricating high-performance Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. In this study, we report the first experimental observation and characterizations of the alloyed Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films. It is found that Cu(+) ions in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films can be substituted with Li(+) ions, forming homogeneous Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.29) alloyed thin films. Consequently, the band gap, conduction band minimum, and valence band maximum of Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films are profoundly affected by Li/Cu ratios. The band alignment at the Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4/CdS interface can be tuned by changing the Li/Cu ratio. We found that the photovoltaic parameters of the Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell devices are strongly influenced by the Li/Cu ratios. Besides, the lattice constant, carrier concentration, and crystal growth of Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films were studied in detail. PMID:26837657

  1. New Alloy for Glass-to-Metal Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmuck, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficient of thermal expansion approximates that of glass more closely. Alloy composed of about 60 percent iron, 40 percent nickel, and traces of six other elements. Developed as replacement for Kovar Fe/Ni/Co alloy in ferrule-and-tube assembly, new alloy has same strength, solderability, and compatibility with fuel as does Kovar. Used in glass-to-metal seals without excessive residual stresses. Potential for other applications in which low thermal expansion important; mechanical measuring devices and precise sliding parts that must function over wide temperature ranges.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of dental metals and alloys in different media.

    PubMed

    Kedici, S P; Aksüt, A A; Kílíçarslan, M A; Bayramoğlu, G; Gökdemir, K

    1998-10-01

    The corrosion tendencies of metals are related with their position in the electromotive series. These electrode potential degrees may change due to the compositions of the alloys, the surrounding media, or due to alterations in the composition because of recurrent casting. Therefore in this research, the electrode potentials and their changes over a period of time were measured in different pH media simulating the oral electrochemical conditions in vitro. The surface structure of the first and second castings of 29 different dental metals and alloys were examined under a scanning electron microscope and their composition in percentage weight was calculated by the Energy-dispersive X-ray Analysor system. Further the current-potential curves of the dental alloys were found by the potentiodynamic method in three different solutions and, in addition, the changes of corrosion potentials over time were also determined. The corrosion rates, corrosion potentials, their changes over time and their cathodic Tafel slopes were determined. All alloys tested showed ion leakage in corrosive media. Titanium exhibited the least, but alloys with tin and cobalt content displayed the greatest corrosion tendencies. Alloys with iron and copper corroded in the acid media, conversely alloys containing chromium, nichel and molybdenum proved to be resistant to corrosion. The recurrent castings were also corrosion resistant. PMID:9802590

  3. Quantum Chemistry for Surface Segregation in Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David

    2006-08-31

    Metal alloys are vital materials for the fabrication of high-flux, high-selectivity hydrogen separation membranes. A phenomenon that occurs in alloys that does not arise in pure metals is surface segregation, where the composition of the surface differs from the bulk composition. Little is known about the strength of surface segregation in the alloys usually considered for hydrogen membranes. Despite this lack of knowledge, surface segregation may play a decisive role in the ability of appropriately chosen alloys to be resistant to chemical poisoning, since membrane poisoning is controlled by surface chemistry. The aim of this Phase I project is to develop quantum chemistry approaches to assess surface segregation in a prototypical hydrogen membrane alloy, fcc Pd{sub 75}Cu{sub 25}. This alloy is known experimentally to have favorable surface properties as a poison resistant H{sub 2} purification membrane (Kamakoti et al., Science 307 (2005) 569-573), but previous efforts at modeling surfaces of this alloy have ignored the possible role of surface segregation (Alfonso et al., Surf. Sci. 546 (2003) 12-26).

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Milheiro, Ana; Nozaki, Kosuke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Muris, Joris; Miura, Hiroyuki; Feilzer, Albert J

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys on mouse fibroblast cells. Metal salts were used to prepare seven solutions (concentration range 100 ppm-1 ppb) of the transition metals, such as Ni(II), Pd(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I), and the metals, such as Ga(III), In(III), and Sn(II). Cytotoxicity on mouse fibroblasts L929 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Ni, Cu, and Ag are cytotoxic at 10 ppm, Pd and Ga at 100 ppm. Sn and In were not able to induce cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Transition metals were able to induce cytotoxic effects in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys. Ni, Cu, and Ag were the most cytotoxic followed by Pd and Ga; Sn and In were not cytotoxic. Cytotoxic reactions might be considered in the etiopathogenesis of clinically observed local adverse reactions. PMID:25549610

  5. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  6. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  7. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Even, Jr., William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  8. Performance of chromia- and alumina-forming Fe- and Ni-base alloys exposed to metal dusting environments: The effect of water vapor and temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rouaix-Vande Put, Aurelie; Unocic, Kinga A.; Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-11-18

    Fe- and Ni-base alloys including an alumina-forming austenitic alloy were exposed for 500 h under metal dusting environments with varying temperature, gas composition and total pressure. For one H2–CO–CO2–H2O environment, the increase in temperature from 550 to 750 °C generally decreased metal dusting. When H2O was added to a H2–CO–CO2 environment at 650 °C, the metal dusting attack was reduced. Even after 5000 h at a total pressure of 9.1 atm with 20%H2O, the higher alloyed specimens retained a thin protective oxide. Lastly, for gas mixtures containing little or no H2O, the Fe-base alloys were less resistant to metal dustingmore » than Ni-base alloys.« less

  9. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:26491304

  10. Electromagnetic Characterization Of Metallic Sensory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  11. Electromagnetic characterization of metallic sensory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  12. Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.

    1998-01-01

    An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

  13. Laser-induced diffusion decomposition in Fe-V thin-film alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polushkin, N. I.; Duarte, A. C.; Conde, O.; Alves, E.; Barradas, N. P.; García-García, A.; Kakazei, G. N.; Ventura, J. O.; Araujo, J. P.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the origin of ferromagnetism induced in thin-film (∼20 nm) Fe-V alloys by their irradiation with subpicosecond laser pulses. We find with Rutherford backscattering that the magnetic modifications follow a thermally stimulated process of diffusion decomposition, with formation of a-few-nm-thick Fe enriched layer inside the film. Surprisingly, similar transformations in the samples were also found after their long-time (∼103 s) thermal annealing. However, the laser action provides much higher diffusion coefficients (∼4 orders of magnitude) than those obtained under standard heat treatments. We get a hint that this ultrafast diffusion decomposition occurs in the metallic glassy state achievable in laser-quenched samples. This vitrification is thought to be a prerequisite for the laser-induced onset of ferromagnetism that we observe.

  14. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  15. Ancient Metal Mirror Alloy Revisited: Quasicrystalline Nanoparticles Observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, J. A.; Mantri, A. S.; Yamjala, S.; Saha, Sabyasachi; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Rao, P. Rama

    2015-12-01

    This article presents, for the first time, evidence of nanocrystalline structure, through direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, in a Cu-32 wt.% Sn alloy that has been made by an age-old, uniquely crafted casting process. This alloy has been used as a metal mirror for centuries. The TEM images also reveal five-sided projections of nano-particles. The convergent beam nano-diffraction patterns obtained from the nano-particles point to the nano-phase being quasicrystalline, a feature that has never before been reported for a copper alloy, although there have been reports of the presence of icosahedral `clusters' within large unit cell intermetallic phases. This observation has been substantiated by x-ray diffraction, wherein the observed peaks could be indexed to an icosahedral quasi-crystalline phase. The mirror alloy casting has been valued for its high hardness and high reflectance properties, both of which result from its unique internal microstructure that include nano-grains as well as quasi-crystallinity. We further postulate that this microstructure is a consequence of the raw materials used and the manufacturing process, including the choice of mold material. While the alloy consists primarily of copper and tin, impurity elements such as zinc, iron, sulfur, aluminum and nickel are also present, in individual amounts not exceeding one wt.%. It is believed that these trace impurities could have influenced the microstructure and, consequently, the properties of the metal mirror alloy.

  16. 49 CFR 173.187 - Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.187 Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s. Packagings for pyrophoric solids, metals, or alloys, n.o.s. must conform to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at...

  17. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking is described. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  18. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  19. Thermodynamics of Liquid Alkali Metals and Their Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Patel, Minal H.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical investigation of thermodynamic properties like internal energy, entropy, Helmholtz free energy, heat of mixing (ΔE) and entropy of mixing (ΔS) of liquid alkali metals and their binary alloys are reported in the present paper. The effect of concentration on the thermodynamic properties of Ac1Bc2 alloy of the alkali-alkali elements is investigated and reported for the first time using our well established local pseudopotential. To investigate influence of exchange and correlation effects, we have used five different local field correction functions viz; Hartree(H), Taylor(T), Ichimaru and Utsumi(IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S). The increase of concentration C2, increases the internal energy and Helmholtz free energy of liquid alloy Ac1Bc2. The behavior of present computation is not showing any abnormality in the outcome and hence confirms the applicability of our model potential in explaining the thermodynamics of liquid binary alloys.

  20. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  1. Molybdenum-A Key Component of Metal Alloys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum, whose chemical symbol is Mo, was first recognized as an element in 1778. Until that time, the mineral molybdenite-the most important source of molybdenum-was believed to be a lead mineral because of its metallic gray color, greasy feel, and softness. In the late 19th century, French metallurgists discovered that molybdenum, when alloyed (mixed) with steel in small quantities, creates a substance that is remarkably tougher than steel alone and is highly resistant to heat. The alloy was found to be ideal for making tools and armor plate. Today, the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloying agent in stainless steel, alloy steels, and superalloys to enhance hardness, strength, and resistance to corrosion.

  2. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  3. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maiya, P. Subraya; Picciolo, John J.; Emerson, James E.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1998-01-01

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo.sub.0.5 O.sub.x and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo.sub.0.50 O.sub.x is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed.

  4. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maiya, P.S.; Picciolo, J.J.; Emerson, J.E.; Dusek, J.T.; Balachandran, U.

    1998-03-10

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo{sub 0.50}O{sub x} is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  5. Design and evaluation of thin metal surface insulation for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. C.; Petach, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    An all-metal insulation was studied as a thermal protection system for hypersonic vehicles. Key program goals included fabricating the insulation in thin packages which are optimized for high temperature insulation of an actively cooled aluminum structure, and the use of state-of-the-art alloys. The insulation was fabricated from 300 series stainless steel in thicknesses of 0.8 to 12 mm. The outer, 0.127 mm thick, skin was textured to accommodate thermal expansion and oxidized to increase emittance. The thin insulating package was achieved using an insulation concept consisting of foil radiation shields spaced within the package, and conical foil supports to carry loads from the skin and maintain package dimensions. Samples of the metal-insulation were tested to evaluate thermal insulation capability, rain and sand erosion resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, applied load capability, and high temperature emittance.

  6. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  7. The Effect of Boronizing on Metallic Alloys for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Roumiana S.; Suwattananont, Naruemon; Samardzic, Veljko

    2008-06-01

    In this study the wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and oxidation resistance of boronized metallic alloys were investigated. Thermochemical treatment was performed by powder pack boronizing process at temperature 850-950 °C for 4 h. Saw-tooth morphology and smooth interface microstructures were observed with an optical microscope; microhardness was measured across the coating depth. The phases present in the boron coatings depend on the substrate material. High-temperature oxidation resistance was investigated and it was found that boron coating on ferrous alloys can resist temperatures up to 800 °C. The corrosion resistance of the boronized samples was improved and the corrosion rate was calculated for boronized and plain specimens. Wear testing was conducted by following the procedures of ASTM G99, ASTM D2526, and ASTM D4060. The obtained experimental results revealed that boronizing significantly improves the wear-resistance, corrosion-resistance, and oxidation resistance of metallic alloys.

  8. Metal Alloy Compositions And Process Background Of The Invention

    DOEpatents

    Flemings, Merton C.; Martinez-Ayers, Raul A.; de Figueredo, Anacleto M.; Yurko, James A.

    2003-11-11

    A skinless metal alloy composition free of entrapped gas and comprising primary solid discrete degenerate dendrites homogeneously dispersed within a secondary phase is formed by a process wherein the metal alloy is heated in a vessel to render it a liquid. The liquid is then rapidly cooled while vigorously agitating it under conditions to avoid entrapment of gas while forming solid nuclei homogeneously distributed in the liquid. Agitation then is ceased when the liquid contains a small fraction solid or the liquid-solid alloy is removed from the source of agitation while cooling is continued to form the primary solid discrete degenerate dendrites in liquid secondary phase. The solid-liquid mixture then can be formed such as by casting.

  9. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-01-01

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique. PMID:27214495

  10. Alloy perovskite oxide thin film as resistance switching non-volatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yudi

    Nonvolatile memory that permanently stores data is indispensable for computers and hand-held devices. In the last few years, resistance memory (RRAM) has emerged as an intriguing possibility that might replace flash memory one day, which is widely used in hand-held and portable-storage devices. The newest, rapidly growing interest in resistance switching is focused on semiconducting oxides and other related materials. In this dissertation, a novel material system for oxide RRAM that offers unique advantages over all the other existing oxide RRAM materials was designed and systematically investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain a material system with the intrinsic property that allows electrically-induced metal-insulator transition, which is regulated by electron trapping and release at some interval sites. A series of alloy perovskite oxides thin film systems were designed by combining a wide band gap insulator (CaZrO3 or LaAlO3) and a conductor with a narrow bandwidth (SrRuO3 or LaNiO3 ), with the conductor concentration near the percolation threshold. These alloy perovskite oxides thin films are almost atomically flat without any defects, such as cracks or crosshatches, which is achieved using well controlled deposition conditions that favor domain-boundary relaxation of the large misfit strain. The bottom electrode is a single crystalline SrRuO 3 thin film, deposited on a single crystal substrate of SrTiO3 which exhibits high conductivity and ferromagnetic transition at ˜150K. The alloy thin films manifest an anisotropic percolation phenomenon: below a critical thickness a metallic conducting path always exists across the film thickness direction but not along the in-plane direction, which ensures electrical isolation between neighboring memory cells. These initially conducting films present excellent resistance switching properties: low switching voltages (1-3 V), high switching ratio (˜100), fast switching speed (50 ns), good switching

  11. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    SciTech Connect

    White, Jack C.; Traut, Davis E.; Oden, Laurance L.; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  12. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  13. Sputter deposition of metallic thin film and directpatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, X.; Ji, Q.; Leung, K.-N.

    2005-09-09

    A compact apparatus is developed for deposition of metal thin film. The system employs an RF discharge plasma source with a straight RF antenna, which is made of or covered with deposition material, serving as sputtering target at the same time. The average deposition rate of copper thin film is as high as 450nm/min. By properly allocating the metal materials on the sputtering antenna, mixture deposition of multiple metal species is achieved. Using an ion beam imprinting scheme also taking advantage of ion beam focusing technique, two different schemes of direct patterning deposition process are developed: direct depositing patterned metallic thin film and resistless ion beam sputter patterning. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated direct pattern transfer from a template with feature size of micro scale; patterns with more than 10x reduction are achieved by sputtering patterning method.

  14. Metal redox processes for the controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kirkeminde, Alec; Spurlin, Stan; Draxler-Sixta, Laura; Cooper, Jamie; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-03-27

    Nanocrystalline metals have received widespread interest and found various applications owing to their magnetic and catalytic properties and in energy-related fields. A flexible approach for the growth of nanoalloys with controlled properties and well-defined structures on the atomic scale is thus greatly desired. A new synthetic method that avoids incompatible reduction potentials and rates would be critical to grow metal nanostructures with high purities and the desired stoichiometries. A metal-redox strategy that employs spontaneous oxidation/reduction reactions to grow nanocrystalline alloys using molecular-scale zerovalent metal precursors is now described. The selection of suitable zerovalent metal species allows for thermodynamic control of the compositional stoichiometry during the temperature-dependent formation of the metal alloy nanoparticles. A practical and scalable strategy for nanoalloy growth that can potentially produce key metal components of superior metallurgical quality for catalytic and magnetic systems has thus been developed. PMID:25651105

  15. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  17. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia X.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  18. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  19. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  20. Measurement of Crystallization Temperature Using Thermography for Thin Film Amorphous Alloy Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Seiichi; Aono, Yuko; Sakurai, Junpei; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2009-03-01

    This report describes a new non-contact measurement method for the crystallization temperature (Tx) of a thin film amorphous alloy. The thermal emissivity of the amorphous alloy sample is predicted to be modified when it crystallizes. It was attempted to relate this modification to changes in the apparent temperature by thermography. Thin film amorphous alloys of Pt67Si33 and Pt73Si27 were sputtered onto an Al2O3 substrate and then heated at 20 K/min in vacuum, and the film temperature was monitored by thermography. The Tx indicated by the proposed method coincided with the temperature measured by conventional differential scanning calorimeter within 8 K.

  1. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  2. Superior metallic alloys through rapid solidification processing (RSP) by design

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid solidification processing using powder atomization methods and the control of minor elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon can provide metallic alloys with superior properties and performance compared to conventionally processing alloys. Previous studies on nickel- and iron-base superalloys have provided the baseline information to properly couple RSP with alloy composition, and, therefore, enable alloys to be designed for performance improvements. The RSP approach produces powders, which need to be consolidated into suitable monolithic forms. This normally involves canning, consolidation, and decanning of the powders. Canning/decanning is expensive and raises the fabrication cost significantly above that of conventional, ingot metallurgy production methods. The cost differential can be offset by the superior performance of the RSP metallic alloys. However, without the performance database, it is difficult to convince potential users to adopt the RSP approach. Spray casting of the atomized molten droplets into suitable preforms for subsequent fabrication can be cost competitive with conventional processing. If the fine and stable microstructural features observed for the RSP approach are preserved during spray casing, a cost competitive product can be obtained that has superior properties and performance that cannot be obtained by conventional methods.

  3. Controlling Surface Chemistry of Gallium Liquid Metal Alloys to Enhance their Fluidic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyas, Nahid; Cumby, Brad; Cook, Alexander; Durstock, Michael; Tabor, Christopher; Materials; Manufacturing Directorate Team

    Gallium liquid metal alloys (GaLMAs) are one of the key components of emerging technologies in reconfigurable electronics, such as tunable radio frequency antennas and electronic switches. Reversible flow of GaLMA in microchannels of these types of devices is hindered by the instantaneous formation of its oxide skin in ambient environment. The oxide film sticks to most surfaces leaving unwanted metallic residues that can cause undesired electronic properties. In this report, residue-free reversible flow of a binary alloy of gallium (eutectic gallium indium) is demonstrated via two types of surface modifications where the oxide film is either protected by an organic thin film or chemically removed. An interface modification layer (alkyl phosphonic acids) was introduced into the microfluidic system to modify the liquid metal surface and protect its oxide layer. Alternatively, an ion exchange membrane was utilized as a 'sponge-like' channel material to store and slowly release small amounts of HCl to react with the surface oxide of the liquid metal. Characterization of these interfaces at molecular level by surface spectroscopy and microscopy provided with mechanistic details for the interfacial interactions between the liquid metal surface and the channel materials.

  4. Effect of a metal alloy fuel catalyst on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ruma; Koerting, Claudia; Suib, Steven L; Best, Michael H; Berlin, Alvin J

    2005-11-01

    Many microorganisms have been demonstrated to utilize petroleum fuel products to fulfill their nutritional requirement for carbon. As a result, the ability of these microbes to degrade fuel has both a deleterious affect as well as beneficial applications. This study focused on the undesired ability of bacteria to grow on fuel and the potential for some metal alloys to inhibit this biodegradation. The objective of this study was to review the pattern of growth of two reference strains of petroleum-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas oleovorans and Rhodococcus rhodocrous, in a specific hydrocarbon environment in the presence of a commercially available alloy. The alloy formulated and supplied by Advanced Power Systems International Inc. (APSI) is sold for fuel reformulation and other purposes. The components of the alloy used in the study were antimony, tin, lead, and mercury formulated as pellets. Surface characterization also showed the presence of tin oxide and lead amalgam phases. Hydrocarbon used for the study was primarily 87-octane gasoline. The growth of the bacteria in the water and mineral-supplemented gasoline mixture over 6-8 weeks was monitored by the viable plate count method. While an initial increase in bacteria occurred in the first week, overall bacterial growth was found to be suppressed in the presence of the alloy. Results also indicate that the alloy surface characteristics that convey the catalytic activity may also contribute to the observed antibacterial activity. PMID:16262333

  5. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Peker, Atakan; Johnson, William L.

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  6. Alloy with metallic glass and quasi-crystalline properties

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Li-Qian; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.

    2004-02-17

    An alloy is described that is capable of forming a metallic glass at moderate cooling rates and exhibits large plastic flow at ambient temperature. Preferably, the alloy has a composition of (Zr, Hf).sub.a Ta.sub.b Ti.sub.c Cu.sub.d Ni.sub.e Al.sub.f, where the composition ranges (in atomic percent) are 45.ltoreq.a.ltoreq.70, 3.ltoreq.b.ltoreq.7.5, 0.ltoreq.c.ltoreq.4, 3.ltoreq.b+c.ltoreq.10, 10.ltoreq.d.ltoreq.30, 0.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.20, 10.ltoreq.d+e.ltoreq.35, and 5.ltoreq.f.ltoreq.15. The alloy may be cast into a bulk solid with disordered atomic-scale structure, i.e., a metallic glass, by a variety of techniques including copper mold die casting and planar flow casting. The as-cast amorphous solid has good ductility while retaining all of the characteristic features of known metallic glasses, including a distinct glass transition, a supercooled liquid region, and an absence of long-range atomic order. The alloy may be used to form a composite structure including quasi-crystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. Such a composite quasi-crystalline structure has much higher mechanical strength than a crystalline structure.

  7. Titanium and Magnesium Co-Alloyed Hematite Thin Films for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Yin, W. J.; Matin, M. A.; Wang, H.; Deutsch, T.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Turner, J. A.; Yan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Using a combination of density functional theory calculation and materials synthesis and characterization we examine the properties of charge-compensated Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite thin films for the application of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. We find that the charge-compensated co-alloying results in the following effects: (1) It enhances the solubility of Mg and Ti, which leads to reduced electron effective mass and therefore increased electron mobility; (2) It tunes the carrier density and therefore allows the optimization of electrical conductivity; and (3) It reduces the density of charged defects and therefore reduces carrier recombination. As a result, the Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite thin films exhibit improved water oxidation photocurrent magnitudes as compared to pure hematite thin films. Our results suggest that charge-compensated co-alloying is a plausible approach for engineering hematite for the application of PEC water splitting.

  8. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Sputtered InGaN Alloy Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebdah, Mohammad; Hoy, Daniel; Vaughn, Joel; Kordesch, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Amorphous and polycrystalline InGaN alloy thin films were successfully fabricated using rf sputtering technique with a sputtering targets of metal In and Ga in pure Nitrogen. Films were deposited on Si and quartz substrates, with the ratio of In to Ga being varied from 0 to 1 in the alloy. Growth under different sputtering conditions has been examined, such as different temperatures, pressures, and substrate-target distances. The corresponding obtained structures have been studied using the x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The compositions have been verified by means of energy dispersive x-rays (EDX) spectroscopy and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Multiple crystallographic phases have been investigated upon growth at different temperatures, and the existence of Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Indium Nitride (InN) phases were investigated. Hall effect measurements were made in 0.55 T magnetic field for characterizing the electrical resistivity at room temperature and 77 K, the free carrier concentration, and mobility. The optical bandgap and optical properties were studied by spectrophotometric and spectroscopic ellipsometric (SE) techniques.

  9. Coating with overlay metallic-cermet alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A base layer of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet) is arc plasma sprayed onto a substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use. A top layer of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then arc plasma sprayed onto the base layer. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base layer serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top layer and the substrate. Otherwise, the 10 protective top layer would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  10. Powder and particulate production of metallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments of particulate metallurgy of alloyed materials where the final products is a fully dense body are discussed. Particulates are defined as powders, flakes, foils, silvers, ribbons and strip. Because rapid solidification is an important factor in particulate metallurgy, all of the particulates must have at least one dimension which is very fine, sometimes as fine as 10 to 50 microns, but move typically up to several hundred microns, provided that the dimension permits a minimum solidification rate of at least 100 K/s.

  11. [Should metal alloy discs be used for patch testing in suspected metal implant intolerance reaction?].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Geier, J; Dickel, H; Diepgen, T; Hillen, U; Kreft, B; Schnuch, A; Szliska, C; Mahler, V

    2015-11-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, patch testing should not be done in a prophylactic-prophetic approach. Pre-implant patch testing should only be performed to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a reported respective history. In the case of implant-in particular arthroplasty-related complications like, for example, pain, effusion, skin changes, reduced range of motion, or loosening, orthopedic-surgical differential diagnostics should be performed first. Allergological workup of suspected metal implant allergy should be done with the DKG baseline series which contains nickel-, cobalt- and chromium-preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing proved that this approach does not give reliable information about metal allergy. Positive patch test reactions to the discs cannot be assigned to a specific metal within the disc alloy components. Furthermore, availability of such metal discs might be an invitation to uncritical testing. Accordingly, due to lack of benefit in comparison to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs. PMID:26438196

  12. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Sushko, Maria L; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-06-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3-10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2-1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional pathway for oxygen

  13. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3-10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2-1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional pathway for oxygen

  14. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L. Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  15. Dealloying NiCo and NiCoCu Alloy Thin Films Using Linear Sweep Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peecher, Benjamin; Hampton, Jennifer

    When electrodeposited into thin films, metals have well-known electrochemical potentials at which they will be removed from the film. These potential differences can be utilized to re-oxidize only certain metals in an alloy, altering the film's structure and composition. Here we discuss NiCo and NiCoCu thin films' response to linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) as a means of electrochemical dealloying. For each of four different metal ratios, films were dealloyed to various potentials in order to gain insight into the evolution of the film over the course of the LSV. Capacitance, topography, and composition were examined for each sample before and after linear sweep voltammetry was performed. For NiCo films with high percentages of Ni, dealloying resulted in almost no change in composition, but did result in an increased capacitance, with greater increases occurring at higher LSV potentials. Dealloying also resulted in the appearance of large (100-1000 nm) pores on the surface of the film. For NiCoCu films with high percentages of Ni, Cu was almost completely removed from the film at LSV potentials greater than 500 mV. The LSV first removed larger copper-rich dendrites from the film's surface before creating numerous nano-pores, resulting in a net increase in area. This work is supported by an Award to Hope College from the HHMI Undergraduate Science Education Program, the Hope College Department of Physics Frissel Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation under Grants RUI-DMR-1104725 and MRI-CHE-0959282.

  16. Nanoscale phase separation in epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V alloy thin films studied using atom probe tomography: Comparison of experiments and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, A.; Ramanan, S.; Walvekar, S.; Bowden, M. E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kaspar, T. C.; Kurtz, R. J.

    2014-11-21

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However, the presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation, it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefore, laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr{sub 0.61}Mo{sub 0.39}, Cr{sub 0.77}Mo{sub 0.23}, and Cr{sub 0.32}V{sub 0.68} alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus, the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were confirmed.

  17. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography. Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-11-21

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

  18. Soldering of Carbon Materials Using Transition Metal Rich Alloys.

    PubMed

    Burda, Marek; Lekawa-Raus, Agnieszka; Gruszczyk, Andrzej; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2015-08-25

    Joining of carbon materials via soldering has not been possible up to now due to lack of wetting of carbons by metals at standard soldering temperatures. This issue has been a severely restricting factor for many potential electrical/electronic and mechanical applications of nanostructured and conventional carbon materials. Here we demonstrate the formation of alloys that enable soldering of these structures. By addition of several percent (2.5-5%) of transition metal such as chromium or nickel to a standard lead-free soldering tin based alloy we obtained a solder that can be applied using a commercial soldering iron at typical soldering temperatures of approximately 350 °C and at ambient conditions. The use of this solder enables the formation of mechanically strong and electrically conductive joints between carbon materials and, when supported by a simple two-step technique, can successfully bond carbon structures to any metal terminal. It has been shown using optical and scanning electron microscope images as well as X-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive X-ray mapping that the successful formation of carbon-solder bonds is possible, first, thanks to the uniform nonreactive dispersion of transition metals in the tin-based matrix. Further, during the soldering process, these free elements diffuse into the carbon-alloy border with no formation of brazing-like carbides, which would damage the surface of the carbon materials. PMID:26256042

  19. Germanium Lift-Off Masks for Thin Metal Film Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari

    2012-01-01

    A technique has been developed for patterning thin metallic films that are, in turn, used to fabricate microelectronics circuitry and thin-film sensors. The technique uses germanium thin films as lift-off masks. This requires development of a technique to strip or undercut the germanium chemically without affecting the deposited metal. Unlike in the case of conventional polymeric lift-off masks, the substrate can be exposed to very high temperatures during processing (sputter deposition). The reason why polymeric liftoff masks cannot be exposed to very high temperatures (greater than 100 C) is because (a) they can become cross linked, making lift-off very difficult if not impossible, and (b) they can outgas nitrogen and oxygen, which then can react with the metal being deposited. Consequently, this innovation is expected to find use in the fabrication of transition edge sensors and microwave kinetic inductance detectors, which use thin superconducting films deposited at high temperature as their sensing elements. Transition edge sensors, microwave kinetic inductance detectors, and their circuitry are comprised of superconducting thin films, for example Nb and TiN. Reactive ion etching can be used to pattern these films; however, reactive ion etching also damages the underlying substrate, which is unwanted in many instances. Polymeric lift-off techniques permit thin-film patterning without any substrate damage, but they are difficult to remove and the polymer can outgas during thin-film deposition. The outgassed material can then react with the film with the consequence of altered and non-reproducible materials properties, which, in turn, is deleterious for sensors and their circuitry. The purpose of this innovation was to fabricate a germanium lift-off mask to be used for patterning thin metal films.

  20. High performance Zr-based metal hydride alloys for nickel metal hydride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Ovshinsky, S.R.; Huang, B.; Chao, B.S.; Li, Y.

    2000-07-01

    Based upon Ovonic's multi-element, atomic engineering approach, two families of alloys are being used in commercial Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries, i.e., the mischmetal (Mm) based AB{sub 5} and Zr based AB{sub 2} alloys. While Mm based alloys are faster to activate, they are limited by a discharge capacity of only 320--340 mAh/g. The Zr based alloy, although slightly slower to activate, provides a much higher discharge capacity. In this paper, the authors first discuss the use of Ovonic's multi-element approach to generate a spectrum of disordered local environments. They then present experimental data to illustrate that through these atomically engineered local environments, they are able to control the hydrogen site occupancy, discharge capacity, kinetics, and surface states. The Zr based alloy with a specific discharge capacity of 465 mAh/g and excellent rate capability has been demonstrated.

  1. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen helium alloys at temperatures between 0 K and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 megabars. Expressions for the band structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short and long range order are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual crystal harmonic approximation. We conclude that at temperatures below 4,000 K there is complete phase separation of hydrogen helium alloys, and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  2. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase-separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen-helium alloys at temperatures between zero and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 Mbar. Expressions for the band-structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron-ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short- and long-range orders are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual-crystal harmonic approximation. It is concluded that at temperatures below 4000 K, there is essentially complete phase separation of hydrogen-helium alloys and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  3. High Precision Metal Thin Film Liftoff Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A metal film liftoff process includes applying a polymer layer onto a silicon substrate, applying a germanium layer over the polymer layer to create a bilayer lift off mask, applying a patterned photoresist layer over the germanium layer, removing an exposed portion of the germanium layer, removing the photoresist layer and a portion of the polymer layer to expose a portion of the substrate and create an overhanging structure of the germanium layer, depositing a metal film over the exposed portion of the substrate and the germanium layer, and removing the polymer and germanium layers along with the overlaying metal film.

  4. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-Radiative-Efficiency Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and propagating surface plasmons, enabling high-Purcell (total enhancement >10(4)), high-quantum-yield (>50%) spontaneous emission, even as the gap size vanishes (3-5 nm). The enhancement has almost spatially independent efficiency and does not suffer from quenching effects that commonly exist in previous structures. PMID:27244596

  5. Environmental and alloying effects on corrosion of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong

    2009-12-01

    In the first part of this project, corrosion studies were carried out on 304L stainless steel samples welded with Cr-free consumables, which were developed to minimize the concentration of chromate species in the weld fume. The corrosion properties of Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welds and Shielded Metal Arc (SMA) welds are comparable to those of welds fabricated with SS308L consumable, which is the standard consumable for welding 304L. Although the breakdown potentials of the new welds from both welding processes are lower than that of the SS308L weld, the repassivation potential of these new welds is much higher. Generally, the repassivation potential is a more conservative measure of susceptibility to localized corrosion. Our studies showed that the Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd welds are more resistant to crevice corrosion than SS308L welds, which is related to the high repassivation potential. Also, addition of Pd improved the corrosion resistance of the new welds, which is consistent with previous studies from button samples and bead-on-plate samples. Other corrosion studies such as creviced and uncreviced long time immersion, atmospheric exposure, and slow strain rate testing suggest that Ni-Cu-Pd welds can be a qualified substitute for SS308 weld. In the second part of this project, efforts are put on the connection between lab and field exposure tests because sometimes the correspondence between lab atmospheric corrosion tests (ASTM B117) and field exposures is poor as a result of differences in the critical conditions controlling chemical and electrochemical reactions on surfaces. Recent studies in atmospheric chemistry revealed the formation of extremely reactive species from interactions between UV light, chloride aerosols above oceans and oxidizing agents such as ozone or peroxide. Atmospheric corrosion of metals can be affected by these species which might be transported long distances in the atmosphere to locations far from oceans. However, these

  6. Understanding organic film behavior on alloy and metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2010-02-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides, namely nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron, and titanium, were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid, and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates were examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  7. Understanding Organic Film Behavior on Alloy and Metal Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides namely, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron and titanium were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates was examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  8. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  9. Preventing Oxide Adhesion of Liquid Metal Alloys to Enable Actuation in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Ishan; Johnson, Alexander; Ayers, Hudson; Dickey, Michael

    This work explores the wetting behavior of an oxide-coated liquid metal, eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (`EGaIn'), which remains a liquid at room temperature. Liquid metals uniquely combine fluidity with metallic properties. Combined, these properties enable soft, stretchable, and shape reconfigurable electronics with `softer than skin' interfaces. Ga forms spontaneously a thin surface oxide that alters its wetting behavior and makes it difficult to move across surfaces without leaving residue behind. We examine the effects of surface roughness (i.e., Cassie-Baxter state) and lubrication to minimize adhesion of Ga oxide to surfaces. Lubricated surfaces create a `slip-layer' of liquid between the metal and surface that also inhibits wetting. This slip layer allows the metal to move reversibly through microchannels by preventing adhesion of the oxide. The metal may be pumped or moved by using low voltages or pneumatic actuation. Optical microscopy confirms the importance of the slip-layer, which enables non-stick motion of the metal through capillaries. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterizes the electrohydrodynanic motion of EGaIn in capillary systems.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  12. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  13. Dental devices; dental noble metal alloys and dental base metal alloys; designation of special controls. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-08-23

    The Food and Drug Administration is amending the identification and classification regulations of gold-based alloys and precious metal alloys for clinical use and base alloys devices in order to designate a special control for these devices. FDA is also exempting these devices from premarket notification requirements. The agency is taking this action on its own initiative. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the draft guidance documents that would serve as special controls for these devices. PMID:15329980

  14. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  15. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  16. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  17. On the initial stage of plastic deformation of metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, L.B.; Danilov, V.I.; Zavodchikov, S.Y.

    2000-04-01

    Plastic deformation has been studied for a range of metal alloys using speckle interferometry. It has been found that, in the initial stage, the process of plastic flow occurs by the propagation of a deformation front, which divides the deforming material into two regions differing with respect to the material's state. The flow exhibits regular features that can be described in terms of a self-excited wave process manifesting itself in an active medium under external mechanical action.

  18. Excimer laser ceramic and metal surface alloying applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hontzopoulos, E.; Zervaki, A.; Zergioti, Y.; Hourdakis, G.; Raptakis, E.; Giannacopoulos, A.; Fotakis, C.

    1991-02-01

    Recent excimer laser based deposition and surface modification techniques for ceramic and metallurgical engineering applications are reported. These include the improvement of the anti-corrosion and erosion properties and wear resistance of metal alloys and the formation of surface conducting patterns on ceramic materials. Excimer laser chemical vapour deposition (LCVD) applications B, AI and Hf or multielement combinations are discussed together with studies which aim at a better understanding of the fundamental processes governing the deposition process.

  19. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests.

  20. The effect of weldability of alloy JBK-75 with various filler metal wire additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.L.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the compositional factors that affect the weldability of alloy JBK-75. This study was accomplished by using a variety of different commercial filler materials to systematically evaluate the weldability in the compositional range surrounding alloy JBK-75. The experimental design included varestraint testing, scanning electron microscopy, and phase diagram analysis. The varestraint testing demonstrated that the weldability of alloy JBK-75 could be improved with the use of other commercially available filler metals. The best improvement to weldability of alloy JBK-75 was with type 308L stainless steel and Hastelloy W filler metals. Adequate improvement to the weldability of alloy JBK-75 was obtained when utilizing types 309L and 310 stainless steel filler metals. Alloy 320LR, alloy 650 (NiCrFe-1), Incoloy 901, and Inconel 92 (NiCrFe-6) filler metals only marginally improved the weldability of alloy JBK-75. 59 refs., 27 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wire for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites will be discussed. 20 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the Space Shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conservation system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wires for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites are discussed.

  3. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  4. In situ purification, alloying and casting methodology for metallic plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.; Blau, Michael S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    Plutonium metal that has been double ER (electrorefined/electrorefining) was further purified via zone refining, using a floating molten zone to minimize the introduction of impurities. The temperature of the molten zone was 750°C, and the atmosphere was 10 -5 Pa. A total of ten zone refining passes were made at a travel rate of 1.5 cm/h. There were 19 elements reduced to quantities below the minimum detectable limits (MDL) by zone refining, while P, K, and W were significantly reduced. The zone-refined metal was then used in an in situ distillation, alloying, and casting step to prepare tapered specimens for single-crystal growth experiments. Specifically, 241Am was distilled from Pu metal by levitating Pu metal with 1 wt% Ga in the melt in a Crystallox vertical electromagnetic levitation crucible at 10 -5 Pa. The Pu is alloyed with Ga to stabilize the δ phase (fcc symmetry) upon solidification. The Pu was chill-cast directly from the electromagnetic levitation field into 1- cm tapered specimens. A water-cooled ceramic mold was used, and the Pu metal was cooled at a rate of 100°C/min. A microstructure examination of the specimen showed 10 × 25 μm acicular grains with a density of 15.938 g/cm 3 (±0.002 g/cm 3).

  5. Crystal nucleation and glass formation in metallic alloy melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation, containerless solidification, and bulk formation of metallic glasses are discussed. Homogeneous nucleation is not a limiting factor for metallic glass formation at slow cooling rates if the reduced glass transition temperature is high enough. Such glasses can be made in bulk if heterogeneous nucleants are removed. Containerless processing eleminates potential sources of nucleants, but as drop tube experiments on the Pd-Si alloys show, the free surface may still be a very effective heterogeneous nucleant. Combination of etching and heating in vacuum or fluxing can be effective for cleaning fairly large ingots of nucleants. Reduced gravity processing has a potentially useful role in the fluxing technique, for example to keep large metallic ingots surrounded by a low density, low fluidity flux if this proved difficult under ground conditions. For systems where heterogeneous nucleants in the bulk of the ingot need gravity to segregate to the flux-metal interface, reduced gravity processing may not be appropriate for bulk glass formation.

  6. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model at experimentally relevant length scales is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2 - 1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  7. Simulation of metal transfer and weld pool development in gas metal arc welding of thin sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is the most commonly used arc welding method in industry for joining steels and aluminum alloys. But due to the mathematical difficulties associated with the free surface motion of the molten droplet and the weld pool, the process is not well understood and the development of new welding procedures in the manufacturing industry highly depends on expensive, time-consuming and experience-based trial and error. In this dissertation, numerical methods are developed to overcome the difficulties and to simulate the metal transfer and weld pool development in the GMAW of sheet metals. The simulations are validated by experiments and used to study an industrial welding process. A numerical procedure is first developed to model the free surface motion in fusion welding processes. Thermal and electromagnetic models are integrated with the fluid models. Recommendations are made on the selection and improvement of publicly available numerical algorithms, while alternative methods are also reviewed. A model combining the enthalpy, effective-viscosity and volume-of-fluid methods is then developed to simulate the metal transfer process in globular, spray and short-circuiting transfer modes. The model not only describes the influence of gravity, electromagnetic force and surface tension on droplet profile and transfer frequency, but also models the nonisothermal phenomena such as heat transfer and phase change. The melting front motion, the droplet detachment and oscillation, the satellite formation and the fluid convection within the droplet are analyzed. It has been found that the taper formation in spray transfer is closely related to the heat input on the unmelted portion of the welding wire, and the taper formation affects the globular-spray transition by decelerating the transfer process. Experiments with a high-speed motion analyzer validate the simulation results. The model is then extended to simulate the initiation, development and

  8. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, An and alloys thereof.

  9. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  10. Thermal emf generated by laser emission along thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Satiukov, D. G.; Uglov, S. A.

    1991-07-01

    Substantial pulse thermal emf values (about 1.5 V) have been detected along the substrate during the interaction of laser emission with thin metal films (Ni, Ti, and Bi) sprayed on corrugated substrates. Relationships are established between the irradiation conditions and parameters of the generated electrical signals. Possible mechanisms of thermal emf generation and promising applications are discussed.