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Sample records for metal cluster deposition

  1. The structure of deposited metal clusters generated by laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, P.; Brandstättner, M.; Ding, A.

    1991-09-01

    Metal clusters have been produced using a laser evaporation source. A Nd-YAG laser beam focused onto a solid silver rod was used to evaporate the material, which was then cooled to form clusters with the help of a pulsed high pressure He beam. TOF mass spectra of these clusters reveal a strong occurrence of small and medium sized clusters ( n<100). Clusters were also deposited onto grid supported thin layers of carbon-films which were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Very high resolution pictures of these grids were used to analyze the size distribution and the structure of the deposited clusters. The diffraction pattern caused by crystalline structure of the clusters reveals 3-and 5-fold symmetries as well as fcc bulk structure. This can be explained in terms of icosahedron and cuboctahedron type clusters deposited on the surface of the carbon layer. There is strong evidence that part of these cluster geometries had already been formed before the depostion process. The non-linear dependence of the cluster size and the cluster density on the generating conditions is discussed. Therefore the samples were observed in HREM in the stable DEEKO 100 microscope of the Fritz-Haber-Institut operating at 100 KV with the spherical aberration c S =0.5 mm. The quality of the pictures was improved by using the conditions of minimum phase contrast hollow cone illumination. This procedure led to a minimum of phase contrast artefacts. Among the well-crystallized particles were a great amount of five- and three-fold symmetries, icosahedra and cuboctahedra respectively. The largest clusters with five- and three-fold symmetries have been found with diameters of 7 nm; the smallest particles displaying the same undistorted symmetries were of about 2 mm. Even smaller ones with strong distortions could be observed although their classification is difficult. The quality of the images was improved by applying Fourier filtering techniques.

  2. Model studies in catalysis with uhv-deposited metal particles and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppa, H.

    1984-01-01

    Small supported metal particles have become a popular area of intense research interest, and important contributions to the considered problems are being made from the fields of uhv technology, thin film physics surface science, and surface and thin film instrumentation. Attention is given to insulating supports, particulate metal deposits and their properties, metal/support interactions and gas exposures, and integrated experimental approaches. It is concluded that major contributions to the field of model catalysis should be forthcoming in the near future from uhv-based methods of research. Catalysis and catalysis-related problem areas expected to benefit from advanced model studies include catalyst preparation processing, sintering mechanisms for metals and alloys, separation of initial and final state effects for supported clusters, and the influence of particle and/or support morphologies.

  3. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  4. Universal Cluster Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, You; Sun, Zhiguang; Sellmyer, David J.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a universal cluster deposition system (UCDS), which combines a new kind of sputtering-gas-aggregation (SGA) cluster beam source with two atom beams from magnetron sputtering. A highly intense, very stable beam of nanoclusters (like Co, Fe, Ni, Si, CoSm or CoPt) are produced. A quadrupole and/or a new high transmission infinite range mass selector have been designed for the cluster beam. The size distribution (Δd/d) is between 0.05+/-0.10, measured in situ by TOF. A range of mean cluster size is 2 to 10 nm. Usually the deposition rate is about 5 deg/s. The cluster concentration in the film is adjusted through the ratio of cluster and atomic beam deposition rates, as measured in situ with a rotatable quartz microbalance. The UCDS can be used to prepare coated clusters. After exiting from the cluster source, the clusters can be coated first with an atomic or molecular species in an evaporation chamber, and deposited alone or co-deposited with another material. This system is used to deposit simultaneously or alternately mesoscopic thin films or multilayers, and offers the possibility to control independently the incident cluster size and concentration, and thereby the interaction between clusters and cluster-matrix material which is of interest for fundamental research and industry applications. Magnetic properties of Co cluster-assembled materials will be discussed. * Research supported by NSF, DARPA through ARO, and CMRA

  5. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  6. Magnetism of 3{ital d} transition-metal monolayers and two-dimensional Cr clusters deposited on Fe(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzagalli, L.; Stoeffler, D.; Gautier, F.

    1996-11-01

    We study the magnetic properties of transition-metal monolayers (ML) and Cr clusters deposited on Fe(001). We use a self-consistent tight-binding model and the recursion technique in order to get the most stable magnetic state for each atomic configuration. The magnetism is taken into account in the mean-field approximation. We show that for a Cr ML the {ital p}(2{times}2) magnetic solution is lower in energy than all the others. We find that monolayers of V, Ni, and Co are ferromagnetic {ital p}(1{times}1) on Fe(001) whereas the Mn ML are {ital c}(2{times}2) antiferromagnetic. We study also the magnetic transition occurring for Cr clusters, for an increasing Cr atoms number, from ferromagnetic to the {ital p}(2{times}2) order. The results of these calculations are in agreement with those of an Ising model whose parameters are determined. Such an Ising model predicts with a good accuracy the most stable state and the first excited states for each cluster shape. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition. PMID:26018140

  8. The effect of metal cluster deposition route on structure and photocatalytic activity of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO2 by radiolytic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marek; Nadolna, Joanna; Gołąbiewska, Anna; Mazierski, Paweł; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Remita, Hynd; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    TiO2 (P25) was modified with small and relatively monodisperse mono- and bimetallic clusters (Ag, Pd, Pt, Ag/Pd, Ag/Pt and Pd/Pt) induced by radiolysis to improve its photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), photoluminescence spectrometry (PL), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), scanning transition electron microscopy (STEM) and BET surface area analysis. The effect of metal type (mono- and bimetallic modification) as well as deposition method (simultaneous or subsequent deposition of two metals) on the photocatalytic activity in toluene removal in gas phase under UV-vis irradiation (light-emitting diodes- LEDs) and phenol degradation in liquid phase under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) were investigated. The highest photoactivity under Vis light was observed for TiO2 co-loaded with platinum (0.1%) and palladium (0.1%) clusters. Simultaneous addition of metal precursors results in formation of larger metal nanoparticles (15-30 nm) on TiO2 surface and enhances the Vis-induced activity of Ag/Pd-TiO2 up to four times, while the subsequent metal ions addition results in formation of metal particle size ranging from 4 to 20 nm. Subsequent addition of metal precursors results in formation of BNPs (bimetallic nanoparticle) composites showing higher stability in four cycles of toluene degradation under UV-vis. Obtained results indicated that direct electron transfer from the BNPs to the conduction band of the semiconductor is responsible for visible light photoactivity, whereas superoxide radicals (such as O2rad- and rad OOH) are responsible for pollutants degradation over metal-TiO2 composites.

  9. Photobiomolecular deposition of metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2005-02-08

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  10. Catalysis applications of size-selected cluster deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Stefan; White, Michael G.

    2015-12-01

    In this Perspective, we review recent studies of size-selected cluster deposition for catalysis applications performed at the U.S. DOE National Laboratories, with emphasis on work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The focus is on the preparation of model supported catalysts in which the number of atoms in the deposited clusters is precisely controlled using a combination of gas-phase cluster ion sources, mass spectrometry, and soft-landing techniques. This approach is particularly effective for investigations of small nanoclusters, 0.5-2 nm (<200 atoms), where the rapid evolution of the atomic and electronic structure makes it essential to have precise control over cluster size. Cluster deposition allows for independent control of cluster size, coverage, and stoichiometry (e.g., the metal-to-oxygen ratio in an oxide cluster) and can be used to deposit on any substrate without constraints of nucleation and growth. Examples are presented for metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide cluster deposition on a variety of supports (metals, oxides, carbon/diamond) where the reactivity, cluster-support electronic interactions, and cluster stability and morphology are investigated. Both UHV and in situ/operando studies are presented that also make use of surface-sensitive X-ray characterization tools from synchrotron radiation facilities. Novel applications of cluster deposition to electrochemistry and batteries are also presented. This review also highlights the application of modern ab initio electronic structure calculations (density functional theory), which can essentially model the exact experimental system used in the laboratory (i.e., cluster and support) to provide insight on atomic and electronic structure, reaction energetics, and mechanisms. As amply demonstrated in this review, the powerful combination of atomically precise cluster deposition and theory is able to address fundamental aspects of size-effects, cluster

  11. Stability of a deposited liquid cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, P. V.; Hippler, R.; Smirnov, B. M.; Bhattacharyya, S. R.

    2010-03-15

    The fragmentation of silver liquid clusters deposited onto a silicon surface is observed after heating the clusters to 1073 K and subsequent annealing with the exposition time 3 min. This contradicts macroscopic models of a liquid drop deposited on a surface if we use critical parameters of bulk silver. Some versions are analyzed that are based on cluster properties and may explain the phenomenon of cluster fragmentation. An experiment is suggested for clarifying the nature of the cluster fragmentation phenomenon and cluster critical phenomena.

  12. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B/sub 3/H/sub 8/; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds.

  13. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  14. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  15. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  16. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  17. Deposition of bimetallic Au/Ag clusters by the method of laser deposition of nanoparticles from colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A. A.; Arakelian, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Kucherik, A. O.; Vartanian, T. A.

    2014-02-01

    A method of formation of bimetallic clusters on the surface of optically transparent media is proposed. Nanoparticles of noble metals were obtained by laser ablation into a liquid. Clusters were formed by means of colloidal deposition of nanoparticles. Cluster morphology after deposition was studied by means of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. We demonstrate transformation of the transmission spectrum of obtained structures before and after laser-induced aggregation.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of gold cluster growth during sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. W.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme that we apply to study the time evolution of the self-organized growth process of metal cluster assemblies formed by sputter-deposited gold atoms on a planar surface. The simulation model incorporates the characteristics of the plasma-assisted deposition process and allows for an investigation over a wide range of deposition parameters. It is used to obtain data for the cluster properties which can directly be compared with recently published experimental data for gold on polystyrene [M. Schwartzkopf et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 7, 13547 (2015)]. While good agreement is found between the two, the simulations additionally provide valuable time-dependent real-space data of the surface morphology, some of whose details are hidden in the reciprocal-space scattering images that were used for the experimental analysis.

  19. Production of metal particles and clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of producing novel metals or metal clusters in a low gravity environment was studied. The production of coordinately unsaturated metal carbonyls by thermolysis or photolysis of stable metal carbonyls has the potential to generate novel catalysts by this technique. Laser irradiation of available metal carbonyls was investigated. It is found that laser induced decomposition of metal carbonyls is feasible for producing a variety of coordinately unsaturated species. Formation of clustered species does occur but is hampered by weak metal-metal bonds.

  20. Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Travis E.; Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E.

    2014-02-28

    Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

  1. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  2. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  3. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.; Martin, Frank S.

    1994-12-13

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  4. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates. 1 figure.

  5. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  6. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  7. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  8. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  9. MODELING THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.ed

    2010-08-01

    Observed metallicities of globular clusters reflect physical conditions in the interstellar medium of their high-redshift host galaxies. Globular cluster systems in most large galaxies display bimodal color and metallicity distributions, which are often interpreted as indicating two distinct modes of cluster formation. The metal-rich and metal-poor clusters have systematically different locations and kinematics in their host galaxies. However, the red and blue clusters have similar internal properties, such as their masses, sizes, and ages. It is therefore interesting to explore whether both metal-rich and metal-poor clusters could form by a common mechanism and still be consistent with the bimodal distribution. We present such a model, which prescribes the formation of globular clusters semi-analytically using galaxy assembly history from cosmological simulations coupled with observed scaling relations for the amount and metallicity of cold gas available for star formation. We assume that massive star clusters form only during mergers of massive gas-rich galaxies and tune the model parameters to reproduce the observed distribution in the Galaxy. A wide, but not the entire, range of model realizations produces metallicity distributions consistent with the data. We find that early mergers of smaller hosts create exclusively blue clusters, whereas subsequent mergers of more massive galaxies create both red and blue clusters. Thus, bimodality arises naturally as the result of a small number of late massive merger events. This conclusion is not significantly affected by the large uncertainties in our knowledge of the stellar mass and cold gas mass in high-redshift galaxies. The fraction of galactic stellar mass locked in globular clusters declines from over 10% at z > 3 to 0.1% at present.

  10. Fission and dipole resonances in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T. P.; Billas, I. M. L.; Branz, W.; Heinebrodt, M.; Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.

    1997-06-20

    It is not obvious that metal clusters should behave like atomic nuclei--but they do. Of course the energy and distance scales are quite different. But aside from this, the properties of these two forms of condensed matter are amazingly similar. The shell model developed by nuclear physicists describes very nicely the electronic properties of alkali metal clusters. The giant dipole resonances in the excitation spectra of nuclei have their analogue in the plasmon resonances of metal clusters. Finally, the droplet model describing the fission of unstable nuclei can be successively applied to the fragmentation of highly charged metal clusters. The similarity between clusters and nuclei is not accidental. Both systems consist of fermions moving, nearly freely, in a confined space.

  11. A Simple MO Treatment of Metal Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Illustrates how a qualitative description of the geometry and electronic characteristics of homogeneous metal clusters can be obtained using semiempirical MO (molecular orbital theory) methods. Computer applications of MO methods to inorganic systems are also described. (CS)

  12. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Daniel A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms.The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps

  13. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  14. DEPOSITION OF METAL ON NONMETAL FILAMENT

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for purifying metallic uranium by passing a halogen vapor continuously over the impure uranium to form uranium halide vapor and immediately passing the halide vapor into contact with a nonmetallic refractory surface which is at a temperature above the melting point of uranium metal. The halide is decomposed at the heated surface depositing molten metal, which collects and falls into a receiver below.

  15. Cage Destruction in Metal-Fullerene Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.; Frank, S.; Heinebrodt, M.; Billas, I.M.; Martin, T.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass spectrometric studies on free clusters composed of single fullerene molecules and transition metal atoms (C{sub 60}{ital M}{sub {ital x}} and C{sub 70}{ital M}{sub {ital x}}; {ital x}=0.150, {ital M}{element_of}{l_brace}Ti,V,Nb,Ta{r_brace}) reveal that they undergo a laser induced transformation from metal-fullerene clusters to metal carbide and metallo-carbohedrene clusters. Two types of fragmentation behavior are observed. Fullerenes doped with titanium or vanadium seem to be stable at low laser intensities, whereas tantalum and niobium severely destabilize the fullerene cage. Photofragmentation spectra of preselected C{sub 60}Ta{sub {ital x}} indicate that the C{sub 60} cage is destroyed for {ital x}{ge}3. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of polymer-metal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenkrich, Felix; Seyffarth, Susanne; Fuchs, Britta; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    Different polymer-metal nanocomposites, metal clusters on a polymer surface and for the first time also polymer/metal multilayers, were pulsed laser deposited at a wavelength of 248 nm. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and Bisphenol A dimeth-acrylate (BisDMA), which strongly differ in their hardness of 3 and 180 N/mm 2, respectively, were taken as polymer components. Metals Ag and Cu were chosen because of their different reactivity to polymers. When depositing Ag on PMMA, spherical clusters are formed due to high diffusion and total coalescence. For Cu, much smaller grains with partially elongated shapes occur because of lower diffusivity and incomplete coalescence. Compared to the results on the soft PMMA, the clusters formed on the harder BisDMA are much larger due to higher diffusivity on this underlayer. In PMMA/Cu multilayers, wavy layered structures and buckling is observed due to relaxation of compressive stress in the Cu layers. Smooth Cu layers with higher thicknesses can only be obtained, when the hardness of the polymer is sufficiently high, as in the case of BisDMA/Cu multilayers.

  17. Shell structure in faceted metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavloff, Nicolas; Creagh, Stephen C.

    1993-12-01

    We study the quantized electronic energy levels in a three-dimensional icosahedral billiard modeling a faceted metal cluster. The first 2000 levels are determined numerically. The magic numbers are compared with experimental data and with the results for a spherical model. We discuss the supershell structure and propose its study as a test of cluster sphericity. We compare our results with the predictions of the semiclassical trace formula and point out the relevance of diffractive orbits.

  18. Surface growth by random deposition of rigid and wetting clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabella, D. A.; Aldao, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Surface grown by the deposition of rigid and wetting clusters has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulations in 1 + 1 dimensions. Dynamic scaling exponents were determined using the time evolution of the roughness, the local width, the height-height correlation function, and the power spectrum. The values obtained for the roughness exponent clearly reflect the growth mechanism adopted for deposition. In the case of wetting clusters, the roughness exponent corresponds to that of random deposition, but a correlation appears for low window size, with a crossover that is related to the average cluster size and cluster size distribution. On the other hand, rigid cluster deposition belongs to the KPZ universality class. However, determined scaling exponents converge very slowly to those corresponding to KPZ.

  19. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  20. Embedded cluster metal-polymeric micro interface and process for producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Menezes, Marlon E.; Birnbaum, Howard K.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2002-01-29

    A micro interface between a polymeric layer and a metal layer includes isolated clusters of metal partially embedded in the polymeric layer. The exposed portion of the clusters is smaller than embedded portions, so that a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an exposed portion of an individual cluster is smaller than a cross section, taken parallel to the interface, of an embedded portion of the individual cluster. At least half, but not all of the height of a preferred spherical cluster is embedded. The metal layer is completed by a continuous layer of metal bonded to the exposed portions of the discontinuous clusters. The micro interface is formed by heating a polymeric layer to a temperature, near its glass transition temperature, sufficient to allow penetration of the layer by metal clusters, after isolated clusters have been deposited on the layer at lower temperatures. The layer is recooled after embedding, and a continuous metal layer is deposited upon the polymeric layer to bond with the discontinuous metal clusters.

  1. Radial distribution of metallicity in the LMC cluster systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontizas, M.; Kontizas, E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    New determinations of the deprojected distances to the galaxy center for 94 star clusters and their metal abundances are used to investigate the variation of metallicity across the two LMC star cluster systems (Kontizas et al. 1990). A systematic radial trend of metallicity is observed in the extended outer cluster system, the outermost clusters being significantly metal poorer than the more central ones, with the exception of six clusters (which might lie out of the plane of the cluster system) out of 77. A radial metallicity gradient has been found, qualitatively comparable to that of the Milky Way for its system of the old disk clusters. If the six clusters are taken into consideration then the outer cluster system is well mixed up to 8 kpc. The spatial distribution of metallicities for the inner LMC cluster system, consisting of very young globulars does not show a systematic radial trend; they are all metal rich.

  2. Metals Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Ralph

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for metals occupational clusters training programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The guide…

  3. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters.

    PubMed

    Götz, Daniel A; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms. PMID:27181365

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  6. APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-03-13

    An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

  7. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes and metal clusters by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Mirkin, Michael V

    2010-09-10

    Most nanometer-sized electrodes reported to date are made from either Pt or Au. For technical reasons, it is difficult to make nanoelectrodes from many other metals (e.g. Hg) by heat-sealing microwires into glass capillaries or by other established techniques. Such nanoelectrodes can be useful for a wide range of analytical and physicochemical applications from high sensitivity stripping analysis (Hg) to pH nano-sensors to studies of electrocatalysis. In this paper, nanometer-sized metal electrodes are prepared by electrodeposition of Hg or Pt on disk-type, polished or recessed nanoelectrodes. The deposition of Hg is monitored chronoamperometrically to produce near-hemispherical electrodes, which are characterized by voltammetry and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The well-shaped deposits of a solid metal (Pt) at Au nanoelectrodes are prepared and imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic metal clusters can also be prepared using this methodology. Electrodes with the metal surface flush with glass insulator, most suitable for quantitative voltammetric and SECM experiments are fabricated by electrodeposition of a metal inside an etched nanocavity. PMID:20645378

  8. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  9. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  10. The structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  11. Metallicities and Reddenings For Young Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajedini, Ata; Layden, Andrew

    1996-04-01

    We have obtained VI CCD photometry for the young globular clusters Ruprecht 106, Terzan 7, and Arp 2 using the 0.9m and 1.5m telescopes at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The resulting V ~ (V-I) color-magnitude diagrams extend from the tip of the red giant branch to approximately 3 magnitudes below the horizontal branch. We have applied the SRM method of Sarajedini (1994) to the RGBs of these clusters in order to measure their reddenings and metallicities. Furthermore, we have formulated the SRM method in the V ~ (B-V) color-magnitude plane and applied it to published BV photometry for these young globular clusters. The implications of these derived parameters will be discussed.

  12. Atomically precise (catalytic) particles synthesized by a novel cluster deposition instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, C.; Tyo, E.; Kuchta, K.; Issendorff, B. von; Vajda, S.

    2014-05-07

    We report a new high vacuum instrument which is dedicated to the preparation of well-defined clusters supported on model and technologically relevant supports for catalytic and materials investigations. The instrument is based on deposition of size selected metallic cluster ions that are produced by a high flux magnetron cluster source. The throughput of the apparatus is maximized by collecting and focusing ions utilizing a conical octupole ion guide and a linear ion guide. The size selection is achieved by a quadrupole mass filter. The new design of the sample holder provides for the preparation of multiple samples on supports of various sizes and shapes in one session. After cluster deposition onto the support of interest, samples will be taken out of the chamber for a variety of testing and characterization.

  13. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, S. B. Little, B. K.; Xin, Y.; Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M.; Buszek, R. J.; Boatz, J. A.; Boyle, J. M.

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  14. Welding, bonding, and sealing of refractory metals by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Plating process welds, bonds, and seals refractory metals without weakening or changing the structure of the base metals. A metal halide compound in the vapor phase is decomposed to deposit filler metal on the base metal. The resulting bond is a true metal-to-metal bond.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of metallic cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jinhee; Saly, Mark; Kanjolia, Ravi; Chabal, Yves; University of Texas at Dallas Collaboration; SAFC Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Metallic cobalt has rich catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties, which makes it critical to have a better control of Co thin film deposition for various applications. This work focuses on the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of cobalt using (tertiarybutylallyl)cobalttricarbonyl (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 and dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) on H-terminated Si to uncover the growth mechanisms. The first pulse of (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 reacts with surface H--Si bonds completely, forming one monolayer of metallic silicide. In situ infrared absorption spectra show that further deposition of Co is made possible only after linear carbonyl groups which remain after the first (t BuAllyl)Co(CO)3 pulse as the surface ligand are removed by subsequent ALD cycles. Further ALD cycles give rise to metallic Co growth through ligand exchange after a nucleation period of 8--10 cycles. The derived growth rate of cobalt is 0.6 +/- 0.1 Å/cycle. The resultant Co film shows low concentration of carbon and nitrogen impurities in the bulk according to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  16. Jet-driven redistribution of metal in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Heinz, Sebastian; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    The ICM in galaxy clusters is metal enriched, typically to about 30% of solar metallicity, out to large radii. However, metals should form mostly in galaxies and remained bound to their progenitor systems. To enrich the ICM, effective mixing of gas needs to occur across large scales. We carry out numerical simulations of mixing driven by AGN jets in dynamical galaxy clusters. These jets lift gas out of the center of the cluster, redistributing metals and adding energy to the ICM. We compare our results to X-ray observations of metallicity in clusters.

  17. Jet-driven redistribution of metal in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian; Heinz, Sebastian; Reynolds, Christopher; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Brueggen, Marcus

    2015-08-01

    The ICM in galaxy clusters is metal enriched, typically to about 30% of solar metallicity, out to large radii. However, metals should form mostly in galaxies and remained bound to their progenitor systems. To enrich the ICM, effective mixing of gas needs to occur across large scales. We carry out numerical simulations of mixing driven by AGN jets in dynamical galaxy clusters. These jets lift gas out of the center of the cluster, redistributing metals and adding energy to the ICM. We compare our results to X-ray observations of metallicity in clusters.

  18. Growth modes of thin films of ligand-free metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Bleuel, H.; Marsteller, A.; Gantefoer, G.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Tang, Xin; Bowen, K. H.; Kim, Young Dok

    2015-05-21

    Size-selected Mo{sub n}{sup −}, W{sub n}{sup −}, and Fe{sub n}{sup −} cluster anions are deposited on a weakly interacting substrate (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) and studied ex-situ using atomic force microscopy. Depending on size, three growth modes can be distinguished. Very small clusters consisting of less than 10–30 atoms behave similar to atoms and coalesce into 3-dimensional bulk-like islands. Medium sized clusters consisting of hundreds of atoms do not coalesce and follow a Stanski-Krastanov growth pattern. At low coverage, an almost perfect monolayer is formed. This is a new finding different from all previous studies on deposited metal clusters. For clusters with several thousands of atoms, the growth pattern again changes. At low coverage, the substrate is dotted with individual clusters, while at high coverage, the surface becomes extremely rough.

  19. Metal Adatoms and Clusters on Ultrathin Zirconia Films

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of transition metals on zirconia has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since STM requires electrical conductivity, ultrathin ZrO2 films grown by oxidation of Pt3Zr(0001) and Pd3Zr(0001) were used as model systems. DFT studies were performed for single metal adatoms on supported ZrO2 films as well as the (1̅11) surface of monoclinic ZrO2. STM shows decreasing cluster size, indicative of increasing metal–oxide interaction, in the sequence Ag < Pd ≈ Au < Ni ≈ Fe. Ag and Pd nucleate mostly at steps and domain boundaries of ZrO2/Pt3Zr(0001) and form three-dimensional clusters. Deposition of low coverages of Ni and Fe at room temperature leads to a high density of few-atom clusters on the oxide terraces. Weak bonding of Ag to the oxide is demonstrated by removing Ag clusters with the STM tip. DFT calculations for single adatoms show that the metal–oxide interaction strength increases in the sequence Ag < Au < Pd < Ni on monoclinic ZrO2, and Ag ≈ Au < Pd < Ni on the supported ultrathin ZrO2 film. With the exception of Au, metal nucleation and growth on ultrathin zirconia films follow the usual rules: More reactive (more electropositive) metals result in a higher cluster density and wet the surface more strongly than more noble metals. These bind mainly to the oxygen anions of the oxide. Au is an exception because it can bind strongly to the Zr cations. Au diffusion may be impeded by changing its charge state between −1 and +1. We discuss differences between the supported ultrathin zirconia films and the surfaces of bulk ZrO2, such as the possibility of charge transfer to the substrate of the films. Due to their large in-plane lattice constant and the variety of adsorption sites, ZrO2{111} surfaces are more reactive than many other oxygen-terminated oxide surfaces. PMID:27213024

  20. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  1. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  2. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  3. Selective Metal-vapor Deposition on Organic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Selective metal-vapor deposition signifies that metal-vapor atoms are deposited on a hard organic surface, but not on a soft (low glass transition temperature, low Tg ) surface. In this paper, we introduce the origin, extension, and applications of selective metal-vapor deposition. An amorphous photochromic diarylethene film shows light-controlled selective metal-vapor deposition, which is caused by a large Tg change based on photoisomerization, but various organic surfaces, including organic crystal and polymers, can be utilized for achieving selective metal-vapor deposition. Various applications of selective metal-vapor deposition, including cathode patterning of organic light-emitting devices, micro-thin-film fuses, multifunctional diffraction gratings, in-plane electrical bistability for memory devices, and metal-vapor integration, have been demonstrated. PMID:26663735

  4. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  5. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shoji; Sugiyama, Shuta; Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  6. Metallic nanoparticle deposition techniques for enhanced organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacha, Brian Joseph Gonda

    Energy generation via organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells provide many advantages over alternative processes including flexibility and price. However, more efficient OPVs are required in order to be competitive for applications. One way to enhance efficiency is through manipulation of exciton mechanisms within the OPV, for example by inserting a thin film of bathocuproine (BCP) and gold nanoparticles between the C60/Al and ZnPc/ITO interfaces, respectively. We find that BCP increases efficiencies by 330% due to gains of open circuit voltage (Voc) by 160% and short circuit current (Jsc) by 130%. However, these gains are complicated by the anomalous photovoltaic effect and an internal chemical potential. Exploration in the tuning of metallic nanoparticle deposition on ITO was done through four techniques. Drop casting Ag nanoparticle solution showed arduous control on deposited morphology. Spin-coating deposited very low densities of nanoparticles. Drop casting and spin-coating methods showed arduous control on Ag nanoparticle morphology due to clustering and low deposition density, respectively. Sputtered gold on glass was initially created to aid the adherence of Ag nanoparticles but instead showed a quick way to deposit aggregated gold nanoparticles. Electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) proved a quick method to tune nanoparticle morphology on ITO substrates. Control of deposition parameters affected AuNP size and distribution. AFM images of electrodeposited AuNPs showed sizes ranging from 39 to 58 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy showed the presence of localized plasmon resonance through absorption peaks ranging from 503 to 614 nm. A linear correlation between electrodeposited AuNP size and peak absorbance was seen with a slope of 3.26 wavelength(nm)/diameter(nm).

  7. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. Aims: In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. Methods: We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. Results: In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. We found a possible increase of metallicity with age, which, if confirmed, would provide observational evidence for radial migration. Although a statistical significance is given, more studies are certainly needed to exclude selection effects, for example. The comparison of open clusters and Cepheids with recent Galactic models agrees well in general. However, the models do not reproduce the flat gradient of the open clusters in the outer disc. Thus, the effect of radial migration is either underestimated in the models, or an additional mechanism is at work. Conclusions: Apart from the Cepheids, open clusters are the best tracers for metallicity over large Galactocentric distances in the Milky Way. For a sound statistical analysis, a sufficiently large and homogeneous sample of cluster metallicities is needed. Our compilation is currently by far the largest and provides the basis for several basic studies such as the statistical

  8. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  9. Deposition of an energetic Al cluster on Si(111) substrate: a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zongning, Xia; Hao, Zhang; Jiayou, Feng; Yunwen, Lu

    1998-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation on the deposition of an energetic Al cluster on Si(111) substrate was studied. We employed the Stillinger-Weber three-body potential to simulate the Si substrate and the Born-Mayer-Higgins potential to compute the interactions between cluster and substrate. For one impacting Al cluster, the migration distance of the cluster atoms and the deposition morphology were investigated under different substrate temperatures, impacting cluster energies and cluster sizes. It can be found that diffusion distance increases with the increasing substrate temperature, cluster energy and cluster size; moreover the deposition morphologies also change under similar conditions.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  11. Reactive sputter deposition of metal oxide nanolaminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin Aita, Carolyn

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the reactive sputter deposition of metal oxide nanolaminates on unheated substrates using four archetypical examples: ZrO2 Al2O3, HfO2 Al2O3, ZrO2 Y2O3, and ZrO2 TiO2. The pseudobinary bulk phase diagrams corresponding to these nanolaminates represent three types of interfaces. I. Complete immiscibility (ZrO2 Al2O3 and HfO2 Al2O3). II. Complete miscibility (ZrO2 Y2O3). III. Limited miscibility without a common end-member lattice (ZrO2 TiO2). We found that, although reactive sputter deposition is a far-from-equilibrium process, thermodynamic considerations strongly influence both phase formation within layers and at interfaces. We show that pseudobinary phase diagrams can be used to predict interfacial cation mixing in the nanolaminates. However, size effects must be considered to predict specific structures. In the absence of pseudoepitaxy, size effects play a significant role in determining the nanocrystalline phases that form within a layer (e.g. tetragonal ZrO2, tetragonal HfO2, and orthorhombic HfO2) and at interfaces (e.g. monoclinic (Zr,Ti)O2). These phases are not bulk standard temperature and pressure phases. Their formation is understood in terms of self-assembly into the lowest energy structure in individual critical nuclei.

  12. High-nuclearity magnetic clusters: Magnetic interactions in clusters encapsulated by molecular metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borras-Almenar, Juan José; Coronado, Eugenio; Galan-Mascaros, Jose Ramón; Gómez-García, Carlos J.

    1995-02-01

    The ability of the molecular metal oxides derived from the Keggin anion [PW 12O 40] 3- to accommodate magnetic ions at specific sites, giving rise to polymetallic clusters with increasing spin nuclearities is discussed. Examples of magnetic clusters with three, four and nine metal ions exhibiting ferromagnetic exchange couplings or a coexistence of ferro- and antiferromagnetic couplings are reported.

  13. Clusters on surface and embedded in a matrix: comparison between covalent and metallic species

    SciTech Connect

    Broyer, M.; Cottancin, E.; Lerme, J.; Palpant, B.; Pellarin, M.; Ray, C.; Vialle, J. L.; Keghelian, P.; Melinon, P.; Perez, A.; Prevel, B.; Treilleux, M.

    1997-06-20

    The free clusters obtained by the molecular beam technique exhibit original geometric structures. It appears interesting to use these clusters as elementary bricks to build new materials or cluster assembled solids. For this purpose, we use the so called Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition (LECBD). This technique is applied to different kinds of materials. For covalent species, we observed the memory of the free clusters properties for carbon but also for silicon or silicon carbide. On the contrary for metals, the structure of the grain is the bulk structure, but the nanostructured morphology of the films is very interesting and may be controlled. These properties are illustrated for gold clusters. Their optical absorption spectra are measured and the evolution as a function of the size is discussed.

  14. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  15. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  16. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-04-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam.

  17. Graphdiyne oxides as excellent substrate for electroless deposition of Pd clusters with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hetong; Yu, Ping; Wang, Yuexiang; Han, Guangchao; Liu, Huibiao; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Yuliang; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-04-29

    Graphdiyne (GDY), a novel kind of two-dimensional carbon allotrope consisting of sp- and sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, is found to be able to serve as the reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles owing to its low reduction potential and highly conjugated electronic structure. Furthermore, we observe that graphdiyne oxide (GDYO), the oxidation form of GDY, can be used as an even excellent substrate for electroless deposition of ultrafine Pd clusters to form Pd/GDYO nanocomposite that exhibits a high catalytic performance toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The high catalytic performance is considered to benefit from the rational design and electroless deposition of active metal catalysts with GDYO as the support. PMID:25871853

  18. Sputter deposition of metallic thin film and directpatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, X.; Ji, Q.; Leung, K.-N.

    2005-09-09

    A compact apparatus is developed for deposition of metal thin film. The system employs an RF discharge plasma source with a straight RF antenna, which is made of or covered with deposition material, serving as sputtering target at the same time. The average deposition rate of copper thin film is as high as 450nm/min. By properly allocating the metal materials on the sputtering antenna, mixture deposition of multiple metal species is achieved. Using an ion beam imprinting scheme also taking advantage of ion beam focusing technique, two different schemes of direct patterning deposition process are developed: direct depositing patterned metallic thin film and resistless ion beam sputter patterning. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated direct pattern transfer from a template with feature size of micro scale; patterns with more than 10x reduction are achieved by sputtering patterning method.

  19. Enhanced quantum coherence in graphene caused by Pd cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuyuan; Han, Junhao; Du, Yongping; Li, Zhaoguo; Wan, Xiangang; Han, Min; Song, Fengqi; Guo, Guoping; Song, You; Pi, Li; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-12

    We report on the unexpected increase in the dephasing lengths of a graphene sheet caused by the deposition of Pd nanoclusters, as demonstrated by weak localization measurements. The dephasing lengths reached saturated values at low temperatures. Theoretical calculations indicate the p-type charge transfer from the Pd clusters, which contributes more carriers. The saturated values of dephasing lengths often depend on both the carrier concentration and mean free path. Although some impurities are increased as revealed by decreased mobilities, the intense charge transfer leads to the improved saturated values and subsequent improved dephasing lengths.

  20. Bridging the Gap: Electron Relay and Plasmonic Sensitization of Metal Nanocrystals for Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Zeng, Zhiping; Liu, Bin

    2015-08-26

    In recent years, enormous attention has been paid to the construction of metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites because of the fascinating and unique properties of metal clusters; however, investigations on photoelectrochemical (PEC) and photocatalytic properties of metal cluster-semiconductor systems are still rare. Moreover, to date, intrinsic correlation between metal clusters and bulk metal nanocrystals has yet to be elucidated. In this work, a facile layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly strategy has been developed to judiciously and intimately integrate gold nanocrystals (Au) within the interface between gold clusters (Au(x)) and hierarchically ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays framework, by which imperative roles of Au nanocrystals as electron relay mediator and plasmonic sensitizer for Aux clusters were revealed. In addition, it was found that synergistic interaction between Au nanocrystals and Aux clusters contributed to promising visible-light-driven photocatalytical and PEC performances. It is anticipated that our work could provide a general way for rationally constructing metal and metal clusters codecorated semiconductor heterostructures and, more significantly, bridge the gap between metal clusters and metal nanocrystals for a diverse range of applications. PMID:26258281

  1. Star Clusters in M31. VII. Global Kinematics and Metallicity Subpopulations of the Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2016-06-01

    We carry out a joint spatial–kinematical–metallicity analysis of globular clusters (GCs) around the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), using a homogeneous, high-quality spectroscopic data set. In particular, we remove the contaminating young clusters that have plagued many previous analyses. We find that the clusters can be divided into three major metallicity groups based on their radial distributions: (1) an inner metal-rich group ([Fe/H] > -0.4); (2) a group with intermediate metallicity (with median [Fe/H] = ‑1) and (3) a metal-poor group, with [Fe/H] < -1.5. The metal-rich group has kinematics and spatial properties like those of the disk of M31, while the two more metal-poor groups show mild prograde rotation overall, with larger dispersions—in contrast to previous claims of stronger rotation. The metal-poor GCs are the least concentrated group; such clusters occur five times less frequently in the central bulge than do clusters of higher metallicity. Despite some well-known differences between the M31 and Milky Way GC systems, our revised analysis points to remarkable similarities in their chemodynamical properties, which could help elucidate the different formation stages of galaxies and their GCs. In particular, the M31 results motivate further exploration of a metal-rich GC formation mode in situ, within high-redshift, clumpy galactic disks.

  2. Simple and efficient separation of atomically precise noble metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Atanu; Hassinen, Jukka; Pulkkinen, Petri; Tenhu, Heikki; Ras, Robin H A; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-12-16

    There is an urgent need for accessible purification and separation strategies of atomically precise metal clusters in order to promote the study of their fundamental properties. Although the separation of mixtures of atomically precise gold clusters Au25L18, where L are thiolates, has been demonstrated by advanced separation techniques, we present here the first separation of metal clusters by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), which is simple yet surprisingly efficient. This method was successfully applied to a binary mixture of Au25L18 with different ligands, as well as to a binary mixture of different cluster cores, Au25 and Au144, protected with the same ligand. Importantly, TLC even enabled the challenging separation of a multicomponent mixture of mixed-monolayer-protected Au25 clusters with closely similar chemical ligand compositions. We anticipate that the realization of such simple yet efficient separation technique will progress the detailed investigation of cluster properties. PMID:25395064

  3. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  4. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  5. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  6. Polymer-assisted aqueous deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Jia, Quanxi

    2003-07-08

    An organic solvent-free process for deposition of metal oxide thin films is presented. The process includes aqueous solutions of necessary metal precursors and an aqueous solution of a water-soluble polymer. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is fired at high temperatures to yield optical quality metal oxide thin films.

  7. Structure of overheated metal clusters: MD simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Vorontsov, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    The structure of overheated metal clusters appeared in condensation process was studied by computer simulation techniques. It was found that clusters with size larger than several tens of atoms have three layers: core part, intermediate dense packing layer and a gas- like shell with low density. The change of the size and structure of these layers with the variation of internal energy and the size of cluster is discussed.

  8. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  9. Interaction of hydrogen with palladium clusters deposited on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Julio A.; Granja, Alejandra; Cabria, Iván; López, María J.

    2015-12-31

    Hydrogen adsorption on nanoporous carbon materials is a promising technology for hydrogen storage. However, pure carbon materials do not meet the technological requirements due to the week binding of hydrogen to the pore walls. Experimental work has shown that doping with Pd atoms and clusters enhances the storage capacity of porous carbons. Therefore, we have investigated the role played by the Pd dopant on the enhancement mechanisms. By performing density functional calculations, we have found that hydrogen adsorbs on Pd clusters deposited on graphene following two channels, molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption. However, desorption of Pd-H complexes competes with desorption of hydrogen, and consequently desorption of Pd-H complexes would spoil the beneficial effect of the dopant. As a way to overcome this difficulty, Pd atoms and clusters can be anchored to defects of the graphene layer, like graphene vacancies. The competition between molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption of H{sub 2} on Pd{sub 6} anchored on a graphene vacancy has been studied in detail.

  10. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  11. Magnetization and Mössbauer study of partially oxidized iron cluster films deposited on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarras-Wahlberg, Nils; Kamali, Saeed; Andersson, Mats; Johansson, Christer; Rosén, Arne

    2014-10-01

    Iron clusters produced in a laser vaporization source were deposited to form cluster-assembled thin films with different thicknesses on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates. The development of oxidation of the clusters with time, up to three years, was investigated by magnetic measurements using an alternating gradient magnetometer. Furthermore, to receive information about the oxidation states, clusters of 57Fe were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic analysis shows a time evolution of the saturation magnetization, remanence, and coercivity, determined from the hysteresis curves characteristic of a progressing oxidation. The different thicknesses of the iron cluster films as well as a protective layer of vanadium influence the magnetic properties when the samples are subjected to oxidation with time. While the saturation magnetization and remanence decrease and reach half the initial values for almost all the samples after three years, the coercivity increases for all samples and is more substantial for the thickest sample with a vanadium protective layer. This value is three folded after three years. Furthermore, based on a core-shell model and using the saturation magnetization values we have been able to quantitatively calculate the amount of the increase of Fe-oxide as a function of time. The Mössbauer spectroscopy shows peaks corresponding to iron metal and maghemite.

  12. Probing Globular Cluster Formation in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Reines, Amy E.

    2008-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of globular clusters around massive galaxies today suggests that these extreme star clusters must have been formed prolifically in the earlier universe in low-metallicity galaxies. Numerous adolescent and massive star clusters are already known to be present in a variety of galaxies in the local universe; however most of these systems have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) > 8, and are thus not representative of the galaxies in which today's ancient globular clusters were formed. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these massive clusters in environments with few heavy elements, we have targeted several low-metallicity dwarf galaxies with radio observations, searching for newly-formed massive star clusters still embedded in their birth material. The galaxies in this initial study are HS 0822+3542, UGC 4483, Pox 186, and SBS 0335-052, all of which have metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) < 7.75. While no thermal radio sources, indicative of natal massive star clusters, are found in three of the four galaxies, SBS 0335-052 hosts two such objects, which are incredibly luminous. The radio spectral energy distributions of these intense star-forming regions in SBS 0335-052 suggest the presence of ~12,000 equivalent O-type stars, and the implied star formation rate is nearing the maximum starburst intensity limit.

  13. Hybrid uranium-transition-metal oxide cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Hobbs, Franklin; Prendergast, Steven; Adelani, Pius O; Babo, Jean-Marie; Qiu, Jie; Weng, Zhehui; Burns, Peter C

    2014-12-15

    Transition-metal based polyoxometalate clusters have been known for decades, whereas those built from uranyl peroxide polyhedra have more recently emerged as a family of complex clusters. Here we report the synthesis and structures of six nanoscale uranyl peroxide cage clusters that contain either tungstate or molybdate polyhedra as part of the cage, as well as phosphate tetrahedra. These transition-metal-uranium hybrid clusters exhibit unique polyhedral connectivities and topologies that include 6-, 7-, 8-, 10-, and 12-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra and uranyl ions coordinated by bidentate peroxide in both trans and cis configurations. The transition-metal polyhedra appear to stabilize unusual units built of uranyl polyhedra, rather than templating their formation. PMID:25434424

  14. A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake

    2009-09-15

    A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

  15. Towards a photometric metallicity scale for open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Open clusters are a useful tool when investigating several topics connected with stellar evolution; for example the age or distance can be more accurately determined than for field stars. However, one important parameter, the metallicity, is only known for a marginal percentage of open clusters. Aims: We aim at a consistent set of parameters for the open clusters investigated in our photometric Δa survey of chemically peculiar stars. Special attention is paid to expanding our knowledge of cluster metallicities and verifying their scale. Methods: Making use of a previously developed method based on normalised evolutionary grids and photometric data, the distance, age, reddening, and metallicity of open clusters were derived. To transform photometric measurements into effective temperatures to use as input for our method, a set of temperature calibrations for the most commonly used colour indices and photometric systems was compiled. Results: We analysed 58 open clusters in total. Our derived metallicity values were in excellent agreement with about 30 spectroscopically studied targets. The mean value of the absolute deviations was found to be 0.03 dex, with no noticeable offset or gradient. The method was also applied using recent evolutionary models based on the currently accepted lower solar abundance value Z ~ 0.014. No significant differences were found compared to grids using the former adopted solar value Z = 0.02. Furthermore, some divergent photometric datasets were identified and discussed. Conclusions: The method provides an accurate way of obtaining properly scaled metallicity values for open clusters. In light of present and future homogeneous photometric sky surveys, the sample of stellar clusters can be extended to the outskirts of the Milky Way, where spectroscopic studies are almost impossible. This will help for determining galactic metallicity gradients in more detail. Figure 7 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  17. Molecular orbital analysis of dicarbido-transition-metal cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Halet, J.; Mingos, D.M.P.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations on dicarbido-transition-metal carbonyl cluster compounds have shown that the bonding between C/sub 2/ and the metal cage results primarily from electron donation from the C/sub 2/ sigma/sub rho/- and ..pi..-bonding molecular orbitals and back donation from filled metallic molecular orbitals to the C/sub 2/ ..pi..* orbitals. The bonding therefore follows closely the Chatt-Dewar-Ducanson model that has been established previously for ethyne and ethene complexes but not for interstitial moieties. The C-C separation in the dicarbido clusters depends critically on the geometric constraints imposed by the metal cage and the extent of forward and back donation. In these clusters where the carbon atoms are in adjacent trigonal-prismatic sites the calculated formal bond order is between 1.0 and 1.5, which agrees well with the observed C-C bond lengths.

  18. Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, Steven A.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces was studied at an unpolluted coastal (marine) site, an unpolluted rural inland site, and a polluted urban site. Chloride deposition by both wet (precipitation) and dry deposition processes over a multi-year period was measured using ion chromatography analysis of incident precipitation and precipitation runoff from the surface of metal samples. Chloride deposition was measured on zinc, copper, lead, mild steel, and non-reactive blank panels, as well as two panels coated with thermal-sprayed zinc alloys. Chloride deposition measured by runoff chemistry was compared with chloride deposition measurements made by the ASTM wet candle technique. Corrosion mass loss as a function of distance from the ocean is presented for copper and mild steel in bold exposures on the west coast.

  19. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication: A Rapid Metal Deposition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley REsearch Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Thus far, this technique has been demonstrated on aluminum and titanium alloys of interest for aerospace structural applications nickel and ferrous based alloys are also planned. Deposits resulting from 2219 aluminum demonstrations have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials ave exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rated in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 cubic inches per our) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  20. Experimental studies of the chemistry of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The procedures for studying chemical reactions of metal clusters in a continuous-flow reactor are described, and examples of such studies are given. Experiments to be discussed include kinetics and thermodynamics measurements, and determination of the composition of clusters saturated with various adsorbate reagents. Specific systems to be covered include the reaction of iron clusters with ammonia and with hydrogen, the reaction of nickel clusters with hydrogen and with ammonia, and the reaction of platinum clusters with ethylene. The last two reactions are characterized by complex, multi-step processes that lead to adsorbate decomposition and hydrogen desorption from the clusters. Methods for probing these processes will be discussed. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Metal surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Eser, S.

    1996-10-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits on metallic surfaces of the fuel system due to thermal degradation/pyrolysis of jet fuels is a major concern in the development of advanced jet aircraft in which the fuel is to be used to dissipate the heat loads. The effects of these surfaces on deposit formation at relatively high temperatures (> 400{degrees}C) are studied using a bench scale flow reactor by passing JP-8 fuel and a mixture of n-paraffins (NORPAR 13) on metal coupons (Ni, Cu, Ti, Stainless Steel) inserted inside the reactor. Gas phase reaction products are analyzed by an on-line GC attached to the reactor. Global kinetics for deposit formation is studied by the amount of deposit on the coupons. Carbonaceous deposits on the metal coupons are characterized with SEM, optical microscopy and FTIR. Nickel and copper surfaces are found active in incipient deposit formation. Deposit formed from gas phase with isotropic textures is also observed. The combined data help the understanding of the metal surface effects on deposit formation in comparison to those from tubing bomb reactor and those from actual engine fuel system.

  2. Extraction of heavy metals characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami deposits using multiple classification analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kengo; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Komai, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Tsunami deposits accumulated on the Tohoku coastal area in Japan due to the impact of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. In the study reported in this paper, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in tsunami deposits that had been diluted with water or digested using 1 M HCl. The results suggest that the environmental risk is relatively low, evidenced by the following geometric mean concentrations: Pb, 16 mg kg(-1) and 0.003 ml L(-1); As, 1.8 mg kg(-1) and 0.004 ml L(-1); and Cd, 0.17 mg kg(-1) and 0.0001 ml L(-1). CA was performed after outliers were excluded using PCA. The analysis grouped the concentrations of heavy metals for leaching in water and acid. For the acid case, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Cd, Cu, Al, Cr, Zn, and Mn; while the second contained Pb, Sb, As, and Mo. For water, the first cluster contained Ni, Fe, Al, and Cr; and the second cluster contained Mo, Sb, As, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Mn. Statistical analysis revealed that the typical toxic elements, As, Pb, and Cd have steady correlations for acid leaching but are relatively sparse for water leaching. Pb and As from the tsunami deposits seemed to reveal a kind of redox elution mechanism using 1 M HCl. PMID:26469936

  3. Term rules for simple metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Daisuke; Raebiger, Hannes

    2015-10-01

    Hund’s term rules are only valid for isolated atoms, but have no generalization for molecules or clusters of several atoms. We present a benchmark calculation of Al2 and Al3, for which we find the high and low-spin ground states 3Πu and , respectively. We show that the relative stabilities of all the molecular terms of Al2 and Al3 can be described by simple rules pertaining to bonding structures and symmetries, which serve as guiding principles to determine ground state terms of arbitrary multi-atom clusters.

  4. Term rules for simple metal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Daisuke; Raebiger, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Hund’s term rules are only valid for isolated atoms, but have no generalization for molecules or clusters of several atoms. We present a benchmark calculation of Al2 and Al3, for which we find the high and low-spin ground states 3Πu and , respectively. We show that the relative stabilities of all the molecular terms of Al2 and Al3 can be described by simple rules pertaining to bonding structures and symmetries, which serve as guiding principles to determine ground state terms of arbitrary multi-atom clusters. PMID:26497089

  5. Photoionization profiles of metal clusters and the Fowler formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prem, Abhinav; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2012-02-01

    Metal-cluster ionization potentials are important characteristics of these “artificial atoms,” but extracting these quantities from cluster photoabsorption spectra, especially in the presence of thermal smearing, remains a big challenge. Here we demonstrate that the classic Fowler theory of surface photoemission does an excellent job of fitting the photoabsorption profile shapes of neutral Inn=3-34 clusters [Wucher , New J. Phys.NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/10/10/103007 10, 103007 (2008)]. The deduced ionization potentials extrapolate precisely to the bulk work function, and the internal cluster temperatures are in close agreement with values expected for an ensemble of freely evaporating clusters. Supplementing an earlier application to potassium clusters, these results suggest that the Fowler formalism, which is straightforward and physical, may be of significant utility in metal-cluster spectroscopy. It is hoped also that the results will encourage a comprehensive theoretical analysis of the applicability of bulk-derived models to cluster photoionization behavior, and of the transition from atomic and molecular-type to surface-type photoemission.

  6. METAL PRODUCTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: THE NON-GALACTIC COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Joel N.; Anderson, Michael E.; Dai Xinyu E-mail: michevan@umich.ed

    2010-06-10

    The metallicity in galaxy clusters is expected to originate from the stars in galaxies, with a population dominated by high-mass stars likely being the most important stellar component, especially in rich clusters. We examine the relationship between the metallicity and the prominence of galaxies as measured by the star-to-baryon ratio, M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. Counter to expectations, we rule out a metallicity that is proportional to M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, where the best fit has the gas-phase metallicity decreasing with M{sub *}/M{sub bary}, or the metallicity of the gas plus the stars being independent of M{sub *}/M{sub bary}. This implies that the population of stars responsible for the metals is largely proportional to the total baryonic mass of the cluster, not to the galaxy mass within the cluster. If generally applicable, most of the heavy elements in the universe were not produced within galaxies.

  7. From atoms to layers: in situ gold cluster growth kinetics during sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Buffet, Adeline; Körstgens, Volker; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Schlage, Kai; Benecke, Gunthard; Perlich, Jan; Rawolle, Monika; Rothkirch, André; Heidmann, Berit; Herzog, Gerd; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Gehrke, Rainer; Stribeck, Norbert; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-05-01

    The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction of morphological real space parameters, such as cluster size and shape, correlation distance, layer porosity and surface coverage, directly from reciprocal space scattering data. This approach enables a large variety of future investigations of the influence of different process parameters on the thin metal film morphology. Furthermore, our study allows for deducing the wetting behavior of gold cluster films on solid substrates and provides a better understanding of the growth kinetics in general, which is essential for optimization of manufacturing parameters, saving energy and resources.The adjustment of size-dependent catalytic, electrical and optical properties of gold cluster assemblies is a very significant issue in modern applied nanotechnology. We present a real-time investigation of the growth kinetics of gold nanostructures from small nuclei to a complete gold layer during magnetron sputter deposition with high time resolution by means of in situ microbeam grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS). We specify the four-stage growth including their thresholds with sub-monolayer resolution and identify phase transitions monitored in Yoneda intensity as a material-specific characteristic. An innovative and flexible geometrical model enables the extraction

  8. EXPLORATION STRATEGY FOR HOT-SPRING PRECIOUS-METAL DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Byron R.; Adams, Samuel S.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of economic precious-metal deposits related to physical-chemical processes in the near-surface portions of high-temperature hot-spring systems has led to intensive exploration efforts for this deposit type. To increase the probability of success, these exploration programs should (1) be based on the most important visually recognizable or readily measurable deposit-model criteria; (2) be able to identify specific targets within the best search areas; and (3) be able to rank the order of priority among the targets. We propose a process-recognition exploration strategy for hot-spring deposits that has been developed from data from precious-metal occurrences at several localities in the western United States. The exploration model is based on the degree to which recognizable geologic and geochemical criteria are favorable or unfavorable to the occurrence of an economic deposit, either through their presence or absence.

  9. STEM characterization of metal clusters in/on oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehraeen, Shareghe

    Dispersed metal clusters in or on a support matrix are key phenomenons in many technological fields. Two widely used examples of them which are investigated in this thesis are supported-metal clusters in heterogeneous catalysis and transition metal clusters in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) applied in spintronics. The catalytic activity and selectivity of catalysts often depend sensitively on structure parameters, such as particles size and shape. With the same analogy, the magnetic properties of DMS oxides are sensitively related to the crystal defects of the host material as a consequence of doping the transition metal. Therefore it is essential to develop and understand the correlation between nanostructure and function of these materials. STEM Z-contrast imaging is the best candidate for this type of study because of a high degree of resolution it provides and the unique ability it offers to detect and differentiate between the clusters and oxide matrix due to the large difference between their atomic numbers. Moreover the technique development in the STEM field fosters the conjugation of electron energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Z-contrast imaging and their widespread use for nearly atomic level chemical analysis at interface, second phases, and isolated defects. The advanced preparation method of supported clusters catalysts which is by carbonyl ligands offers a controlled cluster size and shape. MgO-supported Os clusters and SiO2-supported Ta clusters prepared by this method are adsorbed on oxide to convert into single-sized supported metal aggregates. The last step of preparation method is by removal of the ligands (decarbonylation) which is very important because it determines the final size distribution and shape of such clusters. Reaching carbonylated decaosmium clusters with the size of theoretically 0.295 nm and the tetrahedral-shape geometry are the aim of the preparation method. The size distribution measurements of sub-nanoclusters of

  10. Is the Globular Cluster Colour-Metallicity Relation Universal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Christopher; Sluggs Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    Visible at much greater distances than resolved stars, globular clusters are important tools for studying galaxy formation and assembly. Studies of extragalactic globular clusters typically use optical colours to derive metallicites. We use Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy and Subaru Suprime-Cam photometry from the SLUGGS Survey to investigate how the globular cluster colour-metallicity relation varies galaxy to galaxy and with globular cluster luminosity. As in previous studies we see variations in the shape of the relationship between (g - i) colour and the strength of the calcium triplet spectral feature. To measure weaker spectral features in the DEIMOS spectra, we stack the spectra by colour and by magnitude. Comparing spectra with the same colours and luminosities but from different galaxies, we see significant differences in the strengths of several spectral features, including the calcium triplet and weak iron lines. We interpret this as strong evidence that the globular cluster colour-metallicity relation varies galaxy-to-galaxy. We suggest differences in globular cluster ages between galaxies and in the abundances of light elements (helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen) between galaxies as possible explanations for the observed variations in the colour-metallicity relation.

  11. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  12. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  14. Ionic recoil energies in the Coulomb explosion of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, S.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    The photoionization of metal clusters in intense femtosecond laser fields has been studied. In contrast to an experiment on atoms, the interaction in this case leads to a very efficient and high charging of the particle where tens of electrons per atom are ejected from the cluster. The recoil energy distribution of the atomic fragment ions was measured which in the case of lead clusters exceeds 180 keV. Enhanced charging efficiency which we observed earlier for specific pulse conditions is not reflected in the recoil energy spectra. Both the average and the maximum energies decrease with increasing laser pulse width. This is in good agreement with molecular dynamics calculations.

  15. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  16. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  17. Plasma assisted deposition of metal fluorides for 193nm applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gaebler, Dieter; Kaiser, Norbert; Tuennermann, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    The ArF lithography technology requires a minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters, and the vacuum conditions. Until now the best results were achieved by metal boat evaporation with high substrate temperature and without plasma assistance. In fact, it was demonstrated that the plasma assisted deposition process results in optical thin films with high packing density but the losses due to absorption were extremely high for deep and vacuum ultraviolet applications. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides can be deposited by electron beam evaporation with plasma assistance. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films show low absorption in the VUV spectral range, high packing density, and less water content. The densification of the thin films was performed by a Leybold LION plasma source. As working gas, a variable mixture of fluorine and argon gas was chosen. To understand the deposition process and the interaction of the plasma with the deposition material, various characterization methods like plasma emission spectroscopy and ion current measurements were implemented.

  18. UV laser deposition of metal films by photogenerated free radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. K.; Mantei, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel photochemical method for liquid-phase deposition of metal films is described. In the liquid phase deposition scheme, a metal containing compound and a metal-metal bonded carbonyl complex are dissolved together in a polar solvent and the mixture is irradiated using a UV laser. The optical arrangement consists of a HeCd laser which provides 7 mW of power at a wavelength of 325 nm in the TEM(OO) mode. The beam is attenuated and may be expanded to a diameter of 5-20 mm. Experiments with photochemical deposition of silver films onto glass and quartz substrates are described in detail. Mass spectrometric analysis of deposited silver films indicated a deposition rate of about 1 A/s at incident power levels of 0.01 W/sq cm. UV laser-induced copper and palladium films have also been obtained. A black and white photograph showing the silver Van Der Pauw pattern of a solution-deposited film is provided.

  19. Theoretical dynamical studies of metal clusters and cluster-ligand systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.

    1995-06-01

    In what follows we use the term cluster to designate a cohesive group of like atoms (molecules), i.e., bare ({open_quotes}neet{close_quotes} {open_quotes}naked{close_quotes}) clusters. More generally, the term is also used for organo- and inorganometallic compounds, i.e., ligated clusters. Although the approaches and techniques used by the various disciplines to study metal-ligand interactions are quite different, many of the central subjects and issues are common for them. The common subjects include possible geometric structures and isomeric forms, structural (isomerization) transitions, stability, fluxionality, structure-reactivity correlation (or lack of it), role of coordination, etc. However, the precise interpretation of these issues and the details emphasized by the different disciplines are dictated by the nature of the objects studied and may not, therefore, be identical. For example, questions regarding structures, isomerization transitions, fluxionality or even melting of metal clusters refer to the state and properties of the metal network itself. The same questions, when asked in connection with organo- and inorganometallic compounds, often refer to the arrangements and rearrangements of the ligands attached to a metal framework of a fixed structure. Of course, when required, the state of and changes in the metal framework are considered as well. The fields of metal-containing molecular compounds, surface science, and physics and chemistry of clusters furnish complementary information on a broad variety of metal-ligand systems. A comprehensive understanding of the nature and properties of these systems, as defined by the type and number of metal atoms and ligands involved, can be achieved only through a mutual awareness of and continuing progress in all of these research areas.

  20. Hitomi observations of the Perseus Cluster / Constant metallicity in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Norbert; Simionescu, Aurora; Urban, Ondrej; Allen, Steven

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations with the Suzaku satellite reveal a remarkably homogeneous distribution of iron out to the virial radii of nearby galaxy clusters. Observations of the Virgo Cluster, that also allow us to measure the abundances of Si, S, and Mg out to the outskirts, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales. These observations require that most of the metal enrichment and mixing of the intergalactic medium occurred before clusters formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. We estimate the ratio between the number of SN Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 15-20%, generally consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy.

  1. Variable Stars In the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6388 using time-series BV photometry. Twenty-eight new variables were found in this survey, increasing the total number of variables found near NGC 6388 to approx. 57. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae (approx. 14), most of which are probable cluster members. The periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are shown to be unusually long compared to metal-rich field stars. The existence of these long period RRab stars suggests that the horizontal branch of NGC 6388 is unusually bright. This implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal if the RR Lyrae in NGC 6388 are indeed metal-rich. We consider the alternative possibility that the stars in NGC 6388 may span a range in [Fe/H]. Four candidate Population II Cepheids were also found. If they are members of the cluster, NGC 6388 would be the most metal-rich globular cluster to contain Population II Cepheids. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 16.85 +/- 0.05 resulting in a distance of 9.0 to 10.3 kpc, for a range of assumed values of (M(sub V)) for RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.40 +/- 0.03 mag, with differential reddening across the face of the cluster. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of their RR Lyrae, and address evolutionary constraints on a recent suggestion that they are of Oosterhoff type II.

  2. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  3. Influence of Metal Substrates on the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Zhong, Lixiang; Li, Yuanchang

    Using ab initio calculations, we systematically investigate the graphene nucleation on ten kinds of metal substrates that have been reported for the chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene. Noble metals (Cu, Ag and Au) and Co have a kinetic smallest graphene precursor, corresponding to the structural transition from linear chain to sp2 compact cluster. Ru, Rh, Ir and Pt have a energetic smallest graphene precursor, which is much larger than that in terms of kinetics. While for Ni and Pd, the carbon atoms trend to immerse inside the metals, resulting in the distinctively different growth mechanism from other metals. The different influence of metals is associated with their characterized carbon-metal and carbon-carbon coupling competition. The incorporation of five-membered rings into the sp2 compact cluster is the result of the competition between the curvature energy and the edge formation energy of graphene islands, and is suitable for the enlargement of graphene domain. And the effect of experimental conditions such as temperature, step or defects on the nucleation of graphene at different metal substrates is also discussed. This work was supported by the MOST, NSFC and Shenzhen Projects for Basic Research of China.

  4. Flexible macrocycles as versatile supports for catalytically active metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jason D; Gagnon, Kevin J; Teat, Simon J; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D

    2016-07-12

    Here we present three structurally diverse clusters stabilised by the same macrocyclic polyphenol; t-butylcalix[8]arene. This work demonstrates the range of conformations the flexible ligand is capable of adopting, highlighting its versatility in metal coordination. In addition, a Ti complex displays activity for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactide. PMID:26892948

  5. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. PMID:26724469

  6. Separability Between Valence and Conduction Bands in Transition Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apra, Edoardo; Carter, Emily A.; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2004-07-30

    Simplified theories of transition metal electronic structure have been postulated for many decades. Here we test one such approximation, namely separate treatments of d (valence) and s/p (conduction) electrons in transition metal clusters, within a density functional formalism. Two different basic approaches are considered: (a) an independent-band approximation, in which the d- and s/p-bands interact only via the ?-dependent components of the Kohn-Sham operator; and (b) a more realistic approximation, in which the lowest-energy d- and s/p-orbitals (separately derived) are allowed to interact through explicit off-diagonal coupling matrix elements. Results are presented for the energy differences among three structural forms (icosahedral, cuboctahedral and truncated decahedral) of 13-atom Ni and Pt clusters. We demonstrate that an explicit decoupling of the d- and s/p-bands does not produce accurate results for the clusters considered here, not even for nickel, i.e., the transition metal for which d-s/p mixing should be at its minimum. By contrast, allowing the lowest energy orbitals of the two separate bands to interact improves the results considerably, and assures a fair description of metal-metal bonding. This suggests simplified models that exclude explicit d-s/p coupling should be employed with caution.

  7. Metal fluoride coatings prepared by ion-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gäbler, Dieter; Bernitzki, Helmut; Zaczek, Christoph; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    ArF lithography technology requires minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently, it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters (temperature and deposition rate) and the vacuum conditions. A substrate temperature of more than 300°C is a condition for high density and low water content of metal fluorides. Therefore, a substrate temperature of 150°C results in inhomogeneous films with high water content. Until now, the best results were achieved by boat evaporation. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides like MgF2, AlF3, and even LaF3 can be deposited by electron beam evaporation. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films have the lowest absorption in the VUV spectral range. Furthermore, metal fluoride thin films were prepared by ion assistance. It will be demonstrated, that they have less water content, high packing density, and low absorption in the VUV spectral range. In this study, single layers of LaF3 and AlF3 and antireflection coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation with and without ion-assistance. The mechanical, structural, and optical properties were examined and discussed.

  8. ELECTROCATALYSIS ON SURFACES MODIFIED BY METAL MONOLAYERS DEPOSITED AT UNDERPOTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    ADZIC,R.

    2000-12-01

    The remarkable catalytic properties of electrode surfaces modified by monolayer amounts of metal adatoms obtained by underpotential deposition (UPD) have been the subject of a large number of studies during the last couple of decades. This interest stems from the possibility of implementing strictly surface modifications of electrocatalysts in an elegant, well-controlled way, and these bi-metallic surfaces can serve as models for the design of new catalysts. In addition, some of these systems may have potential for practical applications. The UPD of metals, which in general involves the deposition of up to a monolayer of metal on a foreign substrate at potentials positive to the reversible thermodynamic potential, facilitates this type of surface modification, which can be performed repeatedly by potential control. Recent studies of these surfaces and their catalytic properties by new in situ surface structure sensitive techniques have greatly improved the understanding of these systems.

  9. Exploring the Formation of Galaxies through Metallicities of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yong Beom; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Young-Wook; Tamura, Naoyuki; Sohn, S. Tony; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kodama, Tadayuki; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2014-06-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are among the oldest stellar objects in the universe. They have long served the role of providing constraints on many aspects of galaxy evolution theory. Bimodal color distribution of GC systems in many luminous early-type galaxies is an observationally established phenomenon and has been interpreted as evidence of two GC subgroups with different metallicities. In this study, we use spectroscopic data on the GC systems of two giant galaxies, M31 (the Andromeda) and M87 (NGC 4486), to investigate the GC bimodality and the underlying metallicity distributions. Recent high signal-to-ratio spectroscopic data on M31 GCs revealed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Given that spectroscopy provides a more robust probe into stellar population than photometry, the reported spectral line index bimodality may indicate the presence of two distinct GC populations. However, here we show that the spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs is due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and therefore one does not need two separate GC subsystems. We consider this as an analogy to the recent interpretation in which metallicity-color nonlinearity is the prime cause for observed GC color bimodality. We present spectra of ~130 old globular clusters (GCs) associated with the Virgo giant elliptical galaxy M87, obtained with the Multi-Object Spectrography (MOS) mode of Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) on the Subaru telescope. The fundamental properties of globular clusters such as age, metallicity and elemental abundance ratio are investigated by comparing with a set of Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models. M87 GCs with reliable metallicity measurements exhibit significant inflection along the color-metallicity relations, through which observed color bimodality is reproduced using a broad, unimodal metallicity distribution. Our findings lend further support to this new interpretation of the GC color

  10. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maicu, Marina Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter; Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald; Hecker, Dominic

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  11. Molecular Models for DSMC Simulations of Metal Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2011-05-20

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied here to model the electron-beam (e-beam) physical vapor deposition of copper thin films. A suitable molecular model for copper-copper interactions have been determined based on comparisons with experiments for a 2D slit source. The model for atomic copper vapor is then used in axi-symmetric DSMC simulations for analysis of a typical e-beam metal deposition system with a cup crucible. The dimensional and non-dimensional mass fluxes obtained are compared for two different deposition configurations with non-uniformity as high as 40% predicted from the simulations.

  12. Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-03-01

    Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

  13. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters.

    PubMed

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-08-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated. PMID:27273215

  14. Method of preparing size-selected metal clusters

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2010-05-11

    The invention provides a method for depositing catalytic clusters on a surface, the method comprising confining the surface to a controlled atmosphere; contacting the surface with catalyst containing vapor for a first period of time; removing the vapor from the controlled atmosphere; and contacting the surface with a reducing agent for a second period of time so as to produce catalyst-containing nucleation sites.

  15. Development of Metal Cluster-Based Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, James; Hooper, Joseph; Stoltz, Chad; Wilson, Becca; Mayo, Dennis; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The energy available from the combustion of Al is 2 to 3 times that of conventional high explosives and as a result is often loaded into explosive and propellant formulations in micron and nano-particle form. However, even at the nano-scale the release of energy is slowed by the reaction kinetics of particle oxidation. In order to realize faster reaction rates, on the order of current CHNO explosives, the size of the particles of interest need to be reduced significantly into the molecular size-range (10's of atoms). Current research efforts at NSWC-IHD are utilizing gas-phase molecular beam studies, theoretical calculations, and condensed-phase production methods to identify novel metal cluster systems in which passivated metal clusters make up the subunit of a molecular metal-based energetic material. To date, small amounts of a metal-based compound with a subunit containing four Al atoms and four Cp* ligands has been produced and is currently being characterized using DSC and TGA. Additional Al based systems passivated with a variety of organic ligands are being systematically examined. Analytical and theoretical results obtained for Al4Cp*4 and the additional cluster systems under investigation along with their potential energetic applications will be presented.

  16. The LLNL Cluster Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S L

    2007-03-27

    {lg_bullet} The Cluster Tool -is a set of linked vacuum chambers -can deposit multiple layers of metal and metal oxides {lg_bullet} Each layer can be deposited without breaking vacuum {lg_bullet} Shadow masks can give each layer a different pattern {lg_bullet} The Cluster Tool will be operational in April

  17. Metal-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of large area nanocrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Marek E.; Xu, Cigang; Cooke, Mike; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Chong, Harold M. H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on large area, metal-free deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) directly onto wet thermally oxidized 150 mm silicon substrates using parallel-plate plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Thickness non-uniformities as low as 13% are achieved over the whole substrate. The cluster size {{L}_{\\text{a}}} of the as-obtained films is determined from Raman spectra and lies between 1.74 and 2.67 nm. The film uniformity was further confirmed by Raman mapping. The sheet resistance {{R}_{\\text{sq}}} of 3.73 \\text{k}\\Omega and charge carrier mobility μ of 2.49\\;\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}^{2}}\\;{{\\text{V}}^{-1}}\\;{{\\text{s}}^{-1}} are measured. We show that the NCG films can be readily patterned by reactive ion etching. NCG is also successfully deposited onto quartz and sapphire substrates and showed >85% optical transparency in the visible light spectrum.

  18. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Sanjubala Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM{sub 13} (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM{sub 13} clusters, Co{sub 13} is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe{sub 13} and Ni{sub 13} clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters.

  19. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.

    1996-09-01

    Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) is a hybrid process combining cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The properties of metal plasma produced by vacuum arcs are reviewed and the consequences for MePIIID are discussed. Different version of MePIIID are described and compared with traditional methods of surface modification such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). MePIIID is a very versatile approach because of the wide range of ion species and energies used. In one extreme case, films are deposited with ions in the energy range 20--50 eV, and at the other extreme, ions can be implanted with high energy (100 keV or more) without film deposition. Novel features of the technique include the use of improved macroparticle filters; the implementation of several plasma sources for multi-element surface modification; tuning of ion energy during implantation and deposition to tailor the substrate-film intermixed layer and structure of the growing film; simultaneous pulsing of the plasma potential (positive) and substrate bias (negative) with a modified Marx generator; and the use of high ion charge states.

  20. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  1. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Norton, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  2. Electronic interactions and charge transfers of metal atoms and clusters on oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2013-02-14

    Understanding the interaction of small metal clusters and isolated atoms with oxide surfaces is crucial in order to rationalize the properties of heterogeneous catalysts composed of sub-nanometer metal particles dispersed on an oxide support. The interaction with the oxide surface can significantly alter the original properties of the metal deposit. In particular, the occurrence and the direction of charge transfer at the metal/oxide interface determine the chemical activity of the supported catalyst. The charge transfer depends on a number of factors like the nature of the oxide (reducible or non-reducible), the surface exposed, the presence of defects, the nature of the supported metal, etc. In this article we describe the most important conceptual aspects of the electronic metal-support interaction, a phenomenon related to the direct modification of the metal nano-particle determined by the formation of chemical bonds at the interface with the oxide. For metal nano-particles with a size of about 1 nm or below these effects become dominant although difficult to identify experimentally. PMID:23287900

  3. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  4. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  5. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  6. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  7. Deep Mixing and Metallicity in Globular Cluster Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a study of carbon depletion and deep mixing in globular cluster red giants across a wide range of metallicity. CH bandstrengths are measured from low-resolution (R 1000) spectra and converted to [C/Fe] abundances by comparisons with synthetic spectra. Although some models of deep mixing predict that its efficiency will be reduced at high metallicity, no sign of such a cutoff is seen in our data, which span the range -2.29 < [Fe/H] < -1.29.

  8. The old, metal-poor, anticentre open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrera, R.; Tosi, M.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a long-term programme, we analyse the evolutionary status and properties of the old and populous open cluster Trumpler 5 (Tr 5), located in the Galactic anticentre direction, almost on the Galactic plane. Tr 5 was observed with Wide Field Imager@MPG/ESO Telescope using the Bessel U, B, and V filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMD with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different stellar evolution sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). Age, reddening, and distance are derived through the synthetic CMD method using stellar evolutionary models with subsolar metallicity (Z = 0.004 or Z = 0.006). Additional spectroscopic observations with Ultraviolet VLT Echelle Spectrograph@Very Large Telescope of three red clump stars of the cluster were used to determine more robustly the chemical properties of the cluster. Our analysis shows that Tr 5 has subsolar metallicity, with [Fe/H] = -0.403 ± 0.006 dex (derived from spectroscopy), age between 2.9 and 4 Gyr (the lower age is found using stellar models without core overshooting), reddening E(B - V) in the range 0.60-0.66 mag complicated by a differential pattern (of the order of ˜±0.1 mag), and distance modulus (m - M)0 = 12.4 ± 0.1 mag.

  9. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  10. Electronic Principles Governing the Stability and Reactivity of Ligated Metal and Silicon Encapsulated Transition Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Marissa Baddick

    A thorough understanding of the underlying electronic principles guiding the stability and reactivity of clusters has direct implications for the identification of stable clusters for incorporation into clusters-assembled materials with tunable properties. This work explores the electronic principles governing the stability and reactivity of two types of clusters: ligated metal clusters and silicon encapsulated transition metal clusters. In the first case, the reactivity of iodine-protected aluminum clusters, Al13Ix - (x=0-4) and Al14Iy- (y=0-5), with the protic species methanol was studied. The symmetrical ground states of Al13Ix- showed no reactivity with methanol but reactivity was achieved in a higher energy isomer of Al 13I2- with iodines on adjacent aluminum atoms -- complementary Lewis acid-base active sites were induced on the opposite side of the cluster capable of breaking the O-H bond in methanol. Al 14Iy- (y=2-5) react with methanol, but only at the ligated adatom site. Reaction of methanol with Al14 - and Al14I- showed that ligation of the adatom was necessary for the reaction to occur there -- revealing the concept of a ligand-activated adatom. In the second case, the study focused heavily on CrSi12, a silicon encapsulated transition metal cluster whose stability and the reason for that stability has been debated heavily in the literature. Calculations of the energetic properties of CrSi n (n=6-16) revealed both CrSi12 and CrSi14 to have enhanced stability relative to other clusters; however CrSi12 lacks all the traditional markers of a magic cluster. Molecular orbital analysis of each of these clusters showed the CNFEG model to be inadequate in describing their stability. Because the 3dz2 orbital of Cr is unfilled in CrSi12, this cluster has only 16 effective valence electrons, meaning that the 18-electron rule is not applicable. The moderate stability of CrSi 12 can be accounted for by the crystal-field splitting of the 3d orbitals, which pushes the

  11. Noble metal abundances in an Early Archean impact deposit.

    PubMed

    Kyte, F T; Zhou, L; Lowe, D R

    1992-01-01

    We report detailed analyses on the concentrations of the noble metals Pd, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in an early Archean spherule bed (S4) of probable impact origin from the lower Fig Tree Group, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Compared to other sedimentary deposits of known or suspected impact origin, some noble metals are present in exceptionally high concentrations. Noble metal abundances are fractionated relative to abundances in chondrites with ratios of Os/Ir, Pt/Ir, Pd/Ir, and Au/Ir at only 80, 80, 41, and 2% of these values in CI chondrites. Although an extraterrestrial source is favored for the noble metal enrichment, the most plausible cause of the fractionation is by regional hydrothermal/metasomatic alteration. PMID:11537203

  12. Noble metal abundances in an early Archean impact deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Zhou, Lei; Lowe, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed analyses are reported on the concentrations of the noble metals Pd, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in an early Archean spherule bed (S4) of probably impact origin from the lower Fig Tree Group, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Compared to other sedimentary deposits of known or suspected impact origin, some noble metals are present in exceptionally high concentrations. Noble metal abundances are fractionated relative to abundances in chondrites with ratios of Os/Ir, Pt/Ir, Pd/Ir, and Au/Ir at only 80, 80, 41, and 2 percent of these values on CI chondrites. Although an extraterrestrial source is favored for the noble metal enrichment, the most plausible cause of the fractionation is by regional hydrothermal/metasomatic alteration.

  13. Liner conformality in ionized magnetron sputter metal deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, S.; Rossnagel, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    The conformality of thin metal films (liners) formed on high-aspect-ratio trench structures in ionized magnetron sputter deposition processes is studied numerically and experimentally. The numerical simulator (SHADE) used to predict the surface topography is based on the shock-tracking method for surface evolution. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimentally observed thin-film topography. It is shown that combination of direct deposition and trench-bottom resputtering results in good conformality of step coverages and the amount of the resputtering needed for the good conformality is almost independent of trench aspect ratios. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  14. Innovations in laser cladding and direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Frank; Nowotny, Steffen; Leyens, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    The present paper reviews recent progress in productivity, precision and quality of laser-based cladding and additive layer manufacturing. Recently, we have demonstrated the great benefits obtained from induction assisted laser cladding. This novel hybrid technology combines high deposition rates with excellent cladding properties. Laser-based direct metal deposition is a novel concept for the fabrication of components and repair as well as geometrical surface modifications. Newly developed nozzle design allows focused powder spots to generate wall thicknesses of about 30 μm. An in-depth understanding of the processes and the resulting materials properties is key for the development of technically viable and economically reasonable customized solutions.

  15. The Old, Super-Metal-Rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G. G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar evolution and Galactic evolution have both been greatly advanced by the study of star clusters. In addition the elemental abundance results from clusters have revealed information about Galactic chemical evolution and nucleosynthesis. The cluster, NGC 6791, has a number of bizarre properties that make it especially interesting for comparative cluster studies. It is old (8.3 Gyr) yet metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.30). It has a heliocentric distance of 4 kpc and a galactic latitude of +11 degrees which makes it 1 kpc above the galactic plane. Its boxy orbit has a high eccentricity (~0.5) with a perigalactic distance of 3 kpc and an apogalactic distance of 10 kpc. The orbital period of ~130 Myr indicates that it has crossed the Galactic plane several times yet has remained as an intact cluster. We have determined abundances from high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra of turn-off stars in this open cluster NGC 6791. We have a solid determination of [Fe/H] = +0.30 +/-0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]n with a mean of -0.06 +/-0.02, indicating a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of old, metal-rich field stars. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, have values of [Cr/Fe] = +0.05 +/-0.02 and [Ni/Fe] = +0.04 +/-0.01. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis; this is consistent with the upper limits in this temperature range for turn-off/subgiant stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. We speculate that no stars in NGC 6791 have retained the Li with which they formed.

  16. The metal content of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Ortolani, S.; Renzini, A.; Bica, E.; Momany, Y.; Pasquini, L.; Minniti, D.; Rich, R. M.

    2004-08-01

    High resolution spectra of five stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC 6528 were obtained at the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph. Out of the five stars, two of them showed evidence of binarity. The target stars belong to the horizontal and red giant branch stages, at 4000 < Tefflt; 4800 K. Multiband V, I, J, H, Ks photometry was used to derive initial effective temperatures and gravities. The main purpose of this study is the determination of metallicity and elemental ratios for this template bulge cluster, as a basis for the fundamental calibration of metal-rich populations. The present analysis provides a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.1±0.2 and the α-elements O, Mg and Si, show [α/Fe] ≈ +0.1, whereas Ca and Ti are around the solar value or below, resulting in an overall metallicity Z ≈ Z⊙. Observations collected both at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal and La Silla, Chile (ESO programme 65.L-0340) and with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA Inc. under contract to NASA. Tables \\ref{targets}, \\ref{logobs}, \\ref{tablines} and Fig. \\ref{chart} are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  17. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  18. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  19. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca E-mail: whitmore@stsci.edu

    2009-09-15

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z {approx} M {sup 0.30{+-}}{sup 0.05}. No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  20. Metallicity distributions of globular cluster systems in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eerik, H.; Tenjes, P.

    We collected a sample of 100 galaxies for which different observers have determined colour indices of globular cluster candidates. The sample includes representatives of galaxies of various morphological types and different luminosities. Colour indices (in most cases (V-I), but also (B-I) and (C-T_1)) were transformed into metallicities [Fe/H] according to a relation by Kissler-Patig (1998). These data were analysed with the KMM software in order to estimate similarity of the distribution with uni- or bimodal Gaussian distribution. We found that 45 of 100 systems have bimodal metallicity distributions. Mean metallicity of the metal-poor component for these galaxies is < [Fe/H]> = -1.40 +/- 0.02, of the metal-rich component < [Fe/H]> = -0.69 +/- 0.03. Dispersions of the distributions are 0.15 and 0.18, respectively. Distribution of unimodal metallicities is rather wide. These data will be analysed in a subsequent paper in order to find correlations with parameters of galaxies and galactic environment.

  1. Process for electroless deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the electroless deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electroless plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article upon sufficient contact with the article.

  2. Process for electrolytic deposition of metals on zirconium materials

    DOEpatents

    Donaghy, Robert E.

    1979-01-30

    A process for the electrolytic deposition of a metal layer on an article comprised of zirconium or a zirconium alloy is disclosed. The article is activated in an aged aqueous solution comprising from about 10 to about 20 grams per liter ammonium bifluoride and from about 0.75 to about 2 grams per liter of sulfuric acid. The solution is aged by immersion of pickled zirconium in the solution for at least about 10 minutes. The loosely adhering film formed on the article in the activating step is removed and the article is contacted with an electrolytic plating solution containing the metal to be deposited on the article in the presence of an electrode receiving current.

  3. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    PubMed

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397. PMID:23903747

  4. Deposition of carbon nanostructures on metal substrates at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-03-01

    The microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD of carbon nanostructures at atmospheric pressure allows shorter deposition times and reduces the complexity of the experimental set-up. In our study, the substrate temperature was varied in a wide range (300 – 700 C) using microwave plasma heating, as well as an additional heater. The distance between the substrate and the plasma flame was also varied in order to establish the conditions for an efficient deposition process, the latter being carried out at specific argon/hydrogen/methane gas mixtures. Optical measurements of the plasma flame spectrum were conducted to obtain the gas temperature and the plasma density and to analyze the existence of reactive species. The carbon nanostructures deposited on the metal samples were investigated by SEM. The relation between the morphology and the gas-discharge conditions is discussed.

  5. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  6. Charging dynamics of metal clusters in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Teuber, S.; Schumacher, M.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    2000-09-01

    Clusters of heavy metal atoms in strong femtosecond laser-light fields undergo multi-ionization with the loss of hundreds of electrons. The cross section largely exceeds that of corresponding isolated atoms, which leads in the case of PbN to a complete ionization of the 4f shell with a light intensity of 1.2×1015 W/cm2. Experimental investigations on Pb and Pt clusters with variable pulse widths and, for the first time, with the pump&probe technique give insight into the dynamics of the coupling of electromagnetic radiation into the clusters. Both approaches support the picture according to which, after an initial charging, the clusters expand due to Coulomb forces. This expansion is accompanied by a reduction of the electron density and at the same time by an increase of the optical sensitivity. Once the plasmon energy of the diluted nanoplasma approaches the photon energy, the charging efficiency increases significantly. The experimental observations are confirmed by random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations of the optical response, including molecular-dynamics simulations of the expanding systems.

  7. Water clusters in mixed ionic complexes with metal dipicolinate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2013-02-01

    Formations of three different types of hydrogen-bonded water clusters in the interstices of mixed ionic complexes with metal dipicolinate anions are reported. In the complex [Co(phen)2(H2O)2][Zn(dpa)2]ṡ7H2O (1) (where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, dpa = dipicolinate), both the cation and anion is hydrophilic in nature, exhibits an unusual 2D infinite cyclic water decamers (H2O)10 stabilized by four identical zinc dipicolinato complex anions. Modulating the cationic unit to a hydrophobic environment by replacing the aqua ligand with 2,2'-bipyridine ligand the water cluster can be modified. The complex [Ni(phen)2ṡbpy][Co(dpa)2]ṡ8H2O (2) (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) has unprecedented discrete hydrogen bonded hexadecameric (H2O)16 water clusters encapsulated between eight anionic units. A rare wavelike infinite water chain (H2O)n is observed in complex [Co(phen)3][Mn(dpa)2]ṡ12H2O (3), in this case the water chain fills the interstitial space created by packing of large hydrophilic anionic units and hydrophobic cationic units. The reported clusters are indefinitely stable in their respective complex at ambient temperature, but the water loss is irreversible when thermally decomposed.

  8. Shell structure of magnesium and other divalent metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Diederich, Th.; Doeppner, T.; Fennel, Th.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2005-08-15

    Clusters of the divalent metals magnesium, cadmium, and zinc have been grown in ultracold helium nanodroplets and studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry, with a special emphasis on magnesium. The mass spectra of all materials show similar characteristic features independent of the chosen ionization technique - i.e., electron impact ionization as well as nanosecond and femtosecond multiphoton excitation. In the lower-size range the abundance distributions can be explained by an electronic shell structure. The associated electron delocalization - i.e., metallic bonding - is found to set in at about N=20 atoms. For Mg{sub N} we have resolved crossings of electronic levels at the highest-occupied molecular orbital which result in additional magic numbers compared to the alkali metals: e.g., Mg{sub 40} with 80 electrons. This specific electronic shell structure is also present in the intensity pattern of doubly charged Mg{sub N}. For larger clusters (N{>=}92) a coexistence of electronic shell effects and geometrical packing is observed and a clear signature of icosahedral structure is present beyond N{>=}147.

  9. Research on the processing experiments of laser metal deposition shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Weijun; Shang, Xiaofeng

    2007-04-01

    Laser additive direct deposition of metals is a new rapid manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design (CAD), laser cladding and rapid prototyping. The advanced technology can build fully dense metal components directly from CAD files with neither mould nor tool. Based on the theory of this technology, a promising rapid manufacturing system called "Laser Metal Deposition Shaping (LMDS)" has been constructed and developed successfully by Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang Institute of Automation. Through the LMDS system, comprehensive experiments are carried out with nickel-based superalloy to systematically investigate the influences of the processing parameters on forming characteristics. By adjusting to the optimal processing parameters, fully dense and near-net-shaped metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting coaxially fed powder with a laser. Moreover, the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-formed samples are tested and analyzed synthetically. As a result, significant processing flexibility with the LMDS system over conventional processing capabilities is recognized, with potentially lower production cost, higher quality components, and shorter lead-time.

  10. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang Chaofan; Svensson, Svante; Maartensson, Nils; Bjoerneholm, Olle; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2012-05-28

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with {approx}3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  11. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang, Chaofan; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Svensson, Svante; Mârtensson, Nils; Björneholm, Olle

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with ˜3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  12. Properties of Red Giant Branches of Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds and Their Relation with Cluster Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Černiauskas, A.; Tanabé, T.

    We derive a new calibration that relates the observed cluster RGB slope in the Ks vs. J--Ks color-magnitude diagram with cluster metallicity. The new calibration is derived using a sample of intermediate age (1--8 Gyr) clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds with precise JHKs photometry available from the SIRIUS photometric survey of the Magellanic Clouds. Cluster metallicities are literature data obtained either from high resolution or infrared calcium triplet spectroscopy of individual cluster RGB stars. We find systematic differences between the RGB slope vs. metallicity relation derived in this work and that of Valenti et al. (2004), the latter obtained using a sample of old Galactic globular clusters. The possible origin of the discrepancies is discussed briefly.

  13. Multiple populations in more metal-rich galactic globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Maria J.

    In this thesis we present chemical abundances for bright stars in the intermediate metallicity globular cluster (GC) M5, and the relatively metal-rich GCs M71 and 47 Tuc with the goal of improving the understanding of chemical evolution in the metallicity regime sampled by these three GCs. The first chapter presents a brief historical overview in light element abundance variations in globular clusters. In the second chapter we present the results obtained for 47 Tuc, the most-metal rich cluster of my sample. 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since it is the closest massive GC. Chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu were determined for 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The average [Fe/H]= --0.79+/-0.09 dex is consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ~ --0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields

  14. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  15. Trace elements in zircon from rocks of the Katugin rare-metal deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashova, E. V.; Skublov, S. G.; Marin, Yu. B.; Lupashko, T. N.; Ilchenko, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Katugin deposit of economic Ta, Nb, Zr, U, REE, Y, and cryolite (Na3AlF6) ores is located in the Kalar district of the Chita region and classified as unique in Nb, Ta, and Y reserves hosted in rare-metal alkali granite. The distribution of trace elements (including REE) in zircon was studied for ore-bearing arfvedsonite-aegirine, biotite-riebeckite rocks, and zones of late recrystallization with nodular zircon clusters. The outer rims and marginal zones of zircon grains are depleted in almost all trace elements except for hafnium as compared with cores and central zones. Compositional features of zircon cores indicate their magmatic origin and do not prove metasomatic nature of the deposit. The similar REE patterns of zircon rims and cores, as well as other attributes assume postmagmatic or metamorphic origin of the rims.

  16. Statistical sampling of the distribution of uranium deposits using geologic/geographic clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, W.I.; Grundy, W.D.; Pierson, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of geologic/geographic clusters was developed particularly to study grade and tonnage models for sandstone-type uranium deposits. A cluster is a grouping of mined as well as unmined uranium occurrences within an arbitrary area about 8 km across. A cluster is a statistical sample that will reflect accurately the distribution of uranium in large regions relative to various geologic and geographic features. The example of the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province reveals that only 3 percent of the total number of clusters is in the largest tonnage-size category, greater than 10,000 short tons U3O8, and that 80 percent of the clusters are hosted by Triassic and Jurassic rocks. The distributions of grade and tonnage for clusters in the Powder River Basin show a wide variation; the grade distribution is highly variable, reflecting a difference between roll-front deposits and concretionary deposits, and the Basin contains about half the number in the greater-than-10,000 tonnage-size class as does the Colorado Plateau, even though it is much smaller. The grade and tonnage models should prove useful in finding the richest and largest uranium deposits. ?? 1992 Oxford University Press.

  17. Superatoms and Metal-Semiconductor Motifs for Cluster Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A. W.

    2013-10-11

    A molecular understanding of catalysis and catalytically active materials is of fundamental importance in designing new substances for applications in energy and fuels. We have performed reactivity studies and ultrafast ionization and coulomb explosion studies on a variety of catalytically-relevant materials, including transition metal oxides of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ti, V, Nb, and Ta. We demonstrate that differences in charge state, geometry, and elemental composition of clusters of such materials determine chemical reactivity and ionization behavior, crucial steps in improving performance of catalysts.

  18. Zintl cluster chemistry in the alkali-metal-gallium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, R.

    1998-03-27

    Previous research into the alkali-metal-gallium systems has revealed a large variety of networked gallium deltahedra. The clusters are analogues to borane clusters and follow the same electronic requirements of 2n+2 skeletal electrons for closo-deltahedra. This work has focused on compounds that do not follow the typical electron counting rules. The first isolated gallium cluster was found in Cs{sub 8}Ga{sub 11}. The geometry of the Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} unit is not deltahedral but can be described as a penta-capped trigonal prism. The reduction of the charge from a closo-Ga{sub 11}{sup 13{minus}} to Ga{sub 11}{sup 7{minus}} is believed to be the driving force of the distortion. The compound is paramagnetic because of an extra electron but incorporation of a halide atom into the structure captures the unpaired electron and forms a diamagnetic compound. A second isolated cluster has been found in Na{sub 10}Ga{sub 10}Ni where the tetra-capped trigonal prismatic gallium is centered by nickel. Stabilization of the cluster occurs through Ni-Ga bonding. A simple two-dimensional network occurs in the binary K{sub 2}Ga{sub 3} Octahedra are connected through four waist atoms to form a layered structure with the potassium atoms sitting between the layers. Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x} is nonstoichiometric and needs only a small amount of silver to form (x {approximately} 2--6). The structure is composed of three different clusters which are interconnected to form a three-dimensional structure. The RbGa{sub 3{minus}x}Au{sub x} system is also nonstoichiometric with a three-dimensional structure composed of Ga{sub 8} dodecahedra and four-bonded gallium atoms. Unlike Na{sub 30.5}Ga{sub 60{minus}x}Ag{sub x}, the RbGa{sub 3} binary is also stable. The binary is formally a Zintl phase but the ternary is not. Some chemistry in the alkali-metal-indium system also has been explored. A new potassium-indium binary is discussed but the structure has not been completely

  19. Metal patterning on silicon surface by site-selective electroless deposition through colloidal crystal templating.

    PubMed

    Asoh, Hidetaka; Sakamoto, Seiji; Ono, Sachiko

    2007-12-15

    Site-selective Cu deposition on a Si substrate was achieved by a combination of colloidal crystal templating, hydrophobic treatment, and electroless plating. Uniformly sized nano/microstructures were produced on the substrate using a monolayer coating of colloidal spheres instead of a conventional resist. The Cu patterns obtained were of two different types: networklike honeycomb and isolated-island patterns with a minimum period of 200 nm. Each ordered pattern with the desired intervals was composed of clusters of Cu nanoparticles with a size range of 50-100 nm. By the present method, it is possible to control the periodicity of metal arrays by changing the diameter of the colloidal spheres used as an initial mask and to adjust the shape of the metal patterns by changing the mask structure for electroless plating. PMID:17915242

  20. Nearby Spiral Galaxy Globular Cluster Systems. II. Globular Cluster Metallicities in NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantais, Julie B.; Huchra, John P.; Barmby, Pauline; Olsen, Knut A. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present new metallicity estimates for globular cluster (GC) candidates in the Sd spiral NGC 300, one of the nearest spiral galaxies outside the Local Group. We have obtained optical spectroscopy for 44 Sculptor Group GC candidates with the Boller and Chivens (B&C) spectrograph on the Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. There are two GCs in NGC 253 and 12 objects in NGC 300 with globular-cluster-like spectral features, nine of which have radial velocities above 0 km s-1. The remaining three, due to their radial velocities being below the expected 95% confidence limit for velocities of NGC 300 halo objects, are flagged as possible foreground stars. The non-cluster-like candidates included 13 stars, 15 galaxies, and an H II region. One GC, four galaxies, two stars, and the H II region from our sample were identified in archival Hubble Space Telescope images. For the GCs, we measure spectral indices and estimate metallicities using an empirical calibration based on Milky Way GCs. The GCs of NGC 300 appear similar to those of the Milky Way. Excluding possible stars and including clusters from the literature, the GC system (GCS) has a velocity dispersion of 68 km s-1 and has no clear evidence of rotation. The mean metallicity for our full cluster sample plus one literature object is [Fe/H] = -0.94, lying above the relationship between mean GC metallicity and overall galaxy luminosity. Excluding the three low-velocity candidates, we obtain a mean [Fe/H] = -0.98, still higher than expected, raising the possibility of significant foreground star contamination even in this sample. Visual confirmation of genuine GCs using high-resolution space-based imagery could greatly reduce the potential problem of interlopers in small samples of GCSs in low-radial-velocity galaxies. Data for this project were obtained at the Baade 6.5 m telescope, Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint

  1. Cotton fabrics with UV blocking properties through metal salts deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Hossam E.; Bechtold, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to sunlight is important for human health as this increases the resistance to diverse pathogens, but the higher doses cause skin problems and diseases. Hence, wearing of sunlight protective fabrics displays a good solution for people working in open atmosphere. The current study offered quite simple and technically feasible ways to prepare good UV protection fabrics based on cotton. Metal salts including Zn, Cu and Ti were immobilized into cotton and oxidized cotton fabrics by using pad-dry-cure technique. Metal contents on fabrics were determined by AAS; the highest metal content was recorded for Cu-fabric and it was 360.6 mmol/kg after treatment of oxidized cotton with 0.5 M of copper nitrate. Ti contents on fabrics were ranged between 168.0 and 200.8 mmol/kg and it showed the lowest release as only 38.1-46.4% leached out fabrics after five laundry washings. Metal containing deposits were specified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. UV-transmission radiation over treated fabrics was measured and ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) was calculated. UPF was enhanced after treatment with Cu and Ti salts to be 11.6 and 14, respectively. After five washings, the amount of metal (Cu or Ti) retained indicates acceptable laundering durability.

  2. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  3. Critical Metals In Western Arctic Ocean Ferromanganese Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. R.; Spinardi, F.; Conrad, T. A.; Conrad, J. E.; Genetti, J.

    2013-12-01

    Little exploration for minerals has occurred in the Arctic Ocean due to ice cover and the remote location. Small deposits of seafloor massive sulfides that are rich in copper and zinc occur on Gakkel Ridge, which extends from Greenland to the Laptev Sea, and on Kolbeinsey and Mohns ridges, both located between Greenland and mainland Europe. However, rocks were recently collected by dredge along the western margin of the Canada Basin as part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) program north of Alaska. Sample sites include steep escarpments on the Chukchi Borderland, a newly discovered seamount informally named Healy seamount, the southern part of Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, and several basement outcrops in Nautilus Basin. These dredge hauls yielded three types of metal-rich mineralized deposits: ferromanganese crusts, ferromanganese nodules, and hydrothermal iron and manganese deposits. Chemical analyses of 43 crust and nodule samples show high contents of many critical metals needed for high-technology, green-technology, and energy and military applications, including cobalt (to 0.3 wt.%), vanadium (to 0.12 wt.%), zirconium (to 459 grams/tonne=ppm), molybdenum (to 453 g/t), the rare-earth elements (including scandium and yttrium; yttrium to 229 g/t), lithium (to 205 g/t), tungsten (to 64 g/t), and gallium (to 26 g/t). The metal contents of these Arctic Ocean crusts and nodules are comparable to those found throughout the global ocean, however, these Arctic Ocean samples are the first that have been found to be enriched in rare metal scandium. The metal contents of these samples indicate a diagenetic component. Crusts typically form by precipitation of metal oxides solely from seawater (hydrogenetic) onto rock surfaces producing a pavement, whereas nodules form by accretion of metal oxides, from both seawater and pore waters (diagenetic), around a nucleus on the surface of soft sediment. The best evidence for this diagenetic input to the crusts is that crusts

  4. Optical properties of silicon clusters deposited on the basal plane of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, L. N.; Chase, L. L.; Balooch, M.; Terminello, L. J.; Tench, R. J.; Wooten, F.

    1994-04-01

    Laser ablation was used to deposit of silicon on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces in an ultra high-vacuum environment equipped with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and luminescence spectroscopy. For deposition of up to several monolayers, post annealing produced silicon clusters, whose size distribution was determined vs annealing time and temperature using STM. Pure silicon clusters ranging from 1 to 10 nm showed no detectable photoluminescence in visible range. Exposure to oxygen at 10(exp -6) Torr and for up to 8 hours showed adsorption on the surface of the clusters without silicon oxide formation and no detectable luminescence. Hydrogen termination of these clusters was accomplished by exposing them to atomic hydrogen beam but did not result in any photoluminescence. Prolonged exposure of these clusters to ambient air, however, resulted in strong photoluminescence spectra with color ranging from red to greenish-blue depending on average cluster size. Auger electron spectra revealed the existence of partially oxidized silicon clusters. This luminescence could be due to either an oxide phase or to changes in electronic structure of the clusters as a result of quantum confinement effect.

  5. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO2) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  6. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, Alessandro E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it

    2015-12-21

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO{sub 2}) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  7. Double σ-Aromaticity in a Surface-Deposited Cluster: Pd4 on TiO2 (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-03-15

    We report double σ-aromaticity in a surface-deposited cluster, Pd4 , on the TiO2 (110) surface. In the gas phase, Pd4 adopts a tetrahedral structure. However, surface binding promotes a flat, σ-aromatic cluster. This is the first time aromaticity has been found in surface-deposited clusters. The concept of aromaticity is expected to become instrumental in predicting and interpreting properties of such systems, much like it is for isolated molecules and clusters.

  8. Radical AdoMet enzymes in complex metal cluster biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duffus, Benjamin R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Shepard, Eric M; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2012-11-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzymes comprise a large superfamily of proteins that engage in a diverse series of biochemical transformations through generation of the highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate. Recent advances into the biosynthesis of unique iron-sulfur (FeS)-containing cofactors such as the H-cluster in [FeFe]-hydrogenase, the FeMo-co in nitrogenase, as well as the iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor in [Fe]-hydrogenase have implicated new roles for radical AdoMet enzymes in the biosynthesis of complex inorganic cofactors. Radical AdoMet enzymes in conjunction with scaffold proteins engage in modifying ubiquitous FeS precursors into unique clusters, through novel amino acid decomposition and sulfur insertion reactions. The ability of radical AdoMet enzymes to modify common metal centers to unusual metal cofactors may provide important clues into the stepwise evolution of these and other complex bioinorganic catalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology. PMID:22269887

  9. Properties of Red Giant Branches of Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds and Their Relation with Cluster Metallicity. II. Mean Photometric Colors of Cluster RGBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Lazauskaitė, R.; Tanabé, T.

    We derive new calibrations that relate the mean J-Ks photometric colors of red giant branch (RGB) stars at MKs=-5.5 and -5.0 with cluster metallicity. The new calibrations are derived using a sample of intermediate age (1--8 Gyr) clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, with the JHKs photometry taken from the SIRIUS photometric survey of the Magellanic Clouds. Cluster metallicities are literature data, obtained either from the high resolution or infrared calcium triplet spectroscopy of individual RGB stars. We find systematic differences between the RGB color vs. metallicity relations derived in this work and those determined by Valenti et al. (2004), the latter ones obtained for a sample of old Galactic globular clusters. In terms of age, this discrepancy corresponds to ˜ 5 Gyr and therefore can be attributed to the age difference between the two cluster samples used in the derivation of the corresponding RGB color vs. metallicity relations.

  10. Volatile metal deposits on lunar soils: Relation to volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Allen, R. O., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.

    1977-01-01

    Parallel leaching and volatilization experiments conducted on lunar samples and similar experiments on sphalerite do not supply the information needed to resolve the question of the chemical nature of pb 204, Zn, Bi and Tl deposits on lunar soil surfaces. It is proposed that in Apollo 17 mare and terra soils and fractions of pb 204, Zn and Tl that are insoluble under mild, hot pH 5HNO3, leaching conditions and involatile at 600 C were originally surface deposits which became immobilized by migration into the silicate substrate or by chemisorption. Only Bi is predominantly indigenous. The implication is also that the soils over their respective times of evolution were exposed to heavy metal vapors or that an episodic exposure occurred after they had evolved. A sequence of events is proposed to account for orange 74220 and black 74001 glasses by lava fountaining and for soil 74241 as tephra from an explosive volcanic eruption.

  11. Deposition and Characterization of Thin Films on Metallic Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatica, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    A CVD method was successfully developed to produce conversion coatings on aluminum alloys surfaces with reproducible results with a variety of precursors. A well defined protocol to prepare the precursor solutions formulated in a previous research was extended to other additives. It was demonstrated that solutions prepared following such a protocol could be used to systematically generate protective coatings onto aluminum surfaces. Experiments with a variety of formulations revealed that a refined deposition protocol yields reproducible conversion coatings of controlled composition. A preliminary correlation between solution formulations and successful precursors was derived. Coatings were tested for adhesion properties enhancement for commercial paints. A standard testing method was followed and clear trends were identified. Only one precursors was tested systematically. Anticipated work on other precursors should allow a better characterization of the effect of intermetallics on the production of conversion/protective coatings on metals and ceramics. The significance of this work was the practical demonstration that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques can be used to systematically generate protective/conversion coating on non-ferrous surfaces. In order to become an effective approach to replace chromate-based pre- treatment processes, namely in the aerospace or automobile industry, the process parameters must be defined more precisely. Moreover, the feasibility of scale-up designs necessitates a more comprehensive characterization of the fluid flow, transport phenomena, and chemical kinetics interacting in the process. Kinetic characterization showed a significantly different effect of magnesium-based precursors when compared to iron-based precursors. Future work will concentrate on refining the process through computer simulations and further experimental studies on the effect of other transition metals to induce deposition of conversion/protective films

  12. Growth of cluster assembled ZnO film by nanocluster beam deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Nilanjan

    2015-06-24

    ZnO is considered as one of the most promising material for optoelectronic devices. The present work emphasizes production of cluster assembled ZnO films by a UHV nanocluster beam deposition technique where the nanoclusters were produced in a laser vaporization cluster source. The microstructural and the optical properties of the ZnO nanocluster film deposited were investigated. As the wet chemical processes are not compatible with current solid state methods of device fabrication, therefore alternative UHV technique described in the paper is the need of the hour.

  13. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  14. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  15. Influence of metal-support interaction on the surface structure of gold nanoclusters deposited on native SiO(x)/Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Portale, Giuseppe; Sciortino, Luisa; Albonetti, Cristiano; Giannici, Francesco; Martorana, Antonino; Bras, Wim; Biscarini, Fabio; Longo, Alessandro

    2014-04-14

    The structure of small gold nanoclusters (around 2.5 nm) deposited on different silica-on-silicon (SiOx/Si) substrates is investigated using several characterization techniques (AFM, XRD, EXAFS and GISAXS). The grain morphology and the surface roughness of the deposited gold cluster layers are determined by AFM. The in-plane GISAXS intensity is modelled in order to obtain information about the cluster size and the characteristic length scale of the surface roughness. The surface morphology of the deposited clusters depends on whether the native defect-rich (n-SiOx/Si) or the defect-poor substrate obtained by thermal treatment (t-SiO2/Si) is used. Gold clusters show a stronger tendency to aggregate when deposited on n-SiOx/Si, resulting in films characterized by a larger grain dimension (around 20 nm) and by a higher surface roughness (up to 5 nm). The more noticeable cluster aggregation on n-SiOx/Si substrates is explained in terms of metal-support interaction mediated by the defects located on the surface of the native silica substrate. Evidence of metal-support interaction is provided by EXAFS, demonstrating the existence of an Au-O distance for clusters deposited on n-SiOx/Si that is not found on t-SiO2/Si. PMID:24576989

  16. Metallic alloy targets for high Tc superconducting film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, P.; Nigro, A.; Romano, P.; Vaglio, R.

    1989-02-01

    Many experiments are nowadays conducting worldwide on superconducting films based on the recently developed high Tc superconductor materials (YBCO, BISCO, etc). There are different ways to produce these films, among which sputtering and evaporation are most popular. Normally, use is made of oxides, pure metals or compounds as material sources. In the present paper we describe the fabrication process and the physico-chemical characteristics of various metallic alloy components for both sputtering and evaporation processes which show various advantages in terms of stability, easiness of use, purity, flexibility in composition and shape and allow good process control. Deposition techniques and experimental results obtained on thin films of the new superconductors realized starting from these alloys are also reported.

  17. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds. Progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper reports results on the following five studies: (1) The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; (2) Nucleophilic ring opening of thietane ligand in metal carbonyl cluster complexes; (3) Ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; (4) Insertion of an alkynes into a metal-metal bond -- evidence for an intramolecular insertion with a trans-stereochemistry; and (5) Cyclobutyne -- the ligand. Plans for future research are also briefly discussed. Two studies are planned: (1) studies of the synthesis and reactivity of strained ring ligands in metal cluster compounds; and (2) studies of the reactivity of dimetallic complexes with alkynes.

  18. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  19. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications. PMID:25853630

  20. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-17

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  1. Probing the History of Galaxy Clusters with Metallicity and Entropy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkholy, Tamer Yohanna

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects found today in our Universe. The gas they contain, the intra-cluster medium (ICM), is heated to temperatures in the approximate range of 1 to 10 keV, and thus emits X-ray radiation. Studying the ICM through the spatial and spectral analysis of its emission returns the richest information about both the overall cosmological context which governs the formation of clusters, as well as the physical processes occurring within. The aim of this thesis is to learn about the history of the physical processes that drive the evolution of galaxy clusters, through careful, spatially resolved measurements of their metallicity and entropy content. A sample of 45 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy and metallicity profiles. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radial extents than in previous Chandra analyses. The results of this analysis are made available to the scientific community in an electronic database. Comparing metallicity and entropy in the outskirts of clusters, we find no signature on the entropy profiles of the ensemble of supernovae that produced the observed metals. In the centers of clusters, we find that the metallicities of high-mass clusters are much less dispersed than those of low-mass clusters. A comparison of metallicity with the regularity of the X-ray emission morphology suggests that metallicities in low-mass clusters are more susceptible to increase from violent events such as mergers. We also find that the variation in the stellar-to-gas mass ratio as a function of cluster mass can explain the variation of central metallicity with cluster mass, only if we assume that there is a constant level of metallicity for clusters of all masses, above which the observed galaxies add more metals in proportion to their mass. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  2. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  3. Modifying the Photoluminescence of Monolayer MoS2 by Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dezheng; You, Yumeng; Mak, Kin Fai; Zhang, Fan; Hone, James; Bartels, Ludwig; Heinz, Tony

    2013-03-01

    Monolayer MoS2 exhibits strong photoluminescence (PL) due to its direct band gap located at K point. Because of its monolayer thickness, light emission from MoS2 is known to be strongly influenced by interactions with surrounding media. In this study, we have investigated the effect on the photoluminescence of exfoliated monolayers of MoS2 induced by the deposition of gold atoms. The PL from the sample was recorded as a function of amount of gold deposited, up to an effective thickness of about 1 nm. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the gold forms isolated island structures on the surface. A progressive increase in quenching was seen with increasing gold coverage. Deposition of gold on suspended MoS2 samples led to quenching of the PL by more than a factor of 100. Given the low reactivity of gold, we attribute the PL quenching primarily to energy transfer of the photogenerated excitons to the metal clusters. The observed changes in the shape and intensity of emission spectra will be discussed in terms of this mechanism and possible effects of doping induced by the gold deposition.

  4. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  5. Analysis and assessment on heavy metal sources in the coastal soils developed from alluvial deposits using multivariate statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinling; He, Ming; Han, Wei; Gu, Yifan

    2009-05-30

    An investigation on heavy metal sources, i.e., Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and Cd in the coastal soils of Shanghai, China, was conducted using multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis, clustering analysis, and correlation analysis). All the results of the multivariate analysis showed that: (i) Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd had anthropogenic sources (e.g., overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, industrial and municipal discharges, animal wastes, sewage irrigation, etc.); (ii) Zn and Cr were associated with parent materials and therefore had natural sources (e.g., the weathering process of parent materials and subsequent pedo-genesis due to the alluvial deposits). The effect of heavy metals in the soils was greatly affected by soil formation, atmospheric deposition, and human activities. These findings provided essential information on the possible sources of heavy metals, which would contribute to the monitoring and assessment process of agricultural soils in worldwide regions. PMID:18976857

  6. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  7. Microplasma synthesis of sub-5 nm metal clusters: A novel platform for study and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan

    2013-09-01

    Homogeneous, gas-phase nucleation of particles in reactive plasmas is well known. Dust formation in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes is undesired and can lead to deleterious effects on device fabrication and performance. Recently, plasma systems have been developed to purposefully synthesize nanoparticles for technological applications. The advantage of plasmas over other chemical methods include the high purity, uniformity of particle size, and the possibility of accessing unique chemistries through the non-equilibrium environment. In this talk, I will present our contribution to this rapidly emerging field: the development of a new class of atmospheric-pressure, low-temperature microplasma systems that enables the synthesis of unagglomerated, sub-5 nm particles in a single step. The synthesis of clusters in this size range is of current interest for the study and discovery of novel nanomaterials. To illustrate this point, two examples will be presented. One, clusters of Ni, Fe, and other metals are produced from their corresponding organometallic precursors. Alloys with precisely controlled compositions are also obtained by tuning the relative amount of the precursors in the plasma phase. The availability of metal clusters with well-defined size and composition has allowed us to systematically study carbon nanotube nucleation and growth, and relate the properties of the catalyst to the as-grown tube diameter and chirality. Two, we have carried out studies of carbon cluster formation and observed the presence of diamond-phase carbon. The nucleation of diamond at near ambient conditions supports theoretical predictions of the stability of sp3 diamond over sp2 carbon and suggests a potential route for their existence in the cosmos. NSF Award No. CBET-0746821 and AFOSR Award No. FA9550-10-1-0160.

  8. Hydrothermal-electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphates on various metals.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Matsuo, K; Mizutani, N; Hasegawa, J

    1999-09-01

    Calcium phosphates were formed on five kinds of substrate metals using a hydrothermal-electrochemical method in an autoclave with two electrodes. The electrolyte dissolving NaCl, K2HPO4, CaCl2.2H2O, tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, and hydrochloric acid was maintained at 100 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 200 degrees C. The counter electrode, the anode, was platinum plate, 20 x 20 x 0.5 mm, and the working electrodes as cathode were pure titanium, pure zinc, pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates. A constant direct current at 12.5 mA/cm2 was loaded for 1 hr. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] only deposited at three temperatures on pure titanium plate. On pure zinc plate, both parascholzite [CaZn2(PO4)2.2H2O] and hydroxyapatite were formed at 150 degrees C and both parascholzite and ZnO were formed at 200 degrees C. Both hydroxyapatite and beta-TCP [beta-Ca3(PO4)2] were formed on pure nickel, pure iron, and stainless steel plates at 200 degrees C. It seems that the incorporation of the metal ions released from the electrode decreased the Ca/P ratio of the deposit due to the formation of other compounds except hydroxyapatite. PMID:10786136

  9. High-dispersion spectroscopy of giants in metal-poor globular clusters. I - Iron abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minniti, Dante; Geisler, Doug; Peterson, Ruth C.; Claria, Juan J.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, high-SNR CCD spectra have been obtained for 16 giants in eight metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. Fe abundances accurate to 0.15 dex have been determined by a fully consistent set of model atmospheres and spectrum synthesis techniques. A metallicity scale is presented for metal-poor clusters that should prove useful for calibrating a wide variety of photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic metallicity indicators.

  10. Vapor phase deposition of transition metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Brigitte; Jacoboni, Charles

    1991-08-01

    Multicomponent fluoride glasses in the PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3 (PZG) vitreous ternary system have been prepared by vapor phase deposition. The thermal stability of the deposited glass was improved by adding stabilizing agents (AlF3, NaF, LiF, InF3). The thin films, deposited on different substrates (fluoride glass, fluoride single crystal, metal, and silica glass) have been characterized by x-ray diffraction. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The quality of the film, adherence, and homogeneity was controlled by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The optical characteristics of the film and PZG glass are given: the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) window is 0.3-8 micrometers and the refractive index 1.59+/- 0.2 depends on the lead content. Mn2+ doped films (up to 3 mole % MnF2) are optically active: Mn2+ exhibits a broad luminescence band at 560-570 nm (orange). The achieved film thickness varies from 0.5 to 80 micrometers , and the refractive index gradient approaches the required geometry for planar waveguides (doping of the film with lanthanides is in progress).

  11. Volatile metal deposits on lunar soils - Relation to volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. W., Jr.; Jovanovic, S.; Allen, R. O., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Parallel leaching and volatilization experiments conducted on lunar samples and similar experiments on sphalerite do not supply the information needed to resolve the question of the chemical nature of Pb-204, Zn, Bi, and Tl deposits on lunar soil surfaces. It is proposed that in Apollo 17 mare and terra soils the fractions of Pb-204, Zn, and Tl that are insoluble under mild, hot pH 5 HNO3, leaching conditions and involatile at 600 C were originally surface deposits which became immobilized by migration into the silicate substrate or by chemisorption. Most of the Bi does not seem to be the result of such a deposit. The implication is also that the soils, over their respective times of evolution, were exposed to heavy metal vapors or that an episodic exposure occurred after they had evolved. A sequence of events is proposed to account for orange 74220 and black 74001 glasses by lava fountaining and for soil 74241 as tephra from an explosive volcanic eruption.

  12. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications-that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications. PMID:27493181

  13. Contribution of radiation chemistry to the study of metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Belloni, J

    1998-11-01

    Radiation chemistry dates from the discovery of radioactivity one century ago by H. Becquerel and P. and M. Curie. The complex phenomena induced by ionizing radiation have been explained progressively. At present, the methodology of radiation chemistry, particularly in the pulsed mode, provides a powerful means to study not only the early processes after the energy absorption, but more generally a broad diversity of chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms. Among them, the new area of metal cluster chemistry illustrates how radiation chemistry contributed to this field in suggesting fruitful original concepts, in guiding and controlling specific syntheses, and in the detailed elaboration of the mechanisms of complex and long-unsolved processes, such as the dynamics of nucleation, electron transfer catalysis and photographic development. PMID:9806605

  14. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications—that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications.

  15. Effects of gas flow rate on deposition rate and number of Si clusters incorporated into a-Si:H films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toko, Susumu; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Keya, Kimitaka; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The suppression of cluster incorporation into a-Si:H films is the key to better film stability, because incorporated clusters contribute to the formation of SiH2 bonds and hence lead to light-induced degradation of the films. To deposit stable a-Si:H solar cells at a high deposition rate (DR), we studied the effects of the gas flow rate on DR and the number of Si clusters incorporated into a-Si:H films with discharge power as a parameter, using a multihollow discharge-plasma chemical vapor deposition method. We succeeded in depositing high-quality a-Si:H films with the incorporation of few clusters at DR of 0.1 nm/s. We also found that, under a low gas flow rate and a high discharge power, high-density clusters exist in plasma and hence DR is reduced as a result of radical loss to the clusters.

  16. Fluid-dynamical approach to collective modes in metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Providência, João, Jr.; de Haro, Raphael, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A simple variational method has recently been used to obtain the bulk-plasmon dispersion relation in a metal. In the present work we investigate the eigenmodes of the valence electrons in a metal cluster considering a semiclassical version of the method presented by Andō and Nishizaki. As a variational function we consider the Slater determinant ||φ> which is related to the Slater determinant ||φ0>, describing the ground state, by means of the unitary transformation ||φ>=e(i/ħ)S||φ0>, where S(x,p,t)=χ(x,t)+1/2[p.s(x,t)+s(x,t).p]. We use a polynomial approximation to determine the dynamical fields χ(x,t) and s(x,t). It is shown that the eigensolutions satisfy the energy weighted sum rule and the cubic energy weighted sum rule. The spectrum of excited energies, as well as transition densities and currents are obtained for the sodium, aluminum, and silver.

  17. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. PMID:25706750

  18. Pal 12 - A metal-rich globular cluster in the outer halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Persson, S. E.; Zinn, R.

    1980-01-01

    New optical and infrared observations of several stars in the distant globular cluster Pal 12 show that they have CO strengths and heavy element abundances only slightly less than in M 71, one of the more metal-rich globular clusters. Pal 12 thus has a metal abundance near the high end of the range over which globular clusters exist and lies in the outer galactic halo. Its red horizontal branch is not anomalous in view of the abundance that has been found.

  19. Deposition Technique For Chemical Free Black Coatings On Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J. G.; Cobbe, N.; O'Donoghue, J.; Pambaguian, L.; Norman, A.; Liedtke, V.; McCaul, T.

    2012-07-01

    Coatings having specific thermo-optical properties are necessary to manage the temperature equilibrium in space hardware. Incumbent black body coatings have a need to extend their operating temperature as well as increase the range of substrate materials that can be coated; in addition, issues relating to outgassing can limit the application of black body coatings. In this paper a relatively new coating technology, CoBlast, is used to deposit material on to titanium substrates, to produce a black body surface; SolarBlack. CoBlast, replaces the oxide layer of reactive metals with a fused thin surface. The process is uniquely non-complex, requiring no thermal input, no wet chemistry and is performed in an ambient temperature and pressure environment. Thermo optical and micro-structure analysis of SolarBlack was completed and the characterisation results including thermo cycling, up to 700°C, are discussed.

  20. Electrochemical deposition of highly-conducting metal dithiolene films.

    PubMed

    Allwright, Emily; Silber, Georg; Crain, Jason; Matsushita, Michio M; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2016-05-31

    Electrochemical deposition has been used to prepare a thin film of neutral 4',4-(3-alkyl)-thiophene-5',5-hydogen-nickel and copper dithiolenes (Ni-C2, Cu-C2). The application of molecular electrodeposition provides a means to solution process molecular semiconductors of poor solubility, which results from the strong intermolecular interaction required for charge transport. Both Ni-C2 and Cu-C2 form continuous thin films that show intense NIR absorptions, extending to 1800 nm and 2000 nm respectively giving evidence for the strong intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Both films are highly conducting and temperature dependence of resistance gave an activation energy of 0.42 eV and 0.072 eV respectively, with the near-metallic behaviour of Cu-C2 attributed to the additional presence of an unpaired electron. PMID:27184422

  1. Emergence of metallicity in silver clusters in the 150 atom regime: a study of differently sized silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Erusappan, Jayanthi; Govindarajan, Anuradha; Sugi, K. S.; Udayabhaskararao, Thumu; Ghosh, Atanu; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-06-01

    We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of the functionality of the thiol ligand.We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of

  2. Chiral structures and tunable magnetic moments in 3d transition metal doped Pt6 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-Rong; Yang, Xing; Ding, Xun-Lei

    2012-09-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition metal doped platinum clusters MPt6 (M=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) are systematically studied by using the relativistic all-electron density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Most of the doped clusters show larger binding energies than the pure Pt7 cluster, which indicates that the doping of the transition metal atom can stabilize the pure platinum cluster. The results of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)—lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps suggest that the doped clusters can have higher chemical activities than the pure Pt7 cluster. The magnetism calculations demonstrate that the variation range of the magnetic moments of the MPt6 clusters is from 0 μB to 7 μB, revealing that the MPt6 clusters have potential utility in designing new spintronic nanomaterials with tunable magnetic properties.

  3. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating. PMID:15348125

  4. Formation of aluminum films on silicon by ion beam deposition: A comparison with ionized cluster beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhr, R.A.; Haynes, T.E.; Galloway, M.D. ); Tanaka, S.; Yamada, A.; Yamada, I. . Ion Beam Engineering Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The direct ion beam deposition (IBD) technique has been used to study the formation of oriented aluminum films on single crystal silicon substrates. In the IBD process, thin film growth is accomplished by decelerating a magnetically-analyzed ion beam to low energies (10--200 eV) for direct deposition onto the substrate under UHV conditions. The energy of the incident ions can be selected to provide the desired growth conditions, and the mass analysis ensures good beam purity. The aluminum on silicon system is one which has been studied extensively by ionized cluster beam (ICB) deposition. In this work, we have studied the formation of such films by IBD with emphasis on the effects of ion energy, substrate temperature, and surface cleanliness. Oriented films have been grown on Si(111) at temperatures from 40{degree} to 300{degree}C and with ion energies from 30 to 120 eV per ion. Completed films were analyzed by ion scattering, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Results achieved for thin films grown by IBD are compared with results for similar films grown by ICB deposition. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  6. Metallicity determinations for globular clusters through spectrophotometry of their integrated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, J. P.; Hanes, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Using an appropriately weighted combination of 16 indices of absorption line strength measured in low-dispersion spectra of the integrated light of globular clusters, metallicities Fe/H are determined for thirty-six clusters in the Galaxy. The results confirm the suggestion that Zinn's (1980) scale suffers a systematic error in the region of intermediate metallicity and support an explanation in which his metallicity-indicative Q39 index has been diluted by excess ultraviolet light in clusters with anomalously rich blue horizontal branches. The methods, which involve the measurement of spectral features arising from many species, produce estimates of metallicity which are insensitive to this problem. Good agreement is found with several recent studies, but a disagreement is noted for the most metal-rich clusters studied by Frogel, Cohen, and Persson (1983). Finally, a similar method with a modified calibration is used to determine metallicities for the nuclei of six galaxies.

  7. Conical octopole ion guide: Design, focusing, and its application to the deposition of low energetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Roettgen, Martin A.; Judai, Ken; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus

    2006-01-15

    A design of a radio-frequency (rf) octopole ion guide with truncated conical rods arranged in a conical geometry is presented. The performance is tested in a cluster deposition apparatus used for the soft-landing of size-selected clusters on well-characterized substrates used as a model system in heterogeneous catalysis in ultrahigh vacuum. This device allows us to focus 500 pA of a mass-selected Ni{sub 20}{sup +} cluster ion beam from 9 mm down to a spot size of 2 mm in diameter. The transmittance is 70%{+-}5% at a rf voltage of 420 V{sub pp} applied over an amateur radio transceiver with an interposed homemade amplifier-transformer circuit. An increase of the cluster density by a factor of 15 has been achieved. Three ion trajectories are simulated by using SIMION6, which are relevant for this focusing device: transmitted, reflected, and absorbed. The observed effects in the simulations can be successfully explained by the adiabatic approximation. The focusing behavior of the conical octopole lens is demonstrated by experiment and simulations to be a very useful technique for increasing molecule or cluster densities on a substrate and thus reducing deposition time.

  8. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0deposited using sol-gel or metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  9. RHAPSODY-G simulations II - Baryonic growth and metal enrichment in massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Hahn, Oliver; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-04-01

    We study the evolution of the stellar component and the metallicity of both the intracluster medium and of stars in massive (Mvir ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙/h) simulated galaxy clusters from the RHAPSODY-G suite in detail and compare them to observational results. The simulations were performed with the AMR code RAMSES and include the effect of AGN feedback at the sub-grid level. AGN feedback is required to produce realistic galaxy and cluster properties and plays a role in mixing material in the central regions and regulating star formation in the central galaxy. In both our low and high resolution runs with fiducial stellar yields, we find that stellar and ICM metallicities are a factor of two lower than in observations. We find that cool core clusters exhibit steeper metallicity gradients than non-cool core clusters, in qualitative agreement with observations. We verify that the ICM metallicities measured in the simulation can be explained by a simple "regulator" model in which the metallicity is set by a balance of stellar yield and gas accretion. It is plausible that a combination of higher resolution and higher metal yield in AMR simulation would allow the metallicity of simulated clusters to match observed values; however this hypothesis needs to be tested with future simulations. Comparison to recent literature highlights that results concerning the metallicity of clusters and cluster galaxies might depend sensitively on the scheme chosen to solve the hydrodynamics.

  10. RHAPSODY-G simulations - II. Baryonic growth and metal enrichment in massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Hahn, Oliver; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-07-01

    We study the evolution of the stellar component and the metallicity of both the intracluster medium and of stars in massive (Mvir ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙ h-1) simulated galaxy clusters from the RHAPSODY-G suite in detail and compare them to observational results. The simulations were performed with the AMR code RAMSES and include the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback at the subgrid level. AGN feedback is required to produce realistic galaxy and cluster properties and plays a role in mixing material in the central regions and regulating star formation in the central galaxy. In both our low- and high-resolution runs with fiducial stellar yields, we find that stellar and ICM metallicities are a factor of 2 lower than in observations. We find that cool core clusters exhibit steeper metallicity gradients than non-cool core clusters, in qualitative agreement with observations. We verify that the ICM metallicities measured in the simulation can be explained by a simple `regulator' model in which the metallicity is set by a balance of stellar yield and gas accretion. It is plausible that a combination of higher resolution and higher metal yield in AMR simulation would allow the metallicity of simulated clusters to match observed values; however, this hypothesis needs to be tested with future simulations. Comparison to recent literature highlights that results concerning the metallicity of clusters and cluster galaxies might depend sensitively on the scheme chosen to solve the hydrodynamics.

  11. Assessment of PM10 and heavy metals concentration in a Ceramic Cluster (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen Vicente, Ana; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teofilo; Bech, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Environmental pollution control is one of the most important goals in pollution risk assessment today. The aim of this study is conducting a retrospective view of the evolution of particulate matter (PM10) and heavy metals (As, Cd, Ni and Pb) at different localities in the Spanish cluster ceramic in the period between January 2007 and December 2011. The study area is in the province of Castellón. This province is a strategical area in the framework of European Union Pollution control. Approximately 80% of European ceramic tiles and ceramic frits manufacturers are concentrated in two areas, forming the so-called "Ceramics Clusters"; one is in Modena (Italy) and the other in Castellón (Spain). In this kind of areas, there are a lot of pollutants from this industry that represent an important contribution to soil contamination so it is necessary to control the air quality in them. These atmospheric particles are deposited in the ground through both dry and wet deposition. Soil is a major sink for heavy metals released into the environment. The level of pollution of soils by heavy metals depends on the retention capacity of the soil, especially on physical-chemical properties (mineralogy, grain size, organic matter) affecting soil particle surfaces and also on the chemical properties of the metal. The most direct consequences on the ground of air pollutants are acidification, salinization and the pollutions that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. For this purpose the levels of PM10 in ambient air and the corresponding annual and weekly trend were calculated. The results of the study show that the PM10 and heavy metals concentrations are below the limit values recommended by European Union Legislation for the protection of human health and ecosystems in the study period. There is an important reduction of them from 2009 in all control stations due to the economic crisis. References Moral, R., Gilkes, R.J., Jordán, M.M., 2005

  12. Color-magnitude diagrams for six metal-rich, low-latitude globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, Taft E.

    1988-01-01

    Colors and magnitudes for stars on CCD frames for six metal-rich, low-latitude, previously unstudied globular clusters and one well-studied, metal-rich cluster (47 Tuc) have been derived and color-magnitude diagrams have been constructed. The photometry for stars in 47 Tuc are in good agreement with previous studies, while the V magnitudes of the horizontal-branch stars in the six program clusters do not agree with estimates based on secondary methods. The distances to these clusters are different from prior estimates. Redding values are derived for each program cluster. The horizontal branches of the program clusters all appear to lie entirely redwards of the red edge of the instability strip, as is normal for their metallicities.

  13. A uniform metal distribution in the intergalactic medium of the Perseus cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Werner, Norbert; Urban, Ondrej; Simionescu, Aurora; Allen, Steven W

    2013-10-31

    Most of the metals (elements heavier than helium) produced by stars in the member galaxies of clusters currently reside within the hot, X-ray-emitting intra-cluster gas. Observations of X-ray line emission from this intergalactic medium have suggested a relatively small cluster-to-cluster scatter outside the cluster centres and enrichment with iron out to large radii, leading to the idea that the metal enrichment occurred early in the history of the Universe. Models with early enrichment predict a uniform metal distribution at large radii in clusters, whereas those with late-time enrichment are expected to introduce significant spatial variations of the metallicity. To discriminate clearly between these competing models, it is essential to test for potential inhomogeneities by measuring the abundances out to large radii along multiple directions in clusters, which has not hitherto been done. Here we report a remarkably uniform iron abundance, as a function of radius and azimuth, that is statistically consistent with a constant value of ZFe = 0.306 ± 0.012 in solar units out to the edge of the nearby Perseus cluster. This homogeneous distribution requires that most of the metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium occurred before the cluster formed, probably more than ten billion years ago, during the period of maximal star formation and black hole activity. PMID:24172976

  14. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated trace metals. “Crustal” elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Ti), sulfate (S), and the rare earths present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. These major burial peaks are uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating consistency in net snow accumulation rates and transport vectors. A suite of trace elements (Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Tl, U) exhibit deposition patterns similar to that of the crustals and S. However, the burial patterns of several other elements (Cu, Sn, Zn, oxyanions) were weakly correlated with the crustals and other modes are apparent. The Hg profile exhibits summer peaks and is anti-correlated with most other elements, but is correlated with TOC. TOC and LMWA are, in general though, poorly correlated with most elements, indicating that post-depositional diagenesis may be significant for carbon. A principal component analysis identified four element clusters that appear to be consistent with deposition modalities and element geochemistry, and which explains 71% of total variance.

  15. Deposition of heavy metals from particulate settleable matter in soils of an industrialized area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfeliu, Teófilo

    2010-05-01

    Particulate air pollutants from industrial emissions and natural resource exploitation represent an important contribution to soil contamination. These atmospheric particles, usually settleable particulate matter form (which settle by gravity) are deposited on soil through both dry and wet. The most direct consequences on soil of air pollutants are acidification and salinization, not to mention the pollution that can cause heavy metals as components of suspended particulate matter. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of air pollution in soil composition. For this purpose, has been conducted a study of the composition of heavy metals in the settleable particulate matter in two locations (Almazora and Vila-real) with high industrial density (mainly ceramic companies) located in the ceramic cluster of Castellón (Spain). Settleable air particles samples were collected with a PS Standard Britannic captor (MCV-PS2) for monthly periods between January 2007 and December 2009. We analyzed the following elements: Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Sb and Bi which are highly toxic and have the property of accumulating in living organisms. It has been determined the concentration of heavy metals in the soluble fraction of settleable air particles by ICP-MS. The annual variation of the results obtained in both populations shows a decline over the study period the concentrations of heavy metals analyzed. This fact is associated with the steady implementation of corrective measures in the main industrial sector in the area based on the treatment of mineral raw materials. Moreover, this decline is, in turn, a lower intake of heavy metals to the soil. REFERENCES Gómez E.T.; Sanfeliu T.; Rius J.; Jordán M.M. (2005) "Evolution, sources and distribution of mineral particles and amorphous phase of atmospheric aerosol in an industrial and Mediterranean coastal area" Water, air and Soil Pollution 167:311-330 Moral R., Gilkes R.J.; Jordán M.M. (2005) "Distribution of heavy

  16. Structure, dynamic and energetic of mixed transition metal clusters. A computational study of mixed clusters of silver and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewage, J. W.; Rupika, W. L.; Amar, F. G.

    2012-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation (MD) with Sutton-Chen potential has been used to generate the minimum energy and to study the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of mixed transition metal cluster motifs of Ag n Ni(13- n) for n ≤ 13. Literature results of thirteen particle clusters of neat silver and nickel atoms were first reproduced before the successive replacement of the silver atom by nickel. Calculation was repeated for both silver-centred and nickel-centred clusters. It was found that the nickel-centred clusters were more stable than the silver-centred clusters. Heat capacities and hence the melting points of silver and nickel-centred clusters were determined by using the Histogram method. Species-centric order parameters developed by Hewage and Amar were used to understand the dynamic behaviour in the transition of silver-centred clusters to more stable nickel-centred clusters. This species-centric order parameter calculation further confirmed the stability of nickel-centred clusters over those of silver-centred species.

  17. Reverse hydrogen spillover on and hydrogenation of supported metal clusters: insights from computational model studies.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Petrova, Galina P; Shor, Elena A Ivanova; Nasluzov, Vladimir A; Shor, Alexei M; St Petkov, Petko; Rösch, Notker

    2012-05-01

    "Reverse" spillover of hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the support onto supported transition metal clusters, forming multiply hydrogenated metal species, is an essential aspect of various catalytic systems which comprise small, highly active transition metal particles on a support with a high surface area. We review and analyze the results of our computational model studies related to reverse hydrogen spillover, interpreting available structural and spectral data for the supported species and examining the relationship between metal-support and metal-hydrogen interactions. On the examples of small clusters of late transition metals, adsorbed in zeolite cavities, we showed with computational model studies that reverse spillover of hydrogen is energetically favorable for late transition metals, except for Au. This preference is crucial for the chemical reactivity of such bifunctional catalytic systems because both functions, of metal species and of acidic sites, are strongly modified, in some cases even suppressed - due to partial oxidation of the metal cluster and the conversion of protons from acidic hydroxyl groups to hydride ligands of the metal moiety. Modeling multiple hydrogen adsorption on metal clusters allowed us to quantify how (i) the support affects the adsorption capacity of the clusters and (ii) structure and oxidation state of the metal moiety changes upon adsorption. In all models of neutral systems we found that the metal atoms are partially positively charged, compensated by a negative charge of the adsorbed hydrogen ligands and of the support. In a case study we demonstrated with calculated thermodynamic parameters how to predict the average hydrogen coverage of the transition metal cluster at a given temperature and hydrogen pressure. PMID:22353996

  18. Carbon nanotube growth from metallic nanoparticles deposited by pulsed-laser deposition on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Mireille; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Semmar, Nadjib; Millon, Éric; Petit, Agnès

    2012-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes carpets were grown by RF plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on various substrates coated by Fe and Ni transition metals that act as catalyst. C2H2 gas was used for the carbon source. The results show that carbon nanotubes CNT can be grown on Si3N4/Si and SiO2/Si substrates only with an Fe catalyst. They are typically formed by multi-walled graphene layers, and can be obtained for a temperature as low as 550 °C. Nanotubes grown on TiN/SiO2/Si substrate from Fe or Ni catalysts present bamboo-like nanostructures and are obtained for particular experimental conditions. This study demonstrates substrate-to-catalyst effect on the CNT growth and their microstructures indicating that the adhesion force of nanoparticles on substrates is a main parameter. Catalyst particles are spherical and several tens of nm in diameter (weak adhesion strength) when deposited onto SiO2/Si or Si3N4/Si, the tip growth mode of nanotube is favored. On TiN/SiO2/Si substrate, particles are larger (large adhesion strength) and CNT growth is no more in tip mode, bamboo-like structures are obtained. When an Fe-Ni catalyst multilayer has been deposited onto the different substrates, carbon nanotube microstructures show multi-walled graphene parallel layers on Si3N4/Si and SiO2/Si insulating substrates, and bamboo-like microstructures on TiN/SiO2/Si conductor substrate.

  19. Crossover from the coffee-ring effect to the uniform deposit caused by irreversible cluster-cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivoi, A.; Zhong, X.; Duan, Fei

    2015-09-01

    The coffee-ring effect for particle deposition near the three-phase line after drying a pinned sessile colloidal droplet has been suppressed or attenuated in many recent studies. However, there have been few attempts to simulate the mitigation of the effect in the presence of strong particle-particle attraction forces. We develop a three-dimensional stochastic model to investigate the drying process of a pinned colloidal sessile droplet by considering the sticking between particles, which was observed in the experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that by solely promoting the particle-particle attraction in the model, the final deposit shape is transformed from the coffee ring to the uniform film deposition. This phenomenon is modeled using the colloidal aggregation technique and explained by the "Tetris principle," meaning that unevenly shaped or branched particle clusters rapidly build up a sparse structure spanning throughout the entire domain in the drying process. The influence of the controlled parameters is analyzed as well. The simulation is reflected by the drying patterns of the nanofluid droplets through the surfactant control in the experiments.

  20. Crossover from the coffee-ring effect to the uniform deposit caused by irreversible cluster-cluster aggregation.

    PubMed

    Crivoi, A; Zhong, X; Duan, Fei

    2015-09-01

    The coffee-ring effect for particle deposition near the three-phase line after drying a pinned sessile colloidal droplet has been suppressed or attenuated in many recent studies. However, there have been few attempts to simulate the mitigation of the effect in the presence of strong particle-particle attraction forces. We develop a three-dimensional stochastic model to investigate the drying process of a pinned colloidal sessile droplet by considering the sticking between particles, which was observed in the experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that by solely promoting the particle-particle attraction in the model, the final deposit shape is transformed from the coffee ring to the uniform film deposition. This phenomenon is modeled using the colloidal aggregation technique and explained by the "Tetris principle," meaning that unevenly shaped or branched particle clusters rapidly build up a sparse structure spanning throughout the entire domain in the drying process. The influence of the controlled parameters is analyzed as well. The simulation is reflected by the drying patterns of the nanofluid droplets through the surfactant control in the experiments. PMID:26465468

  1. Metal patterning using maskless vacuum evaporation process based on selective deposition of photochromic diarylethene

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Rie; Masui, Kyoko; Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2008-11-24

    We developed an electrode/wiring patterning method that does not employ evaporation shadow masks; this method is based on selective metal deposition of photochromic diarylethene (DAE). In the selective Mg deposition based on the photoisomerization of DAE, Mg vapor atoms are deposited only on colored DAE film obtained upon UV irradiation, but not on uncolored film. We demonstrated fine metal Mg patterning with a minimum width of 3 {mu}m and the preparation of a patterned cathode. The selective metal deposition method has significant potential for preparing fine electrodes/wiring for various organic electronic devices.

  2. Beam-Induced Deposition of Thin Metallic Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funsten, Herbert Oliver, III

    1990-01-01

    Ion and electron beam induced deposition (BID) of thin (1 μm), conductive films is accomplished by dissociating and removing the nonmetallic components of an adsorbed, metal-based, molecular gas. Current research has focused primarily on room temperature (monolayer adsorption) BID using electrons and slow, heavy ions. This study investigates low temperature (50 to 200 K) BID in which the condensation of the precursor gases (SnCl _4 and (CH_3) _4Sn) maximizes the efficiency of the incident radiation which can create and remove nonmetallic fragments located several monolayers below the film surface. The desired properties of the residual metallic films are produced by using as incident radiation either nuclear (35 keV Ar ^+) or electronic (2 keV electrons, 25 keV H^+, or 50 keV H ^+) energy loss mechanisms. Residual films are analyzed ex situ by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thickness measurements, resistivity measurements, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and infrared spectroscopy. Low temperature BID film growth models, which are derived from both a computer simulation and a mathematical analysis, closely agree. Both the fragmentation and sputtering cross sections for a particular ion and energy are derived for films created from (CH_3) _4Sn. The fragmentation cross section, which corresponds to film growth, is roughly related to the electronic stopping power by the 1.9 power. The loss of carbon in films which were created from (CH_3) _4Sn is strongly dependent on the nuclear stopping power. Film growth rates for low temperature BID have been found to be 10 times those of room temperature BID.

  3. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  4. Study of Flux Ratio of C60 to Ar Cluster Ion for Hard DLC Film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Miyauchi, K.; Toyoda, N.; Kanda, K.; Matsui, S.; Kitagawa, T.; Yamada, I.

    2003-08-26

    To study the influence of the flux ratio of C60 molecule to Ar cluster ion on (diamond like carbon) DLC film characteristics, DLC films deposited under various flux ratios were characterized with Raman spectrometry and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). From results of these measurements, hard DLC films were deposited when the flux ratio of C60 to Ar cluster ion was between 0.7 and 4. Furthermore the DLC film with constant sp2 content was obtained in the range of the ratio from 0.7 to 4, which contents are lower values than that of conventional films such as RF plasma. DLC films deposited under the ratio from 1 to 4 had hardness from 40 to 45GPa. It was shown that DLC films with stable properties of low sp2 content and high hardness were formed even when the fluxes were varied from 1 to 4 during deposition. It was indicated that this process was useful in the view of industrial application.

  5. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  6. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  7. Comparison between chemical vapor deposited and physical vapor deposited WSi2 metal gate for InGaAs n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, B. S.; Pey, K. L.; Ong, C. Y.; Tan, C. S.; Antoniadis, D. A.; Fitzgerald, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    We compare chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) WSi2 metal gate process for In0.53Ga0.47As n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using 10 and 6.5 nm Al2O3 as dielectric layer. The CVD-processed metal gate device with 6.5 nm Al2O3 shows enhanced transistor performance such as drive current, maximum transconductance and maximum effective mobility. These values are relatively better than the PVD-processed counterpart device with improvement of 51.8%, 46.4%, and 47.8%, respectively. The improvement for the performance of the CVD-processed metal gate device is due to the fluorine passivation at the oxide/semiconductor interface and a nondestructive deposition process.

  8. Porosity formation and gas bubble retention in laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, G. K. L.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Bi, G.; Zheng, H. Y.

    2009-11-01

    One of the inherent problems associated with laser metal deposition using gas-assisted powder transfer is the formation of porosity, which can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of the bulk material. In this work, a comprehensive investigation of porosity is carried out using gas atomised Inconel 718 powder. In the analysis, a clear distinction is made between two types of porosity; namely lack of fusion and gas porosity. The results show that the two types of porosity are attributed by different factors. The gas porosity, which is more difficult to eliminate than the lack of fusion, can be as high as 0.7%. The study shows that the gas porosity is dependent on the process parameters and the melt pool dynamics. The flotation of entrapped gas bubbles was analysed, showing that in a stationary melt pool the gas would be retained by Marangoni-driven flow. The overall Marangoni-driven flow of the melt pool is in the order of five times higher than the flotation effect, and this is the reason why the melt pool geometry would tend to dominate the flow direction of the gas bubbles. Through optimisation, the gas porosity can be reduced to 0.037%.

  9. Investigation of Metal Free Naphthalocyanine Vapor Deposited on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Bryan C.; Hipps, Kerry W.

    2014-02-27

    Naphthalocyanines (Ncs) are promising candidates for future components in electronic devices and applications. To maximize the efficiency of Nc devices, it is critical to understand their structural and electronic properties and how these are impacted by deposition methods. The formation of a metal free naphthalocyanine (H2Nc) self-assembled monolayer on a Au(111) crystal was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy under ultra-high-vacuum conditions at room temperature. A rigorous purification and processing procedure was developed to produce high purity, low defect, and well-ordered monolayers. High-resolution STM images reveal epitaxial growth of H2Nc on Au(111) with the observed structure having a molecular spacing of 1.6 ± 0.05 nm, with molecules orientated slightly off (roughly 2.5°) the low density packing direction of Au(111). A commensurate structure having 4 molecules per unit cell and unit cell parameters of A = 3.25 ± 0.05 nm, B = 3.17 ± 0.05 nm, and α = 87.5 ± 2° is proposed. Orbital-mediated tunneling spectroscopy was used to examine the electronic properties of individual molecules within the thin film. The first ionization potential and electron affinity of H2Nc adsorbed on Au(111) were measured to be -0.68 ± 0.03 and 1.12 ± 0.02 eV, relative to the Fermi energy.

  10. Reactions of metal cluster anions with inorganic and organic molecules in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-07-28

    The study of gas phase ion-molecule reactions by state-of-the-art mass spectrometric experiments in conjunction with quantum chemistry calculations offers an opportunity to clarify the elementary steps and mechanistic details of bond activation and conversion processes. In the past few decades, a considerable number of publications have been devoted to the ion-molecule reactions of metal clusters, the experimentally and theoretically tractable models for the active phase of condensed phase systems. The focus of this perspective concerns progress on activation and transformation of important inorganic and organic molecules by negatively charged metal clusters. The metal cluster anions cover bare metal clusters as well as ligated systems with oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, among others. The following important issues have been summarized and discussed: (i) dependence of chemical reactivity and selectivity on cluster structures and sizes, metals and metal oxidation states, odd-even electron numbers, etc. and (ii) effects of doping, ligation, and pre-adsorption on the reactivity of metal clusters toward rather inert molecules. PMID:27346242

  11. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6253

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Maderak, Ryan M.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Twarog, Bruce E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: bjat@ku.edu

    2012-11-01

    High-resolution CTIO 4 m/HYDRA spectroscopy of the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 ([Fe/H] = +0.43 {+-} 0.01) has been used to study the stellar lithium (Li) abundances near the cluster's turnoff. NGC 6253 greatly expands the range of [Fe/H] for clusters that have a Li abundance analysis. This is important for studying the complicated effects of, and potential correlations with, stellar Fe abundance on surface Li abundance. Comparisons to the younger and less-metal-rich Hyades and to the similarly aged but solar-metallicity M67 show that NGC 6253's Li abundances are qualitatively consistent with the prediction, from Standard Stellar Evolution Theory, that higher-metallicity stars have a greater Li depletion. Comparison with M67 provides evidence that the more-metal-rich NGC 6253 had a higher initial Li, which is consistent with expectations from models of Galactic Li production. NGC 6253 is also compared to the intermediate-aged NGC 3680, NGC 752, and IC 4651 open clusters. Comparison of the Li-gap positions in all six clusters shows that (1) the gap's position in T{sub eff} is independent of metallicity, but (2) higher-metallicity clusters have their gaps in higher-mass stars. In addition, the Li gap's position is shown not to evolve with age, which provides an important constraint for the non-standard depletion mechanisms that may create the Li gap.

  12. Molecular adsorption and metal-support interaction for transition-metal clusters in zeolites: NO adsorption on Pd(n) (n=1-6) clusters in mordenite.

    PubMed

    Grybos, Robert; Benco, Lubomir; Bucko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-03-14

    The adsorption of NO molecules on Pd(n) clusters of varying size (n=1-6) located in the main channel of mordenite and the interaction of the metallic clusters with the zeolitic framework were investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations under periodic boundary conditions. The supported clusters are created by binding Pd(n) (2+) cations to the inner cavity of a deprotonated Al-exchanged zeolite with an Al/Si ratio of 1/11, such that a charge-neutral system is created. Compared to the highly symmetric structures of the gas-phase clusters, the clusters bound to the zeolitic framework undergo appreciable geometric distortions lowering their symmetry. The distortions are induced by strong interactions with "activated" framework oxygens located close to the charge-compensating Al/Si substitution sites, but the cluster forms also weaker bonds to "nonactivated" oxygen atoms. The interaction with the framework also affects the electronic and magnetic properties of the clusters. While in the gas phase all clusters (except the isolated Pd atom with a closed d(10) ground state) have a paramagnetic moment of 2mu(B), in the zeolite clusters with two to four atoms have zero magnetic moment, while the Pd(5) cluster has a magnetic moment of 2mu(B) and for the Pd(6) cluster, it is even enhanced to 4 mu(B) (but the magnetic energy differences relative to low-spin configurations are modest). Analysis of the magnetization densities shows that in all clusters with zero total moment (singlet ground state), there are sites with excess spin densities of opposite sign. The influence of the cluster-support interaction on the chemical properties of the clusters has been tested by the adsorption of NO molecules. The results demonstrate the interplay between the molecule-cluster and cluster-framework interactions, which can lead to an increase or decrease in the adsorption energy compared to NO on a gas-phase cluster. While on the gas-phase cluster adsorption in low

  13. Molecular adsorption and metal-support interaction for transition-metal clusters in zeolites: NO adsorption on Pdn (n=1-6) clusters in mordenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grybos, Robert; Benco, Lubomir; Bučko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of NO molecules on Pdn clusters of varying size (n =1-6) located in the main channel of mordenite and the interaction of the metallic clusters with the zeolitic framework were investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations under periodic boundary conditions. The supported clusters are created by binding Pdn2+ cations to the inner cavity of a deprotonated Al-exchanged zeolite with an Al/Si ratio of 1/11, such that a charge-neutral system is created. Compared to the highly symmetric structures of the gas-phase clusters, the clusters bound to the zeolitic framework undergo appreciable geometric distortions lowering their symmetry. The distortions are induced by strong interactions with "activated" framework oxygens located close to the charge-compensating Al/Si substitution sites, but the cluster forms also weaker bonds to "nonactivated" oxygen atoms. The interaction with the framework also affects the electronic and magnetic properties of the clusters. While in the gas phase all clusters (except the isolated Pd atom with a closed d10 ground state) have a paramagnetic moment of 2μB, in the zeolite clusters with two to four atoms have zero magnetic moment, while the Pd5 cluster has a magnetic moment of 2μB and for the Pd6 cluster, it is even enhanced to 4μB (but the magnetic energy differences relative to low-spin configurations are modest). Analysis of the magnetization densities shows that in all clusters with zero total moment (singlet ground state), there are sites with excess spin densities of opposite sign. The influence of the cluster-support interaction on the chemical properties of the clusters has been tested by the adsorption of NO molecules. The results demonstrate the interplay between the molecule-cluster and cluster-framework interactions, which can lead to an increase or decrease in the adsorption energy compared to NO on a gas-phase cluster. While on the gas-phase cluster adsorption in low-coordination sites (vertex or

  14. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-26

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel-MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium-MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium-MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal-MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications. PMID:27419644

  15. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of ab-initio calculations are reported for (1) small transition metal clusters and (2) potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions important in hydrogen combustion and high temperature air chemistry.

  16. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters were studied at a high level of approximation, including all the valence electrons in the calculation and extensive electron correlation, in order to understand the electronic structure of these small metal clusters. By comparison of dimers, trimers, and possibly higher clusters, the information obtained was used to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals. Small metal clusters are currently of considerable experimental interest and some information is becomming available both from matrix electron spin resonance studies and from gas phase spectroscopy. Collaboration between theorists and experimentalists is thus expected to be especially profitable at this time since there is some experimental information which can serve to guide the theoretical work.

  17. Laser-induced metal plasmas for pulsed laser deposition of metal-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaars, Erik; Colgan, James; Rajendiran, Sudha; Rossall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal-oxide thin films, e.g. ZnO, MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2, are widely used in e.g. microelectronics, catalysts, photonics and displays. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is a plasma-based thin-film deposition technique that is highly versatile and fast, however it suffers from limitations in control of film quality due to a lack of fundamental understanding of the underlying physical processes. We present experimental and modelling studies of the initial phases of PLD: laser ablation and plume expansion. A 2D hydrodynamic code, POLLUX, is used to model the laser-solid interaction of a Zn ablation with a Nd:YAG laser. In this early phase of PLD, the plasma plume has temperatures of about 10 eV, is highly ionized, and travels with a velocity of about 10-100 km/sec away from the target. Subsequently, the plasma enters the plume expansion phase in which the plasma cools down and collision chemistry changes the composition of the plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy shows that Zn I and Zn II emission lines dominate the visible range of the light emission. Comparison with the Los Alamos plasma kinetics code ATOMIC shows an average temperature around 1 eV, indicating a significant drop in plasma temperature during the expansion phase. We acknowledge support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Grant EP/K018388/1.

  18. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Céspedes, J.; Álvarez-García, J.; Zhang, X.; Hampshire, J.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process (~700 °C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to

  19. Processing Parameters Optimization for Material Deposition Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2016-03-01

    Ti6Al4V is an important Titanium alloy that is mostly used in many applications such as: aerospace, petrochemical and medicine. The excellent corrosion resistance property, the high strength to weight ratio and the retention of properties at high temperature makes them to be favoured in most applications. The high cost of Titanium and its alloys makes their use to be prohibitive in some applications. Ti6Al4V can be cladded on a less expensive material such as steel, thereby reducing cost and providing excellent properties. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an additive manufacturing process is capable of producing complex part directly from the 3-D CAD model of the part and it also has the capability of handling multiple materials. Processing parameters play an important role in LMD process and in order to achieve desired results at a minimum cost, then the processing parameters need to be properly controlled. This paper investigates the role of processing parameters: laser power, scanning speed, powder flow rate and gas flow rate, on the material utilization efficiency in laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V. A two-level full factorial design of experiment was used in this investigation, to be able to understand the processing parameters that are most significant as well as the interactions among these processing parameters. Four process parameters were used, each with upper and lower settings which results in a combination of sixteen experiments. The laser power settings used was 1.8 and 3 kW, the scanning speed was 0.05 and 0.1 m/s, the powder flow rate was 2 and 4 g/min and the gas flow rate was 2 and 4 l/min. The experiments were designed and analyzed using Design Expert 8 software. The software was used to generate the optimized process parameters which were found to be laser power of 3.2 kW, scanning speed of 0.06 m/s, powder flow rate of 2 g/min and gas flow rate of 3 l/min.

  20. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  1. Mixed protein-templated luminescent metal clusters (Au and Pt) for H2O2 sensing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective method to synthesize the luminescent noble metal clusters (Au and Pt) in chicken egg white aqueous solution at room temperature is reported. The red-emitting Au cluster is used as fluorescent probe for sensitive detection of H2O2. PMID:23601828

  2. Assessment of toxicity in waters due to heavy metals derived from atmospheric deposition using Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Cukurluoglu, Sibel; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2013-01-01

    Water toxicity originating from the atmospheric deposition of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) was investigated on Vibrio fischeri activity in Izmir, Turkey. A LUMIStox® test was applied to dry and wet deposition samples and metal solutions. The inhibition levels and effective toxicity concentrations of these samples and solutions were determined. Interactive toxicity effects among the metals were investigated. When the impacts of the synthetic single heavy metal solutions were compared with each other, a toxicity ranking of Cr>Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Ni was obtained in order of decreasing severity. The total effective concentrations of these six metals were in the ranges of 0.074-0.221 mg/L and 0.071-0.225 mg/L for receiving aqueous solutions of dry and wet atmospheric depositions, respectively. The toxicity data showed that the wet deposition samples were 15% more toxic than the dry deposition samples. The interactive toxicity effects of the heavy metals in both dry and wet deposition samples were classified as antagonistic. High levels of heavy metals deposited in dissolved form may constitute an important input in the biochemical cycle and may have significant impacts. PMID:23030388

  3. Supersonic metal cluster beams of refractory metals: Spectral investigations of ultracold Mo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J. B.; Langridge-Smith, P. R. R.; Morse, M. D.; Smalley, R. E.

    1983-02-01

    A novel technique involving pulsed laser vaporization of the bulk metal within a pulsed supersonic nozzle has been shown to successfully produce ultracold bare metal clusters of even the most refractory of metals, tungsten and molybdenum. Clusters of up to 25 atoms may be readily prepared using this technique. Mass-selective resonant two-photon ionization spectra of Mo2 produced in this fashion show that the dimer is efficiently cooled in the expansion Ttrans<6 K, Trot˜5 K, and Tvib˜325 K. We have rotationally resolved the A 1Σ+u←X 1Σ+g (0-0) band for 92Mo2 and determined the bond length in the ground and excited states to be 1.940±0.009 and 1.937±0.008 Å, respectively. This confirms and extends the analysis of Efremov et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 73, 40 (1970)] who prepared 98Mo2 by flash photolysis of isotopically pure Mo(CO)6. We have also observed the (1-1), (2-2), and (3-3) sequence bands which together with the ground state data of Efremov et al. determine vibrational constants ω'e=449.0±0.2 cm-1 and ωex'e=2.3±0.2 cm-1 for the A 1Σ+u state. The lifetime of the A 1Σ+u v=0 state of Mo2 has been measured to be 18±3 ns by time-delayed two-photon ionization. The ionization potential of Mo2 is found to be less than 6.42 eV (compared to 7.10 eV for atomic Mo) indicating a substantially stronger chemical bond in Mo+2 than in Mo2. A discussion of the electronic structure of Mo2 and the implications of these findings for bonding in other transition metal dimers is also presented.

  4. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  5. Surface rejuvenation for multilayer metal deposition on polymer microspheres via self-seeded electroless plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Bunyamin; Sirkecioglu, Okan; Bicak, Niyazi

    2013-11-01

    A surface rejuvenation process was developed for generation variable thickness of metal deposits on polymer microspheres via electroless plating. Thus, Ni(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) complexes formed on triethylenetetramine (TETA) functional crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres were reduced to zero-valent metals. The resulting metals (1.1-1.5 mmol g-1) were employed as seed points for electroless metal plating (self-seeding) without using Pd or tin pre-activating species. Treatment of the metalized surfaces with hydrazine or hydrazinium formate was demonstrated to reactivate (rejuvenate) the surface and allows further metal deposition from electroless plating solutions. Followed repeating of the surface rejuvenation-metalization steps resulted in step wise increasing of the metal deposits (90-290 mg per g in each cycle), as inferred from metal analyses, ESEM and XPS analysis. Experiments showed that, after 6 times of cycling the metal deposits exceed 1 g per g of the microspheres on average. The process seemed to be promising for tuning up of the metal thickness by stepwise electroless plating.

  6. Particle clustering and dielectric enhancement in percolating metal-insulator composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, William T.

    1995-11-01

    An effective cluster model has been developed [Phys. Rev. B 42, 9319 (1990)] that treats a disordered suspension of monodisperse metal spheres as a mixture of isolated spheres and close-packed spherical clusters of spheres using the Clausius-Mossotti or Maxwell equations. The effective cluster model is adapted to such suspensions with a random intermingled cluster topology using Bruggemann's symmetrical equation. Model susceptibilities for the two cluster topologies are contrasted with one another and compared with experiments. Guillien's permittivity measurements [Ann. Phys. (Paris) Ser. 11 16, 205 (1941)] and Turner's conductivity measurements [Chem. Eng. Sci. 31, 487 (1976)] exemplify nonpercolating island topology suspensions. The permittivity measurements of Grannan, Garland, and Tanner [Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 375 (1981)] exemplify percolating random topology clusters. The models for both cluster topologies are in excellent agreement with experiment over the entire accessible range of volume loading.

  7. The LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of Star Clusters in M31. II. Metallicities, Ages, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingqiu; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Yuan, Haibo; Huang, Yang; Shi, Jianrong; Fan, Zhou; Huo, Zhiying; Wang, Chun; Ren, Juanjuan; Tian, Zhijia; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Gaochao; Cao, Zihuang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-08-01

    We select from Paper I a sample of 306 massive star clusters observed with the Large Sky Area Multi–Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) in the vicinity fields of M31 and M33, and determine their metallicities, ages, and masses. Metallicities and ages are estimated by fitting the observed integrated spectra with stellar synthesis population (SSP) models with a pixel–to–pixel spectral fitting technique. Ages for most young clusters are also derived by fitting the multi–band photometric measurements with model spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The estimated cluster ages span a wide range, from several million years to the age of the universe. The numbers of clusters younger and older than 1 Gyr are, respectively, 46 and 260. With ages and metallicities determined, cluster masses are then estimated by comparing the multi–band photometric measurements with SSP model SEDs. The derived masses range from ∼ {10}3 to ∼ {10}7 M ⊙, peaking at ∼ {10}4.3 and ∼ {10}5.7 M ⊙ for young (\\lt 1 Gyr) and old (\\gt 1 Gyr) clusters, respectively. Our estimated metallicities, ages, and masses are in good agreement with available literature values. Old clusters richer than [Fe/H] ∼ ‑0.7 dex have a wide range of ages. Those poorer than [Fe/H] ∼ ‑0.7 dex seem to be composed of two groups, as previously found for Galactic globular clusters—one of the oldest ages with all values of metallicity down to ∼ -2 dex and another with metallicity increasing with decreasing age. The old clusters in the inner disk of M 31 (0–30 kpc) show a clear metallicity gradient measured at ‑0.038 ± 0.023 dex kpc‑1.

  8. The LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of Star Clusters in M31. II. Metallicities, Ages, and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bingqiu; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Yuan, Haibo; Huang, Yang; Shi, Jianrong; Fan, Zhou; Huo, Zhiying; Wang, Chun; Ren, Juanjuan; Tian, Zhijia; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Gaochao; Cao, Zihuang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2016-08-01

    We select from Paper I a sample of 306 massive star clusters observed with the Large Sky Area Multi–Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) in the vicinity fields of M31 and M33, and determine their metallicities, ages, and masses. Metallicities and ages are estimated by fitting the observed integrated spectra with stellar synthesis population (SSP) models with a pixel–to–pixel spectral fitting technique. Ages for most young clusters are also derived by fitting the multi–band photometric measurements with model spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The estimated cluster ages span a wide range, from several million years to the age of the universe. The numbers of clusters younger and older than 1 Gyr are, respectively, 46 and 260. With ages and metallicities determined, cluster masses are then estimated by comparing the multi–band photometric measurements with SSP model SEDs. The derived masses range from ˜ {10}3 to ˜ {10}7 M ⊙, peaking at ˜ {10}4.3 and ˜ {10}5.7 M ⊙ for young (\\lt 1 Gyr) and old (\\gt 1 Gyr) clusters, respectively. Our estimated metallicities, ages, and masses are in good agreement with available literature values. Old clusters richer than [Fe/H] ˜ ‑0.7 dex have a wide range of ages. Those poorer than [Fe/H] ˜ ‑0.7 dex seem to be composed of two groups, as previously found for Galactic globular clusters—one of the oldest ages with all values of metallicity down to ˜ -2 dex and another with metallicity increasing with decreasing age. The old clusters in the inner disk of M 31 (0–30 kpc) show a clear metallicity gradient measured at ‑0.038 ± 0.023 dex kpc‑1.

  9. One-dimensional fast migration of vacancy clusters in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Zinkle, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    The migration of point defects, e.g. crystal lattice vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), typically occurs through three-dimensional (3-D) random walk. However, when vacancies and SIAs agglomerate with like defects forming clusters, the migration mode may change. Recently, atomic-scale computer simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) codes have reported that nanometer-sized two-dimensional (2-D) clusters of SIAs exhibit one-dimensional (1-D) fast migration1-7. The 1-D migration mode transports the entire cluster containing several tens of SIAs with a mobility comparable to single SIAs3. This anisotropic migration of SIA clusters can have a significant impact on the evolution of a material fs neutron-irradiation damage microstructure, which dominates the material fs lifetime in nuclear reactor environments8-9. This is also proposed to be a key physical mechanism for the self-organization of nanometer-sized sessile vacancy cluster arrays10-13. Given these findings for SIA clusters, a fundamental question is whether the 1-D migration mode is also possible for 2-D clusters of vacancies. Preceding MD results predicted that 1-D migration of vacancy clusters is possible in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron, but not in face-centered cubic (fcc) copper2. Previous experimental studies have reported 1-D migration of SIA clusters14, but there have been no observations of 1-D vacancy cluster migration. Here we present the first experimental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dynamic observation demonstrating the 1-D migration of vacancy clusters in fcc gold. It was found that the mobility of the vacancy clusters via the 1-D migration is much higher than single vacancies via 3-D random walk and comparable to single SIAs via 3-D random walk. Hence, the mobility of the glissile clusters is not associated with the character of their constituent point defects. Dynamic conversion of a planar vacancy loop into a 3-D stacking fault tetrahedron geometry was also observed.

  10. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-01

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel‑MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium‑MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium‑MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal‑MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications.

  11. Growth and optical properties of Ag clusters deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Flores-Camacho, J M; Weidlinger, G; Sun, L D; Schmidegg, K; Hohage, M; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P; Zeppenfeld, P

    2011-07-01

    The growth and concomitant evolution of the optical properties of Ag nano-clusters deposited on biaxially extruded poly(ethylene terephthalate) films is studied by reflectance difference spectroscopy. It is demonstrated by low energy ion scattering and simulated optical spectra that the clusters form a two-dimensional layer buried beneath the surface of the substrate. The experimental spectra are described by simulations in which different configurations of the host such as anisotropy, amorphization, and dilution are considered in an effective medium approach. The contribution of the anisotropic substrate is used to explain the resulting line shapes. We also discuss the role of the rate of change of the filling fraction with Ag coverage in the evolution of the spectra and the detection of the onset of coalescence by optical means. PMID:21597154

  12. Metal cluster structures and properties from Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaminici, Patrizia Köster, Andreas M. Vásquez-Pérez, José Manuel Martínez, Gabriel Ulises Gamboa

    2015-01-22

    Density functional theory (DFT) Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of metal clusters are presented. The calculations have been performed with the deMon2k [1] code employing all-electron basis sets and local and non-local functionals. The capability to perform reasonable long (∼ 100 ps) first-principle BOMD simulations in order to explore potential energy landscape of metallic clusters will be presented [2,3]. The evolution of the cluster structures and properties, such as polarizability and heat capacity, with temperature is discussed.

  13. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yip-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  14. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yin-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  15. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Xi Chu; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-03-10

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  16. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Chu, X.; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-07-07

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  17. The old, massive, metal rich open cluster NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    NGC~6791 is a rich open cluster that attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. Recent estimates indicate that the mass is even larger, around 5000\\,$\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$. This is quite remarkable: the cluster is in fact 8\\,Gyr old, while the typical dissolution time for Galactic open clusters is a few Myr only. This might imply that the cluster managed to survive so long either because its original mass was much larger, or because it moved along a preferential orbit. In any case, such combination of old age and large mass is unique among Galactic open clusters, especially for clusters located in the inner regions of the Galactic disk. This is not the only special property of NGC 6791. Its abundance in iron is [Fe/H] $\\sim$ +0.40. again unique among Galactic star clusters of the same age range. Significant dispersions in various elements have been detected, that are not routinely found in Galactic open clusters. The combined UV flux of the few hot HB stars makes the cluster the closest proxy of an elliptical galaxy. This surprising result might indeed indicate that NGC 6791 was massive enough at origin to experience a strong burst of star formation and a fast enrichment.This pletora of unique properties renders NGC 6791 an extremely important object to study and understand.How and where could such a stellar system have formed? Is NGC 6791 just an open cluster? Did it form close to the bulge? How could have survived in the adverse, high-density, environment of the inner Galactic disk?These are difficult questions to answer to, of course. One of the still missing key observational evidence is whether the cluster suffered from tidal interaction, that could have significantly decreased its mass. We find such evidences, and use them as an argument to support a scenario in which the cluster formed as a massive object. We also estimate, using approximate analytic description based on available $N$-body models, how much mass NGC~6791 lost, and which was its

  18. NOVEL VAPOR-DEPOSITED LUBRICANTS FOR METAL-FORMING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a preliminary laboratory study of the feasibility of using vapor-phase lubrication to lubricate industrial metal forging dies. (NOTE: the forging and shaping of metal parts is one of many metal fabricating processes that may generate volatile organic c...

  19. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Size selected cluster deposition on well characterized surfaces: Ag{sub n}/Pd(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Vandoni, G.; Felix, C.; Harbich, W.; Monot, R.; Buttet, J.; Massobrio, C.

    1997-06-20

    We study the deposition of Ag ions, and size selected Ag{sub 7} and Ag{sub 19} cluster ions on Pd(100) at total kinetic energies of 20 eV and 95 eV using Thermal Energy Atom Scattering and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We find that at all energies Ag atoms are implanted into the substrate and Pd atoms are ejected in the adlayer. The experimental results in the case of Ag{sub 7} can be understood in taking into account both implantation of Ag atoms and heavy fragmentation. In the case of Ag{sub 19} the deposition leads at low temperature to non compact structures localized around the impact point. We propose a model in which morphology changes take place between 200 K and 300 K resulting in well separated compact structures formed of Ag and Pd adatoms.

  1. Development of metal cluster-based energetic materials at NSWC-IHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightstone, James; Stoltz, Chad; Wilson, Rebecca M.; Horn, Jillian M.; Hooper, Joe; Mayo, Dennis; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit H.; White, Michael G.

    2012-03-01

    Current research efforts at NSWC-IHD are utilizing gas-phase molecular beam studies, theoretical calculations, and condensed-phase production methods to identify novel metal cluster systems in which passivated metal clusters make up the subunit of a molecular metal-based energetic material. The reactivity of NixAly+ clusters with nitromethane was investigated using a gas-phase molecular beam system. Results indicate that nitromethane is highly reactive toward the NixAly+ clusters and suggests it would not make a good passivating ligand for these cluster systems. To date, small amounts of a metal-based compound with a subunit containing four aluminum atoms and four Cp* ligands has been produced and was characterized using DSC and TGA. Results indicate this cluster material is more reactive than micron- and nano-sized aluminum. However lack of stability in air precludes it from being a viable replacement for current aluminum particles. Volumetric heat of combustion of Al50Cp*12 was determined using thermodynamic data obtained from first principles calculations. The Al50 cluster is found to have a heat of combustion near 60% that of pure aluminum.

  2. Structures and stability of metal-doped GenM (n = 9, 10) clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-06-26

    The lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic Ge nM (n = 9, 10; M = Si, Li, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Au, Ag, Yb, Pm and Dy) clusters were studied by genetic algorithm (GA) and first-principles calculations. The calculation results show that doping of the metal atoms and Si into Ge9 and Ge10 clusters is energetically favorable. Most of the metal-doped Ge cluster structures can be viewed as adding or substituting metal atom on the surface of the corresponding ground-state Gen clusters. However, the neutral and cationic FeGe9,10,MnGe9,10 and Ge10Al are cage-like with the metal atom encapsulated inside. Suchmore » cage-like transition metal doped Gen clusters are shown to have higher adsorption energy and thermal stability. Our calculation results suggest that Ge9,10Fe and Ge9Si would be used as building blocks in cluster-assembled nanomaterials because of their high stabilities.« less

  3. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters at a high level of approximation i.e. including all the valence electrons in the calculation and also including extensive electron correlation were studied. Perhaps the most useful end result of these studies is the qualitative information about the electronic structure of these small metal clusters, including the nature of the bonding. The electronic structure studies of the small clusters are directly applicable to problems in catalysis. From comparison of dimers, trimers and possibly higher clusters, it is possible to extrapolate the information obtained to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals and their interaction with other atoms and molecules at both surface and interior locations.

  4. Thermal expansion in small metal clusters and its impact on the electric polarizability

    PubMed

    Kummel; Akola; Manninen

    2000-04-24

    The thermal expansion coefficients of Na(N) clusters with 8clusters are obtained from ab initio Born-Oppenheimer local-density-approximation molecular dynamics. Thermal expansion of small metal clusters is considerably larger than that in the bulk and is size dependent. We demonstrate that the average static electric dipole polarizability of Na clusters depends linearly on the mean interatomic distance and only to a minor extent on the detailed ionic configuration when the overall shape of the electron density is enforced by electronic shell effects. Taking thermal expansion into account brings theoretical and experimental polarizabilities into quantitative agreement. PMID:11019216

  5. Sputtered metal and silicon cluster ions: collision-induced fragmentation and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begemann, W.; Hector, R.; Liu, Y. Y.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Lutz, H. O.

    1989-03-01

    Mass separated metal and silicon cluster ion beams M{/n +, -} are produced by sputtering and undergo fragmenting and/or neutralizing collisions at different kinetic energies (100 1800 eV) in Ar and SF6. Fragment patterns induced by rare gas collisions open a way to determine ionization potentials and electron affinities of clusters. These values are compared to known experimental and theoretical data. For negatively charged clusters the absorption in gas targets is mainly due to neutralization, the cross sections varying with cluster material, number of atoms and collision partner from 10 Å2 to about 50 Å2.

  6. Laser controlled deposition of metal microstructures via nondiffracting Bessel beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-04-01

    The technique of the laser controlled deposition of sodium and rubidium deposits on the sapphire substrate is presented. The metals were deposited on the clean sapphire substrate from the vapor phase contained in the evacuated and sealed cell. We use an axicon to produce a non-diffracting Bessel beam out of the beam got from the cw diode laser with 200 mW power at the wavelength of 532 nm. After 30 minutes of the laser-controlled deposition the substrates were examined in the optical microscope. The obtained metal deposits form the sharp-cut circles with the pitch of 10 μm, coincident with the tens of dark rings of the Bessel beam. Reduction of the laser power leads to the build up of the continuous metal film over the whole substrate.

  7. Atmospheric heavy metal deposition plumes adjacent to a primary lead-zinc smelter.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, M

    1999-09-15

    A method for the determination of atmospheric heavy metal deposition rates has been developed using 0.5-m2 deposition trays at 0.1 m from the ground. Trays were spaced at 150-m intervals along a 1500-m line 500 m east of a Pb-Zn smelter. Ten sampling events of 1-3-h duration were conducted under westerly wind conditions so as to determine the sources of heavy metals deposited near the smelter. Deposited materials were sampled from the trays using wipes. There was good agreement between deposition trays placed side-by-side and exposed in pairs. Under certain conditions, however, the method is not appropriate owing to the potential for local contamination. Geometric mean deposition rates for Pb, Zn, Fe, Cu, As and Cd averaged over a nominal plume width of 600 m amounted to 18.8, 22.2, 12.2, 0.614, 0.403 and 0.052 mg m-2 day-1, respectively. Gaussian deposition profiles were seen for Pb, Zn, Fe, Cu, As and Cd downwind from the blast furnace, sinter plant, and refinery area. Zinc deposition could also be attributed to a northern Zn production area. This northern site was not generally associated with elevated Pb deposition. On the basis of this work, the deposition of heavy metals in residential areas adjoining the smelter is likely to occur downwind from the smelter site, with deposition rates increasing with wind speed. The strategic measurement of heavy metal dry-deposition rates over short periods of time using large collection surfaces provides source-specific information not obtainable by conventional long-term 'passive' deposition sampling. Lower detection limits than those achieved here are likely to be achieved in non-smelter settings. Previous suggestions implicating a sink of city surface dusts as the probable source of Pb recontamination of residential settings in the absence of ongoing smelter emissions are not supported by this work. PMID:10535148

  8. Preventing Technique of Metal Deposition on Optical Devices in Space Diode Laser Welding for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Kenji; Ohtani, Masato; Shobako, Shinichiro; Terajima, Noboru; Hiraoka, Nobuaki

    In future space developments, the welding in space may be required for the repairs of the ISS and the constructions of lunar base and space structures. The authors have studied the space Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc (GHTA) welding process since 1993. This paper describes the results for space applying the space Diode Laser (DL) welding process which the authors proposed in 2002. It is necessary to prevent the metal deposition on optical devices in order to utilize the space DL welding process in space. The authors studied the preventing technique of metal deposition which covered optical devices with the nozzle and blew the shielding gas out from nozzle outlet. The metal deposition can be reduced by supplying the nozzle with inert gas and blowing the gas out from nozzle outlet. The shielding gas argon perfectly prevents the metal deposition on optical devices when argon pressurizes the nozzle to over 19.9 Pa and spouts out from the nozzle outlet.

  9. Assessment of the Altitudinal Atmospheric Metal(loid) Deposition in a Mountainous City by Mosses.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Zhang, Guoping; Liu, Hong; Li, Ling; Fu, Zhiping; Ouyang, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jingjing; Hu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Samples of moss (Haplocladium microphyllum) were collected at different elevations on a mountain and four representative sites in Guiyang City, and the concentrations of metal(loid)s were determined by ICP-MS. The altitudinal deposition of soil-originated metals differed from that of anthropogenic metal(loid)s. The concentrations of soil-related elements decreased with elevation, indicating that these elements tend to deposit at lower elevations and their impact on the higher elevations is less. The concentrations of anthropogenic elements varied only slightly with elevation, indicating that the atmospheric deposition of these elements did not vary largely with elevation. The results of this study showed that the mosses at different locations may serve to indicate a vertical gradient of atmospheric metal(loid) deposition. PMID:26055166

  10. Introduction: advances and opportunities in cluster research. [Neutral (metal) and ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of neutral and ionic clusters include these in the upper and lower atmosphere, interstellar grain formation, combustion, radiation physics and chemistry, surface bombardment, fission product transport in reactors, corrosion, etc. This paper is a brief overview of some recent developments in cluster research. (DLC)

  11. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  12. Inhomogeneous halo collapse and early Galactic chemical evolution - Globular cluster metallicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinie, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Mathews, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A new solution to the observed Galactic globular cluster metallicity distribution is proposed by considering inhomogeneous collapse of a centrally condensed proto-Galaxy. In contrast to the standard one-zone model, it is shown that, for inhomogeneous models, the metallicity distribution can be reproduced without the need to decrease the nucleosynthetic yield for metal-poor stars. Chemical evolution in free fall is calculated analytically. A hybrid hydroparticle code is developed to study the effect of supernova induced pressure.

  13. Age and metallicity of star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud from integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Bruno; Coelho, Paula; Kerber, Leandro; Barbuy, Beatriz; Idiart, Thais

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of integrated spectra of star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds can bring important information for studies on the chemical evolution of the Clouds. The aim of the present work is to derive ages and metallicities from integrated spectra of 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), some of them not studied so far. Making use of a full spectrum fitting technique, we compared the integrated spectra of the sample clusters to three different sets of single stellar population models available in the literature. We derived ages and metallicities for the sample clusters employing the codes STARLIGHT and ULySS. Out of the 15 clusters in our sample, 9 are old/intermediate age clusters and 6 are young clusters. We point out the results for the newly identified as old/intermediate age clusters HW1, NGC 152, Lindsay 3 and 11. We also confirm old ages for NGC 361, NGC 419 and Kron 3, and the oldest well-known SMC cluster NGC 121.

  14. Process for preparation of a seed layer for selective metal deposition

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for selective metal deposition comprising of the steps of: a. formation of an initial surface on a substrate, said initial surface being comprised of at least two layers of which the uppermost is inert, b. exposing the surface to a source of heat in pre-determined places wherein surface activation is desired, and c. deposition of metal on activated portions of said surface.

  15. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.; Katz, Alexander

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  16. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  17. Immersion Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon and Germanium Substrates in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Wai, Chien M.; Zhang, Daqing; Kranov, Yanko; Mcilroy, David; Lin, Yuehe; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2003-01-29

    A low temperature carbon dioxide based on immersion deposition technology (SFID) has been developed for producing palladium, copper, silver, and other metal films on silicon-based substrates in supercritical CO2. The reaction is initiated by oxidation of elemental silicon to SiF4 or H2SiF6 by HF with the release of electrons that cause the reduction of metal ions in an organometallic precursor to the metallic form on silicon surface in CO2. Only the substrate surfaces are coated with metals using this method. Based on surface analysis of the films and spectroscopic analysis of the reaction products, the mechanism of metal film deposition is discussed. The metal films (Pd, Cu, and Ag) formed on silicon surfaces by the SFID method exhibit good coverage, smooth and dense texture, high purity and a metallic behavior. Similarly, metal films can also be deposited onto geranium substrates using SFID. The gas-like properties and the high pressure of the supercritical fluids, combined with the low reaction temperature, make this SFID method potentially useful for depositing thin metal films in small features, which are difficult to accomplish by conventional CVD methods.

  18. Full spectral fitting of Milky Way and M 31 globular clusters: ages and metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezario, E.; Coelho, P. R. T.; Alves-Brito, A.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of disk galaxies are long standing questions in astronomy. Understanding the properties of globular cluster systems can lead to important insights on the evolution of its host galaxy. Aims: We aim to obtain the stellar population parameters - age and metallicity - of a sample of M 31 and Galactic globular clusters. Studying their globular cluster systems is an important step towards understanding their formation and evolution in a complete way. Methods: Our analysis employs a modern pixel-to-pixel spectral fitting technique to fit observed integrated spectra to updated stellar population models. By comparing observations to models we obtain the ages and metallicities of their stellar populations. We apply this technique to a sample of 38 globular clusters in M 31 and to 41 Galactic globular clusters, used as a control sample. Results: Our sample of M 31 globular clusters spans ages from 150 Myr to the age of the Universe. Metallicities [Fe/H] range from -2.2 dex to the solar value. The age-metallicity relation obtained can be described as having two components: an old population with a flat age-[Fe/H] relation, possibly associated with the halo and/or bulge, and a second one with a roughly linear relation between age and metallicity, higher metallicities corresponding to younger ages, possibly associated with the M 31 disk. While we recover the very well known Galactic GC metallicity bimodality, our own analysis of M 31's metallicity distribution function (MDF) suggests that both GC systems cover basically the same [Fe/H] range yet M 31's MDF is not clearly bimodal. These results suggest that both galaxies experienced different star formation and accretion histories. Table 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Intrinsic Magnetic Properties of fct FePt Nanocubes and Rods by Cluster Beam Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdogan, Ozan; Li, Wanfeng; Hadjipanayis, George; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David

    2012-02-01

    In this work, single crystal fct FePt nanocubes have been successfully produced by a cluster beam deposition technique without the need of post annealing. Particles have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering using high Ar pressures (0.5 to 2 Torr) on both single crystal Si substrates and Au grids for the measurement of magnetic and structural properties, respectively. The nanocubes have a uniform size distribution with an average size of 6.5 nm. At 1 Torr, the particles have the fct structure with an order parameter of 0.5 and a RT coercivity of 2 kOe with high switching fields seen in the hysteresis loop. Particle size was controlled by changing the pressure and power and also by ex-situ annealing. In addition to these nanocubes, micron size rods (which consist of 20 nm nanoparticles) with the fct structure have been observed near the cluster gun. These particles show a room temperature coercivity of 8 kOe with an order parameter of 0.85. Intrinsic magnetic properties (Curie temperature, HA, MS and magnetic viscosity) of the nanocubes and the nanoparticles (separated from the rods) have been extensively studied and the results will be reported.

  20. Polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD): a full-solution strategy for flexible, stretchable, compressible, and wearable metal conductors.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Yan, Casey; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-08-20

    Metal interconnects, contacts, and electrodes are indispensable elements for most applications of flexible, stretchable, and wearable electronics. Current fabrication methods for these metal conductors are mainly based on conventional microfabrication procedures that have been migrated from Si semiconductor industries, which face significant challenges for organic-based compliant substrates. This Research News highlights a recently developed full-solution processing strategy, polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD), which is particularly suitable for the roll-to-roll, low-cost fabrication of high-performance compliant metal conductors (Cu, Ni, Ag, and Au) on a wide variety of organic substrates including plastics, elastomers, papers, and textiles. This paper presents i) the principles of PAMD, and how to use it for making ii) flexible, stretchable, and wearable conductive metal electrodes, iii) patterned metal interconnects, and d) 3D stretchable and compressible metal sponges. A critical perspective on this emerging strategy is also provided. PMID:24458846

  1. Processing of metal and oxygen from lunar deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Constance F.

    1992-01-01

    On the moon, some whole rocks may be ores for abundant elements, such as oxygen, but beneficiation will be important if metallic elements are sought from raw lunar dirt. In the extraction process, a beneficiated metallic ore, such as an oxide, sulfide, carbonate, or silicate mineral, is converted to reduced metal. A variety of plausible processing technologies, which includes recovery of meteoritic iron, and processing of lunar ilmenite, are described in this report.

  2. Vacuum deposited polymer/metal films for optical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.D.; Martin, P.M.; Gross, M.E.; Coronado, C.; Greenwell, E.

    1995-04-01

    Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Tantalum/Polymer/Aluminum Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuun web coating operation on polyester substrates with a new, high speed deposition process. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 0.8{mu}m. This new vacuum processing technique has been shown to be capable of deposition line speeds in excess of 500 linear meters/minute. Central to this technique is a new position process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process -- for Polymer Multi-Layer. Also, vacuum deposited, index matched, polymer/CaF{sub 2} composites were fabricated from monomer slurries that were subsequently cured with LTV light. This second technique is called the Liquid Multi-Layer (or LML) process. Each of these polymer processes is compatible with each other and with conventional vacuum deposition processes such as sputtering or evaporation.

  3. Coulomb frustration of the multiphoton ionization of metallic clusters under intense EUV FEL evidenced by ion spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, T.; Devetta, M.; Milani, P.; Motomura, K.; Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Yamada, A.; Okunishi, M.; Nagaya, K.; Iwayama, H.; Sugishima, A.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Saito, N.; Coreno, M.; Fennel, Th; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Togashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.; Piseri, P.

    2015-12-01

    Free electron laser light sources delivering high intensity pulses of short wavelength radiation are opening novel possibilities for the investigation of matter at the nanoscale and for the discovery and understanding of new physical processes occurring at the exotic transient states they make accessible. Strong ionization of atomic constituents of a nano-sized sample is a representative example of such processes and the understanding of ionization dynamics is crucial for a realistic description of the experiments. We report here on multiple ionization experiments on free clusters of titanium, a high cohesive energy metal. The time of flight ion spectra reveal a saturation of the cluster ionization at ∼1016 photons per pulse per cm2. Our results also show a clear lack of any explosion process, opposite to what is observed for a rare-gas cluster under similar conditions. A simple and generalized multi-step ionization model including Coulomb frustration of the photoemission process effectively reproduces with a good agreement the main features of the experimental observation and points to an interpretation of the data involving a substantial energy deposition into the cluster through electronic system heating upon scattering events within photoemission.

  4. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in Varanasi City, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajesh Kumar; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Marshall, Fiona M

    2008-07-01

    Rapid growth in urbanization and industrialization in developing countries may significantly contribute in heavy metal contamination of vegetables through atmospheric depositions. In the present study, an assessment was made to investigate the spatial and seasonal variations in deposition rates of heavy metals and its contribution to contamination of palak (Beta vulgaris). Samples of bulk atmospheric deposits and Beta vulgaris for analysis of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb were collected from different sampling locations differing in traffic density and land use patterns. The results showed that the sampling locations situated in industrial or commercial areas with heavy traffic load showed significantly elevated levels of Cu, Zn and Cd deposition rate as compared to those situated in residential areas with low traffic load. The deposition rates of Cu, Zn and Cd were significantly higher in summer and winter as compared to rainy season, however, Pb deposition rate was significantly higher in rainy and summer seasons as compared to winter season. Atmospheric depositions have significantly elevated the levels of heavy metals in B. vulgaris collected during evening as compared to those collected in morning hours. The study further showed that local population has maximum exposure to Cd contamination through consumption of B. vulgaris. The present study clearly points out the urban and industrial activities of a city have potential to elevate the levels of heavy metals in the atmospheric deposits, which may consequently contaminate the food chain and thus posing health risk to the local population. PMID:17879134

  5. Metallicity and star formation history of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Ma, Er

    1993-01-01

    Using population synthesis method, the star formation history in globular clusters has been studied. No single star formation mode with a constant star formation rate (SER) and an invariable initial mass function (IMF) can fit the observations of globular clusters. There are at least two stages of star formation: a pollution stage and a starburst stage. In the pollution stage, either the IMF is very peculiar (only form massive stars), or its SFR is so small that the low-mass stars form only a little. A starburst then follows to form most stars in the globular cluster. Within the framework of Fall and Rees'model, the collisions between warm clouds in the two phase medium may provide a suitable external cause to stimulate the starburst.

  6. Metallicity and star formation history of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Ma, Er

    1993-03-01

    Using population synthesis method, the star formation history in globular clusters has been studied. No single star formation mode with a constant star formation rate (SER) and an invariable initial mass function (IMF) can fit the observations of globular clusters. There are at least two stages of star formation: a pollution stage and a starburst stage. In the pollution stage, either the IMF is very peculiar (only form massive stars), or its SFR is so small that the low-mass stars form only a little. A starburst then follows to form most stars in the globular cluster. Within the framework of Fall and Rees' model, the collisions between warm clouds in the two phase medium may provide a suitable external cause to stimulate the starburst.

  7. X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of Boron-Nitride Clusters Deposited by Ion-Plating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohzuki, H.; Motoyama, M.; Kaneyoshi, T.; Kowada, Y.; Kawai, J.; Adachi, H.

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN) films were deposited on a silicon substrate by varying the deposition time, using a reactive ion-plating method. In order to investigate the growth mechanism of c-BN films, these c-BN films were characterized by x-ray emission spectra of boron (B K x-ray emission spectra), infrared absorption spectra, selected area diffraction patterns, and TEM microstructures. It was found that the BN film with sp2 bonding formed initially on the substrate and subsequently c-BN film formed. The c-BN film was composed of fine crystallites with a size of about 10 nm and with random orientation. In the case of the B K x-ray emission spectrum from the BN film with sp2 bonding, the intensity of the satellite peak at the short-wavelength side was extremely stronger than that of sp2-bonded BN-like turbostratic or hexagonal BN. As a result of calculation of the B K x-ray emission spectrum of BN using the discrete variational Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-Xα) method, it was found that the satellite peak intensity increased with formation of the fine BN cluster having two-coordinated boron (which has a dangling bond) and with decreasing size of the cluster. Therefore, it is considered that the BN film with sp2 bonding was composed of the very fine BN cluster having two-coordinated borons, and became the precursor of c-BN film at the interface between the substrate and c-BN film.

  8. Deposition of various metal, ceramic, and cermet coatings by an industrial-scale large area filtered arc deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, V.; Bowman, C.; VanVorous, D.; Wallace, J.

    2009-07-15

    Nearly defect-free nitride, carbide, and oxiceramic coatings have been deposited by a unidirectional dual large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) process. One LAFAD dual arc vapor plasma source was used in both gas ionization and coating deposition modes with and without vertical magnetic rastering of the plasma flow. Substrates made of different metal alloys, as well as carbide and ceramics, were installed at different vertical positions on the 0.5 m diameter turntable of the industrial-scale batch coating system which was rotated at 12 rpm to assess deposition rates and coating thickness uniformity. Targets of the same or different compositions were installed on the primary cathodic arc sources of the LAFAD plasma source to deposit a variety of coating compositions by mixing the metal vapor and reactive gaseous components in a magnetically confined, strongly ionized plasma flow with large kinetic energy. The maximum deposition rate typically ranged from 1.5 {mu}m/h for TiCr/TiCrN to 2.5 {mu}m/h for Ti/TiN multilayer and AlN single layer coatings, and up to 6 {mu}m/h for AlCr-based oxiceramic coatings for primary cathode current ranging from 120 to 140 A. When the arc current was increased to 200 A, the deposition rates of TiN-based coatings were as high as 5 {mu}m/h. The vertical coating thickness uniformity was {+-}15% inside of a 150 mm area without vertical rastering. Vertical rastering increased the uniform coating deposition area up to 250 mm. The coating thickness distribution was well correlated with the output ion current distribution as measured by a multisection ion collector probe. Coatings were characterized for thickness, surface profile, adhesion, hardness, and elemental composition. Estimates of electrical resistivity indicated good dielectric properties for most of the TiCrAlY-based oxiceramic, oxinitride, and nitride coatings. The multielement LAFAD plasma flow consisting of fully ionized metal vapor with a reactive gas ionization rate in

  9. Modeling electrochemical deposition inside nanotubes to obtain metal-semiconductor multiscale nanocables or conical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Konstantin; Mafé, Salvador; Stroeve, Pieter

    2005-08-01

    Nanocables with a radial metal-semiconductor heterostructure have recently been prepared by electrochemical deposition inside metal nanotubes. First, a bare nanoporous polycarbonate track-etched membrane is coated uniformly with a metal film by electroless deposition. The film forms a working electrode for further deposition of a semiconductor layer that grows radially inside the nanopore when the deposition rate is slow. We propose a new physical model for the nanocable synthesis and study the effects of the deposited species concentration, potential-dependent reaction rate, and nanopore dimensions on the electrochemical deposition. The problem involves both axial diffusion through the nanopore and radial transport to the nanopore surface, with a surface reaction rate that depends on the axial position and the time. This is so because the radial potential drop across the deposited semiconductor layer changes with the layer thickness through the nanopore. Since axially uniform nanocables are needed for most applications, we consider the relative role of reaction and axial diffusion rates on the deposition process. However, in those cases where partial, empty-core deposition should be desirable (e.g., for producing conical nanopores to be used in single nanoparticle detection), we give conditions where asymmetric geometries can be experimentally realized. PMID:16852830

  10. Influence of substrate metal alloy type on the properties of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited using a novel ambient temperature deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Barry, J N; Cowley, A; McNally, P J; Dowling, D P

    2014-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are applied widely to enhance the level of osteointegration onto orthopedic implants. Atmospheric plasma spray (APS) is typically used for the deposition of these coatings; however, HA crystalline changes regularly occur during this high-thermal process. This article reports on the evaluation of a novel low-temperature (<47°C) HA deposition technique, called CoBlast, for the application of crystalline HA coatings. To-date, reports on the CoBlast technique have been limited to titanium alloy substrates. This study addresses the suitability of the CoBlast technique for the deposition of HA coatings on a number of alternative metal alloys utilized in the fabrication of orthopedic devices. In addition to titanium grade 5, both cobalt chromium and stainless steel 316 were investigated. In this study, HA coatings were deposited using both the CoBlast and the plasma sprayed techniques, and the resultant HA coating and substrate properties were evaluated and compared. The CoBlast-deposited HA coatings were found to present similar surface morphologies, interfacial properties, and composition irrespective of the substrate alloy type. Coating thickness however displayed some variation with the substrate alloy, ranging from 2.0 to 3.0 μm. This perhaps is associated with the electronegativity of the metal alloys. The APS-treated samples exhibited evidence of both coating, and significantly, substrate phase alterations for two metal alloys; titanium grade 5 and cobalt chrome. Conversely, the CoBlast-processed samples exhibited no phase changes in the substrates after depositions. The APS alterations were attributed to the brief, but high-intensity temperatures experienced during processing. PMID:23589437

  11. Charge Transfer and Dissociation in Collisions of Metal Clusters with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2002-10-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of charge transfer and dissociation in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is found only when the exact experimental time of flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. We demonstrate the validity of the simple physical image that consists in explaining evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer.

  12. Particle size effect for metal pollution analysis of atmospherically deposited dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rajhi, M. A.; Al-Shayeb, S. M.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    The metallic compositions of 231 atmospherically deposited dust samples obtained from widely-differing environments in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia, have been investigated in relation to the particle size distributions. Sample data are presented which show that particle size classification is very important when analysing dust samples for atmospheric metal pollution studies. By cross-correlation and comparison, it was found that the best way to express the results of the metal concentration trend was as an average of particle ratios. Correlations between the six metals studied, namely Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Li, were found for every particle size (eight categories) and reveal that the metal concentrations increased as the particle size decreased. On the basis of this work, it is strongly recommended that future international standards for metal pollutants in atmospherically deposited dusts should be based on particle size fractions.

  13. Formation of magnetic nanocolumns during vapor phase deposition of a metal-polymer nanocomposite: Experiments and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, L.; Greve, H.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Bonitz, M.

    2013-07-01

    Metal-polymer nanocomposites have been investigated extensively during the last years due to their interesting functional applications. They are often produced by vapor phase deposition which generally leads to the self-organized formation of spherical metallic nanoparticles in an organic matrix, while nanocolumns are only obtained under very specific conditions. Experiments [Greve et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 123103 (2006)] have shown that co-evaporation of the metallic and organic components in a simple single-step process can give rise to the formation of ultrahigh-density Fe-Ni-Co nanocolumnar structures embedded in a fluoropolymer matrix. Here we present a kinetic Monte Carlo approach which is based on a new model involving the depression of the melting point on the nanoscale and a critical nanoparticle size required for solidification. In addition we present new experimental results on the formation of Fe-Ni-Co nanocolumns in a Teflon AF matrix via co-evaporation down to a deposition temperature of -70 °C and also report the magnetic properties of the nanocolumns. The simulations provide a detailed understanding of the transition from spherical cluster growth to formation of elongated structures and are in good agreement with the experiments.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  15. The relationship between hydrocarbon and stratabound metal sulfide deposits: The Upper Smackover as an analog

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.E. )

    1991-03-01

    A genetic link between hydrocarbon and stratabound metal sulfide deposits has often been suggested. Both are thought to result from similar processes operating during the evolution of sedimentary basins, yet exploitable hydrocarbon and metal sulfide deposits are not found together. Consequently, the nature of their genetic relationship remains unclear. The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation of the North Louisiana Salt Basin - a prolific hydrocarbon producer - contains disseminated authigenic sulfide minerals reminiscent of stratabound metal sulfide deposits. The close association of these sulfide minerals with hydrocarbon deposits provides an opportunity to examine the relation between the two. The mineralogy and chemistry of late-stage authigenic phases in the Upper Smackover are similar to ore and 'gangue' minerals of Mississippi Valley-type sulfide deposits. The sulfide minerals consist of replacement or pore-filling sphalerite, galena, pyrite, marcasite, and chalcopyrite. The mineralogy and chemistry of the sulfides and their related minerals vary spatially throughout the basin. These variations reflect local processes and the sources of the sulfide minerals' constituents. The same source rocks from which hydrocarbons are derived are likely sources of base metal ions. Likewise, reduced sulfur is related to hydrocarbons by either a common source or by thermochemical sulfate reduction. Thus, spatial variations in chemistry and mineralogy of the late-stage authigenic sulfides of the Upper Smackover may be the key to understanding the relationship between hydrocarbons and stratabound metal sulfide deposits.

  16. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide thin films via pyrolysis of dimethylaluminum isopropoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Benjamin W.; Sweet, William J. III; Rogers, Bridget R.; Bierschenk, Eric J.; Gren, Cameron K.; Hanusa, Timothy P.

    2010-03-15

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide films were produced via pyrolysis of dimethylaluminum isopropoxide in a high vacuum reaction chamber in the 417-659 deg. C temperature range. Deposited films contained aluminum, oxygen, and carbon, and the carbon-to-aluminum ratio increased with increased deposition temperature. Aluminum-carbon bonding was observed in films deposited at 659 deg. C by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, but not in films deposited at 417 deg. C. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction controlled regime was 91 kJ/mol. The O/Al and C/Al ratios in the deposited films were greater and less than, respectively, the ratios predicted by the stoichiometry of the precursor. Flux analysis of the deposition process suggested that the observed film stoichiometries could be explained by the participation of oxygen-containing background gases present in the reactor at its base pressure.

  17. Dynamic screening of a localized hole during photoemission from a metal cluster

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy techniques have fueled the interest in the theoretical description of electronic processes taking place in the subfemtosecond time scale. Here we study the coupled dynamic screening of a localized hole and a photoelectron emitted from a metal cluster using a semi-classical model. Electron density dynamics in the cluster is calculated with time-dependent density functional theory, and the motion of the photoemitted electron is described classically. We show that the dynamic screening of the hole by the cluster electrons affects the motion of the photoemitted electron. At the very beginning of its trajectory, the photoemitted electron interacts with the cluster electrons that pile up to screen the hole. Within our model, this gives rise to a significant reduction of the energy lost by the photoelectron. Thus, this is a velocity-dependent effect that should be accounted for when calculating the average losses suffered by photoemitted electrons in metals. PMID:22873820

  18. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  19. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sonia; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  20. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  1. Selective Metal Deposition on a Phase-Separated Polymer Blend Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2013-07-01

    We report selective metal deposition on a phase-separated polymer blend surface. A polymer blend film consisting of polystyrene (PS) and a polystyrene-block-polybutadiene copolymer (PS-BR) was annealed, and a micro-phase-separated film was obtained. Pb was evaporated onto the phase-separated surface without an evaporation mask and was selectively deposited on the PS phase but not on the PS-BR phase. We achieved fine metal patterns corresponding to the microphase separation. This result suggests a novel method of preparing fine metal patterns for electronics and photonics.

  2. Carbon deposition on metallic surfaces studied by RF plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, J. A.; Coad, J. P.; Richards, E. W. T.; Stenhouse, I. A.

    1980-12-01

    The accumulation of carbonaceous deposits on surfaces exposed to gases containing hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide, such as the stainless steel fuel pins in an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor, is investigated by means of an RF plasma discharge system. Specimens of the 20/25/Nb steel used for the fuel pins and of copper were subjected to an RF plasma discharge of a CO/CH4 gas mixture, and the amounts and compositions of the deposits formed were determined. The steel is observed to acquire a significant deposit of carbon after 4 h in the discharge, while the copper remained essentially clean. When the steel is coated with a silica layer, however, it is also found to remain clean throughout its exposure, while nearby uncoated steel specimens were contaminated. Spectroscopic examination of the light emitted from the plasma in the vicinity of the specimens indicates that the carbonaceous deposition is induced largely by the catalytic activity of the steel surface itself, and that deposition can be prevented by the use of suitable coatings.

  3. Low-metallicity Young Clusters in the Outer Galaxy. II. Sh 2-208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Chikako; Kobayashi, Naoto; Saito, Masao; Izumi, Natsuko

    2016-05-01

    We obtained deep near-infrared images of Sh 2-208, one of the lowest-metallicity H ii regions in the Galaxy, [O/H] = ‑0.8 dex. We detected a young cluster in the center of the H ii region with a limiting magnitude of K = 18.0 mag (10σ), which corresponds to a mass detection limit of ∼0.2 M⊙. This enables the comparison of star-forming properties under low metallicity with those of the solar neighborhood. We identified 89 cluster members. From the fitting of the K-band luminosity function (KLF), the age and distance of the cluster are estimated to be ∼0.5 Myr and ∼4 kpc, respectively. The estimated young age is consistent with the detection of strong CO emission in the cluster region and the estimated large extinction of cluster members (AV ∼ 4–25 mag). The observed KLF suggests that the underlying initial mass function (IMF) of the low-metallicity cluster is not significantly different from canonical IMFs in the solar neighborhood in terms of both high-mass slope and IMF peak (characteristic mass). Despite the very young age, the disk fraction of the cluster is estimated at only 27% ± 6%, which is significantly lower than those in the solar metallicity. Those results are similar to Sh 2-207, which is another star-forming region close to Sh 2-208 with a separation of 12 pc, suggesting that their star-forming activities in low-metallicity environments are essentially identical to those in the solar neighborhood, except for the disk dispersal timescale. From large-scale mid-infrared images, we suggest that sequential star formation is taking place in Sh 2-207, Sh 2-208, and the surrounding region, triggered by an expanding bubble with a ∼30 pc radius.

  4. Colorimetric recognition of different enzymology-concerning transition metals based on a hybrid cluster complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Hua; Yuan, Wen-Tao; Zheng, Hong; Xu, Jin-Gou

    2004-07-01

    A hybrid cluster complex, formed by chelating a chromogenic ligand to a [2Fe-2S] cluster, sensitively exhibited differential colorimetric responses towards Hg2+, Cd2+, Cr3+, Pb2, Sn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Co2+ in water at physiological pH. Speciation of some of these metal elements, such as Cr(III) and Sn(IV), was also studied by UV/Vis absorption. PMID:15293390

  5. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1990-06-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs.

  6. A DFT study of Ni clusters deposition on titania and zirconia (101) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosoni, Sergio; Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Density functional calculations are employed to simulate the deposition of an isolated Ni atom and a Ni10 particle on the stoichiometric and reduced anatase TiO2 (101) and tetragonal ZrO2 (101) surfaces. The main purpose of this work is to study the modification of the electronic structure of the oxide induced by the metal, aiming at the understanding of the physical properties of new catalysts for biomass conversion. When the adsorption of a Ni atom takes place on stoichiometric surfaces, no major charge transfer is observed. On reduced titania, and more pronouncedly on reduced zirconia, the Ni atom is negatively charged, provided that the vacancy is in direct contact with the adsorbed metal atom. For Ni10, on titania the bonding is dominated by the hybridization of the metal and the oxide states but we did not find evidence for a direct reduction of the oxide via formation of Ti3 + states. For Ni10 on zirconia, the metal particle is positively charged on the stoichiometric surface and negatively charged on the reduced one but, again, there is no indication of a direct reduction of the oxide. Finally, the reverse oxygen spillover is considered as a possible route to reduce the oxide support. The result is that Ni10 promotes oxygen spillover on titania almost spontaneously, while on zirconia this process is thermodynamically unfavourable.

  7. Metal-AlN cermet solar selective coatings deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Chu

    1998-02-01

    A series of metal-aluminium nitride (M-AlN) cermet materials for solar selective coatings was deposited by a novel direct current (d.c.) magnetron sputtering technology. Aluminium nitride was used as the ceramic component in the cermets, and stainless steel (SS), nickel-based alloy 0022-3727/31/4/003/img1 (NiCr), molybdenum-based alloy 0022-3727/31/4/003/img2 (TZM) and tungsten were used as the metallic components. The aluminium nitride ceramic and metallic components of the cermets were deposited by simultaneously running both an aluminium target and another metallic target in a gas mixture of argon and nitrogen. The ceramic component was deposited by d.c. reactive sputtering and the metallic component by d.c. non-reactive sputtering. The total sputtering gas pressure was 0.8-1.0 Pa and the partial pressure of reactive nitrogen gas was set at 0.020-0.025 Pa which is sufficiently high to ensure that a nearly pure AlN ceramic sublayer was deposited by d.c. reactive sputtering. Because of the excellent nitriding resistance of stainless steel and the other alloys and metal, a nearly pure metallic sublayer was deposited by d.c. sputtering at this low nitrogen partial pressure. A multilayered system, consisting of alternating metallic and AlN ceramic sublayers, was deposited by substrate rotation. This multisublayer system can be considered as a macrohomogeneous cermet layer with metal volume fraction determined by controlling the thicknesses of metallic and ceramic sublayers. Following this procedure, M-AlN cermet solar selective coatings with a double cermet layer structure were deposited. The films of these selective surfaces have the following structure: a low metal volume fraction cermet layer is placed on a high metal volume fraction cermet layer which in turn is placed on an aluminium metal infrared reflection layer. The top surface layer consists of an aluminium nitride antireflection layer. A solar absorptance of 0.92-0.96 and a normal emittance of 0.03-0.05 at

  8. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  9. Width of the plasmon resonance in metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, B.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    1995-05-01

    The width of the plasmon resonance in the clusters Na+9, Na+21, and Na+41 is investigated in the framework of the structure-averaged jellium model and compared with recent experimental data. The two leading mechanisms for the line broadening are fragmentation of the resonance into nearby 1ph states and splitting through thermal quadrupole fluctuations. The fragmentation becomes activated mainly through octupole fluctuations and it gives the dominating contribution to the width.

  10. On the interaction between perfect interstitial clusters and a vacancy in BCC, FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Puigvi, Mary Angels; Serra, Anna; de Diego, Nieves; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2004-01-01

    Point defects and defect clusters have been observed in metals irradiated by high-energy particles. Interactions of these defects between themselves and with existing microstructure features cause microstructure evolution and lead to changes in mechanical and physical properties of the irradiated materials. Models for prediction of radiation-induced changes should include details of reactions involving defects, and so in this paper we present the results of atomic-scale computer modelling of interactions between a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and a single vacancy in models of bcc, fcc and hcp metals. The vacancy is taken to lie on or within the glide prism of the cluster. This type of reaction is considered to be one of the most frequent because formation of SIA clusters, particularly glissile clusters, is commonly observed in high-energy displacement cascades in all metals. The interaction depends strongly on the dislocation nature of the cluster and therefore these interactions are different in the three crystal structures. Vacancy-SIA recombination, in particular, is inhibited by dissociation of the SIA loop on its glide prism.

  11. Synthesis and catalytic properties of metal clusters encapsulated within small-pore (SOD, GIS, ANA) zeolites.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sarika; Wu, Zhijie; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-10-24

    The synthesis protocols for encapsulation of metal clusters reported here expand the diversity in catalytic chemistries made possible by the ability of microporous solids to select reactants, transition states, and products on the basis of their molecular size. We report a synthesis strategy for the encapsulation of noble metals and their oxides within SOD (Sodalite, 0.28 nm × 0.28 nm), GIS (Gismondine, 0.45 nm × 0.31 nm), and ANA (Analcime, 0.42 nm × 0.16 nm) zeolites. Encapsulation was achieved via direct hydrothermal synthesis for SOD and GIS using metal precursors stabilized by ammonia or organic amine ligands, which prevent their decomposition or precipitation as colloidal hydroxides at the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis (<380 K) and favor interactions between metal precursors and incipient aluminosilicate nuclei during self-assembly of microporous frameworks. The synthesis of ANA requires higher crystallization temperatures (~415 K) and high pH (>12), thereby causing precipitation of even ligand-stabilized metal precursors as hydroxides. As a result, encapsulation was achieved by the recrystallization of metal clusters containing GIS into ANA, which retained these metal clusters within voids throughout the GIS-ANA transformation. PMID:23016946

  12. Cage Opening of a Carborane Ligand by Metal Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Os3 (CO)10 (NCMe)2 with closo-o-C2 B10 H10 has yielded two interconvertible isomers Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -4,5,9-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 a) and Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -3,4,8-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 b) formed by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster. Two BH bonds of the o-C2 B10 H10 were activated in its addition to the osmium cluster. A second triosmium cluster was added to the 1 a/1 b mixture to yield the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)2 (μ3 -4,5,9-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H7 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)3 (2) that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. When heated, 2 was transformed to the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)(μ3 -3,4,8-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H8 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H) (3) by a novel opening of the carborane cage with loss of H2 . PMID:26971388

  13. Temporal stability of magic-number metal clusters: beyond the shell closing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desireddy, Anil; Kumar, Santosh; Guo, Jingshu; Bolan, Michael D.; Griffith, Wendell P.; Bigioni, Terry P.

    2013-02-01

    The anomalous stability of magic-number metal clusters has been associated with closed geometric and electronic shells and the opening of HOMO-LUMO gaps. Despite this enhanced stability, magic-number clusters are known to decay and react in the condensed phase to form other products. Improving our understanding of their decay mechanisms and developing strategies to control or eliminate cluster instability is a priority, to develop a more complete theory of their stability, to avoid studying mixtures of clusters produced by the decay of purified materials, and to enable technology development. Silver clusters are sufficiently reactive to facilitate the study of the ambient temporal stability of magic-number metal clusters and to begin to understand their decay mechanisms. Here, the solution phase stability of a series of silver:glutathione (Ag:SG) clusters was studied as a function of size, pH and chemical environment. Cluster stability was found to be a non-monotonic function of size. Electrophoretic separations showed that the dominant mechanism involved the redistribution of mass toward smaller sizes, where the products were almost exclusively previously known cluster sizes. Optical absorption spectra showed that the smaller clusters evolved toward the two most stable cluster sizes. The net surface charge was found to play an important role in cluster stabilization although charge screening had no effect on stability, contrary to DLVO theory. The decay mechanism was found to involve the loss of Ag+ ions and silver glutathionates. Clusters could be stabilized by the addition of Ag+ ions and destabilized by either the addition of glutathione or the removal of Ag+ ions. Clusters were also found to be most stable in near neutral pH, where they had a net negative surface charge. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the control of post-synthesis stability and chemical decay of magic-number metal clusters, which could be used to develop design principles

  14. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  15. Plasmon-Enhanced Multi-Ionization of Small Metal Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köller, L.; Schumacher, M.; Köhn, J.; Teuber, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    1999-05-01

    The multiply charging process of platinum cluster ions under intense field conditions show a strong dependence on the width of the femtosecond laser pulse. Increasing the pulse width from 140 to 600 fs while keeping the energy per pulse constant leads to an increase in the highest observed charge state z* of the ejected atoms from z* = 13 to z* = 20. This increased charging efficiency is explained by the evolution of the plasmon energy of the metal cluster upon the change in electron density during the Coulomb explosion process. Thus the time dependence of the charging of a cluster in an intense light field has been observed in real time.

  16. A study of rotating globular clusters. The case of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 4372 is a poorly studied old, very metal-poor globular cluster (GC) located in the inner Milky Way halo. Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. We build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve using this kinematic data set. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting algorithm. From this, we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as rh = 3.44' ± 0.04' and ɛ = 0.08 ± 0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km s-1) for its metallicity. This puts it in line, however, with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs: M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC Mdyn = 2.0 ± 0.5 × 105M⊙ based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M⊙/L⊙, representative of an old, purely stellar population. Based on

  17. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings from metal (Mg alloy)-drug deposited onto medical implant by laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir; Serbezov, Svetlin

    2013-03-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are active implants whose function is to create healing effects. The current requirements for active medical coatings for Drug-eluting medical implants are to be biocompatible, biodegradable, polymer free, mechanically stable and enable a controlled release of one or more drugs and defined degradation. This brings hybrid nanocomposite coatings into focus especially in the field of cardiovascular implants. We studied the properties of Metal (Mg alloy)-Paclitaxel coatings obtained by novel Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition Technique (LAAD) onto cardiovascular stents from 316 LVM stainless steel material. The morphology and topology of coatings were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Comparative measurements were made of the morphology and topology of hybrid, polymer free nanocomposite coatings deposited by LAAD and polymerdrug coatings deposited by classical spray technique. The coatings obtained by LAAD are homogeneous without damages and cracks. Metal nanoparticles with sizes from 40 nm to 230 nm were obtained in drug matrixes. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of metal nanoparticles presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The new technology opens up possibilities to obtain new hybrid nanocomposite coatings with applications in medicine, pharmacy and biochemistry.

  18. Controlled insulator-to-metal transformation in printable polymer composites with nanometal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sankaran; Chia, Perq-Jon; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K.-H.

    2007-02-01

    Although organic semiconductors have received the most attention, the development of compatible passive elements, such as interconnects and electrodes, is also central to plastic electronics. For this, ligand-protected metal-cluster films have been shown to anneal at low temperatures below 250∘C to highly conductive metal films, but they suffer from cracking and inadequate substrate adhesion. Here, we report printable metal-cluster-polymer nanocomposites that anneal to a controlled-percolation nanostructure without complete sintering of the metal clusters. This overcomes the previous challenges while still retaining the desired low transformation temperatures. Highly water- and alcohol-soluble gold clusters (75mgml-1) were synthesized and homogeneously dispersed into poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) to give a material with annealed d.c. conductivity tuneable between 10-4 and 105Scm-1. These composites can inject holes efficiently into all-printed polymer organic transistors. The insulator-metal transformation can also be electrically induced at 1MVcm-1, suggesting possible memory applications.

  19. A review of lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Huang, Jun; Yann Liaw, Bor; Metzler, Viktor; Zhang, Jianbo

    2014-05-01

    Major aspects related to lithium deposition in lithium-ion and lithium metal secondary batteries are reviewed. For lithium-ion batteries with carbonaceous anode, lithium deposition may occur under harsh charging conditions such as overcharging or charging at low temperatures. The major technical solutions include: (1) applying electrochemical models to predict the critical conditions for deposition initiation; (2) preventions by improved battery design and material modification; (3) applying adequate charging protocols to inhibit lithium deposition. For lithium metal secondary batteries, the lithium deposition is the inherent reaction during charging. The major technical solutions include: (1) the use of mechanistic models to elucidate and control dendrite initiation and growth; (2) engineering surface morphology of the lithium deposition to avoid dendrite formation via adjusting the composition and concentration of the electrolyte; (3) controlling battery working conditions. From a survey of the literature, the areas that require further study are proposed; e.g., refining the lithium deposition criteria, developing an effective AC self pre-heating method for low-temperature charging of lithium-ion batteries, and clarifying the role the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays in determining the deposition morphology; to facilitate a refined control of the lithium deposition.

  20. Metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors based on gallium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Bolat, Sami; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2014-10-01

    Proof-of-concept, first metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors based on nanocrystalline gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by low-temperature hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition are demonstrated. Electrical and optical characteristics of the fabricated devices are investigated. Dark current values as low as 14 pA at a 30 V reverse bias are obtained. Fabricated devices exhibit a 15× UV/VIS rejection ratio based on photoresponsivity values at 200 nm (UV) and 390 nm (VIS) wavelengths. These devices can offer a promising alternative for flexible optoelectronics and the complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration of such devices.

  1. Metal, Semiconductor, and Carbon Cluster Studies Including the Discovery and Characterization of Carbon -60: Buckminsterfullerene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, James Richard

    Experiments using the laser vaporization technique for production of metal clusters have been performed. The reactions of neutral metal clusters with various gases have been studied using a fast flow reactor. Dramatic reactivity variations were observed which depended on cluster size, metal, and reactant. A laser vaporization disc source has been developed for the study of semiconductor clusters. Some preliminary studies on neutral germanium and silicon clusters were performed. Their ionization potentials have been bracketed and the clusters were found to fragment by a fissioning process and to have long lived (100 nanoseconds) excited electronic states. A detailed study has been undertaken into carbon clusters. Laser synthesis of astrophysically important polyyne molecules such as H-C-(C-C)_{ rm 2n}-N has been done. Chains containing up to 22 carbon atoms are formed in a vaporized carbon and reactant gas plasma. A photophysically stable and chemically inert cluster, C_{60}, has been discovered and hypothesized to have the structure of a truncated icosahedron. All even clusters in the 60 atom size range were found to be inert to highly reactive gases, while odd clusters readily reacted. The results are consistent with a whole series (30-90 atoms) of closed cage-like structures. Closure of even clusters only is possible via the inclusion of twelve pentagons into a hexagonal network. Odd clusters show neither the photophysical nor chemical stability of the even clusters. A mechanism for the formation of spherical soot particles has been developed. Stable organometallic complexes of the formula C_{rm 2n}M (20 < n < 40 and M = La, Ba, Sr, Ca) have been laser synthesized. The dominant complex observed was C_{60}M ^+. These species are photophysically stable, chemically inert, and no C_{rm 2n}M_2^ecies were detected. The ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrum of C_{60} has been measured. Because excited electronic states are not expected to live long in a molecule

  2. Dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes - a new class of single source precursors for deposition of metal selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sajid N.; Akhtar, Masood; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Qadeer Malik, Abdul; Azad Malik, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    We report here a new synthetic approach for convenient and high yield synthesis of dialkyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes. A number of diphenyldiselenophosphinato-metal as well as diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal complexes have been synthesized and used as precursors for deposition of semiconductor thin films and nanoparticles. Cubic Cu2-xSe and tetragonal CuInSe2 thin films have been deposited by AACVD at 400, 450 and 500 °C whereas cubic PbSe and tetragonal CZTSe thin films have been deposited through doctor blade method followed by annealing. SEM investigations revealed significant differences in morphology of the films deposited at different temperatures. Preparation of Cu2-xSe and In2Se3 nanoparticles using diisopropyldiselenophosphinato-metal precursors has been carried out by colloidal method in HDA/TOP system. Cu2-xSe nanoparticles (grown at 250 °C) and In2Se3 nanoparticles (grown at 270 °C) have a mean diameter of 5.0 ± 1.2 nm and 13 ± 2.5 nm, respectively.

  3. Solution-Membrane Equilibrium at Metal-Deposited Cation-Exchange Membranes: Chronopotentiometric Characterization of Metal-Modified Membranes.

    PubMed

    Shahi; Prakash; Ramachandraiah; Rangarajan; Vasudevan

    1999-08-01

    Copper- and lead-deposited interpolymer cationic membranes have been prepared by electroless plating by an ion-exchange method and characterized by chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry. The parameters such as transition time (tau), Itau1/2, the potential drop (E0) across these membranes immediately after the application of constant current (I), and the height of the potential jump (DeltaE) across the membrane at tau have been measured by chronopotentiometry and compared with those of plain membranes. The approximate percentage of metal coverage and the number of ionic sites masked by the deposited metal in terms of NaCl concentration have been estimated from the differences in Itau1/2 values of plain and metal-deposited membranes. The quantity of metal deposited in a unit area of the membrane surface was measured by differential pulse polarography. The oxidation and reduction peak potentials corresponding to Cu(0)/Cu(II) and Pb(0)/Pb(II) couples were identified by cyclic voltammetry at pH 2.8 and 4.5 of 0.2 M CH3COONa-H2SO4. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10395776

  4. Synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W; Stair, Peter C

    2013-08-20

    Supported metal nanoparticles are among the most important catalysts for many practical reactions, including petroleum refining, automobile exhaust treatment, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The catalytic performance strongly depends on the size, composition, and structure of the metal nanoparticles, as well as the underlying support. Scientists have used conventional synthesis methods including impregnation, ion exchange, and deposition-precipitation to control and tune these factors, to establish structure-performance relationships, and to develop better catalysts. Meanwhile, chemists have improved the stability of metal nanoparticles against sintering by the application of protective layers, such as polymers and oxides that encapsulate the metal particle. This often leads to decreased catalytic activity due to a lack of precise control over the thickness of the protective layer. A promising method of catalyst synthesis is atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a variation on chemical vapor deposition in which metals, oxides, and other materials are deposited on surfaces by a sequence of self-limiting reactions. The self-limiting character of these reactions makes it possible to achieve uniform deposits on high-surface-area porous solids. Therefore, design and synthesis of advanced catalysts on the nanoscale becomes possible through precise control over the structure and composition of the underlying support, the catalytic active sites, and the protective layer. In this Account, we describe our advances in the synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by ALD. After a short introduction to the technique of ALD, we show several strategies for metal catalyst synthesis by ALD that take advantage of its self-limiting feature. Monometallic and bimetallic catalysts with precise control over the metal particle size, composition, and structure were achieved by combining ALD sequences, surface treatments, and deposition temperature control. Next, we describe

  5. Metal dust deposition in a shotgun wound associated with barrel modification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew S; Bowes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Contact-range gunshot wounds commonly demonstrate deposition of black soot in and around the wound. Deposition of other visible pigments originating from the firearm has not been specifically described. In the current case, an adult male was found dead adjacent to a shotgun fixed in a vice grip with a modified, shortened barrel. A handheld, powered, metal grinding wheel was nearby. Autopsy revealed an intraoral gunshot wound, including soot deposition in and around the mouth and within the wound track. In addition, there was a peculiar, gray, lustrous film on the lips, gingiva, and anterior teeth. The material was concentrated around the most severe areas of injury in the anterior mouth and easily rubbed off with a cotton swab. It was not visualized in the rest of the mouth and not present in the larynx, or the esophagus. Overall, our opinion is that this unique, gray, lustrous film represents deposition of fine metallic dust that accumulated in the barrel of the shotgun during its modification with the grinding wheel. This type of unique pigment deposition should be recognized by forensic pathologists as possibly being related to the discharge of a firearm with a recently modified barrel or other cause for fine metallic dust accumulation within the barrel. Depending on the circumstances of the case, collection of samples of such metal dust deposits could be indicated for subsequent analysis. PMID:26782960

  6. ZnO deposition on metal substrates: Relating fabrication, morphology, and wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaini, Sara S.; Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Carey, Van P.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-05-01

    It is not common practice to deposit thin films on metal substrates, especially copper, which is a common heat exchanger metal and practical engineering material known for its heat transfer properties. While single crystal substrates offer ideal surfaces with uniform structure for compatibility with oxide deposition, metallic surfaces needed for industrial applications exhibit non-idealities that complicate the fabrication of oxide nanostructure arrays. The following study explored different ZnO fabrication techniques to deposit a (super)hydrophobic thin film of ZnO on a metal substrate, specifically copper, in order to explore its feasibility as an enhanced condensing surface. ZnO was selected for its non-toxicity, ability to be made (super)hydrophobic with hierarchical roughness, and its photoinduced hydrophilicity characteristic, which could be utilized to pattern it to have both hydrophobic-hydrophilic regions. We investigated the variation of ZnO's morphology and wetting state, using SEMs and sessile drop contact angle measurements, as a function of different fabrication techniques: sputtering, pulsed laser deposition (PLD), electrodeposition and annealing Zn. We successfully fabricated (super)hydrophobic ZnO on a mirror finish, commercially available copper substrate using the scalable electrodeposition technique. PLD for ZnO deposition did not prove viable, as the ZnO samples on metal substrates were hydrophilic and the process does not lend itself to scalability. The annealed Zn sheets did not exhibit consistent wetting state results.

  7. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  8. Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A.; De Rosa, H.; Cultrera, L.

    2010-11-10

    We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

  9. Phosphorus vacancy cluster model for phosphorus diffusion gettering of metals in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Renyu; Trzynadlowski, Bart; Dunham, Scott T.

    2014-02-07

    In this work, we develop models for the gettering of metals in silicon by high phosphorus concentration. We first performed ab initio calculations to determine favorable configurations of complexes involving phosphorus and transition metals (Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Ti, Mo, and W). Our ab initio calculations found that the P{sub 4}V cluster, a vacancy surrounded by 4 nearest-neighbor phosphorus atoms, which is the most favorable inactive P species in heavily doped Si, strongly binds metals such as Cu, Cr, Ni, and Fe. Based on the calculated binding energies, we build continuum models to describe the P deactivation and Fe gettering processes with model parameters calibrated against experimental data. In contrast to previous models assuming metal-P{sub 1}V or metal-P{sub 2}V as the gettered species, the binding of metals to P{sub 4}V satisfactorily explains the experimentally observed strong gettering behavior at high phosphorus concentrations.

  10. Response of mosses to the heavy metal deposition in Poland--an overview.

    PubMed

    Grodzińska, K; Szarek-Łukaszewska, G

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn) in Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt., a common moss species, were used to indicate relative levels of atmospheric deposition in Poland in the years 1975-1998. Spatial and temporal differences in the heavy metal concentrations in mosses were found. The highest concentration of heavy metals was recorded in the moss samples from the southern, most industrialised part of the country, and the lowest from north-eastern Poland. A significant decrease of heavy metals over 20 years (1975-1998) was found. PMID:11584642

  11. Polyoxometalate Cluster-Incorporated Metal-Organic Framework Hierarchical Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobin; Chen, Shuangming; Chen, Yifeng; Sun, Hongyu; Song, Li; He, Wei; Wang, Xun

    2016-06-01

    A simple method to prepare metal-organic framework (MOF) nanotubes is developed by employing polyoxometalates (POMs) as modulators. The local structure of the MOF nanotubes is investigated combining XANES and EXAFS studies. These nanotubes show both an excellent catalytic performance in the detoxification of sulfur compounds in O2 atmosphere and a remarkable cycling stability as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27101564

  12. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-08-01

    We investigated stellar spatial density distribution around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) in order to find extended stellar substructures. Wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data were taken using the WFCAM near-infrared array on United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The contamination of field stars around clusters was minimised by applying a statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color-magnitude diagram. In two-dimensional isodensity contour map, we find that all four of the globular clusters shows tidal stripping stellar features in the form of tidal tails (NGC 6266 and NGC 6723) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723). The stellar substructures extend toward the Galactic centre or anticancer, and the proper motion direction of the clusters. The radial density profiles of the clusters also depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and show overdensity feature with a break in a slope of profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results indicate that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge have experienced strong tidal force or bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy. These observational results provide us further constraints to understand the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  13. Electronic structure and magnetism of transition metal doped Zn12O12 clusters: Role of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Nirmal; Dasgupta, Indra; Sanyal, Biplab

    2010-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the energetics and magnetic properties of ZnO clusters doped with 3d transition metals (TMs) using ab initio density functional calculations in the framework of generalized gradient approximation+Hubbard U (GGA+U) method. Our results within GGA+U for all 3d dopants except Ti indicate that antiferromagnetic interaction dominates in a neutral, defect-free cluster. Formation energies are calculated to identify the stable defects in the ZnO cluster. We have analyzed in details the role of these defects to stabilize ferromagnetism when the cluster is doped with Mn, Fe, and Co. Our calculations reveal that in the presence of charged defects the TM atoms residing at the surface of the cluster may have an unusual oxidation state, that plays an important role to render the cluster ferromagnetic. Defect induced magnetism in ZnO clusters without any TM dopants is also analyzed. These results on ZnO clusters may have significant contributions in the nanoengineering of defects to achieve desired ferromagnetic properties for spintronic applications.

  14. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  15. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals in Soil Affected by Different Soil Uses of Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, J. A.; Faz, A.; Martínez-Martínez, S.; Bech, J.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metals are a natural constituent of rocks, sediments and soils. However, the heavy metal content of top soils is also dependent on other sources than weathering of the indigenous minerals; input from atmospheric deposition seems to be an important pathway. Atmospheric deposition is defined as the process by which atmospheric pollutants are transferred to terrestrial and aquatic surfaces and is commonly classified as either dry or wet. The interest in atmospheric deposition has increased over the past decade due to concerns about the effects of deposited materials on the environment. Dry deposition provides a significant mechanism for the removal of particles from the atmosphere and is an important pathway for the loading of heavy metals into the soil ecosystem. Within the last decade, an intensive effort has been made to determine the atmospheric heavy metal deposition in both urban and rural areas. The main objective of this study was to identification of atmospheric heavy metals deposition in soil affected by different soil uses. Study area is located in Murcia Province (southeast of Spain), in the surroundings of Murcia City. The climate is typically semiarid Mediterranean with an annual average temperature of 18°C and precipitation of 350 mm. In order to determine heavy metals atmospheric deposition a sampling at different depths (0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-15 cm and 15-30 cm) was carried out in 7 sites including agricultural soils, two industrial areas and natural sites. The samples were taken to the laboratory where, dried, passed through a 2 mm sieve, and grinded. For the determination of the moisture the samples were weighed and oven dried at 105 °C for 24 h. The total amounts of metals (Pb, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni and Cr) were determined by digesting the samples with nitric/perchoric acids and measuring with ICP-MS. Results showed that zinc contamination in some samples of industrial areas was detected, even this contamination reaches 30 cm depth; thus it is

  16. Microplasmas for direct, substrate-independent deposition of nanostructured metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Katherine E.; Pebley, Andrew C.; Butala, Megan M.; Zhang, Jinping; Stucky, Galen D.; Gordon, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A general, substrate-independent method for plasma deposition of nanostructured, crystalline metal oxides is presented. The technique uses a flow-through, micro-hollow cathode plasma discharge (supersonic microplasma jet) with a "remote" ring anode to deliver a highly directed flux of growth species to the substrate. A diverse range of nanostructured materials (e.g., CuO, α-Fe2O3, and NiO) can be deposited on any room temperature surface, e.g., conductors, insulators, plastics, fibers, and patterned surfaces, in a conformal fashion. The effects of deposition conditions, substrate type, and patterning on film morphology, nanostructure, and surface coverage are highlighted. The synthesis approach presented herein provides a general and tunable method to deposit a variety of functional and hierarchical metal oxide materials on many different surfaces. High surface area, conversion-type CuO electrodes for Li-ion batteries are demonstrated as a proof-of-concept example.

  17. Transport and deposition of heavy metals in the Ross Sea Region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Andrea; Bertler, Nancy; Neff, Peter; Edwards, Ross; Emanuelsson, Daniel; Beers, Thomas; Mayewski, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Emissions and long-range transport of toxic metals and metalloids pose a global threat to ecosystems and human health. Global industrialization occurring from the late nineteenth century releases large quantities of pollutants into the Earth's atmosphere. Despite international efforts to mitigate emissions, accumulation of metals is still observed in the most remote regions of the planet. New baseline studies are needed to determine (i) natural background concentration of pollutants, (ii) contributions of anthropogenic emissions, and (iii) potential remobilization of previously deposited metals. Constructing such records requires distinguishing source strength from transport efficiency to the recording site and accounting for local depositional effects. Here we investigate the sensitivity and representation of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Al, Mn, Pb, Tl, and As) in the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core, a new coastal Antarctic ice core site. Concentration variability with precipitation is explored in daily surface snow samples collected over 70 days, while seasonal deposition is investigated through snow pit sampling. We find that snow sample concentrations increase with particular snow precipitation types (rime and fog) and enhanced meridional atmospheric transport to the site. Snow pit heavy metals peak in summer and also show variable intraannual peaks. Seasonal airmass modeling based on ERA Interim reanalysis data indicates a synoptic shift during the spring and summer months. We conclude that modern heavy metal concentrations are influenced by transport efficiency and scavenging behavior; and thus, time series records from RICE have the potential to provide representative data of regional changes in heavy metals.

  18. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered. PMID:23413829

  19. Carbonyl clusters of transition metals on oxide supports as heterogeneous catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Koval`chuk, V.I.

    1995-05-01

    The methods of preparation of heterogeneous catalysts by immobilization of carbonyl clusters of transition metals on oxide supports, as well as the study of the state of supported compounds and their catalytic properties in CO hydrogenation and olefin hydroformulation are briefly reviewed.

  20. Optical response and gas sequestration properties of metal cluster supported graphene nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2016-07-28

    The possibility of obtaining metal cluster (M3O(+), M = Li, Na, K) supported pristine, B-doped and BN-doped graphene nanoflakes (GR, BGR and BNGR, respectively) has been investigated by carrying out density functional theory (DFT) based calculations. Thermochemical analysis reveals the good stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties. The dynamic stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties is confirmed through an atom-centered density matrix propagation simulation at 298 K up to 500 fs. Orbital and electrostatic interactions play pivotal roles in stabilizing the metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes. The metal clusters lower the Fermi levels of the host nanoflakes and enable them to exhibit reasonably good optical response properties such as polarizability and static first hyperpolarizability. In particular, Na3O(+)/K3O(+)@BGR complexes exhibit very large first hyperpolarizability values at the static field limit. All the M3O(+)@BGR/BNGR moieties demonstrate broadband optical absorption encompassing the ultraviolet, visible as well as infrared domains. The metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes, in general, can sequestrate polar molecules, viz. CO, NO and CH3OH, in a thermodynamically more favorable way than GR, BGR and BNGR. In the adsorbed state, the CO, NO and CH3OH molecules, in general, attain an 'active' state as compared to their free counterparts. PMID:27346831

  1. A high-nuclearity metal-cyanide cluster [Mo6Cu14] with photomagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Bridonneau, N; Chamoreau, L-M; Gontard, G; Cantin, J-L; von Bardeleben, J; Marvaud, V

    2016-06-21

    A high-nuclearity metal-cyanide cluster [Mo6Cu14] has been prepared and its photomagnetic properties investigated. The photoswitchable magnetic phenomenon observed is thermally reversible (T≈ 230 K). In the field of photomagnetism, [Mo6Cu14] represents a unique example of a nanocage and the highest nuclearity observed so far. PMID:27174703

  2. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  3. Formation of Deep Sea Umber Deposits Linked to Microbial Metal Oxidation at the South Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-04-01

    Umber deposits are important metalliferous deposits, which occur in off-axis half-graben structures at ancient and modern ocean floor. The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides and co-precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data suggest that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, which constitute a trophic base that may support the activities of heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits underscore the importance of geomicrobiologcial interaction in triggering the formation of deep-sea deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  4. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China: estimation based on native moss analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, G Geoff; Fang, Yan-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We studied atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China, using moss (Haplocladium microphyllum and H. angustifolium) as a biomonitoring agent. Moss samples were collected from 49 sites determined by a systematic sampling method. The top layer of soil on each site was also sampled. No significant correlation (P < 0.05) was observed between the moss and soil concentrations for any of the six heavy metal elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn), indicating that the soil substrate had little effect on the heavy metal concentrations in the moss materials. The metal enrichment capacity of the moss material, characterized by the concentration ratio between the moss and soil samples for each heavy metal, was topped by Cd and then followed by Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Ni, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found among the six elements in mosses, suggesting potential anthropogenic inputs of these heavy metal pollutants. Based on concentrations of the heavy metals in mosses and the calculated contamination factors, we evaluated the contamination level of each heavy metal on the 49 sampling sites. Spatial distribution maps of heavy metal deposition for each element were interpolated using ArcGIS 9.0. A total pollution coefficient was calculated for each sampling site to identify the seriously polluted areas in the region. PMID:27207630

  5. Determining the availability of sediment-bound trace metals to aquatic deposit-feeding animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Cain, D.J.; Thomson, E.A.; Johansson, C.; Jenne, E.A.; Bryan, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Physicochemical form affects, by as much as 1000 fold, the uptake rate by deposit-feeding clams of metals bound to sediments. The strength of metal binding to the different sedimentary binding substrates controls this effect. Statistical studies that were spatially intensive (comparing 35 stations in 17 estuaries) and temporally intensive (2 stations through 2 years time) indicate that sediments control the availability of Ag, Cd, Co, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn, and possibly Cu to clams and polychaete worms in nature. Metal concentrations removed from sediments by chemical extractants generally follow availability better than do total metal concentrations, but the specific extractant differs among different metals. Concentrations of binding substrates (Fe, Mn, organic carbon, humic substances) also statistically explain a proportion of the variance of metal concentrations in the animals, suggesting that metal partitioning among substrates in sediments is an important control on metal availability. The specific substrates which contribute to availability also differ among metals. Statistical assessment of metal form in sediments suggested that different substrates compete for the partitioning of metals, that each metal is partitioned among a variety of forms in an oxidized sediment, and that partitioning will vary with the physicochemical characteristics of the sediments. (USGS)

  6. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1991-07-01

    BVRI CCD photometry is presented in two overlapping fields in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372. The observations extend approximately 2 mag below the main-sequence turnoff to V about 21. By comparing the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with those of clusters with similar metallicities, it is found that E(B-V) = 0.50 {plus minus} 0.03, and (m-M)v = 14.75 {plus minus} 0.06. Comparison with theoretical isochrones leads to a value E(B-V) = 0.53 {plus minus} 0.03. Comparison of the CMD with that of bright stars published by other authors yields a value for Delta V(TO-HB) = 3.3 {plus minus} 0.3. The weighted mean value of the age of the cluster, derived from the four colors, is 15 {plus minus} 4 Gyr (estimated external uncertainty). 17 refs.

  7. A new approach for the facile preparation of metal-organic framework composites directly contacting with metal nanoparticles through arc plasma deposition.

    PubMed

    Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Yoshimaru, Shotaro; Kasai, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamauchi, Miho

    2016-06-28

    The arc plasma deposition (APD) method is first applied to prepare metal-organic framework (MOF) composites loading metal nanoparticles having a direct contact with the MOF. We demonstrate the detailed growth mechanism of metal particles on the MOFs and the applicability of the APD for various combinations of metals and MOFs. PMID:27298045

  8. Metallic particles from the Macha meteorite crater and several placer deposits in Iakutiia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, E. P.; Kolesov, G. M.; Kudinova, L. A.; Rakitskaia, R. B.; Samoilovich, L. G.

    The composition of metallic particles from the Macha crater in Iakutiia is shown to be close to the composition of cosmogenic particles from the region of the Tungusk meteorite as well as Ukrainian placer deposits. A description is given of cosmogenic particles from placer deposits of northern Iakutiia, whose formation may be connected with a large impact event in the northeastern part of the USSR.

  9. Formation of accurate 1-nm gaps using the electromigration method during metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Yasuhisa; Wei, Qingshuo; Mukaida, Masakazu; Ishida, Takao

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the origin of fabricated nanogap width variations using the electromigration method during metal deposition. This method also facilitates improved control over the nanogap width. A large suppression in the variation is achieved by sample annealing at 373 K during the application of bias voltages for electromigration, which indicates that the variation is caused by structural changes. This electromigration method during metal deposition for the fabrication of an accurate 1-nm gap electrode is useful for single-molecule-sized electronics. Furthermore, it opens the door for future research on integrated sub-1-nm-sized nanogap devices.

  10. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  11. Heavy metals in mammals from two unmined copper-zinc deposits in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.J.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1981-07-01

    This paper describes concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury and arsenic fom eight species of mammals collected at two areas in northern Wisconsin where zinc and copper deposits have been discovered and mines will be developed. The purposes of these analyses were: (1) to determine if differences existed in heavy metal concentrations in mammals between the two areas with different ore compositions and with the different amounts of glacial deposits over the ore bodies; and (2) to provide background levels which can be used for comparison of concentrations of these metals in mammals from other areas and from these same areas after the mines have been developed.

  12. TOWARD THE GENERAL RED GIANT BRANCH SLOPE-METALLICITY-AGE CALIBRATION. I. METALLICITIES, AGES, AND KINEMATICS FOR EIGHT LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Saurabh; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.; Ivanov, V. D.; Geisler, D. E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl E-mail: vivanov@eso.org

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, we discuss the properties of color-magnitude diagrams, age, metallicity, and radial velocities of eight massive Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) clusters using data taken from the FORS2 multiobject spectrograph at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope/Unit Telescope 1. The strong near-infrared Ca II triplet lines of red giant branch stars obtained from the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra are used to determine the metallicity and radial velocity of cluster members. We report for the first time spectroscopically determined metallicity values for four clusters based on the mean [Fe/H] value of {approx}10 cluster members each. We found two concentrations in the distribution of ages of the target clusters. Six have ages between 0.8 Gyr and 2.2 Gyr and the other two, NGC 1754 and NGC 1786, are very old. The metallicity of the six intermediate-age clusters, with a mean age of 1.5 Gyr, is -0.49 with a scatter of only 0.04. This tight distribution suggests that a close encounter between the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud may have caused not only the restart of cluster formation in the LMC but also the generation of the central bar. The metallicity for the two old clusters is similar to that of the other old, metal-poor LMC clusters. We find that the LMC cluster system exhibits disk-like rotation with no clusters appearing to have halo kinematics and there is no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the LMC, in contrast with the stellar population of the Milky Way and M33, where the metallicity decreases as galactocentric distance increases. The LMC's stellar bar may be the factor responsible for the dilution of any kind of gradient in the LMC.

  13. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source sputter deposited 17 metals and metal oxides on H-13 steel. The films ranged 1 to 8 micrometers in thickness and their adherence was generally greater than the capacity of the measuring device; adherence quality depended on proper precleaning of the substrate before deposition. N2 or air was introduced for correct stoichiometry in metallic compounds. Au, Ag, MgO, and Ta5Si3 films 8 microns thick have bond strength equal to 1 micron coatings; the bond strength of pure metallic films up to 5 microns thick was greater than the epoxy to film bond (8000 psi). The results of exposures of coated material to temperatures up to 700 C are presented.

  14. Surface-grafted polymer-assisted electroless deposition of metals for flexible and stretchable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuqing; Zhou, Xuechang; Li, Yi; Zheng, Zijian

    2012-05-01

    Surface-grafted polymers, that is, ultrathin layers of polymer coating covalently tethered to a surface, can serve as a particularly promising nanoplatform for electroless deposition (ELD) of metal thin films and patterned structures. Such polymers consist of a large number of well-defined binding sites for highly efficient and selective uptake of ELD catalysts. Moreover, the polymer chains provide flexible 3D network structures to trap the electrolessly deposited metal particles, leading to strong metal-substrate adhesion. In the past decade, surface-grafted polymers have been demonstrated as efficient nanoplatforms for fabricating durable and high-performance metal coatings by ELD on plastic substrates for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics. This focus review summarizes these recent advances, with a particular focus on applications in polymeric flexible and stretchable substrates. An outlook on the future challenges and opportunities in this field is given at the end of this paper. PMID:22392811

  15. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  16. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  17. On the Nature of Bonding in Parallel Spins in Monovalent Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2016-05-27

    As we approach the Lewis model centennial, it may be timely to discuss novel bonding motifs. Accordingly, this review discusses no-pair ferromagnetic (NPFM) bonds that hold together monovalent metallic atoms using exclusively parallel spins. Thus, without any traditional electron-pair bonds, the bonding energy per atom in these clusters can reach 20 kcal mol(-1). This review describes the origins of NPFM bonding using a valence bond (VB) analysis, which shows that this bonding motif arises from bound triplet electron pairs that are delocalized over all the close neighbors of a given atom in the cluster. The VB model accounts for the tendency of NPFM clusters to assume polyhedral shapes with rather high symmetry and for the very steep rise of the bonding energy per atom. The advent of NPFM clusters offers new horizons in chemistry of highly magnetic species sensitive to magnetic and electric fields. PMID:27070320

  18. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the stellar density substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge. Wide-field near-infrared (JHK s ) imaging data were obtained from WFCAM of UKIRT telescope. Field stars contamination around the globular clusters was reduced by using a statistical weighted filtering algorithm. Tidal stripping stellar substructures in the form of tidal tail (NGC 6266 and NGC 6626) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) were found around the four globular clusters in the two-dimensional density contour maps. We also find the overdensity features, which deviate from the theoretical models, in the outer region of radial density profiles. The observed results imply that the four globular clusters have experienced a strong tidal force or the bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy.

  19. Cluster ion beam assisted fabrication of metallic nanostructures for plasmonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Iram; Tilakaratne, Buddhi P.; Li, Yang; Bao, Jiming; Wijesundera, Dharshana N.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2016-08-01

    We report a high-throughput, single-step method for fabricating rippled plasmonic nanostructure arrays via self-assembly induced by oblique angle cluster ion beam irradiation of metal surfaces. This approach does not require lithographic or chemical processes and has the prominent advantage of possible large surface area coverage and applicability to different starting materials. The polarization dependent plasmonic property of the gold nano-ripple is due to their one dimension structure. The localized plasmon resonance frequency of synthesized nano-ripple arrays is tunable by changing nano-ripple dimensions that can be engineered by changing the cluster ion beam irradiation parameters. In this specific case presented, using 30 keV Ar-gas cluster ion beam, we fabricate gold nano-ripple arrays that show localized plasmon resonance in the visible range through near IR range, tunable by varying cluster ion irradiation fluence.

  20. On the Nature of Bonding in Parallel Spins in Monovalent Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2016-05-01

    As we approach the Lewis model centennial, it may be timely to discuss novel bonding motifs. Accordingly, this review discusses no-pair ferromagnetic (NPFM) bonds that hold together monovalent metallic atoms using exclusively parallel spins. Thus, without any traditional electron-pair bonds, the bonding energy per atom in these clusters can reach 20 kcal mol-1. This review describes the origins of NPFM bonding using a valence bond (VB) analysis, which shows that this bonding motif arises from bound triplet electron pairs that are delocalized over all the close neighbors of a given atom in the cluster. The VB model accounts for the tendency of NPFM clusters to assume polyhedral shapes with rather high symmetry and for the very steep rise of the bonding energy per atom. The advent of NPFM clusters offers new horizons in chemistry of highly magnetic species sensitive to magnetic and electric fields.

  1. Rutile-Deposited Pt–Pd clusters: A Hypothesis Regarding the Stability at 50/50 Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Mai-Anh; Dadras, Mostafa J.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2014-10-03

    Mixed Pt–Pd clusters deposited on oxides have been of great interest to catalysis. Clusters containing Pt and Pd in roughly equal proportions were found to be unusually stable against sintering, one of the major mechanisms of catalyst deactivation. After aging of such catalysts, the 50/50 Pt–Pd and Pd–O clusters appeared to be the two most prevalent phases. The reason for the enhanced stability of these equally proportioned clusters has remained unclear. In the following, sintering of mixed Pt–Pd clusters on TiO2(110) for various initial atomic concentrations of Pt and Pd and at a range of catalytically relevant temperatures was simulated. It is confirmed that equally mixed clusters have the relatively highest survival rate. Surprisingly, subnanoclusters containing Pt and Pd in all proportions have very similar geometries and chemical bonding, revealing no apparent explanation for favoring the 1:1 Pt/Pd ratio. However, it was discovered that at high temperatures, the 50/50 clusters have considerably more thermally accessible isomers than clusters containing Pt and Pd in other proportions. Hence, one of the reasons for stability is entropic stabilization. Electrostatics also plays a key role as a subtle charge redistribution, and a shift of electron density to the slightly more electronegative Pt results in the partially charged atoms being further stabilized by intracluster Coulomb attraction; this effect is greatest for 1:1 mixtures.

  2. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. II. Sodium abundance variations on the asymptotic giant branch as a function of globular cluster age and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Chantereau, William

    2016-02-01

    Context. Long-lived stars in globular clusters exhibit chemical peculiarities with respect to their halo counterparts. In particular, sodium-enriched stars are identified as belonging to a second stellar population born from cluster material contaminated by the hydrogen-burning ashes of a first stellar population. Their presence and numbers in different locations of the colour-magnitude diagram provide important constraints on the self-enrichment scenarios. In particular, the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) has recently been found to vary strongly from cluster to cluster (NGC 6752, 47 Tuc, and NGC 2808), while it is relatively constant on the red giant branch (RGB). Aims: We investigate the impact of both age and metallicity on the theoretical sodium spread along the AGB within the framework of the fast rotating massive star (FRMS) scenario for globular cluster self-enrichment. Methods: We computed evolution models of low-mass stars for four different metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.2, -1.75, -1.15, -0.5) assuming the initial helium-sodium abundance correlation for second population stars derived from the FRMS models and using mass loss prescriptions on the RGB with two realistic values of the free parameter in the Reimers formula. Results: Based on this grid of models we derive the theoretical critical initial mass for a star born with a given helium, sodium, and metal content that determines whether that star will climb or not the AGB. This allows us to predict the maximum sodium content expected on the AGB for globular clusters as a function of both their metallicity and age. We find that (1) at a given metallicity, younger clusters are expected to host AGB stars exhibiting a larger sodium spread than older clusters and (2) at a given age, higher sodium dispersion along the AGB is predicted in the most metal-poor globular clusters than in the metal-rich ones. We also confirm the strong impact of the mass loss rate in the earlier

  3. Mineral Deposit Data for Epigenetic Base- and Precious-metal and Uranium-thorium Deposits in South-central and Southwestern Montana and Southern and Central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal deposits spatially associated with the Cretaceous Boulder and Idaho batholiths of southwestern Montana and southern and central Idaho have been exploited since the early 1860s. Au was first discovered in placer deposits; exploitation of vein deposits in bedrock soon followed. In 1865, high-grade Ag vein deposits were discovered and remained economically important until the 1890s. Early high-grade deposits of Au, Ag and Pb were found in the weathered portions of the veins systems. As mining progressed to deeper levels, Ag and Pb grades diminished. Exploration for and development of these vein deposits in this area have continued until the present. A majority of these base- and precious-metal vein deposits are classified as polymetallic veins (PMV) and polymetallic carbonate-replacement (PMR) deposits in this compilation. Porphyry Cu and Mo, epithermal (Au, Ag, Hg and Sb), base- and precious-metal and W skarn, W vein, and U and Th vein deposits are also common in this area. The world-class Butte Cu porphyry and the Butte high-sulfidation Cu vein deposits are in this study area. PMV and PMR deposits are the most numerous in the region and constitute about 85% of the deposit records compiled. Several types of syngenetic/diagenetic sulfide mineral deposits in rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their equivalents are common in the region and they have been the source of a substantial metal production over the last century. These syngenetic deposits and their metamorphosed/structurally remobilized equivalents were not included in this database; therefore, deposits in the Idaho portion of the Coeur d'Alene district and the Idaho Cobalt belt, for example, have not been included because many of them are believed to be of this type.

  4. Theoretical research program to predict the properties of molecules and clusters containing transition metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary focus of this research has been the theoretical study of transition metal (TM) chemistry. A major goal of this work is to provide reliable information about the interaction of H atoms with iron metal. This information is needed to understand the effect of H atoms on the processes of embrittlement and crack propagation in iron. The method in the iron hydrogen studies is the cluster method in which the bulk metal is modelled by a finite number of iron atoms. There are several difficulties in the application of this approach to the hydrogen iron system. First the nature of TM-TM and TM-H bonding for even diatomic molecules was not well understood when these studies were started. Secondly relatively large iron clusters are needed to provide reasonable results.

  5. A Transition Metal Complex (Venus Flytrap Cluster) for Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Raymond J.; Beatty, Barbara G.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Varadarajan, Aravamuthan; Williams, Lawrence E.; Curtis, Frederick L.; Knobler, Carolyn B.; Beatty, J. David; Shiveley, John E.

    1991-04-01

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained 57Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84.66 was conjugated to 57Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of 57Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radio-immunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  6. A transition metal complex (Venus flytrap cluster) for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, R.J.; Curtis, F.L.; Shively, J.E. ); Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D. ); Hawthorne, M.F.; Varadarajan, A.; Knobler, C.B. )

    1991-04-15

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained {sup 57}Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84,66 was conjugated to {sup 57}Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of {sup 57}Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radioimmunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  7. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  8. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Trace metal determination in total atmospheric deposition in rural and urban areas.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Sam; Ludwig, Alexandre; Thévenot, Daniel R; Colin, Jean-Louis

    2003-06-01

    The wet, dry and total atmospheric depositions of some metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb and Zn) were sampled at two sites and atmospheric fallout fluxes were determined for these locations. This work, led by two different research groups, allowed to reach two main goals: to define a simple analytical procedure to secure accurate shipboard sampling and analysis of atmospheric deposition, and to assess anthropogenic impacts of heavy metals to the environment. The first step about the validation step showed that the prevalent deposition type was dry deposition which represents 40, 60 and 80% for Cd, Cu and Pb, respectively. This prevalence of dry deposition in total atmospheric fallout supported the necessity of funnel wall rinsing which contains 30, 50 and 40% of collected Cd, Cu and Pb, respectively. Moreover, the reproducibility of atmospheric deposition collection was determined. The second step was performed by comparing two sampling sites. A rural sampling site, situated in Morvan's regional park (250 km south-east of Paris), was chosen for its isolation from any local and regional contamination sources. Fluxes obtained in this area were compared with those obtained at an urban site (Créteil, suburb of Paris) allowing comparison between urban and rural areas and demonstrating the impact of anthropogenic activities on atmospheric deposition of Cr, Cu and Pb. PMID:12738217

  10. XAFS Study on Nano-Sized Pd Metal Catalyst Deposited on Ti-Containing Zeolite by a Photo-Assisted Deposition (PAD) Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hiromi; Miura, Yuki; Tomonari, Masanori; Masui, Yosuke; Mori, Kohsuke

    2007-02-02

    The nano-sized Pd metal catalyst can be highly deposited on Ti-containing silicalite zeolite (TS-1) under UV-light irradiation (PAD-Pd/TS-1) using a photo-assisted deposition (PAD) method. The nano-sized Pd metal was deposited having the direct interaction with the photo-excited tetrahedrally coordinated titanium oxide moieties of TS-1. Under a flow of H2 and O2 in water, H2O2 could be synthesized efficiently on this nano-sized Pd metal catalyst.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE METAL ENRICHMENT OF LOW-MASS GALAXIES IN NEARBY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Petropoulou, V.; Vilchez, J.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.

    2012-04-20

    In this paper, we study the chemical history of low-mass star-forming (SF) galaxies in the local universe clusters Coma, A1367, A779, and A634. The aim of this work is to search for the imprint of the environment on the chemical evolution of these galaxies. Galaxy chemical evolution is linked to the star formation history, as well as to the gas interchange with the environment, and low-mass galaxies are well known to be vulnerable systems to environmental processes affecting both these parameters. For our study we have used spectra from the SDSS-III DR8. We have examined the spectroscopic properties of SF galaxies of stellar masses 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, located from the core to the cluster's outskirts. The gas-phase O/H and N/O chemical abundances have been derived using the latest empirical calibrations. We have examined the mass-metallicity relation of cluster galaxies, finding well-defined sequences. The slope of these sequences, for galaxies in low-mass clusters and galaxies at large cluster-centric distances, follows the predictions of recent hydrodynamic models. A flattening of this slope has been observed for galaxies located in the core of the two more massive clusters of the sample, principally in Coma, suggesting that the imprint of the cluster environment on the chemical evolution of SF galaxies should be sensitive to both the galaxy mass and the host cluster mass. The H I gas content of Coma and A1367 galaxies indicates that low-mass SF galaxies, located at the core of these clusters, have been severely affected by ram-pressure stripping (RPS). The observed mass-dependent enhancement of the metal content of low-mass galaxies in dense environments seems plausible, according to hydrodynamic simulations. This enhanced metal enrichment could be produced by the combination of effects such as wind reaccretion, due to pressure confinement by the intracluster medium (ICM), and the truncation of gas infall, as a result of the RPS. Thus, the

  12. Spectroscopic age and metallicity for a sample of Globular Clusters from Stellar Population Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. J.; Calderón, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present spectroscopic age and metallicity predictions for a sample of 20 Globular Clusters in the massive E0 galaxy NGC 1407 (data from Cenarro et al. 2007, AJ, 134, 391) and for the Galacic Globular Clusters data from the Library of Integrated Spectra of Galactic Globular Clusters (GGC's) from Schiavon et al. (2005, ApJS, 160, 163) including the widely studied 47 Tuc cluster. Using index-index plots we compared model Single Stellar Populations (SSP's) spectra to the integrated spectra of both samples of Globular Clusters using high resolution line strength indices (Stock, in prep.) and the syntethic SSP's models from P. Coelho (2007, private comm.) as well as the CB07 solar models. For the GC's in NGC1407, the predictions from the syntethic models's with [α /Fe]=0.4 are in good agreement with the results from Cenarro et al. (2007, AJ, 134, 391), taking into account that the dispersion is partially due to the fact that the mean [α/Fe] ratio of the sample is ≈ 0.3 dex, resulting in younger ages and lower metallicities (Thomas et al. 2003, A&A, 401, 429). We observe a bimodal distribution of the Fe4383+ index which is in turn an indicator of metallicity, also seen in Cenarro et al. (2005). The CB07 models predict ages that are widely spread over the plot yielding ages greater than 14 Gyrs. The metallicity derived from these models are very low for almost all the objects (Z < 0.008). The distribution of the GGC's on the syntethic model grid shows a trend in the sense that metal poor clusters are younger than metal rich ones, but this effect might not be real (de Angeli et al. 2005, AJ, 130, 116). For 47 Tuc we estimate an age of ≈ 10 Gyr, and metallicity Z < 0.011 (<[Fe/H]= -0.5) which are both comparable with the values reported in the literature (Carretta et al. 2000; Liu & Chaboyer 2000, ApJ, 544, 818; Schiavon et al. 2002, ApJ, 580, 873; Gratton et al. 2003, A&A, 408, 529).

  13. The changes in small metal cluster size with adsorption Be13Xn, X = H, O, S, Cl and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Be-Be and Be-adsorbate distances are optimized for small Be13Xn clusters,s assuming only two independent degrees of freedom. Results for chemisorption into the three-fold hollows are quite similar to those found for small metal clusters on supports. It is predicted that Cl and F will have the same effect on the metal-metal bond lengths, and so will O and S.

  14. Motion Planning for a Direct Metal Deposition Rapid Prototyping System

    SciTech Connect

    AMES,ARLO L.; HENSINGER,DAVID M.; KUHLMANN,JOEL L.

    1999-10-18

    A motion planning strategy was developed and implemented to generate motion control instructions from solid model data for controlling a robotically driven solid free-form fabrication process. The planning strategy was tested using a PUMA type robot arm integrated into a LENS{trademark} (Laser Engineered Net Shape) system. Previous systems relied on a series of x, y, and z stages, to provide a minimal coordinated motion control capability. This limited the complexity of geometries that could be constructed. With the coordinated motion provided by a robotic arm, the system can produce three dimensional parts by ''writing'' material onto any face of existing material. The motion planning strategy relied on solid model geometry evaluation and exploited robotic positioning flexibility to allow the construction of geometrically complex parts. The integration of the robotic manipulator into the LENS{trademark} system was tested by producing metal parts directly from CAD models.

  15. Discovery of Extended Blue Horizontal Branches in Two Metal-rich Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. Michael; Sosin, Craig; Djorgovski, S. George; Piotto, Giampaolo; King, Ivan R.; Renzini, Alvio; Phinney, E. Sterl; Dorman, Ben; Liebert, James; Meylan, Georges

    1997-07-01

    We have used WFPC2 to construct B, V color-magnitude diagrams of four metal-rich globular clusters, NGC 104 (47 Tuc), NGC 5927, NGC 6388, and NGC 6441. All four clusters have well populated red horizontal branches (RHB), as expected for their metallicity. However, NGC 6388 and 6441 also exhibit a prominent blue horizontal-branch (BHB) extension, including stars reaching as faint in V as the turnoff luminosity. This discovery demonstrates directly for the first time that a major population of hot horizontal-branch (HB) stars can exist in old, metal-rich systems. This may have important implications for the interpretation of the integrated spectra of elliptical galaxies. The cause of the phenomenon remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that NGC 6388 and 6441 are older than the other clusters, but a simple difference in age may not be sufficient to produce the observed distributions along the HB. The high central densities in NGC 6388 and 6441 suggest that the existence of the BHB tails might be caused by stellar interactions in the dense cores of these clusters, which we calculate to have two of the highest collision rates among globular clusters in the Galaxy. Tidal collisions might act in various ways to enhance loss of envelope mass and therefore populate the blue side of the HB. However, the relative frequency of tidal collisions does not seem large enough (compared to that of the clusters with pure RHBs) to account for such a drastic difference in HB morphology. While a combination of an age difference and dynamical interactions may help, prima facie the lack of a radial gradient in the BHB/RHB star ratio seems to argue against dynamical effects playing a role. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. Transient behaviour of deposition of liquid metal droplets on a solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, J.; Romero, E.; Soulié, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms that contribute to the spreading of liquid metal macro-drop deposited during Stationary Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding on an initially cold solid workpiece. Surface tension and inertial effects take an important part in the behaviour of the liquid metal macro-drop, but in this configuration the influence of energetic effects can also be significant. The experimental results are discussed in the light of dimensional analysis in order to appreciate the influence of the process parameters and the physical mechanisms involved on the spreading of a macro-drop. A law is established to model forced non-isothermal spreading.

  17. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metallic species to the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottley, C. J.; Harrison, Roy M.

    Air sampling on a series of 10 research cruises on the North Sea (south of 56°N) has yielded detailed spatial distributions of atmospheric metal concentrations, Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Na, Pb and Zn which closely parallel the results of earlier published models. Air mass back trajectory analysis demonstrates the strong influence which source region may have upon the elemental composition of the North Sea atmosphere. A cascade impactor designed to collect efficiently large as well as small aerosol has produced detailed size distributions from which mass weighted deposition velocity estimates have been produced (Al, 0.33; Cd, 0.24; Cu, 0.44; Fe, 0.30; Pb, 0.13; Zn, 0.30 cm s -1) enabling estimates for the dry deposition flux to the study area to be made. Extrapolation of these data to the whole of the North Sea yields dry deposition flux estimates (Cd, 33; Cu, 350; Pb, 370; Zn, 2640 tonnes yr -1) which are in some instances substantially lower than those previously reported, but nevertheless represent a significant pathway for metallic species to enter this marine environment. The size distributions show the clear dominance that large aerosol has upon the overall dry deposition flux. Flux estimates are thus highly sensitive to the sampling of this large aerosol component, and to assumptions made regarding the sea surface as a source of giant trace metal-enriched particles which act only as a means of recycling marine metals.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of metal tellurides and selenides using alkylsilyl compounds of tellurium and selenium.

    PubMed

    Pore, Viljami; Hatanpää, Timo; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2009-03-18

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal selenide and telluride thin films has been limited because of a lack of precursors that would at the same time be safe and exhibit high reactivity as required in ALD. Yet there are many important metal selenide and telluride thin film materials whose deposition by ALD might be beneficial, for example, CuInSe2 for solar cells and Ge2Sb2Te5 for phase-change random-access memories. Especially in the latter case highly conformal deposition offered by ALD is essential for high storage density. By now, ALD of germanium antimony telluride (GST) has been attempted only using plasma-assisted processes owing to the lack of appropriate tellurium precursors. In this paper we make a breakthrough in the development of new ALD precursors for tellurium and selenium. Compounds with a general formula (R3Si)2Te and (R3Si)2Se react with various metal halides forming the corresponding metal tellurides and selenides. As an example, we show that Sb2Te3, GeTe, and GST films can be deposited by ALD using (Et3Si)2Te, SbCl3, and GeCl2 x C4H8O2 compounds as precursors. All three precursors exhibit a typical saturative ALD growth behavior and GST films prepared at 90 degrees C show excellent conformality on a high aspect-ratio trench structure. PMID:19123860

  19. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF TOXIC METALS TO LAKE MICHIGAN: PRELIMINARY ANNUAL MODEL CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern is growing for the environmental water quality of the Great Lakes. tmospheric deposition of toxic substances is recognized as a major pathway of contaminants to the water medium. o estimate the annual atmospheric loadings of five toxic metals -- arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd)...

  20. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Studies of Chromium Clusters Deposited on Moiré Patterns on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Luo, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Moiré patterns (MP) formed by twisted graphene layers, present great potential for use as periodic substrates to facilitate the growth of nanostructures to obtain useful electronic and/or magnetic properties. The growth of Chromium (Cr) deposited on MPs on the surface of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and its effects on the electronic structure in the MPs were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Without Cr, two van Hove singularities (VHSs) were observed by STS on the MPs. With low coverage of Cr, atoms deposited on graphite Moiré form small clusters randomly distributed over the surface. With the presence of Cr clusters, the energy difference between the two VHS peaks enlarged while its linear dependence on the twisting angle remains. Compare to the situation before deposition, the graphite's Fermi velocity increased while the interlayer interaction decreased. The electronic structure modification caused by a Cr cluster as a function of distance from the cluster was studied with extremely low coverage. The effective distance can reach about 10 lattice cells of the Moiré pattern. This work was supported by NSF DMR1006286.

  2. On the lithium dip in the metal poor open cluster NGC 2243

    SciTech Connect

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Palsa, R.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-05-02

    Lithium is a key element for studying the mixing mechanisms operating in stellar interiors. It can also be used to probe the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Measuring the abundance of Lithium in stars belonging to Open Clusters (hereafter OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models. NGC 2243 is particularly interesting thanks to its relative low metallicity ([Fe/H]=−0.54 ± 0.10 dex). We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the VLT 8.2m telescope. Lithium abundance has been measured in 27 stars. We found a Li dip center of 1.06 M{sub ⊙}, which is significantly smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tue. We derived an iron abundance of [Fe/H]=−0.54±0.10 dex for NGC 2243, in agreement (within the errors) with previous findings.

  3. Photon-Induced Thermal Desorption of CO from Small Metal-Carbonyl Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüttgens, G.; Pontius, N.; Bechthold, P. S.; Neeb, M.; Eberhardt, W.

    2002-02-01

    Thermal CO desorption from photoexcited free metal-carbonyl clusters has been resolved in real time using two-color pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy. Sequential energy dissipation steps between the initial photoexcitation and the final desorption event, e.g., electron relaxation and thermalization, have been resolved for Au2(CO)- and Pt2(CO)-5. The desorption rates for the two clusters differ considerably due to the different numbers of vibrational degrees of freedom. The unimolecular CO-desorption thresholds of Au2(CO)- and Pt2(CO)-5 have been approximated by means of a statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel calculation using the experimentally derived desorption rate constants.

  4. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  5. Geochronology and historical deposition of trace metals in three tropical estuaries in the Gulf of Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, Edem; Nyarko, Elvis; Hulme, Samuel; Swarzenski, Peter; Asiedu, Daniel K.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2016-08-01

    The depositional histories of trace metals (Pb, Cu, and Zn) in sediment cores from three Ghanaian estuaries were reconstructed using radioisotope-derived (210Pb and 137Cs) geochronologies. A core collected from each of the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries was analyzed for trace metals and radionuclides. Lead-210 and 137Cs dating via gamma spectroscopy, and trace metal analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used in deriving sedimentation rates, geochronologies and accumulation trends of trace metals. The sedimentation rates in all three estuaries (in the range of 0.54-0.83 cm yr-1) were greater than the predicted sea level rise (∼0.33 cm yr-1) for the Accra Coast of Ghana. The 210Pb depositional rates of 6.83 dpm cm-2 y-1, 2.74 dpm cm-2 y-1 and 1.75 dpm cm-2 y-1 estimated for the Amisa, Sakumo II and Volta estuaries, respectively, are higher than those recorded in other latitudes. Trace metal analysis revealed differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn between deeper and surficial layers of each core to be in the range of 10-20%, which is well within the natural variations attributed to geochemical factors. Relative to the Amisa and Volta estuaries, the temporal profiles of Al-normalized metal concentrations and estimated fluxes suggest anthropogenic processes augmented the natural fluxes of trace metals, particularly Zn into the Sakumo II estuary during the last 7 years.

  6. Enhanced quantum coherence in graphene caused by Pd cluster deposition and its zero-temperature saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fengqi; Han, Junhao; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Nanjing Team

    2014-03-01

    The surface decoration of graphene offers great opportunities because graphene is a fully open system. Functional defects, p/n type doping, spin polarization, and additional spin-orbit interactions can be introduced when atoms are absorbed from an external source. Researchers are even considering inducing topologically nontrivial gaps inside the Dirac cone. Despite the potential advances, however, an important problem remains that surface absorption, along with introducing the required functionality, induces additional electronic scattering Such scattering may suppress the coherence of the Dirac fermions and may even disable these desired quantum states. Here we report on the unexpected increase of the dephasing lengths of a graphene sheet caused by the deposition of Pd nanoclusters, demonstrated by weak localization measurements. The dephasing lengths reached saturated values at low temperatures, essentially related to zero-temperature dephasing. The temperature-dependent dephasing was described by 1/(TlnT) and the saturated dephasing period was found to depend on σle. This reveals disorder-induced zero-temperature dephasing in our defect-enriched graphene. Combined with theoretical calculations, we suggest that competition between surface scattering and charge transfer leads to the improvement of quantum coherence in cluster-decorated graphene. (in review)

  7. Biomagnetic monitoring of heavy metals contamination in deposited atmospheric dust, a case study from Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Samira; Khademi, Hossein; Cano, Angel Faz; Acosta, Jose A

    2016-05-15

    Tree leaves are considered as one of the best biogenic dust collectors due to their ability to trap and retain particulate matter on their surfaces. In this study, the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the concentration of selected heavy metals of plane tree (Platanus orientalis L.) leaves and deposited atmospheric dust, sampled by an indirect and a direct method, respectively, were determined to investigate the relationships between leaf magnetic parameters and the concentration of heavy metals in deposited atmospheric dust. The objective was to develop a biomagnetic method as an alternative to the common ones used for determining atmospheric heavy metal contaminations. Plane tree leaves were monthly sampled on the 19th of May to November, 2012 (T1-T7), for seven months from 21 different sites in the city of Isfahan, central Iran. Deposited atmospheric dust samples were also collected using flat glass surfaces from the same sites on the same dates, except for T1. MS (χlf, χhf) values in washed (WL) and unwashed leaves (UL) as well as Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in UL and deposited atmospheric dust samples were determined. The results showed that the MS content with a biogenic source was low with almost no significant change during the sampling period, while an increasing trend was observed in the MS content of UL samples due to the deposition of heavy metals and magnetic particles on leaf surfaces throughout the plant growth. The latter type of MS content could be reduced through washing off by rain. Most heavy metals examined, as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) in UL, showed statistically significant correlations with MS values. The correlation between heavy metals content in atmospheric dust deposited on glass surfaces and leaf MS values was significant for Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn. Moreover, the similarity observed between the spatial distribution maps of leaf MS and deposited atmospheric dust PLI provided convincing evidence regarding

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of molten metal droplet deposition applied to rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Du, Jun; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2016-08-01

    Rapid prototyping based on molten metal droplets deposition is an additive process in which parts are produced from molten materials in a single operation without the use of any mold or other tooling. Near-net shaped parts are fabricated by sequentially depositing molten droplets layer by layer. This paper presents a systematic numerical and experimental investigation of the transient transport phenomenon during the droplets impinging onto a substrate surface. The 3D models based on a volume of fluid (VOF) method were developed to investigate the deposition of molten metal droplets on a horizontally aluminum substrate surface. Based on the above research, a semiquantitative relationship between external morphology and internal microstructure was proposed, which was further certified by investigating the piled vertical columns and the three-dimensional parts. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based rapid prototyping techniques.

  9. Deposition of gold nanoparticles on silica spheres by electroless metal plating technique.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Tadaki, Yohei; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2005-03-15

    A previously proposed method for metal deposition with silver [Kobayashi et al., Chem. Mater. 13 (2001) 1630] was extended to uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on submicrometer-sized silica spheres. The present method consisted of three steps: (1) the adsorption of Sn(2+) ions took place on surface of silica particles, (2) Ag(+) ions added were reduced and simultaneously adsorbed to the surface, while Sn(2+) was oxidized to Sn(4+), and (3) Au(+) ions added were reduced and deposited on the Ag surface. TEM observation, X-ray diffractometry, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy revealed that gold metal nanoparticles with an average particle size of 13 nm and a crystal size of 5.1 nm were formed on the silica spheres with a size of 273 nm at an Au concentration of 0.77 M. PMID:15721938

  10. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-05

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  11. Direct Metal Deposition of H13 Tool Steel on Copper Alloy Substrate: Parametric Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M. Khalid; Masood, S. H.; Brandt, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated interest in tribology and prototyping by the laser aided material deposition process. Laser aided direct metal deposition (DMD) enables the formation of a uniform clad by melting the powder to form desired component from metal powder materials. In this research H13 tool steel has been used to clad on a copper alloy substrate using DMD. The effects of laser parameters on the quality of DMD deposited clad have been investigated and acceptable processing parameters have been determined largely through trial-and-error approaches. The relationships between DMD process parameters and the product characteristics such as porosity, micro-cracks and microhardness have been analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analysis software (ImageJ) and microhardness tester. It has been found that DMD parameters such as laser power, powder mass flow rate, feed rate and focus size have an important role in clad quality and crack formation.

  12. Characteristics of some silver-, and base metal-bearing, epithermal deposits of Mexico and Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.

    1984-01-01

    Although many characteristics of the geology and geochemistry of this type of deposit were considered, the most important criterion for choosing these deposits was that they have substantial quantities of precious- and base-metal mineralization. Additional criteria for selecting the deposits were that they be hosted primarily by calc-alkaline volcanic rocks of intermediate to silicic composition and that they be younger than Tertiary in age. Many deposits in Mexico and Peru and other parts of Central and South America were excluded because the literature describing the districts is not readily available. Furthermore, many districts have not been examined in detail or the information available is of limited geological scope. The four districts that are compiled in this report were chosen because they are described in abundant literature dating from early mining reports on the general geology and mineralogy to very recent data on detailed geochemical and mineralogical studies. They were chosen as being fairly typical, classic examples of near-surface, low-temperature vein deposits as described by Lindgren (1928) in his treatise on ore deposits (Mineral deposits, McGraw-Hill, 1049 p.). These deposits are similar in aspects of their geology and geochemistry to many of the famous, epithermal silver mining districts in Colorado and Nevada including Creede, Colorado, Tonapah, Nevada, and the Sunnyside Mine of the Eureka district, Colorado, and, in the special case of Julcani, to Summitville, Colorado, and Goldfield, Nevada. The characteristics that distinguish them include overall size, production and alteration assemblage. The information documented in each summary will be used in a forthcoming series of papers on the comparative anatomy of precious and base metal deposits in North and South America.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of electrochemically deposited protein/metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth J; Mathew, Mathew T; Shull, Kenneth R

    2015-04-01

    The interfacial gelation of proteins at metallic surfaces was investigated with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). When Cr electrodes were corroded in proteinaceous solutions, it was found that gels will form at the Cr surfaces if molybdate ions are also present in the solution. Gelation is reversible and can also be controlled with the electrochemical potential at the electrode. Further, a method was developed to characterize the viscoelastic properties of thin films in liquid media using the QCM as a high-frequency rheometer. By measuring the frequency and dissipation at multiple harmonics of the resonance frequency, the viscoelastic phase angle, density-modulus product, and areal mass of a film can be determined. The method was applied to characterize the protein films, demonstrating that they have a phase angle near 55° and a density-modulus product of ≈10(7) Pa·g/cm(3). Data imply that the gels are composed of a weakly cross-linked proteinaceous network with properties similar to albumin solutions with concentrations in the range of ≈40 wt %. PMID:25780816

  14. Tuning molecule-substrate coupling via deposition of metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Hsiang; Tsai, Hsu-Han; Ying, Chi-Feng; Yang, Tsung-Han; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chun-hsien; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrids constitute an important class of functional materials. The fundamentals at the molecular levels are, however, relatively unexplored. PTCDA (perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride) is a colorant and extensively applied in organic-based optoelectronic devices. PTCDA/Cu(111) and Fe-PTCDA/Cu(111) metal-organic hybrid monolayers are studied by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT). The former exhibits Moiré pattern-modulated molecular density of states while the latter adapts a commensurate adlattice. Both imaging and spectroscopic results suggest a strong hybridization between PTCDA molecules and Cu(111) substrate. Weak PTCDA-Cu(111) coupling can be obtained by the introduction of Fe adatoms. Compared to PTCDA/Cu(111), STS spectra of Fe-PTCDA/Cu(111) exhibit a higher energy and sharper features of the frontier orbitals. Together with the DFT results, we found that the PTCDA-Cu(111) coupling is attenuated by the presence of Fe adatoms and Fe-PTCDA coordination.

  15. Tuning molecule-substrate coupling via deposition of metal adatoms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Hsiang; Tsai, Hsu-Han; Ying, Chi-Feng; Yang, Tsung-Han; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2015-11-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrids constitute an important class of functional materials. The fundamentals at the molecular levels are, however, relatively unexplored. PTCDA (perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride) is a colorant and extensively applied in organic-based optoelectronic devices. PTCDA/Cu(111) and Fe-PTCDA/Cu(111) metal-organic hybrid monolayers are studied by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT). The former exhibits Moiré pattern-modulated molecular density of states while the latter adapts a commensurate adlattice. Both imaging and spectroscopic results suggest a strong hybridization between PTCDA molecules and Cu(111) substrate. Weak PTCDA-Cu(111) coupling can be obtained by the introduction of Fe adatoms. Compared to PTCDA/Cu(111), STS spectra of Fe-PTCDA/Cu(111) exhibit a higher energy and sharper features of the frontier orbitals. Together with the DFT results, we found that the PTCDA-Cu(111) coupling is attenuated by the presence of Fe adatoms and Fe-PTCDA coordination. PMID:26567677

  16. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  17. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  18. Remote plasma-assisted deposition of metals onto the surface of nanocrystalline ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Sergio A.; Nemashkalo, Anastasiia; Chapagain, Puskar; Pant, Shreedhar; Alarcon, Phillip; Strzhemechny, Yuri M.

    2011-10-01

    Controllable surface modification of nanoscale ZnO is crucial for many existing and future applications. We investigated the effectiveness of metal deposition using remote O2/He plasma passing through a metal mesh electrode onto the surface of ZnO nanopowders with an average grain size of 25 nm. Surface stoichiometry was monitored in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy, whereas surface optoelectronic properties were probed; also in situ, using surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy. We observed a strong dependence of surface modification on the distance from the metal electrode. At short distances the metal coverage was reaching tens of percent of one monolayer. Simultaneously we observed a significant improvement of the SPV response pointing to metal-enhanced surface charge dynamics.

  19. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boffa, A B

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  20. Real-Time Monitoring of Morphology and Optical Properties during Sputter Deposition for Tailoring Metal-Polymer Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Santoro, Gonzalo; Brett, Calvin J; Rothkirch, André; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Hinz, Alexander; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Yao, Yuan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V

    2015-06-24

    The reproducible low-cost fabrication of functional metal-polymer nanocomposites with tailored optoelectronic properties for advanced applications remains a major challenge in applied nanotechnology. To obtain full control over the nanostructural evolution at the metal-polymer interface and its impact on optoelectronic properties, we employed combined in situ time-resolved microfocus grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (μGISAXS) with in situ UV/vis specular reflectance spectroscopy (SRS) during sputter deposition of gold on thin polystyrene films. On the basis of the temporal evolution of the key scattering features in the real-time μGISAXS experiment, we directly observed four different growth regimes: nucleation, isolated island growth, growth of larger aggregates via partial coalescence, and continuous layer growth. Moreover, their individual thresholds were identified with subnanometer resolution and correlated to the changes in optical properties. During sputter deposition, a change in optical reflectivity of the pristine gray-blue PS film was observed ranging from dark blue color due to the presence of isolated nanoclusters at the interface to bright red color from larger Au aggregates. We used simplified geometrical assumptions to model the evolution of average real space parameters (distance, size, density, contact angle) in excellent agreement with the qualitative observation of key scattering features. A decrease of contact angles was observed during the island-to-percolation transition and confirmed by simulations. Furthermore, a surface diffusion coefficient according to the kinetic freezing model and interfacial energy of Au on PS at room temperature were calculated based on a real-time experiment. The morphological characterization is complemented by X-ray reflectivity, optical, and electron microscopy. Our study permits a better understanding of the growth kinetics of gold clusters and their self-organization into complex nanostructures

  1. A street deposit sampling method for metal and hydrocarbon contamination assessment.

    PubMed

    Bris, F J; Garnaud, S; Apperry, N; Gonzalez, A; Mouchel, J M; Chebbo, G; Thévenot, D R

    1999-09-01

    Urban surface contamination, by atmospheric deposits as well as human activities, is a major concern for urban pollution management. Besides coarse street deposits which are clearly perceived and easily removed, suspended solid (SS) surface loads and contamination by heavy metals and hydrocarbons are rarely assessed although they could be of major importance with regards to combined or separate server overflow (CSO and SSO) impacts. Both dry and wet vacuum sampling procedures have been first compared, in the laboratory, using dry and sieved clay or street deposits. Then the wet vacuum sampling procedure has been refined, coupling the injection of water and the hand-brushing of the surface prior to its vacuum cleaning, and evaluated on a car parking area close to the University. Finally this procedure has been assessed in Béarn Street within the 'Le Marais' district in Paris centre, and 34 samples have been analysed for metal and eight for aromatic hydrocarbon contamination. Heavy metal concentrations (0.1-1.7 g kg-1 dry wt. Cu, 0.9-6.1 g kg-1 dry wt. Pb and 1.5-4.6 g kg-1 dry wt. Zn) within street deposit samples collected in Paris centre, indicate a high contamination, especially for copper and zinc, as compared to reported data. Total polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are in the 3-11 mg kg-1 dry wt. range, thus approximately 10 times less contaminated than dry atmospheric deposits. This paper presents data obtained and discusses the difficulties encountered when sampling street deposits in busy areas of a city like Paris. The water jet street cleaning procedure used by Paris city workers was tested for its efficiency, by comparison of surface loads before and after the cleaning procedure. Although solids cleaning efficiency is highly variable (20-65%) and somewhat higher for particles larger than 100 microns, particulate metal cleaning efficiency is even more variable (0-75%) and particulate PAHs appear not to be significantly removed. PMID:10535121

  2. Selective self-assembly of molecular clusters with designed sizes on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Qing; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Pan, Minghu

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembly of ``magic'' molecular clusters on various substrates provides a new arena for studies of surface nanocatalysis and molecular electronics. Here we present the self-assembly of phenylacetylene molecules on Cu(100) by a combined low-temperature STM and in-depth density functional theory investigation. We observe the molecules form distinct tetramer clusters on Cu(100) at 40 K. Each cluster has a four-fold symmetry and consists of four molecules. A delicate balance of intramolecular and dipole-dipole interactions between clusters maintains this magic tetramer configuration on Cu(100). The strong interaction between the molecules and the copper surface creates an anchor at each adsorption site. Through comparison with our previous observed hexamer (six-molecule) clusters on Au(111), we conclude that the epitaxial relationship between the molecules and metal surfaces is crucial in defining magic numbers of surface-supported molecular clusters under weak intermolecular interaction. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Trends in methanol decomposition on transition metal alloy clusters from scaling and Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmood, Faisal; Rankin, Rees B.; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-05-15

    A combination of first principles Density Functional Theory calculations and thermochemical scaling relationships are employed to estimate the thermochemistry and kinetics of methanol decomposition on unsupported subnanometer metal clusters. The approach uses binding energies of various atomic and molecular species, determined on the pure metal clusters, to develop scaling relationships that are then further used to estimate the methanol decomposition thermodynamics for a series of pure and bimetallic clusters with four atoms per cluster. Additionally, activation energy barriers are estimated from Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi plots relating transition and final state energies on these clusters. The energetic results are combined with a simple, microkinetically-inspired rate expression to estimate reaction rates as a function of important catalytic descriptors, including the carbon and atomic oxygen binding energies to the clusters. Finally, based on these analyses, several alloy clusters are identified as promising candidates for the methanol decomposition reaction.

  4. Potential use of a roadside fern (Pteris vittata) to biomonitor Pb and other aerial metal deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Y.B.; Tai, K.M.

    1985-10-01

    Lead, widely used as antiknock additives in gasoline in many parts of the world, is released from vehicular exhausts and contaminates the roadside environment. The Pb-containing particulates often settle onto roadside vegetation by sedimentation, impaction and interception resulting in high Pb content in the vegetation. The concentrations of Pb in such plants in turn are often used to demonstrate the extent of aerial deposition of Pb along roadsides. Hong Kong is a city with high traffic density of over 200 vehicles per kilometer of road. In these studies it was found that some plants could be utilized as biomonitors of atmospheric Pb and other trace metals in the roadside environment. This paper reports on the Pb and other trace metal levels in the fern Pteris vittata growing along roadside and its possible use as biomonitor species for aerial deposition of metals.

  5. A Precious Metal-Free Electroless Technique for the Deposition of Copper on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Dehui; Yao, Guangchun; Cao, Zhuokun

    2012-11-01

    This article introduces a new technique of electroless copper deposition on carbon fibers in the absence of precious metal as the catalyst. Copper layers were electrolessly deposited on the surface of carbon fiber without using the conventional palladium or silver catalyst to initiate redox reactions leading to metallization. This new technique shows that nickel seeds can serve as excellent catalysts to expedite the redox reactions. By performing experiments, parameters such as activation temperature, nickel ion concentration, and pH value were optimized, and an orbicular copper plating layer of carbon fiber was obtained in the copper sulfate salt-based conventional electroless solution. The surface morphology of copper coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that uniform and smooth copper coating could be obtained by the new precious-metal free activation process. The resulting copper coating thickness is about 1 μm.

  6. Theoretical Investigations into Self-Organized Ordered Metallic Semi-Clusters Arrays on Metallic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Using the energy minimization calculations based on an interfacial potential and a first-principles total energy method, respectively, we show that (2 × 2)/(3 × 3) Pb/Cu(111) system is a stable structure among all the [(n − 1) × (n − 1)]/(n × n) Pb/Cu(111) (n = 2, 3,…, 12) structures. The electronic structure calculations indicate that self-organized ordered Pb semi-clusters arrays are formed on the first Pb monolayer of (2 × 2)/(3 × 3) Pb/Cu(111), which is due to a strain-release effect induced by the inherent misfits. The Pb semi-clusters structure can generate selective adsorption of atoms of semiconductor materials (e.g., Ge) around the semi-clusters, therefore, can be used as a template for the growth of nanoscale structures with a very short periodic length (7.67 Å). PMID:20672088

  7. Nutrient and trace metals atmospheric deposition in the western Mediterranean: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, Karine; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Simeoni, Pasquale; Dulac, François

    2015-04-01

    Mediterranean Sea is a typical LNLC region particularly well adapted to assess the role of ocean-atmosphere exchanges. Throughout the summer stratification period when diffusion through the thermocline is low, atmospheric inputs become the main external source of nutrients to the surface open waters of the MS, mostly by wet deposition in the western basin.Here, we show a 3-yr time continuous series of nutrient (N, P) and trace metals (Cr, Cu, Fe, P, V, Zn) total deposition fluxes in Corsica. Between March 2008 and May 2011, a monitoring station was operated with a weekly sampling time step at Galeria (42.44°N; 8.65°E) on the western coast of Corsica in the framework of the projects DUNE (a Dust Experiment in a Low Nutrient Low Chlorophyll Ecosystem) and then ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerososl Mediterranean Experiment). Monthly fluxes were measured to assess the temporal variability of the measured elements over the Western Mediterranean. Nutrients deposition presented a clear seasonal pattern which was different for each studied nutrients, emphasizing a difference of sources for the nutrients. The results show no dust event larger than 0.68 g m-2 so that the maximum yearly flux was among the lowest ever observed in Corsica (1.7 g m-2 y-1). One dust deposition event could contribute up to 30% of yearly deposition fluxes of nutrient and trace metals, confirming the high temporal variability of atmospheric deposition. However a source apportionment work via statistical methods shows that the yearly deposition fluxes of considered nutrient and trace metals were dominated by anthropogenic sources, except for Fe. Acknowledgements: DUNE project was funded by ANR. ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is funded by CNRS/INSU, ADEME, CEA and Météo-France in the framework of the programme MISTRALS (http://www.mistrals-home.org)

  8. Structurally Well-Defined Sigmoidal Gold Clusters: Probing the Correlation between Metal Atom Arrangement and Chiroptical Response.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Wang, Yuechao; Jiang, Hong; Zhao, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetric arrangement of metal atoms is crucial for understanding the chirality origin of chiral metal nanoclusters and facilitating the design and development of new chiral catalysts and chiroptical devices. Here, we describe the construction of four asymmetric gold and gold-silver clusters by chirality transfer from diimido ligands. The acquired metal clusters show strong circular dichroism (CD) response with large anisotropy factors of up to 6 × 10(-3), larger than the values of most reported chiral gold nanoclusters. Regardless of the same absolute configuration of the applied three diimido ligands, sigmoidal and reverse-sigmoidal arrangements of gold atoms both can be achieved, which resultantly produce an opposite Cotton effect within a specific absorption range. On the basis of the detailed structural characterization via X-ray crystallography and contrast experiments, the chirality contribution of the imido ligand, the asymmetrically arranged metal cluster, and the chiral arrangement of aromatic rings of phosphine ligands have been qualitatively evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that the chiroptical property of the acquired metal clusters is mainly influenced by the asymmetrically arranged metal atoms. Correlation of asymmetric arrangements of metal atoms in clusters with their chiroptical response provides a viable means of fabricating a designable chiral surface of metal nanoclusters and opens a broader prospect for chiral cluster application. PMID:27070415

  9. [Pollution evaluation and health risk assessment of heavy metals from atmospheric deposition in Lanzhou].

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Xue, Su-Yin; Wang, Sheng-Li; Nan, Zhong-Ren

    2014-03-01

    In order to evaluate the contamination and health risk of heavy metals from atmospheric deposition in Lanzhou, samples of atmospheric deposition were collected from 11 sampling sites respectively and their concentrations of heavy metals were determined. The results showed that the average contents of Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn and Mn were 82.22, 130.31, 4.34, 88.73, 40.64, 369.23 and 501.49 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was great difference among different functional areas for all elements except Mn. According to the results, the enrichment factor score of Mn was close to 1, while the enrichment of Zn, Ni, Cu and Cr was more serious, and Pb and Cd were extremely enriched. The assessment results of geoaccumulation index of potential ecological risk indicated that the pollution of Cd in the atmospheric deposition of Lanzhou should be classified as extreme degree, and that of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb as between slight and extreme degrees, and Cr as practically uncontaminated. Contaminations of atmospheric dust by heavy metals in October to the next March were more serious than those from April to August. Health risk assessment indicated that the heavy metals in atmospheric deposition were mainly ingested by human bodies through hand-mouth ingestion. The non-cancer risk was higher for children than for adults. The order of non-cancer hazard indexes of heavy metals was Pb > Cr > Cd > Cu > Ni > Zn. The non-cancer hazard indexes and carcinogen risks of heavy metals were both lower than their threshold values, suggesting that they will not harm the health. PMID:24881392

  10. Characteristics of Cobalt Films Deposited by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Method Using Dicobalt Hexacarbonyl tert-Butylacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunwoo; Park, Taeyong; Lee, Jaesang; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Jeongtae; Kwak, Nohjung; Yeom, Seungjin; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2008-07-01

    Cobalt films were deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using C12H10O6(Co)2 (dicobalt hexacarbonyl tert-butylacetylene, CCTBA) as the Co precursor and H2 reactant gas. The impurity content of the Co films was monitored as a function of the partial pressure of H2 reactant gas. The carbon and oxygen content of as-deposited Co films greatly decrease with the increase of H2 partial pressure, and at H2 partial pressure of 10 Torr and a substrate temperature of 150 °C were 2.8 at. % and less than 1 at. %, respectively. As the H2 partial pressure increased, carbon and oxygen content decreased markedly. Excellent conformality of Co film over 80% was achieved on a patterned wafer with aspect ratio of 15:1, 0.12 µm wide and 1.8 µm deep. The phase transition was analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) depending on RTA temperature. CoSi was observed at 500 °C annealing, and was transformed to CoSi2 at 600 °C annealing. In addition, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data showed a 1:2 atomic ratio of Co:Si in the CoSi2 layer.

  11. Cobalt(I) Olefin Complexes: Precursors for Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Purity Cobalt Metal Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jeff A; Pugh, Thomas; Johnson, Andrew L; Kingsley, Andrew J; Richards, Stephen P

    2016-07-18

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a family of organometallic cobalt(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and diene ligands. The molecular structures of the complexes cyclopentadienyl-cobalt(I) diolefin complexes are described, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis and thermal stability studies of the complexes highlighted the isoprene, dimethyl butadiene, and cyclohexadiene derivatives [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2CHC(Me)CH2)] (1), [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-CH2C(Me)C(Me)CH2)] (2), and [(C5H5)Co(η(4)-C6H8)] (4) as possible cobalt metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Atmospheric pressure MOCVD was employed using precursor 1, to synthesize thin films of metallic cobalt on silicon substrates under an atmosphere (760 torr) of hydrogen (H2). Analysis of the thin films deposited at substrate temperatures of 325, 350, 375, and 400 °C, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal temperature-dependent growth features. Films grown at these temperatures are continuous, pinhole-free, and can be seen to be composed of hexagonal particles clearly visible in the electron micrograph. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show the films to be highly crystalline, high-purity metallic cobalt. Raman spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of cobalt silicides at the substrate/thin film interface. PMID:27348614

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Ca Dimer Deposited on Helium and Mixed Helium/Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, A.; Briant, M.; Mestdagh, J. M.; Gaveau, M. A.

    2011-05-20

    We study the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/argon clusters. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence about 422.7 nm. These electronic excited states of Ca{sub 2} are respectively a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 3}P)+Ca(4s 3d {sup 3}D) and a repulsive one correlating diabatically to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 1}P)+Ca(4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence consists of the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S(leftarrow){sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup -1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. Interestingly, the branching ratio to the ejection of Ca({sup 1}P) increases along with the wavelength of the excitation photon, i.e. when its energy decreases. This is contrary to what is intuitively expected and to what is really found on pure argon clusters. On mixed helium/argon clusters, a new spectral band appears on the red side of the calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the argon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small argon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  13. Fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering of data from abandoned mine site contaminated with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourjabbar, A.; Sârbu, C.; Kostarelos, K.; Einax, J. W.; Büchel, G.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of pore water and slate samples are critically analyzed using fuzzy hierarchical cross-clustering statistical techniques. The main aim of this study was to investigate the source of contamination near an abandoned uranium mine in Germany. The mining activities were abandoned in 1990 the site was closed, and the surrounding area was remediated. However, heavy metal contamination is still detectable in water, soil and plants today. Hence, investigating the source of the current contamination is an important task. In order to achieve the goal, results from chemical analysis of both pore water samples and leachates from slate samples were initially analyzed using hard (classical) hierarchical clustering algorithms that did not provide meaningful results. By using two fuzzy clustering algorithms, Fuzzy Divisive Hierarchical Clustering (FDHC) and Fuzzy Hierarchical Cross-Clustering (FHCC), a relationship between the leachate from Ordovician-Silurian slate samples (10 samples collected from the test site and the surrounding area) and pore water samples (53 samples collected from 3 locations within the test site at 3 depths over the course of 4 years) was identified. The leachate data formed a cluster which was statistically similar to the cluster formed by the pore water samples collected from two of three locations. In addition, the fuzzy cross-clustering approach allowed for the identification of the characteristics (qualitative and quantitative) responsible for the observed similarities between all the samples. We conclude that the fuzzy algorithms were a better tool for the analysis and interpretation of geological/hydrogeological data where the data sets have an inherent vagueness/uncertainty.

  14. The metallicity distribution function of globular clusters systems through near-infrared photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okon, Waldemar M. M.

    New, deep, wide-field photometry in the K -band obtained with the Canada- France-Hawaii Telescope Infrared Camera (CFHT-IR) is used in combination with archival V and I -band data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (HST-WFPC2) to study the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of eight elliptical galaxies of various luminosities. These include the Leo Group galaxies NGC 3377 and 3379, Virgo Galaxy Cluster galaxies M 60, M 86, M 89, as well as the giant elliptical M 87. Two other galaxies, NGC 2768 in Ursa Major and NGC 3608 in Leo are also studied. Combining the new CFHT-IR data with archival HST-WFPC2 data, V - K colours, which are significantly more sensitive to metallicity than the commonly used V - I colour indices, are derived. The main properties of the GCSs of these galaxies that are studied here are the V - K colour distribution functions, metallicity distribution functions, abundance distribution functions, V - K vs V - I colour-colour diagrams and cumulative age distributions. The metallicities are derived by transforming the V - K colours using an existing empirical calibration between colour and metallicity. Four galaxies showed a bimodal CDF. The bias-corrected mean colour and metallicity for the GCSs were found to be < V - K > 2.61 ± 0.32 and - 0.88 ± 0.33 dex respectively. From the abundance distributions and the application of a simple chem ical evolution model, it was found that the average yield for the metal-poor clusters for these GCSs is 0.0033 ± 0.0016, and for the metal-rich 0.0132 ± 0.0059, or about four times higher. The average value lies in between the yields of the Milky Way and M 31 GCSs. The age information is obtained with the aid of colour-colour diagrams and theoretical isochrones from simple stellar population (SSP) models. Several of the GCSs studied here (most notably M 60 and M 87) show evidence for intermediate-age clusters in the metal-rich regime. In addition, artificial colour-colour diagrams

  15. AGES AND METALLICITIES OF CLUSTER GALAXIES IN A779 USING MODIFIED STROeMGREN PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha; Rakos, Karl D.; Hensler, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Werner W.; Odell, Andrew P.

    2012-03-01

    In the quest for the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters, Rakos and co-workers introduced a spectrophotometric method using modified Stroemgren photometry, but with the considerable debate toward the project's abilities, we re-introduce the system by testing for the repeatability of the modified Stroemgren colors and compare them with the Stroemgren colors, and check for the reproducibility of the ages and metallicities (using the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique and the GALEV models) for the six common galaxies in all three A779 data sets. As a result, a fair agreement between two filter systems was found to produce similar colors (with a precision of 0.09 mag in (uz - vz), 0.02 mag in (bz - yz), and 0.03 mag in (vz - vz)) and the generated ages and metallicities are also similar (with an uncertainty of 0.36 Gyr and 0.04 dex from PCA and 0.44 Gyr and 0.2 dex using the GALEV models). We infer that the technique is able to relieve the age-metallicity degeneracy by separating the age effects from the metallicity effects, but it is still unable to completely eliminate it. We further extend this paper to re-study the evolution of galaxies in the low mass, dynamically poor A779 cluster (as it was not elaborately analyzed by Rakos and co-workers in their previous work) by correlating the luminosity (mass), density, and radial distance with the estimated age, metallicity, and the star formation history. Our results distinctly show the bimodality of the young, low-mass, metal-poor population with a mean age of 6.7 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr) and the old, high-mass, metal-rich galaxies with a mean age of 9 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr). The method also observes the color evolution of the blue cluster galaxies to red (Butcher-Oemler phenomenon), and the downsizing phenomenon. Our analysis shows that modified Stroemgren photometry is very well suited for studying low- and intermediate-z clusters, as it is capable of observing deeper with better spatial resolution at

  16. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds. Progress report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    In the recent year, the authors extended investigations into insertion reactions by investigating the insertion of dicarboxylate acetylene into the metal-metal bond of Re{sub 2}(CO){sub 9}(NCMe). Secondly, the authors considered the ring opening reactions of the cyclic thioethers: tetrahydrothiophene and thiacyclohexane when complexed to Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(NCMe){sub 2}. In a third effort, various osmium complexes of cyclobutynes were synthesized and the subsequent reactivity probed. Finally, energy storage (via absorption of UV-visible photons) in osmium cluster compounds was investigated.

  17. Tunable two types of Fano resonances in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Qu-Quan; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that two types of Fano resonances could be observed in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticle heptamer clusters. The first kind of Fano resonance is caused by the coupling between electric dipolar plasmon modes. It still remains with high refractive index shells even though metal cores are separated by them. The second one is caused by the interference between scattering electromagnetic modes of dielectric shell and modified plasmon modes. The energy and line shape of these Fano resonances are highly tunable with shell index and particle geometry, which could find applications in nanophotonics.

  18. Effects of intrusions on grades and contents of gold and other metals in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.; Berger, V.I.; Mosier, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The reason some VMS deposits contain more gold or other metals than others might be due to the influence of intrusions. A new approach examining this possibility is based on examining the information about many VMS deposits to test statistically if those with associated intrusions have significantly different grades or amounts of metals. A set of 632 VMS deposits with reported grades, tonnages, and information about the observed presence or absence of subvolcanic or plutonic intrusive bodies emplaced at or after VMS mineralization is statistically analyzed. Deposits with syn-mineralization or post-mineralization intrusions nearby have higher tonnages than deposits without reported intrusions, but the differences are not statistically significant. When both kinds of intrusions are reported, VMS deposit sizes are significantly higher than in the deposits without any intrusions. Gold, silver, zinc, lead, and copper average grades are not significantly different in the VMS deposits with nearby intrusions compared to deposits without regardless of relative age of intrusive. Only zinc and copper contents are significantly higher in VMS deposits with both kinds of intrusive reported. These differences in overall metal content are due to significantly larger deposit sizes of VMS deposits where both intrusive kinds are observed and reported, rather than any difference in metal grades. ?? 2010.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity of the γ Vel cluster (Spina+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Randich, S.; Palla, F.; Sacco, G. G.; Magrini, L.; Franciosini, E.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Sousa, S. G.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Montes, D.; Tabernero, H.; Klutsch, A.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofre, P.; de Laverny, P.; Masseron, T.; Worley, C.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric parameters, radial velocities, lithium equivalent widths are products of the Gaia-ESO Survey that were used for our membership analysis of the 48 UVES targets observed in the Gamma Velorum fields. Also photometry from Jeffries et al. (2009MNRAS.393..538J) has been used. Iron abundances of these stars have been used to determine the metal content of the cluster. We also discussed the metallicity derived through the iron abundances of the 208 cluster members targeted with GIRAFFE and identified by Jeffries et al. (2014A&A...563A..94J). Stellar parameters of 39 stars targeted by both UVES and GIRAFFE have been used to check the quality of the data. (4 data files).

  20. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  1. Geometric and electronic structure of mixed metal-semiconductor clusters from global optimization.-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank; Wu, Jianhua

    2006-03-01

    In addition to pure metal and semiconductor clusters, hybrid species that contain both types of constituents occur at the metal-semiconductor interface. Thus, clusters of the form Cu(x)Si(y) were detected by mass spectrometry [1]. In this contribution, the geometric and energetic features of Me(m)Si(7-m) (Me=Cu and Li) clusters are discussed. The choice of these systems is motivated by the structural similarity of the pure Si(7), Li(7), and Cu(7) systems which all stabilize in D(5h) symmetry. On the other hand, Li and Cu, representing the alkali group (IA) and the noble metal group (IB) of the periodic system, are expected to display strongly differing behavior when integrated into a Si(n) cluster, resulting in different ground state geometries for the cases Me = Li and Me = Cu. Addressing this problem by means of geometry optimization requires, in view of the large number of possible atomic permutations for Me(m)Si(7-m) with 0 < m < 7, the use of a global search algorithm. Equilibrium geometries are obtained by simulated annealing within the Nose' thermostat frame. It is observed that Cu(m)Si(7-m) clusters with m < 6 tend towards ground state geometries derived from the D(5h) prototype. For Li(m)Si(7-m), the Li(m) subsystem is found to adsorb on the framework of the Si(7-m) dianion. [1] J.J. Scherer, J.B. Pau, C.P. Collier, A. O'Keefe, and R.J. Saykally, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 9187 (1995).

  2. Spectroscopic Metallicities for Fornax Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies, Globular Clusters, and Nucleated Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieske, S.; Hilker, M.; Infante, L.; Jordán, A.

    2006-05-01

    Various formation channels for the puzzling ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) have been proposed in the last few years. To better judge some of the competing scenarios, we present spectroscopic [Fe/H] estimates for a sample of 26 compact objects in the central region of the Fornax Cluster, covering the magnitude range of UCDs and bright globular clusters (18 magmetallicity distribution of compact objects at MV~=-11 mag (~=3×106 Msolar): for MV<-11 mag the mean metallicity is [Fe/H]=-0.62+/-0.05 dex, 0.56+/-0.15 dex higher than the value of -1.18+/-0.15 dex found for MV>-11 mag. This metallicity break is accompanied by a change in the size-luminosity relation for compact objects, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope imaging: for MV<-11 mag, rh scales with luminosity, while for MV>-11 mag, rh is almost luminosity-independent. In our study we therefore assume a limiting absolute magnitude of MV=-11 mag between UCDs and globular clusters. The mean metallicity of five Fornax nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy (dE,N) nuclei included in our study is about 0.8 dex lower than that of the UCDs, a difference significant at the 4.5 σ level. This difference is marginally higher than expected from a comparison of their (V-I) colors, indicating that UCDs are younger than or at most coeval to dE,N nuclei. Because of the large metallicity discrepancy between UCDs and nuclei, we disfavor the hypothesis that most of the Fornax UCDs are the remnant nuclei of tidally stripped dE,Ns. Our metallicity estimates for UCDs are closer to but slightly below those derived for young massive clusters (YMCs) of comparable masses. We therefore favor a scenario in which most UCDs in Fornax are successors of merged YMCs produced in the course of violent galaxy-galaxy mergers. It is noted that, in contrast, the properties of Virgo UCDs are more consistent with the stripping scenario, suggesting that different UCD formation channels may

  3. Influence of group 10 metals on the growth and subsequent Coulomb explosion of small silicon clusters under strong light pulses.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matt W; Castleman, A W

    2013-03-18

    Growth and ionization patterns of small silicon clusters are studied using ultrafast pulses centered at 624 nm by varying the metal electron source for cluster formation using group 10 transition metals. The silicon-cluster size was observed to change as the electron source was varied from Pdcluster growth in the palladium system is attributed to the higher work function of palladium metal, producing less collisions of the laser-induced plasma with the silane. This shows that changing the metal electron source while holding the laser intensity constant affects the degree of dehydrogenation of SiH4 due to the number of collisions in the cluster source. The saturation intensities of each atomic charge state of silicon, resulting from Coulomb explosion of pure silicon clusters, formed with each metal are measured and compared to those calculated by using semi-classical tunneling theory assuming sequential ionization. The ion signal of silicon atomic charge states produced when using palladium as electron source for cluster formation shows a greater degree of ionization enhancement than that observed for the nickel and platinum systems. This is reflected by the smaller-size clusters formed in the palladium system. Based on a plot of the ion signal as a function of laser intensity compared to the simulated ion signal from tunneling theory, the ionization enhancement of silicon high-charge states is found to increase by varying the electron source from Ni

  4. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity

  5. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Buck, Kristen N.; Casey, John R.; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W.; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity. PMID

  6. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  7. Successive ionic layer deposition (SILD) as a new sensor technology: synthesis and modification of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotcenkov, G.; Tolstoy, V.; Schwank, J.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we have discussed both peculiarities and advantages of successive ionic layer deposition (SILD) methods for the synthesis and modification of metal oxides. For these purposes, the results of research into the design of SILD technology suitable for preparing porous nanostructure SnO2 films and the surface modification of SnO2 films deposited by spray pyrolysis have been analysed. It has been shown that this new method can be used for the deposition of metal oxides and for noble metals. A great deal of interest in the SILD method may be generated by the method's simplicity, cheapness, and ability to deposit thin nanostructure films on rough surfaces. The SILD method essentially consists of successive treatments of both conductive and dielectric substrates by solutions of various salts, which form poorly soluble compounds at the substrate surface. It has been found that SILD technology is an effective method for improving gas sensor parameters. For example, it has been established that surface modification by Pd and Ag using SILD technology improves the gas response of SnO2-based sensors to reducing gases, and depresses their sensitivity to oxidizing gases. This article was presented at the 13th International Conference on Sensors and Their Applications, held in Chatham, Kent, on 6-7 September 2005.

  8. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  9. The transformation of organic amines by transition metal cluster compounds: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    Research during the current award period has covered several related topics which have emerged and grown as a consequence of the various discoveries that have been made during this award period. They have been divided into the following subsections for clarity and emphasis: The activation of tertiary amines by osmium cluster complexes; CH bond activation and ring opening of a nitrogen containing strained ring heterocycle by an osmium cluster complex; Ring opening of cyclic thioethers; cyclooligomerization of Thietanes; Studies of the cyclobutyne ligand; Insertion of an alkynes into metal-metal bonds; and Energy storage in metal clusters. A summary of the results of these studies is given in the following sections of this report. These studies have resulted in 50 scientific publications over the last three years and details of their studies beyond that given in the following sections can be found in those reports. All of these reports are listed in the final section of this report by the author`s names, title and journal citation.

  10. Classification and identification of metal-accumulating plant species by cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenhao; Li, He; Zhang, Taoxiang; Sen, Lin; Ni, Wuzhong

    2014-09-01

    Identification and classification of metal-accumulating plant species is essential for phytoextraction. Cluster analysis is used for classifying individuals based on measured characteristics. In this study, classification of plant species for metal accumulation was conducted using cluster analysis based on a practical survey. Forty plant samples belonging to 21 species were collected from an ancient silver-mining site. Five groups such as hyperaccumulator, potential hyperaccumulator, accumulator, potential accumulator, and normal accumulating plant were graded. For Cd accumulation, the ancient silver-mining ecotype of Sedum alfredii was treated as a Cd hyperaccumulator, and the others were normal Cd-accumulating plants. For Zn accumulation, S. alfredii was considered as a potential Zn hyperaccumulator, Conyza canadensis and Artemisia lavandulaefolia were Zn accumulators, and the others were normal Zn-accumulating plants. For Pb accumulation, S. alfredii and Elatostema lineolatum were potential Pb hyperaccumulators, Rubus hunanensis, Ajuga decumbens, and Erigeron annuus were Pb accumulators, C. canadensis and A. lavandulaefolia were potential Pb accumulators, and the others were normal Pb-accumulating plants. Plant species with the potential for phytoextraction were identified such as S. alfredii for Cd and Zn, C. canadensis and A. lavandulaefolia for Zn and Pb, and E. lineolatum, R. hunanensis, A. decumbens, and E. annuus for Pb. Cluster analysis is effective in the classification of plant species for metal accumulation and identification of potential species for phytoextraction. PMID:24888623

  11. Magnetic properties of bimetallic clusters composed of Gd and transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2016-02-01

    Gadolinium, a rare earth metal, is ferromagnetic, while Mn, a transition metal atom, is antiferromagnetic in the bulk phase. Clusters of these elements, however, share some common properties; both exhibit ferrimagnetic behavior and maintain magnetic moments close to their free atomic value. Using density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation, we have studied the magnetic properties of bimetallic clusters composed of Gd and Mn to see if they show unusual behavior. The coupling between Gd and Mn spins is found to be antiferromagnetic, while that between Mn atoms is ferromagnetic. Moreover, the bonding between Gd and Mn atoms is stronger than that between the Gd atoms or Mn atoms, thus enabling the possibility of creating more stable magnetic particles. A systematic study of the magnetic and binding properties of clusters composed of Gd atom and other transition metal atoms such as V, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Co is also carried out to probe the effect of 3d-orbital occupation on magnetic coupling.

  12. Heterometallic Triiron-Oxo/Hydroxo Clusters: Effect of Redox-Inactive Metals

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, David E.; Lionetti, Davide; Rittle, Jonathan; Agapie, Theodor

    2014-01-01

    A series of tetranuclear oxo/hydroxo clusters comprised of three Fe centers and a redox-inactive metal (M) of various charge is reported. Crystallographic studies show an unprecedented Fe3M(μ4-O)(μ2-OH) core that remains intact upon changing M or the oxidation state of iron. Electrochemical studies reveal that the reduction potentials (E1/2) span a window of 500 mV and depend upon the Lewis acidity of M. Using the pKa of the redox-inactive metal aqua complex as a measure of Lewis acidity, these compounds display a linear dependence between E1/2 and acidity with a slope of ca. 70 mV per pKa unit. The current study of [Fe3MO(OH)] and previous ones of [Mn3MOn] (n = 2, 4) moieties support the generality of the above relationship between the reduction potentials of heterometallic oxido clusters and the Lewis acidity of incorporated cations, as applied to clusters of different redox-active metals. PMID:24304416

  13. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  14. Nonlinear Color-Metallicity Relations of Globular Clusters. III. On the Discrepancy in Metallicity between Globular Cluster Systems and Their Parent Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Blakeslee, John P.; Peng, Eric W.; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Cho, Jaeil; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Young-Wook

    2011-12-01

    One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies—globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magnitude in the host galaxy mass, suggesting a universal process of chemical enrichment among various GC systems. Given that GCs are bluer than field stars within the same galaxy, it is plausible that the chemical enrichment processes of GCs ceased somewhat earlier than that of the field stellar population, and if so, GCs preferentially trace the major, vigorous mode of star formation events in galactic formation. We further suggest a possible systematic age difference among GC systems, in that the GC systems in more luminous galaxies are older. This is consistent with the downsizing paradigm whereby stars of brighter galaxies, on average, formed earlier than those of dimmer galaxies; this additionally supports the similar nature shared by GCs and field stars. Although the sample used in this study (the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel, WFPC2, and WFC3 photometry for the GC systems in the Virgo galaxy cluster) confines our

  15. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. III. ON THE DISCREPANCY IN METALLICITY BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AND THEIR PARENT ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jaeil; Kim, Hak-Sub; Chung, Chul; Kim, Sooyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Blakeslee, John P.; Peng, Eric W.; Sohn, Sangmo T.

    2011-12-20

    One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies-globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magnitude in the host galaxy mass, suggesting a universal process of chemical enrichment among various GC systems. Given that GCs are bluer than field stars within the same galaxy, it is plausible that the chemical enrichment processes of GCs ceased somewhat earlier than that of the field stellar population, and if so, GCs preferentially trace the major, vigorous mode of star formation events in galactic formation. We further suggest a possible systematic age difference among GC systems, in that the GC systems in more luminous galaxies are older. This is consistent with the downsizing paradigm whereby stars of brighter galaxies, on average, formed earlier than those of dimmer galaxies; this additionally supports the similar nature shared by GCs and field stars. Although the sample used in this study (the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel, WFPC2, and WFC3 photometry for the GC systems in the Virgo galaxy cluster) confines our

  16. The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Open Sites on Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Michael Mark

    Coordinatively unsaturated corner and edge atoms have been hypothesized to have the highest activity of sites responsible for many catalytic reactions on a metal surface. Recent studies have validated this hypothesis in varied reaction systems. However, quantification of different types of coordinatively unsaturated sites, and elucidation of their individual catalytic rates has remained a largely unresolved challenge when understanding catalysis on metal surfaces. Yet such structure-function knowledge would be invaluable to the design of more active and selective metal-surface catalysts in the future. I investigated the catalytic contributions of undercoordinated sites such as corner and edge atoms are investigated in a model reaction system using organic ligands bound to the gold nanoparticle surface. The catalyst consisted of 4 nm gold nanoparticles on a metal oxide support, using resazurin to resorufin as a model reaction system. My results demonstrate that in this system, corner atom sites are the most undercoordinated sites, and are over an order of magnitude more active when compared to undercoordinated edge atom sites, while terrace sites remain catalytically inactive for the reduction reaction of resazurin to resorufin. Catalytic activity has been also demonstrated for calixarene-bound gold nanoparticles using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. With the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction, a comparative study was undertaken to compare calixarene phosphine and calixarene thiol bound 4 nm gold particles. The results of the study suggested that a leached site was responsible for catalysis and not sites on the original gold nanoparticles. Future experiments with calixarene bound gold clusters could investigate ligand effects in reactions where the active site is not a leached or aggregated gold species, possibly in oxidation reactions, where electron-rich gold is hypothesized to be a good catalyst. The results that emphasize the enhanced catalytic activity of

  17. Reactive sputter deposition of pyrite structure transition metal disulfide thin films: Microstructure, transport, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Baruth, A.; Manno, M.; Narasimhan, D.; Shankar, A.; Zhang, X.; Johnson, M.; Aydil, E. S.; Leighton, C.

    2012-09-01

    Transition metal disulfides crystallizing in the pyrite structure (e.g., TMS{sub 2}, with TM = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are a class of materials that display a remarkably diverse array of functional properties. These properties include highly spin-polarized ferromagnetism (in Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2}), superconductivity (in CuS{sub 2}), an antiferromagnetic Mott insulating ground state (in NiS{sub 2}), and semiconduction with close to optimal parameters for solar absorber applications (in FeS{sub 2}). Exploitation of these properties in heterostructured devices requires the development of reliable and reproducible methods for the deposition of high quality pyrite structure thin films. In this manuscript, we report on the suitability of reactive sputter deposition from metallic targets in an Ar/H{sub 2}S environment as a method to achieve exactly this. Optimization of deposition temperature, Ar/H{sub 2}S pressure ratio, and total working gas pressure, assisted by plasma optical emission spectroscopy, reveals significant windows over which deposition of single-phase, polycrystalline, low roughness pyrite films can be achieved. This is illustrated for the test cases of the ferromagnetic metal CoS{sub 2} and the diamagnetic semiconductor FeS{sub 2}, for which detailed magnetic and transport characterization are provided. The results indicate significant improvements over alternative deposition techniques such as ex situ sulfidation of metal films, opening up exciting possibilities for all-sulfide heterostructured devices. In particular, in the FeS{sub 2} case it is suggested that fine-tuning of the sputtering conditions provides a potential means to manipulate doping levels and conduction mechanisms, critical issues in solar cell applications. Parenthetically, we note that conditions for synthesis of phase-pure monosulfides and thiospinels are also identified.

  18. Structural strengthening of rocket nozzle extension by means of laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honoré, M.; Brox, L.; Hallberg, M.

    2012-03-01

    Commercial space operations strive to maximize the payload per launch in order to minimize the costs of each kg launched into orbit; this yields demand for ever larger launchers with larger, more powerful rocket engines. Volvo Aero Corporation in collaboration with Snecma and Astrium has designed and tested a new, upgraded Nozzle extension for the Vulcain 2 engine configuration, denoted Vulcain 2+ NE Demonstrator The manufacturing process for the welding of the sandwich wall and the stiffening structure is developed in close cooperation with FORCE Technology. The upgrade is intended to be available for future development programs for the European Space Agency's (ESA) highly successful commercial launch vehicle, the ARIANE 5. The Vulcain 2+ Nozzle Extension Demonstrator [1] features a novel, thin-sheet laser-welded configuration, with laser metal deposition built-up 3D-features for the mounting of stiffening structure, flanges and for structural strengthening, in order to cope with the extreme load- and thermal conditions, to which the rocket nozzle extension is exposed during launch of the 750 ton ARIANE 5 launcher. Several millimeters of material thickness has been deposited by laser metal deposition without disturbing the intricate flow geometry of the nozzle cooling channels. The laser metal deposition process has been applied on a full-scale rocket nozzle demonstrator, and in excess of 15 kilometers of filler wire has been successfully applied to the rocket nozzle. The laser metal deposition has proven successful in two full-throttle, full-scale tests, firing the rocket engine and nozzle in the ESA test facility P5 by DLR in Lampoldshausen, Germany.

  19. The grape cluster, metal particle 63344,1. [in lunar coarse fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Axon, H. J.; Agrell, S. O.

    1975-01-01

    The grape cluster metal particle 63344,1 found in lunar coarse fines is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron microprobe, and an optical microscope. This metal particle is approximately 0.5 cm in its largest dimension and consists of hundreds of metallic globules welded together to form a structure somewhat like a bunch of grapes. Electron microprobe analysis for Fe, Ni, Co, P, and S in the metal was carried out using wavelength dispersive detectors. No primary solidification structure is observed in the globules, and the particle is slow cooled from the solidification temperature (nearly 1300 C) taking days to probably months to reach 600 C. Two mechanisms for the formation of globules are proposed. One mechanism involves the primary impact of an iron meteorite which produces a metallic liquid and vapor phase. The second mechanism involves the formation of a liquid pool of metal after impact of an iron meteorite projectile followed by a secondary impact in the liquid metal pool.

  20. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  1. Heat-Resistant Co-W Catalytic Metals for Multilayer Graphene Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Satoru; Baba, Shotaro; Hanai, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sakuma, Naoshi; Kajita, Akihiro; Sakai, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) is expected to be a low-resistance and high-reliability interconnect material replacing copper (Cu) in nanoscale interconnects. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is expected as a practical method for MLG deposition. To obtain high-quality MLG films without catalyst agglomeration by CVD, heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals were investigated. The agglomeration of the Co-W catalytic metals was suppressed by increasing the W composition; however, MLG deposition was suppressed at the same time. The effects of W addition on the MLG growth were discussed from the viewpoints of the crystallographic change of the Co-W catalysts and chemical reactions. It was found that the Co grain size was reduced and the fcc Co formation was suppressed by W addition. In addition, graphite formation was supposed to be suppressed by W addition owing to the formation of phases other than fcc Co according to the Co-W-C phase diagram. With the optimum W concentration, MLG crystallinity was improved by high-temperature CVD using the heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals (0.7 at. %) without agglomeration, compared with that in the case of using pure-Co catalysts.

  2. Electroless deposition of metal nanoparticles on graphene with substrate-assisted techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Meeks, Veronica; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    We present the electroless reduction of solution-based metal ions for nanoparticle deposition on a variety of substrates. The substrates include graphene-coated metals, insulators, doped semiconductors, and patterned ferroelectrics. We find that the metal ions are spontaneously reduced on a wide variety of graphene substrates, and the substrates play a large role in the nanoparticle coverage. For example, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. Given that the work function of graphene is approximately 4.4eV, the Fermi level is -0.1 V vs the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE). Since the reduction potential of gold chloride is +1.002 V, the spontaneous transfer of electrons from the graphene to the metal ion is energetically favorable. However, we find substrates with similar work functions nevertheless result in varied deposition rates, which we attribute to electron availability. We also find that patterned ferrolectrics can be used as a template for patterned nanoparticle deposition, with and without graphene. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant # DMR-1206935.

  3. Carbon deposition from aromatic solvents onto active intact 3d metal surface at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Safronov, A P; Kurlyandskaya, G V; Chlenova, A A; Kuznetsov, M V; Bazhin, D N; Beketov, I V; Sanchez-Ilarduya, M B; Martinez-Amesti, A

    2014-03-25

    The process of carbon deposition onto 3d metal surface immersed in aromatic solvents (benzene, toluene, xylene) at ambient conditions was studied for as-prepared magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and Fe-based films by thermal analysis, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The mechanism of the deposition at the interface is likely the heterogeneous Scholl oxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbons, which is the cationic polymerization of the aryl rings. It results in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) chemically bonded to the surface of a MNP or thin metallic film. The benzene rings in the polycyclic deposit do not maintain planar aligned structures and do not provide delocalization of the π-electrons in the zone structure. Contrary to the dense graphite layers, the polycyclic layers, although chemically bonded, are not attached tightly to the surface. Such "hairlike" structure of the carboneous deposit might be especially favorable for the applications that imply the enhanced interaction at the surfaces incorporated in the functional matrices (polymeric composites or biosensors). The aromatic chemical nature of the deposit provides strong interaction with most polymers, while its loose structure favors conformational mobility of macromolecular chains at the interface. PMID:24593324

  4. Atmospheric Deposition and Critical Loads for Nitrogen and Metals in Arctic Alaska: Review and Current Status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linder, Greg L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Neitlich, Peter; Little, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To protect important resources under their bureau’s purview, the United States National Park Service’s (NPS) Arctic Network (ARCN) has developed a series of “vital signs” that are to be periodically monitored. One of these vital signs focuses on wet and dry deposition of atmospheric chemicals and further, the establishment of critical load (CL) values (thresholds for ecological effects based on cumulative depositional loadings) for nitrogen (N), sulfur, and metals. As part of the ARCN terrestrial monitoring programs, samples of the feather moss Hylocomium splendens are being col- lected and analyzed as a cost-effective means to monitor atmospheric pollutant deposition in this region. Ultimately, moss data combined with refined CL values might be used to help guide future regulation of atmospheric contaminant sources potentially impacting Arctic Alaska. But first, additional long-term studies are needed to determine patterns of contaminant deposition as measured by moss biomonitors and to quantify ecosystem responses at particular loadings/ ranges of contaminants within Arctic Alaska. Herein we briefly summarize 1) current regulatory guidance related to CL values 2) derivation of CL models for N and metals, 3) use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition and loadings, 4) preliminary analysis of vulnerabilities and risks associated with CL estimates for N, 5) preliminary analysis of existing data for characterization of CL values for N for interior Alaska and 6) implications for managers and future research needs.

  5. Metal deposition by electroless plating on polydopamine functionalized micro- and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Giovanni; Wisser, Florian M; Leifert, Annika; Mohamed-Noriega, Nasser; Grothe, Julia; Dörfler, Susanne; Kaskel, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metal coated micro- and nanoparticles by functionalization with a thin polydopamine layer followed by electroless plating is reported. The particles are initially coated with polydopamine via self-polymerization. The resulting polydopamine coated particles have a surface rich in catechols and amino groups, resulting in a high affinity toward metal ions. Thus, they provide an effective platform for selective electroless metal deposition without further activation and sensitization steps. The combination of a polydopamine-based functionalization with electroless plating ensures a simple, scalable, and cost-effective metal coating strategy. Silver-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, copper-plated tungsten carbide microparticles, and copper-plated alumina nanoparticles were successfully fabricated, showing also the high versatility of the method, since the polymerization of dopamine leads to the formation of an adherent polydopamine layer on the surface of particles of any material and size. The metal coated particles produced with this process are particularly well suited for the production of metal matrix composites, since the metal coating increases the wettability of the particles by the metal, promoting their integration within the matrix. Such composite materials are used in a variety of applications including electrical contacts, components for the automotive industries, magnets, and electromagnetic interference shielding. PMID:24041548

  6. Conductive Perovskite-type Metal Oxide Thin Films Prepared by Chemical Solution Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, K.; Uchida, H.

    2011-10-01

    Metal oxide electrode have been widely developed for high-performance electric device because they possess some attractive characteristic such as thermal/chemical stabilities and change compensation for oxygen vacancies in interconnected dielectric layers, etc., which is often hardly achieved by convention metal electrodes. As almost all metal oxide electrodes were usually fabricated by some vapour deposition techniques which require large-scale equipments, power, resources and costs, film deposition via solution technique would be worthy for familiarizing the metal oxide electrodes. In this research, thin films of conductive perovskite-type oxides, (La,Sr)CoO3 [LSCO], were fabricated by chemical solution deposition technique. The precursor solution for LSCO was prepared using metal nitrate, acetates, and iso-propoxide and 2-methoxyethanol. The solution was spin-coated on substrates, followed by drying, pyrolysis and RTA-treatment for crystallization at 500-750°C, for 5 min in air. These processes were repeated to obtain desired film thickness. (100)Si and (100)SrTiO3 were used as substrate. XRD analysis indicated that both of LSCO films fabricated on (100)SrTiO3 and (100)Si substrates were crystallized at and above 600°C. The films on (100)SrTiO3 had preferential crystal orientation of (100)LSCO normal to the substrate surface, while random crystal orientation was confirmed for the films on (100)Si. Electrical resistivity of the both films fabricated at 700°C were 6.09 × 10-5 Ω cm and 1.12 × 10-4 Ω cm, respectively, which is almost same as the LSCO films fabricated by conventional vapour deposition technique.

  7. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    SciTech Connect

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Sneden, Christopher; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R. E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  8. Atmospheric Parameters and Metallicities for 2191 Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Sneden, Christopher; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Nascimbeni, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V <= 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  9. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Russell, H. R.; Blundell, K. M.; Canning, R. E. A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Walker, S. A.; Grimes, C. K.

    2016-03-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100 pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10 s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ˜7 kpc `notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are multiple shocks, including a 1.9-kpc-radius inner shell-like structure and a weak 1.1-1.4 Mach number shock around the central cavities. Within a 10 kpc radius are nine depressions in surface brightness, several of which appear to be associated with radio emission. The shocks and cavities imply that the nucleus has been repeatedly active on 5-10 Myr time-scales, indicating a tight balance between heating and cooling. We confirm the presence of a series of linear quasi-periodic structures. If they are sound waves, the ˜5 kpc spacing implies a period of 6 Myr, similar to the ages of the shocks and cavities. Alternatively, these structures may be Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, their associated turbulence or amplified magnetic field layers.

  10. Method for localized deposition of noble metal catalysts with control of morphology

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Huber, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 .degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick .times.10 .mu.m wide .times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer.

  11. A Novel Method for Depositing Precious Metal Films on Difficult Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, L. C.; Phillip, W. H.

    1994-01-01

    A guanidine-based vehicle was developed to deposit precious metal coatings on surfaces known to be difficult to coat. To demonstrate this method, a platinum coating was deposited on alumina fibers using a guanidine-platinum solution. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the only species present in the coating was platinum and that all of the carbon species had been removed upon heat treatment. SEM results showed that some porosity was present but that the coatings uniformly covered the fiber surface and adhered well to the finer.

  12. Preparation and characterization of YBCO coating on metallic RABiT substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonal, M. R.; Prajapat, C. L.; Igalwar, P. S.; Maji, B. C.; Singh, M. R.; Krishnan, M.

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting YBCO films are coated on metallic Rolling Assisted Bi-axially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) Ni-5wt % W (NiW) (002) substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Targets of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and buffer layers of Ceria and 8 mole % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of high density are synthesized. At each stage of deposition coatings are characterized by XRD. Transport studies show superconducting nature of YBCO only when two successive buffer layers of YSZ and CeO2 are used.

  13. The role of gas dynamics in operation conditions of a Pulsed Microplasma Cluster Source for nanostructured thin films deposition.

    PubMed

    Tafreshi, H Vahedi; Piseri, P; Benedek, G; Milani, P

    2006-04-01

    This study intends to explain the fluid dynamic characteristics of a Pulsed Microplasma Cluster Source (PMCS). An axially symmetric steady state simulation is performed for modeling the real-life three-dimensional unsteady flow of hypersonic helium inside our PMCS. Hypersonic helium flow is simulated using Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model. We obtained the jet velocity, density, and pressure field inside our PMCS for the conditions considered and discussed them with respect to our experimental observations. We also presented a qualitative discussion on the formation-termination process of this hypersonic jet. In particular, simulation, in agreement with the experiment, indicates that the middle stage of the injection process, where the Mach disk stands close to the ablation target and at the same time the mass flow rate is relatively high, is almost the appropriate time for firing the electric discharge. We simulated the jet-electrode impingement and tracked the trajectory of the ablated carbon clusters, considered as rigid spheres, inside the PMCS. We noticed that the spatial distribution of the clusters inside PMCS is highly conserved during the free expansion of the cluster beam out of the nozzle (in the vacuum chambers) and is recognizable in the deposited carbon film. This indicates that the geometry of PMCS plays a significant role in the uniformity of the deposited film. PMID:16736779

  14. Copper Benzenetricarboxylate Metal-Organic Framework Nucleation Mechanisms on Metal Oxide Powders and Thin Films formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Paul C; Zhao, Junjie; Williams, Philip S; Walls, Howard J; Shepherd, Sarah D; Losego, Mark D; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-04-13

    Chemically functional microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals are attractive for filtration and gas storage applications, and recent results show that they can be immobilized on high surface area substrates, such as fiber mats. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding initial key reaction steps in thin film MOF nucleation and growth. We find that thin inorganic nucleation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) can promote solvothermal growth of copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF (Cu-BTC) on various substrate surfaces. The nature of the ALD material affects the MOF nucleation time, crystal size and morphology, and the resulting MOF surface area per unit mass. To understand MOF nucleation mechanisms, we investigate detailed Cu-BTC MOF nucleation behavior on metal oxide powders and Al2O3, ZnO, and TiO2 layers formed by ALD on polypropylene substrates. Studying both combined and sequential MOF reactant exposure conditions, we find that during solvothermal synthesis ALD metal oxides can react with the MOF metal precursor to form double hydroxy salts that can further convert to Cu-BTC MOF. The acidic organic linker can also etch or react with the surface to form MOF from an oxide metal source, which can also function as a nucleation agent for Cu-BTC in the mixed solvothermal solution. We discuss the implications of these results for better controlled thin film MOF nucleation and growth. PMID:26999431

  15. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  16. Surface chemistry of the atomic layer deposition of metals and group III oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, David Nathan

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technique offering precise control of film thickness and the ability to coat high-aspect-ratio features such as trenches and nanopowders. Unlike other film growth techniques, ALD does not require harsh processing conditions and is not limited by line-of-sight deposition. Emerging applications for ALD materials include semiconductor devices, gas sensors, and water-diffusion barriers. The chemistry behind ALD involves understanding how the precursors interact with surfaces to deposit the desired material. All ALD precursors need to be stable on the substrate to ensure self-limiting behavior yet reactive enough to be easily removed with the second reagent. Recent precursor development has provided many volatile organometallic compounds for most of the periodic table. As the number of precursors increases, proper precursor choice becomes crucial. This is because the film properties, growth rates, and growth temperature vary widely between the precursors. Many of the above traits can be predicted with knowledge of the precursor reaction mechanisms. This thesis aims to link surface reaction mechanisms to observed growth and nucleation trends in metal and oxide ALD systems. The first portion of this thesis explores the mechanisms of two ALD oxide systems. First, I examine the mechanism of ALD alumina with ozone. Ozone is used as an oxidant in the semiconductor industry because the deposited Al 2O3 films possess better insulating properties and ozone is easier to purge from a vacuum system. FT-IR analysis reveals a complicated array of surface intermediates such as formate, carbonate, and methoxy groups that form during Al2O3 growth with ozone. Next, a new method to deposit thin films of Ga2O3 is introduced. Gallium oxide is a transparent conducting oxide that needs expensive solid precursors to be deposited by ALD. I show that trimethylgallium is a good high-temperature ALD precursor that deposits films of Ga2O 3 with

  17. Mono- and Dinuclear Macrocyclic Calcium Complexes as Platforms for Mixed-Metal Complexes and Clusters.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Emma A; Leeland, James W; Love, Jason B

    2016-01-19

    Mono- and dinuclear calcium complexes of the Schiff-base macrocycles H4L have been prepared and characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. In the formation of Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)), Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), and Ca2(THF)4(L(2)), the ligand framework adopts a bowl-shaped conformation instead of the conventional wedge, Pacman-shaped structure as seen with the anthracenyl-hinged complex Ca2(py)5(L(3)). The mononuclear calcium complex Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)) reacts with various equivalents of LiN(SiMe3)2 to form calcium/alkali metal clusters and dinuclear transition metal complexes when reacted subsequently with transition metal salts. The dinuclear calcium complex Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), when reacted with various equivalents of NaOH, is shown to act as a platform for the formation of calcium/alkali metal hydroxide clusters, displaying alternate wedged and bowl-shaped conformations. PMID:26709870

  18. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles. PMID:25970127

  19. Modeling of liquid-metal corrosion/deposition in a fusion reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Malang, S.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    A model has been developed for the investigation of the liquid-metal corrosion and the corrosion product transport in a liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blanket. The model describes the two-dimensional transport of wall material in the liquid-metal flow and is based on the following assumptions: (1) parallel flow in a straight circular tube; (2) transport of wall material perpendicular to the flow direction by diffusion and turbulent exchange; in flow direction by the flow motion only; (3) magnetic field causes uniform velocity profile with thin boundary layer and suppresses turbulent mass exchange; and (4) liquid metal at the interface is saturated with wall material. A computer code based on this model has been used to analyze the corrosion of ferritic steel by lithium lead and the deposition of wall material in the cooler part of a loop. Three cases have been investigated: (1) ANL forced convection corrosion experiment (without magnetic field); (2) corrosion in the MARS liquid-metal-cooled blanket (with magnetic field); and (3) deposition of wall material in the corrosion product cleanup system of the MARS blanket loop.

  20. Hydrazine-Free Solution-Deposited CuIn(S,Se)2 Solar Cells by Spray Deposition of Metal Chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Arnou, Panagiota; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Cooper, Carl S; Malkov, Andrei V; Walls, John M; Bowers, Jake W

    2016-05-18

    Solution processing of semiconductors, such as CuInSe2 and its alloys (CIGS), can significantly reduce the manufacturing costs of thin film solar cells. Despite the recent success of solution deposition approaches for CIGS, toxic reagents such as hydrazine are usually involved, which introduce health and safety concerns. Here, we present a simple and safer methodology for the preparation of high-quality CuIn(S, Se)2 absorbers from metal sulfide solutions in a diamine/dithiol mixture. The solutions are sprayed in air, using a chromatography atomizer, followed by a postdeposition selenization step. Two different selenization methods are explored resulting in power conversion efficiencies of up to 8%. PMID:27135679

  1. Salt-Driven Deposition of Thermoresponsive Polymer-Coated Metal Nanoparticles on Solid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyue; Maji, Samarendra; da Fonseca Antunes, André B; De Rycke, Riet; Hoogenboom, Richard; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-06-13

    Here we report on a simple, generally applicable method for depositing metal nanoparticles on a wide variety of solid surfaces under all aqueous conditions. Noble-metal nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction followed by coating with thermoresponsive polymers spontaneously form a monolayer-like structure on a wide variety of substrates in presence of sodium chloride whereas this phenomenon does not occur in salt-free medium. Interestingly, this phenomenon occurs below the cloud point temperature of the polymers and we hypothesize that salt ion-induced screening of electrostatic charges on the nanoparticle surface entropically favors hydrophobic association between the polymer-coated nanoparticles and a hydrophobic substrate. PMID:27142455

  2. Globular Cluster Systems in Giant Ellipticals: The Mass/Metallicity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.

    2009-07-01

    Data from the Hubble Space Telescope taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/WFC camera have been used to investigate the globular cluster (GC) populations around six giant elliptical galaxies that are ~40 Mpc distant. From these six fields, imaged in B and I, a total of more than 15,000 candidate GCs have been measured, of which 8000 or more are high-probability GCs. The data reach a limiting magnitude near MI sime -8, about 0.4 mag fainter than the GC luminosity function turnover point, and thus thoroughly cover the bright half of the GC population. Most of the individual GCs on these images are marginally resolved nonstellar objects, so King-model profiles convolved with the stellar point-spread functions are used to measure their individual total magnitudes, colors, and linear effective radii. The classic bimodal form of the GC color-magnitude distribution shows up unambiguously in all the galaxies, allowing an accurate definition of the mean colors along each of the two sequences as a function of magnitude (the mass/metallicity relation or MMR). The blue, metal-poor cluster sequence shows a clearly defined but nonlinear MMR: in this particular photometric data set the mean GC color changes smoothly from a near-vertical sequence at low luminosity (MI gsim -9.5) to an increasingly redward slope at higher luminosity. By contrast, the red, metal-rich sequence shows little trace of an MMR and is nearly vertical at all luminosities. The form and slope of the MMR along either sequence do not depend strongly on either cluster size rh or galactocentric distance R gc. All the observed features of the present data agree with the interpretation that the MMR is created primarily by GC self-enrichment, along the lines of the quantitative model of Bailin & Harris. During the protocluster formation stage, the more massive GCs are better able to hold back the enriched products of the earliest supernovae and to seed the lower-mass stars still in formation. The "threshold

  3. Variable Stars in the Unusual, Metal-Rich Globular Cluster NGC-6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Marcio; Sweigart, Allen V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for variable stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6441 using time-series BV photometry. The total number of variables found near NGC 6441 has been increased to approx. 104, with 48 new variables being found in this survey. A significant number of the variables are RR Lyrae stars (approx. 46), most of which are probable cluster members. As was noted by Layden et al. (1999), the periods of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae are unusually long compared to field stars of similar metallicity. The existence of these long period RRab stars is consistent with Sweigart & Catelan's (1998) prediction that the horizontal branch of NGC 6441 is unusually bright. This result implies that the metallicity-luminosity relationship for RR Lyrae stars is not universal. We discuss the difficulty in determining the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 6441 due to the unusual nature of its RR Lyrae. A number of ab-type RR Lyrae are found to be both brighter and redder than the other probable RRab found along the horizontal branch, which may be a result of blending with stars of redder color. A smaller than usual gap is found between the shortest period fundamental mode and the longest period first-overtone mode RR Lyrae. We determine the reddening of the cluster to be E(B - V) = 0.51 +/- 0.02 mag, with substantial differential reddening across the face of the cluster. The mean V magnitude of the RR Lyrae is found to be 17.51 +/- 0.02 resulting in a distance of 10.4 to 11.9 kpc, for a range of assumed values of < M(sub V)> for RR Lyrae stars. The possibility that stars in NGC 6441 may span a range in [Fe/H] is also discussed.

  4. Atomic Resolution of the Structure of a Metal Support Interface: Triosmium Clusters on MgO (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Chi, Miaofang; Gates, Bruce C.; kulkarni, Apoorva; Ortalan, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Aberration-corrected STEM images of MgO-supported triosmium clusters show that the osmium atoms reside atop magnesium atoms. On the basis of the results, structural models of the clusters that include the metal-support interaction are derived.

  5. Production of strontium sulfide coatings by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.S.; Dye, R.C.; Tuenge, R.T.

    1998-11-01

    This work was focused on the MOCVD of the cerium-doped strontium sulfide (SrS:Ce) phosphor for use in thin film electroluminescent displays (TFELs). Following previous research on a small scale reactor, a feasibility scale-up using a commercially available reactor enlarged the size of the deposition area to a 4`` diameter wafer or a 2`` by 2`` glass slide. Films were deposited from the reaction of Sr(thd){sub 2}, Ce(thd){sub 4}, and H{sub 2}S at 450{degrees}C and 5 torr. This system employed a liquid delivery system for the accurate and repeatable delivery of the metal organic reagents. The deposition from this reactor was shown to be crystalline-as-deposited SrS with a (200) orientation, possibly a result of the thin nature of the coating and the involvement of (200) grains in the initial nucleation process. The wafers showed good uniformity, but had some thickness variation near the outer radius of the wafer resulting from the addition of H{sub 2}S from the outer edge. There were eighteen total deposition experiments, of which nine were characterized for EL performance. The highest brightness observed was 5 fL.. The samples were exceedingly thin as a result of the fifteen fold increase in the surface area between the deposition reactors. Increasing the sample thickness to 7,000{angstrom} or higher will dramatically increase the brightness of the emission.

  6. A model of the atmospheric metal deposition by cosmic dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, W. J.

    1993-11-01

    We have developed a model of the deposition of meteoric metals in Earth's atmosphere. The model takes as input the total mass influx of material to the Earth and calculates the deposition rate at all altitudes through solution of the drag and subliminal equations in a Monte Carlo-type computation. The diffusion equation is then solved to give steady state concentration of complexes of specific metal species and kinetics are added to calculate the concentration of individual complexes. Concentrating on sodium, we calculate the Na(D) nightglow predicted by the model, and by introduction of seasonal variations in lower tropospheric ozone based on experimental results, we are able to duplicate the seasonal variation of mid-latitude nightglow data.

  7. THE METALLICITY BIMODALITY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS: A TEST OF GALAXY ASSEMBLY AND OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tonini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    We build a theoretical model to study the origin of the globular cluster metallicity bimodality in the hierarchical galaxy assembly scenario. The model is based on empirical relations such as the galaxy mass-metallicity relation [O/H]-M {sub star} as a function of redshift, and on the observed galaxy stellar mass function up to redshift z {approx} 4. We make use of the theoretical merger rates as a function of mass and redshift from the Millennium simulation to build galaxy merger trees. We derive a new galaxy [Fe/H]-M {sub star} relation as a function of redshift, and by assuming that globular clusters share the metallicity of their original parent galaxy at the time of their formation, we populate the merger tree with globular clusters. We perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations of the galaxy hierarchical assembly, and study the properties of the final globular cluster population as a function of galaxy mass, assembly and star formation history, and under different assumptions for the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation. The main results and predictions of the model are the following. (1) The hierarchical clustering scenario naturally predicts a metallicity bimodality in the galaxy globular cluster population, where the metal-rich subpopulation is composed of globular clusters formed in the galaxy main progenitor around redshift z {approx} 2, and the metal-poor subpopulation is composed of clusters accreted from satellites, and formed at redshifts z {approx} 3-4. (2) The model reproduces the observed relations by Peng et al. for the metallicities of the metal-rich and metal-poor globular cluster subpopulations as a function of galaxy mass; the positions of the metal-poor and metal-rich peaks depend exclusively on the evolution of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation and the [O/Fe], both of which can be constrained by this method. In particular, we find that the galaxy [O/Fe] evolves linearly with redshift from a value of {approx}0.5 at redshift

  8. Characteristics Of Atmospheric Dry Deposition Of Metals To The Region Of Lake Asan And Sapgyo, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Shin, H.; Lee, M.; Lim, Y.; Seo, M.; Jung, I.

    2008-12-01

    Environment includes a multi-media such as air, surface water, soil, underground water and ecosystem. Some pollutants transfer among a multi-media, posing serious threat to humans, animals and plants. Pollutants released into the environment remain for long times and transport long distances while going through physical and chemical interactions such as transports between multi-media ; air, water and soil, deposition, and absorption and release from organisms. This study assessed the amount of heavy metals transferred from air to water and soil using dry deposition plate and water surface sampler during spring (June 13 ~ 21, 2007) and winter (October 23 ~ 30 in 2007) at 9 locations including Dangjin, Pyeongtaek and Asan. Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, MOUDI was used to confirm the size distribution. The measured heavy metal deposition flux was compared with the expectation obtained with deposition model. In addition, amount of heavy metal deposition at Asan and Sapgyo lakes were evaluated to verify the water pollution state driven by atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metals are 133.92 microgram m-2 day-1, 44.01 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.915 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.175 microgram m-2 day-1 during spring, and 72.86 microgram m-2 day- 1, 88.14 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.991 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.189 microgram m-2 day-1 during fall, for lead, nickel, arsenic, and cadmium, respectively. It is required to re- calculation the dry deposition flux by land use type due to possibility of underestimating the flux in case of using grease surrogate surface having low surface roughness. The cadmium, lead, and arsenic size distribution was mono-modal with the peaks in the 0.65 ~ 1.1 micrometer size range in the fine mode showing sharp peak in the condensation submode especially for cadmium and lead because of effect of primary emission. The nickel size distribution was bimodal, a typical size distribution for an urban atmosphere, showing sharp

  9. In situ gas phase measurements during metal alkylamide atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, J E; Kimes, W A; Sperling, B A

    2011-09-01

    Metal alkylamide compounds, such as tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), represent a technologically important class of metalorganic precursors for the deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides via atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemical vapor deposition. The development of in situ diagnostics for processes involving these compounds could be beneficial in, e.g., developing deposition recipes and validating equipment-scale simulations. This report describes the performance of the combination of two techniques for the simultaneous, rapid measurement of the three major gas phase species during hafnium oxide thermal ALD using TEMAH and water: TEMAH, water, and methylethyl amine (MEA), the only major reaction by-product. For measurement of TEMAH and MEA, direct absorption methods based on a broadband infrared source with different mid-IR bandpass filters and utilizing amplitude modulation and synchronous detection were developed. For the measurement of water, wavelength modulation spectroscopy utilizing a near-IR distributed feedback diode laser was used. Despite the relatively simple reactor geometry employed here (a flow tube), differences were easily observed in the time-dependent species distributions in 300 mL/min of a helium carrier gas and in 1000 mL/min of a nitrogen carrier gas. The degree of TEMAH entrainment was lower in 300 mL/min of helium compared to that in 1000 mL/min of nitrogen. The capability to obtain detailed time-dependent species concentrations during ALD could potentially allow for the selection of carrier gas composition and flow rates that would minimize parasitic wall reactions. However, when nitrogen was employed at the higher flow rates, various flow effects were observed that, if detrimental to a deposition process, would effectively limit the upper range of useful flow rates. PMID:22097559

  10. Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition Induced by Uniformly Distributed Lithium Ions for Efficient Lithium Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin-Bing; Hou, Ting-Zheng; Zhang, Rui; Peng, Hong-Jie; Zhao, Chen-Zi; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Li dendrite-free growth is achieved by employing glass fiber with large polar functional groups as the interlayer of Li metal anode and separator to uniformly distribute Li ions. The evenly distributed Li ions render the dendrite-free Li deposits at high rates (10 mA cm(-2) ) and high lithiation capacity (2.0 mAh cm(-2) ). PMID:26900679

  11. Grain Size Effect on the Microhardness of BCC Metal Vapor Deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P; Saw, C K; Vallier, R F; Go, J; Bliss, R A

    2004-09-08

    The physical vapor deposition methods of evaporation and sputtering are used to prepare foils of the body-centered-cubic metals, vanadium and tantalum. A two-fold increase in the micro-hardness is measured as the grain size decreases to the sub-micron scale. The micro-hardness of vanadium increases to 2.7 GPa and for tantalum to 2.9 GPa.

  12. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  13. Structure and Function of Non-Native Metal Clusters in Human Arginase I

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Edward L.; Hai, Yang; Christianson, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Various binuclear metal ion clusters and complexes have been reconstituted in crystalline human arginase I by removing the Mn2+2-cluster of the wild-type enzyme with metal chelators and subsequently soaking the crystalline apoenzyme in buffer solutions containing NiCl2 or ZnCl2. X-ray crystal structures of these metal ion variants are correlated with catalytic activity measurements that reveal differences resulting from metal ion substitution. Additionally, treatment of crystalline Mn2+2-human arginase I with Zn2+ reveals for the first time the structural basis for inhibition by Zn2+, which forms a carboxylate-histidine-Zn2+ triad with H141 and E277. The imidazole side chain of H141 is known to be hyper-reactive and its chemical modification or mutagenesis is known to similarly compromise catalysis. The reactive substrate analogue 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) binds as a tetrahedral boronate anion to Mn2+2, Co2+2, Ni2+2, and Zn2+2 clusters in human arginase I, and it can be stabilized by a third inhibitory Zn2+ ion coordinated by H141. Since ABH binds as an analogue of the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis, this implies that the various metallosubstituted enzymes are capable of some level of catalysis with an actual substrate. Accordingly, we establish the following trend for turnover number (kcat) and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM): Mn2+ > Ni2+ ≈ Co2+ ≫ Zn2+. Therefore, Mn2+ is required for optimal catalysis by human arginase I. PMID:23061982

  14. Silver-copper nanoalloys-an efficient sensitizer for metal-cluster-sensitized solar cells delivering stable current and high open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Naveed; Chen, Fuyi; He, Lirong; Li, Weiyin; Wang, Hongkai

    2015-10-01

    Metal clusters (CLs) are recognized as a new class of sensitizers in a metal-cluster-sensitized solar cell (MCSC) which is an extension to well-recognized dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The function performed by dyes in DSSCs has predominately been executed by metal CLs in MCSCs. The distinct behavior of CLs at nano-scaled level can enhance their significance in photovoltaic applications. Recently, metal CLs have been explored as sensitizers in a solar cell, and the efficiency of the cell has been reported to be more than 2%. Herein, we present glutathione-protected Ag-Cu bimetallic CLs (alloyed CLs or nanoalloys) as sensitizer in MCSCs. Spray-coating technique has been employed to deposit CLs on photoanodes. The TiO2 modified with Cu rich alloyed CLs exhibit the short circuit photocurrent (Jsc) of 2.87 mAcm-2 with Voc of 691 mV. EIS and Mott-Schottky analysis have been performed to explicate the processes occurring inside MCSCs. Comparative study has been conducted to elucidate the effect of alloying on photo-electrochemical (PEC) response. Our results lay the foundations for exploring other nanoalloys as sensitizers in solar cells because nanoalloys present a greater degree of flexibility in properties, structure, size, and the composition of the constituent elements.

  15. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  16. Combinatorial investigation of transition metals deposited on anatase TiO 2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Koinuma, H.

    2004-02-01

    By using a combinatorial laser molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)/ in situ low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system, we have investigated a behavior of transition metals (TMs) deposited on the anatase TiO 2 (0 0 1)-(4 × 1) surface systematically. TiO 2 (0 0 1) thin films were fabricated on 0.05 mol% Nb doped SrTiO 3 (0 0 1) substrates and on each of those films TMs were deposited with gradual variation of its deposition amount. In situ analysis of the libraries with LEED and STM revealed the surface morphologies that were sensitive to TM element and on the process temperature. The results are discussed in terms of the oxide formation enthalpy Δ H kJ mol -1 of TMs.

  17. Characterization of calcium phosphate deposited on valve metal by anodic oxidation with polarity inversion.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Seigo; Homma, Kikuo; Kanatani, Mitsugu; Watanabe, Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    Electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphate (CAP) on valve metals such as Ta, Nb, and Zr, was performed by anodic oxidation with alternate polarity inversion at an applied 20 VDC. A saturated hydroxyapatite(HAP)-phosphoric acid solution (pH 3) was used as the electrolyte. FTIR, XRD, and XPS were employed to investigate the detailed characteristics of the deposition. HAP was precipitated on Ta; HAP including brushite and monetite on Nb; and HAP and monetite on Zr. The Ca/P atomic ratios were 1.3-1.5 by XPS, and HPO(4)(2- )bands were detected on Ta by FTIR. Therefore, the HAP precipitated on Ta was a Ca-deficient HAP. In addition, the XPS spectra of the specimens showed that phosphate ions were incorporated into the anodic oxide film. Deposits with nano-grain size were observed by AFM. The results confirmed that CAP with nano-grain size was deposited on valve metals by the anodic oxidation with polarity inversion. PMID:19721291

  18. A comparative study of AumRhn (4 ≤ m + n ≤ 6) clusters in the gas phase versus those deposited on (100) MgO.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Fernando; Vargas, Jorge A; Beltrán, Marcela R; Davis, Jack B A; Johnston, Roy L

    2016-08-10

    A comparative theoretical study has been performed of the gas phase and deposited AumRhn (4 ≤ m + n ≤ 6) clusters. The combined use of a genetic algorithm and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations allows us to explore the potential energy surface and, therefore, find efficiently and automatically the global minimum configuration for each composition. Our results show interesting effects on the geometries of the clusters on deposition. This occurs because the rhodium atoms (electronically) prefer to be in contact with the MgO surface, sometimes promoting planar clusters to become three-dimensional when deposited, and three-dimensional clusters in the gas phase to become two-dimensional. Together with the change in geometries, the magnetic moment is reduced from the gas phase, as the electrons rearrange themselves when the cluster interacts with the substrate. PMID:27444254

  19. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Hydride Cluster Anions and Their Roles in Hydrogenation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    The interaction between transition metals and hydrogen has been an intriguing research topic for such applications as hydrogen storage and catalysis of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. Special bonding features between TM and hydrogen are interesting not only because they are scarcely reported but also because they could help to discover and understand the nature of chemical bonding. Very recently, we discovered a PtZnH5- cluster which possessed an unprecedented planar pentagonal coordination between the H5- moiety and Pt, and exhibited special σ-aromaticity. The H5-kernel as a whole can be viewed as a η5-H5 ligand for Pt. As the second example, an H2 molecule was found to act as a ligand in the PdH3-cluster, in which two H atoms form a η2-H2 type of ligation to Pd. These transition metal hydride clusters were considered to be good hydrogen sources for hydrogenation. The reactions between PtHn- and CO2 were investigated. We observed formate in the final product H2Pt(HCO2)- .

  20. Heterometallic triiron-oxo/hydroxo clusters: effect of redox-inactive metals.

    PubMed

    Herbert, David E; Lionetti, Davide; Rittle, Jonathan; Agapie, Theodor

    2013-12-26

    A series of tetranuclear oxo/hydroxo clusters comprised of three Fe centers and a redox-inactive metal (M) of various charge is reported. Crystallographic studies show an unprecedented Fe3M(μ4-O)(μ2-OH) core that remains intact upon changing M or the oxidation state of iron. Electrochemical studies reveal that the reduction potentials (E1/2) span a window of 500 mV and depend upon the Lewis acidity of M. Using the pKa of the M-aqua complex as a measure of Lewis acidity, these compounds display a linear dependence between E1/2 and acidity, with a slope of ∼70 mV per pKa unit. The current study of [Fe3MO(OH)] and previous ones of [Mn3MOn] (n = 2,4) moieties support the generality of the above relationship between the reduction potentials of heterometallic oxido clusters and the Lewis acidity of incorporated cations, as applied to clusters of different redox-active metals. PMID:24304416