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Sample records for metal induced embrittlement

  1. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  2. Fracture toughness of metallic glasses: annealing-induced embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Rycroft, Chris H; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative understanding of the fracture toughness of metallic glasses, including the associated ductile-to-brittle (embrittlement) transitions, is not yet available. Here, we use a simple model of plastic deformation in glasses, coupled to an advanced Eulerian level set formulation for solving complex free-boundary problems, to calculate the fracture toughness of metallic glasses as a function of the degree of structural relaxation corresponding to different annealing times near the glass temperature. Our main result indicates the existence of an elastoplastic crack tip instability for sufficiently relaxed glasses, resulting in a marked drop in the toughness, which we interpret as annealing-induced embrittlement transition similar to experimental observations. PMID:23215386

  3. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  4. Embrittlement of metal by solute segregation-induced amorphization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Kalia, Rajiv K; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; van Duin, Adri C T; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10(6)-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path. PMID:20481998

  5. Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.-P.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Duin, Adri C. T. van

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10{sup 6}-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path.

  6. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.; Frohmberg, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement refers to metals stressed while exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere. Tested in air, even after exposure to hydrogen under pressure, this effect is not observed on similar specimens. Much high purity hydrogen is prepared by evaporation of liquid hydrogen, and thus has low levels for potential impurities which could otherwise inhibit or poison the absorbent reactions that are involved. High strength steels and nickel-base allows are rated as showing extreme embrittlement; aluminum alloys and the austenitic stainless steels, as well as copper, have negligible susceptibility to this phenomenon. The cracking that occurs appears to be a surface phenomenon, is unlike that of internal hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  8. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  9. Metal induced embrittlement. [Annual report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, R.G.

    1989-08-31

    This program has been directed at the nature and cause of the severe embrittlement and loss of load carrying, capability that occurs in certain solid metals in contact with some liquid metals. This three-year program began March 1, 1987, and, during its course, has involved a set of fracture mechanics experiments to explore the response of several alloy/liquid metal systems coupled with a more theoretical study consisting of atomic simulation of the crack tip separation process. Some of the information generated in this study is contained in papers published or submitted for publication and accompanying, this report. This report is an overview of information contained in these papers as well as information currently in preparation for publication.

  10. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. Critical Crystallization for Embrittlement in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Ketkaew, Jittisa; Liu, Ze; Chen, Wen; Schroers, Jan

    2015-12-31

    We studied the effect of crystallization on the embrittlement of bulk metallic glasses. Specifically, we measured fracture toughness for Zr(44)Ti(11)Cu(10)Ni(10)Be(25) and Pd(43)Cu(27)Ni(10)P(20) after annealing at various times to introduce controlled volume fraction of crystallization. We found that crystallization of up to ∼6% by volume does not measurably affect fracture toughness. When exceeding ∼6%, a dramatic drop in fracture toughness occurs; an additional 1% of crystallization reduces fracture toughness by 50%. Such a dramatic transition can be explained by the interaction among the crystals' stress fields in the amorphous matrix that becomes effective at ∼7% crystallinity. Our findings of a critical crystallization for embrittlement of metallic glasses help in designing tough metallic glasses and their composites, as well as defining processing protocols for the unique thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses to avoid embrittlement. PMID:26765004

  12. Critical Crystallization for Embrittlement in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkaew, Jittisa; Liu, Ze; Chen, Wen; Schroers, Jan

    2015-12-01

    We studied the effect of crystallization on the embrittlement of bulk metallic glasses. Specifically, we measured fracture toughness for Zr44Ti11Cu10Ni10Be25 and Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 after annealing at various times to introduce controlled volume fraction of crystallization. We found that crystallization of up to ˜6 % by volume does not measurably affect fracture toughness. When exceeding ˜6 % , a dramatic drop in fracture toughness occurs; an additional 1% of crystallization reduces fracture toughness by 50%. Such a dramatic transition can be explained by the interaction among the crystals' stress fields in the amorphous matrix that becomes effective at ˜7 % crystallinity. Our findings of a critical crystallization for embrittlement of metallic glasses help in designing tough metallic glasses and their composites, as well as defining processing protocols for the unique thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses to avoid embrittlement.

  13. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  14. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  15. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Michael A; Schuh, Christopher A

    2016-03-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  16. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  17. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  18. The role of a bilayer interfacial phase on liquid metal embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cheng, Huikai; Asl, Kaveh Meshinchi; Kiely, Christopher J; Harmer, Martin P

    2011-09-23

    Intrinsically ductile metals are prone to catastrophic failure when exposed to certain liquid metals, but the atomic-level mechanism for this effect is not fully understood. We characterized a model system, a nickel sample infused with bismuth atoms, by using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and observed a bilayer interfacial phase that is the underlying cause of embrittlement. This finding provides a new perspective for understanding the atomic-scale embrittlement mechanism and for developing strategies to control the practically important liquid metal embrittlement and the more general grain boundary embrittlement phenomena in alloys. This study further demonstrates that adsorption can induce a coupled grain boundary structural and chemical phase transition that causes drastic changes in properties. PMID:21940889

  19. Multiscale modelling of gallium induced embrittlement in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogireddy, Venkata Sai Pavan Kumar; Todorova, Mira; Spatschek, Robert; Neugebauer, Jörg

    Liquid metal embrittlement is a degradation phenomenon in which a solid metal undergoes brittle failure when it is stressed while in contact with a liquid metal. The transition from ductile to brittle metal failure manifests itself by rapid crack propagations which reduces the elongation to failure ratio. Combining density functional theory calculations with continuum methods, we study the liquid metal embrittlement of aluminium in contact with gallium. Comparing ab initio calculated energies for a Σ 3 and a Σ 5 Al grain boundary and their corresponding surface energies in the presence and absence of Ga, we identify critical Ga concentrations which result in a weakening of the mechanical strength of aluminium. Parametrising the DFT results in continuum model we obtain the concentration as a function of the strain in the system. In a final step we extend this approach and compute the stress field induced by cracks in bulk and at grain boundaries. The stress field explains the large segregation of gallium atoms at the crack tip and the crack tip's subsequent propagation.

  20. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  1. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  2. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  3. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals and its control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed together with characteristics of hydrogen-environment embrittlement, the degree of hydrogen-environment embrittlement of a wide variety of alloys, the effect of hydrogen environments on various properties, (tension, fatigue, creep and fracture mechanics), and the influence of hydrogen exposure parameters on the degree of embrittlement. Design methods for high-pressure hydrogen service and for prevention of hydrogen-environment embrittlement are also covered.

  4. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  5. Moisture-induced embrittlement of Fe sub 3 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; DeVan, J.H.; Sikka, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent tests at ORNL indicate that the ductility of iron aluminides is very sensitive to the test environment. It is believed that the loss of ductility observed in moist air environments is associated with a hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon as a result of dissociation of water vapor and the intake of atomic hydrogen into the aluminide matrix. This possibility will be investigated in a series of tests under controlled environmental conditions. Compact specimens will be tested under controlled stress intensity conditions. Crack growth rates as a function of the applied stress intensity will be measured with the direct-current potential drop technique. Initial tests will be conducted in moist air and in vacuum at room temperature. In an additional series of tests the temperature of the moist air will be varied to permit the determination of an activation energy for the embrittlement process. Fractographic examination of the fracture surfaces will also be performed. It is anticipated that this series of test will increase our understanding of the environmentally-induced embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Simulation of He embrittlement at grain boundaries in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake

    2015-10-01

    To investigate what atomic properties largely determine vulnerability to He embrittlement at grain boundaries (GB) of bcc metals, we introduce a computational model composed of first principles density functional theory and a He segregation rate theory model. Predictive calculations of He embrittlement at the first wall of the future DEMO fusion concept reactor indicate that variation in the He embrittlement originated not only from He production rate related to neutron irradiation, but also from the He segregation energy at the GB that has a systematic trend in the periodic table.

  7. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  8. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  9. Moisture-induced delayed spallation and interfacial hydrogen embrittlement of alumina scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2006-01-01

    While interfacial sulfuris the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Alalloy+3(H2O)air=Al(OH)- 3+3H+ may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized René N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  10. Small punch test evaluation of neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a Cr-Mo low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.-H. . E-mail: shsonguk@yahoo.co.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Marmy, P.; Weng, L.-Q.

    2004-09-15

    Neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a 2.25Cr1Mo steel is investigated by means of small punch testing along with scanning electron microscopy. There is an apparent irradiation-induced embrittlement effect after the steel is irradiated at about 400 deg. C for 86 days with a neutron dose rate of 1.75x10{sup -8} dpa/s. The embrittlement is mainly nonhardening embrittlement caused by impurity grain boundary segregation.

  11. A Grain Boundary Fracture Model for Predicting Dynamic Embrittlement and Oxidation-Induced Cracking in Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are sometimes susceptible to oxygen embrittlement in the form of dynamic embrittlement or oxidation-induced grain boundary cracking during services at elevated temperatures. Dynamic embrittlement is a fracture process that involves the ingress and diffusion of atomic oxygen to induce time-dependent decohesion of grain boundaries. A related fracture process, also a time-dependent process, is stress-accelerated grain boundary oxidation and oxide-induced cracking along grain boundaries. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to treat both dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in Ni-based superalloys. The model is utilized to assess: (1) the conditions where dynamic embrittlement are dominant, (2) the conditions where oxidation-induced crack growth are dominant, and (3) the role of oxidation in suppressing dynamic embrittlement in Ni-based superalloys. For illustration, the grain boundary fracture model is applied to predict the onset of dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in superalloys such as IN 718.

  12. Lithiation-induced embrittlement of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zheng, He; Liu, Xiao Hua; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Jiangwei; Kushima, Akihiro; Hudak, Nicholas S; Huang, Xu; Zhang, Sulin; Mao, Scott X; Qian, Xiaofeng; Li, Ju; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-09-27

    Lithiation of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was conducted in situ inside a transmission electron microscope. Upon lithiation, the intertube spacing increased from 3.4 to 3.6 Å, corresponding to about 5.9% radial and circumferential expansions and ∼50 GPa tensile hoop stress on the outermost tube wall. The straight tube walls became distorted after lithiation. In situ compression and tension tests show that the lithiated MWCNTs were brittle with sharp fracture edges. Such a failure mode is in stark contrast with that of the pristine MWCNTs which are extremely flexible and fail in a "sword-in-sheath" manner upon tension. The lithiation-induced embrittlement is attributed to the mechanical effect of a "point-force" action posed by the intertubular lithium that induces the stretch of carbon-carbon bonds in addition to that by applied strain, as well as the chemical effect of electron transfer from lithium to the antibonding π orbital that weakens the carbon-carbon bond. The combined mechanical and chemical weakening leads to a considerable decrease of the fracture strain in lithiated MWCNTs. Our results provide direct evidence and understanding of the degradation mechanism of carbonaceous anodes in lithium ion batteries. PMID:21819128

  13. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  14. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1993-04-15

    The effect in ambient air the tensile and fatigue behavior of an Fe{sub 3}Al, Cr type intermetallic alloy is examined as a function of test temperature. Hydrogen due to moisture in the air is found to be a major cause of embrittlement. Rates and mechanisms of observed embrittlement appear to be temperature dependent. In addition, the alloy was found to have no notch sensitivity.

  15. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  16. Moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-04-01

    FeAl alloys {ge}24 at. %Al are H embrittled by both H2 gas and water vapor. This examines effect of H embrittlement by H2 gas and moisture-bearing air on tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance of two ordered FeAl intermetallic alloys (28, 36 at. % Al) and one disordered Fe-Al alloy (16 at. % Al). Susceptibility to embrittlement varies with both Al content and ordered state. Tensile ductility of disordered low Al alloy is not affected by moisture-bearing air, and fatigue crack growth resistance is affected only slightly by moisture. However, the higher Al alloys are severely embrittled by moisture-bearing air. Oxidation of Al with concurrent release of H2 is responsible for embrittlement of Fe3Al alloys. It is likely that the smaller amount of Al available for the oxidation reaction in the 16at. % alloy precludes such embrittling reactions. In contrast, H2 is found to be embrittling to all alloys in both cyclic and monotonic tests. Fractography shows that H2 preferentially attacks cleavage planes in these alloys. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance in an inert environment of the low Al disordered alloy is found to be much lower than that for the high Al alloys. Fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment can be expressed as superposed mechanical fatigue and corrosion-fatigue components. Fatigue crack growth tests in inert and embrittling environments are used to isolate corrosion fatigue of the crack growth rate in Fe-28at. %Al. The corrosion-fatigue component displays a frequency dependence: At lower frequencies, more time is available for penetration of H ahead of the crack tip. H transport in the Fe-Al alloys occurs primarily by dislocation-assisted transport, which allows for penetration depths of 10-100x the distance that can be achieved by bulk diffusion. An equation is developed for the corrosion-fatigue component of crack growth rate which includes stress intensity range and frequency dependence.

  17. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  18. Lattice defects affecting moisture-induced embrittlement of Ni-based L1{sub 2} ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, T.; Hanada, S.

    1997-12-31

    Moisture-induced embrittlement of L1{sub 2} alloys (such as Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) and Ni{sub 3}Al) is observed by tensile test and SEM fractography. A variety of microstructures were prepared by selecting pre-deformation and heat treatment conditions. It is shown that tensile ductility and the associated fractography depend on structure as well as test atmosphere. Well-annealed specimens are susceptible to moisture-induced embrittlement while pre-deformed specimens are resistive to moisture-induced embrittlement. Also, this embrittlement is generally sensitive to the heat treatment scheme preceded by the pre-deformation. Results indicate that the embrittlement occurs when hydrogen is enriched on grain boundaries. On the other hand, the embrittlement can be suppressed when hydrogen is trapped at lattice defects such as dislocations and vacancies. These results are discussed in association with the kinetics of hydrogen in the pre-deformed microstructure.

  19. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C. ); Begley, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  20. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Begley, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  1. Rapid Relaxation and Embrittlement of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Electropulsing

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, P; Chen, Y. C.; Chu, J. P.; Chang, S Y; Bei, Hongbin; Jang, J. S.C.; Hsueh, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical relaxation and embrittlement of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glasses were achieved rapidly by the direct current electropulsing treatment. The temperature profile was recorded by an infrared camera and it was found to be non-uniform in the treated specimen. Specifically, temperatures below the glass transition temperature, near and above the crystallization temperature could be ach- ieved, respectively, at different locations in the same treated specimen. Two sets of nanoindentation were conducted. While the first set investigated the mechanical properties of three individually elec- tropulsed specimens with different conditions, the second set indented a single treated specimen along its temperature gradient. Both sets of indentation revealed that by Joule heating to different tempera- tures, relaxation, embrittlement, and crystallization were significantly accelerated by electrical pulses. Results suggest that electropulsing provides an opportunity to simultaneously achieve plastic forming and mechanical property control of metallic glasses.

  2. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Frohmber, R. P.; Lewett, R. P.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Walter, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Study includes extensive tests examining effects of hydrogen environment on different high-strength metals and alloys. Recommendations for preventing metal failure include use of hydrogen-resistant coatings and inhibitors. Study includes references to related investigations and discussion of work in progress.

  3. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  5. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1994-04-19

    Alloy FA-129 undergoes an increase in crack propagation rate and a loss of fracture toughness in moisture-bearing and hydrogen gas environments. A similar effect is seen on ductility of FA-129 in tensile tests. The embrittling effect in air is attributed to oxidation of aluminum in the alloy by water vapor to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrogen gas. Alloy FAP-Y, which is disordered and contains only 16 a%Al is embrittled by hydrogen gas in a manner similar to that of FA-129. However, laboratory air had little effect on the crack growth rates, fracture toughness, or tensile ductility. The lower aluminum content apparently is insufficient to induce the Al-H{sub 2}O reaction. TEM and SEM analyses of microstructure and fracture surfaces were consistent with the change in fracture toughness with order and environment. Testing at elevated temperatures reduces crack growth rates in FA-129, and increases fracture toughness and ductility. This is consistent with the well documented peak in hydrogen embrittlement in structural alloys at or near room temperature. Elevated temperature affects the degree of embrittlement in a complex manner, possibly changing the rates of several of the processes involved.

  6. Effect of alloying additions on the hydrogen-induced grain boundary embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Tian, Z X; Yan, J X; Hao, W; Xiao, W

    2011-01-12

    Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the influence of Mo, V and Pd on the H-induced grain boundary embrittlement in Fe. We find that, in the high impurity concentration systems, all of the three alloying elements facilitate H embrittlement at the Σ3 (111) [Formula: see text] grain boundary in Fe. The calculated binary effects of the H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) couples are 0.063, 0.074 and 0.040 eV, respectively. On the other hand, in the large unit cell with low impurity concentration, both Mo and V can facilitate H embrittlement, and the binary effects of pairs are 0.152 and 0.164 eV, respectively. While Pd reduces the H embrittlement on the cohesion of the Fe grain boundary with the binary effect of - 0.1 eV. The H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) interactions are interpreted by electronic structure analyses. PMID:21406825

  7. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  8. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  9. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  10. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey themore » empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.« less

  11. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson's ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a "mechanical probe" of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip. PMID:26435318

  12. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip. PMID:26435318

  13. Sulfur-induced embrittlement of nickel: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-09-01

    We study the embrittlement of Ni due to the presence of S impurities, considering their effect in the bulk and at grain boundaries (GBs). For bulk Ni, we employ Rice's theory based on generalized-stacking-fault energetics and the unstable stacking energy criterion. We use first-principles density-functional-theory calculations to determine the ductility parameter D = γs/γus, the ratio of the surface energy γs to the unstable stacking energy γus, for bulk Ni with substitutional S impurities. Similar arguments based on Rice's theory for the mechanical properties of GBs are invoked. We study the Σ5(0 1 2) GB with interstitial S impurities, in which case D is defined as the ratio of the work of separation Ws and the unstable stacking energy γus, to model the competition between grain decohesion and shear-induced plastic deformation due to grain boundary sliding (GBS). The presence of S impurities is found to increase the value of D by ˜40% in bulk Ni, but reduces it by over 80% for the GB. These results support earlier suggestions that embrittlement of Ni by S impurities is related to their effect on GBs. We further calculate relevant tensile and shear stresses to study the expected fracture mode and find that intergranular crack propagation accommodated by GBS is inhibited in the system considered here.

  14. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  15. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  16. Transmission electron microscopic observations of embrittlement of an aluminum alloy by liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.M.; Su, Y.J.; Qiao, L.J.; Chu, W.Y.

    1999-09-01

    Change in dislocation configuration ahead of a loaded crack tip of Al alloy 7075 (UNS A97075) before and after adsorbing Hg-3at% Ga atoms, and initiation of liquid-metal-induced microcracking have been observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using a special TEM constant-deflection device with precracked foil. Results showed that chemisorption of liquid metal atoms can facilitate dislocation emission multiplication and motion. A microcrack initiated in the dislocation free zone or at the crack tip and propagated by a cleavage made when the chemisorption-facilitated local plasticity developed to a critical level.

  17. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  18. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  19. Mercury embrittlement of Cu-Al alloys under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, T. M.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mercury on the room temperature, high cycle fatigue properties of three alloys: Cu-5.5 pct Al, Cu-7.3 pct Al, and Cu-6.3 pct Al-2.5 pct Fe has been determined. Severe embrittlement under cyclic loading in mercury is associated with rapid crack propagation in the presence of the liquid metal. A pronounced grain size effect is noted under mercury, while fatigue properties in air are insensitive to grain size. The fatigue results are discussed in relation to theories of adsorption-induced liquid metal embrittlement.

  20. Hydrogen environment embrittlement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  1. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of welded MANET II (DIN 1.4914) in liquid Pb17Li.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, T.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.

    1996-10-01

    TIG welding of 12 mm thick plates of MANET II steel was accomplished using filler material of the same composition. Tensile tests, at a constant displacement rate of 0.1 mm min -1 (corresponding to an initial strain rate of 1.1 × 10 -4 s -1), were carried out on specimens consisting solely of the weld, HAZ and bulk material under vacuum and liquid Pb17Li at 250 and 400°C. The post-weld heat treatment (750°C/4 h air cooled) which was given to the welded plates was sufficient to prevent any liquid metal embrittlement. The presence of oxide inclusions and pores in the weld reduced the extent of plastic strain at rupture exhibited by some of the welds.

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility and Hydrogen-Induced Additive Stress of 7050 Aluminum Alloy Under Various Aging States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, W. J.; Song, R. G.; Qi, X.; Li, H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, C.; Jin, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of 7050 aluminum alloy under various aging states has been investigated by means of cathodic hydrogen permeation, slow strain rate test, hydrogen determinator, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope, and effect of hydrogen on atomic binding force of charged alloy has been calculated by free electron theory in this paper. Simultaneously, hydrogen-induced additive stress (σad) of 7050 aluminum alloy hydrogen charged with different current densities under various aging states have been investigated by flowing stress differential method. The results showed that hydrogen concentration of examined alloy increased with increasing charging time or current density under the same aging state. Hydrogen segregation occurred at grain boundaries which enlarged the crystal lattice constant, meanwhile, it reduced the average bonding energy and interatomic bonding force of the grain boundary atoms, thus resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; moreover, σad of 7050 aluminum alloy increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration under the same aging state, i.e., under aged: σad = -1.61 + 9.93 × 105 C H, peak aged: σad = -1.55 + 9.67 × 105 C H, over aged: σad = -0.16 + 9.35 × 105 C H, correspondingly, σad increased the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement ( I HE) further. Under the same charging condition, aging states had a great influence on σad and I HE, the under-aged state alloy was of the highest, the over-aged state alloy was of the lowest, and peak-aged was in the middle.

  3. Environment-induced embrittlement: effect of impurity segregation and state of stress. Technical progress report, 1 January 1982-30 June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reviewed for a research program directed at understanding environmentally-induced embrittlement primarily from two standpoints: (a) the effects of grain-boundary orientation and chemistry on intergranular hydrogen embrittlement and (b) the influence of the state of stress on both hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). During the period the program has examined: (1) the effects of grain-boundary misorientation on intergranular segregation and HE of Ni bicrystals, (2) the influence of multiaxial deformation on the HE of polycrystalline Ni sheet, (3) the HE of Zircaloy 2 sheet under multiaxial states of stress, (4) the SCC of Admiralty brass under slow strain-rate, multiaxial deformation, and (5) the SCC behavior of alpha-beta brass.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement Understood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sofronis, P.; Nagao, A.; Martin, M. L.; Wang, S.; Gross, D. W.; Nygren, K. E.

    2015-06-01

    The connection between hydrogen-enhanced plasticity and the hydrogen-induced fracture mechanism and pathway is established through examination of the evolved microstructural state immediately beneath fracture surfaces including voids, "quasi-cleavage," and intergranular surfaces. This leads to a new understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in which hydrogen-enhanced plasticity processes accelerate the evolution of the microstructure, which establishes not only local high concentrations of hydrogen but also a local stress state. Together, these factors establish the fracture mechanism and pathway.

  5. Influence of the chemical composition of Al-based amorphous alloys on thermally induced embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova, E. A.; Maksimov, V. V.; Rassolov, S. G.; Nosenko, V. K.; Tkach, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Structural changes of rapidly cooled ribbons of the amorphous alloys Al88-86(Ni,Co,Fe)6-8(Y,Gd,Nd,La)5-6, which occur during heating at a rate of 10 K/min and lead to a loss of ductility, have been investigated experimentally. It has been shown that samples of the studied alloys are divided into two groups, in the first of which the loss of ductility is due to the formation of a nanocomposite structure, whereas the embrittlement of samples in the second group is caused by processes of structural relaxation in the amorphous phase (decrease in the concentration of a free volume). It has been established for the first time that there is an empirical correlation between the dynamic temperature, after heating to which the alloys lose their ductility at room temperature, and the ratio of the shear modulus to the elastic modulus of the alloys, which is calculated from the nominal chemical composition.

  6. Embrittlement proof nickel-alloy bellows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Thin cover of corrosion-resistant steel (CRES) protects metal bellows and ducts against hydrogen embrittlement. Bellow current carries hydrogen at high pressure and currently is used in the engine of Space Shuttle.

  7. Recent work on environmental embrittlement in silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Peng, J.; Wang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reviewed the recent progress in the environmental embrittlement of silicide. On the surface of silicides, the Si in the silicides such as Fe{sub 3}(Si,Al) alloy reacts with both oxygen and water vapor more easy than with iron. A molecular hydrogen mechanism of surface reaction, i.e., Si + 2H{sub 2}O = SiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}, can be derived. The moisture-induced embrittlement of silicides can be considered to be an embrittlement in a localized high pressure molecular hydrogen condition. It is a kinetic hydrogen gas embrittlement. Silicides may have more severely intrinsic brittleness than iron aluminides due to their special electronic structure and bonding mechanism, leading to elucidate the role of environment on ductility with difficulty. The improvement of both the intrinsic brittleness and moisture-induced embrittlement are critical for the development of silicides.

  8. Nondestructive detection and measurement of hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Alex, Franklin; Byrne, Joseph Gerald

    1977-01-01

    A nondestructive system and method for the determination of the presence and extent of hydrogen embrittlement in metals, alloys, and other crystalline structures subject thereto. Positron annihilation characteristics of the positron-electron annihilation within the tested material provide unique energy distribution curves for each type of material tested at each respective stage of hydrogen embrittlement. Gamma radiation resulting from such annihilation events is detected and statistically summarized by appropriate instrumentation to reveal the variations of electron activity within the tested material caused by hydrogen embrittlement therein. Such data from controlled tests provides a direct indication of the relative stages of hydrogen embrittlement in the form of unique energy distribution curves which may be utilized as calibration curves for future comparison with field tests to give on-site indication of progressive stages of hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  10. Testing for hydrogen embrittlement: Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure, so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. Three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered: (1) the original location and form of the hydrogen, (2) the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point where it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and (3) the embrittlement interaction itself. A few secondary influences on the embrittlement process are also discussed.

  11. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  12. Identical mechanism of isochronal and isothermal embrittlement in Ni(Bi) alloy: Thermo-induced non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation of Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei; Chellali, Reda; Schlesiger, Ralf; Meng, Ye; Baither, Dietmar; Schmitz, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Isochronal and isothermal plasticity after thermal pre-treatments are obtained by tensile tests to characterize the embrittling behaviors of Ni(Bi) alloy. Both isochronal and isothermal plasticity show evident minima. Fractography observed by scanning electron microscopy displays intergranular fracture for samples of low plasticity. The microstructure is found to be free of precipitates within grains and at grain boundaries by focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy. Atom probe analysis indicates a strong tendency of Bi segregation to grain boundaries. By these results, the existing interpretations are discussed to be inadequate and both embrittlement are confirmed to be identical in mechanism, i.e. thermo-induced non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation of Bi.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  14. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  15. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  16. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of V-Ti-Ni and V-Ni alloys in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F.A.; Pawel, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    Vanadium, V-1Ni, V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni (at %) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels strongly elevated the ductile to brittle transition temperature. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces leads to strong increases in the density of the alloy.

  17. NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING AND EMBRITTLEMENT OF PURE IRON AND PURE NICKEL IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 AND BOR-60 FAST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Krasnoselov, V. A.; Porollo, S. I.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-09-01

    Pure iron and nickel were irradiated to very high exposures in two fast reactors, BOR-60 and BN-350. It appears that both nickel and iron exhibit a transient-dominated swelling behavior in the range of 2 to 15x10-7 dpa/sec, with the shortest transient at approximately 500 C in nickel, but at less than 350 C for iron. It also appears that the duration of the transient regime may be dependent on the dpa rate. When the two metals are irradiated at 345-355 C, it is possible to obtain essentially the same swelling level, but the evolution of mechanical properties is quite different. The differences reflect the fact that iron is subject to a low-temperature embrittlement arising from a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature, while nickel is not. Nickel, however, exhibits high temperature embrittlement, thought to arise from the collection of helium gas at the grain boundaries. Iron generates much less helium during equivalent irradiation.

  18. Estimate of Radiation-Induced Steel Embrittlement in the BWR Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade MOX/UOX Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Lisa R.

    2002-07-01

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 - 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased {sup 239}Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. The primary conclusion of this research was that the addition of the maximum fraction of 1/3 MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. (author)

  19. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Experimental variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, gas purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  20. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    A somewhat phenomological overview of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, is presented in a effort to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. What are believed to be the three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered - the original location and form of the hydrogen, the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and the embrittlement interaction itself. Additionally, a few of the large number of secondary influences on the embrittlement process are discussed, for example, the influence of impurity species in the environment, surface hydride films, and surface oxide films.

  1. Role of Hf and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the hydrogen embrittlement of aged Ta alloy T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and similar Ta and Cb alloys. It is found that aging ternary Ta alloys such as T-111 near 1040 C for 1000 hr or longer increases their sensitivity to low-temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Segregation of Hf to grain boundaries during aging causes embrittlement upon testing at -196 C and is responsible for the observed hydrogen embrittlement. Binary Ta and Cb alloys, Ta-2Hf and Cb-1Zr, are not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under the conditions of this study and did not exhibit grain boundary segregation of Hf or Zr. Ternary alloys Ta-8W-.5Hf, Ta-8W-1Hf, and Ta-4W-2Hf are superior to T-111 for containment of alkali metals in that they do not exhibit aging embrittlement. However, these alloys in the aged condition are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement.

  2. Fast Quenching For Hydrogen-Embrittlement Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, Mark J.; Burkhart, Richard L.; Koncel, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus exposes hot metal specimens in hydrogen atmospheres to sudden cooling. Heater surrounds pressure vessel initially. On command, heater slides downward on track, exposing vessel. Spray bar falls over vessel and directs high-pressure jets of cold water at it. Developed to evaluate susceptibilities of specimens to embrittlement by hydrogen. Cools specimens by 1,050 degrees F (580 degrees C) in 160 seconds.

  3. Microstructure and embrittlement of the fine-grained heat-affected zone of ASTM4130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Ying; Wang, Yong; Han, Tao; Li, Chao-Wen

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructure features of the fine-grained heat-affected zone (FGHAZ) of ASTM4130 steel was investigated by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and welding thermal simulation test. It is found that serious embrittlement occurs in the FGHAZ with an 81.37% decrease of toughness, compared with that of the base metal. Microstructure analysis reveals that the FGHAZ is mainly composed of acicular, equiaxed ferrite, granular ferrite, martensite, and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. The FGHAZ embrittlement is mainly induced by granular ferrite because of carbides located at its boundaries and sub-boundaries. Meanwhile, the existence of martensite and M-A constituent, which distribute in a discontinuous network, is also detrimental to the mechanical properties.

  4. Mechanisms of Metal-Induced Centrosome Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to toxic and carcinogenic metals is widespread; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. One potential mechanism for metal-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity is centrosome amplification. Here, we review the mechanisms for metal-induced centrosome amplification, including arsenic, chromium, mercury and nano-titanium dioxide. PMID:21118148

  5. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  6. A Mechanical Study of T91 Embrittlement by Liquid Lead-bismuth Eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Hamouche, Zehoua; Auger, Thierry; Guillot, Ivan

    2008-07-01

    The susceptibility of liquid metal embrittlement of the T91 martensitic steel is investigated from slow deformation rate (6.67x10{sup -8} m.s{sup -1}) to high deformation rate (6.67x10{sup -3} m.s{sup -1}), using a Center Cracked in Tension geometry. Brittle fracture, characterized by elongated river cracks on all the fracture surfaces, indicates that T91 is sensitive to the Embrittlement by LBE. This embrittlement effect is very marked at the low deformation rate ({approx}10{sup -5} mm.s{sup -1}). A ductile-brittle transition is observed in the high strain rate range investigated. In this transition regime, there is a competition between the growth of dimples and the cracking induced by the liquid metal. Ductility recovery is complete at the highest investigated displacement rate. This dependence of T91/LBE susceptibility to LME on the displacement rate and the brittle to ductile transition at high strain rate is confirmed by a fracture mechanics analysis. (authors)

  7. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  8. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-21

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  9. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated highly embrittled steel and intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; McCabe, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated a submerged-arc (SA) weld irradiated to a high level of embrittlement and a temper embrittled base metal that exhibits significant intergranular fracture (IGF) relative to representation by the Master Curve. The temper embrittled steel revealed that the intergranular mechanism significantly extended the transition temperature range up to 150 C above To. For the irradiated highly embrittled SA weld study, a total of 21 1T compact specimens were tested at five different temperatures and showed the Master Curve to be nonconservative relative to the results, although that observation is uncertain due to evidence of intergranular fracture.

  10. Recent advances in the study of hydrogen embrittlement at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M. ,; Liang, Y.; Teter, D. F.; Aravas, N.; Sofronis, Petros,

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at the University of Illinois on the fundamental mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement. Our approach combines experimental and theoretical methods. We describe the theoretical work on hydride formation and its application to hydrogen embrittlement of Ti alloys through the stress-induced hydride formation and cleavage mechanism, the localization of shear due to solute hydrogen, and finally, we present experimental evidence that favors the decohesion mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in a P-Ti alloy.

  11. A comparison of internal hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen environment embrittlement of X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.

    1999-12-01

    Hydrogen has been shown to degrade the mechanical properties of nickel-base alloys. This degradation occurs whether the material is in a hydrogen producing environment or if the material has dissolved hydrogen in the metal due to prior exposure to hydrogen. Materials behave differently under these two conditions. Therefore, the degradation due to hydrogen has been split into two categories, internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE). IHE may be defined as the embrittlement of a material that has been charged with hydrogen prior to testing or service while HEE may be defined by the embrittlement of a material in a hydrogen environment where the hydrogen may come from gaseous hydrogen or generated from a corrosion reaction. This work will compare IHE and HEE of fracture mechanics specimens. Different fugacities of hydrogen for HEE and hydrogen concentrations for IHE were examined for Alloy X-750, a nickel-base super alloy. The test results were analyzed and the role of hydrogen in IHE and HEE was evaluated. A model based on a critical grain boundary hydrogen concentration will be proposed to describe the behavior in both HEE and IHE conditions.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Its Control in Hydrogen-Fueled Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The nature of hydrogen embrittlement by high pressure gaseous hydrogen is described and methods of designing SSME gaseous hydrogen systems, including techniques of hydrogen embrittlement prevention, are discussed. The effects of gaseous hydrogen environments are emphasized. Results of extensive investigations of gaseous hydrogen environments on metals conducted under the SSME program are presented.

  13. Corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of nanocrystalline nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tapas

    Nanocrystalline (nc) materials have attracted the interest of the scientific community because of their unique physical and mechanical properties. However, limited research has been performed to analyze their electrochemical behavior. The majority of research in the field of electrochemical and corrosion behavior exists for electrodeposited nanocrystalline metals. This research studies the behavior of sputter-deposited nc Nickel films in corrosive and hydrogen environment by potentiodynamic polarization and microindentation. The surface morphology and composition of the samples was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy. Bulk Ni samples exhibit mild passivation in 3.5 % NaCl solution. The surface reveals a fine distribution of small pits and numerous large pits. However, nc Ni films show a higher corrosion potential, but lower corrosion rate. This can be attributed to the rapid formation of a passive film to resist the corrosion, and better purity of sputtered films. A very uniform and periodic corrosion pattern is observed on the surface, without any pitting. In 0.1 N H2 SO4 solution, active dissolution of Ni was observed in both bulk and nanocrystalline samples. This is due to the absence of passivation for Ni in this environment. Nc Ni shows a higher corrosion rate and higher anodic corrosion potential. This behavior is attributed to a higher density of grain boundaries that act as a catalyst to the hydrogen reduction reaction and increase the corrosion rate. Effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen was observed for bulk and nanocrystalline Nickel. Bulk Ni displayed a slight increase in hardness and signs of hydrogen induced plastic deformation. On the other hand, the nanocrystalline Ni shows brittle failure by buckling and spalling. This is attributed to its limited ductility and the high density that act as preferred sites for hydrogen adsorption and subsequently enhance hydrogen diffusion, leading to

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  15. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials. PMID:23142843

  16. Embrittlement data base, version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water-reactor (LWR) pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials depends on many different factors such as flux, fluence, fluence spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Based on embrittlement predictions, decisions must be made concerning operating parameters and issues such as low-leakage-fuel management, possible life extension, and the need for annealing the pressure vessel. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules and test reactor experiments, comprising many different materials and different irradiation conditions, are needed to develop generally applicable damage prediction models that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Version 1 of the Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data resulting from merging version 2 of the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB). Fracture toughness data were also integrated into Version 1 of the EDB. For power reactor data, the current EDB lists the 1,029 Charpy transition-temperature shift data points, which include 321 from plates, 125 from forgoings, 115 from correlation monitor materials, 246 from welds, and 222 from heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials that were irradiated in 271 capsules from 101 commercial power reactors. For test reactor data, information is available for 1,308 different irradiated sets (352 from plates, 186 from forgoings, 303 from correlation monitor materials, 396 from welds and 71 from HAZs) and 268 different irradiated plus annealed data sets.

  17. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  18. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  19. Power reactor embrittlement data base

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement prediction models and of vessel integrity under load can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized embrittlement data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance reports and other published reports of commercial nuclear reactors. The uses of the data base require that as many different data as available are collected from as many sources as possible with complete references and that subsets of relevant data can be easily retrieved and processed. The objectives of this NRC-sponsored program are the following: to compile and to verify the quality of the PR-EDB; to provide user-friendly software to access and process the data; to explore or confirm embrittlement prediction models; and to interact with standards organizations to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards that can be used in regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. 9 figs.

  20. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  1. Electroplating offers embrittlement protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Thin copper electrodeposited layer protects metal parts in environments with which they may be incompatible. Originally developed for main engine of Space Shuttle where high strength nickle alloy bellows must operate in high-pressure hydrogen, technique protects nickel and is unaffected by forming process or subsequent heat treatment and preinstallation processing.

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  3. Pressure-induced metallization of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Struzhkin, V.; Song, Y.; Goncharov, A.; Ahart, M.; Liu, Z.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH4), silane (SiH4), and germane (GeH4) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH4 undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  4. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  5. Technique to Predict Ultraviolet Radiation Embrittlement of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the low-Earth-orbit environment, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation embrittles polymer materials through bond breaking and crosslinking. This UV embrittlement increases the surface hardness of the polymer. Before the durability of polymer materials in the low- Earth-orbit environment can be predicted, the extent of UV embrittlement needs to be determined. However, traditional techniques for measuring the microhardness of materials cannot be employed to measure changes in the hardness of UV-embrittled surfaces because traditional techniques measure bulk hardness and are not sensitive enough to surface changes. A unique technique was used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to quantify polymer surface damage that had been induced by UV radiation. The technique uses an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure surface microhardness. An atomic force microscope measures the repulsive forces between the atoms in a microscopic cantilevered tip and the atoms on the surface of a sample. Typically, an atomic force microscope produces a topographic image of a surface by monitoring the movement of the tip over features of the surface. The force applied to the cantilevered tip, and the indention of the tip into the surface, can be measured. The relationship between force and distance of indentation, the quantity force/distance (newtons/meter), provides a measure of the surface hardness. Under identical operating conditions, direct comparisons of surface hardness values can be made.

  6. Corrosion and embrittlement of high-strength steel bridge wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaas, Garry Wayne

    Suspension bridge cable inspections have revealed severely corroded and broken wires in some main cables. Accelerated cyclic corrosion studies were conducted to assess the relative effect of corrosion on high-strength steel bridge wire. Galvanized and ungalvanized wire samples were corroded under various levels of sustained loads in a cabinet that cyclically applied an acidic salt spray, dry conditions, and 100% relative humidity at elevated temperature. Mass loss, hydrogen concentration, ultimate load, and elongation at failure were measured for corroded and uncorroded samples. Elongation measurements indicated a significant embrittlement of the wires that could not be explained only by the presence of absorbed hydrogen (hydrogen embrittlement). The main cause of reduction of wire elongation was found to be the surface irregularities induced by the corrosion process. The corrosion process in a high-strength steel wire was modeled and analyzed using finite element methods. Forty-one separate FEM tests were run and this data was compared to the experimental data. In addition, for the purpose of comparison, a previously developed hydrogen embrittlement model was analyzed and its validity was discussed in detail. SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces were taken and possible causes and mechanisms of fracture were suggested by observations of the fracture morphology. It was shown through this experimental and numerical research work that the geometry of the wire, determined by the amount of corrosion, pitting, and surface irregularities, controls the ultimate elongation of the wire sample, as also confirmed by the SEM analysis of the fracture surfaces. It was also shown that, using a generally accepted hydrogen embrittlement model, there is no evidence that hydrogen embrittlement is occurring, or at least that hydrogen evolution is not the controlling factor in the loss of wire's ductility.

  7. Embrittlement of a Duplex Stainless Steel in Acidic Environment Under Applied Cathodic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen-induced degradation of mechanical properties of a duplex stainless steel in 0.1N H2SO4 solution has been studied under in situ cathodic charging conditions. Significant reductions in percentage of elongation, toughness, and time to failure were noticed due to the ingress of hydrogen into the material at various applied cathodic potentials in the range of -200 to -800 mV (SCE). Cleavage fractures were identified mainly in the ferritic phases. Crack growth was observed to be inhibited by the austenite phase. However, depending on the severity of the environment, both the ferrite and austenite phases could be embrittled. At less negative potentials, presence of surface film and low hydrogen fugacity seemed to control hydrogen ingress in the metal. Addition of thiosulfate to the acidic solution further degraded the mechanical properties of the steel at the applied cathodic potential.

  8. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  9. Susceptibility of irradiated steels to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Investigation determined whether irradiated pressure-vessel steels 4340 and 212-B are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and to catastrophic failure. Hydrogen-charging conditions which completely embrittled 4340 steel had negligible effect on 212-B steel in tensile and delayed-failure tests.

  10. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated

  11. Reduced hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in platinum implanted high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, J. G.; Lowder, L. J.; Culbertson, R. J.; Kosik, W. E.; Brown, R.

    1991-07-01

    High strength steels suffer from a high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in a corrosive atmosphere, a factor which limits their usefulness. A good catalyst, such as platinum, present on the surface of the steel may lead to a low value of hydrogen overvoltage, thereby reducing the accumulation and subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the metal. In the present study, platinum was implanted into high strength electroslag remelted (ESR) 4340 steel specimens to a dose of 10 16 atoms/cm 2. Both Pt-implanted and unimplanted specimens were rate charged with hydrogen. The relative concentration of diffusible hydrogen was determined using an electrochemical measurement device known as a Barnacle Electrode. The specimens implanted with platinum exhibited less diffusible hydrogen than the unimplanted steel. Slow strain rate notched-tensile tests, in an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt.% NaCI, were performed in order to evaluate the effect of hydrogen on strength and ductility. The Pt-implanted specimens were able to sustain significantly higher loads before fracture than their unimplanted counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified the presence of brittle cracking typical of hydrogen embrittlement type failures. Degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement was thus significantly reduced. This suggested that both the electrochemical and catalytic properties of the Pt-implanted surface were responsible for the improvement in properties.

  12. Mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel under monotonic and cyclic loadings in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.-B.; Verleene, A.; Serre, I.; Legris, A.

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical properties in liquid metals of the T91 martensitic steel, a candidate material for the window of an accelerating driven system (ADS). Two main questions are examined, the risk of liquid metal embrittlement and the accelerated fatigue damage by a liquid metal. It is found that the transition from ductile to brittle behaviour induced by a liquid metal is possible as a result of a decrease in surface energy caused by the adsorbed liquid metal. The embrittlement can occur only with a hard microstructure and a nucleation of very sharp defects inside the liquid metal. Under cycling straining, the fatigue resistance of the standard T91 steel is decreased by a factor of about 2 in the liquid metal as compared to air. It is proposed that short crack growth is promoted by the liquid metal which weakens the microstructural grain boundary barriers and skip the microcrack coalescence stage.

  13. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  15. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  17. Liquid-copper/zinc embrittlement in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.; King, J.; Raczkowski, C.

    1998-06-01

    Welding of Alloy 718 is known to cause intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). In this work, an Alloy 718 sample that exhibited HAZ cracking revealed high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. Previous studies on HAZ cracking of Alloy 718 have not reported high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. It is proposed here that the presence of liquid Cu/Zn can cause liquid-metal embrittlement (LME) and HAZ cracking in Alloy 718.

  18. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin I Practical Aspects of the Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Since aircraft design is tending toward all-metal construction, the strong heat-treatable light aluminum alloy, duralumin (a generic name for a class of heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si), is finding increasing application. Doubt has been expressed concerning the reliability and permanence of these materials. Information is given on the effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of 14-gauge sheet duralumin, heat treated by quenching in hot water after being heated for 15 minutes in a fused nitrate bath at 500 to 510 C. Intercrystalline corrosion and practical aspects of intercrystalline embrittlement are discussed with respect to duralumin.

  19. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  20. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  1. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  2. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  3. Monitoring the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels by using the Seebeck coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H. J.

    2009-06-01

    The degree of embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) limits the lifetime of nuclear power plants. Therefore, neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels demands accurate monitoring. Current federal legislation requires a surveillance program in which specimens are placed inside the RPV for several years before their fracture toughness is determined by destructive Charpy impact testing. Measuring the changes in the thermoelectric properties of the material due to irradiation, is an alternative and non-destructive method for the diagnostics of material embrittlement. In this paper, the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient ( K¯) of several Charpy specimens, made from two different grades of 22 NiMoCr 37 low-alloy steels, irradiated by neutrons with energies greater than 1 MeV, and fluencies ranging from 0 up to 4.5 × 10 19 neutrons per cm 2, are presented. Within this range, it was observed that K¯ increased by ≈500 nV/°C and a linear dependency was noted between K¯ and the temperature shift Δ T41 J of the Charpy energy vs. temperature curve, which is a measure for the embrittlement. We conclude that the change of the Seebeck coefficient has the potential for non-destructive monitoring of the neutron embrittlement of RPV steels if very precise measurements of the Seebeck coefficient are possible.

  4. Evaluation of test procedures for hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Report presents discussion of three common and primary influences on embrittlement process. Application of theoretical considerations to design of test coupons and methods is illustrated for both internal and external hydrogen embrittlement. Acceptable designs and methods are indicated.

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation in Tensile Properties of Stainless Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.

    2008-03-01

    The advanced design of fuel-cell vehicles requires high-pressure low-temperature hydrogen systems, which in turn requires a high-pressure low-temperature mechanical properties database to address hydrogen embrittlement issues. A very simple and safe mechanical properties testing procedure to evaluate low temperature hydrogen embrittlement has been developed and is reported here. Tensile properties of stainless steel, SUS 304, 304L and 316L, obtained by this simple method are in good agreement with previous data obtained in a high pressure chamber. The effect of hydrogen changed also with the amount of strain-induced martensitic transformation in those steels at low temperatures.

  6. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of molybdenum rhenium alloys and their improvement by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Ueda, Kazukiyo; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation-induced embrittlement is one of the major problems with molybdenum alloys, which have been considered as one of the candidates for divertor structural materials. The effects of rhenium content, heat-treatment and irradiation condition on mechanical properties and microstructural development of molybdenum rhenium alloys were studied after neutron exposure by FFTF/MOTA up to high fluence (˜1 × 10 27 n/m 2, En>0.1 MeV). Appreciable plastic deformation was observed in a bending test on stress-relieved Mo-5 wt% Re irradiated at high temperatures. Fine, dense precipitates were observed in Mo-41 wt% Re, resulting in large hardening and embrittlement.

  7. Embrittlement Phenomena in an Austenitic Stainless Steel: Influence of Hydrogen and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamani, Emil; Jouinot, Patrice

    2007-04-01

    The influence of hydrogen and temperature (up to 650°C) on an austenitic stainless steel is studied by means of two main techniques: the disk pressure embrittlement and the special biaxial tensile tests. The embrittlement index of the steel is determined as the ratio of rupture pressures of the disks tested similarly under helium and hydrogen. Furthermore, we studied the effect of loading speed and temperature on rupture pressures. We show that the mechanical behavior of the steel is strongly influenced by the apparition of a second phase: the deformation induced martensite, α'.

  8. Small punch testing for irradiation embrittlement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses are used to evaluate nuclear reactor vessel integrity. These analyses require knowledge of a range of vessel material mechanical properties, particularly fracture properties. Estimation of vessel material fracture properties is currently made indirectly via correlations between embrittlement and vessel steel chemistry and neutron fluence, and by standard Charpy testing (for transition temperature or RT{sub NDT}) of surveillance material. The small punch test approach is a miniature specimen mechanical test which, based on accumulated experience with fossil plant steels, shows significant application potential for in-service nuclear reactor vessel irradiation embrittlement evaluation. The small punch test specimen is small enough to potentially overcome the surveillance material availability problem (30 small punch test specimens can be easily removed from a single standard half-Charpy bar) and even permit a direct vessel material interrogation by non-disruptive removal of miniature samples from the vessel. An immediate, near-term benefit of the small punch test approach will be the conservation of surveillance material. The results of preliminary feasibility testing on a heat of reactor vessel steel weld metal in the unirradiated, irradiated, and irradiated + annealed conditions show that the small punch test transition temperature correlates with the standard Charpy transition temperature. In addition, application of the small punch test-based fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}, J{sub Ic}) estimation method developed on a previous EPRI project (RP2426-38) produced toughness estimates for the irradiated steel within the {+-}25% accuracy range demonstrated on RP2426-38. The results show that the small punch test can be a viable means of evaluating irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Recommendations are provided for further developing the test method for this application.

  9. On Hydrogen and Helium embrittlement in Isotopic tailoring Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2000-09-01

    The results of shear punch testing performed on irradiated isotopically tailored alloys are considered in terms of hydrogen and helium embrittlement in order to quantify the observed behavior. The results indicate that hydrogen embrittlement may be more significant than helium embrittlement.

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.H.; Scammon, K.

    1995-09-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement properties of some nickel based superalloys such as C-22, C-276, G-30 and Alloy 625 were studied. The alloys were studied for their susceptibility in annealed, cold worked and aged conditions. The degradation in mechanical properties were evaluated by slow strain rate testing. The hydrogen permeation parameters were deduced using thin foil specimens and electrochemical hydrogen charging according to Devanathan-Stacharsky. The fractographic evaluations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. The alloys were rank ordered. Results indicate that all the alloys tested are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and that any strengthening heat treatment increases their susceptibility to hydrogen damage.

  11. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  12. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb Welds

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; C.K. Battige; N. Liwis; M.A. Penik; J. Kikel; A.J. Silvia; C.K. McDonald

    2001-03-18

    Nickel based alloys are often welded with argon/hydrogen shielding gas mixtures to minimize oxidation and improve weld quality. However, shielding gas mixtures with {ge} 1% hydrogen additions can result in hydrogen concentrations greater than 5 wt. ppm in the weld metal and reduce ductility via hydrogen embrittlement. For the conditions investigated, the degree of hydrogen embrittlement is highly variable between 5 and 14 wt. ppm. investigation of hydrogen embrittlement of EN82H GTAW welds via tensile testing, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that this variability is due to the inhomogeneous microstructure of the welds, the presence of recrystallized grains, and complex residual plastic strains. Specifically, research indicates that high residual strains and hydrogen trapping lower the ductility of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb weld metal when dissolved hydrogen concentrations are greater than 5 wt. ppm. The inhomogeneous microstructure contains columnar dendritic, cellular dendritic, and recrystallized grains. The decreased tensile ductility observed in embrittled samples is recovered by post weld heat treatments that decrease the bulk hydrogen concentration below 5 wt. ppm.

  13. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  14. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  15. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  16. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of T-250 laser welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, L. W.; Huang, W. B.; Chen, C.

    1997-04-01

    The tensile properties of laser-welded T-250 maraging steel are measured, with attention paid to the influence of strain rate and gaseous hydrogen on the fracture behavior of welded specimens. Post-weld heat treatments are performed on laser-welded specimens to obtain underaged (WU), peak-aged (WP), and overaged (WO) specimens. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) affects the tensile fracture behavior of the welded specimens; HE changes not only the fracture mode but also the fracture location. Without the influence of hydrogen, the fracture location is at the softest region, the weld metal (WM), and the fracture appearance reveals a ductile dimple fracture. For welds sensitive to HE, the fracture is initiated at the heat-affected zone (HAZ) with coarse grain size, and the associated fracture surface exhibits intergranular and quasi-cleavage fractures that are brittle in nature. In addition, the HAZ with coarse grain size is more prone to HE, as compared to other regions in the welded specimens. The WU specimens are susceptible to HE in air under a low strain rate, while the WP specimens are only susceptible to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement (GHE). However, the WO specimens are immune to GHE and insensitive to strain rate.

  17. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  18. Potential/charge induced nanoporous metal actuators.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, R N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical response to the electrochemical charging of nanoporous metals with their pore space wetted by electrolyte have been studied in-situ using dilatometry and wide angle x-ray diffractometry techniques. The actuation strain reported in this manuscript is purely elastic and completely reversible. The capacitive double layer charging became more effective near to the potential to zero charge (pzc) and contribute significantly to the variations of surface stress and crystal strain. In a suitable experimental setup, the actuator effect from porous metals can be amplified, where deliberate movements of the actuator parts are desirable with minimum external force, suggesting that metallic foam-like materials with high surface to volume ratio could be used to mimic natural muscles. PMID:19964917

  19. Correlating radiation exposure with embrittlement: Comparative studies of electron- and neutron-irradiated pressure vessel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-22

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results show the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiate samples relative to unalloyed iron. Despite their disparate nature of defect production similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  20. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  1. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found. PMID:24125362

  2. Liquid metal folding patterns induced by electric capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental phenomenon regarding spontaneous formation of symmetrical folding patterns induced on liquid metal free surface with circular shape features was disclosed. The occurrence and evolution processes of the patterns were demonstrated and interpreted. The electric capillary force imposed on liquid metal due to surface tension gradient was found responsible for producing a variety of surface folding patterns like wheel-shape, dual concentric ring-shape, and so on. All the patterns display a property of axial symmetry and could be analogue to the Rayleigh-Benard convection which produces hexagonal patterns. This finding on liquid metal flow folding refreshes knowledge of classical fluid kinematics.

  3. Strain induced fragility transition in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Bin; Richert, Ranko; Maaß, Robert; Samwer, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here, we report that mechanical strain in a model metallic glass modulates the relaxation dynamics in unexpected ways. We find that a large strain amplitude makes a fragile liquid become stronger, reduces dynamical heterogeneity at the glass transition and broadens the loss spectra asymmetrically, in addition to speeding up the relaxation dynamics. These findings demonstrate the distinctive roles of strain compared with temperature on the relaxation dynamics and indicate that dynamical heterogeneity inherently relates to the fragility of glass-forming materials. PMID:25981888

  4. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  5. Pressure-induced metallization of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhang, Haidong; Goncharov, Alexander F; Lobanov, Sergey S; Kagayama, Tomoko; Sakata, Masafumi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-07-18

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements of molybdenum disulfide MoS(2) are performed at pressures up to 81 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Above 20 GPa, we find discontinuous changes in Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns which provide evidence for isostructural phase transition from 2H(c) to 2H(a) modification through layer sliding previously predicted theoretically. This first-order transition, which is completed around 40 GPa, is characterized by a collapse in the c-lattice parameter and volume and also by changes in interlayer bonding. After the phase transition completion, MoS(2) becomes metallic. The reversibility of the phase transition is identified from all these techniques. PMID:25083660

  6. Sliding induced crystallization of metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear experiments, electron microscopy, and diffraction studies were conducted with an Fe67Co18B14Si1 ferrous-base metallic glass in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at room temperature in air. The results indicate that the amorphous alloy can be crystallized during the sliding process. Crystallization of the wear surface causes high friction. Plastic flow occurred on the amorphous alloy with sliding, and the flow film of the alloy transferred to the aluminum oxide surface. Two distinct types of wear debris were observed as a result of sliding: an alloy wear debris, and powdery and whiskery oxide debris. Generation of oxide wear debris particles on an alloy can cause transitions in friction behavior.

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pulse-Plated Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Eggert D.; Von Bestenbostel, Wolfgang; Sebald, Torsten; Paronis, Georgios; Vanelli, Diego; Müller, Yves

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the European-funded project MultiHy (Multiscale modeling of hydrogen embrittlement in crystalline materials) is the development of multiscale models for hydrogen transport in complex microstructures. The validation and application of the models will be carried out by investigating the role of the microstructure in industrial problems involving hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of advanced materials. Pulse-plated nickel (PP-Ni) material, as used in various industrial applications, has shown a susceptibility to HE that may cause premature failure of a structure. Due to the nature of the pulse-plating process, H is incorporated into the microstructure of the material. This H may lead to crack initiation when combined with localized stress concentrations due to subsequent manufacturing steps, e.g., welding. This article provides an overview of experimental studies aimed at evaluating the influence of the microstructure on the susceptibility of PP-Ni to HE and, ultimately, at improving the plating process.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, R.G.; Dietzel, W.; Zhang, B.J.; Liu, W.J.; Tseng, M.K.; Atrens, A

    2004-09-20

    The age hardening, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu 7175 alloy were investigated experimentally. There were two peak-aged states during ageing. For ageing at 413 K, the strength of the second peak-aged state was slightly higher than that of the first one, whereas the SCC susceptibility was lower, indicating that it is possible to heat treat 7175 to high strength and simultaneously to have high SCC resistance. The SCC susceptibility increased with increasing Mg segregation at the grain boundaries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) increased with increased hydrogen charging and decreased with increasing ageing time for the same hydrogen charging conditions. Computer simulations were carried out of (a) the Mg grain boundary segregation using the embedded atom method and (b) the effect of Mg and H segregation on the grain boundary strength using a quasi-chemical approach. The simulations showed that (a) Mg grain boundary segregation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is spontaneous, (b) Mg segregation decreases the grain boundary strength, and (c) H embrittles the grain boundary more seriously than does Mg. Therefore, the SCC mechanism of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is attributed to the combination of HE and Mg segregation induced grain boundary embrittlement.

  9. Fuel Manifold Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T.

    1986-01-01

    Completely-cast hydrogen-compatible alloy preferable to protective plating. Complexity of plating, welding, and brazing unnecessary if hydrogen-compatible alloy used for entire casting instead of protective overlay. Parts exposed to high-pressure hydrogen made immune to hydrogen embrittlement if fabricated from new alloy, Incoly 903 (or equivalent). Material strong and compatible with hydrogen at all temperatures and adapted for outlet manifold of Space Shuttle main combustion chamber.

  10. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  11. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  12. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  13. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  14. Pressure-induced superconductivity in europium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Debessai, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hamlin, J.J.; Bi, W.; Meng, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Schilling, J.S.

    2010-05-24

    Of the 52 known elemental superconductors among the 92 naturally occurring elements in the periodic table, fully 22 only become superconducting under sufficiently high pressure. In the rare-earth metals, the strong local magnetic moments originating from the 4f shell suppress superconductivity. For Eu, however, Johansson and Rosengren have suggested that sufficiently high pressures should promote one of its 4f electrons into the conduction band, changing Eu from a strongly magnetic (J=7/2) 4f{sup 7}-state into a weak Van Vleck paramagnetic (J=0) 4f{sup 6}-state, thus opening the door for superconductivity, as in Am (5f{sup 6}). We report that Eu becomes superconducting above 1.8 K for pressures exceeding 80 GPa, T{sub c} increasing linearly with pressure to 142 GPa at the rate +15 mK/GPa. Eu thus becomes the 53rd elemental superconductor in the periodic table. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies to 92 GPa at ambient temperature reveal four structural phase transitions.

  15. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1995-02-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of different polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitrile (SAN), polybutadieneterephthalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylene (POM) were treated by excimer-laser radiation at 248 nm in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification and ablation to increase surface roughness. Therefore, the laser-processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the ablation depth, optical penetration depth, absorption coefficient and ablation threshold are determined. The metallization of pretreated (laser, wet chemical and plasma etching) polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes were electroplating and physical vapour deposition (PVD). The adhesion of the deposited films is measured with scratch and tape test methods in order to determine the regimes of suitable surface modification for metallization.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  17. Nature of Pressure-induced Insulating States in Simple Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Hemley, Russell

    As experimentally established, all the alkali metals and heavy alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr and Ba) become progressively less conductive on compression, at least up to some critical limit over a broad pressure range. Of these metals, Li and Na clearly undergo pressure-induced metal-insulator transitions, which may also be called reverse Mott transitions. Here, using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that such transitions can be understood in terms of band representations introduced by Zak. The valence bands in the insulating states are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of semimetallic phases with flat surface states. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca). This research was supported by EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DESC0001057.

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum: the crucial role of vacancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-04-22

    We report first-principles calculations which demonstrate that vacancies can combine with hydrogen impurities in bulk aluminum and play a crucial role in the embrittlement of this prototypical ductile solid. Our studies of hydrogen-induced vacancy superabundant formation and vacancy clusterization in aluminum lead to the conclusion that a large number of H atoms (up to 12) can be trapped at a single vacancy, which overcompensates the energy cost to form the defect. In the presence of trapped H atoms, three nearest-neighbor single vacancies which normally would repel each other, aggregate to form a trivacancy on the slip plane of Al, acting as embryos for microvoids and cracks and resulting in ductile rupture along these planes. PMID:15904157

  19. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  20. Segregation of alloying atoms at a tilt symmetric grain boundary in tungsten and their strengthening and embrittling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Wu; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Liu-Wei; Liu, Chang-Song; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the segregation behavior of alloying atoms (Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ti) near Σ3 (111) [11¯0] tilt symmetric grain boundary (GB) in tungsten and their effects on the intergranular embrittlement by performing first-principles calculations. The calculated segregation energies suggest that Ag, Au, Cd, In, Sc, Sr, Th, and Ti prefer to occupy the site in the mirror plane of the GB, while Cu, Cr, Mn, and Zn intend to locate at the first layer nearby the GB core. The calculated strengthening energies predict Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Ti, and Zn act as embrittlers while Cu, Cr, and Mn act as cohesion enhancers. The correlation of the alloying atom's metal radius with strengthening energy is strong enough to predict the strengthening and embrittling behavior of alloying atoms; that is, the alloying atom with larger metal radius than W acts as an embrittler and the one with smaller metal radius acts as a cohesion enhancer.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  2. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement: Prevention and control; ASTM Special Technical Publication, No. 962

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.

    1988-01-01

    The control and prevention of hydrogen embrittlement in metals are discussed, with a focus on test methods, in reviews and reports presented at the ASTM national symposium held in Los Angeles in May 1985. Sections are devoted to current standards and projections, hydrogen in steel and Ti, relative susceptibility, hydrogen in welding, case histories of prevention and control, and ongoing research. Topics addressed include electrochemical aspects, accelerated acceptance testing methods, the barnacle electrode method, the disk pressure test, a bent-beam test for H2S stress corrosion cracking, diffusible hydrogen testing by gas chromatography, surface films for embrittlement prevention, the effects of strain on hydrogen entry and transport in ferrous alloys, and the temperature dependence of fatigue crack propagation in Nb-H alloys.

  4. Prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Chistyakov, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new method has been proposed for prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The method is based on the test results for materials in two conditions, namely, aged at temperatures of temper embrittlement and annealed after irradiation. The prediction is based on the McLean's equation and the dependencies describing thermally activated and radiation-enhanced phosphorus diffusion. Experimental studies have been carried out for estimation of thermal ageing of the WWER-1000 RPV 2Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel. The ductile to brittle transition temperature shift ΔTk due to phosphorus segregation has been estimated on the basis of experimental data processed by the proposed method for the time t = 5 × 105 h (more than 60 years of operation) for the base and weld metals of the WWER-1000 RPV.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of metal-induced side-effects.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Vera; Hudecek, Romuald; Stejskal, Jenny; Sterzl, Ivan

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors are recognized as a cause of the increasing frequency of allergic and autoimmune diseases. In addition to external pollutants, metal ions released from dental restorations or from other body implants might trigger inflammation in susceptible subjects. In humans, genes governing metal-induced inflammation and autoimmunity are not yet known. In clinical praxis, metal-sensitive patients will present various symptoms ranging from oral mucosal changes and skin disease to excessive fatigue and autoimmune diseases. Since genetic markers of genetic susceptibility in man are not known, one has to rely on the phenototypic markers. Such biomarkers might be certain detoxification enzymes but also the presence of metal-specific memory cells in the blood. With the increasing use of metal implants in medicine and dentistry, it is important to have a proper tool for the diagnosis of metal allergy in susceptible subjects. After nickel, gold is now the second most common sensitizer. In addition to patch test, an in vitro blood test, an optimized commercially available lymphocyte transformation test (MELISA) is discussed. Both tests were used for the diagnosis of metal allergy in a selected group of 15 patients who suffered from clinical metal sensitivity in addition to other health problems. The concordance of the two tests was good but MELISA detected more metal allergies than patch test. The removal of incompatible dental material (RID) resulted in long-term health improvement in the majority of patients. We postulate that in vivo, metal ions activate T-cells, initiating systemic inflammation, which, through cytokines, affects the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. We postulate that in vivo metal ions will activate T-cells starting systemic inflammation which, through cytokines affect the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The treatment and rehabilitation of metal sensitive patients is based on a firm understanding and

  6. Investigation of Teflon FEP embrittlement on spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(TM) fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) is used on the exterior of spacecraft surfaces in the low earth orbit environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized Teflon(TM) FEP used in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provided evidence of the low earth orbit environments. Samples from the LDEF and HST were evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  7. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  8. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  9. Origin of yielding in metallic glass: Stress-induced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Chen, M. W.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Yielding in crystalline metals is well known to be governed by dislocation dynamics; however, the structural origin of yielding in metallic glasses (MGs) still remains as an issue of intense debate despite that substantial research efforts have been expended. In this Letter, based on well-designed cyclic microcompression tests, we provide compelling experimental evidence revealing that yielding of MGs is essentially a stress-induced viscous flow process, during which the measured viscosity ranges from 1014 Pa.s to 1011 Pa.s and decreases with the increase of applied stress, resembling the "shear-thinning" behavior of non-Newtonian liquids. This stress-induced non-Newtonian flow finally leads to shear instability, which manifests itself as the phenomenon of delayed yielding common to a variety of MGs.

  10. Radiation annealing of radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2016-02-01

    Influence of neutron irradiation on RPV steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore - nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation structure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. As a result oscillation arise that in tern lead to enhanced data scatter.

  11. Study to minimize hydrogen embrittlement of ultrahigh-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsea, S. T.; Fletcher, E. E.; Groeneveld, T. P.

    1967-01-01

    Hydrogen-stress cracking in high-strength steels is influenced by hydrogen content of the material and its hydrogen absorption tendency. Non-embrittling cleaning, pickling, and electroplating processes are being studied. Protection from this hydrogen embrittlement is important to the aerospace and aircraft industries.

  12. Embrittlement of MISSE 5 Polymers After 13 Months of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Yi, Grace T.; Ashmead, Claire C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding space environment induced degradation of spacecraft materials is essential when designing durable and stable spacecraft components. As a result of space radiation, debris impacts, atomic oxygen interaction, and thermal cycling, the outer surfaces of space materials degrade when exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO). The objective of this study was to measure the embrittlement of 37 thin film polymers after LEO space exposure. The polymers were flown aboard the International Space Station and exposed to the LEO space environment as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 5 (MISSE 5). The samples were flown in a nadir-facing position for 13 months and were exposed to thermal cycling along with low doses of atomic oxygen, direct solar radiation and omnidirectional charged particle radiation. The samples were analyzed for space-induced embrittlement using a bend-test procedure in which the strain necessary to induce surface cracking was determined. Bend-testing was conducted using successively smaller mandrels to apply a surface strain to samples placed on a semi-suspended pliable platform. A pristine sample was also tested for each flight sample. Eighteen of the 37 flight samples experienced some degree of surface cracking during bend-testing, while none of the pristine samples experienced any degree of cracking. The results indicate that 49 percent of the MISSE 5 thin film polymers became embrittled in the space environment even though they were exposed to low doses (approx.2.75 krad (Si) dose through 127 mm Kapton) of ionizing radiation.

  13. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  14. Nondestructive Technique To Assess Embrittlement In Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research at NASA Langley Research Center led to identification of nondestructive technique for detection of temper embrittlement in HY80 steel. Measures magnetoacoustic emission associated with reversible motion of domain walls at low magnetic fields. Of interest to engineers responsible for reliability and safety of various dynamically loaded and/or thermally cycled steel parts. Applications include testing of landing gears, naval vessels, and parts subjected to heat, such as those found in steam-pipe fittings, boilers, turbine rotors, and nuclear pressure vessels.

  15. Apparatus For Tests Of Embrittlement By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C.; Lycou, Peter P.

    1992-01-01

    Test apparatus exposes disk specimens to hydrogen in controlled, repeatable way simulating conditions in use. Disk specimen constitutes thin wall between pressure and vacuum chambers. Test proceeds until hydrogen weakens disk enough that it ruptures. Aluminum impact plate absorbs debris from ruptured disk. Apparatus replicates aspects of service environments relevant to embrittlement by hydrogen in such equipment as storage tanks, valves, and fluid-handling components containing hydrogen at high absolute or gauge pressure. Hydrogen inside permeates stressed material and produces gradient of concentration as hydrogen diffuses through material to low-pressure side.

  16. The effects of hydrogen embrittlement of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Delbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium alloys, by virtue of their attractive strength to density ratio, fatigue, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance are now commonly used in various aerospace and marine applications. The cost, once very expensive, has been reduced, making titanium even more of a competitive material today. Titanium and titanium alloys have a great affinity to several elements. Hydrogen, even in small amounts, can cause embrittlement, which in turn causes a reduction in strength and ductility. The reduction of strength and ductility is the subject of this investigation.

  17. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  18. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  19. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Hartmut; Wesner, David A.; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang

    1995-04-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of various polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitril (SAN), polybutadieneterphtalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylen (POM) were treated by excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm) in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification. Therefore the laser processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the absorption coefficient, optical penetration depth, ablation depth and ablation threshold are determined. The surface morphology and surface roughness are studied by optical surface profilometry and secondary electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of laser treatment on chemical composition of modified and ablated surfaces is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Depending on the processing parameters and materials properties different microstructures and values of surface roughness are generated on the micrometer length scale. Pretreatment for the subsequent metallization is performed with laser radiation, wet chemical and plasma etching. The metallization of polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes are electroplating and physical vapor deposition (PVD). Adhesion of the deposited films, measured with scratch and tape test methods, is used as a criterion for determining regimes of suitable surface modification for subsequent metallization.

  20. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  1. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  2. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  3. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-08-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture.

  4. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - neutron embrittlement.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  5. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - Neutron embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  6. Metal induced crystallization of amorphous silicon for photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gestel, D.; Gordon, I.; Poortmans, J.

    A silicon thin-film technology could lead to less expensive modules by the use of less silicon material and by the implementation of monolithic module processes. A technology based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-films with a grain size between 1 μm and 1 mm (pc-Si), seems particularly promising since it combines the low-cost potential of a thin-film technology with the high efficiency potential of crystalline silicon. One of the possible approaches to fabricate pc-Si absorber layers is metal induced crystallization (MIC). For solar cell applications mainly aluminium is investigated as metal because 1) it forms a eutectic system with silicon instead of a silicide-metal system like e.g. Ni 2) only shallow level defects are formed in the forbidden bandgap of silicon and 3) a layer exchange process can be obtained in combination with a-Si. Aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) of a-Si on non-silicon substrates can results in grains with a preferential (100) orientation and a maximum grain sizes above 50 micrometer. These layers can act as seed layers for further epitaxial growth. Based on this two-step approach (AIC + epitaxial growth) we made solar cells with an energy conversion efficiency of 8%. Based on TEM, EBIC, SEM, defect etch and EBSD measurements we showed that the efficiency is nowadays mainly limited by the presence of electrical intragrain defects.

  7. Dental metal-induced innate reactivity in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Buskermolen, Jeroen K; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan; von Blomberg, B Mary E; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-12-25

    Gold, nickel, copper and mercury, i.e. four metals frequently used in dental applications, were explored for their capacity to induce innate immune activation in keratinocytes (KC). Due to their anatomical location the latter epithelial cells are key in primary local irritative responses of skin and mucosa. Fresh foreskin-derived keratinocytes and skin and gingiva KC cell lines were studied for IL-8 release as a most sensitive parameter for NF-kB activation. First, we verified that viral-defense mediating TLR3 is a key innate immune receptor in both skin- and mucosa derived keratinocytes. Second, we found that, in line with our earlier finding that ionized gold can mimic viral dsRNA in triggering TLR3, gold is very effective in KC activation. It would appear that epithelial TLR3 can play a key role in both skin- and mucosa localized irritation reactivities to gold. Subsequently we found that not only gold, but also nickel, copper and mercury salts can activate innate immune reactivity in keratinocytes, although the pathways involved remain unclear. Although current alloys have been optimized for minimal leakage of metal ions, secondary factors such as mechanical friction and acidity may still facilitate such leakage. Subsequently, these metal ions may create local irritation, itching and swelling by triggering innate immune reactions, potentially also facilitating the development of metal specific adaptive immunity. PMID:26456670

  8. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  9. Influence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Kendig, M. W.; Meisels, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments performed to determine the roles of hydrogen absorption and hydrogen electron transfer on the susceptibility of Fe- and Ni-base alloys to ambient-temperature hydroen embrittlement. An apparent independence is noted between hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal hydrogen embrittlement. The experiments were performed on Inconel 718, Incoloy 903, and A286. The electrochemical results obtained indicate that Inconel 718 either adsorbs hydrogen more rapidly and/or the electrochemical oxidation of the adsorbed hydrogen occurred more rapidly than in the other two materials.

  10. ON QUANTIFICATION OF HELIUM EMBRITTLEMENT IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.

    2000-12-01

    Helium accumulation due to transmutation has long been considered a potential cause for embrittlement in ferritic/martensitic steels. Three Charpy impact databases involving nickel- and boron-doped alloys are quantified with respect to helium accumulation, and it is shown that all predict a very large effect of helium production on embrittlement. If these predictions are valid, use of Ferritic/Martensitic steels for Fusion first wall applications is highly unlikely. It is therefore necessary to reorient efforts regarding development of these steels for fusion applications to concentrate on the issue of helium embrittlement.

  11. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  12. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(registered trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene-propylene) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized FEP is used for the outer layer of thermal control blankets because of its low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. FEP is also preferred over other spacecraft polymers because of its relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its low atomic oxygen erosion yield, FEP has not been protected in the space environment. Recent, long term space exposures such as on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF, 5.8 years in space), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, after 3.6 years in space) have provided evidence of LEO environmental degradation of FEP. These exposures provide unique opportunities for studying environmental degradation because of the long durations and the different conditions (such as differences in altitude) of the exposures. Samples of FEP from LDEF and from HST (retrieved during its first servicing mission) have been evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen. Micro-indenter results indicate that the surface hardness increased as the ratio of atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence decreased for the LDEF samples. FEP multilayer insulation (MLI) retrieved from HST provided evidence of severe embrittlement on solar facing surfaces. Micro-indenter measurements indicated higher surface hardness values for these samples than LDEF samples, but the solar exposures were higher. Cracks induced during bend testing were significantly deeper for the HST samples with the highest solar exposure than for LDEF samples with similar atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence ratios. If solar fluences are compared, the LDEF samples appear as damaged as HST samples, except that HST had deeper induced cracks. The results illustrate difficulties in comparing LEO exposed materials from

  13. Plasmon-induced hot carriers in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Jun G; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter

    2014-08-26

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. However, despite very significant experimental effort, a comprehensive theoretical description of the hot carrier generation process is still missing. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. In this model, the conduction electrons of the metal are described as free particles in a finite spherical potential well, and the plasmon-induced hot carrier production is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. Specifically, larger nanoparticle sizes and shorter lifetimes result in higher carrier production rates but smaller energies, and vice versa. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. The results presented here contribute to the basic understanding of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and provide insight for optimization of the process. PMID:24960573

  14. Pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; Meng, Yue; Park, Changyong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Junqiao; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2 based on synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Our isothermal compression experiments at room temperature and 383 K show that the room temperature monoclinic phase (M 1 ,P 21/c ) and the high-temperature rutile phase (R ,P 42/m n m ) of VO2 undergo phase transitions to a distorted M 1 monoclinic phase (M 1' ,P 21/c ) above 13.0 GPa and to an orthorhombic phase (CaCl2-like, P n n m ) above 13.7 GPa, respectively. Upon further compression, both high-pressure phases transform into a new phase (phase X ) above 34.3 and 38.3 GPa at room temperature and 383 K, respectively. The room temperature M 1 -M 1' phase transition structurally resembles the R -CaCl2 phase transition at 383 K, suggesting a second-order displacive type of transition. Contrary to previous studies, our electrical resistivity results, Raman measurements, as well as ab initio calculations indicate that the new phase X , rather than the M 1' phase, is responsible for the metallization under pressure. The metallization mechanism is discussed based on the proposed crystal structure.

  15. Inducibility of a molecular bioreporter system by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimowski, L.; Rayms-Keller, A.; Olson, K.E.; Yang, R.S.H.; Tessari, J.; Carlson, J.; Beaty, B.

    1996-02-01

    The authors have developed a molecular bioreporter model for detecting an invertebrate response to heavy metals in streams. The bioreporter system, pMt2-luc, utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein promoter to regulate luciferase expression in stably transformed mosquito cells.The LucC5 clone, which was isolated from pMt2-luc transformed, hygromycin-resistant C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) cells, demonstrated a 12-fold increase in luciferase-specific activity 48 h after exposure to 13 ppm copper (Cu). In addition to Cu, exposure of LucC5 cells to 19 ppm lead (Pb) or 3 ppm mercury (Hg) for 48 h induced luciferase expression threefold and fourfold, respectively. Exposures of up to 30 ppm arsenic (As), 8 ppm cadmium (Cd), 7 ppm chromium (Cr), or 5 ppm nickel (Ni) had no effect on luciferase induction. LucC5 cells exposed to metal mixtures of 13 ppm Cu and 19 ppm Pb yielded an additive response with a 14-fold increase in luciferase expression. When organic chemicals such as phenol (3 ppm) were mixed with 13 ppm Cu, 19 ppm Pb, or 3 ppm Hg a significant reduction in luciferase activity was noted. Additionally, atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that two of the metals, Cu and Pb, show marked differences in accumulation within the LucC5 cell line.

  16. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20 ns pulse duration and 193 nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ≤10 ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ≤80 ns) for more than 1 μs. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  17. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures. PMID:27045994

  18. Fracture surface of hydrogen embrittlement in iron single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, N.; Kidani, K.; Hattori, Y.; Terasaki, F. )

    1993-07-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of iron and low strength steels has been studied for a long time. Its mechanism, however has not been explained clearly yet. Fractography is often used as a method for the study of the fracture mechanism. The fracture process, for example, microvoid coalescence (MVC), cleavage, grain boundary fracture and so on, can be determined by means of fractography. Then it is possible to understand by which process hydrogen causes the embrittlement. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the characteristics of such fracture surfaces and to deduce the fracture mechanism. As for the embrittlement of iron and steels, they often occur after a fair amount of plastic deformation, which strongly depends on the crystallographic orientation and temperature. In this paper, the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen embrittlement are investigated with various crystallographic orientation and temperatures.

  19. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys have been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a% Al-5a% Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added and tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. It was found that decreased test frequency leads to increased crack growth rates in a Zr-containing alloy which points to a moisture-induced embrittlement mechanism responsible for the higher crack growth rates in air. Fracture path tends to be insensitive to environment for each alloy.

  20. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels in H/sub 2/S plus H/sub 2/O vapor environment. Quarterly report No. 8, May 15-August 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.J.

    1980-11-28

    In previous tests the environment was H/sub 2/S of the highest commercially available purity. In this environment it proved impossible, by our current techniques, to induce hydrogen embrittlement in low yield strength (45 to 75 ksi or 300 to 500 MPa) samples which had been given a post weld heat treatment. The introduction of saturated water vapor in the H/sub 2/S has clearly served to give conditions in which the lower strength steels can be embrittled.

  1. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    Metal vanadates contain a diverse family of compounds due to the facile accessibility of different vanadium oxidation states and local coordination environments. Though these systems present a number of applications in catalysis and electronics, there may exist untapped physical phenomena that only reveal themselves when scaling these materials to nanoscale dimensions. Finite-size effects result from a number of factors including surface energy structural instabilities, nanostructure "self-purification," and physical constraints on mechanistic or conductive pathways. The MxV2O 5 bronze materials possess non-stoichiometry and this interesting property has hindered synthetic techniques to procure perfect crystalline material which is needed to expose the true physical properties. Through hydrothermal synthesis methods, pseudo one---dimensional nanostructures of Mx V2O5 display fascinating new properties and may be model systems for studying fundamentals associated with correlated electron dynamics in solid-state physics. Electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction reveal the near-perfect crystalline nanostructures. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies show strong evidence for the localization of electron density and long-range crystal structure alignment of the nanowires. Single-nanowire electron transport measurements for the beta'-CuxV2O5 and the delta-KxV2O5 data shows novel temperature-induced reversible metal---insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. The unprecedented magnitude (˜105) and discontinuous nature of the MIT suggests a mechanism closely associated with correlated electron motion. Additionally, the MIT can be induced by voltage ramping. The simultaneous temperature/voltage studies of single-nanowire transport support the existence of a critical threshold to overcome in order to facilitate instability in the insulating phase and transition to a metallic phase for the delta-KxV2O5 bronze. The MIT transition magnitudes of several

  2. Composition effect on intrinsic plasticity or brittleness in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  3. Composition Effect on Intrinsic Plasticity or Brittleness in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  4. SSME - Materials and Methods for Addressing High-Pressure Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczk, Daniel; Russell, Dale; Frandsen, Jon; Swanson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    From the humid, corrosion-friendly atmosphere of KSC, to the extreme heat of ascent, to the cold vacuum of space, the Space Shuttle faced one hostile environment after another. One of those harsh environments the hydrogen environment existed within the shuttle itself. Liquid hydrogen was the fuel that powered the shuttle s complex, powerful, and reusable main engine. Hydrogen provided the high specific impulse the bang per pound of fuel needed to perform the shuttle s heavy lifting duties. Hydrogen, however, was also a potential threat to the very metal of the propulsion system that used it. The diffusion of hydrogen atoms into a metal can make it more brittle and prone to cracking a process called hydrogen embrittlement. This effect can reduce the toughness of carefully selected and prepared materials. A concern that exposure to hydrogen might encourage crack growth was present from the beginning of the Space Shuttle Program, but the rationale for using hydrogen was compelling. This paper outlines the material characterization, anomaly resolution, and path to understanding of hydrogen embrittlement on superalloys through the course of the SSME program. Specific examples of nickel alloy turbine housings and single crystal turbine blades are addressed. The evolution of fracture mechanics analytical methods is also addressed.

  5. Beam-Induced Deposition of Thin Metallic Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funsten, Herbert Oliver, III

    1990-01-01

    Ion and electron beam induced deposition (BID) of thin (1 μm), conductive films is accomplished by dissociating and removing the nonmetallic components of an adsorbed, metal-based, molecular gas. Current research has focused primarily on room temperature (monolayer adsorption) BID using electrons and slow, heavy ions. This study investigates low temperature (50 to 200 K) BID in which the condensation of the precursor gases (SnCl _4 and (CH_3) _4Sn) maximizes the efficiency of the incident radiation which can create and remove nonmetallic fragments located several monolayers below the film surface. The desired properties of the residual metallic films are produced by using as incident radiation either nuclear (35 keV Ar ^+) or electronic (2 keV electrons, 25 keV H^+, or 50 keV H ^+) energy loss mechanisms. Residual films are analyzed ex situ by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thickness measurements, resistivity measurements, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and infrared spectroscopy. Low temperature BID film growth models, which are derived from both a computer simulation and a mathematical analysis, closely agree. Both the fragmentation and sputtering cross sections for a particular ion and energy are derived for films created from (CH_3) _4Sn. The fragmentation cross section, which corresponds to film growth, is roughly related to the electronic stopping power by the 1.9 power. The loss of carbon in films which were created from (CH_3) _4Sn is strongly dependent on the nuclear stopping power. Film growth rates for low temperature BID have been found to be 10 times those of room temperature BID.

  6. Localised slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinised dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration of serpentinised ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure; however the extents of strain localisation and unstable frictional sliding are still under debate. Microstructural and mineralogical evidence from dunites of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides demonstrates that prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of large-grained olivine rich in magnetite inclusions. The epitaxial growth of comparatively Fe-poor prograde olivine on Fe-richer relics of primary olivine caused a high variability in Fe-content, even within single crystals. On a larger scale, the average Fe-content of olivine rises towards the vein edges, which reflects a decrease in the degree of initial serpentinisation towards the host rock. The former distribution of serpentine strongly influenced the mechanical response of the rock to the fluid production during deserpentinisation: The faulting caused by the associated dehydration embrittlement occurred along highly localized slip planes in the centres of the meta-serpentinite veins. Around these slip planes, the prograde olivine experienced significant grain size reduction, but very limited shear strain. The strain concentration on narrow faults, also documented by a sharp offset of chromite layers, and the brittle deformation of the surrounding olivine suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. This natural example of deserpentinisation-induced embrittlement illustrates that structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins have first-order controls on strain localisation and frictional sliding. While strain may be distributed during dehydration of a homogeneous serpentinite, as has been observed in recent experimental studies, it may become strongly localised in a heterogeneous rock volume where fluid pressure is locally increased along pre-existing veins. As most of the oceanic lithosphere

  7. Defect-induced semiconductor to metal transition in graphene monoxide.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jungwook; Yun, Kyung-Han; Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-07-14

    This study investigates the influence of point defects on the geometric and electronic structure of graphene monoxide (GMO) via density functional theory calculations. In aspects of defect formation energy, GMOs with oxygen vacancies and bridge interstitial defects are more likely to form when compared to GMOs with defects such as carbon vacancies and hollow interstitial defects. It was also found that the oxygen vacancy or the hollow interstitial defect induces local tensile strain around the defective site and this strain increases the band gap energy of the defective GMO. In addition, the band gaps of GMO with carbon vacancies or bridge interstitial defects decreased mainly due to the dangling bonds, not due to the strain effect. It is noted that the dangling bond derived from the defects forms the defect-level in the band gap of GMO. The semiconductor to metal transition by the band gap change (0-0.7 eV) implies the possibility for band gap engineering of GMO by vacancies and interstitial defects. PMID:24886723

  8. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  9. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  10. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  11. Double Seismic Zones and Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, T.; Yamasaki, T.

    2001-12-01

    Dehydration embrittlement is still an attractive mechanism for intermediate-depth earthquake occurrence. We explore the possibility whether this hypothesis can explain the observed geometry of the double seismic zones. We calculate transient temperature structures of slabs using a finite element method, based on geologically estimated subduction histories for NE Japan, SW Japan, E. Aleutian, N. Chile, Taiwan, and Cape Mendocino, where double zones have been observed. We then delineate the dehydration loci utilizing the phase diagrams of serpentine by Wunder and Schreyer (1997), Bose and Navrotsky (1998) and Ulmer and Trommsdorff (1995), and of meta-basalt by Kerrick and Connolly (2001). For slabs whose crust passes from blueschist to lawsonite-eclogite facies, we take the glaucophane-out boundary as the upper limit of the significant dehydration of meta-basalt. The dehydration loci of serpentine produces a double-layered structure for NE Japan, E. Aleutian, N. Chile, and Taiwan, whose slabs are older than 40 Ma at the trench. In these regions, the lower zone of the double zones can be explained by the lower dehydration locus of serpentine, and the upper zone by that of meta-basalt. The deepest portion of the upper zone might contain the upper dehydration locus of serpentine; however, this occurs only in NE Japan and E. Aleutian. The dehydration loci of serpentine degenerate into a single one in SW Japan and Cape Mendocino whose slabs are younger than 20 Ma at the trench. For these regions, the lower zone of the double zone is explained by the degenerated dehydration locus of serpentine and the upper zone by successive dehydration of meta-basalt from greenschist to dry eclogite facies in the shallow depth. Provided that the oceanic crust is metamorphosed into hydrated minerals at the mid-ocean ridge, the condition for the existence of a double zone is the serpentinization of the subducting oceanic plate at mid-plate depth for a cold slab and at shallow depth for a

  12. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  13. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  14. Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial-Free Steels

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Interstitial-free (IF) steels are defined by their low amounts of solute interstitial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen. During secondary forming, strain can be localized at the grain boundaries of these steels, resulting in secondary cold work embrittlement (CWE).

  15. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  16. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  17. Fano response induced by the interference between localized plasmons and interface reflections in metal-insulator-metal waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Ju; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhai, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The original Fano response induced by the interference between the localized plasmons and interface-reflected surface plasmon polaritons in a single metal-insulator-metal waveguide with two parallel separated metal strips is predicted theoretically through the coupled mode theory combined with the Fano function. The prominent asymmetric line shape resulting from the coupling between the discrete dipole resonance formed between metal strips and an interface-reflected-induced continuum is confirmed by the performed numerical simulations. The novel Fano spectrum is tuned easily by varying the length and coupling distance of metal strips. By introducing another separated metal strip, the outstanding double Fano behavior is obtained, and the corresponding underlying physics is illustrated. In particular, based on the performed refractive index sensing spectra, the high sensitivity of 855 nm/RIU and figure of merit up to 30 are achieved via the double Fano resonance. Undoubtedly, such ingenious structure may benefit the fabrications of nano-integrated plasmonic devices for optical switching and sensing.

  18. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  19. Unusual Cyclodextrin Derivatives as a New Avenue to Modulate Self- and Metal-Induced Aβ Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Valentina; Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Vecchio, Graziella

    2015-09-28

    Mounting evidence suggests an important role of cyclodextrins in providing protection in neurodegenerative disorders. Metal dyshomeostasis is reported to be a pathogenic factor in neurodegeneration because it could be responsible for damage involving oxidative stress and protein aggregation. As such, metal ions represent an effective target. To improve the metal-binding ability of cyclodextrin, we synthesized three new 8-hydroxyquinoline-cyclodextrin conjugates with difunctionalized cyclodextrins. In particular, the 3-difunctionalized regioisomer represents the first example of cyclodextrin with two pendants at the secondary rim, resulting in a promising compound. The derivatives have significant antioxidant capacity and the powerful activity in inhibiting self-induced amyloid-β aggregation seems to be led by synergistic effects of both cyclodextrin and hydroxyquinoline. Moreover, the derivatives are also able to complex metal ions and to inhibit metal-induced protein aggregation. Therefore, these compounds could have potential as therapeutic agents in diseases related to protein aggregation and metal dyshomeostasis. PMID:26298549

  20. Metal-induced generalized pruriginous dermatitis and endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, A; Riambau, V; Serra-Baldrich, E; Camarasa, J G

    2000-07-01

    Metal contact allergy is a common problem in the general population. Diagnostic and therapeutic medical-surgical procedures in which metals can be responsible for eczema are diverse. Endovascular aortic surgery is still an experimental but less invasive technique. A generalized eczematous dermatitis elicited by metal of an endovascular prosthesis is presented. An abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed in a 79-year-old woman. Endoluminal repair with a straight Vanguard endograft was successful. 3 weeks later, she suffered a severe episode of erythema and eczema on the legs. Since then, she complained of continuous pruritus with eczema and excoriated papules. The dermatitis and also the patch test pathology showed eczema. Patch testing was positive to nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride. An endograft semi-quantitative metal analysis was performed with plasma-induction joint mass-spectrometry. The self-expanding metal stent was mainly composed of nickel (approximately 55%) and titanium (21%) with reinforcing thread of platinum. Antimony was detected only in the polyester textile. These results are consistent with Nitinol composition. The need for preoperative patch testing for metals is controversial. Enquiry about metal allergy is recommended before endoluminal surgical procedures. In the near future, the design of endografts must take into account the possibility of this sort of reaction. PMID:10902587

  1. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

  2. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  3. Observations of ``1000{degree}F embrittlement`` in Ni-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, C.P. Jr.; Henry, M.F.

    1996-05-01

    In this study, the effect of cold work and ``low temperature`` thermal exposure on tensile behavior was evaluated. Superalloys Rene 88DT and IN718 were compressed at room temperature to induce cold work in excess of what could be achieved in tension. Tensile tests were performed on the compressed material after subsequent heat treatments. A dramatic increase in strength and significant loss in ductility was observed for material that was compressed 30%, exposed to 538 C and tensile tested at room temperature (compared to as-compressed material). The effect was less dramatic at lower levels of cold work, and subsequent high temperature heat treatments were shown to restore ductility and decrease strength. The mechanism for this 1,000 F embrittlement of highly deformed superalloys is still not known. Environmental embrittlement can be ruled out, since the vacuum results are the same as the air results. It is unlikely that this is the result of precipitation of a phase (carbides or other) on dislocations, since no differences were observed in the exposed and unexposed thin foil and extraction replica samples in TEM. Work is currently underway to investigate a possible role of solute atoms. The data presented here are not inconsistent with strain aging phenomena.

  4. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  6. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  7. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepička, P.; Juřík, P.; Malinský, P.; Macková, A.; Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Švorčík, V.

    2014-08-01

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar+ ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  8. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205). PMID:22014396

  9. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Subramani, Ranjit

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  10. Bulk diffusion induced structural modifications of carbon-transition metal nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.; Abrasonis, G.; Kovacs, Gy. J.; Krause, M.; Munnik, F.; Heller, R.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2011-03-15

    The influence of transition metal (TM = V,Co,Cu) type on the bulk diffusion induced structural changes in carbon:TM nanocomposite films is investigated. The TMs have been incorporated into the carbon matrix via ion beam co-sputtering, and subsequently the films have been vacuum annealed in the temperature range of 300 - 700 deg. C. The structure of both the dispersed metal rich and the carbon matrix phases has been determined by a combination of elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The as-grown films consist of carbidic (V and Co) and metallic (Cu) nanoparticles dispersed in the carbon matrix. Thermal annealing induces surface segregation of Co and Cu starting at {>=} 500 deg. C, preceded by the carbide-metal transformation of Co-carbide nanoparticles at {approx} 300 deg. C. No considerable morphological changes occur in C:V films. In contrast to the surface diffusion dominated regime where all the metals enhance the six-fold ring clustering of C, in the bulk diffusion controlled regime only Co acts as a catalyst for the carbon graphitization. These results are consistent with the metal-induced crystallization mechanism in the C:Co films. The results are discussed on the basis of the metal-carbide phase stability, carbon solubility in metals or their carbides, and interface species.

  11. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed. PMID:26832524

  12. The deformation units in metallic glasses revealed by stress-induced localized glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, L. S.; Ma, J.; Ke, H. B.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-06-01

    We report that even in quasi-static cyclic compressions in the apparent elastic regimes of the bulk metallic glasses, the precisely measured stress-strain curve presents a mechanical hysteresis loop, which is commonly perceived to occur only in high-frequency dynamic tests. A phenomenological viscoelastic model is established to explain the hysteresis loop and demonstrate the evolutions of the viscous zones in metallic glasses during the cyclic compression. The declining of the viscosity of the viscous zones to at least 1 × 1012 Pa s when stress applied indicates that stress-induced localized glass to supercooled liquid transition occurs. We show that the deformation units of metallic glasses are evolved from the intrinsic heterogeneous defects in metallic glasses under stress and the evolution is a manifestation of the stress-induced localized glass transition. Our study might provide a new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of plastic deformation of metallic glasses.

  13. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-04-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam.

  14. Carbon monoxide-induced dynamic metal-surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Carenco, Sophie

    2014-08-18

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule in surface science, materials chemistry, catalysis and nanotechnology. Its interaction with a number of metal surfaces is at the heart of major processes, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or fuel-cell optimization. Recent works, coupling structural and nanoscale in situ analytic tools have highlighted the ability of metal surfaces and nanoparticles to undergo restructuring after exposure to CO under fairly mild conditions, generating nanostructures. This Minireview proposes a brief overview of recent examples of such nanostructuring, which leads to a discussion about the driving force in reversible and non-reversible situations. PMID:25044189

  15. Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Mathias; Ninham, Barry W.; Brevik, Iver; Persson, Clas; Parsons, Drew F.; Sernelius, Bo E.

    2012-06-01

    There is an attractive Casimir-Lifshitz force between two silica surfaces in a liquid (bromobenze or toluene). We demonstrate that adding an ultrathin (5-50 Å) metallic nanocoating to one of the surfaces results in repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces above a critical separation. The onset of such quantum levitation comes at decreasing separations as the film thickness decreases. Remarkably, the effect of retardation can turn attraction into repulsion. From that we explain how an ultrathin metallic coating may prevent nanoelectromechanical systems from crashing together.

  16. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  17. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-01

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices.We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced

  18. Chemical trend of pressure-induced metallization in alkaline earth hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sijia; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2010-09-02

    The pressure-induced metallization of alkaline earth hydrides was systematically investigated using ab initio methods. While BeH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} present different semimetallic phases, CaH{sub 2}, SrH{sub 2}, and BaH{sub 2} share the same metallic phase (P6/mmm). The metallization pressure shows an attractive decrease with each increment of metal radius, and this trend is well correlated with both the electronegativity of alkaline earth metals and the band gap of alkaline earth hydrides at ambient pressure. Our results are consistent with current experimental data, and the obtained trend has significant implications for designing and engineering metallic hydrides for energy applications.

  19. Embrittlement Database from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance capsules of U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors and from experiments in material test reactors. The collected data are contained in either the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) or the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB). The EDB work includes verification of the quality of the EDB, provision for user-friendly software to access and process the data, exploration and/or confirmation of embrittlement prediction models, provision for rapid investigation of regulatory issues, and provision for the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards or regulatory guides. The EDB is designed for use with a personal computer. The data are collected into "raw data files." Traceability of all data is maintained by including complete references along with the page numbers. External data verification of the PR-EDB is the responsibility of the vendors, who were responsible for the insertion and testing of the materials in the surveillance capsules. Internal verification is accomplished by checking against references and checking for inconsistencies. Examples of information contained in the EDBs are: Charpy data, tensile data, reactor type, irradiation environments, fracture toughness data, instrumented Charpy data, pressure-temperature (P-T) data, chemistry data, and material history. The TR-EDB additionally has annealing Charpy data. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the test results from 269 Charpy capsules irradiated in 101 reactors. These results include 320 plate data points, 123 forging data points, 113 standard reference materials (SRMS) or correlation monitor (CM) points, 244 weld material data points, and 220 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) material data points. Similarly, the TR-EDB contains information for 290 SRM or CM points, 342 plate data points, 165 forging data points, 378 welds, and 55 HAZ materials. [copied from http://rsicc.ornl.gov/RelatedLinks.aspx?t=edb

  20. Investigation of gold embrittlement in connector solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine to what extent typical flight connector solder joints may be embrittled by the presence of gold. In addition to mapping of gold content in connector solder joints by an electron microprobe analyzer, metallographic examinations and mechanical tests (thermal shock, vibration, impact and tensile strength) were also conducted. A description of the specimens and tests, a discussion of the data, and some conclusions are presented.

  1. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  2. The effects of tempering reactions on temper embrittlement of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; McMahon, C. J.

    1983-06-01

    The effects of tempering reactions which produce molybdenum-rich carbides on the temper embrittlement of NiCrMo, NiCrMoV, CrMo, and CrMoV steels, particularly embrittlement due to phosphorus segregation, are reviewed. Molybdenum can act as an effective scavenger for phosphorus and other embrittling impurities, but the scavenging is lost when the molybdenum is precipitated in carbides as a result of continued tempering during service at elevated temperatures. This leads to very slow embrittlement, controlled by the rates of alloy carbide formation, rather than by the diffusion of phosphorus, for example. The presence of vanadium apparently retards the embrittlement process even more by interfering with the formation of the molybdenum-rich carbides. Observations of the temper embrittlement behavior, and of the effects of service exposure, in three CrMoV steam turbine rotors are also reported and are shown to be consistent with the previous results.

  3. Structural anisotropy in metallic glasses induced by mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2009-03-06

    We observed structural anisotropy in metallic glasses samples deformed by homogenous mechanical creep and by inhomogeneous compression using high energy X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis indicates bond anisotropy in the first atomic shell. This suggests that mechanical deformation involves rearrangements in a cluster of atoms by a bond reformation.

  4. Double seismic zone and dehydration embrittlement of the subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Seno, Tetsuzo

    2003-04-01

    Dehydration embrittlement of metamorphosed oceanic crust and mantle in the subducting slab may be responsible for the occurrence of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We explore the possibility that this hypothesis can explain the morphology of the double seismic zones observed in northeast Japan, southwest Japan, northeast Taiwan, northern Chile, Cape Mendocino, and eastern Aleutians. We calculate transient temperature structures of slabs based on geologically estimated subduction histories of these regions. We then determine dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentinized mantle using experimentally derived phase diagrams. The depth range of the dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentine is dependent on slab age. The dehydration loci of serpentine produce a double-layered structure. Because the upper dehydration loci of serpentine are mostly located in the wedge mantle above the slab, we regard the upper plane seismicity representing dehydration embrittlement in the oceanic crust, and we fix the slab geometry so that the upper plane seismicity is just below the upper surface of the slab. We find that the lower plane seismicity is located at the lower dehydration loci of serpentine, which indicates that the morphology of the double seismic zones is consistent with the dehydration embrittlement.

  5. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-16

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (∼2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices. PMID:27273622

  6. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  7. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effects of alloy modification were investigated. Results showed that T-111 contains a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss of ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. This appears to occur because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries and this also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; however, most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  10. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) (DuPont) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces for thermal control in the low-Earth orbit environment. Silverized or aluminized Teflon FEP is used for the outer layers of the thermal control blanket because of its high reflectance, low solar absorptance, and high thermal emittance. Teflon FEP is also desirable because, compared with other spacecraft polymers (such as Kapton), it has relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its comparably low atomic oxygen erosion yield, Teflon FEP has been used unprotected in the space environment. Samples of Teflon FEP from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (retrieved during its first servicing mission) were evaluated for solar-induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.