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Sample records for metal induced embrittlement

  1. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  2. Fracture toughness of metallic glasses: annealing-induced embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Rycroft, Chris H; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative understanding of the fracture toughness of metallic glasses, including the associated ductile-to-brittle (embrittlement) transitions, is not yet available. Here, we use a simple model of plastic deformation in glasses, coupled to an advanced Eulerian level set formulation for solving complex free-boundary problems, to calculate the fracture toughness of metallic glasses as a function of the degree of structural relaxation corresponding to different annealing times near the glass temperature. Our main result indicates the existence of an elastoplastic crack tip instability for sufficiently relaxed glasses, resulting in a marked drop in the toughness, which we interpret as annealing-induced embrittlement transition similar to experimental observations. PMID:23215386

  3. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  4. Embrittlement of metal by solute segregation-induced amorphization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Kalia, Rajiv K; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; van Duin, Adri C T; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10(6)-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path. PMID:20481998

  5. Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.-P.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya; Yuan, Zaoshi; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Lu, Gang; Duin, Adri C. T. van

    2010-04-16

    Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10{sup 6}-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics simulations provide the missing link. Namely, an order-of-magnitude reduction of grain-boundary shear strength due to amorphization, combined with tensile-strength reduction, allows the crack tip to always find an easy propagation path.

  6. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, R. P.; Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.; Frohmberg, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement refers to metals stressed while exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere. Tested in air, even after exposure to hydrogen under pressure, this effect is not observed on similar specimens. Much high purity hydrogen is prepared by evaporation of liquid hydrogen, and thus has low levels for potential impurities which could otherwise inhibit or poison the absorbent reactions that are involved. High strength steels and nickel-base allows are rated as showing extreme embrittlement; aluminum alloys and the austenitic stainless steels, as well as copper, have negligible susceptibility to this phenomenon. The cracking that occurs appears to be a surface phenomenon, is unlike that of internal hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. Recent developments in liquid-metal embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews developments in liquid-metal embrittlement of the past 7 years including data on cyclic loading. Embrittlement by solid and liquid metals and by hydrogen has many common features, although the mechanism of embrittler transport differs. Fracture may occur in each type of embrittlement by environmentally assisted shear and by reduced cohesion; embrittlement under cyclic loading has been widely observed, with stress level, temperature, and substrate alloy composition and grain size being the major variables. The degree of embrittlement between any combination of environment (i.e. hydrogen, liquid metal, or solid metal) and substrate depends upon the strength of the interaction with the substrate, the kinetics of embrittler transport, the mutual solubility of embrittler and substrate, and a large number of test and microstructural conditions. A method of calculating the most significant of these variables and the strength of interaction was reviewed and predictions of embrittlement in previously untested couples were made.

  8. Susceptibility of 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel to liquid metal induced embrittlement by lithium-lead solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.A.; Edwards, G.R.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the liquid metal induced embrittlement susceptibility of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to lithium and 1a/o lead-lithium at temperatures between 190/sup 0/C and 525/sup 0/C. This research was part of an ongoing effort to evaluate the compatibility of liquid lithium solutions with potential fusion reactor containment materials. Of particular interest was the microstructure present in a weld heat-affected zone, a microstructure known to be highly susceptible to corrosive attack by liquid lead-lithium solutions. Embrittlement susceptibility was determined by conducting tension tests on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel exposed to an inert environment as well as to a lead-lithium liquid and observing the change in tensile behavior. The 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was also given a base plate heat treatment to observe its embrittlement susceptibility to 1a/o lead-lithium. The base plate microstructure was severely embrittled at temperatures less than 500/sup 0/C. Tempering the base plate was effective in restoring adequate ductility to the steel.

  9. Metal induced embrittlement. [Annual report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, R.G.

    1989-08-31

    This program has been directed at the nature and cause of the severe embrittlement and loss of load carrying, capability that occurs in certain solid metals in contact with some liquid metals. This three-year program began March 1, 1987, and, during its course, has involved a set of fracture mechanics experiments to explore the response of several alloy/liquid metal systems coupled with a more theoretical study consisting of atomic simulation of the crack tip separation process. Some of the information generated in this study is contained in papers published or submitted for publication and accompanying, this report. This report is an overview of information contained in these papers as well as information currently in preparation for publication.

  10. Noble Metals Would Prevent Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, N. E.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    According to proposal, addition of small amounts of noble metals makes iron- and nickel-based alloys less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen. Metallurgists demonstrated adding 0.6 to 1.0 percent by weight of Pd or Pt eliminates stress/corrosion cracking in type 4130 steel. Proposal based on assumption that similar levels (0.5 to 1.0 weight percent) of same elements effective against hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. Critical Crystallization for Embrittlement in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Ketkaew, Jittisa; Liu, Ze; Chen, Wen; Schroers, Jan

    2015-12-31

    We studied the effect of crystallization on the embrittlement of bulk metallic glasses. Specifically, we measured fracture toughness for Zr(44)Ti(11)Cu(10)Ni(10)Be(25) and Pd(43)Cu(27)Ni(10)P(20) after annealing at various times to introduce controlled volume fraction of crystallization. We found that crystallization of up to ∼6% by volume does not measurably affect fracture toughness. When exceeding ∼6%, a dramatic drop in fracture toughness occurs; an additional 1% of crystallization reduces fracture toughness by 50%. Such a dramatic transition can be explained by the interaction among the crystals' stress fields in the amorphous matrix that becomes effective at ∼7% crystallinity. Our findings of a critical crystallization for embrittlement of metallic glasses help in designing tough metallic glasses and their composites, as well as defining processing protocols for the unique thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses to avoid embrittlement. PMID:26765004

  12. Critical Crystallization for Embrittlement in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkaew, Jittisa; Liu, Ze; Chen, Wen; Schroers, Jan

    2015-12-01

    We studied the effect of crystallization on the embrittlement of bulk metallic glasses. Specifically, we measured fracture toughness for Zr44Ti11Cu10Ni10Be25 and Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 after annealing at various times to introduce controlled volume fraction of crystallization. We found that crystallization of up to ˜6 % by volume does not measurably affect fracture toughness. When exceeding ˜6 % , a dramatic drop in fracture toughness occurs; an additional 1% of crystallization reduces fracture toughness by 50%. Such a dramatic transition can be explained by the interaction among the crystals' stress fields in the amorphous matrix that becomes effective at ˜7 % crystallinity. Our findings of a critical crystallization for embrittlement of metallic glasses help in designing tough metallic glasses and their composites, as well as defining processing protocols for the unique thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses to avoid embrittlement.

  13. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  14. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Michael A; Schuh, Christopher A

    2016-03-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  15. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  16. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  17. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  18. The role of a bilayer interfacial phase on liquid metal embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cheng, Huikai; Asl, Kaveh Meshinchi; Kiely, Christopher J; Harmer, Martin P

    2011-09-23

    Intrinsically ductile metals are prone to catastrophic failure when exposed to certain liquid metals, but the atomic-level mechanism for this effect is not fully understood. We characterized a model system, a nickel sample infused with bismuth atoms, by using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and observed a bilayer interfacial phase that is the underlying cause of embrittlement. This finding provides a new perspective for understanding the atomic-scale embrittlement mechanism and for developing strategies to control the practically important liquid metal embrittlement and the more general grain boundary embrittlement phenomena in alloys. This study further demonstrates that adsorption can induce a coupled grain boundary structural and chemical phase transition that causes drastic changes in properties. PMID:21940889

  19. Multiscale modelling of gallium induced embrittlement in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogireddy, Venkata Sai Pavan Kumar; Todorova, Mira; Spatschek, Robert; Neugebauer, Jörg

    Liquid metal embrittlement is a degradation phenomenon in which a solid metal undergoes brittle failure when it is stressed while in contact with a liquid metal. The transition from ductile to brittle metal failure manifests itself by rapid crack propagations which reduces the elongation to failure ratio. Combining density functional theory calculations with continuum methods, we study the liquid metal embrittlement of aluminium in contact with gallium. Comparing ab initio calculated energies for a Σ 3 and a Σ 5 Al grain boundary and their corresponding surface energies in the presence and absence of Ga, we identify critical Ga concentrations which result in a weakening of the mechanical strength of aluminium. Parametrising the DFT results in continuum model we obtain the concentration as a function of the strain in the system. In a final step we extend this approach and compute the stress field induced by cracks in bulk and at grain boundaries. The stress field explains the large segregation of gallium atoms at the crack tip and the crack tip's subsequent propagation.

  20. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  1. Zn Penetration in Liquid Metal Embrittled TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Heeseung; Cho, Lawrence; Lee, Changwook; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Hot-dip Zn-coated high manganese twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel is sensitive to liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The microstructure of Zn-coated TWIP steel after brittle fracture at 1123 K (850 °C) was investigated. The grain boundaries at the tip of the Zn penetration were analyzed by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Γ-(Fe,Mn)3Zn10 was found at the tip of the Zn penetration in the TWIP steel, implying that liquid Fe- and Mn-saturated Zn-rich alloy had percolated along the grain boundaries to the tip of the Zn penetration. Evidence for extensive Zn grain boundary diffusion ahead of the Zn-rich alloy percolation path was also observed. Both the Stoloff-Johnson-Westwood-Kamdar model and the Krishtal-Gordon-An model for LME crack formation are compatible with the present in-depth microanalysis of the Zn penetration.

  2. Factors Affecting Liquid-Metal Embrittlement in C-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R.; Lampson, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of weld cracks on Space Shuttle control thrustors point toward better understanding of cracking problem in columbium metal, which has also plagued nonaerospace users. Although liquid-metal embrittlement is known to be cause of problem, factors affecting growth and severity of cracks are not well understood. New results tie crack growth to type of contaminants present, grain size and level of stress present while welding is done.

  3. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals and its control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed together with characteristics of hydrogen-environment embrittlement, the degree of hydrogen-environment embrittlement of a wide variety of alloys, the effect of hydrogen environments on various properties, (tension, fatigue, creep and fracture mechanics), and the influence of hydrogen exposure parameters on the degree of embrittlement. Design methods for high-pressure hydrogen service and for prevention of hydrogen-environment embrittlement are also covered.

  4. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  5. Moisture-induced embrittlement of Fe sub 3 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; DeVan, J.H.; Sikka, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent tests at ORNL indicate that the ductility of iron aluminides is very sensitive to the test environment. It is believed that the loss of ductility observed in moist air environments is associated with a hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon as a result of dissociation of water vapor and the intake of atomic hydrogen into the aluminide matrix. This possibility will be investigated in a series of tests under controlled environmental conditions. Compact specimens will be tested under controlled stress intensity conditions. Crack growth rates as a function of the applied stress intensity will be measured with the direct-current potential drop technique. Initial tests will be conducted in moist air and in vacuum at room temperature. In an additional series of tests the temperature of the moist air will be varied to permit the determination of an activation energy for the embrittlement process. Fractographic examination of the fracture surfaces will also be performed. It is anticipated that this series of test will increase our understanding of the environmentally-induced embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Simulation of He embrittlement at grain boundaries in bcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake

    2015-10-01

    To investigate what atomic properties largely determine vulnerability to He embrittlement at grain boundaries (GB) of bcc metals, we introduce a computational model composed of first principles density functional theory and a He segregation rate theory model. Predictive calculations of He embrittlement at the first wall of the future DEMO fusion concept reactor indicate that variation in the He embrittlement originated not only from He production rate related to neutron irradiation, but also from the He segregation energy at the GB that has a systematic trend in the periodic table.

  7. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  8. Moisture-induced delayed spallation and interfacial hydrogen embrittlement of alumina scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2006-01-01

    While interfacial sulfuris the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Alalloy+3(H2O)air=Al(OH)- 3+3H+ may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized René N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  9. Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    While interfacial sulfur is the primary chemical factor affecting Al2O3 scale adhesion, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but impressive, mechanistic detail. Similarities with bulk metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al(sub alloy)+3(H2O)(sub air) = Al(OH)(-) (sub 3) +3H(+) may be the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested on pre-oxidized Rene N5 by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, as monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the acid electrolyte produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. Thus, hydrogen charging was detrimental to alumina scale adhesion. Moisture-induced interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is concluded to be the cause of delayed scale spallation and desktop thermal barrier coating failures.

  10. Small punch test evaluation of neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a Cr-Mo low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.-H. . E-mail: shsonguk@yahoo.co.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Marmy, P.; Weng, L.-Q.

    2004-09-15

    Neutron-irradiation-induced embrittlement of a 2.25Cr1Mo steel is investigated by means of small punch testing along with scanning electron microscopy. There is an apparent irradiation-induced embrittlement effect after the steel is irradiated at about 400 deg. C for 86 days with a neutron dose rate of 1.75x10{sup -8} dpa/s. The embrittlement is mainly nonhardening embrittlement caused by impurity grain boundary segregation.

  11. A Grain Boundary Fracture Model for Predicting Dynamic Embrittlement and Oxidation-Induced Cracking in Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are sometimes susceptible to oxygen embrittlement in the form of dynamic embrittlement or oxidation-induced grain boundary cracking during services at elevated temperatures. Dynamic embrittlement is a fracture process that involves the ingress and diffusion of atomic oxygen to induce time-dependent decohesion of grain boundaries. A related fracture process, also a time-dependent process, is stress-accelerated grain boundary oxidation and oxide-induced cracking along grain boundaries. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to treat both dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in Ni-based superalloys. The model is utilized to assess: (1) the conditions where dynamic embrittlement are dominant, (2) the conditions where oxidation-induced crack growth are dominant, and (3) the role of oxidation in suppressing dynamic embrittlement in Ni-based superalloys. For illustration, the grain boundary fracture model is applied to predict the onset of dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in superalloys such as IN 718.

  12. Lithiation-induced embrittlement of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zheng, He; Liu, Xiao Hua; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Jiangwei; Kushima, Akihiro; Hudak, Nicholas S; Huang, Xu; Zhang, Sulin; Mao, Scott X; Qian, Xiaofeng; Li, Ju; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-09-27

    Lithiation of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was conducted in situ inside a transmission electron microscope. Upon lithiation, the intertube spacing increased from 3.4 to 3.6 Å, corresponding to about 5.9% radial and circumferential expansions and ∼50 GPa tensile hoop stress on the outermost tube wall. The straight tube walls became distorted after lithiation. In situ compression and tension tests show that the lithiated MWCNTs were brittle with sharp fracture edges. Such a failure mode is in stark contrast with that of the pristine MWCNTs which are extremely flexible and fail in a "sword-in-sheath" manner upon tension. The lithiation-induced embrittlement is attributed to the mechanical effect of a "point-force" action posed by the intertubular lithium that induces the stretch of carbon-carbon bonds in addition to that by applied strain, as well as the chemical effect of electron transfer from lithium to the antibonding π orbital that weakens the carbon-carbon bond. The combined mechanical and chemical weakening leads to a considerable decrease of the fracture strain in lithiated MWCNTs. Our results provide direct evidence and understanding of the degradation mechanism of carbonaceous anodes in lithium ion batteries. PMID:21819128

  13. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  14. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1993-04-15

    The effect in ambient air the tensile and fatigue behavior of an Fe{sub 3}Al, Cr type intermetallic alloy is examined as a function of test temperature. Hydrogen due to moisture in the air is found to be a major cause of embrittlement. Rates and mechanisms of observed embrittlement appear to be temperature dependent. In addition, the alloy was found to have no notch sensitivity.

  15. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  16. Moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-04-01

    FeAl alloys {ge}24 at. %Al are H embrittled by both H2 gas and water vapor. This examines effect of H embrittlement by H2 gas and moisture-bearing air on tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance of two ordered FeAl intermetallic alloys (28, 36 at. % Al) and one disordered Fe-Al alloy (16 at. % Al). Susceptibility to embrittlement varies with both Al content and ordered state. Tensile ductility of disordered low Al alloy is not affected by moisture-bearing air, and fatigue crack growth resistance is affected only slightly by moisture. However, the higher Al alloys are severely embrittled by moisture-bearing air. Oxidation of Al with concurrent release of H2 is responsible for embrittlement of Fe3Al alloys. It is likely that the smaller amount of Al available for the oxidation reaction in the 16at. % alloy precludes such embrittling reactions. In contrast, H2 is found to be embrittling to all alloys in both cyclic and monotonic tests. Fractography shows that H2 preferentially attacks cleavage planes in these alloys. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance in an inert environment of the low Al disordered alloy is found to be much lower than that for the high Al alloys. Fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment can be expressed as superposed mechanical fatigue and corrosion-fatigue components. Fatigue crack growth tests in inert and embrittling environments are used to isolate corrosion fatigue of the crack growth rate in Fe-28at. %Al. The corrosion-fatigue component displays a frequency dependence: At lower frequencies, more time is available for penetration of H ahead of the crack tip. H transport in the Fe-Al alloys occurs primarily by dislocation-assisted transport, which allows for penetration depths of 10-100x the distance that can be achieved by bulk diffusion. An equation is developed for the corrosion-fatigue component of crack growth rate which includes stress intensity range and frequency dependence.

  17. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  18. Lattice defects affecting moisture-induced embrittlement of Ni-based L1{sub 2} ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, T.; Hanada, S.

    1997-12-31

    Moisture-induced embrittlement of L1{sub 2} alloys (such as Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) and Ni{sub 3}Al) is observed by tensile test and SEM fractography. A variety of microstructures were prepared by selecting pre-deformation and heat treatment conditions. It is shown that tensile ductility and the associated fractography depend on structure as well as test atmosphere. Well-annealed specimens are susceptible to moisture-induced embrittlement while pre-deformed specimens are resistive to moisture-induced embrittlement. Also, this embrittlement is generally sensitive to the heat treatment scheme preceded by the pre-deformation. Results indicate that the embrittlement occurs when hydrogen is enriched on grain boundaries. On the other hand, the embrittlement can be suppressed when hydrogen is trapped at lattice defects such as dislocations and vacancies. These results are discussed in association with the kinetics of hydrogen in the pre-deformed microstructure.

  19. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C. ); Begley, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  20. Evaluation of liquid metal embrittlement of SS304 by Cd and Cd-Al solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Begley, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    The susceptibility of stainless steel 304 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) by cadmium (Cd) and cadmium-aluminum (Cd-Al) solutions was examined as part of a failure evaluation for SS304-clad cadmium reactor safety rods which had been exposed to elevated temperatures. The active, or cadmium (Cd) bearing, portion of the safety rod consists of a 0.756 in. diameter aluminum allow (Al-6061) core, a 0.05 in. thick Cd layer, and a 0.042 in. thick Type 304 stainless steel cladding. The safety rod thermal tests were conducted as part of a program to define the response of reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor. LME was considered as a potential failure mechanism based on the nature of the failure and susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to embrittlement by other liquid metals.

  1. Rapid Relaxation and Embrittlement of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Electropulsing

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, P; Chen, Y. C.; Chu, J. P.; Chang, S Y; Bei, Hongbin; Jang, J. S.C.; Hsueh, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical relaxation and embrittlement of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glasses were achieved rapidly by the direct current electropulsing treatment. The temperature profile was recorded by an infrared camera and it was found to be non-uniform in the treated specimen. Specifically, temperatures below the glass transition temperature, near and above the crystallization temperature could be ach- ieved, respectively, at different locations in the same treated specimen. Two sets of nanoindentation were conducted. While the first set investigated the mechanical properties of three individually elec- tropulsed specimens with different conditions, the second set indented a single treated specimen along its temperature gradient. Both sets of indentation revealed that by Joule heating to different tempera- tures, relaxation, embrittlement, and crystallization were significantly accelerated by electrical pulses. Results suggest that electropulsing provides an opportunity to simultaneously achieve plastic forming and mechanical property control of metallic glasses.

  2. Hydrogen-environment embrittlement of metals: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Frohmber, R. P.; Lewett, R. P.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Walter, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Study includes extensive tests examining effects of hydrogen environment on different high-strength metals and alloys. Recommendations for preventing metal failure include use of hydrogen-resistant coatings and inhibitors. Study includes references to related investigations and discussion of work in progress.

  3. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  5. Effect of alloying additions on the hydrogen-induced grain boundary embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Tian, Z X; Yan, J X; Hao, W; Xiao, W

    2011-01-12

    Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the influence of Mo, V and Pd on the H-induced grain boundary embrittlement in Fe. We find that, in the high impurity concentration systems, all of the three alloying elements facilitate H embrittlement at the Σ3 (111) [Formula: see text] grain boundary in Fe. The calculated binary effects of the H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) couples are 0.063, 0.074 and 0.040 eV, respectively. On the other hand, in the large unit cell with low impurity concentration, both Mo and V can facilitate H embrittlement, and the binary effects of pairs are 0.152 and 0.164 eV, respectively. While Pd reduces the H embrittlement on the cohesion of the Fe grain boundary with the binary effect of - 0.1 eV. The H-X (X = Mo, V, Pd) interactions are interpreted by electronic structure analyses. PMID:21406825

  6. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1994-04-19

    Alloy FA-129 undergoes an increase in crack propagation rate and a loss of fracture toughness in moisture-bearing and hydrogen gas environments. A similar effect is seen on ductility of FA-129 in tensile tests. The embrittling effect in air is attributed to oxidation of aluminum in the alloy by water vapor to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrogen gas. Alloy FAP-Y, which is disordered and contains only 16 a%Al is embrittled by hydrogen gas in a manner similar to that of FA-129. However, laboratory air had little effect on the crack growth rates, fracture toughness, or tensile ductility. The lower aluminum content apparently is insufficient to induce the Al-H{sub 2}O reaction. TEM and SEM analyses of microstructure and fracture surfaces were consistent with the change in fracture toughness with order and environment. Testing at elevated temperatures reduces crack growth rates in FA-129, and increases fracture toughness and ductility. This is consistent with the well documented peak in hydrogen embrittlement in structural alloys at or near room temperature. Elevated temperature affects the degree of embrittlement in a complex manner, possibly changing the rates of several of the processes involved.

  7. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  8. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  9. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey themore » empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.« less

  10. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson's ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a "mechanical probe" of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip. PMID:26435318

  11. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300 °C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip. PMID:26435318

  12. On the correlation between microscopic structural heterogeneity and embrittlement behavior in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-05

    To establish a relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties, we systematically annealed a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) at 100 ~ 300°C and measured their mechanical and thermal properties. The as-cast BMG exhibits some ductility, while the increase of annealing temperature and time leads to the transition to a brittle behavior that can reach nearly-zero fracture energy. The differential scanning calorimetry did not find any significant changes in crystallization temperature and enthalpy, indicating that the materials still remained fully amorphous. Elastic constants measured by ultrasonic technique vary only slightly with respect to annealing temperature and time, which does obey the empirical relationship between Poisson’s ratio and fracture behavior. Nanoindentation pop-in tests were conducted, from which the pop-in strength mapping provides a “mechanical probe” of the microscopic structural heterogeneities in these metallic glasses. Based on stochastically statistic defect model, we found that the defect density decreases with increasing annealing temperature and annealing time and is exponentially related to the fracture energy. A ductile-versus-brittle behavior (DBB) model based on the structural heterogeneity is developed to identify the physical origins of the embrittlement behavior through the interactions between these defects and crack tip.

  13. Sulfur-induced embrittlement of nickel: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-09-01

    We study the embrittlement of Ni due to the presence of S impurities, considering their effect in the bulk and at grain boundaries (GBs). For bulk Ni, we employ Rice's theory based on generalized-stacking-fault energetics and the unstable stacking energy criterion. We use first-principles density-functional-theory calculations to determine the ductility parameter D = γs/γus, the ratio of the surface energy γs to the unstable stacking energy γus, for bulk Ni with substitutional S impurities. Similar arguments based on Rice's theory for the mechanical properties of GBs are invoked. We study the Σ5(0 1 2) GB with interstitial S impurities, in which case D is defined as the ratio of the work of separation Ws and the unstable stacking energy γus, to model the competition between grain decohesion and shear-induced plastic deformation due to grain boundary sliding (GBS). The presence of S impurities is found to increase the value of D by ˜40% in bulk Ni, but reduces it by over 80% for the GB. These results support earlier suggestions that embrittlement of Ni by S impurities is related to their effect on GBs. We further calculate relevant tensile and shear stresses to study the expected fracture mode and find that intergranular crack propagation accommodated by GBS is inhibited in the system considered here.

  14. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  15. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  16. Transmission electron microscopic observations of embrittlement of an aluminum alloy by liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.M.; Su, Y.J.; Qiao, L.J.; Chu, W.Y.

    1999-09-01

    Change in dislocation configuration ahead of a loaded crack tip of Al alloy 7075 (UNS A97075) before and after adsorbing Hg-3at% Ga atoms, and initiation of liquid-metal-induced microcracking have been observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using a special TEM constant-deflection device with precracked foil. Results showed that chemisorption of liquid metal atoms can facilitate dislocation emission multiplication and motion. A microcrack initiated in the dislocation free zone or at the crack tip and propagated by a cleavage made when the chemisorption-facilitated local plasticity developed to a critical level.

  17. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  18. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  19. Mercury embrittlement of Cu-Al alloys under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, T. M.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mercury on the room temperature, high cycle fatigue properties of three alloys: Cu-5.5 pct Al, Cu-7.3 pct Al, and Cu-6.3 pct Al-2.5 pct Fe has been determined. Severe embrittlement under cyclic loading in mercury is associated with rapid crack propagation in the presence of the liquid metal. A pronounced grain size effect is noted under mercury, while fatigue properties in air are insensitive to grain size. The fatigue results are discussed in relation to theories of adsorption-induced liquid metal embrittlement.

  20. Hydrogen environment embrittlement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  1. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of welded MANET II (DIN 1.4914) in liquid Pb17Li.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, T.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.

    1996-10-01

    TIG welding of 12 mm thick plates of MANET II steel was accomplished using filler material of the same composition. Tensile tests, at a constant displacement rate of 0.1 mm min -1 (corresponding to an initial strain rate of 1.1 × 10 -4 s -1), were carried out on specimens consisting solely of the weld, HAZ and bulk material under vacuum and liquid Pb17Li at 250 and 400°C. The post-weld heat treatment (750°C/4 h air cooled) which was given to the welded plates was sufficient to prevent any liquid metal embrittlement. The presence of oxide inclusions and pores in the weld reduced the extent of plastic strain at rupture exhibited by some of the welds.

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility and Hydrogen-Induced Additive Stress of 7050 Aluminum Alloy Under Various Aging States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, W. J.; Song, R. G.; Qi, X.; Li, H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, C.; Jin, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of 7050 aluminum alloy under various aging states has been investigated by means of cathodic hydrogen permeation, slow strain rate test, hydrogen determinator, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscope, and effect of hydrogen on atomic binding force of charged alloy has been calculated by free electron theory in this paper. Simultaneously, hydrogen-induced additive stress (σad) of 7050 aluminum alloy hydrogen charged with different current densities under various aging states have been investigated by flowing stress differential method. The results showed that hydrogen concentration of examined alloy increased with increasing charging time or current density under the same aging state. Hydrogen segregation occurred at grain boundaries which enlarged the crystal lattice constant, meanwhile, it reduced the average bonding energy and interatomic bonding force of the grain boundary atoms, thus resulting in hydrogen embrittlement; moreover, σad of 7050 aluminum alloy increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration under the same aging state, i.e., under aged: σad = -1.61 + 9.93 × 105 C H, peak aged: σad = -1.55 + 9.67 × 105 C H, over aged: σad = -0.16 + 9.35 × 105 C H, correspondingly, σad increased the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement ( I HE) further. Under the same charging condition, aging states had a great influence on σad and I HE, the under-aged state alloy was of the highest, the over-aged state alloy was of the lowest, and peak-aged was in the middle.

  3. Environment-induced embrittlement: effect of impurity segregation and state of stress. Technical progress report, 1 January 1982-30 June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reviewed for a research program directed at understanding environmentally-induced embrittlement primarily from two standpoints: (a) the effects of grain-boundary orientation and chemistry on intergranular hydrogen embrittlement and (b) the influence of the state of stress on both hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). During the period the program has examined: (1) the effects of grain-boundary misorientation on intergranular segregation and HE of Ni bicrystals, (2) the influence of multiaxial deformation on the HE of polycrystalline Ni sheet, (3) the HE of Zircaloy 2 sheet under multiaxial states of stress, (4) the SCC of Admiralty brass under slow strain-rate, multiaxial deformation, and (5) the SCC behavior of alpha-beta brass.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement Understood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sofronis, P.; Nagao, A.; Martin, M. L.; Wang, S.; Gross, D. W.; Nygren, K. E.

    2015-06-01

    The connection between hydrogen-enhanced plasticity and the hydrogen-induced fracture mechanism and pathway is established through examination of the evolved microstructural state immediately beneath fracture surfaces including voids, "quasi-cleavage," and intergranular surfaces. This leads to a new understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in which hydrogen-enhanced plasticity processes accelerate the evolution of the microstructure, which establishes not only local high concentrations of hydrogen but also a local stress state. Together, these factors establish the fracture mechanism and pathway.

  5. Influence of the chemical composition of Al-based amorphous alloys on thermally induced embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova, E. A.; Maksimov, V. V.; Rassolov, S. G.; Nosenko, V. K.; Tkach, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Structural changes of rapidly cooled ribbons of the amorphous alloys Al88-86(Ni,Co,Fe)6-8(Y,Gd,Nd,La)5-6, which occur during heating at a rate of 10 K/min and lead to a loss of ductility, have been investigated experimentally. It has been shown that samples of the studied alloys are divided into two groups, in the first of which the loss of ductility is due to the formation of a nanocomposite structure, whereas the embrittlement of samples in the second group is caused by processes of structural relaxation in the amorphous phase (decrease in the concentration of a free volume). It has been established for the first time that there is an empirical correlation between the dynamic temperature, after heating to which the alloys lose their ductility at room temperature, and the ratio of the shear modulus to the elastic modulus of the alloys, which is calculated from the nominal chemical composition.

  6. Embrittlement proof nickel-alloy bellows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Thin cover of corrosion-resistant steel (CRES) protects metal bellows and ducts against hydrogen embrittlement. Bellow current carries hydrogen at high pressure and currently is used in the engine of Space Shuttle.

  7. Recent work on environmental embrittlement in silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Peng, J.; Wang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reviewed the recent progress in the environmental embrittlement of silicide. On the surface of silicides, the Si in the silicides such as Fe{sub 3}(Si,Al) alloy reacts with both oxygen and water vapor more easy than with iron. A molecular hydrogen mechanism of surface reaction, i.e., Si + 2H{sub 2}O = SiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}, can be derived. The moisture-induced embrittlement of silicides can be considered to be an embrittlement in a localized high pressure molecular hydrogen condition. It is a kinetic hydrogen gas embrittlement. Silicides may have more severely intrinsic brittleness than iron aluminides due to their special electronic structure and bonding mechanism, leading to elucidate the role of environment on ductility with difficulty. The improvement of both the intrinsic brittleness and moisture-induced embrittlement are critical for the development of silicides.

  8. Nondestructive detection and measurement of hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Alex, Franklin; Byrne, Joseph Gerald

    1977-01-01

    A nondestructive system and method for the determination of the presence and extent of hydrogen embrittlement in metals, alloys, and other crystalline structures subject thereto. Positron annihilation characteristics of the positron-electron annihilation within the tested material provide unique energy distribution curves for each type of material tested at each respective stage of hydrogen embrittlement. Gamma radiation resulting from such annihilation events is detected and statistically summarized by appropriate instrumentation to reveal the variations of electron activity within the tested material caused by hydrogen embrittlement therein. Such data from controlled tests provides a direct indication of the relative stages of hydrogen embrittlement in the form of unique energy distribution curves which may be utilized as calibration curves for future comparison with field tests to give on-site indication of progressive stages of hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  10. Testing for hydrogen embrittlement: Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure, so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. Three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered: (1) the original location and form of the hydrogen, (2) the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point where it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and (3) the embrittlement interaction itself. A few secondary influences on the embrittlement process are also discussed.

  11. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  12. Identical mechanism of isochronal and isothermal embrittlement in Ni(Bi) alloy: Thermo-induced non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation of Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lei; Chellali, Reda; Schlesiger, Ralf; Meng, Ye; Baither, Dietmar; Schmitz, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Isochronal and isothermal plasticity after thermal pre-treatments are obtained by tensile tests to characterize the embrittling behaviors of Ni(Bi) alloy. Both isochronal and isothermal plasticity show evident minima. Fractography observed by scanning electron microscopy displays intergranular fracture for samples of low plasticity. The microstructure is found to be free of precipitates within grains and at grain boundaries by focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy. Atom probe analysis indicates a strong tendency of Bi segregation to grain boundaries. By these results, the existing interpretations are discussed to be inadequate and both embrittlement are confirmed to be identical in mechanism, i.e. thermo-induced non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation of Bi.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  14. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  15. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  16. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of V-Ti-Ni and V-Ni alloys in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F.A.; Pawel, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    Vanadium, V-1Ni, V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni (at %) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels strongly elevated the ductile to brittle transition temperature. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces leads to strong increases in the density of the alloy.

  17. NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING AND EMBRITTLEMENT OF PURE IRON AND PURE NICKEL IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 AND BOR-60 FAST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Krasnoselov, V. A.; Porollo, S. I.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-09-01

    Pure iron and nickel were irradiated to very high exposures in two fast reactors, BOR-60 and BN-350. It appears that both nickel and iron exhibit a transient-dominated swelling behavior in the range of 2 to 15x10-7 dpa/sec, with the shortest transient at approximately 500 C in nickel, but at less than 350 C for iron. It also appears that the duration of the transient regime may be dependent on the dpa rate. When the two metals are irradiated at 345-355 C, it is possible to obtain essentially the same swelling level, but the evolution of mechanical properties is quite different. The differences reflect the fact that iron is subject to a low-temperature embrittlement arising from a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature, while nickel is not. Nickel, however, exhibits high temperature embrittlement, thought to arise from the collection of helium gas at the grain boundaries. Iron generates much less helium during equivalent irradiation.

  18. Estimate of Radiation-Induced Steel Embrittlement in the BWR Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade MOX/UOX Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Lisa R.

    2002-07-01

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 - 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased {sup 239}Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. The primary conclusion of this research was that the addition of the maximum fraction of 1/3 MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. (author)

  19. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Experimental variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, gas purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  20. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Primary and secondary influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    A somewhat phenomological overview of the hydrogen embrittlement process, both internal as well as external, is presented in a effort to make more clear the type of parameters which must be considered in the selection of a test method and test procedure so that the resulting data may be meaningfully applied to real engineering structures. What are believed to be the three primary influences on the embrittlement process are considered - the original location and form of the hydrogen, the transport reactions involved in the transport of hydrogen from its origin to some point it can interact with the metal to cause embrittlement, and the embrittlement interaction itself. Additionally, a few of the large number of secondary influences on the embrittlement process are discussed, for example, the influence of impurity species in the environment, surface hydride films, and surface oxide films.

  1. Role of Hf and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the hydrogen embrittlement of aged Ta alloy T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and similar Ta and Cb alloys. It is found that aging ternary Ta alloys such as T-111 near 1040 C for 1000 hr or longer increases their sensitivity to low-temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Segregation of Hf to grain boundaries during aging causes embrittlement upon testing at -196 C and is responsible for the observed hydrogen embrittlement. Binary Ta and Cb alloys, Ta-2Hf and Cb-1Zr, are not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under the conditions of this study and did not exhibit grain boundary segregation of Hf or Zr. Ternary alloys Ta-8W-.5Hf, Ta-8W-1Hf, and Ta-4W-2Hf are superior to T-111 for containment of alkali metals in that they do not exhibit aging embrittlement. However, these alloys in the aged condition are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement.

  2. Fast Quenching For Hydrogen-Embrittlement Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, Mark J.; Burkhart, Richard L.; Koncel, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus exposes hot metal specimens in hydrogen atmospheres to sudden cooling. Heater surrounds pressure vessel initially. On command, heater slides downward on track, exposing vessel. Spray bar falls over vessel and directs high-pressure jets of cold water at it. Developed to evaluate susceptibilities of specimens to embrittlement by hydrogen. Cools specimens by 1,050 degrees F (580 degrees C) in 160 seconds.

  3. Microstructure and embrittlement of the fine-grained heat-affected zone of ASTM4130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Ying; Wang, Yong; Han, Tao; Li, Chao-Wen

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructure features of the fine-grained heat-affected zone (FGHAZ) of ASTM4130 steel was investigated by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and welding thermal simulation test. It is found that serious embrittlement occurs in the FGHAZ with an 81.37% decrease of toughness, compared with that of the base metal. Microstructure analysis reveals that the FGHAZ is mainly composed of acicular, equiaxed ferrite, granular ferrite, martensite, and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. The FGHAZ embrittlement is mainly induced by granular ferrite because of carbides located at its boundaries and sub-boundaries. Meanwhile, the existence of martensite and M-A constituent, which distribute in a discontinuous network, is also detrimental to the mechanical properties.

  4. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  5. Mechanisms of Metal-Induced Centrosome Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to toxic and carcinogenic metals is widespread; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. One potential mechanism for metal-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity is centrosome amplification. Here, we review the mechanisms for metal-induced centrosome amplification, including arsenic, chromium, mercury and nano-titanium dioxide. PMID:21118148

  6. A Mechanical Study of T91 Embrittlement by Liquid Lead-bismuth Eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Hamouche, Zehoua; Auger, Thierry; Guillot, Ivan

    2008-07-01

    The susceptibility of liquid metal embrittlement of the T91 martensitic steel is investigated from slow deformation rate (6.67x10{sup -8} m.s{sup -1}) to high deformation rate (6.67x10{sup -3} m.s{sup -1}), using a Center Cracked in Tension geometry. Brittle fracture, characterized by elongated river cracks on all the fracture surfaces, indicates that T91 is sensitive to the Embrittlement by LBE. This embrittlement effect is very marked at the low deformation rate ({approx}10{sup -5} mm.s{sup -1}). A ductile-brittle transition is observed in the high strain rate range investigated. In this transition regime, there is a competition between the growth of dimples and the cracking induced by the liquid metal. Ductility recovery is complete at the highest investigated displacement rate. This dependence of T91/LBE susceptibility to LME on the displacement rate and the brittle to ductile transition at high strain rate is confirmed by a fracture mechanics analysis. (authors)

  7. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  8. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-21

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  9. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated highly embrittled steel and intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; McCabe, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated a submerged-arc (SA) weld irradiated to a high level of embrittlement and a temper embrittled base metal that exhibits significant intergranular fracture (IGF) relative to representation by the Master Curve. The temper embrittled steel revealed that the intergranular mechanism significantly extended the transition temperature range up to 150 C above To. For the irradiated highly embrittled SA weld study, a total of 21 1T compact specimens were tested at five different temperatures and showed the Master Curve to be nonconservative relative to the results, although that observation is uncertain due to evidence of intergranular fracture.

  10. Recent advances in the study of hydrogen embrittlement at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M. ,; Liang, Y.; Teter, D. F.; Aravas, N.; Sofronis, Petros,

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at the University of Illinois on the fundamental mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement. Our approach combines experimental and theoretical methods. We describe the theoretical work on hydride formation and its application to hydrogen embrittlement of Ti alloys through the stress-induced hydride formation and cleavage mechanism, the localization of shear due to solute hydrogen, and finally, we present experimental evidence that favors the decohesion mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in a P-Ti alloy.

  11. A comparison of internal hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen environment embrittlement of X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.

    1999-12-01

    Hydrogen has been shown to degrade the mechanical properties of nickel-base alloys. This degradation occurs whether the material is in a hydrogen producing environment or if the material has dissolved hydrogen in the metal due to prior exposure to hydrogen. Materials behave differently under these two conditions. Therefore, the degradation due to hydrogen has been split into two categories, internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE). IHE may be defined as the embrittlement of a material that has been charged with hydrogen prior to testing or service while HEE may be defined by the embrittlement of a material in a hydrogen environment where the hydrogen may come from gaseous hydrogen or generated from a corrosion reaction. This work will compare IHE and HEE of fracture mechanics specimens. Different fugacities of hydrogen for HEE and hydrogen concentrations for IHE were examined for Alloy X-750, a nickel-base super alloy. The test results were analyzed and the role of hydrogen in IHE and HEE was evaluated. A model based on a critical grain boundary hydrogen concentration will be proposed to describe the behavior in both HEE and IHE conditions.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement and Its Control in Hydrogen-Fueled Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    The nature of hydrogen embrittlement by high pressure gaseous hydrogen is described and methods of designing SSME gaseous hydrogen systems, including techniques of hydrogen embrittlement prevention, are discussed. The effects of gaseous hydrogen environments are emphasized. Results of extensive investigations of gaseous hydrogen environments on metals conducted under the SSME program are presented.

  13. Corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of nanocrystalline nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tapas

    Nanocrystalline (nc) materials have attracted the interest of the scientific community because of their unique physical and mechanical properties. However, limited research has been performed to analyze their electrochemical behavior. The majority of research in the field of electrochemical and corrosion behavior exists for electrodeposited nanocrystalline metals. This research studies the behavior of sputter-deposited nc Nickel films in corrosive and hydrogen environment by potentiodynamic polarization and microindentation. The surface morphology and composition of the samples was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy. Bulk Ni samples exhibit mild passivation in 3.5 % NaCl solution. The surface reveals a fine distribution of small pits and numerous large pits. However, nc Ni films show a higher corrosion potential, but lower corrosion rate. This can be attributed to the rapid formation of a passive film to resist the corrosion, and better purity of sputtered films. A very uniform and periodic corrosion pattern is observed on the surface, without any pitting. In 0.1 N H2 SO4 solution, active dissolution of Ni was observed in both bulk and nanocrystalline samples. This is due to the absence of passivation for Ni in this environment. Nc Ni shows a higher corrosion rate and higher anodic corrosion potential. This behavior is attributed to a higher density of grain boundaries that act as a catalyst to the hydrogen reduction reaction and increase the corrosion rate. Effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen was observed for bulk and nanocrystalline Nickel. Bulk Ni displayed a slight increase in hardness and signs of hydrogen induced plastic deformation. On the other hand, the nanocrystalline Ni shows brittle failure by buckling and spalling. This is attributed to its limited ductility and the high density that act as preferred sites for hydrogen adsorption and subsequently enhance hydrogen diffusion, leading to

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  15. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials. PMID:23142843

  16. Embrittlement data base, version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water-reactor (LWR) pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials depends on many different factors such as flux, fluence, fluence spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Based on embrittlement predictions, decisions must be made concerning operating parameters and issues such as low-leakage-fuel management, possible life extension, and the need for annealing the pressure vessel. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules and test reactor experiments, comprising many different materials and different irradiation conditions, are needed to develop generally applicable damage prediction models that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Version 1 of the Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data resulting from merging version 2 of the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB). Fracture toughness data were also integrated into Version 1 of the EDB. For power reactor data, the current EDB lists the 1,029 Charpy transition-temperature shift data points, which include 321 from plates, 125 from forgoings, 115 from correlation monitor materials, 246 from welds, and 222 from heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials that were irradiated in 271 capsules from 101 commercial power reactors. For test reactor data, information is available for 1,308 different irradiated sets (352 from plates, 186 from forgoings, 303 from correlation monitor materials, 396 from welds and 71 from HAZs) and 268 different irradiated plus annealed data sets.

  17. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  18. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  19. Power reactor embrittlement data base

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Regulatory and research evaluations of embrittlement prediction models and of vessel integrity under load can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed, computerized embrittlement data base. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance reports and other published reports of commercial nuclear reactors. The uses of the data base require that as many different data as available are collected from as many sources as possible with complete references and that subsets of relevant data can be easily retrieved and processed. The objectives of this NRC-sponsored program are the following: to compile and to verify the quality of the PR-EDB; to provide user-friendly software to access and process the data; to explore or confirm embrittlement prediction models; and to interact with standards organizations to provide the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards that can be used in regulatory guides, standard review plans, and codes. 9 figs.

  20. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  1. Electroplating offers embrittlement protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Thin copper electrodeposited layer protects metal parts in environments with which they may be incompatible. Originally developed for main engine of Space Shuttle where high strength nickle alloy bellows must operate in high-pressure hydrogen, technique protects nickel and is unaffected by forming process or subsequent heat treatment and preinstallation processing.

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  3. Technique to Predict Ultraviolet Radiation Embrittlement of Polymers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the low-Earth-orbit environment, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation embrittles polymer materials through bond breaking and crosslinking. This UV embrittlement increases the surface hardness of the polymer. Before the durability of polymer materials in the low- Earth-orbit environment can be predicted, the extent of UV embrittlement needs to be determined. However, traditional techniques for measuring the microhardness of materials cannot be employed to measure changes in the hardness of UV-embrittled surfaces because traditional techniques measure bulk hardness and are not sensitive enough to surface changes. A unique technique was used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to quantify polymer surface damage that had been induced by UV radiation. The technique uses an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure surface microhardness. An atomic force microscope measures the repulsive forces between the atoms in a microscopic cantilevered tip and the atoms on the surface of a sample. Typically, an atomic force microscope produces a topographic image of a surface by monitoring the movement of the tip over features of the surface. The force applied to the cantilevered tip, and the indention of the tip into the surface, can be measured. The relationship between force and distance of indentation, the quantity force/distance (newtons/meter), provides a measure of the surface hardness. Under identical operating conditions, direct comparisons of surface hardness values can be made.

  4. Pressure-induced metallization of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,X.; Struzhkin, V.; Song, Y.; Goncharov, A.; Ahart, M.; Liu, Z.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH4), silane (SiH4), and germane (GeH4) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH4 undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  5. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  6. Corrosion and embrittlement of high-strength steel bridge wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaas, Garry Wayne

    Suspension bridge cable inspections have revealed severely corroded and broken wires in some main cables. Accelerated cyclic corrosion studies were conducted to assess the relative effect of corrosion on high-strength steel bridge wire. Galvanized and ungalvanized wire samples were corroded under various levels of sustained loads in a cabinet that cyclically applied an acidic salt spray, dry conditions, and 100% relative humidity at elevated temperature. Mass loss, hydrogen concentration, ultimate load, and elongation at failure were measured for corroded and uncorroded samples. Elongation measurements indicated a significant embrittlement of the wires that could not be explained only by the presence of absorbed hydrogen (hydrogen embrittlement). The main cause of reduction of wire elongation was found to be the surface irregularities induced by the corrosion process. The corrosion process in a high-strength steel wire was modeled and analyzed using finite element methods. Forty-one separate FEM tests were run and this data was compared to the experimental data. In addition, for the purpose of comparison, a previously developed hydrogen embrittlement model was analyzed and its validity was discussed in detail. SEM photographs of the fracture surfaces were taken and possible causes and mechanisms of fracture were suggested by observations of the fracture morphology. It was shown through this experimental and numerical research work that the geometry of the wire, determined by the amount of corrosion, pitting, and surface irregularities, controls the ultimate elongation of the wire sample, as also confirmed by the SEM analysis of the fracture surfaces. It was also shown that, using a generally accepted hydrogen embrittlement model, there is no evidence that hydrogen embrittlement is occurring, or at least that hydrogen evolution is not the controlling factor in the loss of wire's ductility.

  7. Embrittlement of a Duplex Stainless Steel in Acidic Environment Under Applied Cathodic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen-induced degradation of mechanical properties of a duplex stainless steel in 0.1N H2SO4 solution has been studied under in situ cathodic charging conditions. Significant reductions in percentage of elongation, toughness, and time to failure were noticed due to the ingress of hydrogen into the material at various applied cathodic potentials in the range of -200 to -800 mV (SCE). Cleavage fractures were identified mainly in the ferritic phases. Crack growth was observed to be inhibited by the austenite phase. However, depending on the severity of the environment, both the ferrite and austenite phases could be embrittled. At less negative potentials, presence of surface film and low hydrogen fugacity seemed to control hydrogen ingress in the metal. Addition of thiosulfate to the acidic solution further degraded the mechanical properties of the steel at the applied cathodic potential.

  8. Susceptibility of irradiated steels to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossin, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Investigation determined whether irradiated pressure-vessel steels 4340 and 212-B are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and to catastrophic failure. Hydrogen-charging conditions which completely embrittled 4340 steel had negligible effect on 212-B steel in tensile and delayed-failure tests.

  9. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  10. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated

  11. Reduced hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in platinum implanted high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, J. G.; Lowder, L. J.; Culbertson, R. J.; Kosik, W. E.; Brown, R.

    1991-07-01

    High strength steels suffer from a high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in a corrosive atmosphere, a factor which limits their usefulness. A good catalyst, such as platinum, present on the surface of the steel may lead to a low value of hydrogen overvoltage, thereby reducing the accumulation and subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the metal. In the present study, platinum was implanted into high strength electroslag remelted (ESR) 4340 steel specimens to a dose of 10 16 atoms/cm 2. Both Pt-implanted and unimplanted specimens were rate charged with hydrogen. The relative concentration of diffusible hydrogen was determined using an electrochemical measurement device known as a Barnacle Electrode. The specimens implanted with platinum exhibited less diffusible hydrogen than the unimplanted steel. Slow strain rate notched-tensile tests, in an aqueous solution of 3.5 wt.% NaCI, were performed in order to evaluate the effect of hydrogen on strength and ductility. The Pt-implanted specimens were able to sustain significantly higher loads before fracture than their unimplanted counterparts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) verified the presence of brittle cracking typical of hydrogen embrittlement type failures. Degradation of mechanical properties due to hydrogen embrittlement was thus significantly reduced. This suggested that both the electrochemical and catalytic properties of the Pt-implanted surface were responsible for the improvement in properties.

  12. Mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel under monotonic and cyclic loadings in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, J.-B.; Verleene, A.; Serre, I.; Legris, A.

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical properties in liquid metals of the T91 martensitic steel, a candidate material for the window of an accelerating driven system (ADS). Two main questions are examined, the risk of liquid metal embrittlement and the accelerated fatigue damage by a liquid metal. It is found that the transition from ductile to brittle behaviour induced by a liquid metal is possible as a result of a decrease in surface energy caused by the adsorbed liquid metal. The embrittlement can occur only with a hard microstructure and a nucleation of very sharp defects inside the liquid metal. Under cycling straining, the fatigue resistance of the standard T91 steel is decreased by a factor of about 2 in the liquid metal as compared to air. It is proposed that short crack growth is promoted by the liquid metal which weakens the microstructural grain boundary barriers and skip the microcrack coalescence stage.

  13. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  15. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  17. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin I Practical Aspects of the Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Since aircraft design is tending toward all-metal construction, the strong heat-treatable light aluminum alloy, duralumin (a generic name for a class of heat-treatable alloys containing Cu, Mg, Mn, and Si), is finding increasing application. Doubt has been expressed concerning the reliability and permanence of these materials. Information is given on the effect of corrosion on the tensile properties of 14-gauge sheet duralumin, heat treated by quenching in hot water after being heated for 15 minutes in a fused nitrate bath at 500 to 510 C. Intercrystalline corrosion and practical aspects of intercrystalline embrittlement are discussed with respect to duralumin.

  18. Liquid-copper/zinc embrittlement in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.; King, J.; Raczkowski, C.

    1998-06-01

    Welding of Alloy 718 is known to cause intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). In this work, an Alloy 718 sample that exhibited HAZ cracking revealed high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. Previous studies on HAZ cracking of Alloy 718 have not reported high Cu/Zn concentrations on the fracture surface. It is proposed here that the presence of liquid Cu/Zn can cause liquid-metal embrittlement (LME) and HAZ cracking in Alloy 718.

  19. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  20. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  1. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  2. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  3. Monitoring the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels by using the Seebeck coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H. J.

    2009-06-01

    The degree of embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) limits the lifetime of nuclear power plants. Therefore, neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels demands accurate monitoring. Current federal legislation requires a surveillance program in which specimens are placed inside the RPV for several years before their fracture toughness is determined by destructive Charpy impact testing. Measuring the changes in the thermoelectric properties of the material due to irradiation, is an alternative and non-destructive method for the diagnostics of material embrittlement. In this paper, the measurement of the Seebeck coefficient ( K¯) of several Charpy specimens, made from two different grades of 22 NiMoCr 37 low-alloy steels, irradiated by neutrons with energies greater than 1 MeV, and fluencies ranging from 0 up to 4.5 × 10 19 neutrons per cm 2, are presented. Within this range, it was observed that K¯ increased by ≈500 nV/°C and a linear dependency was noted between K¯ and the temperature shift Δ T41 J of the Charpy energy vs. temperature curve, which is a measure for the embrittlement. We conclude that the change of the Seebeck coefficient has the potential for non-destructive monitoring of the neutron embrittlement of RPV steels if very precise measurements of the Seebeck coefficient are possible.

  4. Evaluation of test procedures for hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Report presents discussion of three common and primary influences on embrittlement process. Application of theoretical considerations to design of test coupons and methods is illustrated for both internal and external hydrogen embrittlement. Acceptable designs and methods are indicated.

  5. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of molybdenum rhenium alloys and their improvement by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Ueda, Kazukiyo; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation-induced embrittlement is one of the major problems with molybdenum alloys, which have been considered as one of the candidates for divertor structural materials. The effects of rhenium content, heat-treatment and irradiation condition on mechanical properties and microstructural development of molybdenum rhenium alloys were studied after neutron exposure by FFTF/MOTA up to high fluence (˜1 × 10 27 n/m 2, En>0.1 MeV). Appreciable plastic deformation was observed in a bending test on stress-relieved Mo-5 wt% Re irradiated at high temperatures. Fine, dense precipitates were observed in Mo-41 wt% Re, resulting in large hardening and embrittlement.

  6. Embrittlement Phenomena in an Austenitic Stainless Steel: Influence of Hydrogen and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamani, Emil; Jouinot, Patrice

    2007-04-01

    The influence of hydrogen and temperature (up to 650°C) on an austenitic stainless steel is studied by means of two main techniques: the disk pressure embrittlement and the special biaxial tensile tests. The embrittlement index of the steel is determined as the ratio of rupture pressures of the disks tested similarly under helium and hydrogen. Furthermore, we studied the effect of loading speed and temperature on rupture pressures. We show that the mechanical behavior of the steel is strongly influenced by the apparition of a second phase: the deformation induced martensite, α'.

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation in Tensile Properties of Stainless Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.

    2008-03-01

    The advanced design of fuel-cell vehicles requires high-pressure low-temperature hydrogen systems, which in turn requires a high-pressure low-temperature mechanical properties database to address hydrogen embrittlement issues. A very simple and safe mechanical properties testing procedure to evaluate low temperature hydrogen embrittlement has been developed and is reported here. Tensile properties of stainless steel, SUS 304, 304L and 316L, obtained by this simple method are in good agreement with previous data obtained in a high pressure chamber. The effect of hydrogen changed also with the amount of strain-induced martensitic transformation in those steels at low temperatures.

  8. Small punch testing for irradiation embrittlement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses are used to evaluate nuclear reactor vessel integrity. These analyses require knowledge of a range of vessel material mechanical properties, particularly fracture properties. Estimation of vessel material fracture properties is currently made indirectly via correlations between embrittlement and vessel steel chemistry and neutron fluence, and by standard Charpy testing (for transition temperature or RT{sub NDT}) of surveillance material. The small punch test approach is a miniature specimen mechanical test which, based on accumulated experience with fossil plant steels, shows significant application potential for in-service nuclear reactor vessel irradiation embrittlement evaluation. The small punch test specimen is small enough to potentially overcome the surveillance material availability problem (30 small punch test specimens can be easily removed from a single standard half-Charpy bar) and even permit a direct vessel material interrogation by non-disruptive removal of miniature samples from the vessel. An immediate, near-term benefit of the small punch test approach will be the conservation of surveillance material. The results of preliminary feasibility testing on a heat of reactor vessel steel weld metal in the unirradiated, irradiated, and irradiated + annealed conditions show that the small punch test transition temperature correlates with the standard Charpy transition temperature. In addition, application of the small punch test-based fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}, J{sub Ic}) estimation method developed on a previous EPRI project (RP2426-38) produced toughness estimates for the irradiated steel within the {+-}25% accuracy range demonstrated on RP2426-38. The results show that the small punch test can be a viable means of evaluating irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Recommendations are provided for further developing the test method for this application.

  9. On Hydrogen and Helium embrittlement in Isotopic tailoring Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2000-09-01

    The results of shear punch testing performed on irradiated isotopically tailored alloys are considered in terms of hydrogen and helium embrittlement in order to quantify the observed behavior. The results indicate that hydrogen embrittlement may be more significant than helium embrittlement.

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement of Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.H.; Scammon, K.

    1995-09-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement properties of some nickel based superalloys such as C-22, C-276, G-30 and Alloy 625 were studied. The alloys were studied for their susceptibility in annealed, cold worked and aged conditions. The degradation in mechanical properties were evaluated by slow strain rate testing. The hydrogen permeation parameters were deduced using thin foil specimens and electrochemical hydrogen charging according to Devanathan-Stacharsky. The fractographic evaluations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. The alloys were rank ordered. Results indicate that all the alloys tested are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and that any strengthening heat treatment increases their susceptibility to hydrogen damage.

  11. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb Welds

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; C.K. Battige; N. Liwis; M.A. Penik; J. Kikel; A.J. Silvia; C.K. McDonald

    2001-03-18

    Nickel based alloys are often welded with argon/hydrogen shielding gas mixtures to minimize oxidation and improve weld quality. However, shielding gas mixtures with {ge} 1% hydrogen additions can result in hydrogen concentrations greater than 5 wt. ppm in the weld metal and reduce ductility via hydrogen embrittlement. For the conditions investigated, the degree of hydrogen embrittlement is highly variable between 5 and 14 wt. ppm. investigation of hydrogen embrittlement of EN82H GTAW welds via tensile testing, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that this variability is due to the inhomogeneous microstructure of the welds, the presence of recrystallized grains, and complex residual plastic strains. Specifically, research indicates that high residual strains and hydrogen trapping lower the ductility of Ni-Cr-Mn-Nb weld metal when dissolved hydrogen concentrations are greater than 5 wt. ppm. The inhomogeneous microstructure contains columnar dendritic, cellular dendritic, and recrystallized grains. The decreased tensile ductility observed in embrittled samples is recovered by post weld heat treatments that decrease the bulk hydrogen concentration below 5 wt. ppm.

  12. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  13. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  14. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  15. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  16. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of T-250 laser welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, L. W.; Huang, W. B.; Chen, C.

    1997-04-01

    The tensile properties of laser-welded T-250 maraging steel are measured, with attention paid to the influence of strain rate and gaseous hydrogen on the fracture behavior of welded specimens. Post-weld heat treatments are performed on laser-welded specimens to obtain underaged (WU), peak-aged (WP), and overaged (WO) specimens. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) affects the tensile fracture behavior of the welded specimens; HE changes not only the fracture mode but also the fracture location. Without the influence of hydrogen, the fracture location is at the softest region, the weld metal (WM), and the fracture appearance reveals a ductile dimple fracture. For welds sensitive to HE, the fracture is initiated at the heat-affected zone (HAZ) with coarse grain size, and the associated fracture surface exhibits intergranular and quasi-cleavage fractures that are brittle in nature. In addition, the HAZ with coarse grain size is more prone to HE, as compared to other regions in the welded specimens. The WU specimens are susceptible to HE in air under a low strain rate, while the WP specimens are only susceptible to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement (GHE). However, the WO specimens are immune to GHE and insensitive to strain rate.

  17. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  18. Potential/charge induced nanoporous metal actuators.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, R N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical response to the electrochemical charging of nanoporous metals with their pore space wetted by electrolyte have been studied in-situ using dilatometry and wide angle x-ray diffractometry techniques. The actuation strain reported in this manuscript is purely elastic and completely reversible. The capacitive double layer charging became more effective near to the potential to zero charge (pzc) and contribute significantly to the variations of surface stress and crystal strain. In a suitable experimental setup, the actuator effect from porous metals can be amplified, where deliberate movements of the actuator parts are desirable with minimum external force, suggesting that metallic foam-like materials with high surface to volume ratio could be used to mimic natural muscles. PMID:19964917

  19. Correlating radiation exposure with embrittlement: Comparative studies of electron- and neutron-irradiated pressure vessel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-22

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results show the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiate samples relative to unalloyed iron. Despite their disparate nature of defect production similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  20. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  1. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found. PMID:24125362

  2. Liquid metal folding patterns induced by electric capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental phenomenon regarding spontaneous formation of symmetrical folding patterns induced on liquid metal free surface with circular shape features was disclosed. The occurrence and evolution processes of the patterns were demonstrated and interpreted. The electric capillary force imposed on liquid metal due to surface tension gradient was found responsible for producing a variety of surface folding patterns like wheel-shape, dual concentric ring-shape, and so on. All the patterns display a property of axial symmetry and could be analogue to the Rayleigh-Benard convection which produces hexagonal patterns. This finding on liquid metal flow folding refreshes knowledge of classical fluid kinematics.

  3. Strain induced fragility transition in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai-Bin; Richert, Ranko; Maaß, Robert; Samwer, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here, we report that mechanical strain in a model metallic glass modulates the relaxation dynamics in unexpected ways. We find that a large strain amplitude makes a fragile liquid become stronger, reduces dynamical heterogeneity at the glass transition and broadens the loss spectra asymmetrically, in addition to speeding up the relaxation dynamics. These findings demonstrate the distinctive roles of strain compared with temperature on the relaxation dynamics and indicate that dynamical heterogeneity inherently relates to the fragility of glass-forming materials. PMID:25981888

  4. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pulse-Plated Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Eggert D.; Von Bestenbostel, Wolfgang; Sebald, Torsten; Paronis, Georgios; Vanelli, Diego; Müller, Yves

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the European-funded project MultiHy (Multiscale modeling of hydrogen embrittlement in crystalline materials) is the development of multiscale models for hydrogen transport in complex microstructures. The validation and application of the models will be carried out by investigating the role of the microstructure in industrial problems involving hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of advanced materials. Pulse-plated nickel (PP-Ni) material, as used in various industrial applications, has shown a susceptibility to HE that may cause premature failure of a structure. Due to the nature of the pulse-plating process, H is incorporated into the microstructure of the material. This H may lead to crack initiation when combined with localized stress concentrations due to subsequent manufacturing steps, e.g., welding. This article provides an overview of experimental studies aimed at evaluating the influence of the microstructure on the susceptibility of PP-Ni to HE and, ultimately, at improving the plating process.

  6. Pressure-induced metallization of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhang, Haidong; Goncharov, Alexander F; Lobanov, Sergey S; Kagayama, Tomoko; Sakata, Masafumi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-07-18

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements of molybdenum disulfide MoS(2) are performed at pressures up to 81 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Above 20 GPa, we find discontinuous changes in Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns which provide evidence for isostructural phase transition from 2H(c) to 2H(a) modification through layer sliding previously predicted theoretically. This first-order transition, which is completed around 40 GPa, is characterized by a collapse in the c-lattice parameter and volume and also by changes in interlayer bonding. After the phase transition completion, MoS(2) becomes metallic. The reversibility of the phase transition is identified from all these techniques. PMID:25083660

  7. Sliding induced crystallization of metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction and wear experiments, electron microscopy, and diffraction studies were conducted with an Fe67Co18B14Si1 ferrous-base metallic glass in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at room temperature in air. The results indicate that the amorphous alloy can be crystallized during the sliding process. Crystallization of the wear surface causes high friction. Plastic flow occurred on the amorphous alloy with sliding, and the flow film of the alloy transferred to the aluminum oxide surface. Two distinct types of wear debris were observed as a result of sliding: an alloy wear debris, and powdery and whiskery oxide debris. Generation of oxide wear debris particles on an alloy can cause transitions in friction behavior.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, R.G.; Dietzel, W.; Zhang, B.J.; Liu, W.J.; Tseng, M.K.; Atrens, A

    2004-09-20

    The age hardening, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu 7175 alloy were investigated experimentally. There were two peak-aged states during ageing. For ageing at 413 K, the strength of the second peak-aged state was slightly higher than that of the first one, whereas the SCC susceptibility was lower, indicating that it is possible to heat treat 7175 to high strength and simultaneously to have high SCC resistance. The SCC susceptibility increased with increasing Mg segregation at the grain boundaries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) increased with increased hydrogen charging and decreased with increasing ageing time for the same hydrogen charging conditions. Computer simulations were carried out of (a) the Mg grain boundary segregation using the embedded atom method and (b) the effect of Mg and H segregation on the grain boundary strength using a quasi-chemical approach. The simulations showed that (a) Mg grain boundary segregation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is spontaneous, (b) Mg segregation decreases the grain boundary strength, and (c) H embrittles the grain boundary more seriously than does Mg. Therefore, the SCC mechanism of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is attributed to the combination of HE and Mg segregation induced grain boundary embrittlement.

  9. Fuel Manifold Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, T.

    1986-01-01

    Completely-cast hydrogen-compatible alloy preferable to protective plating. Complexity of plating, welding, and brazing unnecessary if hydrogen-compatible alloy used for entire casting instead of protective overlay. Parts exposed to high-pressure hydrogen made immune to hydrogen embrittlement if fabricated from new alloy, Incoly 903 (or equivalent). Material strong and compatible with hydrogen at all temperatures and adapted for outlet manifold of Space Shuttle main combustion chamber.

  10. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  11. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  12. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  13. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  14. Pressure-induced superconductivity in europium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Debessai, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hamlin, J.J.; Bi, W.; Meng, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Schilling, J.S.

    2010-05-24

    Of the 52 known elemental superconductors among the 92 naturally occurring elements in the periodic table, fully 22 only become superconducting under sufficiently high pressure. In the rare-earth metals, the strong local magnetic moments originating from the 4f shell suppress superconductivity. For Eu, however, Johansson and Rosengren have suggested that sufficiently high pressures should promote one of its 4f electrons into the conduction band, changing Eu from a strongly magnetic (J=7/2) 4f{sup 7}-state into a weak Van Vleck paramagnetic (J=0) 4f{sup 6}-state, thus opening the door for superconductivity, as in Am (5f{sup 6}). We report that Eu becomes superconducting above 1.8 K for pressures exceeding 80 GPa, T{sub c} increasing linearly with pressure to 142 GPa at the rate +15 mK/GPa. Eu thus becomes the 53rd elemental superconductor in the periodic table. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies to 92 GPa at ambient temperature reveal four structural phase transitions.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  16. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1995-02-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of different polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitrile (SAN), polybutadieneterephthalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylene (POM) were treated by excimer-laser radiation at 248 nm in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification and ablation to increase surface roughness. Therefore, the laser-processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the ablation depth, optical penetration depth, absorption coefficient and ablation threshold are determined. The metallization of pretreated (laser, wet chemical and plasma etching) polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes were electroplating and physical vapour deposition (PVD). The adhesion of the deposited films is measured with scratch and tape test methods in order to determine the regimes of suitable surface modification for metallization.

  17. Hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum: the crucial role of vacancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2005-04-22

    We report first-principles calculations which demonstrate that vacancies can combine with hydrogen impurities in bulk aluminum and play a crucial role in the embrittlement of this prototypical ductile solid. Our studies of hydrogen-induced vacancy superabundant formation and vacancy clusterization in aluminum lead to the conclusion that a large number of H atoms (up to 12) can be trapped at a single vacancy, which overcompensates the energy cost to form the defect. In the presence of trapped H atoms, three nearest-neighbor single vacancies which normally would repel each other, aggregate to form a trivacancy on the slip plane of Al, acting as embryos for microvoids and cracks and resulting in ductile rupture along these planes. PMID:15904157

  18. Nature of Pressure-induced Insulating States in Simple Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan; Hemley, Russell

    As experimentally established, all the alkali metals and heavy alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr and Ba) become progressively less conductive on compression, at least up to some critical limit over a broad pressure range. Of these metals, Li and Na clearly undergo pressure-induced metal-insulator transitions, which may also be called reverse Mott transitions. Here, using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that such transitions can be understood in terms of band representations introduced by Zak. The valence bands in the insulating states are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of semimetallic phases with flat surface states. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca). This research was supported by EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DESC0001057.

  19. Segregation of alloying atoms at a tilt symmetric grain boundary in tungsten and their strengthening and embrittling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Wu; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Liu-Wei; Liu, Chang-Song; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the segregation behavior of alloying atoms (Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ti) near Σ3 (111) [11¯0] tilt symmetric grain boundary (GB) in tungsten and their effects on the intergranular embrittlement by performing first-principles calculations. The calculated segregation energies suggest that Ag, Au, Cd, In, Sc, Sr, Th, and Ti prefer to occupy the site in the mirror plane of the GB, while Cu, Cr, Mn, and Zn intend to locate at the first layer nearby the GB core. The calculated strengthening energies predict Sr, Th, In, Cd, Ag, Sc, Au, Ti, and Zn act as embrittlers while Cu, Cr, and Mn act as cohesion enhancers. The correlation of the alloying atom's metal radius with strengthening energy is strong enough to predict the strengthening and embrittling behavior of alloying atoms; that is, the alloying atom with larger metal radius than W acts as an embrittler and the one with smaller metal radius acts as a cohesion enhancer.

  20. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  1. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement: Prevention and control; ASTM Special Technical Publication, No. 962

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.

    1988-01-01

    The control and prevention of hydrogen embrittlement in metals are discussed, with a focus on test methods, in reviews and reports presented at the ASTM national symposium held in Los Angeles in May 1985. Sections are devoted to current standards and projections, hydrogen in steel and Ti, relative susceptibility, hydrogen in welding, case histories of prevention and control, and ongoing research. Topics addressed include electrochemical aspects, accelerated acceptance testing methods, the barnacle electrode method, the disk pressure test, a bent-beam test for H2S stress corrosion cracking, diffusible hydrogen testing by gas chromatography, surface films for embrittlement prevention, the effects of strain on hydrogen entry and transport in ferrous alloys, and the temperature dependence of fatigue crack propagation in Nb-H alloys.

  4. Prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Chistyakov, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    A new method has been proposed for prediction of the effects of thermal ageing on the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The method is based on the test results for materials in two conditions, namely, aged at temperatures of temper embrittlement and annealed after irradiation. The prediction is based on the McLean's equation and the dependencies describing thermally activated and radiation-enhanced phosphorus diffusion. Experimental studies have been carried out for estimation of thermal ageing of the WWER-1000 RPV 2Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel. The ductile to brittle transition temperature shift ΔTk due to phosphorus segregation has been estimated on the basis of experimental data processed by the proposed method for the time t = 5 × 105 h (more than 60 years of operation) for the base and weld metals of the WWER-1000 RPV.

  5. Investigation of Teflon FEP embrittlement on spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(TM) fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) is used on the exterior of spacecraft surfaces in the low earth orbit environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized Teflon(TM) FEP used in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provided evidence of the low earth orbit environments. Samples from the LDEF and HST were evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  6. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of metal-induced side-effects.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Vera; Hudecek, Romuald; Stejskal, Jenny; Sterzl, Ivan

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors are recognized as a cause of the increasing frequency of allergic and autoimmune diseases. In addition to external pollutants, metal ions released from dental restorations or from other body implants might trigger inflammation in susceptible subjects. In humans, genes governing metal-induced inflammation and autoimmunity are not yet known. In clinical praxis, metal-sensitive patients will present various symptoms ranging from oral mucosal changes and skin disease to excessive fatigue and autoimmune diseases. Since genetic markers of genetic susceptibility in man are not known, one has to rely on the phenototypic markers. Such biomarkers might be certain detoxification enzymes but also the presence of metal-specific memory cells in the blood. With the increasing use of metal implants in medicine and dentistry, it is important to have a proper tool for the diagnosis of metal allergy in susceptible subjects. After nickel, gold is now the second most common sensitizer. In addition to patch test, an in vitro blood test, an optimized commercially available lymphocyte transformation test (MELISA) is discussed. Both tests were used for the diagnosis of metal allergy in a selected group of 15 patients who suffered from clinical metal sensitivity in addition to other health problems. The concordance of the two tests was good but MELISA detected more metal allergies than patch test. The removal of incompatible dental material (RID) resulted in long-term health improvement in the majority of patients. We postulate that in vivo, metal ions activate T-cells, initiating systemic inflammation, which, through cytokines, affects the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. We postulate that in vivo metal ions will activate T-cells starting systemic inflammation which, through cytokines affect the brain and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The treatment and rehabilitation of metal sensitive patients is based on a firm understanding and

  8. Radiation annealing of radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2016-02-01

    Influence of neutron irradiation on RPV steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore - nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation structure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. As a result oscillation arise that in tern lead to enhanced data scatter.

  9. Study to minimize hydrogen embrittlement of ultrahigh-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsea, S. T.; Fletcher, E. E.; Groeneveld, T. P.

    1967-01-01

    Hydrogen-stress cracking in high-strength steels is influenced by hydrogen content of the material and its hydrogen absorption tendency. Non-embrittling cleaning, pickling, and electroplating processes are being studied. Protection from this hydrogen embrittlement is important to the aerospace and aircraft industries.

  10. Embrittlement of MISSE 5 Polymers After 13 Months of Space Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Yi, Grace T.; Ashmead, Claire C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding space environment induced degradation of spacecraft materials is essential when designing durable and stable spacecraft components. As a result of space radiation, debris impacts, atomic oxygen interaction, and thermal cycling, the outer surfaces of space materials degrade when exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO). The objective of this study was to measure the embrittlement of 37 thin film polymers after LEO space exposure. The polymers were flown aboard the International Space Station and exposed to the LEO space environment as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 5 (MISSE 5). The samples were flown in a nadir-facing position for 13 months and were exposed to thermal cycling along with low doses of atomic oxygen, direct solar radiation and omnidirectional charged particle radiation. The samples were analyzed for space-induced embrittlement using a bend-test procedure in which the strain necessary to induce surface cracking was determined. Bend-testing was conducted using successively smaller mandrels to apply a surface strain to samples placed on a semi-suspended pliable platform. A pristine sample was also tested for each flight sample. Eighteen of the 37 flight samples experienced some degree of surface cracking during bend-testing, while none of the pristine samples experienced any degree of cracking. The results indicate that 49 percent of the MISSE 5 thin film polymers became embrittled in the space environment even though they were exposed to low doses (approx.2.75 krad (Si) dose through 127 mm Kapton) of ionizing radiation.

  11. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  12. Nondestructive Technique To Assess Embrittlement In Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research at NASA Langley Research Center led to identification of nondestructive technique for detection of temper embrittlement in HY80 steel. Measures magnetoacoustic emission associated with reversible motion of domain walls at low magnetic fields. Of interest to engineers responsible for reliability and safety of various dynamically loaded and/or thermally cycled steel parts. Applications include testing of landing gears, naval vessels, and parts subjected to heat, such as those found in steam-pipe fittings, boilers, turbine rotors, and nuclear pressure vessels.

  13. Apparatus For Tests Of Embrittlement By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C.; Lycou, Peter P.

    1992-01-01

    Test apparatus exposes disk specimens to hydrogen in controlled, repeatable way simulating conditions in use. Disk specimen constitutes thin wall between pressure and vacuum chambers. Test proceeds until hydrogen weakens disk enough that it ruptures. Aluminum impact plate absorbs debris from ruptured disk. Apparatus replicates aspects of service environments relevant to embrittlement by hydrogen in such equipment as storage tanks, valves, and fluid-handling components containing hydrogen at high absolute or gauge pressure. Hydrogen inside permeates stressed material and produces gradient of concentration as hydrogen diffuses through material to low-pressure side.

  14. The effects of hydrogen embrittlement of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Delbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium alloys, by virtue of their attractive strength to density ratio, fatigue, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance are now commonly used in various aerospace and marine applications. The cost, once very expensive, has been reduced, making titanium even more of a competitive material today. Titanium and titanium alloys have a great affinity to several elements. Hydrogen, even in small amounts, can cause embrittlement, which in turn causes a reduction in strength and ductility. The reduction of strength and ductility is the subject of this investigation.

  15. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  16. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  17. Origin of yielding in metallic glass: Stress-induced flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Chen, M. W.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Yielding in crystalline metals is well known to be governed by dislocation dynamics; however, the structural origin of yielding in metallic glasses (MGs) still remains as an issue of intense debate despite that substantial research efforts have been expended. In this Letter, based on well-designed cyclic microcompression tests, we provide compelling experimental evidence revealing that yielding of MGs is essentially a stress-induced viscous flow process, during which the measured viscosity ranges from 1014 Pa.s to 1011 Pa.s and decreases with the increase of applied stress, resembling the "shear-thinning" behavior of non-Newtonian liquids. This stress-induced non-Newtonian flow finally leads to shear instability, which manifests itself as the phenomenon of delayed yielding common to a variety of MGs.

  18. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  19. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Hartmut; Wesner, David A.; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang

    1995-04-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of various polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitril (SAN), polybutadieneterphtalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylen (POM) were treated by excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm) in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification. Therefore the laser processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the absorption coefficient, optical penetration depth, ablation depth and ablation threshold are determined. The surface morphology and surface roughness are studied by optical surface profilometry and secondary electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of laser treatment on chemical composition of modified and ablated surfaces is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Depending on the processing parameters and materials properties different microstructures and values of surface roughness are generated on the micrometer length scale. Pretreatment for the subsequent metallization is performed with laser radiation, wet chemical and plasma etching. The metallization of polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes are electroplating and physical vapor deposition (PVD). Adhesion of the deposited films, measured with scratch and tape test methods, is used as a criterion for determining regimes of suitable surface modification for subsequent metallization.

  20. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - neutron embrittlement.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  1. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - Neutron embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  2. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  3. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-08-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture.

  4. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  5. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  6. Metal induced crystallization of amorphous silicon for photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gestel, D.; Gordon, I.; Poortmans, J.

    A silicon thin-film technology could lead to less expensive modules by the use of less silicon material and by the implementation of monolithic module processes. A technology based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-films with a grain size between 1 μm and 1 mm (pc-Si), seems particularly promising since it combines the low-cost potential of a thin-film technology with the high efficiency potential of crystalline silicon. One of the possible approaches to fabricate pc-Si absorber layers is metal induced crystallization (MIC). For solar cell applications mainly aluminium is investigated as metal because 1) it forms a eutectic system with silicon instead of a silicide-metal system like e.g. Ni 2) only shallow level defects are formed in the forbidden bandgap of silicon and 3) a layer exchange process can be obtained in combination with a-Si. Aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) of a-Si on non-silicon substrates can results in grains with a preferential (100) orientation and a maximum grain sizes above 50 micrometer. These layers can act as seed layers for further epitaxial growth. Based on this two-step approach (AIC + epitaxial growth) we made solar cells with an energy conversion efficiency of 8%. Based on TEM, EBIC, SEM, defect etch and EBSD measurements we showed that the efficiency is nowadays mainly limited by the presence of electrical intragrain defects.

  7. Dental metal-induced innate reactivity in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Buskermolen, Jeroen K; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan; von Blomberg, B Mary E; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-12-25

    Gold, nickel, copper and mercury, i.e. four metals frequently used in dental applications, were explored for their capacity to induce innate immune activation in keratinocytes (KC). Due to their anatomical location the latter epithelial cells are key in primary local irritative responses of skin and mucosa. Fresh foreskin-derived keratinocytes and skin and gingiva KC cell lines were studied for IL-8 release as a most sensitive parameter for NF-kB activation. First, we verified that viral-defense mediating TLR3 is a key innate immune receptor in both skin- and mucosa derived keratinocytes. Second, we found that, in line with our earlier finding that ionized gold can mimic viral dsRNA in triggering TLR3, gold is very effective in KC activation. It would appear that epithelial TLR3 can play a key role in both skin- and mucosa localized irritation reactivities to gold. Subsequently we found that not only gold, but also nickel, copper and mercury salts can activate innate immune reactivity in keratinocytes, although the pathways involved remain unclear. Although current alloys have been optimized for minimal leakage of metal ions, secondary factors such as mechanical friction and acidity may still facilitate such leakage. Subsequently, these metal ions may create local irritation, itching and swelling by triggering innate immune reactions, potentially also facilitating the development of metal specific adaptive immunity. PMID:26456670

  8. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  9. Influence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Kendig, M. W.; Meisels, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments performed to determine the roles of hydrogen absorption and hydrogen electron transfer on the susceptibility of Fe- and Ni-base alloys to ambient-temperature hydroen embrittlement. An apparent independence is noted between hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal hydrogen embrittlement. The experiments were performed on Inconel 718, Incoloy 903, and A286. The electrochemical results obtained indicate that Inconel 718 either adsorbs hydrogen more rapidly and/or the electrochemical oxidation of the adsorbed hydrogen occurred more rapidly than in the other two materials.

  10. ON QUANTIFICATION OF HELIUM EMBRITTLEMENT IN FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.

    2000-12-01

    Helium accumulation due to transmutation has long been considered a potential cause for embrittlement in ferritic/martensitic steels. Three Charpy impact databases involving nickel- and boron-doped alloys are quantified with respect to helium accumulation, and it is shown that all predict a very large effect of helium production on embrittlement. If these predictions are valid, use of Ferritic/Martensitic steels for Fusion first wall applications is highly unlikely. It is therefore necessary to reorient efforts regarding development of these steels for fusion applications to concentrate on the issue of helium embrittlement.

  11. Trace metal mapping by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Hrdlicka, A; Malina, R; Hartl, M; Kizek, R; Adam, V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique capable of fast multi-elemental analysis of solid, gaseous and liquid samples. The potential applications of lasers for spectrochemical analysis were developed shortly after its invention; however the massive development of LIBS is connected with the availability of powerful pulsed laser sources. Since the late 80s of 20th century LIBS dominated the analytical atomic spectroscopy scene and its application are developed continuously. Here we review the utilization of LIBS for trace elements mapping in different matrices. The main emphasis is on trace metal mapping in biological samples.

  12. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon(registered trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene-propylene) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for thermal control. Silverized or aluminized FEP is used for the outer layer of thermal control blankets because of its low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. FEP is also preferred over other spacecraft polymers because of its relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its low atomic oxygen erosion yield, FEP has not been protected in the space environment. Recent, long term space exposures such as on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF, 5.8 years in space), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, after 3.6 years in space) have provided evidence of LEO environmental degradation of FEP. These exposures provide unique opportunities for studying environmental degradation because of the long durations and the different conditions (such as differences in altitude) of the exposures. Samples of FEP from LDEF and from HST (retrieved during its first servicing mission) have been evaluated for solar induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen. Micro-indenter results indicate that the surface hardness increased as the ratio of atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence decreased for the LDEF samples. FEP multilayer insulation (MLI) retrieved from HST provided evidence of severe embrittlement on solar facing surfaces. Micro-indenter measurements indicated higher surface hardness values for these samples than LDEF samples, but the solar exposures were higher. Cracks induced during bend testing were significantly deeper for the HST samples with the highest solar exposure than for LDEF samples with similar atomic oxygen fluence to solar fluence ratios. If solar fluences are compared, the LDEF samples appear as damaged as HST samples, except that HST had deeper induced cracks. The results illustrate difficulties in comparing LEO exposed materials from

  13. Plasmon-induced hot carriers in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Jun G; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter

    2014-08-26

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. However, despite very significant experimental effort, a comprehensive theoretical description of the hot carrier generation process is still missing. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. In this model, the conduction electrons of the metal are described as free particles in a finite spherical potential well, and the plasmon-induced hot carrier production is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. Specifically, larger nanoparticle sizes and shorter lifetimes result in higher carrier production rates but smaller energies, and vice versa. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. The results presented here contribute to the basic understanding of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and provide insight for optimization of the process. PMID:24960573

  14. Fracture surface of hydrogen embrittlement in iron single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, N.; Kidani, K.; Hattori, Y.; Terasaki, F. )

    1993-07-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of iron and low strength steels has been studied for a long time. Its mechanism, however has not been explained clearly yet. Fractography is often used as a method for the study of the fracture mechanism. The fracture process, for example, microvoid coalescence (MVC), cleavage, grain boundary fracture and so on, can be determined by means of fractography. Then it is possible to understand by which process hydrogen causes the embrittlement. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the characteristics of such fracture surfaces and to deduce the fracture mechanism. As for the embrittlement of iron and steels, they often occur after a fair amount of plastic deformation, which strongly depends on the crystallographic orientation and temperature. In this paper, the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen embrittlement are investigated with various crystallographic orientation and temperatures.

  15. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20 ns pulse duration and 193 nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ≤10 ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ≤80 ns) for more than 1 μs. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  16. Pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; Meng, Yue; Park, Changyong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Junqiao; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2 based on synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Our isothermal compression experiments at room temperature and 383 K show that the room temperature monoclinic phase (M 1 ,P 21/c ) and the high-temperature rutile phase (R ,P 42/m n m ) of VO2 undergo phase transitions to a distorted M 1 monoclinic phase (M 1' ,P 21/c ) above 13.0 GPa and to an orthorhombic phase (CaCl2-like, P n n m ) above 13.7 GPa, respectively. Upon further compression, both high-pressure phases transform into a new phase (phase X ) above 34.3 and 38.3 GPa at room temperature and 383 K, respectively. The room temperature M 1 -M 1' phase transition structurally resembles the R -CaCl2 phase transition at 383 K, suggesting a second-order displacive type of transition. Contrary to previous studies, our electrical resistivity results, Raman measurements, as well as ab initio calculations indicate that the new phase X , rather than the M 1' phase, is responsible for the metallization under pressure. The metallization mechanism is discussed based on the proposed crystal structure.

  17. Inducibility of a molecular bioreporter system by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimowski, L.; Rayms-Keller, A.; Olson, K.E.; Yang, R.S.H.; Tessari, J.; Carlson, J.; Beaty, B.

    1996-02-01

    The authors have developed a molecular bioreporter model for detecting an invertebrate response to heavy metals in streams. The bioreporter system, pMt2-luc, utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein promoter to regulate luciferase expression in stably transformed mosquito cells.The LucC5 clone, which was isolated from pMt2-luc transformed, hygromycin-resistant C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) cells, demonstrated a 12-fold increase in luciferase-specific activity 48 h after exposure to 13 ppm copper (Cu). In addition to Cu, exposure of LucC5 cells to 19 ppm lead (Pb) or 3 ppm mercury (Hg) for 48 h induced luciferase expression threefold and fourfold, respectively. Exposures of up to 30 ppm arsenic (As), 8 ppm cadmium (Cd), 7 ppm chromium (Cr), or 5 ppm nickel (Ni) had no effect on luciferase induction. LucC5 cells exposed to metal mixtures of 13 ppm Cu and 19 ppm Pb yielded an additive response with a 14-fold increase in luciferase expression. When organic chemicals such as phenol (3 ppm) were mixed with 13 ppm Cu, 19 ppm Pb, or 3 ppm Hg a significant reduction in luciferase activity was noted. Additionally, atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that two of the metals, Cu and Pb, show marked differences in accumulation within the LucC5 cell line.

  18. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures. PMID:27045994

  19. The influence of composition on environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of water vapor in air and hydrogen gas on the tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys have been studied at room temperature. Fe-28a% Al-5a% Cr alloys to which either Zr alone or Zr and C have been added and tested in controlled humidity air environments as well as in 1.3 atm hydrogen or oxygen gas and in vacuum. As with other Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, oxygen produces the lowest crack growth rates as well as the highest critical stress intensities and tensile ductility in each of the alloys tested. However, while Zr lowers crack growth rates in the Paris regime, there is no apparent beneficial effect on crack growth thresholds. Hydrogen gas also produces unusual results. While crack growth rates are very high in hydrogen in the Paris regime for all alloys, hydrogen only lowers the crack growth threshold relative to air in ternary Fe-28Al-5Cr; it does not lower the threshold in the Zr-containing alloys. It was found that decreased test frequency leads to increased crack growth rates in a Zr-containing alloy which points to a moisture-induced embrittlement mechanism responsible for the higher crack growth rates in air. Fracture path tends to be insensitive to environment for each alloy.

  20. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels in H/sub 2/S plus H/sub 2/O vapor environment. Quarterly report No. 8, May 15-August 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.J.

    1980-11-28

    In previous tests the environment was H/sub 2/S of the highest commercially available purity. In this environment it proved impossible, by our current techniques, to induce hydrogen embrittlement in low yield strength (45 to 75 ksi or 300 to 500 MPa) samples which had been given a post weld heat treatment. The introduction of saturated water vapor in the H/sub 2/S has clearly served to give conditions in which the lower strength steels can be embrittled.

  1. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    Metal vanadates contain a diverse family of compounds due to the facile accessibility of different vanadium oxidation states and local coordination environments. Though these systems present a number of applications in catalysis and electronics, there may exist untapped physical phenomena that only reveal themselves when scaling these materials to nanoscale dimensions. Finite-size effects result from a number of factors including surface energy structural instabilities, nanostructure "self-purification," and physical constraints on mechanistic or conductive pathways. The MxV2O 5 bronze materials possess non-stoichiometry and this interesting property has hindered synthetic techniques to procure perfect crystalline material which is needed to expose the true physical properties. Through hydrothermal synthesis methods, pseudo one---dimensional nanostructures of Mx V2O5 display fascinating new properties and may be model systems for studying fundamentals associated with correlated electron dynamics in solid-state physics. Electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction reveal the near-perfect crystalline nanostructures. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies show strong evidence for the localization of electron density and long-range crystal structure alignment of the nanowires. Single-nanowire electron transport measurements for the beta'-CuxV2O5 and the delta-KxV2O5 data shows novel temperature-induced reversible metal---insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. The unprecedented magnitude (˜105) and discontinuous nature of the MIT suggests a mechanism closely associated with correlated electron motion. Additionally, the MIT can be induced by voltage ramping. The simultaneous temperature/voltage studies of single-nanowire transport support the existence of a critical threshold to overcome in order to facilitate instability in the insulating phase and transition to a metallic phase for the delta-KxV2O5 bronze. The MIT transition magnitudes of several

  2. Composition effect on intrinsic plasticity or brittleness in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  3. Composition Effect on Intrinsic Plasticity or Brittleness in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  4. SSME - Materials and Methods for Addressing High-Pressure Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matejczk, Daniel; Russell, Dale; Frandsen, Jon; Swanson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    From the humid, corrosion-friendly atmosphere of KSC, to the extreme heat of ascent, to the cold vacuum of space, the Space Shuttle faced one hostile environment after another. One of those harsh environments the hydrogen environment existed within the shuttle itself. Liquid hydrogen was the fuel that powered the shuttle s complex, powerful, and reusable main engine. Hydrogen provided the high specific impulse the bang per pound of fuel needed to perform the shuttle s heavy lifting duties. Hydrogen, however, was also a potential threat to the very metal of the propulsion system that used it. The diffusion of hydrogen atoms into a metal can make it more brittle and prone to cracking a process called hydrogen embrittlement. This effect can reduce the toughness of carefully selected and prepared materials. A concern that exposure to hydrogen might encourage crack growth was present from the beginning of the Space Shuttle Program, but the rationale for using hydrogen was compelling. This paper outlines the material characterization, anomaly resolution, and path to understanding of hydrogen embrittlement on superalloys through the course of the SSME program. Specific examples of nickel alloy turbine housings and single crystal turbine blades are addressed. The evolution of fracture mechanics analytical methods is also addressed.

  5. Localised slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinised dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration of serpentinised ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure; however the extents of strain localisation and unstable frictional sliding are still under debate. Microstructural and mineralogical evidence from dunites of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides demonstrates that prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of large-grained olivine rich in magnetite inclusions. The epitaxial growth of comparatively Fe-poor prograde olivine on Fe-richer relics of primary olivine caused a high variability in Fe-content, even within single crystals. On a larger scale, the average Fe-content of olivine rises towards the vein edges, which reflects a decrease in the degree of initial serpentinisation towards the host rock. The former distribution of serpentine strongly influenced the mechanical response of the rock to the fluid production during deserpentinisation: The faulting caused by the associated dehydration embrittlement occurred along highly localized slip planes in the centres of the meta-serpentinite veins. Around these slip planes, the prograde olivine experienced significant grain size reduction, but very limited shear strain. The strain concentration on narrow faults, also documented by a sharp offset of chromite layers, and the brittle deformation of the surrounding olivine suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. This natural example of deserpentinisation-induced embrittlement illustrates that structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins have first-order controls on strain localisation and frictional sliding. While strain may be distributed during dehydration of a homogeneous serpentinite, as has been observed in recent experimental studies, it may become strongly localised in a heterogeneous rock volume where fluid pressure is locally increased along pre-existing veins. As most of the oceanic lithosphere

  6. Beam-Induced Deposition of Thin Metallic Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funsten, Herbert Oliver, III

    1990-01-01

    Ion and electron beam induced deposition (BID) of thin (1 μm), conductive films is accomplished by dissociating and removing the nonmetallic components of an adsorbed, metal-based, molecular gas. Current research has focused primarily on room temperature (monolayer adsorption) BID using electrons and slow, heavy ions. This study investigates low temperature (50 to 200 K) BID in which the condensation of the precursor gases (SnCl _4 and (CH_3) _4Sn) maximizes the efficiency of the incident radiation which can create and remove nonmetallic fragments located several monolayers below the film surface. The desired properties of the residual metallic films are produced by using as incident radiation either nuclear (35 keV Ar ^+) or electronic (2 keV electrons, 25 keV H^+, or 50 keV H ^+) energy loss mechanisms. Residual films are analyzed ex situ by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thickness measurements, resistivity measurements, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and infrared spectroscopy. Low temperature BID film growth models, which are derived from both a computer simulation and a mathematical analysis, closely agree. Both the fragmentation and sputtering cross sections for a particular ion and energy are derived for films created from (CH_3) _4Sn. The fragmentation cross section, which corresponds to film growth, is roughly related to the electronic stopping power by the 1.9 power. The loss of carbon in films which were created from (CH_3) _4Sn is strongly dependent on the nuclear stopping power. Film growth rates for low temperature BID have been found to be 10 times those of room temperature BID.

  7. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  8. Defect-induced semiconductor to metal transition in graphene monoxide.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jungwook; Yun, Kyung-Han; Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-07-14

    This study investigates the influence of point defects on the geometric and electronic structure of graphene monoxide (GMO) via density functional theory calculations. In aspects of defect formation energy, GMOs with oxygen vacancies and bridge interstitial defects are more likely to form when compared to GMOs with defects such as carbon vacancies and hollow interstitial defects. It was also found that the oxygen vacancy or the hollow interstitial defect induces local tensile strain around the defective site and this strain increases the band gap energy of the defective GMO. In addition, the band gaps of GMO with carbon vacancies or bridge interstitial defects decreased mainly due to the dangling bonds, not due to the strain effect. It is noted that the dangling bond derived from the defects forms the defect-level in the band gap of GMO. The semiconductor to metal transition by the band gap change (0-0.7 eV) implies the possibility for band gap engineering of GMO by vacancies and interstitial defects. PMID:24886723

  9. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  10. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  11. Double Seismic Zones and Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, T.; Yamasaki, T.

    2001-12-01

    Dehydration embrittlement is still an attractive mechanism for intermediate-depth earthquake occurrence. We explore the possibility whether this hypothesis can explain the observed geometry of the double seismic zones. We calculate transient temperature structures of slabs using a finite element method, based on geologically estimated subduction histories for NE Japan, SW Japan, E. Aleutian, N. Chile, Taiwan, and Cape Mendocino, where double zones have been observed. We then delineate the dehydration loci utilizing the phase diagrams of serpentine by Wunder and Schreyer (1997), Bose and Navrotsky (1998) and Ulmer and Trommsdorff (1995), and of meta-basalt by Kerrick and Connolly (2001). For slabs whose crust passes from blueschist to lawsonite-eclogite facies, we take the glaucophane-out boundary as the upper limit of the significant dehydration of meta-basalt. The dehydration loci of serpentine produces a double-layered structure for NE Japan, E. Aleutian, N. Chile, and Taiwan, whose slabs are older than 40 Ma at the trench. In these regions, the lower zone of the double zones can be explained by the lower dehydration locus of serpentine, and the upper zone by that of meta-basalt. The deepest portion of the upper zone might contain the upper dehydration locus of serpentine; however, this occurs only in NE Japan and E. Aleutian. The dehydration loci of serpentine degenerate into a single one in SW Japan and Cape Mendocino whose slabs are younger than 20 Ma at the trench. For these regions, the lower zone of the double zone is explained by the degenerated dehydration locus of serpentine and the upper zone by successive dehydration of meta-basalt from greenschist to dry eclogite facies in the shallow depth. Provided that the oceanic crust is metamorphosed into hydrated minerals at the mid-ocean ridge, the condition for the existence of a double zone is the serpentinization of the subducting oceanic plate at mid-plate depth for a cold slab and at shallow depth for a

  12. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  13. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  14. Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial-Free Steels

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Interstitial-free (IF) steels are defined by their low amounts of solute interstitial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen. During secondary forming, strain can be localized at the grain boundaries of these steels, resulting in secondary cold work embrittlement (CWE).

  15. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Mahmood, S.T.; Stoller, R.E.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-12-31

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV.

  16. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  17. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  18. Fano response induced by the interference between localized plasmons and interface reflections in metal-insulator-metal waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Ju; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhai, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The original Fano response induced by the interference between the localized plasmons and interface-reflected surface plasmon polaritons in a single metal-insulator-metal waveguide with two parallel separated metal strips is predicted theoretically through the coupled mode theory combined with the Fano function. The prominent asymmetric line shape resulting from the coupling between the discrete dipole resonance formed between metal strips and an interface-reflected-induced continuum is confirmed by the performed numerical simulations. The novel Fano spectrum is tuned easily by varying the length and coupling distance of metal strips. By introducing another separated metal strip, the outstanding double Fano behavior is obtained, and the corresponding underlying physics is illustrated. In particular, based on the performed refractive index sensing spectra, the high sensitivity of 855 nm/RIU and figure of merit up to 30 are achieved via the double Fano resonance. Undoubtedly, such ingenious structure may benefit the fabrications of nano-integrated plasmonic devices for optical switching and sensing.

  19. Unusual Cyclodextrin Derivatives as a New Avenue to Modulate Self- and Metal-Induced Aβ Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Valentina; Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Vecchio, Graziella

    2015-09-28

    Mounting evidence suggests an important role of cyclodextrins in providing protection in neurodegenerative disorders. Metal dyshomeostasis is reported to be a pathogenic factor in neurodegeneration because it could be responsible for damage involving oxidative stress and protein aggregation. As such, metal ions represent an effective target. To improve the metal-binding ability of cyclodextrin, we synthesized three new 8-hydroxyquinoline-cyclodextrin conjugates with difunctionalized cyclodextrins. In particular, the 3-difunctionalized regioisomer represents the first example of cyclodextrin with two pendants at the secondary rim, resulting in a promising compound. The derivatives have significant antioxidant capacity and the powerful activity in inhibiting self-induced amyloid-β aggregation seems to be led by synergistic effects of both cyclodextrin and hydroxyquinoline. Moreover, the derivatives are also able to complex metal ions and to inhibit metal-induced protein aggregation. Therefore, these compounds could have potential as therapeutic agents in diseases related to protein aggregation and metal dyshomeostasis. PMID:26298549

  20. Observations of ``1000{degree}F embrittlement`` in Ni-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, C.P. Jr.; Henry, M.F.

    1996-05-01

    In this study, the effect of cold work and ``low temperature`` thermal exposure on tensile behavior was evaluated. Superalloys Rene 88DT and IN718 were compressed at room temperature to induce cold work in excess of what could be achieved in tension. Tensile tests were performed on the compressed material after subsequent heat treatments. A dramatic increase in strength and significant loss in ductility was observed for material that was compressed 30%, exposed to 538 C and tensile tested at room temperature (compared to as-compressed material). The effect was less dramatic at lower levels of cold work, and subsequent high temperature heat treatments were shown to restore ductility and decrease strength. The mechanism for this 1,000 F embrittlement of highly deformed superalloys is still not known. Environmental embrittlement can be ruled out, since the vacuum results are the same as the air results. It is unlikely that this is the result of precipitation of a phase (carbides or other) on dislocations, since no differences were observed in the exposed and unexposed thin foil and extraction replica samples in TEM. Work is currently underway to investigate a possible role of solute atoms. The data presented here are not inconsistent with strain aging phenomena.

  1. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  2. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

  3. Metal-induced generalized pruriginous dermatitis and endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, A; Riambau, V; Serra-Baldrich, E; Camarasa, J G

    2000-07-01

    Metal contact allergy is a common problem in the general population. Diagnostic and therapeutic medical-surgical procedures in which metals can be responsible for eczema are diverse. Endovascular aortic surgery is still an experimental but less invasive technique. A generalized eczematous dermatitis elicited by metal of an endovascular prosthesis is presented. An abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed in a 79-year-old woman. Endoluminal repair with a straight Vanguard endograft was successful. 3 weeks later, she suffered a severe episode of erythema and eczema on the legs. Since then, she complained of continuous pruritus with eczema and excoriated papules. The dermatitis and also the patch test pathology showed eczema. Patch testing was positive to nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride. An endograft semi-quantitative metal analysis was performed with plasma-induction joint mass-spectrometry. The self-expanding metal stent was mainly composed of nickel (approximately 55%) and titanium (21%) with reinforcing thread of platinum. Antimony was detected only in the polyester textile. These results are consistent with Nitinol composition. The need for preoperative patch testing for metals is controversial. Enquiry about metal allergy is recommended before endoluminal surgical procedures. In the near future, the design of endografts must take into account the possibility of this sort of reaction. PMID:10902587

  4. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  6. The formation and structure of the oxide and hydroxide chemisorbed phases at the aluminum surface, and relevance to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael; Kelly, Robert; Neurock, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum alloys used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) induced by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) (Gangloff and Ives 1990). Crack growth experiments have demonstrated a linear relation between the relative humidity of the environment and crack growth rates, indicating the importance of water (Speidel and Hyatt 1972). While the presence of water has been demonstrated to be necessary for EAC of aluminum, crack growth rates have been linked to the diffusivity of hydrogen in aluminum (Gangloff 2003) and hydrogen densities at the crack tip as high as Al2H have been observed (Young and Scully 1998). While the mechanism by which hydrogen embrittles aluminum is yet not well understood, without the entry of hydrogen into the aluminum matrix, embrittlement would not occur. While at the crack tip high hydrogen concentrations exist, the solubility of hydrogen in aluminum is normal near 1 ppm (Wolverton 2004). In this work combined first principles and kinetic Monte Carlo methods will be used to examine the oxide and hydroxide structure resulting from exposure of aluminum to H2O or O2 and relevance to hydrogen entry as well as EAC is discussed.

  7. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepička, P.; Juřík, P.; Malinský, P.; Macková, A.; Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Švorčík, V.

    2014-08-01

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar+ ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  8. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Database - Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Subramani, Ranjit

    2008-03-01

    The aging and degradation of light-water reactor pressure vessels is of particular concern because of their relevance to plant integrity and the magnitude of the expected irradiation embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel materials depends on many factors, such as neutron fluence, flux, and energy spectrum, irradiation temperature, and preirradiation material history and chemical compositions. These factors must be considered to reliably predict pressure vessel embrittlement and to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Large amounts of data from surveillance capsules are needed to develop a generally applicable damage prediction model that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. Furthermore, the investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes, Standard Review Plans (SRPs), and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized database. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Database (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for U.S. designed commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB lists the test results of 104 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials, 115 weld materials, and 141 base materials, including 103 plates, 35 forgings, and 3 correlation monitor materials that were irradiated in 321 capsules from 106 commercial power reactors. The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any personal computer using the Windows operating system. "User-friendly" utility programs have been written to investigate radiation embrittlement using this database. Utility programs allow the user to retrieve, select and manipulate specific data, display data to the screen or printer, and fit and plot Charpy impact data. The PR-EDB Version 3.0 upgrades Version 2.0. The package was developed based on the Microsoft .NET framework technology and uses Microsoft Access for

  9. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205). PMID:22014396

  10. Bulk diffusion induced structural modifications of carbon-transition metal nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.; Abrasonis, G.; Kovacs, Gy. J.; Krause, M.; Munnik, F.; Heller, R.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2011-03-15

    The influence of transition metal (TM = V,Co,Cu) type on the bulk diffusion induced structural changes in carbon:TM nanocomposite films is investigated. The TMs have been incorporated into the carbon matrix via ion beam co-sputtering, and subsequently the films have been vacuum annealed in the temperature range of 300 - 700 deg. C. The structure of both the dispersed metal rich and the carbon matrix phases has been determined by a combination of elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The as-grown films consist of carbidic (V and Co) and metallic (Cu) nanoparticles dispersed in the carbon matrix. Thermal annealing induces surface segregation of Co and Cu starting at {>=} 500 deg. C, preceded by the carbide-metal transformation of Co-carbide nanoparticles at {approx} 300 deg. C. No considerable morphological changes occur in C:V films. In contrast to the surface diffusion dominated regime where all the metals enhance the six-fold ring clustering of C, in the bulk diffusion controlled regime only Co acts as a catalyst for the carbon graphitization. These results are consistent with the metal-induced crystallization mechanism in the C:Co films. The results are discussed on the basis of the metal-carbide phase stability, carbon solubility in metals or their carbides, and interface species.

  11. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed. PMID:26832524

  12. The deformation units in metallic glasses revealed by stress-induced localized glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, L. S.; Ma, J.; Ke, H. B.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-06-01

    We report that even in quasi-static cyclic compressions in the apparent elastic regimes of the bulk metallic glasses, the precisely measured stress-strain curve presents a mechanical hysteresis loop, which is commonly perceived to occur only in high-frequency dynamic tests. A phenomenological viscoelastic model is established to explain the hysteresis loop and demonstrate the evolutions of the viscous zones in metallic glasses during the cyclic compression. The declining of the viscosity of the viscous zones to at least 1 × 1012 Pa s when stress applied indicates that stress-induced localized glass to supercooled liquid transition occurs. We show that the deformation units of metallic glasses are evolved from the intrinsic heterogeneous defects in metallic glasses under stress and the evolution is a manifestation of the stress-induced localized glass transition. Our study might provide a new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of plastic deformation of metallic glasses.

  13. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-04-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam.

  14. Carbon monoxide-induced dynamic metal-surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Carenco, Sophie

    2014-08-18

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule in surface science, materials chemistry, catalysis and nanotechnology. Its interaction with a number of metal surfaces is at the heart of major processes, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or fuel-cell optimization. Recent works, coupling structural and nanoscale in situ analytic tools have highlighted the ability of metal surfaces and nanoparticles to undergo restructuring after exposure to CO under fairly mild conditions, generating nanostructures. This Minireview proposes a brief overview of recent examples of such nanostructuring, which leads to a discussion about the driving force in reversible and non-reversible situations. PMID:25044189

  15. Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Mathias; Ninham, Barry W.; Brevik, Iver; Persson, Clas; Parsons, Drew F.; Sernelius, Bo E.

    2012-06-01

    There is an attractive Casimir-Lifshitz force between two silica surfaces in a liquid (bromobenze or toluene). We demonstrate that adding an ultrathin (5-50 Å) metallic nanocoating to one of the surfaces results in repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces above a critical separation. The onset of such quantum levitation comes at decreasing separations as the film thickness decreases. Remarkably, the effect of retardation can turn attraction into repulsion. From that we explain how an ultrathin metallic coating may prevent nanoelectromechanical systems from crashing together.

  16. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  17. Embrittlement Database from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance capsules of U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors and from experiments in material test reactors. The collected data are contained in either the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) or the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB). The EDB work includes verification of the quality of the EDB, provision for user-friendly software to access and process the data, exploration and/or confirmation of embrittlement prediction models, provision for rapid investigation of regulatory issues, and provision for the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards or regulatory guides. The EDB is designed for use with a personal computer. The data are collected into "raw data files." Traceability of all data is maintained by including complete references along with the page numbers. External data verification of the PR-EDB is the responsibility of the vendors, who were responsible for the insertion and testing of the materials in the surveillance capsules. Internal verification is accomplished by checking against references and checking for inconsistencies. Examples of information contained in the EDBs are: Charpy data, tensile data, reactor type, irradiation environments, fracture toughness data, instrumented Charpy data, pressure-temperature (P-T) data, chemistry data, and material history. The TR-EDB additionally has annealing Charpy data. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the test results from 269 Charpy capsules irradiated in 101 reactors. These results include 320 plate data points, 123 forging data points, 113 standard reference materials (SRMS) or correlation monitor (CM) points, 244 weld material data points, and 220 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) material data points. Similarly, the TR-EDB contains information for 290 SRM or CM points, 342 plate data points, 165 forging data points, 378 welds, and 55 HAZ materials. [copied from http://rsicc.ornl.gov/RelatedLinks.aspx?t=edb

  18. Investigation of gold embrittlement in connector solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine to what extent typical flight connector solder joints may be embrittled by the presence of gold. In addition to mapping of gold content in connector solder joints by an electron microprobe analyzer, metallographic examinations and mechanical tests (thermal shock, vibration, impact and tensile strength) were also conducted. A description of the specimens and tests, a discussion of the data, and some conclusions are presented.

  19. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  20. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-01

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices.We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced

  1. The effects of tempering reactions on temper embrittlement of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; McMahon, C. J.

    1983-06-01

    The effects of tempering reactions which produce molybdenum-rich carbides on the temper embrittlement of NiCrMo, NiCrMoV, CrMo, and CrMoV steels, particularly embrittlement due to phosphorus segregation, are reviewed. Molybdenum can act as an effective scavenger for phosphorus and other embrittling impurities, but the scavenging is lost when the molybdenum is precipitated in carbides as a result of continued tempering during service at elevated temperatures. This leads to very slow embrittlement, controlled by the rates of alloy carbide formation, rather than by the diffusion of phosphorus, for example. The presence of vanadium apparently retards the embrittlement process even more by interfering with the formation of the molybdenum-rich carbides. Observations of the temper embrittlement behavior, and of the effects of service exposure, in three CrMoV steam turbine rotors are also reported and are shown to be consistent with the previous results.

  2. Chemical trend of pressure-induced metallization in alkaline earth hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sijia; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2010-09-02

    The pressure-induced metallization of alkaline earth hydrides was systematically investigated using ab initio methods. While BeH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} present different semimetallic phases, CaH{sub 2}, SrH{sub 2}, and BaH{sub 2} share the same metallic phase (P6/mmm). The metallization pressure shows an attractive decrease with each increment of metal radius, and this trend is well correlated with both the electronegativity of alkaline earth metals and the band gap of alkaline earth hydrides at ambient pressure. Our results are consistent with current experimental data, and the obtained trend has significant implications for designing and engineering metallic hydrides for energy applications.

  3. Double seismic zone and dehydration embrittlement of the subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Seno, Tetsuzo

    2003-04-01

    Dehydration embrittlement of metamorphosed oceanic crust and mantle in the subducting slab may be responsible for the occurrence of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We explore the possibility that this hypothesis can explain the morphology of the double seismic zones observed in northeast Japan, southwest Japan, northeast Taiwan, northern Chile, Cape Mendocino, and eastern Aleutians. We calculate transient temperature structures of slabs based on geologically estimated subduction histories of these regions. We then determine dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentinized mantle using experimentally derived phase diagrams. The depth range of the dehydration loci of metamorphosed oceanic crust and serpentine is dependent on slab age. The dehydration loci of serpentine produce a double-layered structure. Because the upper dehydration loci of serpentine are mostly located in the wedge mantle above the slab, we regard the upper plane seismicity representing dehydration embrittlement in the oceanic crust, and we fix the slab geometry so that the upper plane seismicity is just below the upper surface of the slab. We find that the lower plane seismicity is located at the lower dehydration loci of serpentine, which indicates that the morphology of the double seismic zones is consistent with the dehydration embrittlement.

  4. Structural anisotropy in metallic glasses induced by mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2009-03-06

    We observed structural anisotropy in metallic glasses samples deformed by homogenous mechanical creep and by inhomogeneous compression using high energy X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis indicates bond anisotropy in the first atomic shell. This suggests that mechanical deformation involves rearrangements in a cluster of atoms by a bond reformation.

  5. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-16

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (∼2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices. PMID:27273622

  6. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  7. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effects of alloy modification were investigated. Results showed that T-111 contains a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss of ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. This appears to occur because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries and this also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; however, most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  10. Investigation of Teflon FEP Embrittlement on Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) (DuPont) is commonly used on exterior spacecraft surfaces for thermal control in the low-Earth orbit environment. Silverized or aluminized Teflon FEP is used for the outer layers of the thermal control blanket because of its high reflectance, low solar absorptance, and high thermal emittance. Teflon FEP is also desirable because, compared with other spacecraft polymers (such as Kapton), it has relatively high resistance to atomic oxygen erosion. Because of its comparably low atomic oxygen erosion yield, Teflon FEP has been used unprotected in the space environment. Samples of Teflon FEP from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the Hubble Space Telescope (retrieved during its first servicing mission) were evaluated for solar-induced embrittlement and for synergistic effects of solar degradation and atomic oxygen.

  11. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  12. Agriculturally Induced Heavy Metal Accumulation in Seyfe Lake, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bölükbaşı, Vildan; Akın, Beril Salman

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present 1-year study was to investigate the effect of heavy metals in synthetic fertilizers on water and sediment quality in the Seyfe Lake, where agricultural activity was the only anthropogenic source. Metal concentrations of five different types of synthetic fertilizers used in agricultural fields within the Seyfe Lake closed basin were as follows: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd > As > Ni > Co. The annual average of heavy metal concentrations in the sediment samples were as follows: Zn > Pb > As > Cr > Ni > Cu > Cd > Co. Seyfe Lake sediment was classified as anthropogenically "highly polluted" in terms of the As and Zn concentrations at each sample station based on the sediment quality guidelines. Furthermore, the sediment could be classified as "moderately to highly polluted" in terms of the As concentration, based on the geo-accumulation index. PMID:26744023

  13. Spin induced ferroelectric-like structural transition in a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanfeng; Feng, Hai; Andrew, Princep; Manuel, Pascal; Yamaura, Kazunari; Andrew, Boothroyd

    2015-03-01

    LiOsO3 represents a previously only known example of ``ferroelectric metal,'' a concept presented by Anderson and Blount in 1965, with the properties being promoted by electron lattice coupling involving Li+ ions displacement in the crystal structure [Y. Shi et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 1024(2013)]. We report that in Pb2CoOsO6, a new ordered double-perovskite with a centrosymmetric monoclinic space group of P21/n, a ferroelectric-like structural transition occurs at ~ 38 K in the metallic state, i.e. a continuous second order transition to a noncentrosymmetric structure (space group: P1) associated by appearance of a nominal unique polar axis along the c-axis. The phase transition is coincident with a magnetic transition at the same temperature which corresponds to a long-range antiferromagnetic order. The magnetic structure analysis and theoretical calculations prove that the antiferromagnetic ordering is the driven force for the structural transition in Pb2CoOsO6 and it represents the first double-perovskite ``ferroelectric metal'' involving a magnetic ordering. United Kingdom Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  14. Effects of transition metal ion coordination on the collision-induced dissociation of polyalanines.

    PubMed

    Watson, Heather M; Vincent, John B; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2011-11-01

    Transition metal-polyalanine complexes were analyzed in a high-capacity quadrupole ion trap after electrospray ionization. Polyalanines have no polar amino acid side chains to coordinate metal ions, thus allowing the effects metal ion interaction with the peptide backbone to be explored. Positive mode mass spectra produced from peptides mixed with salts of the first row transition metals Cr(III), Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(I), and Cu(II) yield singly and doubly charged metallated ions. These precursor ions undergo collision-induced dissociation (CID) to give almost exclusively metallated N-terminal product ions whose types and relative abundances depend on the identity of the transition metal. For example, Cr(III)-cationized peptides yield CID spectra that are complex and have several neutral losses, whereas Fe(III)-cationized peptides dissociate to give intense non-metallated products. The addition of Cu(II) shows the most promise for sequencing. Spectra obtained from the CID of singly and doubly charged Cu-heptaalanine ions, [M + Cu - H](+) and [M + Cu](2+) , are complimentary and together provide cleavage at every residue and no neutral losses. (This contrasts with [M + H](+) of heptaalanine, where CID does not provide backbone ions to sequence the first three residues.) Transition metal cationization produces abundant metallated a-ions by CID, unlike protonated peptides that produce primarily b- and y-ions. The prominence of metallated a-ions is interesting because they do not always form from b-ions. Tandem mass spectrometry on metallated (Met = metal) a- and b-ions indicate that [b(n)  + Met - H](2+) lose CO to form [a(n)  + Met - H](2+), mimicking protonated structures. In contrast, [a(n)  + Met - H](2+) eliminate an amino acid residue to form [a(n-1)  + Met - H](2+), which may be useful in sequencing. PMID:22124980

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  16. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  17. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1997-06-01

    Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

  19. Possible role of metal ionophore against zinc induced cognitive dysfunction in D-galactose senescent mice.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Kanchan; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Prakash, Atish

    2016-06-01

    Metal ionophores are considered as potential anti-dementia agents, and some are currently undergoing clinical trials. Many metals are known to accumulate and distribute abnormally in the aging brain. Alterations in zinc metal homeostasis in the glutaminergic synapse could contribute to ageing and the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of metal ionophores on long term administration of zinc in D-galactose induced senescent mice. The ageing model was established by combined administration of zinc and D-galactose to mice for 6 weeks. A novel metal ionophore, PBT-2 was given daily to zinc-induced d-galactose senescent mice. The cognitive behaviour of mice was monitored using the Morris Water Maze. The anti-oxidant status and amyloidogenic activity in the ageing mouse was measured by determining mito-oxidative parameters and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Systemic administration of both zinc and D-galactose significantly produced memory deficits, mito-oxidative damage, heightened acetylcholinesterase enzymatic activity and deposition of amyloid-β. Treatment with PBT-2 significantly improved behavioural deficits, biochemical profiles, cellular damage, and curbed the deposition of APP in zinc-induced senescent mice. These findings suggest that PBT-2, acting as a metal protein attenuating compound, may be helpful in the prevention of AD or alleviation of ageing. PMID:26923568

  20. Metal ion-induced toxic histamine release from human basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schedle, A; Samorapoompichit, P; Füreder, W; Rausch-Fan, X H; Franz, A; Sperr, W R; Sperr, W; Slavicek, R; Simak, S; Klepetko, W; Ellinger, A; Ghannadan, M; Baghestanian, M; Valent, P

    1998-03-15

    Recent data suggest that distinct metal ions can be released from dental alloys or other biomaterials, and may cause toxic effects on various cells. In this study, the effects of 14 metal ions on histamine release from human blood basophils (n = 4), isolated tissue mast cells (lung n = 8, uterus n = 2, skin n = 1, gingiva n = 1), the basophil cell line KU-812, and the mast cell line HMC-1 were analyzed. Of the 14 metal ions, Ag+ (0.33 mM) and Hg2+ (0.33 mM) were found to induce release of histamine in blood basophils, KU-812, mast cells, and HMC-1. The effects of Ag+ and Hg2+ were dose dependent and were observed within 60 min of incubation. In primary mast cells and basophils, AU3+ (0.33 mM) also induced histamine release, whereas no effects of Au3+ on HMC-1 or KU-812 cells were seen. The other metal ions showed no effects on primary or immortal cells within 60 min. However, Pt4+ (0.33 mM) induced histamine liberation in HMC-1 and lung mast cells after 12 h. The Ag+- and Hg2+-induced rapid release of histamine from HMC-1 was associated with ultrastructural signs of necrosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast, prolonged exposure to Pt4+ (0.33 mM, 14 h) induced apoptotic cell death in HMC-1 cells, as assessed by electron microscopy and DNA analysis. Together, certain metal ions induce distinct cytopathogenic effects in mast cells and basophils. Whereas Ag+, Hg2+, and Au3+ cause direct toxicity, Pt4 causes cell death through induction of apoptosis. Whether such effects contribute to local adverse reactions to metal-containing biomaterials in vivo remains to be determined. PMID:9492216

  1. Metal induced inhalation exposure in urban population: A probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widziewicz, Kamila; Loska, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    The paper was aimed at assessing the health risk in the populations of three Silesian cities: Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa and Katowice exposed to the inhalation intake of cadmium, nickel and arsenic present in airborne particulate matter. In order to establish how the exposure parameters affects risk a probabilistic risk assessment framework was used. The risk model was based on the results of the annual measurements of As, Cd and Ni concentrations in PM2.5 and the sets of data on the concentrations of those elements in PM10 collected by the Voivodship Inspectorate of Environmental Protection over 2012-2013 period. The risk was calculated as an incremental lifetime risk of cancer (ILCR) in particular age groups (infants, children, adults) following Monte Carlo approach. With the aim of depicting the effect the variability of exposure parameters exerts on the risk, the initial parameters of the risk model: metals concentrations, its infiltration into indoor environment, exposure duration, exposure frequency, lung deposition efficiency, daily lung ventilation and body weight were modeled as random variables. The distribution of inhalation cancer risk due to exposure to ambient metals concentrations was LN (1.80 × 10-6 ± 2.89 × 10-6) and LN (6.17 × 10-7 ± 1.08 × 10-6) for PM2.5 and PM10-bound metals respectively and did not exceed the permissible limit of the acceptable risk. The highest probability of contracting cancer was observed for Katowice residents exposed to PM2.5 - LN (2.01 × 10-6 ± 3.24 × 10-6). Across the tested age groups adults were approximately one order of magnitude at higher risk compared to infants. Sensitivity analysis showed that exposure duration (ED) and body weight (BW) were the two variables, which contributed the most to the ILCR.

  2. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  3. Topology-induced, strongly diamagnetic response of hollow structured metals at broadband microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Li, Sucheng; Li, Shuo; Duan, Qian; Lu, Weixin; Hou, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Fractal is a type of exotic geometrical shape. By employing the H-fractal and the effective medium view, we show a broadband, strongly diamagnetic response, μ r eff ~0, arising from the structured metallic plate with hollow fractal apertures and without loading high-permittivity dielectrics. In particular, such ~0 permeability is induced by the inherent topology of the fractal aperture and is hardly achieved among other metallodielectric structures with low volumetric ratio of metal. As a demonstration, we present a design of structured metal of 64 % hollowness, which gives rise to a close-to-zero effective permeability with relative bandwidth 175 %.

  4. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  5. Laser-induced metallic nanograined thin films processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Nicoleta E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Toadere, Florin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Tosa, Valer E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    A direct laser writing method for designing metallic nanograined thin films is presented. This method takes advantage of photon conversion within a chemical process localized at the focal point. A computer controlled positioning system allows the control of experimental parameters and spatial resolution of the pattern. Spectroscopic investigations reveal variable attenuation of the optical properties in UV-visible range and a spectral imaging processing algorithm simulated the functionality of these films in visible light. This could be an important step for obtaining neutral density attenuators.

  6. [Cement as a metal allergy-inducing agent].

    PubMed

    Rudzki, E; Kozłowska, A; Czerwińska-Dihm, I

    1981-01-01

    Three groups of patients suffering from eczema, exposed to cement, have been examined. Altogether there were 293 subjects. No particularly strong sensitizing properties of the Polish cement have been found. This, however, calls for confirmation. Differences, hitherto unknown, between masons and concretors have been found at the middle stage of eczema incubation and at middle age when occupational skin lesions occur, indicating a clearly higher allergy risk in concretors. On the other hand the sensitivity to particular metals has been similar in all building workers and did not differ from that in other countries. PMID:6917934

  7. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Narasimhan, R; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-22

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations. PMID:27494475

  8. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  9. Application Of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique In Investigation Of Historical Metal Threads

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Khedr, A.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2009-09-27

    Analysis of the composition of an object is a necessary step in the documentation of the properties of this object for estimating its condition. Also this is an important task for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the result of the application of the suggested treatments. There has been an important evolution in the methods used for analysis of metal threads since the second half of the twentieth century. Today, the main considerations of selecting a method are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal threads. In this study various historical metal threads collected from different museums were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal thread samples were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDX) which is reported in conservation field as the best method, to determine the chemical composition, and corrosion of investigated metal threads. The results show that all investigated metal threads in the present study are too dirty, strongly damaged and corroded with different types of corrosion products. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal threads. It is, in fact, very useful tool as a noninvasive method for analysis of historical metal threads. The first few laser shots are very useful for the investigation of the corrosion and dirt layer, while the following shots are very useful and effective for investigating the coating layer. Higher number of laser shots are very useful for the main

  10. Guest-Induced Emergent Properties in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Allendorf, Mark D; Foster, Michael E; Léonard, François; Stavila, Vitalie; Feng, Patrick L; Doty, F Patrick; Leong, Kirsty; Ma, Eric Yue; Johnston, Scott R; Talin, A Alec

    2015-04-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline nanoporous materials comprised of organic electron donors linked to metal ions by strong coordination bonds. Applications such as gas storage and separations are currently receiving considerable attention, but if the unique properties of MOFs could be extended to electronics, magnetics, and photonics, the impact on material science would greatly increase. Recently, we obtained "emergent properties," such as electronic conductivity and energy transfer, by infiltrating MOF pores with "guest" molecules that interact with the framework electronic structure. In this Perspective, we define a path to emergent properties based on the Guest@MOF concept, using zinc-carboxylate and copper-paddlewheel MOFs for illustration. Energy transfer and light harvesting are discussed for zinc carboxylate frameworks infiltrated with triplet-scavenging organometallic compounds and thiophene- and fullerene-infiltrated MOF-177. In addition, we discuss the mechanism of charge transport in TCNQ-infiltrated HKUST-1, the first MOF with electrical conductivity approaching conducting organic polymers. These examples show that guest molecules in MOF pores should be considered not merely as impurities or analytes to be sensed but also as an important aspect of rational design. PMID:26262970

  11. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and

  12. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement. PMID:25494729

  13. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  14. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  15. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs. PMID:26726416

  16. Metal mixture (As-Cd-Pb)-induced cell transformation is modulated by OLA1.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Baeza, Elia; Rojas, Emilio; Valverde, Mahara

    2016-07-01

    Environmental pollutants are complex mixtures in which metals are ubiquitous. Metal mixtures of arsenic, cadmium and lead are present in the occupational environment and generate health effects such as cardiovascular, renal and cancer diseases. Cell transformation induced by metal mixtures that depend on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell viability maintenance and avoidance of senescence was previously reported by our group. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of a Obg-like ATPase1 (OLA1) in the cell transformation of BALB/c 3T3 A31-1-1 clonal cells induced by a metal mixture (2 µM NaAsO2, 2 µM CdCl2 and 5 µM Pb(C2H3O2)2 3H2O) through ROS generation. The interest in OLA1 is justified because this protein has been proposed to be a negative regulator of the cellular antioxidant response. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown OLA1 before the initiation stage of the transformation assay. We evaluated (ROS) and OLA1 protein expression throughout the initiation and promotion stages of transformation. OLA1 knockdown modulated metal mixture-induced cell transformation more strongly when the metal mixture was an initiator stimulus than when it was a promoter. The ability of the metal mixture to initiate cell transformation was diminished by OLA1 knockdown, an effect that depended on intracellular ROS levels. The effect of OLA1 was synergistic with N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) co-treatment. Oxidative stress-associated transcription factors Egr1 and Smad were also down-regulated by the OLA1 knockdown, contributing to the rescue of metal mixture cell transformation. PMID:26984302

  17. Investigation of Historical Metal Objects Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (libs) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  18. Investigation of historical metal objects using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Ghoneim, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of metal objects is a necessary step for establishing an appropriate conservation treatment of an object or to follow up the application's result of the suggested treatments. The main considerations on selecting a method that can be used in investigation and analysis of metal objects are based on the diagnostic power, representative sampling, reproducibility, destructive nature/invasiveness of analysis and accessibility to the appropriate instrument. This study aims at evaluating the usefulness of the use of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique for analysis of historical metal objects. In this study various historical metal objects collected from different museums and excavations in Egypt were investigated using (LIBS) technique. For evaluating usefulness of the suggested analytical protocol of this technique, the same investigated metal objects were investigated by other methods such as Scanning Electron Microscope with energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). This study confirms that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Technique is considered very useful technique that can be used safely for investigating historical metal objects. LIBS analysis can quickly provide information on the qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental content of different metal objects and their characterization and classification. It is practically non-destructive technique with the critical advantage of being applicable in situ, thereby avoiding sampling and sample preparations. It is can be dependable, satisfactory and effective method for low cost study of archaeological and historical metals. But we have to take into consideration that the corrosion of metal leads to material alteration and possible loss of certain metals in the form of soluble salts. Certain corrosion products are known to leach out of the object and therefore, their low content does not necessarily reflect the composition of the metal at the time of

  19. Subcellular distributions of metals and metal induced stress: A field study

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, K.D.; Howe, S.; Sanders, B.M. )

    1988-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a field study which took place around an exploratory well located in the Santa Barbara Channel. This study was designed to test for significant temporal and spatial differences in the concentrations of a number of drilling fluid-associated metals in both the sediments and biota. Temporal changes in the distribution of Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn were examined in the sediments, and the bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution of these metals were examined in three benthic invertebrate species before and after drilling. Statistically significant increases in the accumulation of several of the metals were found in the surface sediments down current from the site after drilling with Ba showing the most pronounced increase. Statistically significant increases in the bioaccumulation of Ba were also observed in two of the three species examined, Cyclocardia ventricosa and Pactinaria californiensis. Within these organisms the majority of the Ba was localized in the granular pellets (>97%) and less than 0.1% accumulated in the cytosol. These data indicate that although bioaccumulation of Ba occurs in some species immediately down current from the well, most of it remains in an insoluble for, presumably as BaSO{sub 4}.

  20. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  1. Shear-banding Induced Indentation Size Effect in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Sun, B. A.; Zhao, L. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Shear-banding is commonly regarded as the “plasticity carrier” of metallic glasses (MGs), which usually causes severe strain localization and catastrophic failure if unhindered. However, through the use of the high-throughput dynamic nanoindentation technique, here we reveal that nano-scale shear-banding in different MGs evolves from a “distributed” fashion to a “localized” mode when the resultant plastic flow extends over a critical length scale. Consequently, a pronounced indentation size effect arises from the distributed shear-banding but vanishes when shear-banding becomes localized. Based on the critical length scales obtained for a variety of MGs, we unveil an intrinsic interplay between elasticity and fragility that governs the nanoscale plasticity transition in MGs. Our current findings provide a quantitative insight into the indentation size effect and transition mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity in MGs. PMID:27324835

  2. Adsorption-induced magnetic properties and metallic behavior of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Lv, H. F.; Xiao, Haiyan J.

    2009-09-21

    Magnetic properties and electronic structures of graphene with Cl, S, and P adsorption have been investigated using ab initio calculations. The adsorption of Cl leads to Fermi level shifting to valence band, which results in metallic graphene. A band gap of 0.6 eV emerges in a S-absorbed graphene, leading to the semiconducting graphene. The unpaired electrons in the absorbed P atom is polarized and thus, exhibits a magnetic moment of 0.86 μB, while no magnetic moment has been observed after Cl and S adsorption. This demonstrates that the magnetic properties and conductive behavior of graphene can be modified via atom adsorption. Specially, P-absorbed graphene may be useful for spintronic applications, such as tunneling magnetoresistance.

  3. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  4. Evaluation of the environmentally induced fracture resistance of ductile nickel aluminide. Technical report number 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ricker, R.E.; Bertocci, U.; Fink, J.L.; Stoudt, M.R.

    1991-07-01

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and electrochemical experiments were performed in different aqueous solutions on ductile nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al+B, in order to evaluate the possibility of environmentally induced fracture of this material in neutral pH solutions as a result of hydrogen absorption. Two different processes were postulated that could lead to hydrogen absorption and embrittlement: (1) local acidification due to hydrolysis of the corrosion reaction products and (2) hydrogen reduction during the potential transient that accompanies film rupture and repair. Experiments were designed to evaluate each of these possibilities. First, slow strain rate tests were conducted in solutions with varying concentrations of metal ions and pH to determine the critical metal ion concentration and pH that result in hydrogen absorption and embrittlement of this material. Second, the potential transient that follows the mechanical rupture of the protective surface film in different solutions was measured and the minimum potential during the transient was compared to the potential that results in a hydrogen fugacity large enough to cause cracking. The results indicate that hydrogen reduction, absorption, and embrittlement are not to be expected in neutral solutions as a result of local acidification during crevice corrosion or film rupture during crack propagation or cyclic loading.

  5. Surface embrittlement of polyethylene pipe grade resin. Final report, 1 Sep 1979 - 31 Oct 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Broutman, L.J.

    1981-11-01

    Techniques were developed to simulate the effect of a brittle surface on the mechanical behavior of polyethylene. Polyethylene films were exposed to ultraviolet radiation so as to degrade them. These films were than heat fused to polyethylene substrates. It was demonstrated that specimens having bonded films on their surface were embrittled. In addition to attempting to simulate naturally embrittled surfaces by bonding of brittle films to the polyethylene substrate, specimens of polyethylene were subjected to U.V. radiation to determine the effect of surface embrittlement. Severe embrittlement was demonstrated by measuring tensile ultimate strain to failure which was much more sensitive to embrittlement than conventional impact strength. Additional experiments were conducted utilizing sharp razor notches of various depths in surface of polyethylene to evaluate their effect on tensile strain to failure. Experiments were conducted as a function of strain rate which has been demonstrated to have a strong influence on thenotch length required to cause embrittlement. It is shown that the notch length required to cause embrittlement is greater than the film thickness required to cause embrittlement. It has also been shown that U.V. exposure of the polyethylene surface increases the degree of crystallinity and hence establishes a residual stress state in the exposed polymer which has been measured by curvature techniques.

  6. The susceptibility of Cr-Mo-V steel welds to radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Ol'shanskii, N.A.; Amaev, A.D.; Gorskii, K.V.; Murav'eva, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of radiation on the susceptibility to embrittlement fracture of Cr-Mo-V steel welds, produced by electron beam, electroslag, and automatic hidden-arc methods is described. The relationship between microstructural features and susceptibility to radiation embrittlement is presented.

  7. Hydrogen gas embrittlement and the disc pressure test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelet, E. J.; Troiano, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A disc pressure test has been used to study the influenced of a hydrogen gas environment on the mechanical properties of three high strength superalloys, Inconel 718, L-605 and A-286, in static and dynamic conditions. The influence of the hydrogen pressure, loading rate, temperature, mechanical and thermal fatigue has investigated. The permeation characteristics of Inconel 718 have been determined in collaboration with the French AEC. The results complemented by a fractographic study are consistent either with a stress-sorption or with an internal embrittlement type of mechanism.

  8. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen. PMID:21609336

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF RADIATION EMBRITTLEMENT MODELS FOR U.S. POWER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S

    2006-01-01

    The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  10. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  11. Hydrogen Embrittlement in Zirconium: a Quasi-Continuum Density Functional Theory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.

    2012-02-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement in Zirconium becomes a very important and emergent issue for academia, industry and policy makers as a result of the Japan nuclear accident. The hydride formation, diffusion and embrittlement in zircolay will impact dramatically on the development of advanced nuclear energy systems, the life time extension of the current nuclear fleet and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Quasi-Continuum Density Functional Theory (QCDFT) is a powerful concurrent multiscale method based entirely on density functional theory (DFT) and allows quantum simulations of materials properties of a large system with billions of atoms. Using QCDFT modeling, we found that the presents of hydrogen at the cracktip of zirconium, both on crack surface and in-bulk, will form zirconium hydrides and embrittle the system. The concentration of hydrogen and orientation of crack plays important roles in such embrittlement. The mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement under various loading conditions will be discussed.

  12. Plasmon-induced Hot Carriers in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter; LANP Team

    2015-03-01

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. Here we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. A. M. acknowledges financial support from the Welch foundation through the J. Evans Attwell-Welch Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the Smalley Institute of Rice University (Grant No. L-C-004).

  13. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  14. Metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Lee, Myung-Jin; Kim, Kisun; Hyun, Jerome K.; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal (IO) films. Electrochemically synthesized silver IO films with a micrometer cavity exhibited notable fluorescence enhancement at the silver frame, and a decrease in fluorescence lifetime. Numerical calculations supported the observations of a higher fluorescence efficiency at the frame than in the cavity.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  16. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  17. Light-induced resistive switching in silicon-based metal-insulator-semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhov, S. V.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Koryazhkina, M. N.; Antonov, I. N.; Kasatkin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied light-induced resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures based on silicon covered with a tunneling-thin SiO2 layer and nanometer-thick layer of antimony. The role of an insulator was played by yttria-stabilized zirconia.

  18. Spin-state transition induced half metallicity in a cobaltate from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xuedong; Fan, Fengren; Li, Zhengwei; Wang, Hongbo; Wu, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Half metal is a promising spintronic material. Here, we explore, using first principles calculations, a spin-state transition induced half metallicity in a layered cobaltate via a physical or chemical pressure. Our exemplary first principles study shows that the layered cobaltate Sr2CoO3F would undergo a transition, under a pressure of 5.4 GPa, from a high-spin antiferromagnetic insulator to an intermediate-spin ferromagnetic half-metal. The former phase is associated with a superexchange in a Mott insulator, and the latter one is due to a broad band formation and a kinetic energy gain of the partially occupied eg orbital. Note that the above transition could also be induced by a chemical pressure via doping in (Sr1-xCax)2CoO3F (x > 0.3). This work suggests that a cobaltate would be of a particular interest if stabilized into an intermediate-spin state.

  19. Direct optical detection of current induced spin accumulation in metals by magnetization-induced second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pattabi, A. Gu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Finley, J.; Lee, O. J.; Raziq, H. A.; Gorchon, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Bokor, J.

    2015-10-12

    Strong spin-orbit coupling in non-magnetic heavy metals has been shown to lead to large spin currents flowing transverse to a charge current in such a metal wire. This in turn leads to the buildup of a net spin accumulation at the lateral surfaces of the wire. Spin-orbit torque effects enable the use of the accumulated spins to exert useful magnetic torques on adjacent magnetic layers in spintronic devices. We report the direct detection of spin accumulation at the free surface of nonmagnetic metal films using magnetization-induced optical surface second harmonic generation. The technique is applied to probe the current induced surface spin accumulation in various heavy metals such as Pt, β-Ta, and Au with high sensitivity. The sensitivity of the technique enables us to measure the time dynamics on a sub-ns time scale of the spin accumulation arising from a short current pulse. The ability of optical surface second harmonic generation to probe interfaces suggests that this technique will also be useful for studying the dynamics of spin accumulation and transport across interfaces between non-magnetic and ferromagnetic materials, where spin-orbit torque effects are of considerable interest.

  20. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  1. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were ‑5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  2. Laser-induced metal plasmas for pulsed laser deposition of metal-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaars, Erik; Colgan, James; Rajendiran, Sudha; Rossall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal-oxide thin films, e.g. ZnO, MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2, are widely used in e.g. microelectronics, catalysts, photonics and displays. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is a plasma-based thin-film deposition technique that is highly versatile and fast, however it suffers from limitations in control of film quality due to a lack of fundamental understanding of the underlying physical processes. We present experimental and modelling studies of the initial phases of PLD: laser ablation and plume expansion. A 2D hydrodynamic code, POLLUX, is used to model the laser-solid interaction of a Zn ablation with a Nd:YAG laser. In this early phase of PLD, the plasma plume has temperatures of about 10 eV, is highly ionized, and travels with a velocity of about 10-100 km/sec away from the target. Subsequently, the plasma enters the plume expansion phase in which the plasma cools down and collision chemistry changes the composition of the plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy shows that Zn I and Zn II emission lines dominate the visible range of the light emission. Comparison with the Los Alamos plasma kinetics code ATOMIC shows an average temperature around 1 eV, indicating a significant drop in plasma temperature during the expansion phase. We acknowledge support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Grant EP/K018388/1.

  3. Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitobi, Hidekazu; Tanabe, Mamoru; Sekkat, Zouheir; Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-08-27

    Nanomovement of azo polymers induced by metal tip enhanced near-field illumination was studied. A protrusion with 47 nm full width at half maximum was induced with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit. At the top of the protrusion, an anisotropic movement occurs in a direction nearly parallel to the polarization of the incident light, and suggests the existence at the tip end of not only a longitudinal but also a lateral component of the electric field of light. The anisotropic photofluidity and the optical gradient force played important roles in the process of the light induced polymer movement.

  4. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  5. Metal-induced crystallization of a-Si thin films by nonvacuum treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Thin film polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) is of considerable interest today for microelectronics, flat panel displays, and photovoltaics. Low thermal budget solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of a-Si precursor films was achieved using surface treatments with metal-containing solutions. Two different treatment procedures were demonstrated. With these treatments, one based on a Pd solution and the other on a Ni solution, the SPC time at 600 C was reduced from 18 h to 10 min or less. This approach renders the usual vacuum deposition step used in metal-induced crystallization unnecessary. The authors find that the ultraviolet reflectance and Raman shift signals for the crystallized films are independent of whether the SPC-enhancing metal is applied by vacuum or solution. These characterization results do differ, however, with the metal applied.

  6. Ultrasonically induced phthalocyanine degradation: decolouration vs. metal release.

    PubMed

    Banks, Craig E; Wylie, Alison H; Compton, Richard G

    2004-07-01

    The ultrasonically induced degradations of nickel(II) 2,9,16,23-tetraphenoxy-29H, 31H-phthalocyanine and vanadyl 2,9,16,23-tetraphenoxy-29H, 31H-phthalocyanine in a biphasic system consisting of chloroform and water are investigated. Decolourisation of the organic phase containing the metallo-phthalocyanines is found to occur rapidly (approximately minutes for 8 ml of ca. 5 microM solution). Analysis of the aqueous solute via ICP-OES, reveals significant amounts of the released nickel ultimately transfers into the aqueous phase but at a rate much slower than that of decolourisation, whereas the vanadium remains within the organic phase suggesting only partial degradation despite efficient decolourisation. PMID:15157864

  7. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  8. Electric current induced flow of liquid metals: Mechanism and substrate-surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.; Howarth, J.; Dutta, I.

    2014-01-28

    Long range, continuous flow of liquid metals occurs upon application of an electric current. Here, we report experimental results elucidating the mechanism of current-induced liquid metal flow, and its dependence on substrate surface condition. It is shown that the observed flow is diffusion-controlled, with the flow-rate depending linearly on applied current density, indicating that it is driven by electromigration. The effective charge number for liquid electromigration, Z*, of several pure metals, such as Al, Bi, Ga, Sn, and Pb, were deduced from the experimental results and were found to be close to the elemental valency. With the exception of liquid Pb, Z* for all liquid metals tested in this study were positive, indicating that: (i) electron wind contributes much less to Z* in liquid metals than in solids, and (ii) with a few exceptions, liquid metals generally flow in the direction of the electric current. On smooth substrates which are wetted well by the liquid metal, flow occurs in a thin, continuous stream. On rough surfaces which are poorly wetted, on the other hand, discrete beads of liquid form, with mass transport between adjacent beads occurring by surface diffusion on the substrate. A rationale for the role of substrate roughness in fostering this observed transition in flow mechanism is presented.

  9. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging `oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events.

  10. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician–Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging ‘oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician–Silurian palaeobiological events. PMID:26305681

  11. A Generic Guiding Principle for the Prediction of Metal-Induced Reconstructions of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shenyuan; Zhang, Lixin; Chen, Hua; Wang, Enge; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    We have performed extensive and systematical ab initio calculations to substantiate a recently proposed generalized electron counting (GEC) rule that governs the rich patterns of compound semiconductor reconstruction induced by metal adsorption. In this rule, the metal adsorbates serve as an electron bath, either donating or accepting the right number of electrons, with which the binary host system chooses a specific reconstruction under the classical electron counting rule, and meanwhile, the adsorbates stay in their optimal valency. The GEC rule is applied to different GaAs surfaces deposited by various classes of metal adsorbates, leading to a number of possible reconstructions, which can be further confirmed by first-principles calculations and/or experiments. The alkali metal adsorption on the GaAs(110) surface up to the saturate coverage is a perfect example of the GEC rule. The application of the GEC rule to the prototype system of Mn/GaAs(001) not only predicts possible reconstruction patterns over a wide range of coverage, but also provides an underlying link between the reconstruction structures and the local magnetic moments of the metal adsorbates. In Au/GaAs(100), we demonstrate the application of the GEC rule to those systems where metal adsrobates form covalent bonds with the substrate. The GEC rule, as a generic principle, is expected to be applicable to more metal-adsorbed compound semiconductor surfaces. PACS numbers: 68.35.-p, 68.43.Bc, 75.70.-i

  12. A simple approach for producing colloidal noble metal nanocrystals: Alternating voltage induced electrochemical synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Kevin

    Intense research has been focused on developing bottom-up nanocrystal synthesis techniques to obtain nanocrystals with sophisticated compositions and enhanced perfomances. Three popular methods are: 1) the reduction of metal complex ions or molecules with selected reducing agents, 2) the decomposition of metal compounds at elevated temperatures, and 3) the electrochemical reduction of metal ions using specialized potentiostats. The first two require expensive metal salt precursors while the last requires specialized potentiostats and either employ a single sacrificial electrode or metal salt precursors. To resolve these issues, we have focused on a facile and generic approach to generate nanocrystals by an alternating voltage induced electrochemical synthesis (AVIES) method. Nanocrystals are produced when an alternating voltage is applied by a common laboratory transformer to two sacrificial electrodes that are inserted in an electrolyte solution containing capping ligands. This work focuses on the ability of the AVIES approach to synthesize Au, Pd, and Pt noble metal nanocrystals. The nanocrystals synthesized were found to be dependent on the electrolyte identity, capping ligand, applied voltage, reaction temperature. The ability of AVIES to produce alloyed nanocrystals starting with alloyed electrodes will be discussed. The AVIES approach requires neither expensive metal compounds nor specialized instruments, is environmentally benign, and can be easily adoptable to any research lab.

  13. Metal-induced malformations in early Palaeozoic plankton are harbingers of mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R A; Emsbo, Poul; Munnecke, Axel; Nuns, Nicolas; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lepot, Kevin; Quijada, Melesio; Paris, Florentin; Servais, Thomas; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Glacial episodes have been linked to Ordovician-Silurian extinction events, but cooling itself may not be solely responsible for these extinctions. Teratological (malformed) assemblages of fossil plankton that correlate precisely with the extinction events can help identify alternate drivers of extinction. Here we show that metal poisoning may have caused these aberrant morphologies during a late Silurian (Pridoli) event. Malformations coincide with a dramatic increase of metals (Fe, Mo, Pb, Mn and As) in the fossils and their host rocks. Metallic toxins are known to cause a teratological response in modern organisms, which is now routinely used as a proxy to assess oceanic metal contamination. Similarly, our study identifies metal-induced teratology as a deep-time, palaeobiological monitor of palaeo-ocean chemistry. The redox-sensitive character of enriched metals supports emerging 'oceanic anoxic event' models. Our data suggest that spreading anoxia and redox cycling of harmful metals was a contributing kill mechanism during these devastating Ordovician-Silurian palaeobiological events. PMID:26305681

  14. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  15. Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting Using Metallic-Nanoparticle-Loaded Photocatalysts and Photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-18

    Visible- and near-infrared-light-driven water splitting, which splits water molecules to generate hydrogen and oxygen gases, is a significant subject in artificial photosynthesis with the goal of achieving a low-carbon society. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to studies on the development of a plasmon-induced water-splitting system responding to visible light. In this review, we categorized water-splitting systems as gold-nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor photocatalytic particles system and metallic-nanoparticles-loaded semiconductor photoelectrode systems, and introduce the latest studies according to these categories. Especially, we describe the studies that optimize a material or a structural design of metallic-nanoparticle-loaded semiconductor photoelectrodes and consider a whole water-splitting system, including a cathode design. Furthermore, we discuss important points when studying plasmon-induced water splitting, and we describe a methodology that enhances plasmon-induced water-splitting efficiency. PMID:26593450

  16. Optimization of laccase production by two strains of Ganoderma lucidum using phenolic and metallic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Francisco; Papinutti, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst is a white rot fungus that is able to degrade the lignin component in wood. The ability of two strains of this species to produce the ligninolytic enzyme laccase was assessed. After the evaluation of induction with heavy metals and phenolic compounds, it was found that among the tested substances, copper and ferulic acid are the best laccase inducers. It was also observed that the two types of inducers (phenolic and metallic) produce different electrophoretic patterns of laccase activity. Optimized concentrations of inducers were obtained through a factorial design and the thermal stability of optimized supernatants was studied at a wide range of acidic pH. We found that the enzyme is more thermostable at higher pH values. PMID:25011599

  17. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  18. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  19. Heavy metal chelator TPEN attenuates fura-2 fluorescence changes induced by cadmium, mercury and methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    OHKUBO, Masato; MIYAMOTO, Atsushi; SHIRAISHI, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation with heavy metals is known to induce calcium (Ca2+) mobilization in many cell types. Interference with the measurement of intracellular Ca2+ concentration by the heavy metals in cells loaded with Ca2+ indicator fura-2 is an ongoing problem. In this study, we analyzed the effect of heavy metals on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by using TPEN, a specific cell-permeable heavy metal chelator. Manganese chloride (30–300 µM) did not cause significant changes in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. A high concentration (300 µM) of lead acetate induced a slight elevation in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. In contrast, stimulation with cadmium chloride, mercury chloride or MeHg (3–30 µM) elicited an apparent elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in a dose-dependent manner. In cells stimulated with 10 or 30 µM cadmium chloride, the addition of TPEN decreased the elevated fura-2 fluorescence ratio to basal levels. In cells stimulated with mercury or MeHg, the addition of TPEN significantly decreased the elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio induced by lower concentrations (10 µM) of mercury or MeHg, but not by higher concentrations (30 µM). Pretreatment with Ca2+ channel blockers, such as verapamil, 2-APB or lanthanum chloride, resulted in different effects on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. Our study provides a characterization of the effects of several heavy metals on the mobilization of divalent cations and the toxicity of heavy metals to neuronal cells. PMID:26781706

  20. Heavy metal chelator TPEN attenuates fura-2 fluorescence changes induced by cadmium, mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Masato; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Mitsuya

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation with heavy metals is known to induce calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization in many cell types. Interference with the measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by the heavy metals in cells loaded with Ca(2+) indicator fura-2 is an ongoing problem. In this study, we analyzed the effect of heavy metals on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by using TPEN, a specific cell-permeable heavy metal chelator. Manganese chloride (30-300 µM) did not cause significant changes in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. A high concentration (300 µM) of lead acetate induced a slight elevation in the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. In contrast, stimulation with cadmium chloride, mercury chloride or MeHg (3-30 µM) elicited an apparent elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio in a dose-dependent manner. In cells stimulated with 10 or 30 µM cadmium chloride, the addition of TPEN decreased the elevated fura-2 fluorescence ratio to basal levels. In cells stimulated with mercury or MeHg, the addition of TPEN significantly decreased the elevation of the fura-2 fluorescence ratio induced by lower concentrations (10 µM) of mercury or MeHg, but not by higher concentrations (30 µM). Pretreatment with Ca(2+) channel blockers, such as verapamil, 2-APB or lanthanum chloride, resulted in different effects on the fura-2 fluorescence ratio. Our study provides a characterization of the effects of several heavy metals on the mobilization of divalent cations and the toxicity of heavy metals to neuronal cells. PMID:26781706

  1. Divalent metal ions enhance DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Gross, Daniel; Cooney, Adele; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2014-05-21

    Parkinson disease (PD) features profound striatal dopamine depletion and Lewy bodies containing abundant precipitated alpha-synuclein. Mechanisms linking alpha-synucleinopathy with the death of dopamine neurons remain incompletely understood. One such link may be 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). All of the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine passes through DOPAL, which is toxic. DOPAL also potently oligomerizes alpha-synuclein and alpha-synuclein oligomers are thought to be pathogenic in PD. Another implicated factor in PD pathogenesis is metal ions, and alpha-synuclein contains binding sites for these ions. In this study we tested whether divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein in cell-free system and in PC12 cells conditionally over-expressing alpha-synuclein. Incubation with divalent metal ions augmented DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein (Cu(2+)>Fe(2+)>Mn(2+)), whereas monovalent Cu(1+) and trivalent Fe(3+) were without effect. Other dopamine metabolites, dopamine itself, and metal ions alone or in combination with dopamine, also had no effect. Antioxidant treatment with ascorbic acid and divalent cation chelation with EDTA attenuated the augmentation by Cu(2+) of DOPAL-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Incubation of PC12 cells with L-DOPA markedly increased intracellular DOPAL content and promoted alpha-synuclein dimerization. Co-incubation with Cu(2+) amplified (p=0.01), while monoamine oxidase inhibition prevented, L-DOPA-related dimerization of alpha-synuclein (p=0.01). We conclude that divalent metal ions augment DOPAL-induced oligomerization of alpha-synuclein. Drugs that interfere with this interaction might constitute a novel approach for future treatment or prevention approaches. PMID:24670480

  2. A study of ps-laser-induced-damage-threshold in hybrid metal-dielectric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, Václav; Vanda, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced-damage-threshold of two types of metal-dielectric mirrors was tested using a laser apparatus working at 800 nm wavelength with 1 ps pulse length at 1 kHz repetition rate and in 106-on-1 test mode. Four sets of mirror samples with different layer system designs using a multilayer Ta2O5/SiO2 coating on silver or gold metal layer were manufactured. Both BK7 and fused silica substrate materials were used for manufacturing of samples. The measured damage thresholds at 45 deg incidence and P-polarization were compared with computed properties of layer system and used materials.

  3. Carbon dioxide activation and reaction induced by electron transfer at an oxide-metal interface.

    PubMed

    Calaza, Florencia; Stiehler, Christian; Fujimori, Yuichi; Sterrer, Martin; Beeg, Sebastian; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Nilius, Niklas; Heyde, Markus; Parviainen, Teemu; Honkala, Karoliina; Häkkinen, Hannu; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-12

    A model system has been created to shuttle electrons through a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure to induce the formation of a CO2 anion radical from adsorbed gas-phase carbon dioxide that subsequently reacts to form an oxalate species. The process is completely reversible, and thus allows the elementary steps involved to be studied at the atomic level. The oxalate species at the MIM interface have been identified locally by scanning tunneling microscopy, chemically by IR spectroscopy, and their formation verified by density functional calculations. PMID:26012347

  4. Pressure-Induced Metallization of the Mott Insulator MnO

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Aracne, C M; Jackson, D D; Weir, S T; Malba, V; Baker, P A; Vohra, Y K

    2004-01-12

    High-pressure electrical conductivity experiments have been performed on the Mott insulator MnO to a maximum pressure of 106 GPa. We observe a steady decrease in resistivity to 90 GPa, followed by a large, rapid decrease by a factor of 10{sup 5} between 90 and 106 GPa. Temperature cycling the sample at 87 and 106 GPa shows insulating and metallic behavior at these pressures, respectively. Our observations provide strong evidence for a pressure-induced Mott insulator-to-metal transition with an accompanying magnetic collapse beginning at 90 GPa.

  5. Generalized Electron Counting in Determination of Metal-Induced Reconstruction of Compound Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lixin; Wang, E. G.; Xue, Qi-Kun; Zhang, S. B.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Based on theoretical analysis, first-principles calculations, and experimental observations, we establish a generic guiding principle, embodied in generalized electron counting (GEC), that governs the surface reconstruction of compound semiconductors induced by different metal adsorbates. Within the GEC model, the adsorbates serve as an electron bath, donating or accepting the right number of electrons as the host surface chooses a specific reconstruction that obeys the classic electron-counting model. The predictive power of the GEC model is illustrated for a wide range of metal adsorbates.

  6. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  7. Atmospheric thermometry for metallic surfaces by laser-induced second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedanekar, Niranjan R.; Yin, Huiqi; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1996-07-01

    To the best of our knowledge we report the first demonstration of surface thermometry using laser-induced second-harmonic generation (SHG) on a realistic metallic surface at atmospheric pressure. The surface is probed with a pulsed infrared laser beam and the SHG signal is monitored in reflection. For metallic silver, the SHG signal is found to be temperature dependent in the 25-120 degrees C range. The current accuracy of the method is +/-5 degrees C. Future work with platinum should permit the application of SHG thermometry to much higher surface temperatures.

  8. The role of metal ions in X-ray-induced photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2016-03-01

    Metal centres in biomolecules are recognized as being particularly sensitive to radiation damage by X-ray photons. This results in such molecules being both susceptible to an effective X-ray-induced loss of function and problematic to study using X-ray diffraction methods, with reliable structures of the metal centres difficult to obtain. Despite the abundance of experimental evidence, the mechanistic details of radiation damage at metal centres are unclear. Here, using ab initio calculations, we show that the absorption of X-rays by microsolvated Mg2+ results in a complicated chain of ultrafast electronic relaxation steps that comprise both intra- and intermolecular processes and last for a few hundred femtoseconds. At the end of this cascade the metal reverts to its original charge state, the immediate environment becomes multiply ionized and large concentrations of radicals and slow electrons build up in the metal's vicinity. We conclude that such cascades involving metal ions are essential to our understanding of radiation chemistry and radiation damage in biological environments.

  9. The Information Fusion Embrittlement Models for U.S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domain model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The

  10. Impact of metal-induced degradation on the determination of pharmaceutical compound purity and a strategy for mitigation.

    PubMed

    Dotterer, Sally K; Forbes, Robert A; Hammill, Cynthia L

    2011-04-01

    Case studies are presented demonstrating how exposure to traces of transition metals such as copper and/or iron during sample preparation or analysis can impact the accuracy of purity analysis of pharmaceuticals. Some compounds, such as phenols and indoles, react with metals in the presence of oxygen to produce metal-induced oxidative decomposition products. Compounds susceptible to metal-induced decomposition can degrade following preparation for purity analysis leading to falsely high impurity results. Our work has shown even metals at levels below 0.1 ppm can negatively impact susceptible compounds. Falsely low results are also possible when the impurities themselves react with metals and degrade prior to analysis. Traces of metals in the HPLC mobile phase can lead to chromatographic artifacts, affecting the reproducibility of purity results. To understand and mitigate the impact of metal induced decomposition, a proactive strategy is presented. The pharmaceutical would first be tested for reactivity with specific transition metals in the sample solvent/diluents and in the HPLC mobile phase. If found to be reactive, alternative sample diluents and/or mobile phases with less reactive solvents or addition of a metal chelator would be explored. If unsuccessful, glassware cleaning or sample solution refrigeration could be investigated. By employing this strategy during method development, robust purity methods would be delivered to the quality control laboratories, preventing future problems from potential sporadic contamination of glassware with metals. PMID:21163601

  11. Application of magnetoacoustic emission technique to temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denale, R.; Namkung, M.; Todhunter, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic phenomena associated with the use of the magnetoacoustic emission technique for the temper embrittlement characterization of HY-80 steel are investigated in an attempt to explain some peculiarities observed in highly embrittled HY-80 samples. In particular, attention is given to the effects of the ac magnetic field frequency and shape. The peak amplitude of the magnetoacoustic burst, which is directly related to the width of the pulse height distribution, is shown to be a critical parameter in the determination of the degree of temper embrittlement in the steel.

  12. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  13. Evidence for photo-induced monoclinic metallic VO{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David A.; Andrea Artioli, Gianluca; Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-13

    We combine ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy with a diamond-anvil cell to decouple the insulator-metal electronic transition from the lattice symmetry changing structural transition in the archetypal strongly correlated material vanadium dioxide. Coherent phonon spectroscopy enables tracking of the photo-excited phonon vibrational frequencies of the low temperature, monoclinic (M{sub 1})-insulating phase that transforms into the metallic, tetragonal rutile structured phase at high temperature or via non-thermal photo-excitations. We find that in contrast with ambient pressure experiments where strong photo-excitation promptly induces the electronic transition along with changes in the lattice symmetry, at high pressure, the coherent phonons of the monoclinic (M{sub 1}) phase are still clearly observed upon the photo-driven phase transition to a metallic state. These results demonstrate the possibility of synthesizing and studying transient phases under extreme conditions.

  14. Identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.A.

    1986-11-01

    Biological attack of metallic systems is a longstanding problem that affects all structural materials in a variety of environment and systems. Corrosion of buried pipelines by sulfate-reducing bacteria has been studied by the petrochemical industry for years. In the power industry, corrosion studies have focused on condensers and service water systems where slime, barnacles, clams, and other macro-organisms are easily detected. Efforts have been made to eliminate the effect of these organisms through the use of chlorination, back-flushing, organic coatings, or thermal shock. The objective was to maintain component performance by eliminating biofouling and reducing metallic corrosion. Recently, it has been recognized that corrosion caused by micro-organisms can occur even in very clean systems. This article gives guidelines for the identification and counteraction of microbe-induced corrosion in metallic systems.

  15. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal-insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-06-01

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal-insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  16. Ni-Nb-Sn Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Fabricated by Microwave-Induced Sintering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoqiang; Li, Song; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Cao, Ziping; Yoshikawa, Noboru; Sato, Motoyasu; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-07-01

    Using a gas-atomized Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 metallic glassy alloy powder blended with Sn powder of various contents, Ni-Nb-Sn bulk metallic glassy matrix composites were fabricated by a microwave (MW)-induced sintering process in a single-mode 2.45 GHz MW applicator in a separated magnetic field. The Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 glassy alloy powder and its mixed powders containing Sn particles could be heated well in the magnetic field. The addition of Sn particles promoted densification of the sintered Ni59.35Nb34.45Sn6.2 metallic glassy powder. Bulk samples without crystallization of the glassy matrix and with good bonding state among the particles were achieved at a sintering temperature of 833 K.

  17. Metal-dependent SV40 viruses containing inducible enhancers from the upstream region of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Serfling, E; Lübbe, A; Dorsch-Häsler, K; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated SV40 recombinant viruses which are dependent on heavy metal ions for efficient propagation. They were obtained after-co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA (the so-called enhancer trap) with sonicated DNA from the mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) or human metallothionein-IIA (hMT-IIA) upstream regions. To substitute for the SV40 enhancer, these viruses have incorporated a segment of the immediate upstream region of the metallothionein genes. Two recombinant viruses of the SVMT-I type carry segments of the mMT-I gene from positions -73 to -187 and -39 to -194 inverted with respect to their natural configuration. The overlapping segment contains two of the four metal-responsive elements involved in the induction of the mMT-I gene by heavy metal ions. The SVMT-II recombinant virus contains a segment of the hMT-IIA gene from position -39 to -366 which harbors the metal- and hormone-responsive elements of the hMT-IIA gene. Insertion of the mMT-I segment downstream of a rabbit beta-globin test gene enhances beta-globin transcription upon metal ion stimulation. This shows that the immediate upstream region of the mouse metalliothionein-I gene, when detached from its TATA box, can act as an inducible enhancer. It may be generally true that the enhancer/promoters of inducible genes are composed of several regulatory sequence elements which are interspersed with constitutive elements. The number and spatial arrangement of these elements probably determines the basal versus induced level of expression. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2419129

  18. In vitro radiation induced alterations in heavy metals and metallothionein content in Plantago ovata Forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Mishra, Debadutta; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2008-09-01

    Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) have been used to study the effects of gamma irradiation on heavy metal accumulation in callus tissue of Plantago ovata-an important cash crop of India. PIXE analysis revealed radiation-induced alteration in trace element profile during developmental stages of the callus of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed antagonism between Fe and Cu and also Cu and Zn and synergistic effect between Fe and Zn. FACS analysis showed significant induction of the metallothionein (MT) protein following gamma-irradiation, and maximum induction was noted at the 50-Gy absorbed dose. This indicated a progressive increment of MTs as a measure for protection against gamma-rays, to combat alteration in the homeostasis of heavy metals like Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn. PMID:18493724

  19. Ion bombardment induced smoothing of amorphous metallic surfaces: Experiments versus computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vauth, Sebastian; Mayr, S. G.

    2008-04-15

    Smoothing of rough amorphous metallic surfaces by bombardment with heavy ions in the low keV regime is investigated by a combined experimental-simulational study. Vapor deposited rough amorphous Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 27.5} films are the basis for systematic in situ scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on the smoothing reaction due to 3 keV Kr{sup +} ion bombardment. The experimental results are directly compared to the predictions of a multiscale simulation approach, which incorporates stochastic rate equations of the Langevin type in combination with previously reported classical molecular dynamics simulations [Phys. Rev. B 75, 224107 (2007)] to model surface smoothing across length and time scales. The combined approach of experiments and simulations clearly corroborates a key role of ion induced viscous flow and ballistic effects in low keV heavy ion induced smoothing of amorphous metallic surfaces at ambient temperatures.

  20. Current-Induced Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Metal: Domain Wall Dynamics and Spin Wave Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Niu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    When a spin-polarized current flows through a ferromagnetic (FM) metal, angular momentum is transferred to the magnetization via spin transfer torque. However, corresponding theory is absent in antiferromagnetic (AFM) metals due to the absence of spin conservation. We solve this problem via effective gauge theory without the necessity of spin conservation. By identifying the adiabatic dynamics of conduction electrons as a non-Abelian gauge theory on degenerate band, we derive the AFM version of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with current-induced dynamics from a microscopic point of view. Quite different from its FM counterpart, current-induced dynamics in AFM materials does not behave as a torque, but a driving force triggering second order derivative of local staggered order with respect to time. Its physical consequences are studied in two examples: 1. A domain wall is accelerated to a terminal velocity without a Walker's threshold; 2. A sufficiently large spin current will generate spin wave excitation.

  1. The dual role of coherent twin boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement.

    PubMed

    Seita, Matteo; Hanson, John P; Gradečak, Silvija; Demkowicz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) causes engineering alloys to fracture unexpectedly, often at considerable economic or environmental cost. Inaccurate predictions of component lifetimes arise from inadequate understanding of how alloy microstructure affects HE. Here we investigate hydrogen-assisted fracture of a Ni-base superalloy and identify coherent twin boundaries (CTBs) as the microstructural features most susceptible to crack initiation. This is a surprising result considering the renowned beneficial effect of CTBs on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of many engineering alloys. Remarkably, we also find that CTBs are resistant to crack propagation, implying that hydrogen-assisted crack initiation and propagation are governed by distinct physical mechanisms in Ni-base alloys. This finding motivates a re-evaluation of current lifetime models in light of the dual role of CTBs. It also indicates new paths to designing materials with HE-resistant microstructures. PMID:25652438

  2. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  3. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  4. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Steven O; Fan, Chun-Yang; Yeoman, Kim; Wakefield, John; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this study, we describe the development of an Nrf2-specific reporter gene assay that can be used to study the oxidative stress response in multiple cell types. Using five different cell lines, the Nrf2-activating potency of twenty metals was assessed across a range of concentrations. While ten of the metals tested (cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, mercury, silver, sodium arsenite and zinc) stimulated Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity in at least three of the engineered cell lines, only three (cadmium, copper and sodium arsenite) were active in all five cell lines. A comparison of metal-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activation revealed significant differences in the absolute magnitude of activation as well as the relative potencies between the cell lines tested. However, there was no direct correlation between activity and potency. Taken together, these results show that the capacity to stimulate Nrf2 activity and relative potencies of these test compounds are highly dependent on the cell type tested. Since oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the mode of action of many toxicological studies, this observation may inform the design of paradigms for toxicity testing for toxicant prioritization and characterization. PMID:21643505

  5. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  6. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  7. Irradiation induced pulsations of reverse biased metal oxide/silicon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Tabacnics, M.; Rizutto, M. de A; Silva, A. de O D; Chandra, A.; Golovanov, V.; Ivanovskaya, M.; Khirunenko, L.

    2007-08-20

    Specific electronic features have been found in structures consisting of metal oxide layers on silicon substrates upon swift heavy ion irradiation. These features are linked to the appearance of radiation-induced negative differential resistances in the structures. In the reversed bias direction they show high frequency current pulsations at around {approx}10 kHz frequency. Their amplitude increases with increasing applied voltage. The pulsation frequency also shows a small increase. The current amplitude depends on the ion fluence and flux.

  8. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  9. In vivo severe corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of retrieved modular body titanium alloy hip-implants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Danieli C; Urban, Robert M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity, and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination, and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  10. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  11. Hydrogen Embrittlement of a 1500-MPa Tensile Strength Level Steel with an Ultrafine Elongated Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yihong; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2012-05-01

    A deformation of a tempered martensitic structure ( i.e., tempforming) at 773 K (500 °C) was applied to a 0.6 pct C-2 pct Si-1 pct Cr steel. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) property of the tempformed (TF) steel was investigated by a slow strain rate test (SSRT) and an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test (AACT). Hydrogen content within the samples after SSRT and AACT was measured by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The tempforming at 773 K (500 °C) using multipass caliber rolling with an accumulative are reduction of 76 pct resulted in the evolution of an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure with a strong <110>//rolling direction (RD) fiber deformation texture and a dispersion of spheroidized cementite particles. The SSRT of the pre-hydrogen-charged notched specimens and the AACT demonstrated that the TF sample had superior potential for HE resistance to the conventional quenched and tempered (QT) sample at a tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The TDS analysis also indicated that the hydrogen might be mainly trapped by reversible trapping sites such as grain boundaries and dislocations in the TF sample, and the hydrogen trapping states of the TF sample were similar to those of the QT sample. The QT sample exhibited hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture along the boundaries of coarse prior-austenite grains. In contrast, the hydrogen-induced cracking occurred in association with the UFEG structure in the TF sample, leading to the higher HE resistance of the TF sample.

  12. 19F-NMR reveals metal and operator-induced allostery in MerR.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingyun; Teng, Quincy; Phillips, Robert S; Brewer, John M; Summers, Anne O

    2007-08-01

    Metalloregulators of the MerR family activate transcription upon metal binding by underwinding the operator-promoter DNA to permit open complex formation by pre-bound RNA polymerase. Historically, MerR's allostery has been monitored only indirectly via nuclease sensitivity or by fluorescent nucleotide probes and was very specific for Hg(II), although purified MerR binds several thiophilic metals. To observe directly MerR's ligand-induced behavior we made 2-fluorotyrosine-substituted MerR and found similar, minor changes in (19)F chemical shifts of tyrosine residues in the free protein exposed to Hg(II), Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, DNA binding elicits large chemical shift changes in MerR's tyrosine residues and in DNA-bound MerR Hg(II) provokes changes very distinct from those of Cd(II) or Zn(II). These chemical shift changes and other biophysical and phenotypic properties of wild-type MerR and relevant mutants reveal elements of an allosteric network that enables the coordination state of the metal binding site to direct metal-specific movements in the distant DNA binding site and the DNA-bound state also to affect the metal binding domain. PMID:17560604

  13. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-07

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm{sup −1} of FWHM 10.3 cm{sup −1} and atomic smooth interfaces.

  14. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al2O3 under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm-1 of FWHM 10.3 cm-1 and atomic smooth interfaces.

  15. Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Heavy Metal-Induced Neurotoxicity: Effects of Cadmium, Mercury, and Copper

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Elena A.; Sokolova, Tatyana V.; Emelyanova, Larisa V.; Zakharova, Irina O.

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the role of mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC) in heavy-metal-induced neurotoxicity, we studied action of Cd2+, Hg2+, and Cu2+ on cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, respiratory function, and mitochondrial membrane potential of rat cell line PC12. As found, the metals produced, although in a different way, dose- and time-dependent changes of all these parameters. Importantly, Cd2+ beginning from 10 [mu]M and already at short incubation time (3 h) significantly inhibited the FCCP-uncoupled cell respiration; besides, practically the complete inhibition of the respiration was reached after 3 h incubation with 50 [mu]M Hg2+ or 500 [mu]M Cd2+, whereas even after 48 h exposure with 500 [mu]M Cu2+, only a 50% inhibition of the respiration occurred. Against the Cd2+-induced cell injury, not only different antioxidants and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors were protective but also such mtETC effectors as FCCP and stigmatellin (complex III inhibitor). However, all mtETC effectors used did not protect against the Hg2+- or Cu2+-induced cell damage. Notably, stigmatellin was shown to be one of the strongest protectors against the Cd2+-induced cell damage, producing a 15–20% increase in the cell viability. The mechanisms of the mtETC involvement in the heavy-metal-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death are discussed. PMID:22619586

  16. Elemental analysis of metals under water using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichahchy, A. E.; Cremers, D. A.; Ferris, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated for the detection of metals located under water. Repetitive laser sparks were formed on the metals by focused pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm). Using repetitive single sparks (RSS) at 10 Hz, only weak elemental emission signals were generated from even strongly emitting species at high concentrations (e.g. Al(I) from commercially pure aluminum). The spectrum in these cases was dominated by spectrally broad emissions (continuum radiation) from the plume ( T < 3000 K). The use of a repetitive spark pair (RSP), however, produced a plasma ( T ˜ 8,880 K) on the second pulse useful to monitor the elemental composition of the metals. In the RSP, a pair of pulses was focused on the metals at 10 Hz with the separation between pulses adjusted from 30 to 180 μs. The pulse pair was generated from a single laser. Only a weak dependence of the emission intensities on the separation between the pulses of the spark pair was observed although signal enhancements over two orders of magnitude were obtained compared to the RSS. Using the RSP, detection limits of 367, 520, 1200, and 1190 ppm were obtained for Cr, Cu, Mn, and Si in steel. Using time-resolved imaging of the laser plumes/plasmas formed on the metal samples under water, some characteristics of the excitation process were evaluated. It was determined that the first pulse of the RSP forms a large bubble or vapor cavity (maximum diameter ˜ 8 mm) on the metal surface which is then interrogated by the second pulse. The second pulse then forms a plasma resulting in excitation similar to that produced by a single laser spark formed on metal in air.

  17. Studies of low temperature, low flux radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor structural materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    There are several existing research programs which have components pertinent to the issue of low flux/low temperature embrittlement; in particular, examination of the Shippingport shield tank which has been exposed to low flux and relatively low temperature is being performed by ANL, and evaluation of low temperature embrittlement in A508 and A533B steels in support of the HTGR is currently being performed by ORNL. However, these programs are not specifically directed at the broader issue of low flux/low temperature embrittlement in a range of structural steels. Hence, the authors coordinated their effort with these programs so that their investigations were complementary to existing programs, and they focused on a set of materials which expand the data base developed in these programs. In particular, the authors have investigated embrittlement phenomena in steels that are similar to those used in support structure.

  18. Environmental hydrogen embrittlement of an alpha-beta titanium alloy - Effect of microstructure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.; Stein, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Study of environmental hydrogen embrittlement of a Ti-6 Al-4 alloy as a function of test displacement rate and of variations in alpha-beta microstructure. Embrittlement in low-pressure (about 1 atm) gaseous hydrogen was inversely dependent on test displacement rate and strongly dependent on microstructure. At a given displacement rate, microstructures having a continuous alpha-phase matrix were less severely embrittled than those having a continuous beta-phase matrix. Further, brittle fracture occurred in the former microstructures by transgranular cleavage and in the latter microstructures by intergranular separation. These observations are consistent with previous studies made on slow strain-rate embrittlement of hydrogen-charged titanium alloys and are explained in terms of relative hydrogen transport rates within the alpha-phase and beta-phase titanium.

  19. Influence of Al grain boundaries segregations and La-doping on embrittlement of intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anatoly I.; Wainstein, Dmitry L.; Rashkovskiy, Alexander Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The microscopic nature of intergranular fracture of NiAl was experimentally investigated by the set of electron spectroscopy techniques. The paper demonstrates that embrittlement of NiAl intermetallic compound is caused by ordering of atomic structure that leads to formation of structural aluminum segregations at grain boundaries (GB). Such segregations contain high number of brittle covalent interatomic bonds. The alloying by La increases the ductility of material avoiding Al GB enrichment and disordering GB atomic structure. The influence of La alloying on NiAl mechanical properties was investigated. GB chemical composition, atomic and electronic structure transformations after La doping were investigated by AES, XPS and EELFS techniques. To qualify the interatomic bonds metallicity the Fermi level (EF) position and electrons density (neff) in conduction band were determined in both undoped and doped NiAl. Basing on experimental results the physical model of GB brittleness formation was proposed.

  20. Thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel NPP Unit 2 in Jaslovske Bohunice for its radiation embrittlement regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Cepcek, S.

    1993-12-01

    The status of the preparation works for the thermal annealing operation at reactor pressure vessel (RPV) V-230-type Unit 2 in Jaslovske Bohunice planned for Autumn 1993 is presented in this paper. The producer of the RPV W-213 type, SKODA Works, will perform the thermal annealing operation and manufacture all equipment needed. During the planned shutdown for the refueling operation of this unit in September 1989, samples were prepared from base material (BM) and weld metal (WM) by means of special equipment used for the analysis of the chemical composition in the Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute (VUJE) laboratories. Results of the analysis of the irradiated samples and the hardness measurements of RPV material before and after annealing operation serves as the measure of radiation embrittlement recovery efficiency. Possible extension of the operation life of RPVs of WWER type by means of suitable provisions during normal operation before thermal annealing is also discussed.

  1. Differential GFP expression patterns induced by different heavy metals in Tg(hsp70:gfp) transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace Hwee Boon; Xu, Hongyan; Pi, Na; Kelly, Barry C; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is one of the most widely used biomarker for monitoring environment perturbations in biological systems. To facilitate the analysis of hsp70 expression as a biomarker, we generated a Tg(hsp70:gfp) transgenic medaka line in which green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene was driven by the medaka hsp70 promoter. Here, we characterized Tg(hsp70:gfp) medaka for inducible GFP expression by seven environment-relevant heavy metals, including mercury, arsenic, lead, cadmium, copper, chromium, and zinc. We found that four of them (mercury, arsenic, lead, and cadmium) induced GFP expression in multiple and different organs. In general, the liver, kidney, gut, and skin are among the most frequent organs to show induced GFP expression. In contrast, no detectable GFP induction was observed to copper, chromium, or zinc, indicating that the transgenic line was not responsive to all heavy metals. RT-qPCR determination of hsp70 mRNA showed similar induction and non-induction by these metals, which also correlated with the levels of metal uptake in medaka exposed to these metals. Our observations suggested that these heavy metals have different mechanisms of toxicity and/or differential bioaccumulation in various organs; different patterns of GFP expression induced by different metals may be used to determine or exclude metals in water samples tested. Furthermore, we also tested several non-metal toxicants such as bisphenol A, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 4-introphenol, and lindane; none of them induced significant GFP expression in Tg(hsp70:gfp) medaka, further suggesting that the inducibility of Tg(hsp70:gfp) for GFP expression is specific to a subset of heavy metals. PMID:25652692

  2. Plant responses to abiotic stresses: heavy metal-induced oxidative stress and protection by mycorrhization.

    PubMed

    Schützendübel, Andres; Polle, Andrea

    2002-05-01

    cadmium results in unspecific necrosis. Plants in certain mycorrhizal associations are less sensitive to cadmium stress than non-mycorrhizal plants. Data about antioxidative systems in mycorrhizal fungi in pure culture and in symbiosis are scarce. The present results indicate that mycorrhization stimulated the phenolic defence system in the Paxillus-Pinus mycorrhizal symbiosis. Cadmium-induced changes in mycorrhizal roots were absent or smaller than those in non-mycorrhizal roots. These observations suggest that although changes in rhizospheric conditions were perceived by the root part of the symbiosis, the typical Cd-induced stress responses of phenolics were buffered. It is not known whether mycorrhization protected roots from Cd-induced injury by preventing access of cadmium to sensitive extra- or intracellular sites, or by excreted or intrinsic metal-chelators, or by other defence systems. It is possible that mycorrhizal fungi provide protection via GSH since higher concentrations of this thiol were found in pure cultures of the fungi than in bare roots. The development of stress-tolerant plant-mycorrhizal associations may be a promising new strategy for phytoremediation and soil amelioration measures. PMID:11997381

  3. Molecular analysis, developmental function and heavy metal-induced expression of ABCC5 in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Li, Jie; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-01-01

    ABCC5/MRP5 is an organic anion transporter that participates in tissue defense and cellular signal transduction through efflux of anticancer drugs, toxicants and a second messenger cGMP, but its physiological functions in zebrafish remain to be defined. Herein, we report the characterization, spatiotemporal expression and developmental function of zebrafish ABCC5 and its transcriptional responses to heavy metals. Zebrafish abcc5 gene is located on chromosome 18 and comprised of 28 exons. The deduced polypeptide of zebrafish ABCC5 consists of 1426 amino acids, which shares high sequence identity with those from other species. Zebrafish abcc5 is maternally expressed and its transcripts are mainly distributed in brain, lens, liver and intestine of developing embryos. In adults, zebrafish abcc5 is extensively expressed, at higher levels in testis, brain, eye, ovary, intestine and kidney, but at relatively lower levels in gill, liver, heart and muscle. Blockage of endogenous ABCC5 activity by its dominant-negative led to the developmental retardation of zebrafish embryos in which activity of p21 signaling was markedly stimulated and cellular cGMP content was significantly increased. In addition, expression of abcc5 in ZF4 cells and zebrafish embryos was significantly induced by cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) or arsenic (As). The induced expression of ABCC5 by heavy metals was mainly detected in the liver of embryos at 96-h post-fertilization (hpf). In adult zebrafish, expression of abcc5 in brain, intestine, liver, kidney and ovary was significantly induced by one or more of these heavy metals. Furthermore, overexpression of ABCC5 attenuated the toxicity of Cd to zebrafish embryos, but did not affect the toxicity of Hg or As. Thus, ABCC5 is likely to play an active role in embryonic development and heavy metal detoxification through the export of second messenger molecules and toxicants out of cells in zebrafish. PMID:20869459

  4. Design of half-metallic properties induced by 2p impurities in ZnO nanosheet

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Fu-bao; Zhang, Chang-wen; Luan, Hang-xing; Li, Sheng-shi; Wang, Pei-ji

    2013-04-15

    We perform first-principles study on the electronic and magnetic properties of X-doped (X=Be, B, C, N) graphene-like ZnO nanosheet (NS). When one oxygen is substituted by X atom in ZnONS, X-induced spin polarizations led to transition from the semiconducting to half-metallic properties, with magnetic moments of 2.0, 1.0, 2.0, and 1.0 μ{sub B} per Be, B, C, and N dopant, respectively. The local magnetic moments are found to equal to unpaired electrons in the 2p spin states of the doping X atoms. While two oxygen atoms are substituted by X in ZnONS, the formation energy analysis indicates that X ions have a clear clustering tendency. Depending on distance between two X dopants, the ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic or nonmagnetic states are all found in X-doped ZnONSs. More interestingly, for C and N doped cases, the half-metallic properties are robust independent on the doping concentrations, while Be or B doped systems would result in half-metallic to magnetic state transition as the doping concentrations increase. - Graphical abstract: Structure of ZnO NS employed to define various configurations of X-doped, as well as spin-density distribution of one Be-doped system. Highlights: ► X-induced spin polarizations result in half-metallicity. ► The local moments equal to unpaired electrons in 2p spin states of X atom. ► The FM, AFM, and NM states are all found in X-doped ZnONSs. ► The half-metallicity in C and N doped cases are robust.

  5. Electrically induced insulator to metal transition in epitaxial SmNiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Nikhil Dasgupta, Sandeepan; Datta, Suman; Joshi, Toyanath; Borisov, Pavel; Lederman, David

    2014-07-07

    We report on the electrically induced insulator to metal transition (IMT) in SmNiO{sub 3} thin films grown on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. The behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature suggests that the primary transport mechanism in the SmNiO{sub 3} insulating state is dominated by Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping (ES-VRH). Additionally, the magnetic transition in the insulating state of SmNiO{sub 3} modifies the characteristics of the ES-VRH transport. Systematic DC and pulsed current-voltage measurements indicate that current-induced joule heating is the fundamental mechanism driving the electrically induced IMT in SmNiO{sub 3}. These transport properties are explained in context of the IMT in SmNiO{sub 3} being related to the strong electron-lattice coupling.

  6. Overcoming metal-induced fluorescence quenching on plasmo-photonic metasurfaces coated by a self-assembled monolayer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Hideki T; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Akihiro; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-21

    We have experimentally shown significant suppression of metal-induced fluorescence (FL) quenching on plasmo-photonic metasurfaces by incorporating a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of sub-nm thickness. The FL signals of rhodamine dye molecules have been several-ten-fold enhanced by introducing the SAM, in comparison with the previous configuration contacting molecules and metal surfaces. PMID:26088784

  7. Exact matrix treatment of an osmotic ensemble model of adsorption and pressure induced structural transitions in metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Lawrence J; Manos, George

    2016-03-14

    Here we present an exactly treated quasi-one dimensional statistical mechanical osmotic ensemble model of pressure and adsorption induced breathing structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The treatment uses a transfer matrix method. The model successfully reproduces the gas and pressure induced structural changes which are observed experimentally in MOFs. The model treatment presented here is a significant step towards analytical statistical mechanical treatments of flexible metal-organic frameworks. PMID:26514851

  8. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species. PMID:25323404

  9. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  10. Disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Fouran; Kumar, Vinod; Chaudhary, Babloo; Singh, R. G.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kapoor, A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper report on the disorder induced semiconductor to metal transition (SMT) and modifications of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline zinc oxide thin film. Disorder is induced using energetic ion irradiation. It eliminates the possibility of impurities induced transition. However, it is revealed that some critical concentration of defects is needed for inducing such kind of SMT at certain critical temperature. Above room temperature, the current-voltage characteristics in reverse bias attributes some interesting phenomenon, such as electric field induced charge transfer, charge trapping, and diffusion of defects. The transition is explained by the defects induced disorder and strain in ZnO crystallites created by high density of electronic excitations.

  11. Fine Ambient Particles Induce Oxidative Stress and Metal Binding Genes in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T.; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D.; Soukup, Joleen M.; Schwartz, David A.; Yang, Ivana V.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-μm diameter or smaller (PM2.5; 1 μg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P ≤ 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (∼30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM2.5-induced H2O2 release. PM2.5 at 1 μg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM2.5 and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM2.5, both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM2.5 induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  12. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Li, Zhuowei; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen M; Schwartz, David A; Yang, Ivana V

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to pollutant particles increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to particles. Upon contact with particles, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope of this oxidative stress response remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined the gene expression profile in human AMs exposed to particles, and sought to characterize the global response of pro- and antioxidant genes. We exposed AMs obtained by bronchoscopy from normal individuals to Chapel Hill particulate matter of 2.5-microm diameter or smaller (PM(2.5); 1 microg/ml) or vehicle for 4 hours (n = 6 independent samples). mRNAs were extracted, amplified, and hybridized to Agilent human 1A microarray. Significant genes were identified by significance analysis of microarrays (false discovery rate, 10%; P < or = 0.05) and mapped with Gene Ontology in the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We found 34 and 41 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively; 22 genes (approximately 30%) were involved in metal binding, and 11 were linked to oxidative stress, including up-regulation of five metallothionein (MT)-1 isoforms. Exogenous MT1 attenuated PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) premixed with MT1 stimulated less H2O2 release. Knockdown of MT1F gene increased PM(2.5)-induced H2O2 release. PM(2.5) at 1 microg/ml did not increase H2O2 release. Mount St. Helens PM(2.5) and acid-extracted Chapel Hill PM(2.5), both poor in metals, did not induce MT1F or H2O2 release. Our results show that PM(2.5) induced a gene expression profile prevalent with genes related to metal binding and oxidative stress in human AMs, independent of oxidative stress. Metals associated with PM may play an important role in particle-induced gene changes. PMID:19251948

  13. Laser induced forward transfer of metals by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Klini, A; Loukakos, P A; Gray, D; Manousaki, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-07-21

    Temporally shaped, femtosecond laser pulses have been used for controlling the size and the morphology of micron-sized metallic structures obtained by using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique. We report the effect of pulse shaping on the size and morphology of the deposited structures of Au, Zn, Cr on a function of the pulse separation time ??t (from 0 to 10 ps) of double pulses of variable intensities generated by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The observed differences in size and morphology are correlated with the outcome of pump-probe experiments for the study of electron-phonon scattering dynamics and subsequent energy transfer processes to the bulk in the different metals employed. We propose that in metals with weak electron-lattice coupling, the electron ballistic motion and the resulting fast electron scattering at the film surface, as well as the internal electron thermalization process are crucial to the morphology and size of the transferred material. Therefore, temporal shaping within the corresponding time scales of these processes may be used for tailoring the features of the metallic structures obtained by LIFT. PMID:18648449

  14. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  15. Electrostatically Induced Voltage Generated in a Metal Box When a Charged Body Moves—Relation Between the Ratio of Conducting Parts in the Box and the Induced Voltage—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Norimitsu

    When charged bodies such as a human body and a tool wagon etc. move near an electronic equipment of a partially opened metal box, an electrostatically induced voltage appears in the metal box. The induced voltage causes a breakdown of a device or a malfunction of the equipment. In this study, the author measured the induced voltage in the box using a sphere gap and an electromagnetic wave sensor. This paper presents that the author measures the induced voltage with changing the area of two metal foils in the box. As the results, the author clears that the induced voltage increases up to 1.6 times when the area of induction electrode is 10 times (100cm2) larger than that of 10cm2, and the induced voltage doesn't change so far as the area of an ungrounded metal foil is not changed. The fruit will be useful for designing the printed circuit board as a basic study for preventing the malfunction or the failure of the electronic equipment of the partially opened metal box.

  16. Colorimetric Detection of Escherichia coli Based on the Enzyme-Induced Metallization of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhong; Jackson, Angelyca A; Rotello, Vincent M; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-05-01

    A novel enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric assay is developed to monitor and measure beta-galactosidase (β-gal) activity, and is further employed for colorimetric bacteriophage (phage)-enabled detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli). This assay relies on enzymatic reaction-induced silver deposition on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs). In the presence of β-gal, the substrate p-aminophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside is hydrolyzed to produce p-aminophenol (PAP). Reduction of silver ions by PAP generates a silver shell on the surface of AuNRs, resulting in the blue shift of the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance peak and multicolor changes of the detection solution from light green to orange-red. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit for β-gal is 128 pM, which is lower than the conventional colorimetric assay. Additionally, the assay has a broader dynamic range for β-gal detection. The specificity of this assay for the detection of β-gal is demonstrated against several protein competitors. Additionally, this technique is successfully applied to detect E. coli bacteria cells in combination with bacteriophage infection. Due to the simplicity and short incubation time of this enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric method, the assay is well suited for the detection of bacteria in low-resource settings. PMID:26997252

  17. Buffer-gas-induced shift and broadening of hyperfine resonances in alkali-metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreto, P. J.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Post, A. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-04-01

    We review the shift and broadening of hyperfine resonance lines of alkali-metal atoms in buffer gases. We present a simple theory both for the shift and the broadening induced by He gas. The theory is parametrized by the scattering length of slow electrons on He atoms and by the measured hyperfine intervals and binding energies of the S states of alkali-metal atoms. The calculated shifts and their temperature dependence are in good agreement with the published experimental data. The calculated broadening is 1.6 times smaller than the recent measurements, and more than 20 times smaller than the earlier measurements. We attribute much of the linewidth in the earlier experiments to possible small temperature gradients and the resulting inhomogeneous line broadening from the temperature dependence of hyperfine frequency shift at constant buffer-gas pressure.

  18. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale.

    PubMed

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics. PMID:27373740

  19. Evidence of photo-induced dynamic competition of metallic and insulating phase in a layered manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Daonld A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephen; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-11-17

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time-dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitation modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.

  20. Evidence of Photo-induced Dynamic Competition of Metallic and Insulating Phase in a Layered Manganite.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-12-16

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time- dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitation modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.

  1. Evidence of photo-induced dynamic competition of metallic and insulating phase in a layered manganite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Yuelin; Walko, Daonld A.; Li, Qing'an; Liu, Yaohua; Rosenkranz, Stephen; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-11-17

    We show evidence that the competition between the antiferromagetic metallic phase and the charge- and orbital-ordered insulating phase at the reentrant phase boundary of a layered manganite, LaSr2Mn2O7, can be manipulated using ultrafast optical excitation. The time-dependent evolution of the Jahn-Teller superlattice reflection, which indicates the formation of the charge and orbital order, was measured at different laser fluences. The laser-induced enhancement and reduction the Jahn-Teller reflection intensity shows a reversal of sign between earlier (~10 ns) and later (~150 ns) time delays during the relaxation after photo excitation. This effect is consistent with a scenario whereby the laser excitationmore » modulates the local competition between the metallic and the insulating phases.« less

  2. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics. PMID:27373740

  3. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  4. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose. PMID:24225302

  5. Comparison of different substrates for laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization of metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Georgieva, V. B.; Donkov, N.; Borodkov, A. S.; Pento, A. V.; Raicheva, Z. G.; Yordanov, Tc A.

    2016-03-01

    Four different substrates, namely, graphite, tungsten, amorphous silicon (α-Si) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) films, were compared in view of the laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization (LETDI) of metal coordination complexes. A rhenium complex with 8-mercaptoquinoline, a copper complex with diphenylthiocarbazone and chlorophyll A were studied as the test analytes. The dependencies of the ion yield and the surface temperature on the incident radiation fluence were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The temperature was estimated using the numerical solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction problem with a heat source distributed in time and space. It was found that at the same temperature, the ion yield from the different substrates varies in the range of three orders of magnitude. The direct comparison of all studied substrates revealed that LETDI from the TiO2 and α-Si films offer a better choice for producing molecular ions of metal coordination complexes.

  6. Kondo effect in alkaline-earth-metal atomic gases with confinement-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Deping; Cheng, Yanting; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Zhai, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms have a long-lived electronic excited state, and when atoms in this excited state are localized in the Fermi sea of ground-state atoms by an external potential, they serve as magnetic impurities, due to the spin-exchange interaction between the excited- and the ground-state atoms. This can give rise to the Kondo effect. However, in order to achieve this effect in current atomic gas experiments, it requires the Kondo temperature to be increased to a sizable portion of the Fermi temperature. In this paper we calculate the confinement-induced resonance (CIR) for the spin-exchanging interaction between the ground and the excited states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms and propose that the spin-exchange interaction can be strongly enhanced by utilizing the CIR. We analyze this system by the renormalization-group approach and show that near a CIR, the Kondo temperature can be significantly enhanced.

  7. Electron-irradiation-induced crystallization at metallic amorphous/silicon oxide interfaces caused by electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2016-04-01

    Irradiation-induced crystallization of an amorphous phase was stimulated at a Pd-Si amorphous/silicon oxide (a(Pd-Si)/SiOx) interface at 298 K by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Under irradiation, a Pd-Si amorphous phase was initially formed at the crystalline face-centered cubic palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface, followed by the formation of a Pd2Si intermetallic compound through irradiation-induced crystallization. The irradiation-induced crystallization can be considered to be stimulated not by defect introduction through the electron knock-on effects and electron-beam heating, but by the electronic excitation mechanism. The observed irradiation-induced structural change at the a(Pd-Si)/SiOx and Pd/SiOx interfaces indicates multiple structural modifications at the metal/silicon oxide interfaces through electronic excitation induced by the electron-beam processes.

  8. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  9. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  10. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core. PMID:17746396

  11. Perturbed angular correlation study of radiation-induced defects in Rh metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawda, M.; Patel, N.; Sebastian, K. C.; Somayajulu, D. R. S.; Sarkar, M.; Singh, R. P.; Murlithar, S.; Awasthi, D. K.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation-induced defects are studied in cubic rhodium metal, using the local probe technique 'Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) at liquid N-2 temperature. Isochronal annealing was done at 300, 1073 and 1473 K temperatures. The irradiated sample showed two quadrupole interaction frequencies at 1150 and 93 MHz. The low frequency disappeared at room-temperature annealing, which was assigned to In trapped at a vacancy, whereas the higher frequency remained up to high temperatures and was attributed to In trapped at Rh-C complexes in the Rh matrix.

  12. Pressure-induced metal-insulator transition in spinel compound CuV 2S 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, H.; Koyama, K.; Hedo, M.; Uwatoko, Y.; Watanabe, K.

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the pressure effect on electrical properties of CuV 2S 4, we performed the electrical resistivity measurements under high pressures up to 8 GPa for a high-quality polycrystalline sample. The charge density wave (CDW) transition temperatures increase with increasing pressure. The residual resistivity rapidly increases with increasing pressure over 4 GPa, and the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity at 8 GPa exhibits a semiconducting behavior below about 150 K, indicating that a pressure-induced metal-insulator transition occurs in CuV 2S 4 at 8 GPa.

  13. Sputtered metal and silicon cluster ions: collision-induced fragmentation and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begemann, W.; Hector, R.; Liu, Y. Y.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Lutz, H. O.

    1989-03-01

    Mass separated metal and silicon cluster ion beams M{/n +, -} are produced by sputtering and undergo fragmenting and/or neutralizing collisions at different kinetic energies (100 1800 eV) in Ar and SF6. Fragment patterns induced by rare gas collisions open a way to determine ionization potentials and electron affinities of clusters. These values are compared to known experimental and theoretical data. For negatively charged clusters the absorption in gas targets is mainly due to neutralization, the cross sections varying with cluster material, number of atoms and collision partner from 10 Å2 to about 50 Å2.

  14. Neutron-induced latch-up immunity in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Rollins, J.G.; Hachey, D.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron-induced latch-up immunity has been studied in metal gate CMOS integrated circuits as a function of neutron fluence by measuring both the current gain products (beta product) of parasitic NPN and PNP transistors, and the flash x-ray latch-up thresholds prior to and following irradiation and subsequent stabilization anneal. Correlations between the actual latch-up thresholds and the measured beta products are established for the three part types investigated. These correlations indicate that the measurement of beta products on judiciously chosen parasitic transistors is a viable technique for estimating latch-up susceptibility when the observed margin is substantial.

  15. Strain induced electronic structure changes in magnetic transition metal oxides thin films

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, G.; Chopdekar, R.V.; Suzuki, Y.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-07-08

    We show that the angular dependence of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is strongly sensitive to strain-induced electronic structure changes in magnetic transition metal oxides. We observe a pronounced dependence of the XMCD spectral shape on the experimental geometry as well as nonvanishing XMCD with distinct spectral features in transverse geometry in compressively strained MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} films. The angular dependent XMCD can be described as a sum over an isotropic and anisotropic contribution, the latter linearly proportional to the axial distortion due to strain. The XMCD spectra are well reproduced by atomic multiplet calculations.

  16. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  17. Local light-induced spin manipulation in two magnetic centre metallic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenstein, T.; Li, C.; Lefkidis, G.; Hübner, W.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper localized optically induced spin dynamics is presented, based on highly correlational ab initio calculations. Two-magnetic-centre metallic chains are chosen as a material on which the total spin is always found to lie on one of the magnetic centres only. Switching is achieved through a Λ-process driven by a laser pulse whose parameters are optimized with a genetic algorithm. Locally switching the spin on the iron side of a Co-Na-Fe cluster is given as an example of local spin manipulation.

  18. Optical nonlocality induced Zitterbewegung near the Dirac point in metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    The optical nonlocality near the Dirac point in infinite periodic metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials is investigated through the dispersion relation analysis according to the transfer-matrix method. It is revealed that both the symmetric and asymmetric surface plasmon polariton modes present the zero nonlocal effective permittivity, and the degeneracy of these two modes results in the emergence of the Dirac point. Furthermore, the Zitterbewegung effect near the Dirac point induced by the optical nonlocality is demonstrated due to the coherent coupling between the symmetric and asymmetric modes. PMID:27136999

  19. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Edmondson, Philip; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Howard, Richard; Parish, Chad M.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  20. Mapping B1-induced eddy current effects near metallic structures in MR images: A comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Goora, F.; Britton, M. M.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the presence of metallic structures is very common in medical and non-medical fields. Metallic structures cause MRI image distortions by three mechanisms: (1) static field distortion through magnetic susceptibility mismatch, (2) eddy currents induced by switched magnetic field gradients and (3) radio frequency (RF) induced eddy currents. Single point ramped imaging with T1 enhancement (SPRITE) MRI measurements are largely immune to susceptibility and gradient induced eddy current artifacts. As a result, one can isolate the effects of metal objects on the RF field. The RF field affects both the excitation and detection of the magnetic resonance (MR) signal. This is challenging with conventional MRI methods, which cannot readily separate the three effects. RF induced MRI artifacts were investigated experimentally at 2.4 T by analyzing image distortions surrounding two geometrically identical metallic strips of aluminum and lead. The strips were immersed in agar gel doped with contrast agent and imaged employing the conical SPRITE sequence. B1 mapping with pure phase encode SPRITE was employed to measure the B1 field around the strips of metal. The strip geometry was chosen to mimic metal electrodes employed in electrochemistry studies. Simulations are employed to investigate the RF field induced eddy currents in the two metallic strips. The RF simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results. Experimental and simulation results show that the metal has a pronounced effect on the B1 distribution and B1 amplitude in the surrounding space. The electrical conductivity of the metal has a minimal effect.

  1. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  2. Anisotropie embrittlement in high-hardness ESR 4340 steel forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, G. B.; Anctil, A. A.; Desisto, T. S.; Kula, E. B.

    1983-08-01

    ESR 4340 steel forgings tempered to a hardness of HRC 55 exhibit a severe loss of tensile ductility in the short transverse direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp-crack fracture toughness. Brittle behavior is associated with regions of smooth intergranular fracture which are aligned with microstructural banding. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis indicates some intergranular segregation of phosphorus and sulfur in these regions. The anisotropic embrittlement is attributed to an interaction of nonequilibrium segregation on solidification with local equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries during austenitizing. This produces defective regions of enhanced intergranular impurity segregation which are oriented during forging. The regions are prone to brittle fracture under impact conditions and abnormal sensitivity to environmental attack during low strain-rate deformation. A relatively sparse distribution of these defects (˜10cm-3) accounts for the discrepancy between smooth bar and blunt-notch tests vs sharp-crack tests. Isotropie properties are restored by homogenization treatment. For application of these steels at extreme hardness levels, homogenization treatment is essential.

  3. Oxidation Embrittlement Observed in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive materials characterization program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, tensile creep-rupture tests were performed on a SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite. The results of these tests and subsequent analysis revealed an oxidation embrittlement phenomena that occurs readily at a discreet temperature range below the maximum use temperature. The graph shows rupture lives for a creep stress of 83 MPa as a function of temperature. Note that the rupture time is constant at an intermediate temperature range of 700 to 982 C. This graph also shows the failure location, as measured from the center of the specimen. Whereas for temperatures of 500 to 700 C, failure occurred in the specimen gage section; at higher temperatures, the failure location migrated toward the cooled grip ends. Although the results initially suggested that the test procedure was influencing the measured creep rupture lives and driving the failure location out of the gage section, subsequent experiments and thermal stress analyses verified the robustness of the test method employed.

  4. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of PH 13-8 Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y. S.; Tsay, L. W.; Chiang, M. F.; Chen, C.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, notched tensile and fatigue crack growth tests in gaseous hydrogen were performed on PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel specimens at room temperature. These specimens were susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), but at different degrees, depending on the aging conditions or the microstructures of the alloys. In hydrogen, the accelerated fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) usually accompanied a reduced notched tensile strength (NTS) of the specimens, i.e., the faster the FCGR the lower the NTS. It was proposed that the same fracture mechanism could be applied to these two different types of specimens, regardless of the loading conditions. Rapid fatigue crack growth and high NTS loss were found in the H800 (426 °C under-aged) and H900 (482 °C peak-aged) specimens. The HE susceptibility of the steel was reduced by increasing the aging temperature above 593 °C, which was attributed to the increased amount of austenite in the structure. Extensive quasi-cleavage fracture was observed for the specimens that were deteriorated severely by HE.

  5. Embrittlement in CN3MN Grade Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, Mertcan; Chumbley, Scott L.; Kalay, Yunus Eren

    2014-05-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels (SSS) are widely used in extreme environments such as off-shore oil wells, chemical and food processing equipment, and seawater systems due to their excellent corrosion resistance and superior toughness. The design of the corresponding heat treatment process is crucial to create better mechanical properties. In this respect, the short-term annealing behavior of CN3MN grade SSS was investigated by a combined study of Charpy impact tests, hardness measurements, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were heat treated at 1200 K (927 °C) for up to 16 minutes annealing time and their impact strengths and hardnesses were tested. The impact toughness was found to decrease to less than the half of the initial values while hardness stayed the same. Detailed fracture surface analyses revealed a ductile to brittle failure transition for relatively short annealing times. Brittle fracture occurred in both intergranular and transgranular modes. SEM and TEM indicated precipitation of nano-sized intermetallics, accounting for the intergranular embrittlement, along the grain boundaries with respect to annealing time. The transgranular fracture originated from linear defects seen to exist within the grains. Close observation of such defects revealed stacking-fault type imperfections, which lead to step-like cracking observed in microlength scales.

  6. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  7. The Composition of Metals Bound to Class III Metallothionein (Phytochelatin and Its Desglycyl Peptide) Induced by Various Metals in Root Cultures of Rubia tinctorum.

    PubMed Central

    Maitani, T.; Kubota, H.; Sato, K.; Yamada, T.

    1996-01-01

    The induction of phytochelatins (PCs) and their desglycyl peptides (both are referred to as class III metallothionein [CIIIMT]) by exposure to various metals (Ag+, As3+, As5+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ga3+, Hg2+, In3+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Pd2+, Se4+, and Zn2+) and the metal composition in the CIIIMTs were investigated in root cultures of Rubia tinctorum L. All of these metal species induced PCs to various degrees when analyzed by the postcolumn derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography method. The desglycyl peptides of PCs often were also present. However, only Ag, Cd, and Cu were bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced when analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry method. Cu was also bound to the CIIIMTs induced by Ag+, As3+, and Cd2+. After Ag+ exposure, an Fe peak that may be of Fe-CIIIMT was also observed. However, most of the metal species studied were not bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced. PMID:12226248

  8. The Composition of Metals Bound to Class III Metallothionein (Phytochelatin and Its Desglycyl Peptide) Induced by Various Metals in Root Cultures of Rubia tinctorum.

    PubMed

    Maitani, T.; Kubota, H.; Sato, K.; Yamada, T.

    1996-04-01

    The induction of phytochelatins (PCs) and their desglycyl peptides (both are referred to as class III metallothionein [CIIIMT]) by exposure to various metals (Ag+, As3+, As5+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ga3+, Hg2+, In3+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Pd2+, Se4+, and Zn2+) and the metal composition in the CIIIMTs were investigated in root cultures of Rubia tinctorum L. All of these metal species induced PCs to various degrees when analyzed by the postcolumn derivatization high-performance liquid chromatography method. The desglycyl peptides of PCs often were also present. However, only Ag, Cd, and Cu were bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced when analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry method. Cu was also bound to the CIIIMTs induced by Ag+, As3+, and Cd2+. After Ag+ exposure, an Fe peak that may be of Fe-CIIIMT was also observed. However, most of the metal species studied were not bound to the CIIIMTs that they induced. PMID:12226248

  9. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa; an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2. PMID:27527241

  10. Proximity-Induced Spin Polarization of Graphene in Contact with Half-Metallic Manganite.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Seiji; Majumdar, Sayani; Popov, Zakhar I; Avramov, Pavel V; Entani, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yuri; Yamada, Yoichi; Huhtinen, Hannu; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sorokin, Pavel B; Yamauchi, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    The role of proximity contact with magnetic oxides is of particular interest from the expectations of the induced spin polarization and weak interactions at the graphene/magnetic oxide interfaces, which would allow us to achieve efficient spin-polarized injection in graphene-based spintronic devices. A combined approach of topmost-surface-sensitive spectroscopy utilizing spin-polarized metastable He atoms and ab initio calculations provides us direct evidence for the magnetic proximity effect in the junctions of single-layer graphene and half-metallic manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO). It is successfully demonstrated that in the graphene/LSMO junctions a sizable spin polarization is induced at the Fermi level of graphene in parallel to the spin polarization direction of LSMO without giving rise to a significant modification in the π band structure. PMID:27438899

  11. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-01-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa; an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2. PMID:27527241

  12. Neural induced embryoid bodies present high levels of metals detected by x-ray microfluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, Mariana P.; Cardoso, Simone C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-05-01

    Molecular mechanisms driving neural differentiation in human embryonic stem cells are not completely elucidated, specially, the role of atomic elements within this process. In this work, we described the distribution of trace elements in those stem cells growing as embryoid bodies by using synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence (SR-XRF). Naive and neural induced embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 μm to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. We consistently detected metallic elements content raise on neural induced embryoid bodies, mimicking characteristic brain development. The use of SR-XRF reveals that human embryoid bodies exhibit self-organization at the atomic level, which is enhanced during neurogenesis triggered in vitro.

  13. Neural induced embryoid bodies present high levels of metals detected by x-ray microfluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, Mariana P.; Cardoso, Simone C.; Paulsen, Bruna S.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2012-05-17

    Molecular mechanisms driving neural differentiation in human embryonic stem cells are not completely elucidated, specially, the role of atomic elements within this process. In this work, we described the distribution of trace elements in those stem cells growing as embryoid bodies by using synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence (SR-XRF). Naive and neural induced embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 {mu}m to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. We consistently detected metallic elements content raise on neural induced embryoid bodies, mimicking characteristic brain development. The use of SR-XRF reveals that human embryoid bodies exhibit self-organization at the atomic level, which is enhanced during neurogenesis triggered in vitro.

  14. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  15. X-ray induced insulator-metal transitions in CMR manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryukhin, V.; Casa, D.; Keimer, B.; Hill, J.P.; Vigliante, A.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y. |

    1997-12-01

    In this work the authors report a study of the photoinduced insulator-to-metal transition in manganese oxide perovskites of the formula Pr{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. The transition is closely related to the magnetic field induced insulator-to-metal transition (CMR effect) observed in these materials. It is accompanied by a dramatic change in the magnetic properties and lattice structure: the material changes from an insulating charge-ordered canted antiferromagnet to a ferromagnetic metal. The authors present an investigation of the transport and structural properties of these materials over the course of the transition (which usually takes about an hour to complete). The current-voltage characteristics exhibited by the material during the transition are highly nonlinear, indicating a large inhomogeneity of the transitional state. Possible practical applications of this novel type of transition are briefly discussed. They also report a high resolution X-ray diffraction study of the charge ordering in these materials. The temperature dependent charge ordering structure observed in these compounds is more complex than previously reported.

  16. Topical metal chelation therapy ameliorates oxidation-induced toxicity in diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shoeb, Mohammad; Liu, Ping; Xiao, Tianlin; Hogan, Dale; Wong, Ira G; Campbell, Gerald A; Ansari, Naseem H

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in cataractogenesis, the leading cause of blindness worldwide. Since transition metals generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, metal chelation therapy has been proposed for treatment of cataracts. However, the effectiveness of most chelators is limited by low tissue penetrability. This study is the first to demonstrate that the topically applied divalent metal chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) combined with the carrier and permeability enhancer methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM) ameliorates both oxidation-induced lens opacification and the associated toxic accumulation of protein-4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts. Both in vitro (rat lens culture) and in vivo (diabetic rats), EDTA-MSM (1) significantly reduced lens opacification by about 40-50%, (2) significantly diminished lens epithelial cell proliferation and fiber cell swelling in early stages of cataract formation in vivo, and (3) notably decreased the levels of protein-HNE adducts. These findings have important implications specifically for the treatment of cataract and generally for other diseases in which oxidative stress plays a key pathogenic role. PMID:21271438

  17. Analysis of heavy metal aerosols on filters by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Neuhauser, R. E.; Theisen, M.; Fink, H.; Niessner, R.

    2001-06-01

    Particulate heavy metals can lead to severe toxic and carcinogenic effects in humans when inhaled in higher concentrations. For the development of a quasi-continuous emission monitor based on automatic filter sampling on a filter band, laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) was studied for analysis of heavy metal aerosols on quartz fiber filters. The system consists of a 19-inch laser and detector module connected to a miniaturized sensor head through fiber optics, allowing maximum flexibility of the set-up. Parameters for optimum time-resolved analysis, i.e. detection wavelength, timing and filter material, were established. The LIPS investigations were accompanied by a rigorous reference analysis based on total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis. The detection limits for heavy metals (Cd, Ni, As, Co, Mn, Sb, Cr, Tl, Sn, V, Cu and Pb) on filters varied between 0.01 and approximately 0.91 μg cm -2, corresponding to volume detection limits of 0.02-2.73 μg m -3. Analysis of filter samples from waste incineration demonstrated the potential of the LIPS approach. In combination with an echelle spectrometer, ambient samples from environmental monitoring could be characterized in much better detail, due to the improved detection limits and the superior spectral resolution, and spectral range of the echelle.

  18. Metal-induced gap states in ferroelectric capacitors and its relationship with complex band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, Javier; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    At metal-isulator interfaces, the metallic wave functions with an energy eigenvalue within the band gap decay exponentially inside the dielectric (metal-induced gap states, MIGS). These MIGS can be actually regarded as Bloch functions with an associated complex wave vector. Usually only real values of the wave vectors are discussed in text books, since infinite periodicity is assumed and, in that situation, wave functions growing exponentially in any direction would not be physically valid. However, localized wave functions with an exponential decay are indeed perfectly valid solution of the Schrodinger equation in the presence of defects, surfaces or interfaces. For this reason, properties of MIGS have been typically discussed in terms of the complex band structure of bulk materials. The probable dependence on the interface particulars has been rarely taken into account explicitly due to the difficulties to include them into the model or simulations. We aim to characterize from first-principles simulations the MIGS in realistic ferroelectric capacitors and their connection with the complex band structure of the ferroelectric material. We emphasize the influence of the real interface beyond the complex band structure of bulk materials. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes''. Computer resources provided by the RES.

  19. Theoretical analysis of electromigration-induced failure of metallic thin films due to transgranular void propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Gungor, M.R.; Maroudas, D.

    1999-02-01

    Failure of metallic thin films driven by electromigration is among the most challenging materials reliability problems in microelectronics toward ultra-large-scale integration. One of the most serious failure mechanisms in thin films with bamboo grain structure is the propagation of transgranular voids, which may lead to open-circuit failure. In this article, a comprehensive theoretical analysis is presented of the complex nonlinear dynamics of transgranular voids in metallic thin films as determined by capillarity-driven surface diffusion coupled with drift induced by electromigration. Our analysis is based on self-consistent dynamical simulations of void morphological evolution and it is aided by the conclusions of an approximate linear stability theory. Our simulations emphasize that the strong dependence of surface diffusivity on void surface orientation, the strength of the applied electric field, and the void size play important roles in the dynamics of the voids. The simulations predict void faceting, formation of wedge-shaped voids due to facet selection, propagation of slit-like features emanating from void surfaces, open-circuit failure due to slit propagation, as well as appearance and disappearance of soliton-like features on void surfaces prior to failure. These predictions are in very good agreement with recent experimental observations during accelerated electromigration testing of unpassivated metallic films. The simulation results are used to establish conditions for the formation of various void morphological features and discuss their serious implications for interconnect reliability. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Fabricating micro embossments on the metal surface through spatially modulating laser-induced shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. X.; Xuan, T.; Lian, Z. C.; Hua, X. J.; Fu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose one improved method to fabricate micro embossments on the metal surface through laser shock processing. One mapping layer with holes must be actively designed and produced on the metal surface, with which, laser-induced shock wave will be spatially modulated. Laser shock experiments were conducted. Then the surface morphologies, and metallographic microstructures were characterized. The forming process of the micro embossments was simulated with ABAQUS. The results show that under the spatially modulated shock loading, the surface material flows from the high-pressure zone to the low-pressure zone, which is responsible for forming the micro embossments. The shapes, sizes and arrangements of the micro embossments conform to those of the mapping holes. The hardnesses on the entire laser-shocked zones improve remarkably due to the plastic deformation at a high strain rate. The influences of the laser energy and mask pattern on the embossed structures are presented. Within certain limits, increasing laser energy is beneficial for making the embossment more convex. However, further excessively increasing the laser energy, the embossment will exhibit the height saturation due to the pressure rise within the closed mapping hole. The transverse sizes of the mapping holes also can influence the embossment heights significantly. Process parameters need to be chosen carefully to suppress the severe adiabatic compression of the gas within the mapping holes, and then avoid weakening the mechanical properties of the micro embossments. This method has a potential application in manufacturing protruded structures on the metal surface.

  1. Heavy Metal Detection in Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Hemispherical Spatial Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deshuo; Zhao, Nanjing; Ma, Mingjun; Wang, Yin; Hu, Li; Yu, Yang; Fang, Li; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-08-01

    Spatial confinement has great potential for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instruments after it has been proven that it has the ability to enhance the LIBS signal strength and repeatability. In order to achieve in-situ measurement of heavy metals in farmland soils by LIBS, a hemispherical spatial confinement device is designed and used to collect plasma spectra, in which the optical fibers directly collect the breakdown spectroscopy of the soil samples. This device could effectively increase the stability of the spectrum intensity of soil. It also has other advantages, such as ease of installation, and its small and compact size. The relationship between the spectrum intensity and the laser pulse energy is studied for this device. It is found that the breakdown threshold is 160 cm-2, and when the laser fluence increases to 250 J/cm2, the spectrum intensity reaches its maximum. Four different kinds of laser pulse energy were set up and in each case the limits of detection of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were calculated. The results show that when the laser pulse fluence was 2.12 GW/cm2, we obtained the smallest limits of detection of these heavy metals, which are all under 10 mg/kg. This device can satisfy the needs of heavy metal in-situ detection, and in the next step it will be integrated into a portable LIBS instrument.

  2. Influence of Ambient Gas on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Uranium Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dacheng; Ma, Xinwen; Wang, Shulong; Zhu, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is regarded as a suitable method for the remote analysis of materials in any phase, even in an environment with high radiation levels. In the present work we used the third harmonic pulse of a Nd:YAG laser for ablation of uranium metal and measured the plasma emission with a fiber-optic spectrometer. The LIBS spectra of uranium metal and their features in different ambient gases (i.e., argon, neon, oxygen, and nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure were studied. Strong continuum spectrum and several hundreds of emission lines from UI and UII were observed. It is found that the continuum spectrum observed in uranium not only comes from bremsstrahlung emission but is also due to the complex spectrum of uranium. The influence of ambient gas and the gas flow rate for ablation of uranium metal was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the uranium lines was enhanced in argon and nitrogen. However, the intensity of uranium lines was decreased in oxygen due to the generation of UO and other oxides. The results also showed that the highest intensity of uranium lines were obtained in argon gas with a gas flow rate above 2.5 L/min. The enhanced mechanism in ambient gas and the influence of the gas flow rate were analyzed in this work.

  3. Laser-induced forward transfer for improving fine-line metallization in photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Aniorte, M. I.; Mouhamadou, B.; Alloncle, A. P.; Sarnet, T.; Delaporte, P.

    2016-06-01

    Grand challenges to create new front metallization techniques in photovoltaic focus considerable attention on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) approach. This alternative method aims to overcome the limitations of the well-established and mature screen-printing (SP) technique. Such limitations are for instance restrictions in the grid pattern design, high-temperature steps, and limited aspect ratio of the line contact (Poulain et al. in Appl Surf Sci 257:5241-5244, 2011). Although different new front contact metallization concepts have been studied, most of them require a second print step to increase the volume of the contact (Gao et al. in Proceedings of 25th EU PVSEC conference, 2010; Beaucarne and Schubert in Energy Proc 67:2-12, 2015; Lossen and Matusovsky in Energy Proc 67:156-162, 2015; Green in Phys E 14:65-70, 2002; Lennon et al. in Prog Photovolt Res Appl V21:1454-1468, 2012). As a result, it is desirable to find innovative metallization techniques to improve the cell efficiency without significantly increasing the cost. Although many challenges remain before to obtain high-quality, robust, and high-performance LIFT contact formation, it required a fully theoretical and experimental assessment. This paper presents the results of a study of the LIFT technique in picosecond regime and thick silver pastes to create high-quality conductive lines for photovoltaic applications.

  4. Not All That Glitters Is Gold: Metal-Migration-Induced Degradation in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Konrad; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Mine, Nicolas; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Abate, Antonio; Saliba, Michael; Tress, Wolfgang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-06-28

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have now achieved efficiencies in excess of 22%, but very little is known about their long-term stability under thermal stress. So far, stability reports have hinted at the importance of substituting the organic components, but little attention has been given to the metal contact. We investigated the stability of state-of-the-art PSCs with efficiencies exceeding 20%. Remarkably, we found that exposing PSCs to a temperature of 70 °C is enough to induce gold migration through the hole-transporting layer (HTL), spiro-MeOTAD, and into the perovskite material, which in turn severely affects the device performance metrics under working conditions. Importantly, we found that the main cause of irreversible degradation is not due to decomposition of the organic and hybrid perovskite layers. By introducing a Cr metal interlayer between the HTL and gold electrode, high-temperature-induced irreversible long-term losses are avoided. This key finding is essential in the quest for achieving high efficiency, long-term stable PSCs which, in order to be commercially viable, need to withstand hard thermal stress tests. PMID:27187798

  5. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  6. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  7. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  8. Prospective Study of Metal Fume-Induced Responses of Global Gene Expression Profiling in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Li; Kim, Jee Young; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Metal particulate inhalation causes pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Our previous results showed that systemic responses to short-term occupational welding-fume exposure could be assessed by microarray analyses in whole-blood total RNA sampled before and after exposure. To expand our understanding of the duration of particulate-induced gene expression changes, we conducted a study using a similar population 1 yr after the original study and extended our observations in the postexposure period. We recruited 15 individuals with welding fume exposure and 7 nonexposed individuals. Thirteen of the 22 individuals (9 in exposed group and 4 in nonexposed group) had been monitored in the previous study. Whole-blood total RNA was analyzed at 3 time points, including baseline, immediately following exposure (approximately 5 h after baseline), and 24 h after baseline, using cDNA microarray technology. We replicated the patterns of Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with response to stimulus, cell death, phosphorus metabolism, localization, and regulation of biological processes significantly enriched with altered genes in the nonsmoking exposed group. Most of the identified genes had opposite expression changes between the exposure and postexposure periods in nonsmoking welders. In addition, we found dose-dependent patterns that were affected by smoking status. In conclusion, short-term occupational exposure to metal particulates causes systemic responses in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, the acute particulate-induced effects on gene expression profiling were transient in nonsmoking welders, with most effects diminishing within 19 h following exposure. PMID:18951227

  9. Impact of biochar and root-induced changes on metal dynamics in the rhizosphere of Agrostis capillaris and Lupinus albus.

    PubMed

    Houben, David; Sonnet, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Rhizosphere interactions are deemed to play a key role in the success of phytoremediation technologies. Here, the effects of biochar and root-induced changes in the rhizosphere of Agrostis capillaris L. and Lupinus albus L. on metal (Cd, Pb and Zn) dynamics were investigated using a biotest on a 2mm soil layer and a sequential extraction procedure (Tessier's scheme). In the bulk soil, the application of 5% biochar significantly reduced the exchangeable pool of metals primarily due to a liming effect which subsequently promoted the metal shift into the carbonate-bound pool. However, metals were re-mobilized in the rhizosphere of both A. capillaris and L. albus due to root-induced acidification which counteracted the liming effect of biochar. As a result, the concentrations of metals in roots and shoots of both plants were not significantly reduced by the application of biochar. Although the study should be considered a worst-case scenario because experimental conditions induced the intensification of rhizosphere processes, the results highlight that changes in rhizosphere pH can impact the effectiveness of biochar to immobilize metals in soil. Biochar has thus a potential as amendment for reducing metal uptake by plants, provided the acidification of the rhizosphere is minimized. PMID:25559173

  10. Plasmonic effects on the laser-induced metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Davon W.; MacQuarrie, Evan R.; Nag, Joyeeta; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a strongly-correlated electron material with a well-known semiconducting to metallic phase transition that can be induced thermally, optically, or electrically. When switched to the high-temperature (T > 68°C) metallic phase, the greatest contrast in the optical properties occurs at wavelengths in the near-to-mid-infrared and beyond. In the visible to near-infrared, however, upon switching for wavelengths between ~500-1000 nm, VO2 transmits more light in the metallic phase. In this paper, we report studies of the effect of near-IR irradiation (785 nm) on lithographically prepared arrays of gold nanoparticles (NPs) covered with a thin film of VO2 and find that the presence of the NPs substantially lowers the laser threshold for low-power induction of the phase transition. Hybrid Au::VO2 structures were created by coating lithographically prepared arrays of gold nanoparticles (NPs) (diameters 140 and 200 nm, array spacing 450 nm) with 60 nm thick films of VO2 by pulsed laser deposition. Due to resonant absorption of the Au particle-plasmon resonance (PPR) at 785 nm, a temperature-dependent shift in the PPR can be generated by switching the VO2 from one phase to another. We have measured the switching behavior of VO2 and Au::VO2 structures using shuttered CW laser irradiation in order to study both optical and thermal mechanisms of the phase transition. Transient absorption measurements using a shuttered 785 nm pump laser corresponding to the PPR resonance of the Au NPs and 1550 nm CW probe show that the presence of the Au NPs lowers the threshold laser power required to induce the phase transition.

  11. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Ma, L.M.; Li, Y.Y.

    2004-06-28

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  12. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  13. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental studies of hydrogen embrittlement of materials using both experimental observations and numerical simulations of the hydrogen/deformation interactions have been conducted. Our approach integrates mechanical property testing at the macro-scale, microstructural analyses and TEM observations of the deformation processes at the micro- and nano-scale, first-principles calculations of interfacial cohesion at the atomic scale, and finite element simulation and modeling at the micro- and macro-level. Focused Ion Beam machining in conjunction with Transmission Electron Microscopy were used to identify the salient micro-mechanisms of failure in the presence of hydrogen. Our analysis of low strength ferritic steels led to the discovery that “quasi-cleavage” is a dislocation plasticity controlled failure mode in agreement with the hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism. The microstructure underneath the fracture surface of 304 and 316 stainless steels was found to be significantly more complex than would have been predicted by the traditional models of fatigue. The general refinement of the microstructure that occurred near the fracture surface in the presence of hydrogen was such that one may argue that hydrogen stabilizes microstructural configurations to an extent not achievable in its absence. Finite element studies of hydrogen and deformation field similitude for cracks in real-life pipelines and laboratory fracture specimens yielded that the Single Edge Notch Tension specimen can be used to reliably study hydrogen material compatibility for pipeline structures. In addition, simulation of onset of crack propagation in low strength ferritic systems by void growth indicated that hydrogen can reduce the fracture toughness of the material by as much as 30%. Both experimental observations and numerical studies of hydrogen transport on hydrogen accumulations ahead of a crack tip yielded that dislocation transport can markedly enhance hydrogen populations which

  14. Basic Mechanics of DNA Methylation and the Unique Landscape of the DNA Methylome in Metal-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an intricate role in the regulation of gene expression and events that compromise the integrity of the methylome may potentially contribute to disease development. DNA methylation is a reversible and regulatory modification that elicits a cascade of events leading to chromatin condensation and gene silencing. In general, normal cells are characterized by gene-specific hypomethylation and global hypermethylation, while cancer cells portray a reverse profile to this norm. The unique methylome displayed in cancer cells is induced after exposure to carcinogenic metals such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium (VI). These metals alter the DNA methylation profile by provoking both hyper- and hypomethylation events. The metal-stimulated deviations to the methylome are possible mechanisms for metal-induced carcinogenesis and may provide potential biomarkers for cancer detection. Development of therapies based on the cancer methylome requires further research including human studies that supply results with larger impact and higher human relevance. PMID:23844698

  15. Low-temperature embrittlement of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel-718 by high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Notched specimens of titanium alloy and Inconel-718 exhibit little reduction of notch strength at certain low temperatures under 2000 lb/sq in. hydrogen, unnotched specimens are not embrittled at these temperatures. The degree of Inconel-718 embrittlement is lower than earlier observations under 1000 lb/sq in. hydrogen.

  16. Embrittlement of nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base superalloys by exposure to hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Five nickel-base alloys (Inconel 718, Udimet 700, Rene 41, Hastelloy X, and TD-NiCr), one cobalt-base alloy (L-605), and an iron-base alloy (A-286) were exposed in hydrogen at 0.1 MN/sq m (15 psi) at several temperatures in the range from 430 to 980 C for as long as 1000 hours. These alloys were embrittled to varying degrees by such exposures in hydrogen. Embrittlement was found to be: (1) sensitive to strain rate, (2) reversible, (3) caused by large concentrations of absorbed hydrogen, and (4) not associated with any detectable microstructural changes in the alloys. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement.

  17. Role of HF and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the hydrogen embrittlement of aged T-111 and similar Ta and Cb alloys and to describe the mechanisms believed responsible for the increased sensitivity of T-111 to low temperature hydrogen embrittlement after aging for 1000 hr or longer near 1040 C. A total of eight Ta-base alloys and two Cb-base alloys were investigated. The effects of pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature and environment, and alloy composition on the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated. The primary method of determining the effects of these variables on the ductility of T-111 was by bend testing at 25 and -196 C. Fractured specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, metallography, and X-ray diffraction.

  18. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  19. Role of Hf and Zr in the hydrogen embrittlement of Ta and Cb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement of aged T-111 and similar Ta and Cb alloys is characterized and the mechanisms believed responsible for the increased sensitivity of T-111 to low temperature hydrogen embrittlement after aging for 1000 hours or longer near 1040 C are described. A total of eight Ta base alloys and two Cb base alloys were investigated. The effects of pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature and environment, and alloy composition on the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated. The primary method of determining the effects of these variables on the ductility of T-111 was by bend testing at 25 and -196 C. Fractured specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, metallography and X-ray diffration.

  20. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin V : Results of Weather-Exposure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1929-01-01

    In a series of weather exposure tests of sheet duralumin, upon which accelerated corrosion tests in the laboratory by the wet-and-dry corrosion method in a sodium chloride solution has already been carried out, a close parallelism between the results of the two kinds of tests was found to exist. The exposure tests showed that the lack of permanence of sheet duralumin is largely, if not entirely, due to corrosion. A corrosion attack of an intercrystalline nature is very largely responsible for the degree of embrittlement produced. The rate of embrittlement was greatly accelerated by a marine atmosphere and by the tropical climate. Variations in corrosion and embrittlement are noted in relation to heat treatment, cold working, and types of protective coatings.

  1. Directed Assembly of Bi Metallic Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Induced Dewetting: a Unique Nanoscale Time and Length Scale Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, P. D.; Wu, Yeuyeng

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed laser induced dewetting (PLiD) was used to assemble patterned, nanoscale metallic thin film features into bi metallic nanoparticles. The liquid-phase flow is related to a conventional droplet impact test and in appropriate dimensions have inertial and viscoinertial flow characteristics. The final size, morphology, composition, and inter-diffusion of the nanoparticles is governed by the interplay of capillary, inertial and viscous forces and an appropriate dimensional regime defined by competing Rayleigh-Plateau and spinodal instabilities.

  2. An illustrative review to understand and manage metal-induced artifacts in musculoskeletal MRI: a primer and updates.

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, J P; Molière, S; Choquet, P; Goetz, C; Ehlinger, M; Bierry, G

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews and explains the basic physical principles of metal-induced MRI artifacts, describes simple ways to reduce them, and presents specific reduction solutions. Artifacts include signal loss, pile-up artifacts, geometric distortion, and failure of fat suppression. Their nature and origins are reviewed and explained though schematic representations that ease the understanding. Then, optimization of simple acquisition parameters is detailed. Lastly, dedicated sequences and options specifically developed to reduce metal artifacts (VAT, SEMAC, and MAVRIC) are explained. PMID:26837388

  3. Polyhydroxyfullerene Binds Cadmium Ions and Alleviates Metal-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter−1) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter−1) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells. PMID:25038095

  4. Comparative effectiveness of metal ions in inducing curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.; Stinemetz, C. L.; Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; Koon, E. C.; Higby, M. A.; Smucker, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    We used five cultivars of Zea mays (Bear Hybrid WF9 * 38MS, B73 * Missouri 17, Yellow Dent, Merit, and Great Lakes Hybrid 422) to reinvestigate the specificity of metal ions for inducing root curvature. Of 17 cations tested, 6 (Al3+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) induced curvature. Roots curved away from Al3+, Ba2+, and Cd2+. Roots curved away from low (0.1 millimolar) concentrations of Cu2+ but toward higher (1-5 millimolar) concentrations. Roots initially curved away from Zn2+ but the direction of the subsequent curvature was unpredictable. In most cases, roots of all cultivars curved towards calcium. However, in some tests there was no response to calcium or even (especially in the cultivars Merit and B73 * Missouri 17) substantial curvature away from calcium. The results indicate that the induction of root curvature is not specific for calcium. The results are discussed relative to the possible role of calmodulin as a mediator of ion-induced root curvature.

  5. Edge-induced Schottky barrier modulation at metal contacts to exfoliated molybdenum disulfide flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouchi, Ryo

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin two-dimensional semiconductors obtained from layered transition-metal dichalcogenides such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are promising for ultimately scaled transistors beyond Si. Although the shortening of the semiconductor channel is widely studied, the narrowing of the channel, which should also be important for scaling down the transistor, has been examined to a lesser degree thus far. In this study, the impact of narrowing on mechanically exfoliated MoS2 flakes was investigated according to the channel-width-dependent Schottky barrier heights at Cr/Au contacts. Narrower channels were found to possess a higher Schottky barrier height, which is ascribed to the edge-induced band bending in MoS2. The higher barrier heights degrade the transistor performance as a higher electrode-contact resistance. Theoretical analyses based on Poisson's equation showed that the edge-induced effect can be alleviated by a high dopant impurity concentration, but this strategy should be limited to channel widths of roughly 0.7 μm because of the impurity-induced charge-carrier mobility degradation. Therefore, proper termination of the dangling bonds at the edges should be necessary for aggressive scaling with layered semiconductors.

  6. Plasma-induced-damage of GaAs during etching of refractory metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.; Hafich, M.J.; Corless, R.F.; Vartuli, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of plasma-induced-damage on the majority carrier transport properties of GaAs has been studied by monitoring changes in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of thin conducting layers under various plasma conditions including etch conditions for refractory metal contacts. R{sub s} determined from transmission line measurements are used to evaluate plasma-induced-damage for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and reactive ion etch (RIE) conditions by varying the thickness of doped epitaxial layers. The authors speculate that plasma-induced-damage in the near surface region plays a major role in explaining the damage mechanism observed in this study. Very consistent trends have been observed where R{sub s} increases with increasing ECR and RIE dc-bias, increasing microwave power, and decreasing pressure, thus showing R{sub s} increases as either the ion energy or ion flux increases. The authors have also observed that R{sub s} is lower for samples exposed to the RIE than the ECR, possibly due to higher ion and electron densities generated in the ECR and higher pressures in the RIE. It has also been observed R{sub s} dependence on ECR plasma chemistry where, R{sub s} is lower in SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas than Ar and N{sub 2} plasmas possibly related to interactions of F or S atoms with the GaAs surface. Moderate anneal temperatures (200 to 500{degrees}C) have shown significant R{sub s} recovery.

  7. GeOx interfacial layer scavenging remotely induced by metal electrode in metal/HfO2/GeOx/Ge capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehoon; Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Sung Bo; Park, In-Sung; Ahn, Jinho

    2016-07-01

    The metal gate electrodes of Ni, W, and Pt have been investigated for their scavenging effect: a reduction of the GeOx interfacial layer (IL) between HfO2 dielectric and Ge substrate in metal/HfO2/GeOx/Ge capacitors. All the capacitors were fabricated using the same process except for the material used in the metal electrodes. Capacitance-voltage measurements, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy were conducted to confirm the scavenging of GeOx IL. Interestingly, these metals are observed to remotely scavenge the interfacial layer, reducing its thickness in the order of Ni, W, and then Pt. The capacitance equivalent thickness of these capacitors with Ni, W, and Pt electrodes are evaluated to be 2.7 nm, 3.0 nm, and 3.5 nm, and each final remnant physical thickness of GeOx IL layer is 1.1 nm 1.4 nm, and 1.9 nm, respectively. It is suggested that the scavenging effect induced by the metal electrodes is related to the concentration of oxygen vacancies generated by oxidation reaction at the metal/HfO2 interface.

  8. Metal/protein ratio determination in the Rhodobacter capsulatus cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase enzyme by particle induced X-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Solís, C; Celis, H; Romero, I; Isaac-Olivé, K; Andrade, E; Eslava-Rosas, F; Monroy-Rosales, J H; Cuevas-Moreno, R

    2011-02-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphatases are divided in two families, which differ both in structure and mechanism. All of them incorporate in its structure divalent metal cations. In 2003, it was reported for the first time that Rhodobacter capsulatus cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase belongs to family II. It is expected then, that this enzyme contains metal elements in its structure; however, this characterization has not been carried out yet. A fine application of accelerators is the use of proton beams to induce X-ray emission (PIXE) for analyzing the composition of biological macromolecules. The purpose of this work is to complement R. capsulatus cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase characterization by determining the presence of metal elements in its structure. Three different strategies were used: PAGE-PIXE, PAGE-Digestion-PIXE, and Dialysis-PIXE and when metals were found the metal/enzyme ratio was calculated. Only cobalt was found to be associated to the enzyme chemical structure in a ratio 3 Co/enzyme. PMID:21167875

  9. Measurement and modeling of temperature-dependent hydrogen embrittlement of chromium-molybdenum steel to enable fitness-for-service life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rumaih, Abdullah M.

    Thick-wall vessels in petrochemical applications, fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, operate in pressurized H2 at elevated temperature for more than 20 years. There is a concern regarding the interactive effects of temper-embrittlement and hydrogen-embrittlement on fitness-for-service during startup/shutdown near ambient temperatures. The database of degraded material properties is inadequate to enable accurate assessment. Specifically, H loss from small fracture mechanics specimens was substantial during either long-term or elevated temperature experiments. In addition, the influence of temperature on H-embrittlement of Cr-Mo steel is not fundamentally understood. The objectives of this research are to (1) design a novel laboratory method to retain H in small fracture mechanics specimens, (2) characterize the temperature dependent internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) of Cr-Mo weld metal using the developed method, and (3) model H distribution near a stressed crack tip in a H-trap laden bainitic microstructure to fundamentally understand the temperature dependent IHE. The new slotted CT specimen approach, with 3.0 wppm total H produced on the slot surface from acidified thiosulfate charging, quantitatively characterized the temperature dependent threshold stress intensity (KIH and K TH) and kinetics (da/dtRISE and da/dtHOLD) of IHE in Cr-Mo weld metal during both rising and slowly falling K loading. IHE was produced successfully and damage was more severe during rising K loading due to the role of crack tip plasticity in H cracking of low to moderate strength steel. The critical temperature at which embrittlement ceased is in the range 45°C < Tc ≤ 60°C for the weld metal and H content studied. This method provides a useful new tool to generate fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service data. A three-dimensional finite element diffusion model, that accounts for the effect of crack tip plasticity and trapping on H transport, established K, dK/dt and temperature

  10. Adsorbate-Induced Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals on Surfaces Presenting Metal Salts with Mixed Anions

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jacob T.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    We report that metal salts composed of mixtures of anions of differing coordination strength can be used to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of adsorbate-induced anchoring transitions of liquid crystals (LCs) supported on surfaces decorated with the metal salts. Specifically, the dynamics of anchoring transitions triggered by the adsorbate dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on surfaces of aluminum (III) salts were analyzed within the framework of a model for mass transport to reveal that the sensitivity of a nitrile-containing nematic LC to DMMP increased from 250 parts-per- billion (ppb) to 25 ppb when the composition of the (counter) anion was changed from 100% perchlorate to 90% nitrate and 10% perchlorate (by mole percent). To provide insight into these observations, Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflectance-Absorbance Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was used to show that the intensity of the absorption band in the IR spectrum corresponding to the coordinated state of the nitrile group (but not the position of the peak) decreased with increase in mole fraction of the strongly coordinating anion (nitrate) in the anion mixture, thus suggesting that the addition of the strongly coordinating anion decreased the number of coordination interactions (per unit area of the interface) but not the strength of the individual coordination interactions between the metal cation and the LC. We also measured the incorporation of the nitrate anion into the metal salt to decrease the effect of humidity on the dynamic response of the LC to DMMP, a result that is consistent with weaker interactions between the nitrate anion and water as compared to the perchlorate anion and water. Finally, the bidentate anion acetylacetonate was measured to cause a similar increase in sensitivity to DMMP when mixed with perchlorate in a 1:1 ratio (the resulting sensitivity of the system to DMMP was 100 ppb). Overall, these results suggest that tailoring the identity of the anion represents a

  11. Antioxidant effect of vitamin E treatment on some heavy metals-induced renal and testicular injuries in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.

    2010-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals in water, air and soil are global problems that are a growing threat to humanity. Heavy metals are widely distributed in the environment and some of them occur in food, water, air and tissues even in the absence of occupational exposure. The antioxidant and protective influences of vitamin E on a mixture of some heavy metals (Pb, Hg, Cd and Cu)-induced oxidative stress and renal and testicular injuries were evaluated in male mice. Exposure of mice to these heavy metals in drinking water for seven weeks resulted in statistical increases of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations. The levels of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutases (SOD) in kidney and testis tissues were significantly declined. Moreover, the histopathological evaluation of kidney and testis showed severe changes in mice treated with these heavy metals. Administration of vitamin E protected the kidney and testis of mice exposed to heavy metals as evidenced by appearance of normal histological structures, insignificant changes in the values of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid, and the levels of kidney GSH and SOD, while the levels of testis GSH and SOD were notably decreased. These data suggest that the administration of vitamin E protects against heavy metals-induced renal and testicular oxidative stress and injuries. PMID:23961105

  12. Embrittlement of B2 iron aluminide by water vapor and by hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasul, D. B.; Heldt, L. A.

    1994-06-01

    The kinetics of embrittlement of a B2 iron aluminide in air were determined by measuring subcritical crack velocities under constant loading conditions and by measuring the strain rate dependence of the ductility. Correlative studies of embrittlement by internal hydrogen were carried out on cathodically charged samples, and the rates of ductility recovery were measured by baking the samples. The results of the hydrogen experiments are employed to consider whether subcritical cracking in air at the measured rates can be supported by hydrogen penetrating ahead of the advancing crack.

  13. Method and apparatus for using magneto-acoustic remanence to determine embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temperature embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component are presented. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an AC current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a DC current to the electromagnets and then by turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  14. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Material from a single heat of cast and wrought Udimet 700 was processed and/or heat treated to produce five material conditions with identical chemical compositions but with distinct microstructural variations, and then evaluated for susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Two prealloyed powder conditions exhibited significantly improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, as compared to wrought material. No degradation in notch or smooth tensile strengths occurred, and average ductilities of 25 percent reduction of area were determined for 2 hydrogen evaluation procedures. For the most severe hydrogenation procedure, ductility levels were reduced to 15 percent. These improvements were attributed to cleaner grain boundaries and decreases grain size.

  15. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Material from a single heat of cast and wrought Udimet 700 was processed and/or heat treated to produce five material conditions with identical chemical compositions but with distinct microstructural variations, and then evaluated for susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Two prealloyed powder conditions exhibited significantly improved resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, as compared to wrought material. No degradation in notch or smooth tensile strengths occurred, and average ductilities of 25 percent reduction of area were determined for 2 hydrogen evaluation procedures. For the most severe hydrogenation procedure, ductility levels were reduced to 15 percent. These improvements were attributed to cleaner grain boundaries and decreased grain size.

  16. The effects of composition on the environmental embrittlement of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent research on embrittlement of iron aluminides at room temperature brought about by exposure to moisture or hydrogen. The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of several Fe-28Al-5Cr alloys with small additions of Zr and C are described. It will be shown that fatigue crack growth behavior is dependent on composition, environment, humidity level, and frequency. Environments studied include vacuum, oxygen, hydrogen gas, and moist air. All cases of embrittlement are ultimately traceable to the interaction of hydrogen with the crack tip.

  17. Hydrogen embrittlement considerations in niobium-base alloys for application in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.T. ); Hull, A.B.; Loomis, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The ITER divertor will be subjected to hydrogen from aqueous corrosion by the coolant and by transfer from the plasma. Global hydrogen concentrations are one factor in assessing hydrogen embrittlement but local concentrations affected by source fluxes and thermotransport in thermal gradients are more important considerations. Global hydrogen concentrations is some corrosion- tested alloys will be presented and interpreted. The degradation of mechanical properties of Nb-base alloys due to hydrogen is a complex function of temperature, hydrogen concentration, stresses and alloy composition. The known tendencies for embrittlement and hydride formation in Nb alloys are reviewed.

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement considerations in niobium-base alloys for application in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.T.; Hull, A.B.; Loomis, B.A.

    1991-12-31

    The ITER divertor will be subjected to hydrogen from aqueous corrosion by the coolant and by transfer from the plasma. Global hydrogen concentrations are one factor in assessing hydrogen embrittlement but local concentrations affected by source fluxes and thermotransport in thermal gradients are more important considerations. Global hydrogen concentrations is some corrosion- tested alloys will be presented and interpreted. The degradation of mechanical properties of Nb-base alloys due to hydrogen is a complex function of temperature, hydrogen concentration, stresses and alloy composition. The known tendencies for embrittlement and hydride formation in Nb alloys are reviewed.

  19. Correlation of photobleaching, oxidation and metal induced fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Kiyoshi; Maclean, James L.; Liu, Biwu; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Juewen

    2013-03-01

    Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In our effort to elucidate the quenching mechanism, we studied a total of eight AgNCs prepared by different hairpin DNA sequences; they showed different sensitivity to Hg2+, and DNA with a larger cytosine loop size produced more sensitive AgNCs. In all the cases, samples strongly quenched by Hg2+ were also more easily photobleached. Light of shorter wavelengths bleached AgNCs more potently, and photobleached samples can be recovered by NaBH4. Strong fluorescence quenching was also observed with high redox potential metal ions such as Ag+, Au3+, Cu2+ and Hg2+, but not with low redox potential ions. Such metal induced quenching cannot be recovered by NaBH4. Electronic absorption and mass spectrometry studies offered further insights into the oxidation reaction. Our results correlate many important experimental observations and will fuel the further growth of this field.Few-atom noble metal nanoclusters have attracted a lot of interest due to their potential applications in biosensor development, imaging and catalysis. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) are of particular interest as different emission colors can be obtained by changing the DNA sequence. A popular analytical application is fluorescence quenching by Hg2+, where d10-d10 metallophilic interaction has often been proposed for associating Hg2+ with nanoclusters. However, it cannot explain the lack of response to other d10 ions such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. In

  20. Effects of Binary Mixtures of Inducers (Toluene Analogs) and of Metals on Bioluminescence Induction of a Recombinant Bioreporter Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kong, In Chul

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the effects of binary mixtures of bioluminescence inducers (toluene, xylene isomers, m-toluate) and of metals (Cu, Cd, As(III), As(V), and Cr) on bioluminescence activity of recombinant (Pm-lux) strain KG1206. Different responses and sensitivities were observed depending on the types and concentrations of mixtures of inducers or metals. In the case of inducer mixtures, antagonistic and synergistic modes of action were observed, whereas metal mixtures showed all three modes of action. Antagonistic mode of action was most common for mixtures of indirect inducers, which showed bioluminescence ranging from 29% to 62% of theoretically expected effects (P(E)). On the other hand, synergistic mode of action was observed for mixtures of direct and indirect inducers, which showed bioluminescence between 141% and 243% of P(E).In the case of binary metal mixtures, bioluminescence activities were ranged from 62% to 75% and 113% to 164% of P(E) for antagonistic and synergistic modes of action, respectively (p-values 0.0001–0.038). Therefore, mixture effects could not be generalized since they were dependent on both the types and concentrations of chemicals, suggesting that biomonitoring may constitute a better strategy by investigating types and concentrations of mixture pollutants at contaminated sites. PMID:25313497

  1. Effect of silicon resistivity on its porosification using metal induced chemical etching: morphology and photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Sahu, Gayatri; Kumar, Vivek; Sahoo, P. K.; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    The structure and light-emitting properties of porous Si nanowires (Si NWs) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching (MIE) process on two different Si substrates of different resistivities have been investigated here. The surface morphological studies have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy. It is observed that porous Si containing well aligned Si NWs is formed from high resistivity (1-20 Ωcm) Si wafer, whereas interconnected pores or cheese-like structures are formed from low resistivity (0.2 Ωcm) Si wafers after MIE. An explanation for the different porosification processes has been proposed based on the initial doping level, where number of dopants seems to be playing an important role in the etching process. Visible photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from all the porous Si samples, that are attributed due to quantum confinement effect.

  2. Strong coupling among semiconductor quantum dots induced by a metal nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), we investigate the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in an SQD-MNP coupled system. We propose a quantum transformation method to strongly reveal the exciton energy shift and the modified decay rate of SQD as well as the coupling among SQDs. To obtain these parameters, a simple system composed of an SQD, an MNP, and a weak signal light is designed. Furthermore, we consider a model to demonstrate the coupling of two SQDs mediated by SPP field under two cases. It is shown that two SQDs can be entangled in the presence of MNP. A high concurrence can be achieved, which is the best evidence that the coupling among SQDs induced by SPP field in MNP. This scheme may have the potential applications in all-optical plasmon-enhanced nanoscale devices. PMID:22297024

  3. Control of the micrometric scale morphology of silicon nanowires through ion irradiation-induced metal dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Savio, R.; Repetto, L.; Guida, P.; Angeli, E.; Firpo, G.; Volpe, A.; Ierardi, V.; Valbusa, U.

    2016-08-01

    We propose ion-induced dewetting of Au thin films as a mechanism to modify and control the morphology of Si nanowires formed through metal-assisted chemical etching. We show that the patterns formed upon irradiation resemble those typical of dewetting phenomena, with a characteristic length in the nanometer range. Irradiated Au films are then used as a template for the fabrication of Si nanowires, and we show that a long-range order exists also in etched substrates, although at much longer length scales in the micrometer range. Investigation of the optical properties reveals that the Si nanowires emit broadband photoluminescence peaked at 700 nm. The proposed synthesis method allows tuning the morphological features of the nanowire bundles at the nanoscale without affecting the optical properties. This approach can be exploited for the engineering of nanowires-based devices where the morphological features become important.

  4. Origin of photoluminescence from silicon nanowires prepared by metal induced etching (MIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Shailendra K. Rai, Hari. M.; Late, Ravikiran; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    In this present study the origin of luminescence from silicon nanowires (SiNws) has been studied. SiNWs are fabricated on Si substrate by metal induced chemical etching (MIE). Here it is found that the band gap of SiNWs is higher than the gap of luminescent states in SiNWs which leads to the effect of Si=O bond. The band gap is estimated from diffuse reflectance analysis. Here we observe that band gap can be tailored depending on size (quantum confinement) but photoluminescence (PL) from all the sample is found to be fixed at 1.91 eV. This study is important for the understanding of origin of photoluminescence.

  5. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Shailendra K. Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  6. Hydroxylation of a metal-supported hexagonal boron nitride monolayer by oxygen induced water dissociation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufeng; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxylated hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets exhibit potential application in nanocomposites and functional surface coating. Our first-principles calculations reveal possible hydroxylation of a h-BN monolayer on a Ni substrate by surface O adatom induced spontaneous dissociation of water molecules. Here one H atom is split from a water molecule by bonding with the O adatom on the B atom and the resulting O-H radical then bonds with an adjacent B atom, which leads to two hydroxyl groups formed on h-BN/Ni. Hydroxylation slightly influences the electronic properties of a Ni-supported h-BN layer. Similar water dissociation and hydroxylation can occur on the surface of O functionalized h-BN/Cu depending on the O adsorption configuration. Metal substrates play an important catalytic role in enhancing the chemical reactivity of O adatoms on h-BN with water molecules through transferring additional charges to them. PMID:26051363

  7. Electric field-induced reversible trapping of microtubules along metallic glass microwire electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyongwan; Sikora, Aurélien; Nakayama, Koji S.; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Hwang, Wonmuk; Teizer, Winfried

    2015-04-01

    Microtubules are among bio-polymers providing vital functions in dynamic cellular processes. Artificial organization of these bio-polymers is a requirement for transferring their native functions into device applications. Using electrophoresis, we achieve an accumulation of microtubules along a metallic glass (Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20) microwire in solution. According to an estimate based on migration velocities of microtubules approaching the wire, the electrophoretic mobility of microtubules is around 10-12 m2/Vs. This value is four orders of magnitude smaller than the typical mobility reported previously. Fluorescence microscopy at the individual-microtubule level shows microtubules aligning along the wire axis during the electric field-induced migration. Casein-treated electrodes are effective to reversibly release trapped microtubules upon removal of the external field. An additional result is the condensation of secondary filamentous structures from oriented microtubules.

  8. Metal Chloride Induced Formation of Porous Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Films: Morphology, Thermal Properties and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. L.; Yaakob, N. N.; Zainal Abidin, A.; Abu Bakar, M.; Abu Bakar, N. H. H.

    2016-06-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films with highly porous structures were synthesized using a one phase system comprising of metal chloride/methanol/PHB/chloroform (MCl2/CH3OH/PHB/CHCl3). SEM analyses confirmed that the MCl2 (where M = Cu2+ or Ni2+) induced porous structures with pore sizes ranging from 0.3 - 2.0 μm. The average pore size increased with the increasing MCl2 content. There existed weak physical interactions between the PHB chains and MCl2 as revealed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. The residue of MCl2 in the porous PHB film does not exert significant influence on the thermal stability of PHB. Nevertheless, the crystallinity of the prepared film is enhanced, as MCl2 acts as the nucleation sites to promote the growth of spherullites.

  9. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  10. Adiabatic spin-transfer-torque-induced domain wall creep in a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttagupta, S.; Fukami, S.; Zhang, C.; Sato, H.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of elastic interfaces is a general field of interest in statistical physics, where magnetic domain wall has served as a prototypical example. Domain wall `creep’ under the action of sub-threshold driving forces with thermal activation is known to be described by a scaling law with a certain universality class, which represents the mechanism of the interaction of domain walls with the applied forces over the disorder of the system. Here we show different universality classes depending on the driving forces, magnetic field or spin-polarized current, in a metallic system, which have hitherto been seen only in a magnetic semiconductor. We reveal that an adiabatic spin-transfer torque plays a major role in determining the universality class of current-induced creep, which does not depend on the intricacies of material disorder. Our results shed light on the physics of the creep motion of domain walls and other elastic systems.

  11. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  12. Light-induced metal-like surface of silicon photonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Grillanda, Stefano; Morichetti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The surface of a material may exhibit physical phenomena that do not occur in the bulk of the material itself. For this reason, the behaviour of nanoscale devices is expected to be conditioned, or even dominated, by the nature of their surface. Here, we show that in silicon photonic nanowaveguides, massive surface carrier generation is induced by light travelling in the waveguide, because of natural surface-state absorption at the core/cladding interface. At the typical light intensity used in linear applications, this effect makes the surface of the waveguide behave as a metal-like frame. A twofold impact is observed on the waveguide performance: the surface electric conductivity dominates over that of bulk silicon and an additional optical absorption mechanism arises, that we named surface free-carrier absorption. These results, applying to generic semiconductor photonic technologies, unveil the real picture of optical nanowaveguides that needs to be considered in the design of any integrated optoelectronic device. PMID:26359202

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. PMID:26781129

  14. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  15. Plasma-induced damage of GaAs during etching of refractory metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.; Hafich, M.J.; Corless, R.F.; Vartuli, C.B.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of plasma-induced damage on the majority carrier transport properties of {ital p}-type GaAs has been studied by monitoring changes in sheet resistance ({ital R}{sub {ital s}}) of thin conducting layers under various plasma conditions including etch conditions for refractory metal contacts. {ital R}{sub {ital s}} determined from transmission line measurements are used to evaluate plasma-induced damage for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and reactive ion etch (RIE) conditions by varying the thickness and doping of epitaxial layers. Damage depths calculated from {ital R}{sub {ital s}} data show a strong dependence on doping levels. This can be explained by a plasma-damage-induced trap density profile which tails off into the sample. Consistent trends have been observed where {ital R}{sub {ital s}} increases with increasing dc bias, increasing microwave power, and decreasing pressure, thus showing {ital R}{sub {ital s}} increases as either the ion energy or ion flux increases. The lowest plasma-induced damage observed in this study occurs with ECR at low microwave power and no rf biasing. Under rf-bias conditions, samples exposed to the ECR (1 mTorr total pressure) show more damage than those exposed to the RIE (8 mTorr total pressure) at comparable dc bias. We have also observed {ital R}{sub {ital s}} dependence on ECR plasma chemistry where {ital R}{sub {ital s}} is lower in SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas than Ar and N{sub 2} plasmas possibly related to interactions of F or S atoms with the GaAs surface. Moderate anneal temperatures (200--500 {degree}C) have shown significant {ital R}{sub {ital s}} recovery. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  16. Defect-Induced Optoelectronic Response in Single-layer Group-VI Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Philippe K.

    The ever-evolving symbiosis between mankind and nanoelectronics-driven technology pushes the limits of its constituent materials, largely due to the dominance of undesirable hetero-interfacial physiochemical behavior at the few-nanometer length scale, which dominates over bulk material characteristics. Driven by such instabilities, research into two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals-layered materials (e.g. graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), boron nitride), which have characteristically inert surface chemistry, has virtually exploded over the past few years. The discovery of an indirect- to direct-gap conversion in semiconducting group-VI TMDCs (e.g. MoS2) upon thinning to a single atomic layer provided the critical link between metallic and insulating 2D materials. While proof-of-concept demonstrations of single-layer TMDC-based devices for visible-range photodetection, light-emission and solar energy conversion have showed promising results, the exciting qualities are downplayed by poorly-understood defectinduced photocarrier traps, limiting the best-achieved external quantum efficiencies to approximately ~1%. This thesis explores the behavior of defects in atomically-thin TMDC layers in response to optical stimuli using a combination of steady-state photoluminescence, reflectance and Raman spectroscopy at room-temperature. By systematically varying the defect density using plasma-irradiation techniques, an unprecedented room-temperature defect-induced monolayer PL feature was discovered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy correlated the defect-induced PL with plasma-generation of sulfur vacancy defects while reflectance measurements indicate defect-induced sub-bandgap light absorption. Excitation intensity-dependent PL measurements and exciton rate modeling further help elucidate the origin of the defect-induced PL response and highlights the role of non-radiative recombination on exciton conversion processes. The results in this

  17. Characterization of lead induced metal-phytochelatin complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Christian; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of Pb and induction of phytochelatin synthesis were observed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon Pb(II) exposure. Our aim was to examine whether Pb(II) is bound by phytochelatins (PCs) in C. reinhardtii and to examine formed complexes for their stoichiometry and composition. Metal-phytochelatin (Me-PC) complexes induced by Pb were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography in 13 collected fractions, which were analyzed for their PC and metal content by high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of more than 90% of Pb from standard Pb-PC₂ complexes within the total volume of the size-exclusion column indicated the adequacy of the method for Pb-PC(n) complex separation and characterization. Phytochelatins were detected mainly in a molecular weight ranging from 1,000 to 5,300 daltons (Da), indicating the formation of complexes with various stoichiometries. Approximately 72% of total PC₂ eluted in the range from 1,000 to 1,600 Da, and 80% of total PC₃ eluted in the molecular weight range from 1,600 to 2,300 Da. The distribution of Cu, Zn, and Pb showed that more than 70% of these metals were associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions. Copper, zinc, and lead were also observed in PC-containing fractions, suggesting the formation of various Me-PC complexes. The results of the present study indicate that the role of PCs in Pb detoxification is minor, because only 13% of total Pb was associated with PCs. PMID:21898554

  18. Vanadium exposure induces olfactory dysfunction in an animal model of metal neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182μg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions. PMID:24362016

  19. Vanadium Exposure Induces Olfactory Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Metal Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182 µg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions. PMID:24362016

  20. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  1. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  2. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.

  3. High pressure phase-transformation induced texture evolution and strengthening in zirconium metal: Experiment and modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; et al

    2015-07-28

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can bemore » attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.« less

  4. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kaipurath, R. M.; Pietrzyk, M.; Caspani, L.; Roger, T.; Clerici, M.; Rizza, C.; Ciattoni, A.; Di Falco, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial. PMID:27292270

  5. Pressure-induced crossing of the core levels in 5 d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Alexey A.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ekholm, Marcus; Jönsson, H. Johan M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    A pressure-induced interaction between core electrons, the core-level crossing (CLC) transition, has been observed in hcp Os at P ≈400 GPa [L. Dubrovinsky et al., Nature (London) 525, 226 (2015)], 10.1038/nature14681. By carrying out a systematic theoretical study for all metals of the 5 d series (Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au) we have found that the CLC transition is a general effect for this series of metals. While in Pt it occurs at ≈1500 GPa , at a pressure substantially higher than in Os, in Ir it occurs already at 80 GPa. Moreover, we predict that in Re the CLC transition may take place already at ambient pressure. We explain the effect of the CLC and analyze the shift of the transition pressure across the series within the Thomas-Fermi model. In particular, we show that the effect has many common features with the atomic collapse in rare-earth elements.

  6. Heavy Metals and Metalloids as Autophagy Inducing Agents: Focus on Cadmium and Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Roberto; Roccheri, Maria Carmela

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research on the autophagic process has greatly increased, invading the fields of biology and medicine. Several markers of the autophagic process have been discovered and various strategies have been reported studying this molecular process in different biological systems in both physiological and stress conditions. Furthermore, mechanisms of metalloid- or heavy metal-induced toxicity continue to be of interest given the ubiquitous nature and distribution of these contaminants in the environment where they often play the role of pollutants of numerous organisms. The aim of this review is a critical analysis and correlation of knowledge of autophagic mechanisms studied under stress for the most common arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) compounds. In this review we report data obtained in different experimental models for each compound, highlighting similarities and/or differences in the activation of autophagic processes. A more detailed discussion will concern the activation of autophagy in Cd-exposed sea urchin embryo since it is a suitable model system that is very sensitive to environmental stress, and Cd is one of the most studied heavy metal inductors of stress and modulator of different factors such as: protein kinase and phosphatase, caspases, mitochondria, heat shock proteins, metallothioneins, transcription factors, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24710492

  7. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  8. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaipurath, R. M.; Pietrzyk, M.; Caspani, L.; Roger, T.; Clerici, M.; Rizza, C.; Ciattoni, A.; di Falco, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-06-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial.

  9. Optically induced metal-to-dielectric transition in Epsilon-Near-Zero metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaipurath, R M; Pietrzyk, M; Caspani, L; Roger, T; Clerici, M; Rizza, C; Ciattoni, A; Di Falco, A; Faccio, D

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon-Near-Zero materials exhibit a transition in the real part of the dielectric permittivity from positive to negative value as a function of wavelength. Here we study metal-dielectric layered metamaterials in the homogenised regime (each layer has strongly subwavelength thickness) with zero real part of the permittivity in the near-infrared region. By optically pumping the metamaterial we experimentally show that close to the Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) wavelength the permittivity exhibits a marked transition from metallic (negative permittivity) to dielectric (positive permittivity) as a function of the optical power. Remarkably, this transition is linear as a function of pump power and occurs on time scales of the order of the 100 fs pump pulse that need not be tuned to a specific wavelength. The linearity of the permittivity increase allows us to express the response of the metamaterial in terms of a standard third order optical nonlinearity: this shows a clear inversion of the roles of the real and imaginary parts in crossing the ENZ wavelength, further supporting an optically induced change in the physical behaviour of the metamaterial. PMID:27292270

  10. High Pressure Phase-Transformation Induced Texture Evolution and Strengthening in Zirconium Metal: Experiment and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5–1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation. PMID:26218405

  11. Morphological evolution of silver nanoparticles and its effect on metal-induced chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong-Ho; Kong, Bo Hyun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2013-05-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated the morphological evolution of the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by controlling the growth conditions and its effect on morphology of silicon (Si) during metal-induced electroless etching (MICE). Self-organized AgNPs with peculiarly shape were synthesized by an electroless plating method in a conventional aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. AgNP nuclei were densely created on Si wafer surface, and they had a strong tendency to merge and form continuous metal films with increasing AgNO3 concentrations. Also, we have demonstrated that the fabrication of aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) arrays in large area of p-Si (111) substrates by MICE in a mixture of HF and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. We have found that the morphology of the initial AgNPs and oxidant concentration (H2O2) greatly influence on the shape of the SiNW etching profile. The morphological results showed that AgNP shapes were closely related to the etching direction of SiNWs, that is, the spherical AgNPs preferred to move vertical to the Si substrate, whereas non-spherical AgNPs changed their movement to the [100] directions. In addition, as the etching activity was increased at higher H2O2 concentrations, AgNPs had a tendency to move from the original [111] direction to the energetically preferred [100] direction. PMID:23858934

  12. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  13. High Pressure Phase-Transformation Induced Texture Evolution and Strengthening in Zirconium Metal: Experiment and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruifeng; Weldon, David; Vogel, Sven C.; Zhang, Jianzhong; Brown, Donald W.; Wang, Yanbin; Reiche, Helmut M.; Wang, Shanmin; Du, Shiyu; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-07-01

    We studied the phase-transition induced texture changes and strengthening mechanism for zirconium metal under quasi-hydrostatic compression and uni-axial deformation under confined high pressure using the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) apparatus. It is shown that the experimentally obtained texture for ω-phase Zr can be qualitatively described by combining a subset of orientation variants previously proposed in two different models. The determined flow stress for the high-pressure ω-phase is 0.5-1.2 GPa, more than three times higher than that of the α-phase. Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of the two Zr polymorphs. We find that the observed strengthening can be attributed to the relatively strong directional bonding in the ω phase, which significantly increases its shear plastic resistance over the α-phase Zr. The present findings provide an alternate route for Zr metal strengthening by high-pressure phase transformation.

  14. Metal-insulator transition induced in CaVO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Man; Laverock, Jude; Chen, Bo; Smith, Kevin E.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lu Jiwei

    2013-04-07

    Stoichiometric CaVO{sub 3} (CVO) thin films of various thicknesses were grown on single crystal SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) (001) substrates using a pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. The CVO films were capped with a 2.5 nm STO layer. We observed a temperature driven metal-insulator transition (MIT) in CVO films with thicknesses below 4 nm that was not observed in either thick CVO films or STO films. The emergence of this MIT can be attributed to the reduction in effective bandwidth due to a crossover from a three-dimensional metal to a two-dimensional insulator. The insulating phase was only induced with a drive current below 0.1 {mu}A. X-ray absorption measurements indicated different electronic structures for thick and very thin films of CVO. Compared with the thick film ({approx}60 nm), thin films of CVO (2-4 nm) were more two-dimensional with the V charge state closer to V{sup 4+}.

  15. Investigation of the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets induced by random surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.; Bourasseau, E.; Filippini, G.

    2016-07-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets of tin induced by random surface fluctuations. The static regime is analyzed by simulating sheets of different thicknesses, and the dynamic fragmentation is ensured by applying along the longitudinal direction of a sheet an instantaneous expansion velocity per initial unit length (expansion rate) with values ranging from 1 × 109 to 3 × 1010 s-1. The simulations show that the static/dynamic fragmentation becomes possible when the fluctuations of the upper and lower surfaces of the sheets can either overlap or make the local volume density of the system go down below a critical value. These two mechanisms cause locally in the sheet the random nucleation of pores of void, on a timescale that exponentially increases with the sheet thickness. Afterwards, the pores develop following distinct stages of growth, coalescence, and percolation, and later in time aggregates of liquid metal are formed. The simulations also show that the fragmentation of static sheets is characterized by relatively mono-dispersed surface and volume distributions of the pores and aggregates, respectively, whereas in extreme conditions of dynamic fragmentation (expansion rate typically in the range of 1 × 1010 s-1), the distributions are rather poly-dispersed and obey a power law decay with surface (volume). A model derived from the simulations suggests that both dynamic and static regimes of fragmentation are similar for expansion rates below typically 1 × 107 s-1.

  16. Structural characterization of nanostructures grown by Ni metal induced lateral crystallization of amorphous-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnóczi, G. Z.; Dodony, E.; Battistig, G.; Vouroutzis, N.; Kavouras, P.; Stoemenos, J.; Frangis, N.; Kovács, A.; Pécz, B.

    2016-02-01

    The nickel metal induced lateral crystallization of amorphous silicon is studied by transmission electron microscopy in the range of temperatures from 413 to 521 °C. The structural characteristics of the whiskers grown at 413 °C are compared to the grains grown at 600 °C, where both Metal Induced Lateral Crystallization (MILC) and Solid Phase Crystallization (SPC) are involved. At 413 °C, long whiskers are formed at any crystallographic direction almost free of defects. In contrary, whiskers grown by MILC around 600 °C are crystallized along the ⟨111⟩ directions. These differences are attributed to the low crystallization rate and suppression of the SPC process. The activation energy of the pure MILC was measured in the order of 2 eV. The effect of Ni on the crystallization rate is studied by in-situ heating experiments inside the microscope. The role of contamination that can inhibit MILC is discussed. The cases of MILC process under limited Ni and unlimited Ni source were studied and compared to in-situ annealing experiments. The crystallization rate is strongly influenced by the neighbouring Ni sources; this long-range interaction is attributed to the requirement of a critical Ni concentration in amorphous silicon before the initiation of the MILC process. The long-range interaction can enhance crystallization along a certain direction. The transition from MILC to SPC and the change of the crystallization mode due to the lack of Ni are discussed. The beneficial effect of long annealing at 413 °C is also discussed.

  17. Electric-field-induced metal maintained by current of the Mott insulator Ca2RuO4

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Fumihiko; Sakaki, Mariko; Yamanaka, Yuya; Tamaru, Sho; Suzuki, Takashi; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2013-01-01

    Recently, “application of electric field (E-field)” has received considerable attention as a new method to induce novel quantum phenomena since application of E-field can tune the electronic states directly with obvious scientific and industrial advantages over other turning methods. However, E-field-induced Mott transitions are rare and typically require high E-field and low temperature. Here we report that the multiband Mott insulator Ca2RuO4 shows unique insulator-metal switching induced by applying a dry-battery level voltage at room temperature. The threshold field Eth ~40 V/cm is much weaker than the Mott gap energy. Moreover, the switching is accompanied by a bulk structural transition. Perhaps the most peculiar of the present findings is that the induced metal can be maintained to low temperature by a weak current. PMID:23985626

  18. Development of embrittlement prediction models for U.S. power reactors and the impact of the heat-affected zone to thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1998-05-01

    The NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 was based on 177 surveillance data points and the EPRI data base, where 76% of 177 data points and 60% of EPRI data base were from Westinghouse`s data. Therefore, other vendors` radiation environment may not be properly characterized by R.G. 1.99`s prediction. To minimize scatter from the influences of the irradiation temperature, neutron energy spectrum, displacement rate, and plant operation procedures on embrittlement models, improved embrittlement models based on group data that have similar radiation environments and reactor design and operation criteria are examined. A total of 653 shift data points from the current FR-EDB, including 397 Westinghouse data, 93 B and W data, 37 CE data, and 106 GE data, are used. A nonlinear least squares fitting FORTRAN program, incorporating a Monte Carlo procedure with 35% and 10% uncertainty assigned to the fluence and shift data, respectively, was written for this study. In order to have the same adjusted fluence value for the weld and plate material in the same capsule, the Monte Carlo least squares fitting procedure has the ability to adjust the fluence values while running the weld and plate formula simultaneously. Six chemical components, namely, copper, nickel, phosphorus, sulfur, manganese, and molybdenum, were considered in the development of the new embrittlement models. The overall percentage of reduction of the 2-sigma margins per delta RTNDT predicted by the new embrittlement models, compared to that of R.G. 1.99, for weld and base materials are 42% and 36%, respectively. Currently, the need for thermal annealing is seriously being considered for several A302B type RPVs. From the macroscopic view point, even if base and weld materials were verified from mechanical tests to be fully recovered, the linking heat affected zone (HAZ) material has not been properly characterized. Thus the final overall recovery will still be unknown. The great data scatter of the HAZ metals may

  19. Laser-Induced Fabrication of Metallic Interlayers and Patterns in Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Gaddy, Gregory A. (Inventor); Koplitz, Brent D. (Inventor); Simpson, Steven M. (Inventor); Lynch, Michael F. (Inventor); Ruffner, Samuel C. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Self-metallizing polyimide films are created by doping polyamic acid solutions with metallic ions and solubilizing agents. Upon creating a film, the film is exposed to coherent light for a specific time and then cured. The resulting film has been found to have a metallic surface layer and a metallic subsurface layer (interlayer). The layer separating the metallic layer has a uniform dispersion of small metal particulates within the polymer. The layer below the interlayer has larger metal particulates uniformly distributed within the polymer. By varying the intensity or time of exposure to the coherent light, three-dimensional control of metal formation within the film is provided.

  20. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    PubMed

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals. PMID:26505322