Science.gov

Sample records for metal ion analysis

  1. Development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for MeV ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Maskrey, J.T.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium liquid metal ion sources are an attractive complement to the existing gaseous ion sources that are extensively used for ion beam analysis. This is due in part to the high brightness of the liquid metal ion source and in part to the availability of a lithium ion beam. High brightness is of particular importance to MeV ion microprobes which are now approaching current density limitations on targets determined by the ion source. The availability of a lithium beam provides increased capabilities for hydrogen profiling and high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. This paper describes the design and performance of a lithium liquid metal ion source suitable for use on a 5MV Laddertron accelerator. Operational experience with the source and some of its uses for ion beam analysis are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. PMID:26851088

  3. Analysis of Supercritical-Extracted Chelated Metal Ions From Mixed Organic-Inorganic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Organic and inorganic contaminants of an environmental sample are analyzed by the same GC-MS instrument by adding an oxidizing agent to the sample to oxidize metal or metal compounds to form metal ions. The metal ions are converted to chelate complexes and the chelate complexes are extracted into a supercritical fluid such as CO2. The metal chelate extract after flowing through a restrictor tube is directly injected into the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer, preferably containing a refractory metal filament such as rhenium to fragment the complex to release metal ions which are detected. This provides a fast, economical method for the analysis of metal contaminants in a sample and can be automated. An organic extract of the sample in conventional or supercritical fluid solvents can be detected in the same mass spectrometer, preferably after separation in a supercritical fluid chromatograph.

  4. Depth resolution improvement in secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, M.; Kinno, T.; Koike, M.; Tanaka, H.; Takeno, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondou, K.; Teranishi, Y.; Nonaka, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kurokawa, A.; Ichimura, S.

    2006-07-31

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses were carried out using a metal cluster complex ion of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy, and incident angle. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same experimental condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The authors obtained a depth resolution of {approx}1 nm under 5 keV, 45 deg. condition. Depth resolution was degraded by ion-bombardment-induced surface roughness at 5 keV with higher incident angles.

  5. A cross-reactive sensor array for the fluorescence qualitative analysis of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Lin, Liping; Rong, Mingcong; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    A cross-reactive sensor array using mercaptopropionic acid modified cadmium telluride (CdTe), glutathione modified CdTe, poly(methacrylic acid) modified silver nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin modified gold nanoclusters, rhodamine derivative and calcein blue as fluorescent indicators has been designed for the detection of seven heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+)). The discriminatory capacity of the sensor array to different heavy metal ions in different pH solutions has been tested and the results have been analyzed with linear discriminant analysis. Results showed that the sensor array could be used to qualitatively analyze the selected heavy metal ions. The array performance was also evaluated in the identification of known and unknown samples and the preliminary results suggested the promising practicability of the designed sensor assay. PMID:25127598

  6. Nanopore analysis of the effect of metal ions on the folding of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeremy S

    2014-03-01

    In this minireview, the nanopore analysis of peptides and proteins in the presence of divalent metal ions will be surveyed. In all cases the binding of the metal ions causes the peptide or protein to adopt a more compact conformation which can no longer enter the α-hemolysin pore. In the absence of Zn(II) the 30-amino acid Zn-finger peptide can readily translocate the pore; but upon addition of Zn(II) the peptide folds and only bumping events are observed. Similarly, the octapeptide repeat from the N-terminus of the prion protein binds Cu(II), which prevents it from translocating. The full-length prion protein also undergoes conformational changes upon binding Cu(II), which results in an increase in the proportion of bumping events. Myelin basic protein of 170 residues is intrinsically disordered and, perhaps surprisingly, for a basic protein of this size, can translocate against the electric field based on the observation that the event time increases with increasing voltage. It, too, folds into a more compact conformation upon binding Cu(II) and Zn(II), which prevents translocation. Finally even proteins such as maltose binding protein which does not contain a formal binding site for metal ions undergoes conformational changes in the presence of the metal chelator, EDTA. Thus, contamination of proteins with trace metal ions should be considered when studying proteins and peptides by nanopore analysis. PMID:24370255

  7. Application of flowing stream techniques to water analysis Part III. Metal ions: alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, elemental and harmful transition metals, and multielemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2004-05-28

    In the earlier parts of this series of reviews [1,2], the most relevant flowing stream techniques (namely, segmented flow analysis, continuous flow analysis, flow injection (FI) analysis, sequential injection (SI) analysis, multicommuted flow injection analysis and multisyringe flow injection analysis) applied to the determination of several core inorganic parameters for water quality assessment, such as nutrients and anionic species including nitrogen, sulfur and halogen compounds, were described. In the present paper, flow techniques are presented as powerful analytical tools for the environmental monitoring of metal ions (alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, and elemental and harmful transition metals) as well as to perform both multielemental and speciation analysis in water samples. The potentials of flow techniques for automated sample treatment involving on-line analyte separation and/or pre-concentration are also discussed in the body of the text, and demonstrated for each individual ion with a variety of strategies successfully applied to trace analysis. In this context, the coupling of flow methodologies with atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or hydride-generation (HG)/cold-vapor (CV) approaches, launching the so-called hyphenated techniques, is specially worth mentioning. PMID:18969420

  8. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  9. Formation of metal-ion adducts and evidence for surface-catalyzed ionization in electrospray analysis of pharmaceuticals and pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of metal ion adducts in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry positive-ion electrospray analysis of pharmaceuticals and pesticides was investigated. The evidence of surface-catalyzed ionization in the electrospray analysis was also studied. Both positive and negative ion mass spectrometry were used for the analysis of the products. It was found that the sodium adducts formed in the analysis included single, double, and triple sodium adducts. Adduction was found to occur by attachment of the metal ion to carboxyl, carbonyl and aromatic pi electrons of the molecule.

  10. Metal Ions in Unusual Valency States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Robin M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses reactivity of metal ions with the primary products of water radiolysis, hyper-reduced metal ions, zero-valent metal ions, unstable divalent ions from the reduction of bivalent ions, hyper-oxidized metal ions, and metal complexes. (CS)

  11. Multicomponent analysis of mixed rare-earth metal ion solutions by the electronic tongue sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Legin, A.; Kirsanov, D.; Rudnitskaya, A.; Rovny, S.; Logunov, M.

    2007-07-01

    Novel electrochemical sensors based on well-known extracting agents are developed. Sensors have shown high sensitivity towards a variety of rear earth metal ions in acidic media at pH=2. Multi-sensor system (electronic tongue) comprising newly developed sensors was successfully applied for the analysis of binary and ternary mixtures of Ce{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+} cations in different combinations. (authors)

  12. Analysis of the interactions between He + ions and transition metal surfaces using co-axial impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M.; Brown, M. G.; Draxler, M.; Fishwick, L.; Dowsett, M. G.; McConville, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between low energy He + ions and a series of transition metal surfaces have been studied using co-axial impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (CAICISS). Experimental data were collected from the Ni(110), Cu(100), Pd(111), Pt(111) and Au(111) surfaces using ion beams with primary energies between 1.5 keV and 4.0 keV. The shadow cone radii deduced from the experimental surface peak positions were found to closely match theoretical predictions. Data analysis was performed using both the FAN and Kalypso simulation codes, revealing a consistent requirement for a reduction of 0.252 in the screening length correction in the Molière approximation within the Thomas-Fermi (TFM) interaction potential. The adjustments of the screening length in the TFM potential, predicted by O'Connor, and the uncorrected Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (ZBL) potential both yielded inaccurate results for all of the surfaces and incident energies studied. We also provide evidence that, despite their different computational methodologies, the FAN and Kalypso simulation codes generate similar results given identical input parameters for the analysis of 180° backscattering spectra.

  13. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  14. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  15. Hydrophilic polydopamine-coated graphene for metal ion immobilization as a novel immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography platform for phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yinghua; Zheng, Zhifang; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiangmin; Yang, Pengyuan

    2013-09-17

    To discover trace phosphorylated proteins or peptides with great biological significance for in-depth phosphoproteome analysis, it is urgent to develop a novel technique for highly selective and effective enrichment of phosphopeptides. In this work, an IMAC (immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography) material with polydopamine coated on the surface of graphene and functionalized with titanium ions (denoted as Ti(4+)-G@PD) was initially designed and synthesized. The newly prepared Ti(4+)-G@PD with enhanced hydrophilicity and biological compatibility was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and infrared (IR), and its performance for selective and effective enrichment of phosphopeptide was evaluated with both standard peptide mixtures and human serum. PMID:23941301

  16. Requirement for transient metal ions revealed through computational analysis for DNA polymerase going in reverse

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Shock, David D.; Pedersen, Lee G.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerases facilitate faithful insertion of nucleotides, a central reaction occurring during DNA replication and repair. DNA synthesis (forward reaction) is “balanced,” as dictated by the chemical equilibrium by the reverse reaction of pyrophosphorolysis. Two closely spaced divalent metal ions (catalytic and nucleotide-binding metals) provide the scaffold for these reactions. The catalytic metal lowers the pKa of O3′ of the growing primer terminus, and the nucleotide-binding metal facilitates substrate binding. Recent time-lapse crystallographic studies of DNA polymerases have identified an additional metal ion (product metal) associated with pyrophosphate formation, leading to the suggestion of its possible involvement in the reverse reaction. Here, we establish a rationale for a role of the product metal using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of the reverse reaction in the confines of the DNA polymerase β active site. Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis identifies essential residues and metal-binding sites necessary for pyrophosphorolysis. The results indicate that the catalytic metal site must be occupied by a magnesium ion for pyrophosphorolysis to occur. Critically, the product metal site is occupied by a magnesium ion early in the pyrophosphorolysis reaction path but must be removed later. The proposed dynamic nature of the active site metal ions is consistent with crystallographic structures. The transition barrier for pyrophosphorolysis was estimated to be significantly higher than that for the forward reaction, consistent with kinetic activity measurements of the respective reactions. These observations provide a framework to understand how ions and active site changes could modulate the internal chemical equilibrium of a reaction that is central to genome stability. PMID:26351676

  17. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K. Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Polek, M. P.; Harilal, S. S.

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  18. Analysis of Accumulating Ability of Heavy Metals in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Improved by Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Naiyan; Zhang, Fengshou

    2012-05-01

    Heavy metals have seriously contaminated soil and water, and done harm to public health. Academician WANG Naiyan proposed that ion-implantation technique should be exploited for environmental bioremediation by mutating and breeding plants or microbes. By implanting N+ into Taikonglian No.1, we have selected and bred two lotus cultivars, Jingguang No.1 and Jingguang No.2. The present study aims at analyzing the feasibility that irradiation can be used for remediation of soil and water from heavy metals. Compared with parent Taikonglian No.1, the uptaking and accumulating ability of heavy metals in two mutated cultivars was obviously improved. So ion implantation technique can indeed be used in bioremediation of heavy metals in soil and water, but it is hard to select and breed a cultivar which can remedy the soil and water from all the heavy metals.

  19. FTIR spectroscopy structural analysis of the interaction between Lactobacillus kefir S-layers and metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbino, E.; Mobili, P.; Tymczyszyn, E.; Fausto, R.; Gómez-Zavaglia, A.

    2011-02-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to structurally characterize the interaction of S-layer proteins extracted from two strains of Lactobacillus kefir (the aggregating CIDCA 8348 and the non-aggregating JCM 5818) with metal ions (Cd +2, Zn +2, Pb +2 and Ni +2). The infrared spectra indicate that the metal/protein interaction occurs mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of Asp and Glut residues, with some contribution of the NH groups belonging to the peptide backbone. The frequency separation between the νCOO - anti-symmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations in the spectra of the S-layers in presence of the metal ions was found to be ca. 190 cm -1 for S-layer CIDCA 8348 and ca. 170 cm -1 for JCM 5818, denoting an unidentate coordination in both cases. Changes in the secondary structures of the S-layers induced by the interaction with the metal ions were also noticed: a general trend to increase the amount of β-sheet structures and to reduce the amount of α-helices was observed. These changes allow the proteins to adjust their structure to the presence of the metal ions at minimum energy expense, and accordingly, these adjustments were found to be more important for the bigger ions.

  20. Photoelectrochemical detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-07-21

    Depending on the situation, metal ions may either play beneficial roles or be harmful to human health and ecosystems. Sensitive and accurate detection of metal ions is thus a critical issue in the field of analytical sciences and great efforts have been devoted to the development of various metal ion sensors. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is an emerging technique for the bio/chemical detection of metal ions, and features a fast response, low cost and high sensitivity. Using representative examples, this review will first introduce the fundamentals and summarize recent progress in the PEC detection of metal ions. In addition, interesting strategies for the design of particular PEC metal ion sensors are discussed. Challenges and opportunities in this field are also presented. PMID:27297834

  1. Metal Ion Analysis Using Near-Infrared Dyes and the Laboratory-on-a-Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Greg E.

    2004-06-23

    The primary research objective of this effort is to develop a portable, capillary electrophoresis (CE) microchip capable of sensitively and rapidly monitoring hazardous waste metal ions critical to the successful deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of contaminated equipment and structures at various DOE sites. Hazardous waste metal ions to be adapted for sensing on the microchip include UO2 2+, Be2+, Cr6+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cs+, and Sr2+. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing viable, new extraction methods for metal ion sampling from both the air via a microimpinger which is integrated onto the microchip itself, and from contaminated surfaces, both techniques being amenable to on-line introduction onto the microchip. Two different detection methods for monitoring the electrophoretic separations taking place down the microchannel will be exploited in this research, indirect and direct detection. Special emphasis will be placed on maintaining the ultimate portability of the final microchip device through the careful selection of metallochromic dyes and fluorophores which are amenable to use of small, inexpensive light sources (e.g., LED's) and photodetectors.

  2. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size. PMID:26253484

  3. First order Raman scattering analysis of transition metal ions implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Abdul; Rana, Usman Ali; Shakoor, Abdul; Ahmad, Naeem; Hassan, Najam al; Khan, Salah Ud-Din

    2016-03-01

    Transition Metal (TM) ions V, Cr, Mn and Co were implanted into GaN/sapphire films at fluences 5×1014, 5×1015 and 5×1016 cm-2. First order Raman Scattering (RS) measurements were carried out to study the effects of ion implantation on the microstructure of the materials, which revealed the appearance of disorder and new phonon modes in the lattice. The variations in characteristic modes 1GaN i.e. E2(high) and A1(LO), observed for different implanted samples is discussed in detail. The intensity of nitrogen vacancy related vibrational modes appearing at 363 and 665 cm-1 was observed for samples having different fluences. A gallium vacancy related mode observed at 277/281 cm-1 for TM ions implanted at 5×1014 cm-2 disappeared for all samples implanted with rest of fluences. The fluence dependent production of implantation induced disorder and substitution of TM ions on cationic sites is discussed, which is expected to provide necessary information for the potential use of these materials as diluted magnetic semiconductors in future spintronic devices.

  4. Consequences of Decontamination Procedures in Forensic Hair Analysis Using Metal-Assisted Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Eva; Flinders, Bryn; Boone, Carolien M; Bosman, Ingrid J; Lusthof, Klaas J; Van Asten, Arian C; Tytgat, Jan; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-03-15

    Today, hair testing is considered to be the standard method for the detection of chronic drug abuse. Nevertheless, the differentiation between systemic exposure and external contamination remains a major challenge in the forensic interpretation of hair analysis. Nowadays, it is still impossible to directly show the difference between external contamination and use-related incorporation. Although the effects of washing procedures on the distribution of (incorporated) drugs in hair remain unknown, these decontamination procedures prior to hair analysis are considered to be indispensable in order to exclude external contamination. However, insights into the effect of decontamination protocols on levels and distribution of drugs incorporated in hair are essential to draw the correct forensic conclusions from hair analysis; we studied the consequences of these procedures on the spatial distribution of cocaine in hair using imaging mass spectrometry. Additionally, using metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry, we are the first to directly show the difference between cocaine-contaminated and user hair without any prior washing procedure. PMID:26878081

  5. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Hutchens, T W

    1992-01-01

    Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) (1,2) is also referred to as metal chelate chromatography, metal ion interaction chromatography, and ligand-exchange chromatography. We view this affinity separation technique as an intermediate between highly specific, high-affinity bioaffinity separation methods, and wider spectrum, low-specificity adsorption methods, such as ion exchange. The IMAC stationary phases are designed to chelate certain metal ions that have selectivity for specific groups (e.g., His residues) in peptides (e.g., 3-7) and on protein surfaces (8-13). The number of stationary phases that can be synthesized for efficient chelation of metal ions is unlimited, but the critical consideration is that there must be enough exposure of the metal ion to interact with the proteins, preferably in a biospecific manner. Several examples are presented in Fig. 1. The challenge to produce new immobilized chelating groups, including protein surface metal-binding domains (14,15) is being explored continuously. Table 1 presents a list of published procedures for the synthesis and use of stationary phases with immobilized chelating groups. This is by no means exhaustive, and is intended only to give an idea of the scope and versatility of IMAC. Fig. 1 Schematic illustration of several types of immobilized metal-chelating groups, including, iminodiacetate (IDA), tris(carboxymethyl) ethylenediamine (TED), and the metal-binding peptides (GHHPH)(n)G (where n = 1,2,3, and 5) (14,15). Table 1 Immobilized Chelating Groups and Metal Ions Used for Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography Chelating group Suitable metal ions Reference Commercial source Immodiacetate Transitional1,2 Pharmacia LKB Pierce Sigma Boehringer Mannheim TosoHaas 2-Hydroxy-3[N-(2- pyrtdylmethyl) glycme]propyl Transitional3 Not available ?-Alky1 mtrilo triacetic acid Transitional4 Not available Carboxymethylated asparhc acid Ca(II)13 Not available Tris (carboxy- methyl) ethylene Diamme

  6. Analysis of metal ions in crude oil by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography using short column.

    PubMed

    Salar Amoli, H; Porgam, A; Bashiri Sadr, Z; Mohanazadeh, F

    2006-06-16

    In this study a rapid, simultaneous analysis of V, Ni, Fe and Cu in crude oil was achieved by high performance liquid chromatography using 10 cm length reversed-phase C18 column. Since the amount of metal ions is at a very low level, in this work, solvent extraction of metals by a ligand such as 8-hydroxyquinoline from acidic media was investigated with some modification to previous procedures. Average extraction recoveries were 99, 85, 94 and 96 for V, Ni, Fe and Cu, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the crude oil which was obtained from Koshk area in southern Iran. Fast analysis of metal ion in reversed-phase short column was achieved with methanol/water (55/45, v/v) and the detection limits measured as three times the background noise were obtained. Also it was shown that if small amount of 8-hydroxyquinoline was added to the mobile phase, the peak height and the peak symmetry were improved. A typical chromatogram for the separation of the 8-hydroxyquinoline complexes of V (V), Ni (II), Fe (III) and Cu (II) in crude oil was obtained in less than 4 min. PMID:16723133

  7. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  8. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis) extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum). In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs) that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury. PMID:27123034

  9. Ion beam modification of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1990-04-01

    Energetic ions beams may be used in various ways to modify and so improve the tribological properties of metals. These methods include: — ion implantation of selected additive species; — ion beam mixing of thin deposited coatings; — ion-beam-assisted deposition of thicker overlay coatings. The first of these techniques has been widely used to modify the electronic properties of semiconductors, but has since been extended for the treatment of all classes of material. Tool steels can be strengthened by the ion implantation of nitrogen or titanium, to produce fine dispersions of hard second-phase precipitates. Solid solution strengthening, by combinations of substitutional and interstitial species, such as yttrium and nitrogen, has also been successful. Both ion beam mixing (IBM) and ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) use a combination of coating and ion bombardment. In the first case, the objective is to intermix the coating and substrate by the aid of radiation-enhanced diffusion. In the latter case, the coating is densified and modified during deposition and the process can be continued in order to build up overlay coatings several μm in thickness. The surface can then be tailored, for instance to provide a hard and adherent ceramic such as silicon nitride, boron nitride or titanium nitride. It is an advantage that all the above processes can be applied at relatively low temperatures, below about 200° C, thereby avoiding distortion of precision components. Ion implantation is also being successfully applied for the reduction of corrosion, especially at high temperatures or in the atmosphere and to explore the mechanisms of oxidation. Ion-assisted coatings, being compact and adherent, provide a more substantial protection against corrosion: silicon nitride and boron nitride are potentially useful in this respect. Examples will be given of the successful application of these methods for the surface modification of metals and alloys, and developments in the

  10. PROGRESS REPORT. METAL ION ANALYSIS USING NEAR-INFRARED DYES AND THE "LABORATORY-ON-A-CHIP"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary research objective of this effort is to develop a portable, capillary electrophoresis microchip capable of sensitively and rapidly monitoring hazardous waste metal ions critical to the successful deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of contaminated equipment and str...

  11. Mutational analysis of human DNase I at the DNA binding interface: implications for DNA recognition, catalysis, and metal ion dependence.

    PubMed

    Pan, C Q; Ulmer, J S; Herzka, A; Lazarus, R A

    1998-03-01

    Human deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), an enzyme used to treat cystic fibrosis patients, has been systematically analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis of residues at the DNA binding interface. Crystal structures of bovine DNase I complexed with two different oligonucleotides have implicated the participation of over 20 amino acids in catalysis or DNA recognition. These residues have been classified into four groups based on the characterization of over 80 human DNase I variants. Mutations at any of the four catalytic amino acids His 134, His 252, Glu 78, and Asp 212 drastically reduced the hydrolytic activity of DNase I. Replacing the three putative divalent metal ion-coordinating residues Glu 39, Asp 168, or Asp 251 led to inactive variants. Amino acids Gln 9, Arg 41, Tyr 76, Arg 111, Asn 170, Tyr 175, and Tyr 211 were also critical for activity, presumably because of their close proximity to the active site, while more peripheral DNA interactions stemming from 13 other positions were of minimal significance. The relative importance of these 27 positions is consistent with evolutionary relationships among DNase I across different species, DNase I-like proteins, and bacterial sphingomyelinases, suggesting a fingerprint for a family of DNase I-like proteins. Furthermore, we found no evidence for a second active site that had been previously implicated in Mn2+-dependent DNA degradation. Finally, we correlated our mutational analysis of human DNase I to that of bovine DNase I with respect to their specific activity and dependence on divalent metal ions. PMID:9541395

  12. Mechanistic Enzyme Models: Pyridoxal and Metal Ions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, S. E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are presented for experiments on the pyridoxal/metal ion model system. These experiments illustrate catalysis through Schiff's base formation between aldehydes/ketones and primary amines, catalysis by metal ions, and the predictable manner in which metal ions inhibit or catalyze reactions. (JN)

  13. Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Nancy S.; Koval, Carl A.; Noble, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

  14. Metallic ions in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four positive ion composition measurements of the equatorial E region made at Thumba, India, are presented. During the day, the major ions between 90 and 125 km are NO(+) and O2(+). A metallic ion layer centered at 92 km is observed, and found to contain Mg(+), Fe(+), Ca(+), K(+), Al(+), and Na(+) ions. The layer is explained in terms of a similarly shaped latitude distribution of neutral atoms which are photoionized and charge-exchanged with NO(+) and O2(+). Three body reactions form molecular metallic ions which are rapidly lost by dissociative ion-electron recombination. Nighttime observations show downward drifting of the metallic ion layer caused by equatorial dynamo effects. These ions react and form neutral metals which exchange charges with NO(+) and O2(+) to produce an observed depletion of those ions within the metallic ion region.

  15. Modified electrodes used for electrochemical detection of metal ions in environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    March, Gregory; Nguyen, Tuan Dung; Piro, Benoit

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal pollution is one of the most serious environmental problems, and regulations are becoming stricter. Many efforts have been made to develop sensors for monitoring heavy metals in the environment. This review aims at presenting the different label-free strategies used to develop electrochemical sensors for the detection of heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury, arsenic etc. The first part of this review will be dedicated to stripping voltammetry techniques, on unmodified electrodes (mercury, bismuth or noble metals in the bulk form), or electrodes modified at their surface by nanoparticles, nanostructures (CNT, graphene) or other innovative materials such as boron-doped diamond. The second part will be dedicated to chemically modified electrodes especially those with conducting polymers. The last part of this review will focus on bio-modified electrodes. Special attention will be paid to strategies using biomolecules (DNA, peptide or proteins), enzymes or whole cells. PMID:25938789

  16. Modified Electrodes Used for Electrochemical Detection of Metal Ions in Environmental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    March, Gregory; Nguyen, Tuan Dung; Piro, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is one of the most serious environmental problems, and regulations are becoming stricter. Many efforts have been made to develop sensors for monitoring heavy metals in the environment. This review aims at presenting the different label-free strategies used to develop electrochemical sensors for the detection of heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury, arsenic etc. The first part of this review will be dedicated to stripping voltammetry techniques, on unmodified electrodes (mercury, bismuth or noble metals in the bulk form), or electrodes modified at their surface by nanoparticles, nanostructures (CNT, graphene) or other innovative materials such as boron-doped diamond. The second part will be dedicated to chemically modified electrodes especially those with conducting polymers. The last part of this review will focus on bio-modified electrodes. Special attention will be paid to strategies using biomolecules (DNA, peptide or proteins), enzymes or whole cells. PMID:25938789

  17. Incorporation of metal ions into polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. T.; Carver, V. C.; Furtsch, T. A.; Saint Clair, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the incorporation of metal ions into various polyimides on polyimide properties are investigated. Polyimide films derived from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (BDTA) 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone (m,m'-DABP), 4,4'-diaminobenzophenone (p,p'-DABP) or 4,4'-oxydianiline were prepared with the concurrent addition of approximately 20 metals in a variety of forms. In general, it is found that the films derived from BDTA + p,p'-DABP were brittle and of poor quality, with brittle films also produced in most of the BDTA + m, m'-DABP polyimides regardless of whether the added metal was hydrate or anhydrous. Thermomechanical analysis, torsional braid analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, infrared spectral analysis and isothermal studies on many of the polyimide films produced indicate that the softening temperature is generally increased upon the addition of metal ions, at the expense of thermal stability, while no changes in chemical functionality are observed. The best system studied in regard to polymer property enhancement appears to be tri(acetylacetonato)aluminum(III) added to the m, m'-DABP polyamide, which has been found to exhibit four times the lap shear strength of the polyimide alone.

  18. Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Valadbeigi, Younes; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-07-19

    A simple, fast, and inexpensive method was developed for detecting heavy metals via the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) in the negative mode. In this method, Cl(-) ion produced by the thermal ionization of NaCl is employed as the dopant or the ionizing reagent to ionize heavy metals. In practice, a solution of mixed heavy metals and NaCl salts was directly deposited on a Nichrome filament and electrically heated to vaporize the salts. This produced the IMS spectra of several heavy-metal salts, including CdCl2, ZnSO4, NiCl2, HgSO4, HgCl2, PbI2, and Pb(Ac)2. For each heavy metal (M), one or two major peaks were observed, which were attributed to M·Cl(-) or [M·NaCl]Cl(-)complexes. The method proved to be useful for the analysis of mixed heavy metals. The absolute detection limits measured for ZnSO4 and HgSO4 were 0.1 and 0.05 μg, respectively. PMID:27321408

  19. Protein-Transition Metal Ion Networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten showed increases of 2-3 times in modulus with addition of divalent transition metal ions Cu2+ and Zn2+. Increasing concentrations of ions resulted in increased stiffnes...

  20. Metal ions, Alzheimer's disease and chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Ana

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, various studies have been providing evidence that metal ions are critically involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson). Metal ion chelators have been suggested as potential therapies for diseases involving metal ion imbalance. Neurodegeneration is an excellent target for exploiting the metal chelator approach to therapeutics. In contrast to the direct chelation approach in metal ion overload disorders, in neurodegeneration the goal seems to be a better and subtle modulation of metal ion homeostasis, aimed at restoring ionic balance. Thus, moderate chelators able to coordinate deleterious metals without disturbing metal homeostasis are needed. To date, several chelating agents have been investigated for their potential to treat neurodegeneration, and a series of 8-hydroxyquinoline analogues showed the greatest potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21406339

  1. METAL ION ANALYSIS USING NEAR-INFRARED DYES AND THE "LABORATORY-ON-A-CHIP"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project addresses the need for developing a new class of radionuclide and heavy metal complexation agents that are tagged with near-infrared dyes and, therefore, can be extended to the implementation of a compact and portable "laboratory-on-a-chip" operable in the stringent ...

  2. METAL ION ANALYSIS USING NEAR-INFRARED DYES AND THE ''LABORATORY-ON-A-CHIP''

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Greg E.

    2001-09-15

    The DOE currently has the daunting task of deactivating 7,000 contaminated buildings and decommissioning 900 contaminated buildings that remain from the United States' involvement in nuclear weapons development over the last 50 years.1 In addition to decontaminating the metal and concrete building materials that comprise these building structures, this program will require the decontamination and disposal of more than 180,000 metric tons of scrap metal.1 The DOE is also currently entrenched in a massive cleanup program of their nuclear weapons facilities in an effort to prevent serious environmental problems arising from the already widespread contamination of soils, sediments and groundwaters. Incredibly, more than 600 billion gallons of water and 50 million cubic meters of soil have been contaminated by more than 5700 known DOE groundwater plumes.2 The primary concern is migration of these plumes and their potential threat to local and regional water sources. Sites of particular concern include the Snake River Aquifer in Idaho, contaminated groundwaters at the 100, 200 and 300 areas at Hanford, Washington, Oak Ridge/Savannah River groundwaters and contaminated sediments at the Nevada Test Site.2 Numerous landfills also exist at DOE facilities which are estimated to contain over three million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried water.2 The challenges associated with these tasks are numerous, and have been outlined in various research needs statements associated with facility Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D). The Environmental Management team has highlighted the need for revolutionizing technologies capable of improving characterization, monitoring and certification of contaminated equipment and facilities with emphasis on real time characterization in the field. One of the specific science research challenges critical to the advancement of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) is the application of new principles and innovations to

  3. Ohmic model for electrodeposition of metallic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, A. S.; Alexe-Ionescu, A. L.; Barbero, G.

    2015-10-01

    An ohmic model to describe the electrodeposition of metallic ions on the electrodes is proposed. We assume that the ionic distribution is homogeneous across the electrolytic cell, and that the ionic current is due to the bulk electric field. The nucleation in the electrodeposition is supposed to be well described by a kinetic equation at the electrode, taking into account the neutralization of metallic ions on the electrodes. Two cases are considered. In the first case the characteristic time describing the neutralization of the ions is supposed to be negligible with respect to the flight time of the ions across the cell. In this framework the bulk electric field coincides with the external electric field, and our analysis gives analytical formulae for the surface density of deposited ions and for the electric current in the external circuit. The case where the two characteristic times are comparable, and the effective electric field in the bulk depends on the surface deposition, is considered too. In this case the ordinary differential equations describing the ionic distribution and the adsorption phenomenon have to be solved numerically. The agreement between the presented model and the experimental results published by several groups is reasonably good.

  4. Metal Ion Analysis Using Near-Infrared Dyes and the ''Laboratory-on-a-Chip''

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Greg E.; Lu, Qin, Evans III, Lawrence

    1999-06-01

    This project addresses the need for developing a highly sensitive and selective, portable radionuclide analyzer which would permit a low-cost and timely characterization of DOE remediation sites. Through the application of near-infrared fluorophore tagged macrocycles, in combination with the capillary electrophoretic separation of radionuclide and heavy metal complexes on a microchip, we propose an innovative, low cost characterization approach to gaining timely characterization data in the field. The research goals for this program are summarized as follows: (a) To synthesize a new class of near-infrared tagged macrocycles that will take advantage of the inherent metal complexation properties of the macrocycle, while fluorescing in a region of the spectrum with very little background fluorescence. (b) To characterize the fluorescence and complexation behavior of this new class of complexation agents. (c) To implement these new materials into the design of a portable monitor for radionuclide and heavy metal analytes that utilizes the ''laboratory-on-a-chip'' technology for performing capillary electrophoresis on a microchip.

  5. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  6. Potentiometric titration of metal ions in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Graham T T; Mohamed, Mark F; Neverov, Alexei A; Brown, R S

    2006-09-18

    The potentiometric titrations of Zn2+, Cu2+ and 12 Ln3+ metal ions were obtained in ethanol to determine the titration constants (defined as the at which the [-OEt]/[Mx+]t ratios are 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5) and in two cases (La3+ and Zn2+) a complete speciation diagram. Several simple monobasic acids and aminium ions were also titrated to test the validity of experimental titration measurements and to establish new constants in this medium that will be useful for the preparation of buffers and standard solutions. The dependence of the titration constants on the concentration and type of metal ion and specific counterion effects is discussed. In selected cases, the titration profiles were analyzed using a commercially available fitting program to obtain information about the species present in solution, including La3+ for which a dimer model is proposed. The fitting provides the microscopic values for deprotonation of one to four metal-bound ethanol molecules. Kinetics for the La3+-catalyzed ethanolysis of paraoxon as a function of are presented and analyzed in terms of La3+ speciation as determined by the analysis of potentiometric titration curves. The stability constants for the formation of Zn2+ and Cu2+ complexes with 1,5,9-triazacyclododecane as determined by potentiometric titration are presented. PMID:16961382

  7. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multi-cathode, broad beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion-charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amperes peak pulsed and several tens of mA time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  9. COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN OF METAL ION SEQUESTERING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides...

  10. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  11. Trace analysis of heavy metals in groundwater samples by ion chromatography with post-column reaction and ultraviolet-visible detection.

    PubMed

    Santoyo, E; Santoyo-Gutiérrez, S; Verma, S P

    2000-07-01

    Groundwaters originating from local and regional aquifers surrounding ash deposits produced by a coal-fired power plant were collected. These water samples were chemically analyzed for quantifying their heavy metal composition at trace levels. A highly sensitive analytical technique based on ion chromatography with a UV-Vis detector and under isocratic eluent flow-rate conditions was used. In order to quantify the major heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cd, Co, Zn and Ni), three ionic separation column systems were evaluated: (1) a cationic column (HPIC-CS2, Dionex) tested with two eluents (10 mM oxalic acid-7.5 mM citric acid; and 40 mM D-tartaric acid-12 mM citric acid); (2) an anionic column (HPIC-AS4, Dionex) evaluated with 25 mM oxalic acid as eluent: and (3) a bifunctional ion-exchange column (Ionpac CS5, Dionex) which was also tested with two eluents (6 mM pyridine, 2,6-dicarboxylic acid; and 50 mM oxalic acid/95 mM lithium hydroxide). The lowest detection limits achieved with the Ionpac CS5 column and the 50 mM oxalic acid-95 mM lithium hydroxide eluent enabled the heavy metal analysis in groundwater samples to be reliably performed. Details of this comparative study, including the ion chromatography procedure selected and its application to heavy metal analysis of groundwater samples, are presented in this work. PMID:10917442

  12. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  13. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  14. Metallic ion production with the dione EBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visentin, B.; Courtois, A.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Leroy, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first quantitative results obtained with metallic elements injected from an Hollow Cathode ion source into the Dioné EBIS. These results are concerned with the charge state distribution of gold ions, with a maximum for Au47+ of (1,3 × 107 ions), and the highest charge state detectable on a wire profiler of Au63+. The Au50+ ions have been captured in Mimas storage synchrotron, and an Fe20+ ion beam has been accelerated in the Saturne synchrotron. The Hollow Cathode ion source lifetime has been tested on a long term basis (Au1+ injected into Dioné during six weeks, 24 hours per day). This source, able to produce metallic ions with any buffer gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, or N) and is also used to inject gaseous ions into Dioné.

  15. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G.; Atkin, Rob

    2015-12-01

    with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ~60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al3+ system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Ion diameter distribution (grain size analysis) for the PAN + metal ion solutions. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05833c

  16. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  17. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Oberreit, Derek; Rawat, Vivek K.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.

  18. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberreit, Derek; Rawat, Vivek K.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2015-09-01

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI)xM+ (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.

  19. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oberreit, Derek; Rawat, Vivek K; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI)xM(+) (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model. PMID:26374028

  20. [Trace analysis of heavy metal ions in electroplate waste water by capillary electrophoresis with visual offline sample stacking via moving neutralization boundary].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yinping; Li, Shan; Fan, Liuyin; Cao, Chengxi

    2012-08-01

    A moving neutralization boundary (MNB) was developed as a novel model of visual offline sample stacking for the trace analysis of heavy metal ions (HMIs) by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). In the stacking system, the motion direction of MNB to cathode was used with 2.1 mmol/L HCl-98 mmol/L KCl-trace metal ions in the anodic solution and 4.0 mmol/L NaOH-96 mmol/L KCl in the cathodic solution. The voltage was constant at 180 V and the flow rate of the anolyte and catholyte was 1 mL/min. The metal ions in the gel after stacking were detected by capillary electrophoresis. The calibration curves showed good linear relationship (r > or = 0.998 5) in the concentration range used in the experiments. The pre-concentration factors were up to 80 - 150 and the limits of detection (LODs) were 0.163, 0.256, 0.077, 0.153, 0.203, 0.062 and 0.142 mg/L for Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Mg(II), Ca(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III), respectively, obviously lower than the national standards. The intra-day and inter-day assay precisions were good (the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 7.42%). Finally, the developed method has been successfully used for the stacking and the detection of heavy metal ions in electroplate waste water. PMID:23256387

  1. Uptake of metal ions on humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlivan, E.; Arslan, G.

    2006-09-15

    The kinetics, the sorption capacities, pH and temperature dependence of sorption of humic acids (HAs) of Turkish brown coals with respect to Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) ions were investigated, and the roles of the carboxylic and phenolic groups in the adsorption of metals ion on HAs were searched in this work. These metal ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of HAs. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in between 50 and 60 min for all studied cations. HAs extracted from different brown coals have been characterized by chemical and physical methods. The chemical properties of HAs showed differences depending on the source from which they were obtained. The sorption of metals on the surface of HAs depends strongly on the pH, and sorption decreases with decreasing pH. Maximum removal of metal ions was demonstrated at pH values of 4.1-5.0. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to describe observed sorption phenomena. The {Delta}G{sup 0} became negative as the temperature increased, and so the equilibrium constant decreased slightly. The investigation proved that the HAs are suitable materials for the studied heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution and could be considered as potential material for purification of effluent polluted with toxic metal ions.

  2. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  3. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  4. Upgraded vacuum arc ion source for metal ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources have been made and used by a large number of research groups around the world over the past twenty years. The first generation of vacuum arc ion sources (dubbed ''Mevva,'' for metal vapor vacuum arc) was developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1980s. This paper considers the design, performance parameters, and some applications of a new modified version of this kind of source which we have called Mevva-V.Ru. The source produces broad beams of metal ions at an extraction voltage of up to 60 kV and a time-averaged ion beam current in the milliampere range. Here, we describe the Mevva-V.Ru vacuum arc ion source that we have developed at Tomsk and summarize its beam characteristics along with some of the applications to which we have put it. We also describe the source performance using compound cathodes.

  5. Functional Identification of Catalytic Metal Ion Binding Sites within RNA

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s). In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC) that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis. PMID:16092891

  6. Bioavailability of Metal Ions and Evolutionary Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hong Enriquez, Rolando P.; Do, Trang N.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been a long process that began nearly 3.5 × 109 years ago. In their initial moments, evolution was mainly influenced by anaerobic environments; with the rise of O2 and the corresponding change in bioavailability of metal ions, new mechanisms of survival were created. Here we review the relationships between ancient atmospheric conditions, metal ion bioavailability and adaptation of metals homeostasis during early evolution. A general picture linking geochemistry, biochemistry and homeostasis is supported by the reviewed literature and is further illustrated in this report using simple database searches. PMID:25371266

  7. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2006-06-01

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  8. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

  9. Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2005-06-15

    Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort. This project seeks to enhance and strengthen the traditional approach through computer-aided design of new and improved host molecules. Accurate electronic structure calculations are coupled with experimental data to provide fundamental information about ligand structure and the nature of metal-donor group interactions (design criteria). This fundamental information then is used in a molecular mechanics model (MM) that helps us rapidly screen proposed ligand architectures and select the best members from a set of potential candidates. By using combinatorial methods, molecule building software has been developed that generates large numbers of candidate architectures for a given set of donor groups. The specific goals of this project are: • further understand the structural and energetic aspects of individual donor group- metal ion interactions and incorporate this information within the MM framework • further develop and evaluate approaches for correlating ligand structure with reactivity toward metal ions, in other words, screening capability • use molecule structure building software to generate

  10. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  11. Metal analysis of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven varieties of cotton were investigated for 8 metal ions (K, Na, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn) using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy. All of the varieties were grown at the same location. Half of the samples were dry (rain fed only) and the other were well-watered (irrigat...

  12. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal-binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion-binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium-resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high-resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high-resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0-2.5A) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found. PMID:18614239

  13. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0 – 2.5 Å) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found. PMID:18614239

  14. Effect of metal ions on positron annihilation characteristics in metal ion containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of developing improved moisture-resistant epoxy resins, two different types of epoxy resins containing variable mole ratios of chromium ions per polymer repeat unit were developed. Positron annihilation characteristics have been investigated in these resins as a function of their metal ion content. In both cases, the presence of metal ions reduces the lifetime as well as the intensity of the long life component. The long life component intensity reduction is considerably more pronounced than the lifetime reduction. These results have been discussed in terms of increased unpaired electron density at Ps formation sites due to the presence of chromium ions in the matrix.

  15. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  16. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  17. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place. PMID:26001134

  18. Ion irradiation effects on metallic nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Byrne, A. P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    We have investigated structural and morphological properties of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) exposed to ion irradiation. NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy in combination with advanced synchrotron-based analytical techniques, in particular X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. A number of different effects were observed depending on the irradiation conditions. At energies where nuclear stopping is predominant, structural disorder/amorphization followed by inverse Ostwald ripening/dissolution due to ion beam mixing was observed for Au and Cu NCs embedded in SiO2. The ion-irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition in the NCs, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding bulk metals, was attributed to their initially higher structural energy as compared to bulk material and possibly preferential nucleation of the amorphous phase at the NC/SiO2 interface. At very high irradiation energies (swift heavy ion irradiation), where the energy loss is nearly entirely due to electronic stopping, a size-dependent shape transformation of the NCs from spheres to rod like shapes was apparent in Au NCs. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with considerations on melting of the NCs in the ion track as one mechanism involved in the shape transformation.

  19. Ion irradiation effects on metallic nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C.S.; Foran, G.J.; Cookson, D.J.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2008-04-02

    We have investigated structural and morphological properties of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) exposed to ion irradiation. NCs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy in combination with advanced synchrotron-based analytical techniques, in particular X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. A number of different effects were observed depending on the irradiation conditions. At energies where nuclear stopping is predominant, structural disorder/amorphization followed by inverse Ostwald ripening/dissolution due to ion beam mixing was observed for Au and Cu NCs embedded in SiO{sub 2}. The ion-irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transition in the NCs, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding bulk metals, was attributed to their initially higher structural energy as compared to bulk material and possibly preferential nucleation of the amorphous phase at the NC/SiO{sub 2} interface. At very high irradiation energies (swift heavy ion irradiation), where the energy loss is nearly entirely due to electronic stopping, a size-dependent shape transformation of the NCs from spheres to rod like shapes was apparent in Au NCs. Our preliminary results are in good agreement with considerations on melting of the NCs in the ion track as one mechanism involved in the shape transformation.

  20. Electrohydrostatic analysis of equilibrium shape and stability of stressed conducting fluids: Application to liquid metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Miskovsky, N.M.; Cutler, P.H.; Feuchtwang, T.E.; Kazes, E.

    1987-11-01

    An exact mathematical treatment of the problem of an electrically stressed fluid from zero field to the onset of instability gives rise to the nonlinear electrohydrodynamic equations which, in general, are not amenable to analytic solution. To make the problem more tractable, one considers two limiting regimes, the electrohydrostatic (EHS) and the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) limits. In the EHS case, the fields and the velocities are assumed to be small so that quasistatic equilibrium exists and the fluid surface is essentially at rest. In this paper we consider the electrohydrostatic analysis of the equilibrium shape and stability of the electrically stressed fluids. The current work reintroduces the EHS stability criterion due to Zeleny, as well as a new set of equations and numerical procedure for analyzing the stability of an axially symmetric fluid with an arbitrary shaped surface. These are contrasted with a stability criterion, introduced by Taylor, which it is argued, is only an equilibrium condition and not a proper criterion for analyzing the general stability of electrified fluids. The Taylor and Zeleny criteria are applied to fluid sources modeled as simple coordinate surfaces, such as the cone, the cusp, and the hyperboloid. These results lead to a new physical interpretation of the onset of fluid instability in the EHS limit. A set of partial differential equations is derived, whose solution describes the equilibrium shape of a conducting fluid as a function of the applied electric field. Numerical results are presented for the evolution of the equilibrium shapes of several liquid metals as a function of the applied voltage. Values of the critical or breakdown voltage are obtained from these results and found to be in good agreement with experiment. Finally, the EHS analysis indicates that a realistic and accurate treatment of the onset of instability requires fluid flow in a dynamical model.

  1. Complexing of metal ions by humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, N.D.; Zhang, Y.; Jones, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of metal ions with humic substances is being studied using two different techniques. UV-scanning ultracentrifugation is being used to determine molecular weights and to investigate changes in aggregation brought about by metal ion complexation. The relationship between cation charge and conformation of the humic ligands is also being investigated. The complexation of actinide elements (U, Np, Pu, Am) by humic substances from soils contaminated by both natural processes and by low-level effluent releases is also being studied. Gel permeation chromatography has been used to show both that different fractions of humic substances vary greatly in their effectiveness as ligands and that different actinide elements associate with different fractions. These studies have also shown that uranium desorption is kinetically controlled by humic substances.

  2. Interplay of metal ions and urease.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Flugga, Nicholas; Boer, Jodi L; Mulrooney, Scott B; Hausinger, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    Urease, the first enzyme to be crystallized, contains a dinuclear nickel metallocenter that catalyzes the decomposition of urea to produce ammonia, a reaction of great agricultural and medical importance. Several mechanisms of urease catalysis have been proposed on the basis of enzyme crystal structures, model complexes, and computational efforts, but the precise steps in catalysis and the requirement of nickel versus other metals remain unclear. Purified bacterial urease is partially activated via incubation with carbon dioxide plus nickel ions; however, in vitro activation also has been achieved with manganese and cobalt. In vivo activation of most ureases requires accessory proteins that function as nickel metallochaperones and GTP-dependent molecular chaperones or play other roles in the maturation process. In addition, some microorganisms control their levels of urease by metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20046957

  3. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  4. Metal assisted focused-ion beam nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Focused-ion beam milling is a versatile technique for maskless nanofabrication. However, the nonuniform ion beam profile and material redeposition tend to disfigure the surface morphology near the milling areas and degrade the fidelity of nanoscale pattern transfer, limiting the applicability of the technique. The ion-beam induced damage can deteriorate the performance of photonic devices and hinders the precision of template fabrication for nanoimprint lithography. To solve the issue, we present a metal assisted focused-ion beam (MAFIB) process in which a removable sacrificial aluminum layer is utilized to protect the working material. The new technique ensures smooth surfaces and fine milling edges; in addition, it permits direct formation of v-shaped grooves with tunable angles on dielectric substrates or metal films, silver for instance, which are rarely achieved by using traditional nanolithography followed by anisotropic etching processes. MAFIB was successfully demonstrated to directly create nanopatterns on different types of substrates with high fidelity and reproducibility. The technique provides the capability and flexibility necessary to fabricate nanophotonic devices and nanoimprint templates.

  5. Metal assisted focused-ion beam nanopatterning.

    PubMed

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Focused-ion beam milling is a versatile technique for maskless nanofabrication. However, the nonuniform ion beam profile and material redeposition tend to disfigure the surface morphology near the milling areas and degrade the fidelity of nanoscale pattern transfer, limiting the applicability of the technique. The ion-beam induced damage can deteriorate the performance of photonic devices and hinders the precision of template fabrication for nanoimprint lithography. To solve the issue, we present a metal assisted focused-ion beam (MAFIB) process in which a removable sacrificial aluminum layer is utilized to protect the working material. The new technique ensures smooth surfaces and fine milling edges; in addition, it permits direct formation of v-shaped grooves with tunable angles on dielectric substrates or metal films, silver for instance, which are rarely achieved by using traditional nanolithography followed by anisotropic etching processes. MAFIB was successfully demonstrated to directly create nanopatterns on different types of substrates with high fidelity and reproducibility. The technique provides the capability and flexibility necessary to fabricate nanophotonic devices and nanoimprint templates. PMID:27479713

  6. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  7. On the Metal Ion Selectivity of Oxoacid Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between metal chelate stability, ligand basicity, and metal ion acidity are reviewed and the general applicability is illustrated by linear correlations between aqueous stability constants and ligand pKa values for 35 metals with 26 ligands. The results confirm that most individual ligands of this type exhibit a stability ordering that correlates with the Lewis acidity of the metal ion. It is concluded that the general metal ion selectivity exhibited by liquid-liquid oxoacid extractants such as carboxylic acids, -diketones, and alkylphosphoric acids reflects the intrinsic affinity of the metal ion for the negative oxygen donor ligand.

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  9. Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G.; Ullmann, F.; Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L.

    2012-02-15

    We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

  10. Theory of oxidation/reduction-induced valence transformations of metal ion dopants in oxide crystals mediated by oxide-vacancy diffusion: I. Thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinder, M.; Burshtein, Z.; Pelleg, J.

    2014-04-01

    We consider theoretically valence transformations of doping metal ions in oxide crystals induced by oxidation and reduction obtained by changes in the ambient oxygen partial pressure. Three types of oxygen vacancies are assumed to mediate transformations: neutral, singly ionized, and doubly ionized. We provide thermodynamic equilibrium analyses, yielding concentration relations among the oxygen vacancy, metal ions, holes and electrons as functions of the ambient oxygen pressure. The results suggest that experimental study of different species concentrations at thermodynamic equilibrium as functions of pressure and temperature should allow assessment of various reversible reaction constants controlling the process. In the Part II companion paper, the kinetic (diffusion) characteristics are considered in detail.

  11. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  12. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  13. Rational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2000-09-30

    The discriminate bonding of metal ions is a challenge to the synthetic chemist and a phenomenon of considerable practical importance.1 An important feature of many technical applications is the specific or preferential binding of a single metal ion in the presence of many metals. Examples range from large-volume uses (e.g. ferric EDTA as a plant food, calcium complexing agents as water softeners or anticaking formulations) to very high technology applications (technetium complexation in radiopharmaceuticals, synthetic metalloenzymes). We are interested in efficient and discriminate binding of actinides for waste stream remediation. Actinides represent a major and long-lived contaminant in nuclear waste. While the separation of actinides from other radioactive components of waste, such as Sr and Cs, is relatively well established, the separation of actinides from each other and in complex solutions (e.g. those found in tank wastes) is not as well resolved. The challenge of designing metal-specific (actinide) ligands is facilitated by examples from nature. Bacteria synthesize Fe(III)-specific ligands, called siderophores, to sequester Fe(III) from the environment and return it to the cell. The similarities between Fe(III) and Pu(IV) (their charge-to-size ratios and acidity), make the siderophores prototypical for designing actinide-specific ligands. The chelating groups present in siderophores are usually hydroxamic acids and catecholamides. We have developed derivatives of these natural products which have improved properties. The catechol derivatives are the 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamides (TAMs), and 3,4-dihydroxysulfonamides (SFAMs), and the hydroxamic acid derivatives are three isomers of hydroxypyridinones, 1,2- HOPO, 3,2-HOPO, and 3,4-HOPO. All of these ligands are attached to molecular backbones by amides and a very important feature of HOPO and CAM ligands is a strong hydrogen bonds formed between the amide proton and the adjacent phenolic oxygen in the metal

  14. PROJECT SUMMARY. METAL ION ANALYSIS USING NEAR-INFRARED DYES AND THE "LABORATORY-ON-A-CHIP"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project is to develop a sensitive and selective, portable sensor for radionuclides and heavy metals that utilizes a "laboratory-on-a-chip" platform for enabling low-cost, timely characterization of DOE remediation sites. This will be accomplished by ...

  15. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, D. L.; Giedd, R. E.; Wang, Y. Q.; Glass, G. A.

    1999-06-10

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the 'mixing' effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 A thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

  16. Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, D.L.; Giedd, R.E.; Wang, Y.Q.; Glass, G.A.

    1999-06-01

    Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the {open_quotes}mixing{close_quotes} effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 {Angstrom} thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. {ital In situ} RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  18. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  19. Antifungal Properties of Electrically Generated Metallic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Berger, T. J.; Spadaro, J. A.; Bierman, Richard; Chapin, S. E.; Becker, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative investigation was undertaken to study the susceptibility of unicellular eucaryotic organisms (yeasts) to metallic cations generated by low levels of direct current. Results were characteristic of effects obtained previously using clinical and standard bacteria test organisms. The present study demonstrated that anodic silver (Ag+) at low direct currents had inhibitory and fungicidal properties. Broth dilution susceptibility tests were made on several species of Candida and one species of Torulopsis. Growth in all isolates was inhibited by concentrations of electrically generated silver ions between 0.5 and 4.7 μg/ml, and silver exhibited fungicidal properties at concentrations as low as 1.9 μg/ml. The inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations of electrically generated silver ions are lower than those reported for other silver compounds. Images PMID:1034467

  20. Metal Ion Intercalated graphitic as Transparent Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiayu; Bao, Wenzhong; Gu, Feng; Fuhrer, Michael; Hu, Liangbing; UMD Team

    To best utilize the performance of graphene based transparent electrodes, we novelized Li-ion intercalation in graphene, and achieved highest performance of carbon based transparent electrodes. Transmission as high as 91.7% with a sheet resistance of 3.0 ohm/sq is achieved for 19-layer LiC6, significantly higher than any other continuous transparent electrodes. The unconventional modification of ultrathin graphite optoelectronic properties is explained by the suppression of interband optical transitions and a small intraband Drude conductivity near the interband edge. To achieve low cost, large scale graphene-based transparent electrodes, we further developed Na-ion intercalated printed reduced graphene oxide (RGO) film. The larger layer-layer distance of RGO allows Na-ion intercalation, leading to simultaneously much higher DC conductivity and higher optical transmittance. Typical increase of transmittance from 36% to 79% and decrease of sheet resistance from 83 kohms/sq to 311 ohms/sq in the printed network was observed. This study demonstrated the great potential of metal-ion intercalation to improve the performance of graphene-based materials for transparent conductor applications.

  1. An artificial tongue fluorescent sensor array for identification and quantitation of various heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Ren, Changliang; Teoh, Chai Lean; Peng, Juanjuan; Gadre, Shubhankar Haribhau; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Chi-Lik Ken; Chang, Young-Tae

    2014-09-01

    Herein, a small-molecule fluorescent sensor array for rapid identification of seven heavy metal ions was designed and synthesized, with its sensing mechanism mimicking that of a tongue. The photoinduced electron transfer and intramolecular charge transfer mechanism result in combinatorial interactions between sensor array and heavy metal ions, which lead to diversified fluorescence wavelength shifts and emission intensity changes. Upon principle component analysis (PCA), this result renders clear identification of each heavy metal ion on a 3D spatial dispersion graph. Further exploration provides a concentration-dependent pattern, allowing both qualitative and quantitative measurements of heavy metal ions. On the basis of this information, a "safe-zone" concept was proposed, which provides rapid exclusion of versatile hazardous species from clean water samples based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure standards. This type of small-molecule fluorescent sensor array could open a new avenue for multiple heavy metal ion detection and simplified water quality analysis. PMID:25144824

  2. Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

  3. Metal ion cooperativity in ribozyme cleavage of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Brännvall, Mathias; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2001-01-01

    Combinations of chemical and genetic approaches were used to study the function of divalent metal ions in cleavage of RNA by the ribozyme RNase P RNA. We show that different divalent metal ions have differential effects on cleavage site recognition and rescue of cleavage activity by mixing divalent metal ions that do not promote cleavage by themselves. We conclude that efficient and correct cleavage is the result of cooperativity between divalent metal ions bound at different sites in the RNase P RNA-substrate complex. Complementation of a mutant RNase P RNA phenotype as a result of divalent metal ion replacement is demonstrated also. This finding together with other data indicate that one of the metal ions involved in this cooperativity is positioned near the cleavage site. The possibility that the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio might regulate the activity of biocatalysts that depend on RNA for activity is discussed. PMID:11606743

  4. Nanomagnetic chelators for removal of toxic metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarika; Barick, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-02-01

    Ethylenediamine trtraaceteic acid (EDTA) functionalized Fe3O4 nanomagnetic chelators (NMCs) were synthesized by co-precipitation method followed by in-situ grafting of EDTA. XRD and TEM analyses reveal the formation of highly crystalline single-phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles of size about 10 nm. Surface functionalization of Fe3O4 with EDTA was evident from FTIR spectroscopy, TGA analysis and zeta-potential measurement. These NMCs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. It has been observed that NMCs have strong tendency for adsorption of various toxic metal ions (Ni2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Pb2+) from waste-water. Furthermore, these magnetic chelators can be used as highly efficient separable and reusable material for removal of toxic metal ions.

  5. Fluorescence enhancement aided by metal ion displacement.

    PubMed

    Susini, Vanessa; Ienco, Andrea; Lucia Rossi, Veronica; Paolicchi, Aldo; Sanesi, Antonio

    2016-06-15

    Immunosensors are one of the most common platform used in clinical laboratories, in particular the class based on Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assays (ELFA) takes advantage of the amplification step of the enzyme, usually the alkaline phosphatase, that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a fluorescent substrate leading it to fluoresce. Anyway, they suffer in sensitivity if compared to molecular diagnostic or more modern in vitro diagnostic devices. In our work, a simple and effective mechanism to enhance the fluorescent signal, and hence the sensitivity of the system, is presented. It is based on the metal ion displacement principle in which a second fluorophore, in our case Calcein Blue, quenched by a cobalt ion is add to the first one (4-MUP), and, in presence of inorganic phosphate, it will be progressively activated by the inorganic phosphate itself leading to the metal displacement. In this way Calcein Blue, newly free to fluoresce, contributes to global fluorescent signal generated by 4-MU. We have tested our proof of principle on a currently used immunoanalyzer, that is VIDAS® system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) obtaining a fluorescence enhancement of about 50% for each concentration of hydrolyzed 4-MUP tested. PMID:26851581

  6. Microbial metal-ion reduction and Mars: extraterrestrial expectations?

    PubMed

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Cox, B Lea

    2002-06-01

    Dissimilatory metal-ion-reducing bacteria (DMRB) can couple the reduction of a variety of different metal ions to cellular respiration and growth. The excitement of this metabolic group lies not only in the elucidation of a new type of metabolism, but also in the potential use of these abilities for the removal of toxic organics, and in their ability to reduce (and thus, detoxify) other toxic metals, such as U(VI) and Cr(VI). This review focuses on recent advances in the study of DMRB, including the use of external electron shuttles to enhance rates of metal reduction; genome sequencing and consequent genomic and proteomic analyses; new imaging approaches for high resolution analysis of both cells and chemical components; the demonstration of fractionation of stable isotopes of iron during iron reduction; and the elucidation of the types and patterns of secondary mineral formation during metal reduction. One of the secondary minerals is magnetite, the subject of intense controversy regarding the possibility of evidence for life from the Martian meteorite ALH84001. This review thus ends with a short consideration of the evidence for magnetic 'proof' of the existence of past life on Mars. PMID:12057684

  7. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  8. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  9. Paramagnetic metal ions in pulsed ESR distance distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ming; Ruthstein, Sharon; Saxena, Sunil

    2014-02-18

    The use of pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure interspin distance distributions has advanced biophysical research. The three major techniques that use pulsed ESR are relaxation rate based distance measurements, double quantum coherence (DQC), and double electron electron resonance (DEER). Among these methods, the DEER technique has become particularly popular largely because it is easy to implement on commercial instruments and because programs are available to analyze experimental data. Researchers have widely used DEER to measure the structure and conformational dynamics of molecules labeled with the methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL). Recently, researchers have exploited endogenously bound paramagnetic metal ions as spin probes as a way to determine structural constraints in metalloproteins. In this context Cu(2+) has served as a useful paramagnetic metal probe at X-band for DEER based distance measurements. Sample preparation is simple, and a coordinated-Cu(2+) ion offers limited spatial flexibility, making it an attractive probe for DEER experiments. On the other hand, Cu(2+) has a broad absorption ESR spectrum at low temperature, which leads to two potential complications. First, the Cu(2+)-based DEER time domain data has lower signal to noise ratio compared with MTSSL. Second, accurate distance distribution analysis often requires high-quality experimental data at different external magnetic fields or with different frequency offsets. In this Account, we summarize characteristics of Cu(2+)-based DEER distance distribution measurements and data analysis methods. We highlight a novel application of such measurements in a protein-DNA complex to identify the metal ion binding site and to elucidate its chemical mechanism of function. We also survey the progress of research on other metal ions in high frequency DEER experiments. PMID:24289139

  10. Programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae and ashing analysis: A decrement solution for nuclide and heavy metal disposal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Luo, Lang; Xiang, Sha; Zhang, Gege

    2016-08-15

    One of the waste disposal principles is decrement. The programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae regarding bioremoval and ashing process for decrement were studied in present research. The results indicated that S. cerevisiae cells showed valid biosorption for strontium ions with greater than 90% bioremoval efficiency for high concentration strontium ions under batch culture conditions. The S. cerevisiae cells bioaccumulated approximately 10% of strontium ions in the cytoplasm besides adsorbing 90% strontium ions on cell wall. The programmed gradient descent biosorption presented good performance with a nearly 100% bioremoval ratio for low concentration strontium ions after 3 cycles. The ashing process resulted in a huge volume and weight reduction ratio as well as enrichment for strontium in the ash. XRD results showed that SrSO4 existed in ash. Simulated experiments proved that sulfate could adjust the precipitation of strontium ions. Finally, we proposed a technological flow process that combined the programmed gradient descent biosorption and ashing, which could yield great decrement and allow the supernatant to meet discharge standard. This technological flow process may be beneficial for nuclides and heavy metal disposal treatment in many fields. PMID:27136735

  11. Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiaping; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-01-01

    Copper biosorption from aqueous solutions by calcium alginate is reported in this paper. The experimental section includes potentiometric titrations of biosorbents, batch equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption, as well as fixed-bed biosorption experiments. The potentiometric titration results show that the surface charge increases with decreasing pH. The biosorption of copper strongly depends on solution pH; the metal ion binding increases from 0 to 90 percent in pH ranging from 1.5 to 5.0. In addition, a decrease in ionic strength results in an increase of copper ion removal. Kinetic studies indicate that mass transfer plays an important role in the biosorption rate. Furthermore, a fixed-bed biosorption experiment shows that calcium alginate has a significant capacity for copper ion removal. The two-pK Basic Stem model successfully represents the surface charge and equilibrium biosorption experimental data. The calculation results demonstrate that the copper removal may result from the binding of free copper and its hydroxide with surface functional groups of the biosorbents.

  12. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Positive metallic ions have been measured in the earth's atmosphere between 85 and 120 km, during the period of the beta Taurids meteor shower, which is associated with Comet Encke. The ions originate during and following ablation of extraterrestrial debris by the earth's atmosphere. The enhancement of metal ion density during meteor showers is primary evidence for their extraterrestrial origin. The present results were obtained from a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer.

  13. THE ROLES OF METAL IONS IN REGULATION BY RIBOSWITCHES

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions are required by all organisms in order to execute an array of essential molecular functions. They play a critical role in many catalytic mechanisms and structural properties. Proper homeostasis of ions is critical; levels that are aberrantly low or high are deleterious to cellular physiology. To maintain stable intracellular pools, metal ion-sensing regulatory (metalloregulatory) proteins couple metal ion concentration fluctuations with expression of genes encoding for cation transport or sequestration. However, these transcriptional-based regulatory strategies are not the only mechanisms by which organisms coordinate metal ions with gene expression. Intriguingly, a few classes of signal-responsive RNA elements have also been discovered to function as metalloregulatory agents. This suggests that RNA-based regulatory strategies can be precisely tuned to intracellular metal ion pools, functionally akin to metalloregulatory proteins. In addition to these metal-sensing regulatory RNAs, there is a yet broader role for metal ions in directly assisting the structural integrity of other signal-responsive regulatory RNA elements. In this chapter, we discuss how the intimate physicochemical relationship between metal ions and nucleic acids is important for the structure and function of metal ion- and metabolite-sensing regulatory RNAs. PMID:22010271

  14. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrations in an urban estuary.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G; Burgess, Robert M; Coull, Brent; Shine, James P

    2016-05-01

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limited, due to underexplored techniques for measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. In this work, we performed statistical analyses on a large dataset containing repeated measurements of free ion concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd, the most commonly measured metals in seawater, at five inshore locations in Boston Harbor, previously collected using an in-situ equilibrium-based multi-metal free ion sampler, the 'Gellyfish'. We examined correlations among these five metals by season, and evaluated effects of 10 biogeochemical variables on free ion concentrations over time and location through multivariate regressions. We also explored potential clustering among the five metals through a principal component analysis. We found significant correlations among metals, with varying patterns over season. Our regression results suggest that instead of dissolved metals, pH, salinity, temperature and rainfall were the most significant determinants of free metal ion concentrations. For example, a one-unit decrease in pH was associated with a 2.2 (Cd) to 99 (Cu) times increase in free ion concentrations. This work is among the first to reveal key contributors to spatiotemporal variations in free ion concentrations, and demonstrated the usefulness of the Gellyfish sampler in routine sampling of free ions within metal mixtures and in generating data for statistical analyses. PMID:26901477

  15. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Fluorescence imaging of metal ions implicated in diseases.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xuhong; Xu, Zhaochao

    2015-07-21

    Metal ions play an important role in various biological processes, their abnormal homeostasis in cells is related to many diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, cancer and diabetes. Fluorescent imaging offers a unique route to detect metal ions in cells via a contactless and damage-free way with high spatial and temporal fidelity. Consequently, it represents a promising method to advance the understanding of physiological and pathological functions of metal ions in cell biology. In this highlight article, we will discuss recent advances in fluorescent imaging of metal ions by small-molecule sensors for understanding the role of metals in related diseases. We will also discuss challenges and opportunities for the design of small-molecule sensors for fluorescent detection of cellular metal ions as a potential method for disease diagnosis. PMID:25556818

  17. Metal Ion Capture Mechanism of a Copper Metallochaperone.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Li, Pengfei; Tran, Trang T; Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2016-01-26

    A novel cation-π interaction between the bound Cu(+) metal ion and Trp44 in the periplasmic Cu(+)/Ag(+) metallochaperone Escherichia coli CusF protects Cu(+) from the oxidative influence of the periplasm. In a popular model of metal ion transfer, a conformational change in the metal binding loop disrupts the cation-π interaction and moves Trp44 aside to provide access to the occluded metal ion binding site in an "open" conformation. In this study, our molecular dynamics simulations support this putative mechanism of metal ion transfer. We find that the apoprotein undergoes a transition back and forth from the crystallographically observed "closed" state to the hypothesized open conformation over multiple microseconds. In agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance data, our simulations show that similar transitions are prohibited in Cu(+)·CusF, suggesting that the conformational transitions are gated by a metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bond between metal binding residue His36 and Asp37 of the metal binding loop region. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations indicate that metal ion binding strengthens this interaction significantly, much like what is found in the case of other metalloproteins. The study builds toward a common evolutionary role of metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bonds in metalloprotein structure and function. PMID:26690586

  18. Molecular Turnstiles Regulated by Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxia; Xiao, Hongmei; He, Jiaojiao; Xiang, Junfeng; Wang, Ying; Chen, Xuebo; Che, Yanke; Jiang, Hua

    2016-04-15

    A family of novel molecular turnstiles 1-3 composed of two stators with pyridyl binding sites and a different-sized triptycene rotor was synthesized. The molecular turnstiles behave in an open state at room temperature in the absence of metal ions but display significantly different closed states in the presence of Ag(+) and Pd(2+). The Ag(+)-mediated turnstiles 1-3Ag exhibited closed states but unreadable bistability at ambient temperature because the Ag(+)-mediated macrocyclic framework is not able to restrict the rotations of the rotors; while temperature was decreased, the macrocyclic frameworks became stable enough to halt the rotations of the rotors, eventually leading to the readable closed states for 1-3Ag. In contrast, Pd(2+)-mediated macrocyclic frameworks are stable, giving rise to a detectable closed state of turnstiles 1-3Pd in a wide range of temperatures. These findings have also been supported by DFT calculations. PMID:26986992

  19. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  20. Synthesis, Spectral Analysis and Preliminary in Vitro Evaluation of Some Tetrapyrrolic Complexes with 3d Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Socoteanu, Radu; Manda, Gina; Boscencu, Rica; Vasiliu, Georgiana; Oliveira, Anabela Sousa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two tetrapyrrolic complexes, Zn(II)-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin and Cu(II)-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin were synthesized, and characterized from a spectral and biological point of view. The study provided data concerning the behavior of identical external substituents vs. two different core insertions. Some of the properties of the proposed tetrapyrrolic structures were highlighted, having photodynamic therapy of cancer as a targeted biomedical application. Elemental analysis, NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis data in various solvents were provided. A preliminary in vitro study on normal and cancer cultured cells was carried out for biocompatibility assessment in dark conditions. The preliminary in vitro study performed on human peripheral mononuclear cells exposed to tetrapyrrolic compounds (2 µM) showed that the proposed compounds had a convenient cytotoxic profile on human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells under dark conditions. Meanwhile, the investigated compounds reduced the number of metabolically active breast tumor MCF-7 cells, with the exception of Zn(II) complex-containing a symmetrical ligand. Accordingly, preliminary in vitro data suggest that the proposed tetrapyrrolic compounds are good candidates for PDT, as they limit tumor expansion even under dark conditions, whilst sparing normal cells. PMID:26343614

  1. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-02-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT - H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT - H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/ z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/ y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, which results in the electrochemical properties of these metal ions being similar in both the peptide environment and in bulk water.

  2. Metal Ion Sensors Based on DNAzymes and Related DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Rong-Mei; Lu, Yi

    2011-07-01

    Metal ion sensors are an important yet challenging field in analytical chemistry. Despite much effort, only a limited number of metal ion sensors are available for practical use because sensor design is often a trial-and-error-dependent process. DNAzyme-based sensors, in contrast, can be developed through a systematic selection that is generalizable for a wide range of metal ions. Here, we summarize recent progress in the design of DNAzyme-based fluorescent, colorimetric, and electrochemical sensors for metal ions, such as Pb2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, and UO22+. In addition, we also describe metal ion sensors based on related DNA molecules, including T-T or C-C mismatches and G-quadruplexes.

  3. Metal Ion Sensors Based on DNAzymes and Related DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Metal ion sensors are an important yet challenging field in analytical chemistry. Despite much effort, only a limited number of metal ion sensors are available for practical use because sensor design is often a trial-and-error-dependent process. DNAzyme-based sensors, in contrast, can be developed through a systematic selection that is generalizable for a wide range of metal ions. Here, we summarize recent progress in the design of DNAzyme-based fluorescent, colorimetric, and electrochemical sensors for metal ions, such as Pb2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, and UO22+ In addition, we also describe metal ion sensors based on related DNA molecules, including T-T or C-C mismatches and G-quadruplexes. PMID:21370984

  4. Multiply stripped ion generation in the metal vapor vacuum arc

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Feinberg, B.; Galvin, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    We consider the charge state distribution of ions produced in the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A high current metal ion source, the MEVVA ion source, in which the ion beam is extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma, has been used to obtain the spectra of multiple charged ions produced within the cathode spots. A computer calculation of the charge state distribution that evolves within the spots via stepwide ionization of ions by electron impact provides a theoretical basis for comparison of the data. In this paper we report on the measured charge state distributions for a wide variety of metallic species and compare these results with the predictions of this theory. 55 refs.

  5. RNA structure analysis using T2 ribonuclease: detection of pH and metal ion induced conformational changes in yeast tRNAPhe.

    PubMed Central

    Vary, C P; Vournakis, J N

    1984-01-01

    We describe the use of an enzymic probe of RNA structure, T2 ribonuclease, to detect alterations of RNA conformation induced by changes in Mg2+ ion concentration and pH. T2 RNase is shown to possess single-strand specificity similar to S1 nuclease. In contrast to S1 nuclease, T2 RNase does not require divalent cations for activity. We have used this enzyme to investigate the role of Mg2+ ions in the stabilization of RNA conformation. We find that, at neutral pH, drastic reduction of the available divalent metal ions results in a decrease in the ability of T2 RNase to cleave the anticodon loop of tRNAPhe. This change accompanies an increase in the cleavage of the molecule in the T psi C and in the dihydrouracil loops. Similar treatment of Tetrahymena thermophila 5S ribosomal RNA shows that changes in magnesium ion concentration does not have a pronounced effect on the cleavage pattern produced by T2 RNase. T2 RNase activity has a broader pH range than S1 nuclease and can be used to study pH induced conformational shifts in RNA structure. We find that upon lowering the pH from 7.0 to 4.5, nucleotide D16 in the dihydrouracil loop of tRNAPhe becomes highly sensitive to T2 RNase hydrolysis. This change accompanies a decrease in the relative sensitivity of the anticodon loop to the enzyme. The role of metal ion and proton concentrations in maintenance of the functional conformation of tRNAPhe is discussed. Images PMID:6207483

  6. Structural insights into protein-metal ion partnerships.

    PubMed

    Barondeau, David P; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2004-12-01

    New metalloprotein structures continue to provide discoveries regarding protein-metal ion partnerships. Many recent structures reveal metal ion sites that control or are controlled by protein conformational change, including modulation by alternative splice variants and striking conformational changes. Only a few novel catalytic metal centers have been revealed recently, such as the surprising Ni-hook superoxide dismutase catalytic site and the cubane-like Mn(3)CaO(4) photosynthetic oxygen-evolving center. However, important new variations on old heme themes, breakthroughs in the fields of metal ion regulation and metallochaperones, and captivating insights into partnerships between proteins and minerals have also been described. Very high resolution metal site structures and metalloprotein design will be increasingly important in order to leverage the wealth of native metalloprotein structures into a deep understanding of metal ion site specificity and activity. PMID:15582401

  7. Selective retention of basic compounds by metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Asakawa, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    A novel metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography has been developed for the analysis of basic compounds using heat-treated silica gel containing hydrated metal cations (metal aquo-ions) as the packing material. The packing materials of the metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography were prepared by the immobilization of a single metal component such as Fe(III), Al(III), Ag(I), and Ni(II) on silica gel followed by extensive heat treatment. The immobilized metals form aquo-ions to present cation-exchange ability for basic analytes and the cation-exchange ability for basic analytes depends on pKa of the immobilized metal species. In the present study, to evaluate the retention characteristics of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography, the on-line solid-phase extraction of drugs was investigated. Obtained data clearly evidence the selective retention capability of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography for basic analytes with sufficient capacity. PMID:25044622

  8. Impact of Protein-Metal Ion Interactions on the Crystallization of Silk Fibroin Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Lu, Qiang; Kaplan, David; Cebe, Peggy

    2009-03-01

    Proteins can easily form bonds with a variety of metal ions, which provides many unique biological functions for the protein structures, and therefore controls the overall structural transformation of proteins. We use advanced thermal analysis methods such as temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry and quasi-isothermal TMDSC, combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, to investigate the protein-metallic ion interactions in Bombyx mori silk fibroin proteins. Silk samples were mixed with different metal ions (Ca^2+, K^+, Ma^2+, Na^+, Cu^2+, Mn^2+) with different mass ratios, and compared with the physical conditions in the silkworm gland. Results show that all metallic ions can directly affect the crystallization behavior and glass transition of silk fibroin. However, different ions tend to have different structural impact, including their role as plasticizer or anti-plasticizer. Detailed studies reveal important information allowing us better to understand the natural silk spinning and crystallization process.

  9. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  10. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-03

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  11. A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim

    2010-02-15

    A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield such as Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm{sup 2} at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

  12. Determination of metal ion concentrations by SERS using 2,2'-bipyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Julie; Mabbott, Samuel; Smith, W Ewen; Reglinski, John; Faulds, Karen; Davidson, Christine; Graham, Duncan

    2015-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can generate characteristic spectral "fingerprints" from metal complexes, thus providing the potential for the development of methods of analysis for the identification and quantitation of a range of metal ions in solution. The advantages include sensitivity and the use of one ligand for several metals without the need for a specific chromophore. Aqueous solutions of Fe(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Cr(III) and Cd(II) in the presence of excess 2,2'-bipyridyl (bipy) were analysed using SERS. Specific marker bands enabled the identification of each metal ion and the limit of detection for each metal ion was estimated. Two of the ions, Zn(II) and Cu(II), could be detected below the World Health Organisation's (WHO) recommended limits for drinking water at levels of 0.22 and 0.6 mg L(-1), respectively. PMID:26312259

  13. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Takagi, T.

    We have developed an impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source whose tip is a sintered-porous structure made of a refractory metal such as tungsten. By this structure the ratio of the liquid metal surface area facing the vacuum to the volume is low, which decreases useless metal evaporation from the surface. The maximum vapour pressure of the metal in operation for this ion source is 10 -1-10 0 Torr, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that for the needle type. Therefore, useful metal ions such as Ga +, Au +, Ag +, In +, Si 2+, Ge 2+, and Sb 2+ can be extracted from single element metals or alloys. The porous structure of the tip has also an effect on the positive control of the liquid metal flow rate to the tip head. Thus, a stable operation with a high current of a few hundreds of μA can be obtained together with a low current high brightness ion beam. Therefore, this ion source is suitable not only for microfocusing but also for a general use as a metal ion source.

  14. Structures and energetics of complexation of metal ions with ammonia, water, and benzene: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Neela, Y Indra; Narahari Sastry, G

    2016-04-30

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP level to investigate the strength and nature of interactions of ammonia (NH3 ), water (H2 O), and benzene (C6 H6 ) with various metal ions and validated with the available experimental results. For all the considered metal ions, a preference for C6 H6 is observed for dicationic ions whereas the monocationic ions prefer to bind with NH3 . Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) analysis has been employed at PBE0AC/def2-TZVP level on these complexes (closed shell), to understand the various energy terms contributing to binding energy (BE). The DFT-SAPT result shows that for the metal ion complexes with H2 O electrostatic component is the major contributor to the BE whereas, for C6 H6 complexes polarization component is dominant, except in the case of alkali metal ion complexes. However, in case of NH3 complexes, electrostatic component is dominant for s-block metal ions, whereas, for the d and p-block metal ion complexes both electrostatic and polarization components are important. The geometry (M(+) -N and M(+) -O distance for NH3 and H2 O complexes respectively, and cation-π distance for C6 H6 complexes) for the alkali and alkaline earth metal ion complexes increases down the group. Natural population analysis performed on NH3 , H2 O, and C6 H6 complexes shows that the charge transfer to metal ions is higher in case of C6 H6 complexes. PMID:26833683

  15. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  16. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  17. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  18. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  19. Blood metal ion testing is an effective screening tool to identify poorly performing metal-on-metal bearing surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidaginamale, R. P.; Joyce, T. J.; Lord, J. K.; Jefferson, R.; Blain, P. G.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Langton, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this piece of work were to: 1) record the background concentrations of blood chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations in a large group of subjects; 2) to compare blood/serum Cr and Co concentrations with retrieved metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings; 3) to examine the distribution of Co and Cr in the serum and whole blood of patients with MoM hip arthroplasties; and 4) to further understand the partitioning of metal ions between the serum and whole blood fractions. Methods A total of 3042 blood samples donated to the local transfusion centre were analysed to record Co and Cr concentrations. Also, 91 hip resurfacing devices from patients who had given pre-revision blood/serum samples for metal ion analysis underwent volumetric wear assessment using a coordinate measuring machine. Linear regression analysis was carried out and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the reliability of metal ions to identify abnormally wearing implants. The relationship between serum and whole blood concentrations of Cr and Co in 1048 patients was analysed using Bland-Altman charts. This relationship was further investigated in an in vitro study during which human blood was spiked with trivalent and hexavalent Cr, the serum then separated and the fractions analysed. Results Only one patient in the transfusion group was found to have a blood Co > 2 µg/l. Blood/Serum Cr and Co concentrations were reliable indicators of abnormal wear. Blood Co appeared to be the most useful clinical test, with a concentration of 4.5 µg/l showing sensitivity and specificity for the detection of abnormal wear of 94% and 95%, respectively. Generated metal ions tended to fill the serum compartment preferentially in vivo and this was replicated in the in vitro study when blood was spiked with trivalent Cr and bivalent Co. Conclusions Blood/serum metal ion concentrations are reliable indicators of abnormal wear processes. Important differences exist

  20. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  1. Sequence-selective metal ion binding to DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Frøystein, N A; Davis, J T; Reid, B R; Sletten, E

    1993-07-01

    Metal ion titrations of several DNA oligonucleotides, 10 dodecamers and one decamer have been monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy in order to elucidate metal ion binding patterns. Also, the effects of paramagnetic impurities on resonance linewidths and NOESY cross-peak intensities have been reversed by EDTA back-titration experiments. 1H 1D NMR spectra were recorded after successive additions of aliquots of different metal salts to oligonucleotide samples. Paramagnetic manganese(II) salts were used in most cases, but a few samples were also titrated with diamagnetic zinc(II). From this study, we conclude that there exists a sequence-selective metal ion binding pattern. The metal ions bind predominantly to 5'-G in the contexts 5'-GC and 5'-GA. The order of preference seems to be GG > or = GA > GT > > GC. No evidence of metal ion binding to 5'-G in 5'-GC steps or to non-G residues was found. The H6 or H8 resonances on preceding (5'-) bases were affected by the adjacent bound paramagnetic metal ion, but no effect was observed on the protons of the succeeding (3'-) base. The metal binding site in the duplexes is most likely at G-N7, as manifested by the pronounced paramagnetic line broadening or diamagnetic shift of the G-H8 signal. This sequence selectivity may be qualitatively explained by a sequence-dependent variation in the molecular electrostatic potentials of guanine residues (MEPs) along the oligonucleotide chain. PMID:8363924

  2. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  3. Metal ion adsorption at the ionic liquid-mica interface.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Samila; Elbourne, Aaron; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-01-14

    Mica has been employed in many studies of ionic liquid (IL) interfaces on account of its atomic smoothness and well defined surface properties. However, until now it has been unclear whether ions dissolved in ILs can compete with the IL cation and adsorb to mica charge sites. In this work amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to probe metal ion adsorption at the interface of mica with propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature IL. Lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium nitrate salts were added to PAN at a concentration of ∼60 mM. Aluminum nitrate was also investigated, but only at 5 mM because its solubility in PAN is much lower. The AM-AFM images obtained when the metal ions were present are strikingly different to that of pure PAN, indicating that the ions compete effectively with the propylammonium cation and adsorb to negatively charged sites on the mica surface despite their much lower concentration. This is a consequence of electrostatic attractions between the mica charge sites and the metal ions being significantly stronger than for the propylammonium cation; compared to the metal ions the propylammonium charged group is relatively constrained sterically. A distinct honeycomb pattern is noted for the PAN + Al(3+) system, less obviously for the divalent ions and not at all for monovalent ions. This difference is attributed to the strength of electrostatic interactions between metal ions and mica charge sites increasing with the ion charge, which means that divalent and (particularly) trivalent ions are located more precisely above the charged sites of the mica lattice. The images obtained allow important distinctions between metal ion adsorption at mica-water and mica-PAN interfaces to be made. PMID:26661934

  4. Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, A. H.

    1998-05-19

    A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

  5. Separation of platinum group metal ions by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K.; Cox, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    Separations of metal ions on the basis of Donnan dialysis across anion-exchange membranes should be possible if the receiver electrolyte composition favors the formation of selected anionic complexes of the sample metal ions. Moreover, such a separation has the possibility of being better suited from some applications than batch or column experiments with anion-exchange resins. The above hypothesis are tested on the platinum-group metal ions, Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II), Ir(III), and Ir(IV). 13 references, 4 tables.

  6. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  7. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Sandoval, Roxana; Luévano-Rodríguez, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Saldívar-Elias, Sergio; Gurrola-Carlos, Reinaldo; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO3)2. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis. PMID:26064998

  8. Theory of oxidation/reduction-induced valence transformations of metal ion dopants in oxide crystals mediated by oxide-vacancy diffusion: II. Kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinder, M.; Burshtein, Z.; Pelleg, J.

    2014-04-01

    We consider theoretically valence transformations of doping metal ions in oxide crystals induced by oxidation and reduction obtained by changes in the ambient oxygen partial pressure. Three types of oxygen vacancies are assumed to mediate transformations: neutral, singly ionized, and doubly ionized. In the companion part I paper we provide thermodynamic analyses yielding concentration relations among the oxygen vacancy, metal ions, holes and electrons, as functions of the ambient oxygen pressure. In the present companion part II paper we provide time dependent concentration profiles of the various species and reaction rate profiles. The diffusion exhibits a complex behavior; under some conditions, it may be described by a constant diffusivity, and is symmetric with respect to oxidation and reduction. However, under a wide range of conditions, the ionic state changes are highly asymmetric with respect to oxidation and reduction. For example, in the case of a neutral vacancy, a very narrow reaction front may establish during reduction. In the inverse (oxidation) process, however, the different species' profiles are quite smooth.

  9. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future. PMID:26996438

  10. Metal ion levels: how can they help us?

    PubMed

    Griffin, William L

    2014-04-01

    Ion levels have been shown to reliably predict abnormal function of the bearing surface with increased wear, but ion levels should not be used alone as a trigger for when to proceed with revision surgery with metal-metal articulations. Risk stratification strategies help determine which patients should be monitored more closely with serial ion levels, cross-sectional imaging with a MARS MRI, or proceed on to revision. Based on the current data available, an ion level greater than 4.5 ppb (Cr or Co) may serve as a threshold for when abnormal wear is occurring, and is suggested as a trigger for a MARS MRI scan. PMID:24655610

  11. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  12. Effects of metal ions on fibroblasts and spiral ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Paasche, G; Ceschi, P; Löbler, M; Rösl, C; Gomes, P; Hahn, A; Rohm, H W; Sternberg, K; Lenarz, T; Schmitz, K-P; Barcikowski, S; Stöver, T

    2011-04-01

    Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) after deafness and fibrous tissue growth around the electrode carrier after cochlear implantation are two of the major challenges in current cochlear implant research. Metal ions are known to possess antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential. The use of metal ions could therefore provide a way to reduce tissue growth around the electrode array after cochlear implantation. Here, we report on in vitro experiments with different concentrations of metal salts with antiproliferative and toxic effects on fibroblasts, PC-12 cells, and freshly isolated spiral ganglion cells, the target cells for electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant. Standard cell lines (NIH/3T3 and L-929 fibroblasts and PC-12 cells) and freshly isolated SGC were incubated with concentrations of metal ions between 0.3 μmol/liter and 10 mmol/liter for 48 hr. Cell survival was investigated by neutral red uptake, CellQuantiBlue assay, or counting of stained surviving neurons. Silver ions exhibited distinct thresholds for proliferating and confluent cells. For zinc ions, the effective concentration was lower for fibroblasts than for PC-12 cells. SGC showed comparable thresholds for reduced cell survival not only for silver and zinc ions but also for copper(II) ions, indicating that these ions might be promising for reducing tissue growth on the surface of CI electrode arrays. These effects were also observed when combinations of two of these ions were investigated. PMID:21312225

  13. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  14. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  15. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  16. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  17. Comparison of synovial fluid, urine, and serum ion levels in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty at a minimum follow-up of 18 years.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Grübl, Alexander; Kolb, Alexander; Stelzeneder, David; Pilger, Alexander; Kubista, Bernd; Giurea, Alexander; Windhager, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Diagnosis of adverse reactions to metal debris in metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty is a multifactorial process. Systemic ion levels are just one factor in the evaluation and should not be relied upon solely to determine the need for revision surgery. Furthermore, the correlation between cobalt or chromium serum, urine, or synovial fluid levels and adverse local tissue reactions is still incompletely understood. The hypothesis was that elevated serum and urine metal-ion concentrations are associated with elevated local metal-ion concentrations in primary total hip arthroplasties (THA) and with failure of metal-on-metal articulations in the long-term. In our present study, we evaluated these concentrations in 105 cementless THA with metal-on-metal articulating surfaces with small head diameter at a minimum of 18 years postoperatively. Spearman correlation showed a high correlation between the joint fluid aspirate concentration of cobalt and chromium with the serum cobalt (r = 0.81) and chromium level (r = 0.77) in patients with the THA as the only source of metal-ions. In these patients serum metal-ion analysis is a valuable method for screening. In patients with more than one source of metal or renal insufficiency additional investigations, like joint aspirations are an important tool for evaluation of wear and adverse tissue reactions in metal-on-metal THA. PMID:24841922

  18. Predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using ion characteristics: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships have been used to predict the relative toxicity of organic compounds. Although not as common, ion characteristics have also proven useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions. The purpose of this study was to determine if the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay was predictable using ion characteristics. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) were determined for 20 metals in a NaNO{sub 3} medium, which reflected freshwater speciation conditions, using the Microtox bacterial assay. The log of EC50 values was modeled using several ion characteristics, and Akaike`s Information Criterion was calculated to determine which ion characteristics provided the best fit. Whether modeling total ion or free ion EC50 values, the one variable which best modeled EC50s was the softness index, while a combination of {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r ({chi}{sub m} = electronegativity, r = Pauling ionic radius) and {vert_bar}log K{sub OH}{vert_bar} was the best two-variable model. Other variables, including {Delta}E{sub 0} and {chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r (one-variable models) and (AN/{Delta}IP, {Delta}E{sub 0}) and ({chi}{sub m}{sup 2}r, Z{sup 2}/r) (two-variable models), also gave adequate fits. Modeling with speciated (free ion) versus unspeciated (total ion) EC50 values did not improve fits. Modeling mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions separately improved the models. The authors conclude that ion characteristics can be used to predict the relative toxicity of metal ions whether in freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium) or saltwater (NaCl medium) speciation conditions and that this approach can be applied to metal ions varying widely in both valence and binding tendencies.

  19. An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

  20. Smart textile device using ion polymer metal compound.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Ihara, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a smart textile device that detects angular displacement of attached surface using ion polymer metal compound. The device was composed of ion polymer metal compound (IPMC) which was fabricated from Nafion resin by heat-press and chemical gold plating. The generated voltage from IPMC was measured as a function of bending angle. Fabricated IPMC device was weaved into a cotton cloth and multidirectional movements were detected. PMID:24109750

  1. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  2. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  3. The Interchangeability of Plasma and Whole Blood Metal Ion Measurement in the Monitoring of Metal on Metal Hips

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ibrahim A.; Rogers, Joanne; King, Amanda Christina; Clutton, Juliet; Winson, Daniel; John, Alun

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and twenty six paired samples of plasma and whole blood were measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique for metal ions analysis to determine a relationship between them. There was a significant difference between the mean plasma and whole blood concentrations of both cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) (p < 0.0001 for both Co and Cr). The mean ratio between plasma and whole blood Cr and Co was 1.56 (range: 0.39–3.85) and 1.54 (range: 0.64–18.26), respectively, but Bland and Altman analysis illustrated that this relationship was not universal throughout the range of concentrations. There was higher variability at high concentrations for both ions. We conclude that both these concentrations should not be used interchangeably and conversion factors are unreliable due to concentration dependent variability. PMID:26798516

  4. Implantation of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphorus ions into metals

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Gordeeva, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The application of ion implantation for alloying offers a unique opportunity to modify the chemical composition, phase constitution, and microstructure of the surface layers of metals. The authors studied ion implantation of nitrogen and carbon into the surface layers of metallic targets. The phase composition of the implanted layers obtained on the Kh18N10T stainless steel, the refractory molybdenum alloy TsM-6, niobium, and nickel was determined according to the conventional method of recording the x-ray diffraction pattern of the specimens using monochromatic FeK/sub alpha/-radiation on a DRON-2,0 diffractometer. The targets were bombarded at room temperature in an ILU-3 ion accelerator. The implantation of metalloid ions was also conducted with the targets being bombarded with 100-keV phosphorus ions and 40-keV carbon ions.

  5. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  6. Metal ion adsorption to complexes of humic acid and metal oxides: Deviations from the additivity rule

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeer, A.W.P.; McCulloch, J.K.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.; Koopal, L.K.

    1999-11-01

    The adsorption of cadmium ions to a mixture of Aldrich humic acid and hematite is investigated. The actual adsorption to the humic acid-hematite complex is compared with the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities to each of the isolated components. It is shown that the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities is not equal to the adsorption to the complex. In general, the adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex can be understood and qualitatively predicted using the adsorptivities to each of the pure components and taking into account the effect of the pH on the interaction between humic acid and iron oxide on the metal ion adsorption. Due to the interaction between the negatively charged humic acid and the positively charged iron oxide, the adsorption of metal ions on the mineral oxide in the complex will increase as compared to that on the isolated oxide, whereas the adsorption to the humic acid will decrease as compared to that on the isolated humic acid. As a result, the overall adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex will be smaller than predicted by the additivity rule when this metal ion has a more pronounced affinity for the humic acid than for the mineral oxide, whereas it will be larger than predicted by the additivity rule when the metal ion has a higher affinity for the oxide than for the humic acid.

  7. Ion chromatographic determination of transition metals in irradiated nuclear reactor surveillance samples.

    PubMed

    Louw, I

    1996-02-01

    The determination of transition metal ions in radioactive (+/-25 microCi/g) low-alloy steels (nuclear reactor surveillance samples) by ion chromatography (IC) is described. The analysis has been done directly without prior separation of the iron matrix. The eluted metal ions have been detected with a UV-visible spectrophotometric detector after post-column complexation with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. The results are in a good agreement with the certified values for the standard reference material used. The method was applied to nuclear reactor surveillance samples for the determination of Cu, Mn, Co and Ni. PMID:15048428

  8. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    SciTech Connect

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  9. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described. PMID:24593484

  10. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ∼1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and π-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ∼107 Ω/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 Ω/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  11. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes a method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and apparatus used in effecting the removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  12. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  13. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1988-08-26

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  14. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1990-11-13

    A method is disclosed of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 fig.

  15. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  16. In Vivo Metal Ion Imaging Using Fluorescent Sensors.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Hirayama, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging in living animals provides the ability to monitor alterations of signaling molecules, ions, and other biological components during various life stages and in disease. The data gained from in vivo imaging can be used for biological discovery or to determine elements of disease progression and can inform the development and translation of therapeutics. Herein, we present theories behind small-molecule, fluorescent, metal ion sensors as well as the methods for their successful application to in vivo metal ion imaging, including ex vivo validation. PMID:27283424

  17. A new paradigm of DNA synthesis: three-metal-ion catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Weng, Peter J; Gao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis has been studied for over a century. How it actually occurs has not been visualized until recently. By combining in crystallo reaction and X-ray diffraction analysis of reaction intermediates, we have obtained unprecedented atomic details of the DNA synthesis process. Contrary to the established theory that enzyme-substrate complexes and transition states have identical atomic composition and catalysis occurs by the two-metal-ion mechanism, we have discovered that an additional divalent cation has to be captured en route to product formation. Unlike the canonical two metal ions, which are coordinated by DNA polymerases, this third metal ion is free of enzyme coordination. Its location between the α- and β-phosphates of dNTP suggests that the third metal ion may drive the phosphoryltransfer from the leaving group opposite to the 3'-OH nucleophile. Experimental data indicate that binding of the third metal ion may be the rate-limiting step in DNA synthesis and the free energy associated with the metal-ion binding can overcome the activation barrier to the DNA synthesis reaction. PMID:27602203

  18. Investigation of trap properties in high-k/metal gate p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with aluminum ion implantation using random telegraph noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Shoou-Jinn Fang, Yean-Kuen; Huang, Po-Chin; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wu, San-Lein

    2014-08-11

    In this study, the impact of aluminum ion implantation (Al I/I) on random telegraph noise (RTN) in high-k/metal gate (HK/MG) p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (pMOSFETs) was investigated. The trap parameters of HK/MG pMOSFETs with Al I/I, such as trap energy level, capture time and emission time, activation energies for capture and emission, and trap location in the gate dielectric, were determined. The configuration coordinate diagram was also established. It was observed that the implanted Al could fill defects and form a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and thus increase the tunneling barrier height for holes. It was also observed that the trap position in the Al I/I samples was lower due to the Al I/I-induced dipole at the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  19. Neutralization by Metal Ions of the Toxicity of Sodium Selenide

    PubMed Central

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co2+ and Ni2+) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+) or weakly interact (Fe2+) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds. PMID:23342137

  20. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-Yi; Xu, Yun-Fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-Da; Wang, Hao-An; Wang, Wen-Bo; Meng, Fan-Guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-02-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members.

  1. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-yi; Xu, Yun-fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-da; Wang, Hao-an; Wang, Wen-bo; Meng, Fan-guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-01-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members. PMID:25708299

  2. Metal ion implantation in inert polymers for strain gauge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Giovanni; Massaro, Marcello; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Tapfer, Leander

    2010-10-01

    Metal ion implantation in inert polymers may produce ultra-thin conducting films below the polymer surface. These subsurface films are promising structures for strain gauge applications. To this purpose, polycarbonate substrates were irradiated at room temperature with low-energy metal ions (Cu + and Ni +) and with fluences in the range between 1 × 10 16 and 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2, in order to promote the precipitation of dispersed metal nanoparticles or the formation of a continuous thin film. The nanoparticle morphology and the microstructural properties of polymer nanocomposites were investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. At lower fluences (<5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2) a spontaneous precipitation of spherical-shaped metal nanoparticles occurred below the polymer top-surface (˜50 nm), whereas at higher fluences the aggregation of metal nanoparticles produced the formation of a continuous polycrystalline nanofilm. Furthermore, a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak was observed for nanocomposites produced at lower ion fluences, due to the presence of Cu nanoparticles. A reduced electrical resistance of the near-surface metal-polymer nanocomposite was measured. The variation of electrical conductivity as a function of the applied surface load was measured: we found a linear relationship and a very small hysteresis.

  3. The use of divalent metal ions by type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Deweese, Joseph E; Osheroff, Neil

    2010-07-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that regulate DNA under- and overwinding and remove knots and tangles from the genetic material. In order to carry out their critical physiological functions, these enzymes utilize a double-stranded DNA passage mechanism that requires them to generate a transient double-stranded break. Consequently, while necessary for cell survival, type II topoisomerases also have the capacity to fragment the genome. This feature of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes, respectively, is exploited to treat a variety of bacterial infections and cancers in humans. All type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions for catalytic function. These metal ions function in two separate active sites and are necessary for the ATPase and DNA cleavage/ligation activities of the enzymes. ATPase activity is required for the strand passage process and utilizes the metal-dependent binding and hydrolysis of ATP to drive structural rearrangements in the protein. Both the DNA cleavage and ligation activities of type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions and appear to utilize a novel variant of the canonical two-metal-ion phosphotransferase/hydrolase mechanism to facilitate these reactions. This article will focus primarily on eukaryotic type II topoisomerases and the roles of metal ions in the catalytic functions of these enzymes. PMID:20703329

  4. The Use of Divalent Metal Ions by Type II Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Osheroff, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that regulate DNA under- and overwinding and remove knots and tangles from the genetic material. In order to carry out their critical physiological functions, these enzymes utilize a double-stranded DNA passage mechanism that requires them to generate a transient double-stranded break. Consequently, while necessary for cell survival, type II topoisomerases also have the capacity to fragment the genome. This feature of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes, respectively, is exploited to treat a variety of bacterial infections and cancers in humans. All type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions for catalytic function. These metal ions function in two separate active sites and are necessary for the ATPase and DNA cleavage/ligation activities of the enzymes. ATPase activity is required for the strand passage process and utilizes the metal-dependent binding and hydrolysis of ATP to drive structural rearrangements in the protein. Both the DNA cleavage and ligation activities of type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions and appear to utilize a novel variant of the canonical two-metal-ion phosphotransferase/hydrolase mechanism to facilitate these reactions. This article will focus primarily on eukaryotic type II topoisomerases and the roles of metal ions in the catalytic functions of these enzymes. PMID:20703329

  5. Luminometric Label Array for Quantification and Identification of Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, Sari; Montoya Perez, Ileana; Hollo, Niklas; Hokkanen, Elina; Pahikkala, Tapio; Härmä, Harri

    2016-05-17

    Quantification and identification of metal ions has gained interest in drinking water and environmental analyses. We have developed a novel label array method for the quantification and identification of metal ions in drinking water. This simple ready-to-go method is based on the nonspecific interactions of multiple unstable lanthanide chelates and nonantenna ligands with sample leading to a luminescence signal profile, unique to the sample components. The limit of detection at ppb concentration level and average coefficient of variation of 10% were achieved with the developed label array. The identification of 15 different metal ions including different oxidation states Cr(3+)/Cr(6+), Cu(+)/Cu(2+), Fe(2+)/Fe(3+), and Pb(2+)/Pb(4+) was demonstrated. Moreover, a binary mixture of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) and ternary mixture of Cd(2+), Ni(2+), and Pb(2+) were measured and individual ions were distinguished. PMID:27086705

  6. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-04-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam.

  7. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  8. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  9. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL(1) and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL(2) derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML((1-2)2) have been synthesized, where M=Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mnmetal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu>Mn>Ni>Co>Zn. PMID:22813991

  10. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

  11. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  12. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Frolova, V P

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described. PMID:26931966

  13. Intercalation of Coordinatively Unsaturated Fe(III) Ion within Interpenetrated Metal-Organic Framework MOF-5.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Burns, Thomas; Greer, Samuel M; Kobera, Libor; Stoian, Sebastian A; Korobkov, Ilia; Hill, Stephen; Bryce, David L; Woo, Tom K; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-01

    Coordinatively unsaturated Fe(III) metal sites were successfully incorporated into the iconic MOF-5 framework. This new structure, Fe(III) -iMOF-5, is the first example of an interpenetrated MOF linked through intercalated metal ions. Structural characterization was performed with single-crystal and powder XRD, followed by extensive analysis by spectroscopic methods and solid-state NMR, which reveals the paramagnetic ion through its interaction with the framework. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the intercalated ions were indeed Fe(III) , whereas DFT calculations were employed to ascertain the unique pentacoordinate architecture around the Fe(III) ion. Interestingly, this is also the first crystallographic evidence of pentacoordinate Zn(II) within the MOF-5 SBU. This new MOF structure displays the potential for metal-site addition as a framework connector, thus creating further opportunity for the innovative development of new MOF materials. PMID:27061210

  14. Metal ions potentiate microglia responsiveness to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Alsalem, Inás W A; Amor, Sandra; Bontkes, Hetty J; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2016-02-15

    Oral metal exposure has been associated with diverse adverse reactions, including neurotoxicity. We showed previously that dentally applied metals activate dendritic cells (MoDC) via TLR4 (Ni, Co, Pd) and TLR3 (Au). It is still unknown whether the low levels of dental metals reaching the brain can trigger local innate cells or prime them to become more responsive. Here we tested whether dentally applied metals (Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Au, Hg) activate primary human microglia in vitro and, as a model, monocytic THP-1-cells, in high non-toxic as well as near-physiological concentrations. In addition the effects of 'near-physiological' metal exposure on endotoxin (LPS) responsiveness of these cells were evaluated. IL-8 and IL-6 production after 24h was used as read out. In high, non-toxic concentrations all transition metals except Cr induced IL-8 and IL-6 production in microglia, with Ni and Co providing the strongest stimulation. When using near-physiological doses (up to 10× the normal plasma concentration), only Zn and Cu induced significant IL-8 production. Of note, the latter metals also markedly potentiated LPS responsiveness of microglia and THP-1 cells. In conclusion, transition metals activate microglia similar to MoDCs. In near-physiological concentrations Zn and Cu are the most effective mediators of innate immune activation. A clear synergism between innate responses to Zn/Cu and LPS was observed, shedding new light on the possible relation between oral metal exposure and neurotoxicity. PMID:26857501

  15. Analytical strategies based on quantum dots for heavy metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-González, Margarita; Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina

    2014-10-01

    Heavy metal contamination is one of the major concerns to human health because these substances are toxic and retained by the ecological system. Therefore, in recent years, there has been a pressing need for fast and reliable methods for the analysis of heavy metal ions in environmental and biological samples. Quantum dots (QDs) have facilitated the development of sensitive sensors over the past decade, due to their unique photophysical properties, versatile surface chemistry and ligand binding ability, and the possibility of the encapsulation in different materials or attachment to different functional materials, while retaining their native luminescence property. This paper comments on different sensing strategies with QD for the most toxic heavy metal ions (i.e., cadmium, Cd2+; mercury, Hg and lead, Pb2+). Finally, the challenges and outlook for the QD-based sensors for heavy metals ions are discussed.

  16. Does Ion Release Differ Between Hip Resurfacing and Metal-on-metal THA?

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Antonio; Cadossi, Matteo; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potential increased metal ion release. We hypothesized there were no differences in serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum between patients who had metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (Group A; average head diameter, 48 mm; median followup, 24 months) and patients who had 28-mm metal-on-metal THA (Group B; median followup, 25 months). Serum concentrations also were compared with concentrations in healthy subjects. We identified no differences in ion levels between Groups A and B. A distinction was made according to gender. Women showed a higher chromium release in Group A whereas men had a higher cobalt release in Group B. Values obtained from Group A were higher than those of the control subjects. Our data suggest metal-on-metal bearings for THA should not be rejected because of concern regarding potential increased metal ion release; however, patients with elevated ion levels, even without loosening or toxicity, could be at higher risk and should be followed up periodically. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196364

  17. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  18. Colored thin films for specific metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Caroline L; Chen, Mu-San; Price, Ronald R; Schoen, Paul E; Ligler, Frances S

    2004-08-15

    This paper describes the investigation of chitosan and poly(allylamine) (PAH) for the creation of a multi-film, color-based dipstick for the detection of metal ions in solution. Thin, colored films of chitosan and PAH cross-linked with hexamethylene 1,6-di(aminocarboxysulfonate) (HDACS) are created where color is due to film thickness and optical interference effects. The films are investigated for their ability to selectively detect aqueous metal ions via changes in thickness and/or color. Chitosan-HDACS films were selective for Cr(VI) over all other metal ions tested including Cr(acac)3 and Cr(NO3)3 x 9H2O, and PAH-HDACS films were selective for Cu(II) and Cu(I) salts over all other metal ions tested. The irreversible, selective changes due to metal ion solutions were not caused by varying the pH. Potomac River water was also tested using the two films, with results indicating the presence of Cu(II) in the aqueous sample. PMID:15382871

  19. Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

    1983-01-01

    Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

  20. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  1. Topographical analysis of regulatory and metal ion binding sites on glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli: 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer study

    PubMed Central

    Villafranca, J. J.; Rhee, S. G.; Chock, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signals from the [2-13C]ATP adenylylated glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming); EC 6.3.1.2] from Escherichia coli was measured. This effect permitted the determination of distances from the 2-C position and the phosphorus of covalently bound AMP to the two Mn(II) binding sites, n1 and n2. Binding of Mn(II) to the n1 site converts an inactive apo-enzyme to its active form, while the metal ion bound at n2 occupies the metal-nucleotide substrate site. The distances from Mn(II) at the n1 and n2 sites to phosphorus are ∼10 and ∼7 Å and to the 2-C position of the adenine ring are ∼12 and ∼11 Å, respectively. The fluorescence energy transfer method was used to determine distances between Co(II) at n1 and n2 and the adenylyl site. For this experiment the enzyme was adenylylated with ε-ATP. The distances between ε-adenine and Co(II) at n1 and n2 are ∼13 and ∼11 Å, respectively. Quantitation of the paramagnetic effect due to Co(II) on the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signal yielded values of 8 and 6 Å for the distances between the phosphorus of the covalently bound AMP and the n1 and n2 sites, respectively. The results reveal that the covalent modification site is very close to the catalytic center of the enzyme. In this study both nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer techniques have been used to determine distances between the same set of sites on an enzyme surface. PMID:26053

  2. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26749524

  3. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  4. Theoretical study of metal noble-gas positive ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed to determine the spectroscopic constant for the ground and selected low-lying electronic states of the transition-metal noble-gas ions Var(+), FeAr(+), CoAr(+), CuHe(+), CuAr(+), and CuKr(+). Analogous calculations have been performed for the ground states of the alkali noble-gas ions LiAr(+), LiKr(+), NaAr(+), and KAr(+) and the alkaline-earth noble-gas ion MgAr(+) to contrast the difference in binding energies between the simple and transition-metal noble-gas ions. The binding energies increase with increasing polarizability of the noble-gas ions, as expected for a charge-induced dipole bonding mechanism. It is found that the spectroscopic constants of the X 1Sigma(+) states of the alkali noble-gas ions are well described at the self-consistent field level. In contrast, the binding energies of the transition-metal noble-gas ions are substantially increased by electron correlation.

  5. BODIPY-based fluorometric sensor array for the highly sensitive identification of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Li, Hui; Feng, Liang; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Duan, Chun-Feng; Wu, Li-Zhu; Guan, Ya-Feng; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-05-01

    A BODIPY(4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene)-based fluorometric sensor array has been developed for the highly sensitive detection of eight heavy-metal ions at micromolar concentration. The di-2-picolyamine (DPA) derivatives combine high affinities for a variety of heavy-metal ions with the capacity to perturb the fluorescence properties of BODIPY, making them perfectly suitable for the design of fluorometric sensor arrays for heavy-metal ions. 12 cross-reactive BODIPY fluorescent indicators provide facile identification of the heavy-metal ions using a standard chemometric approach (hierarchical clustering analysis); no misclassifications were found over 45 trials. Clear differentiation among heavy-metal ions as a function of concentration was also achieved, even down to 10(-7)M. A semi-quantitative interpolation of the heavy-metal concentration is obtained by comparing the total Euclidean distance of the measurement with a set of known concentrations in the library. PMID:23601979

  6. Localized ion milling of metallic and ceramic TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.T.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of localized ion milling in the preparation of metallic and ceramic specimens for TEM and AEM is being evaluated from the standpoint of optimizing procedures and identifying limitations and milling characteristics. The equipment used was a Gatan model 645 precision ion milling system (PIMS). This device is a scanning ion beam instrument with which selected areas of a sample can be imaged by either secondary electron or secondary ion signals and selectively ion milled in a small region within the imaged area. The 1 to 10 keV ion beam can be focussed to a 2 ..mu..m spot. Specimens are thinned without removing them from the electron microscope specimen holder.

  7. Reducing hazardous heavy metal ions using mangium bark waste.

    PubMed

    Khabibi, Jauhar; Syafii, Wasrin; Sari, Rita Kartika

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of mangium bark and its biosorbent ability to reduce heavy metal ions in standard solutions and wastewater and to assess changes in bark characteristics after heavy metal absorption. The experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal absorption from solutions of heavy metals alone and in mixtures as well as from wastewater. The results show that mangium bark can absorb heavy metals. Absorption percentages and capacities from single heavy metal solutions showed that Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Pb(2+) > Hg(2+), while those from mixture solutions showed that Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Ni(2+). Wastewater from gold mining only contained Cu, with an absorption percentage and capacity of 42.87 % and 0.75 mg/g, respectively. The highest absorption percentage and capacity of 92.77 % and 5.18 mg/g, respectively, were found for Hg(2+) in a mixture solution and Cu(2+) in single-metal solution. The Cu(2+) absorption process in a single-metal solution changed the biosorbent characteristics of the mangium bark, yielding a decreased crystalline fraction; changed transmittance on hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl groups; and increased the presence of Cu. In conclusion, mangium bark biosorbent can reduce hazardous heavy metal ions in both standard solutions and wastewater. PMID:27179811

  8. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    SciTech Connect

    Stoakley, D.M.; St.Clair, A.K. )

    1992-07-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The CTE's of conventional polyimides range from 30 to 60 ppm/C. Approaches that have been reported to lower their CTE's include linearizing the polymer molecular structure and orienting the polyimide film. This current study involves the incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides and has resulted in significantly lowered CTE's. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12% to over 100% depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  9. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  10. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  11. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.

    1996-09-01

    Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) is a hybrid process combining cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The properties of metal plasma produced by vacuum arcs are reviewed and the consequences for MePIIID are discussed. Different version of MePIIID are described and compared with traditional methods of surface modification such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). MePIIID is a very versatile approach because of the wide range of ion species and energies used. In one extreme case, films are deposited with ions in the energy range 20--50 eV, and at the other extreme, ions can be implanted with high energy (100 keV or more) without film deposition. Novel features of the technique include the use of improved macroparticle filters; the implementation of several plasma sources for multi-element surface modification; tuning of ion energy during implantation and deposition to tailor the substrate-film intermixed layer and structure of the growing film; simultaneous pulsing of the plasma potential (positive) and substrate bias (negative) with a modified Marx generator; and the use of high ion charge states.

  12. Comet Encke: Meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Aikin, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metal ions including Na-40(+), Mg-24(+), Si-28(+), K-39(+), Ca-40(+), Sc-45(+), Cr-52(+), Fe-56(+), and Ni-58(+) were detected in the upper atmosphere during the beta Taurids meteor shower. Abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show agreement in most instances with chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites.

  13. Comet encke: meteor metallic ion identification by mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R A; Aikin, A C

    1973-04-20

    Metal ions including 23(+) (Na(+)), 24(+) (Mg(+)) 28(+) (Si(+)), 39(+) (K(+)), 40(+) (Ca(+)), 45(+) (Sc(+)), 52(+) Cr(+)). 56(+) (Fe(+)), and 58(+) (Ni(+)) have been detected in the upper atmosphere during the period of the Beta Taurids meteor shower. The abundances of these ions relative to Si(+) show, agreement in most instances with abundances in chondrites. A notable exception is 45(+), which, if it is Sc(+), is 100 times more abundant than neutral scandium found in chondrites. PMID:17816288

  14. Two Divalent Metal Ions and Conformational Changes Play Roles in the Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage Reaction.

    PubMed

    Mir, Aamir; Chen, Ji; Robinson, Kyle; Lendy, Emma; Goodman, Jaclyn; Neau, David; Golden, Barbara L

    2015-10-20

    The hammerhead ribozyme is a self-cleaving RNA broadly dispersed across all kingdoms of life. Although it was the first of the small, nucleolytic ribozymes discovered, the mechanism by which it catalyzes its reaction remains elusive. The nucleobase of G12 is well positioned to be a general base, but it is unclear if or how this guanine base becomes activated for proton transfer. Metal ions have been implicated in the chemical mechanism, but no interactions between divalent metal ions and the cleavage site have been observed crystallographically. To better understand how this ribozyme functions, we have solved crystal structures of wild-type and G12A mutant ribozymes. We observe a pH-dependent conformational change centered around G12, consistent with this nucleotide becoming deprotonated. Crystallographic and kinetic analysis of the G12A mutant reveals a Zn(2+) specificity switch suggesting a direct interaction between a divalent metal ion and the purine at position 12. The metal ion specificity switch and the pH-rate profile of the G12A mutant suggest that the minor imino tautomer of A12 serves as the general base in the mutant ribozyme. We propose a model in which the hammerhead ribozyme rearranges prior to the cleavage reaction, positioning two divalent metal ions in the process. The first metal ion, positioned near G12, becomes directly coordinated to the O6 keto oxygen, to lower the pKa of the general base and organize the active site. The second metal ion, positioned near G10.1, bridges the N7 of G10.1 and the scissile phosphate and may participate directly in the cleavage reaction. PMID:26398724

  15. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  16. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, L.R.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-08-10

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions. 2 figs.

  17. Adsorbent for metal ions and method of making and using

    DOEpatents

    White, Lloyd R.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A method comprises the step of spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising (alkali metal or ammonium) (metal) hexacyanoferrate particles in a liquid, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers, said particles being active towards Cs ions. The particles, which can be of a single salt or a combination of salts, can be used free flowing, in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove Cs ions from aqueous solutions.

  18. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions. PMID:20656104

  19. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  20. Existence of efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed and inefficient divalent metal ion-independent channels in reactions catalyzed by a hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing-Min; Zhou, De-Min; Takagi, Yasuomi; Kasai, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Atsushi; Baba, Tadashi; Taira, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme is generally accepted as a well characterized metalloenzyme. However, the precise nature of the interactions of the RNA with metal ions remains to be fully defined. Examination of metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions at limited concentrations of metal ions is useful for evaluation of the role of metal ions, as demonstrated in this study. At concentrations of Mn2+ ions from 0.3 to 3 mM, addition of the ribozyme to the reaction mixture under single-turnover conditions enhances the reaction with the product reaching a fixed maximum level. Further addition of the ribozyme inhibits the reaction, demonstrating that a certain number of divalent metal ions is required for proper folding and also for catalysis. At extremely high concentrations, monovalent ions, such as Na+ ions, can also serve as cofactors in hammerhead ribozyme-catalyzed reactions. However, the catalytic efficiency of monovalent ions is extremely low and, thus, high concentrations are required. Furthermore, addition of monovalent ions to divalent metal ion-catalyzed hammerhead reactions inhibits the divalent metal ion-catalyzed reactions, suggesting that the more desirable divalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes are converted to less desirable monovalent metal ion–ribozyme complexes via removal of divalent metal ions, which serve as a structural support in the ribozyme complex. Even though two channels appear to exist, namely an efficient divalent metal ion-catalyzed channel and an inefficient monovalent metal ion-catalyzed channel, it is clear that, under physiological conditions, hammerhead ribozymes are metalloenzymes that act via the significantly more efficient divalent metal ion-dependent channel. Moreover, the observed kinetic data are consistent with Lilley’s and DeRose’s two-phase folding model that was based on ground state structure analyses. PMID:12034824

  1. Photoluminescence properties of Jahn-Teller transition-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates the influence of electron-phonon coupling associated with E ⊗e and T ⊗e Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in different transition-metal (TM) ions on de-excitation phenomena through nonradiative multiphonon relaxation, i.e., photoluminescence (PL) quenching. We developed a configurational curve model which is able to predict from the absorption spectrum whether a given JT-TM ion is PL or quenched. The prediction is made on the basis of an adapted Dexter-Klick-Russell parameter for JT systems, defined in terms of spectroscopic parameters through ΛJT=αΔeabs/Eabs, where Δeabs refers to the splitting of the parent octahedral Eg states by the JT distortion in E ⊗e (α =3/4) or T ⊗e (α =1/4), and Eabs is the energy of the first absorption band involving electronic transition between Eg and T2g. We show that PL in any JT-TM ion occurs whenever ΛJT<0.1 or is quenched if ΛJT>0.2. This result is noteworthy since it allows us to establish structural requirements for the JT-TM ion and the host crystal to be PL. Although PL properties of materials containing TM ions depend on a variety of structural factors such as the electronic configuration, the site symmetry, and the crystal field produced by neighboring atoms, the present model achieves this goal through a simple spectroscopic parameter: ΛJT. In this work we correlated the PL properties of different sixfold-coordinated JT systems such as Ti3+, Cu2+, Mn3+, Cr2+, Fe2+, Co3+, and Ni3+ in halides and oxides with ΛJT obtained from their respective absorption spectra. From this analysis we conclude that depending on the nature of the JT coupling and its strength, PL is either strongly favored or quenched in T ⊗e while it is mostly quenched in E ⊗e systems due to the larger JT distortion.

  2. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  3. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  4. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  5. Metal ion effects on enolase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.E.; Nowak, T.

    1986-05-01

    Most metal binding studies with yeast enolase suggest that two metals per monomer are required for catalytic activity. The functions of metal I and metal II have not been unequivocally defined. In a series of kinetic experiments where the concentration of MgII is kept constant at subsaturating levels (1mM), the addition of MnII or of ZnII gives a hyperbolic decrease in activity. The final velocity of these mixed metal systems is the same velocity obtained with either only MnII or ZnII respectively. The concentration of MnII (40 ..mu..M) or of Zn (2..mu..M) which gives half maximal effect in the presence of (1mM) MgII is approximately the same as the Km' value for MnII (9..mu..M) or ZnII (3..mu..M) respectively. Direct binding of MnII to enolase in the absence and presence of MgII shows that MnII and MgII compete for the same metal site on enolase. In the presence of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PGA) and MgII, only a single site is occupied by MnII. Results suggest MnII at site I and MgII at site II. PRR and high resolution /sup 1/H and /sup 31/P NMR studies of enzyme-ligand complexes containing MnII and MgII and MnII are consistent with this model. /sub 31/P measurements allow a measure of the equilibrium constant (0.36) for enolase. Saturation transfer measurements yield net rate constants (k/sub f/ = 0.49s/sup -1/; k/sub r/ = 1.3s/sup -1/) for the overall reaction. These values are smaller than k/sub cat/ (38s/sup -1/) measured under analogous conditions. The cation at site I appears to determine catalytic activity.

  6. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs. PMID:18315181

  7. DUHOCAMIS: A dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Mueller, M. W. O.; Janik, J.; Liu, K. X.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-02-15

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  8. Sensing Metal Ions with DNA Building Blocks: Fluorescent Pyridobenzimidazole Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jeong; Kool, Eric T.

    2008-01-01

    We describe novel fluorescent N-deoxyribosides (1 and 2) having 2-pyrido-2-benzimidazole and 2-quino-2-benzimidazole as aglycones. The compounds were prepared from the previously unknown heterocyclic precursors and Hoffer’s chlorosugar, yielding alpha anomers as the chief products. X-ray crystal structures confirmed the geometry, and showed that the pyridine and benzimidazole ring systems deviated from coplanarity in the solid state by 154° and 140°, respectively. In methanol the compounds 1 and 2 had absorption maxima at 360 and 370 nm respectively, and emission maxima at 494 and 539 nm. Experiments revealed varied fluorescence responses of the nucleosides to a panel of seventeen monovalent, divalent and trivalent metal ions in methanol. One or both of the nucleosides showed significant changes with ten of the metal ions. The most pronounced spectral changes for ligand-nucleoside 1 included red shifts in fluorescence (Au+, Au3+), strong quenching (Cu2+, Ni2+, Pt2+), and in substantial enhancements in emission intensity coupled with redshifts (Ag+, Cd2+, Zn2+). The greatest spectral changes for ligand-nucleoside 2 included a redshift in fluorescence (Ag+), a blueshift (Cd2+), strong quenching (Pd2+, Pt2+), and in substantial enhancements in emission intensity coupled with a blueshift (Zn2+). The compounds could be readily incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides, where an initial study revealed that they retained sensitivity to metal ions in aqueous solution, and demonstrated possible cooperative sensing behavior with several ions. The two free nucleosides alone can act as differential sensors for at multiple metal ions, and they are potentially useful monomers for contributing metal ion sensing capability to DNAs. PMID:16669686

  9. Metallic ions in cometary comae and plasma tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Axford, W. I.

    1986-06-01

    A surprising result of the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) observations of the comet Giacobini-Zinner was the detection of ions of mass 23-24 AMU with a relatively high abundance. According to the experiments, these ions may be either Na(+) or C2(+), if not both. It is suggested here that the detected ions may indeed be in part Na(+) and/or Mg(+), and that these and other metallic ions, especially Si(+) and Fe(+), may be an important component of the cometary ionosphere and central plasma tail. The reasons are similar in principle to those which account for the prevalence of such ions in sporadic E layers in the terrestrial ionosphere, notably the comparatively short timescales for ionization of their neutral parent atoms and the large difference between the rates of dissociative and radiative recombination.

  10. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar

    2006-08-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear (1 - 3). Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that while binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 × 10-7, binding site 2 (primary) is a low affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 × 10-4. These two binding sites act independently and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A,C102D), reported here and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) (4) has allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal ion activation for DtxR.

  11. Metal ions affecting the gastrointestinal system including the liver.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Declan P; Nepusz, Tamás; Petroczi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In the present context, metal ions can be categorized into several classes including those that are essential for life and those that have no known biological function and thus can be considered only as potentially hazardous. Many complexities arise with regard to metal toxicity and there is a paucity of studies relating to many metals which are frequent components of the diet. For many people ingestion of mineral supplements is considered a risk-free health choice despite growing evidence to the contrary. Numerous approaches have been developed to assess risk associated with ingestion of metal ions. These include straightforward estimation of safe limits such as oral reference dose which are often based on data derived from animal experiments. More convoluted approaches such as the Target Hazard Quotient involve assessment of hazard with frequent exposure over long durations such as a lifetime. The latter calculation also affords facile consideration of the effects of many metals together. In many cases, rigorous data are unavailable, hence, large factors of uncertainty are employed to relate risk to humans. Owing to the nature of metal toxicity, data pertaining to the gastrointestinal tract and liver are often acquired from diseases of metal homeostasis or episodes of considerable metal overload. Whilst these studies provide evidence for mechanisms of metal-induced toxicity such as enhancing oxidative stress, extrapolation of these results to healthy individuals or patients with chronic inflammatory diseases is not straightforward. In summary, the diverse nature of metals and their effects on human tissues along with a paucity of studies on the full range of their effects, warrant further in-depth studies on the association of metals to ageing, chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer. PMID:21473378

  12. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-09-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27306427

  13. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I.-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-06-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser.

  14. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I.-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-09-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  16. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  17. Laser-driven ion sources for metal ion implantation for the reduction of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Boody, F. P.; Juha, L.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Straka, P.; Perina, V.; Woryna, E.; Giersch, D.; Hoepfl, R.; Kelly, J. C.; Hora, H.

    1997-04-15

    The anomalously high ion currents and very high ionization levels of laser-produced plasmas give laser-driven ion sources significant advantages over conventional ion sources. In particular, laser-driven ion sources should provide higher currents of metal ions at lower cost, for implantation into solids in order to improve their material properties such as friction. The energy and charge distributions for Pb and Sn ions produced by ablation of solid targets with {approx}25 J, {approx}300 ps iodine laser pulses, resulting in up to 48-times ionized MeV ions, as well as the optimization of focus position, are presented. Implantation of these ions into Ck-45 steel, without electrostatic acceleration, produced profiles with two regions. Almost all of the ions were implanted in a near surface region a few nm deep. However, a small but significant number of ions were implanted as deep as could be measured with Rutherford backscattering (RBS), here 150 nm for Sn and 250 nm for Pb. For the implanted ion densities and profiles achieved, no change in the coefficient of friction was measured for either ion.

  18. Depth concentrations of deuterium ions implanted into some pure metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Kitowski, K.; Kulikauskas, V.; Wilczynska, T.; Hofman, A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2012-01-01

    Pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh) were implanted by 25-keV deuterium ions at fluences in the range (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2. The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium ions were measured 10 days and three months after the implantation by using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS). Comparison of the obtained results allowed us to make conclusions about relative stability of deuterium and hydrogen gases in pure metals and diluted Pd alloys. Very high diffusion rates of implanted deuterium ions in V and Pd pure metals and Pd alloys were observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed formation of nanosized defects in implanted corundum and titanium.

  19. Experimental study of transition metal ion doping on TiO2 with photocatalytic behavior.

    PubMed

    Siddhapara, K S; Shah, D V

    2014-08-01

    In this research, we have studied the doping behaviors of three transition metal ion dopants on the crystal phase, particle sizes, XRD patterns, EDAX spectra, and photoreactivity of TiO2 nanoparticles. Test metal ion concentrations ranged from 1% to 4 at.%, we report the growth of [Fe, Co and Mn]xTiO2 nanocrystals prepared by Sol-Gel technique, followed by freeze-drying treatment at -30 °C temperature for 12 hrs. The obtained Gel was thermally treated at different temperature like 200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) shows that dopant concentration affects thermal decomposition. The photoreactivities of transition metal ion-doped TiO2 nanoparticles under UV irradiation were quantified by the degradation of formaldehyde. PMID:25936115

  20. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  1. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  2. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  3. The chemistry of river-lake systems in the context of permafrost occurrence (Mongolia, Valley of the Lakes). Part I. Analysis of ion and trace metal concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopińska, Małgorzata; Szumińska, Danuta; Polkowska, Żaneta; Machowiak, Katarzyna; Lehmann, Sara; Chmiel, Stanisław

    2016-07-01

    This study provides a description of water chemistry in river-lake systems located in central Mongolia, at the borderline of permafrost occurrence. The analysis involved water samples collected from two river-lake systems: Baydrag River-Böön Tsagaan Lake system, and Shargalyuut/Tuyn Rivers-Orog Lake system. In the water samples, ions and trace elements were detected and quantified. Additionally, the parameters of pH, electrical conductivity (SEC), total dissolved solids (TDS) and total organic carbon (TOC) were determined. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on the sample results. Water chemistry is mostly influenced by geochemical and hydrometeorological processes. Permafrost thawing could increase the concentration of nitrogen (NH4+, NO3-) as well as Na+ and Ca2+, Cl- and SO42 -. However, it may also be an effect of other factors such as livestock farming. Seasonal drying out of lakes (e.g., Lake Orog) may also influence water chemistry by deflation of evaporites from exposed lake beds and, at the same time, with lower concentration of chemical compounds in water. The PCA shows that water samples can be divided into two groups. The first group contains lake samples, where water chemistry is shaped by prevailing evaporation processes, whereas the second includes samples from rivers and springs. Water chemistry of the latter is predominantly influenced by geochemical and hydro-meteorological processes.

  4. Principles Governing Metal Ion Selectivity in Ion Channel Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Carmay

    2014-03-01

    Our research interests are to (i) unravel the principles governing biological processes and use them to identify novel drug targets and guide drug design, and (ii) develop new methods for studying macromolecular interactions. This talk will provide an overview of our work in these two areas and an example of how our studies have helped to unravel the principles underlying the conversion of Ca2+-selective to Na+-selective channels. Ion selectivity of four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+(Cav) and sodium (Nav) channels, which is controlled by the selectivity filter (SF, the narrowest region of an open pore), is crucial for electrical signaling. Over billions of years of evolution, mutation of the Glu from domain II/III in the EEEE/DEEA SF of Ca2+-selective Cav channels to Lys made these channels Na+-selective. This talk will delineate the physical principles why Lys is sufficient for Na+/Ca2+selectivity and why the DEKA SF is more Na+-selective than the DKEA one.

  5. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved. PMID:24840412

  6. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  7. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  8. Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

  9. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  10. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of ions released by zinc-aluminum bronze and the metallic salts on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Claudia A; Morales, María L; Mirífico, María V; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica A

    2013-07-01

    The use of copper-based alloys for fixed dental crowns and bridges is increasingly widespread in several countries. The aim of this work is to study the dissolution of a zinc-aluminum-bronze and the cytotoxic effects of the ions released on UMR-106 osteoblastic cell line. Two sources of ions were used: (1) ions released by the metal alloy immersed in the cell culture and (2) salts of the metal ions. Conventional electrochemical techniques, atomic absorption spectroscopy [to obtain the average concentration of ions (AC) in solution], and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy analysis were used to study the corrosion process. Corrosion tests revealed a strong influence of the composition of the electrolyte medium and the immersion time on the electrochemical response. The cytotoxicity was evaluated with (a) individual ions, (b) combinations of two ions, and (c) the mixture of all the ions released by a metal disc of the alloy. Importantly, synergistic cytotoxic effects were found when Al-Zn ion combinations were used at concentration levels lower than the cytotoxic threshold values of the individual ions. Cytotoxic effects in cells in the vicinity of the metal disc were also found. These results were interpreted considering synergistic effects and a diffusion controlled mechanism that yields to concentration levels, in the metal surroundings, several times higher than the measured AC value. PMID:23596152

  11. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  12. Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Wysocki, Joseph A.; Storms, Edmund K.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Behrens, Robert G.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.

    1987-06-02

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

  13. Metal negative ion beam extraction from a radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, S.; Yamada, N.; Kasuya, T.; Romero, C. F. P.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A metal ion source of magnetron magnetic field geometry has been designed and operated with a Cu hollow target. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz is directly supplied to the hollow target to maintain plasma discharge and induce self-bias to the target for sputtering. The extraction of positive and negative Cu ion beams have been tested. The ion beam current ratio of Cu{sup +} to Ar{sup +} has reached up to 140% when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. Cu{sup −} ion beam was observed at 50 W RF discharge power and at a higher Ar gas pressure in the ion source. Improvement of poor RF power matching and suppression of electron current is indispensable for a stable Cu{sup −} ion beam production from the source.

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Milheiro, Ana; Nozaki, Kosuke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Muris, Joris; Miura, Hiroyuki; Feilzer, Albert J

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys on mouse fibroblast cells. Metal salts were used to prepare seven solutions (concentration range 100 ppm-1 ppb) of the transition metals, such as Ni(II), Pd(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I), and the metals, such as Ga(III), In(III), and Sn(II). Cytotoxicity on mouse fibroblasts L929 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Ni, Cu, and Ag are cytotoxic at 10 ppm, Pd and Ga at 100 ppm. Sn and In were not able to induce cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Transition metals were able to induce cytotoxic effects in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys. Ni, Cu, and Ag were the most cytotoxic followed by Pd and Ga; Sn and In were not cytotoxic. Cytotoxic reactions might be considered in the etiopathogenesis of clinically observed local adverse reactions. PMID:25549610

  15. Mechanical property measurements on ion-irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Oliver, W.C.

    1986-08-01

    A recently developed mechanical properties microprobe (MPM) has been used to investigate strength and elastic modulus changes in ion-irradiated metals. The indenter load and its displacement are simultaneously monitored while the indentation is being made and also during unloading. Microindentation hardness measurements have been performed on ion-irradiated copper and Cu-0.15% Zr (AMZIRC). The depth dependence of the ion damage has been investigated in selected specimens which were prepared using a cross-section technique. This procedure allows a direct comparison to be made of hardness data from different irradiation depths while the indent size is held constant. The displacement damage associated with ion irradiation caused either hardening or softening, depending on the irradiation conditions and the material.

  16. Metal Ion Binding to Polypeptides Characterized by Irmpd Spectroscopy. Metal-Amide Nitrogen Binding and the Iminol Tautomerization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2012-06-01

    We have recently uncovered a new binding mode for the complexation of metal ions with gas-phase peptides. Termed the iminol mode, this binding mode is adopted by strongly binding divalent metal ions including Mg2+ and Ni2+. The metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, which moves to protonate the amide carbonyl oxygen. A spectroscopic signature of the tautomerization is the disappearance of the characteristic Amide II band normally seen in peptide ion infrared spectra. We find that in peptides up to pentapeptides, multiple iminol binding can take place, such that all amide linkages are tautomerized to the iminol form, and chelate the metal ion. However, the iminol tautomerization depends on the nature of the metal ion, as will be discussed. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm-1.

  17. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Magudapathy, P. Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-24

    Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ∼45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar{sup +} ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of Au{sub x}Ag{sub 1-x} nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  18. Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Sabrina S.; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F.; Etcheberry, Arnaud A.; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl- N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution.

  19. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aquino,J.; Tetenbaum-Novatt, J.; White, A.; Berkovitch, F.; Ringe, D.

    2005-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear. Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that although binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 x 10{sup -7}, binding site 2 (primary) is a low-affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 x 10{sup -4}. These two binding sites act in an independent fashion, and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A, C102D), reported here, and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) have allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal activation for DtxR.

  20. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  1. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  2. Liquid metal alloy ion sources—An alternative for focussed ion beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Lothar; Mazarov, Paul; Bruchhaus, Lars; Gierak, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Today, Focused Ion Beam (FIB) processing is nearly exclusively based on gallium Liquid Metal Ion Sources (LMIS). But, many applications in the μm- or nm range could benefit from ion species other than gallium: local ion implantation, ion beam mixing, ion beam synthesis, or Focused Ion Beam Lithography (IBL). Therefore, Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Sources (LMAIS) represent a promising alternative to expand the remarkable application fields for FIB. Especially, the IBL process shows potential advantages over, e.g., electron beam or other lithography techniques: direct, resistless, and three-dimensional patterning, enabling a simultaneous in-situ process control by cross-sectioning and inspection. Taking additionally into account that the used ion species influences significantly the physical and chemical nature of the resulting nanostructures—in particular, the electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanic properties leading to a large potential application area which can be tuned by choosing a well suited LMAIS. Nearly half of the elements of the periodic table are recently available in the FIB technology as a result of continuous research in this area during the last forty years. Key features of a LMAIS are long life-time, high brightness, and stable ion current. Recent developments could make these sources feasible for nano patterning issues as an alternative technology more in research than in industry. The authors will review existing LMAIS, LMIS other than Ga, and binary and ternary alloys. These physical properties as well as the fabrication technology and prospective domains for modern FIB applications will similarly be reviewed. Other emerging ion sources will be also presented and their performances discussed.

  3. The Structure of the Metal Transporter Tp34 and its Affinity for Divalent Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsen, Gregory; Deka, Ranjit; Brautigam, Chad; Tomchick, Diana; Machius, Mischa; Norgard, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Tp34 is periplasmic membrane protein of the nonculitvatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, the pathogen of syphillis. It was proposed that Tp34 is a divalent metal transporter, but the identity of the preferred metal ion(s) was unclear. In this study we investigated the ability of divalent metal ions to induce rTp34 dimerization using hydrodynamic techniques and determine the crystal structure of metal bound forms. Using analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments, we determined that cobalt is superior to nickel at inducing the dimerization of rTp34. rTp34 was crystallized and selected crystals were incubated at a pH 7.5 with CuSO4 and NiSO4. Diffraction experiments were conducted and the processed electron density maps showed that copper was bound to the major metal binding site as well as to three additional minor binding sites. By contrast nickel was only bound to the major metal binding site in one monomer and to three additional minor sites. These results along with previous findings support evidence of Tp34 being involved with metal transport and/or iron utilization.

  4. Differential UV-spectroscopic studies of transition metal ion interaction with DNA and its monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. A.; Sysa, I. V.; Valeev, V. A.; Gladchenko, G. O.; Degtyar, M. V.; Blagoi, Yu. P.

    1997-06-01

    Data are presented for the base atoms coordinating Cu 2+, Ni 2+, Cd 2+ ions in DNA and its monomers, which were derived from the analysis of the shapes of UVD spectra taken on metal complexes. The corresponding binding constants are found. The Ni 2+ and Cd 2+ ions are noted for a very weak, as compared to Cu 2+ ions, interaction with cytosine of nucleotides. As a result, Cd 2+ and Ni 2+ ions can cause only internal protonation of N3C in the GC pairs of DNA on their interaction with N7G. In the case of Cu 2+ ions this interaction leads to the quasi-Hoogsteen transition of the GC pairs.

  5. Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

  6. Metal fluoride coatings prepared by ion-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gäbler, Dieter; Bernitzki, Helmut; Zaczek, Christoph; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    ArF lithography technology requires minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently, it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters (temperature and deposition rate) and the vacuum conditions. A substrate temperature of more than 300°C is a condition for high density and low water content of metal fluorides. Therefore, a substrate temperature of 150°C results in inhomogeneous films with high water content. Until now, the best results were achieved by boat evaporation. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides like MgF2, AlF3, and even LaF3 can be deposited by electron beam evaporation. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films have the lowest absorption in the VUV spectral range. Furthermore, metal fluoride thin films were prepared by ion assistance. It will be demonstrated, that they have less water content, high packing density, and low absorption in the VUV spectral range. In this study, single layers of LaF3 and AlF3 and antireflection coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation with and without ion-assistance. The mechanical, structural, and optical properties were examined and discussed.

  7. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  8. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  9. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  10. Ab Initio Calculations Applied to Problems in Metal Ion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations can provide accurate spectroscopic data (such as molecular structures) vibrational frequencies, binding energies, etc.) that have been very useful in explaining trends in experimental data and in identifying incorrect experimental measurements. In addition, ab initio calculations. have given considerable insight into the many interactions that make the chemistry of transition metal systems so diverse. In this review we focus on cases where calculations and experiment have been used to solve interesting chemical problems involving metal ions. The examples include cases where theory was used to differentiate between disparate experimental values and cases where theory was used to explain unexpected experimental results.

  11. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  12. Statistical evaluation of biogeochemical variables affecting spatiotemporal distributions of multiple free metal ion concentrationsin an urban estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free metal ion concentrations have been recognized as a better indicator of metal bioavailability in aquatic environments than total dissolved metal concentrations. However, our understanding of the determinants of free ion concentrations, especially in a metal mixture, is limite...

  13. Production of intense metal ion beams from ECR ion sources using the MIVOC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, S. L.; Bondarchenko, A. E.; Efremov, A. A.; Kuzmenkov, K. I.; Lebedev, A. N.; Lebedev, K. V.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Loginov, V. N.; Mironov, V. E.; Yazvitsky, N. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources using the MIVOC (Metal Ions from Volatile Compounds) method is described. The method is based on the use of metal compounds which have high vapor pressure at room temperature, e.g., C2B10H12, Fe(C5H5)2, etc. Intense ion beams of B and Fe were produced using this method at the FLNR JINR cyclotrons. Experiments on the production of cobalt, chromium, vanadium, germanium, and hafnium ion beams were performed at the test bench of ECR ion sources. Main efforts were put into production and acceleration of 50Ti ion beams at the U-400 cyclotron. The experiments on the production of 50Ti ion beams were performed at the test bench using natural and enriched compounds of titanium (CH3)5C5Ti(CH3)3. In these experiments, 80 μA 48Ti5+ and 70 μA 48Ti11+ beam currents were obtained at different settings of the source. Following successful tests, two 3-week runs were performed with 50Ti beams at the U-400 cyclotron aimed to perform experiments on the spectroscopy of superheavy elements. The intensity of the injected 50Ti5+ beam was 50-60 μA. The source worked stably during experiments. The compound consumption rate was determined at about 2.4 mg/h, which corresponded to the 50Ti consumption of 0.6 mg/h.

  14. Photoelectric properties in metal ion modified DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Atul; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Jang Ah Kim; Kim; Sung Ha Park; Taesung Kim

    2015-08-01

    Due to specific or as designed self-assembly, DNA nanostructures gaining popularity in various nanoscale electronic applications. Herein, a novel divalent metal ion-DNA complex known as M-DNA have been investigated for its photoelectric characteristics. The increased conductivity of M-DNA thin films is attributed to the metal ion electrical and optical properties. The gate voltage effect along with illumination on the conductivity of M-DNA demonstrates that M-DNA can be used as an active element of a field-effect transistor. The Zn DNA shows maximum conductivity of 300μS/cm at 480 nm light illumination suggest that M-DNA can be utilized in nano-opto-electronics and bio-sensing applications. PMID:26737260

  15. Chelating Agents and the Regulation of Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Bulman, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Up to about the early 1980s it was perhaps still possible to summarize in a review of a moderate length the development of the medicinal applications of chelation chemistry and the exploitation of such chemistry in regulating the metal ion concentrations in the body. However, in the last few years there has a great surge in the development of chelation chemistry and its usage in medicine and related areas of life sciences research. It is no longer the case that such a review primarily concentrates upon the use of chelating agents in removing toxic metals from the body but it must now cover the use of chelating agents in the imaging procedures nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of chelating agents in unravelling the biochemistry of reactive oxidative species (ROS) and the control and measurement of intracellular calcium ions. It is in the recent applications that there have been the greatest developments over the last ten years. PMID:18476223

  16. Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    1987-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

  17. Further studies of ion mixing in binary metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bai-Xin

    1985-03-01

    Using free energy-composition diagram, a simple model is proposed for the formation of amorphous alloys by ion mixing of metal layers. The basis of the model is the limited atomic mobility in such samples after ion mixing at a suitably low temperature. The model explains the formation of amorphous alloys that have been reported previously and those obtained in this study in the Zr-Ru and Ti-Au systems by ion mixing. These include phases with compositions in both two-phase and single-phase regions of the equilibrium phase diagram. In the Ni-Mo system, an unusual phase transition was observed by X-ray diffraction photos, i.e. an amorphous phase was formed after room temperature aging of an ion induced metastable crystalline phase (h.c.p. structure). Post-irradiation annealing of some ion mixed Ni-Mo amorphous alloys were performed at various temperatures. A schematic free energy diagram is proposed according to the phase evolution in the annealed samples upon annealing, and is used to discuss the ion induced phenomena in this system.

  18. Interaction of heavy metal ions with ammonium humates

    SciTech Connect

    Budaeva, A.D.; Zoltoev, E.V.; Tikhova, V.D.; Bodoev, N.V.

    2006-06-15

    Sorption properties of ammonium humates with respect to Fe(III), Cu(II), Al(III), Ni(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) are studied. The effect of the metal ion concentration on the ammonium humate consumption is examined and the corresponding dependences are analyzed using regression equations. The IR spectra of brown coal humic acids, ammonium humates, as well as Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, and Al humates are presented.

  19. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  20. Precious metal catalysts with oxygen-ion conducting support

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, P.S.; Sundaresan, S.

    1993-08-03

    A three-way supported catalyst is described for treatment of combustion gas emissions from mobile or stationary sources, comprising: an oxygen-ion conducting support material having surface area at least about 20 m[sup 2]/gm, and two active metals selected from the group consisting of (1) platinum and rhodium and (2) palladium and rhodium dispersed on the support material in overall amount of about 0.01-2.2 wt. % of the catalyst.

  1. Ion/ion proton transfer reactions for protein mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J L; McLuckey, S A

    1996-11-15

    Ion/ion proton transfer reactions are shown to be an effective means to facilitate the resolution of ions in electrospray mass spectrometry that differ in mass and charge but are similar in mass-to-charge ratio. Examples are shown in which a minor contaminant protein in a ribonuclease B solution is clearly apparent after ion/ion proton transfer but not in the conventional electrospray mass spectrum. A further example involving a mixture of bovine serum albumin and bovine transferrin also showed the identification of previously unnoticed "contaminant" polymer. The latter mixture also illustrated important issues in the use of the quadrupole ion trap as a reaction vessel and mass analyzer for high mass-to-charge ratio ions. The results suggest that the use of ion trap operating parameters specifically tailored for storage, ejection, detection, and mass-to-charge analysis of high mass-to-charge ratio ions can have attractive analytical figures of merit for determining mixtures of relatively high-mass proteins and, by extension, other types of high-mass biopolymers. PMID:8916454

  2. NOVEL APPROACH TO METAL-HUMIC COMPLEXATION STUDIES BY LANTHANID ION PROBE SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Naturally occurring humic substances are known to be potentially strong binders of metals in the environment. ensitive spectroscopic technique, based on the unique luminescence properties of the tripositive lanthanide metal ions, has been developed to selectively probe metal bind...

  3. Properties of Transition Metal Atoms and Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, Beck, R.

    2008-03-18

    Accomplishments of this project include: (1) improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of the RCI methodology to permit it to tackle almost all TM properties, and making good progress in extending these gains to the RE. Our improvements have stimulated improvements in the GRASP package, done by Froese Fischer. RCI efficiency gains are estimated to be {approx} 200x since the start of the project - about 10x from hardware improvements (originally DOE funded) and about 20x from software improvements. The net result is that currently the longest runs don't exceed 1 day. (2) identification and removal of systematic errors in several TM properties. To some extent, the PI became a 'court of last resort' for experimenters who wondered why certain theoretical-experimental discrepancies existed. Auxiliary analysis codes were written and successfully used to improve the systematic understanding of correlation effects in TM and RE. This improved efficiency and a priori understanding of what new projects might involve. [Unsurprisingly, there are several cases which the PI was unable to resolve. Work on these is unpublished]. (3) education and training of graduate students and postdocs.

  4. Metal oxide collectors for storing matter technique applied in secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miśnik, Maciej; Konarski, Piotr; Zawada, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the use of metal and metal oxide substrates that serve as collectors in 'storing matter', the quantitative technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). This technique allows separating the two base processes of secondary ion formation in SIMS. Namely, the process of ion sputtering is separated from the process of ionisation. The technique allows sputtering of the analysed sample and storing the sputtered material, with sub-monolayer coverage, onto a collector surface. Such deposits can be then analysed by SIMS, and as a result, the so called 'matrix effects' are significantly reduced. We perform deposition of the sputtered material onto Ti and Cu substrates and also onto metal oxide substrates as molybdenum, titanium, tin and indium oxides. The process of sputtering is carried within the same vacuum chamber where the SIMS analysis of the collected material is performed. For sputtering and SIMS analysis of the deposited material we use 5 keV Ar+ beam of 500 nA. The presented results are obtained with the use of stationary collectors. Here we present a case study of chromium. The obtained results show that the molybdenum and titanium oxide substrates used as collectors increase useful yield by two orders, with respect to such pure elemental collectors as Cu and Ti. Here we define useful yield as a ratio of the number of detected secondary ions during SIMS analysis and the number of atoms sputtered during the deposition process.

  5. Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage. PMID:24136830

  6. Nanostructure operations by means of the liquid metal ion sourcesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanov, I. S.; Gurbanov, I. I.

    2012-02-01

    Characteristics of a disperse phase of liquid metal ion source on the basis of various working substances are investigated. It is revealed that generation of the charged particles occurs in the threshold image and is simultaneously accompanied by excitation of capillary instability on a surface of the emitter. The majority of particles has the size about 2 nm (Sn) and a specific charge of 5 × 104 C/kg. If the working liquid possesses high viscosity (Ni), generation of nanodroplets does not occur. Gold nanoparticles are used for deposition on a surface of quartz cantilevers with the purpose of increase in sensitivity of biosensors and on an external surface of carbon nanotubes for creation pressure sensors. By means of an ion source nanostructures can be etched on a flat surface of conductive materials without difficult ion optics.

  7. Metal ion-induced toxic histamine release from human basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schedle, A; Samorapoompichit, P; Füreder, W; Rausch-Fan, X H; Franz, A; Sperr, W R; Sperr, W; Slavicek, R; Simak, S; Klepetko, W; Ellinger, A; Ghannadan, M; Baghestanian, M; Valent, P

    1998-03-15

    Recent data suggest that distinct metal ions can be released from dental alloys or other biomaterials, and may cause toxic effects on various cells. In this study, the effects of 14 metal ions on histamine release from human blood basophils (n = 4), isolated tissue mast cells (lung n = 8, uterus n = 2, skin n = 1, gingiva n = 1), the basophil cell line KU-812, and the mast cell line HMC-1 were analyzed. Of the 14 metal ions, Ag+ (0.33 mM) and Hg2+ (0.33 mM) were found to induce release of histamine in blood basophils, KU-812, mast cells, and HMC-1. The effects of Ag+ and Hg2+ were dose dependent and were observed within 60 min of incubation. In primary mast cells and basophils, AU3+ (0.33 mM) also induced histamine release, whereas no effects of Au3+ on HMC-1 or KU-812 cells were seen. The other metal ions showed no effects on primary or immortal cells within 60 min. However, Pt4+ (0.33 mM) induced histamine liberation in HMC-1 and lung mast cells after 12 h. The Ag+- and Hg2+-induced rapid release of histamine from HMC-1 was associated with ultrastructural signs of necrosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast, prolonged exposure to Pt4+ (0.33 mM, 14 h) induced apoptotic cell death in HMC-1 cells, as assessed by electron microscopy and DNA analysis. Together, certain metal ions induce distinct cytopathogenic effects in mast cells and basophils. Whereas Ag+, Hg2+, and Au3+ cause direct toxicity, Pt4 causes cell death through induction of apoptosis. Whether such effects contribute to local adverse reactions to metal-containing biomaterials in vivo remains to be determined. PMID:9492216

  8. Adsorption of heavy metal ions by immobilized phytic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, G.T.; Zheng, Yizhou; Lu, J.; Gong, Cheng S.

    1997-12-31

    Phytic acid (myoinositol hexaphosphate) or its calcium salt, phytate, is an important plant constituents. It accounts for up to 85% of total phosphorus in cereals and legumes. Phytic acid has 12 replaceable protons in the phytic molecule rendering it the ability to complex with multivalent cations and positively charged proteins. Poly 4-vinyl pyridine (PVP) and other strong-based resins have the ability to adsorb phytic acid. PVP has the highest adsorption capacity of 0.51 phytic acid/resins. The PVP resin was used as the support material for the immobilization of phytic acid. The immobilized phytic acid can adsorb heavy metal ions, such as cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc ions, from aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherms of the selected ions by immobilized phytic acid were conducted in packed-bed column at room temperature. Results from the adsorption tests showed 6.6 mg of Cd{sup 2+}, 7 mg of Cu{sup 2+}, 7.2 mg of Ni{sup 2+}, 7.4 mg of Pb{sup 2+}, and 7.7 mg of Zn{sup 2+} can be adsorbed by each gram of PVP-phytic acid complex. The use of immobilized phytic acid has the potential for removing metal ions from industrial or mining waste water. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  10. Age and Smoking Related Changes in Metal Ion Levels in Human Lens: Implications for Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Tilakaratna, Viranga; Lythgoe, Paul R.; Clark, Simon J.; Bishop, Paul N.; Day, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cataract formation is the primary cause of blindness worldwide and although treatable by surgical removal of the lens the majority of sufferers have neither the finances nor access to the medical facilities required. Therefore, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cataract may identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or slow its progression. Cataract incidence is strongly correlated with age and cigarette smoking, factors that are often associated with accumulation of metal ions in other tissues. Therefore this study evaluated the age-related changes in 14 metal ions in 32 post mortem human lenses without known cataract from donors of 11 to 82 years of age by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; smoking-related changes in 10 smokers verses 14 non-smokers were also analysed. A significant age-related increase in selenium and decrease in copper ions was observed for the first time in the lens tissue, where cadmium ion levels were also increased as has been seen previously. Aluminium and vanadium ions were found to be increased in smokers compared to non-smokers (an analysis that has only been carried out before in lenses with cataract). These changes in metal ions, i.e. that occur as a consequence of normal ageing and of smoking, could contribute to cataract formation via induction of oxidative stress pathways, modulation of extracellular matrix structure/function and cellular toxicity. Thus, this study has identified novel changes in metal ions in human lens that could potentially drive the pathology of cataract formation. PMID:26794210

  11. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, L. H.; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-01

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  12. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  13. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    -oxyl radical. We therefore probed the amount of spin density on the oxido ligand of our complexes using EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with oxygen-17 labeling. Our findings showed that there is a significant amount of spin on the oxido ligand, yet the M-oxo bonds are best described as highly covalent and there is no indication that an oxyl radical is formed. These results offer the intriguing possibility that high-spin M-oxo complexes are involved in O-O bond formation in biology. Ligand redesign to incorporate H-bond accepting units (sulfonamido groups) simultaneously provided a metal ion binding pocket, adjacent H-bond acceptors, and an auxiliary binding site for a second metal ion. These properties allowed us to isolate a series of heterobimetallic complexes of Fe(III) and Mn(III) in which a group II metal ion was coordinated within the secondary coordination sphere. Examination of the influence of the second metal ion on the electron transfer properties of the primary metal center revealed unexpected similarities between Ca(II) and Sr(II) ions, a result with relevance to the OEC. In addition, the presence of a second metal ion was found to prevent intramolecular oxidation of the ligand with an O atom transfer reagent. PMID:26181849

  14. How do metal ion levels change over time in hip resurfacing patients? A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Lucia; Cadossi, Matteo; Chiarello, Eugenio; Fotia, Caterina; Greco, Michelina; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOM-HR) is offered as an alternative to traditional hip arthroplasty for young, active adults with advanced osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, concerns remain regarding wear and corrosion of the bearing surfaces and the resulting increase in metal ion levels. We evaluated three cohorts of patients with Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) at an average follow-up of 2, 5, and 9 years. We asked whether there would be differences in ion levels between the cohorts and inside the gender. Nineteen patients were prospectively analyzed. The correlation with clinical-radiographic data was also performed. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium and cobalt levels demonstrated a tendency to decrease over time. Such tendency was present only in females. An inverse correlation between chromium, implant size, and Harris hip score was present at short term; it disappeared over time together with the decreased ion levels. The prospective analysis showed that, although metal ion levels remained fairly constant within each patient, there was a relatively large variation between subjects, so mean data in this scenario must be interpreted with caution. The chronic high exposure should be carefully considered during implant selection, particularly in young subjects, and a stricter monitoring is mandatory. PMID:25580456

  15. How Do Metal Ion Levels Change over Time in Hip Resurfacing Patients? A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Lucia; Cadossi, Matteo; Chiarello, Eugenio; Fotia, Caterina; Greco, Michelina; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOM-HR) is offered as an alternative to traditional hip arthroplasty for young, active adults with advanced osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, concerns remain regarding wear and corrosion of the bearing surfaces and the resulting increase in metal ion levels. We evaluated three cohorts of patients with Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) at an average follow-up of 2, 5, and 9 years. We asked whether there would be differences in ion levels between the cohorts and inside the gender. Nineteen patients were prospectively analyzed. The correlation with clinical-radiographic data was also performed. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium and cobalt levels demonstrated a tendency to decrease over time. Such tendency was present only in females. An inverse correlation between chromium, implant size, and Harris hip score was present at short term; it disappeared over time together with the decreased ion levels. The prospective analysis showed that, although metal ion levels remained fairly constant within each patient, there was a relatively large variation between subjects, so mean data in this scenario must be interpreted with caution. The chronic high exposure should be carefully considered during implant selection, particularly in young subjects, and a stricter monitoring is mandatory. PMID:25580456

  16. Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis Applied to Investigation of Valinomycin Complexes with Ammonium and Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Štěpánová, Sille; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    This chapter deals with the application of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) to investigation of noncovalent interactions (complexes) of valinomycin, a macrocyclic dodecadepsipeptide antibiotic ionophore, with ammonium and alkali metal ions (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium). The strength of these interactions was characterized by the apparent binding (stability, association) constants (K b) of the above valinomycin complexes using the mobility shift assay mode of ACE. The study involved measurements of effective electrophoretic mobility of valinomycin at variable concentrations of ammonium or alkali metal ions in the background electrolyte (BGE). The effective electrophoretic mobilities of valinomycin measured at ambient temperature and variable ionic strength were first corrected to the reference temperature 25 °C and constant ionic strength (10 or 25 mM). Then, from the dependence of the corrected valinomycin effective mobility on the ammonium or alkali metal ion concentration in the BGE, the apparent binding constants of the valinomycin-ammonium or valinomycin-alkali metal ion complexes were determined using a nonlinear regression analysis. Logarithmic form of the binding constants (log K b) were found to be in the range of 1.50-4.63, decreasing in the order Rb(+) > K(+) > Cs(+) > > Na(+) > NH4 (+) ~ Li(+). PMID:27473493

  17. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  18. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg2+. A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg2+ from Ca2+. Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution. PMID:26450964

  19. Thermal analysis of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. C.; Wan, C. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    A detailed three-dimensional thermal model has been developed to examine the thermal behaviour of a lithium-ion battery. This model precisely considers the layered-structure of the cell stacks, the case of a battery pack, and the gap between both elements to achieve a comprehensive analysis. Both location-dependent convection and radiation are adopted at boundaries to reflect different heat dissipation performances on all surfaces. Furthermore, a simplified thermal model is proposed according to the examination of various simplification strategies and validation from the detailed thermal model. Based on the examination, the calculation speed of the simplified model is comparable with that of a one-dimensional model with a maximum error less than 0.54 K. These models successfully describe asymmetric temperature distribution inside a battery, and they predict an anomaly of temperature distribution on the surface if a metal case is used. Based on the simulation results from the detailed thermal model, radiation could contribute 43-63% at most to the overall heat dissipation under natural convection. Forced convection is effective in depressing the maximum temperature, and the temperature uniformity does not necessarily decrease infinitely when the extent of forced convection is enhanced. The metal battery case serves as a heat spreader, and the contact layer provides extra thermal resistance and heat capacity for the system. These factors are important and should be considered seriously in the design of battery systems.

  20. Luminescent zinc metal-organic framework (ZIF-90) for sensing metal ions, anions and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Yan, Bing

    2015-09-26

    We synthesize a zinc zeolite-type metal-organic framework, the zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-90), which exhibits an intense blue luminescence excited under visible light. Luminescent studies indicate that ZIF-90 could be an efficient multifunctional fluorescence material for high sensitivity metal ions, anions and organic small molecules, especially for Cd(2+), Cu(2+), CrO4(2-) and acetone. The luminescence intensity of ZIF-90 increases with the concentration of Cd(2+) and decreases proportionally with the concentration of Cu(2+), while the same quenched experimental phenomena appear in the sensing of CrO4(2-). With the increase of the amount of acetone, the luminescence intensity decreases gradually in the emulsions of ZIF-90. The mechanism of the sensing properties is studied in detail as well. This study shows that ZIF-90 could be a useful luminescent sensor for metal ions, anions and organic small molecules. PMID:26123790

  1. Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

  2. Ion flotation behaviour of thirty-one metal ions in mixed hydrochloric/nitric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Hualing, D; Zhide, H

    1989-06-01

    The ion flotation of 31 metal ions in hydrochloric/nitric acid solution with the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride was investigated. A 25-ml portion of 0.27-2.87 x 10(-4)M metal ion and 1.8-6.0 x 10(-4)M cetylpyridinium chloride solution in 0.17-3.4M acid mixture ([HCl]:[HNO(3)] = 2.4:1) was subjected to flotation in a cell, 22.5 cm high and 4.0 cm in diameter, for 5 min, with nitrogen bubbles. Ir(IV), Pt(IV), Ge(IV), Sn(IV), Bi(III), Au(III), Tl(III), Pd(II) and Sn(II) were floated from solution in 95-100% yield; Ru(III), Rh(III), Ir(III), Hg(II), Ag(I) and Tl(I) were partly floated, while Cr(VI), Ti(IV), Zr(IV), Ga(III), In(III), Fe(III), Sb(III), Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), CD(II) and Pb(II) were floated with less than 20% yield. The flotation behaviour of these metal ions in the mixed acid system was compared with that in hydrochloric acid. The flotation is more efficient in the mixed acid system. PMID:18964771

  3. Profiling measurements of metal ion distribution in thin polymer inclusion membranes by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedioura, B.; Bendjaballah, N.; Alioui, N.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) composed of a homogeneous mixture of cellulose triacetate matrix, 2-nitro-phenyl-octyl-ether as plasticizer and tri-octyl-phosphine-oxyde as carrier were synthesized by the spin coating method. Synthesized membranes were doped with molybdenum metal ions and then characterized by four experimental techniques: thermo gravimetric and differential analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectrometry using a 3.2 MeV He+ ion beam. The RBS analysis has established both the elemental composition as well as the Mo+ metal profiling of the studied PIMs. The experimental irradiation conditions were optimized in order to determine the ion fluence thresholds resulting in measurable changes in elemental composition of membranes. Changes in physico-chemical properties of the irradiated PIMs vs He+ ion fluence were observed with the ATR-FTIR analysis. Also, the SEM analysis of PIMs surfaces has revealed a porous texture, while the thermal analysis of annealed PIMs at 105°C has showed no significant changes of mass (∼1%) of the studied samples.

  4. A novel Schiff base: Synthesis, structural characterisation and comparative sensor studies for metal ion detections.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet; Purtas, Savas; Güngör, Seyit Ali; Ceyhan, Gökhan; Akgün, Eyup; McKee, Vickie

    2015-02-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2,6-diformylpyridine and 4-aminoantipyrine in MeOH and characterised by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the ligand was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The electrochemical properties of the Schiff base ligand were studied in different solvents at various scan rates. Sensor ability of the Schiff base ligand was investigated by colorimetric and fluorometric methods. Visual colour change of the ligand was investigated in MeOH solvent in presence of various metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). Upon addition of Al(3+) ion into a MeOH solution of the ligand, an orange colour developed which is detectable by naked eye. Fluorescence emission studies showed that the ligand showed single emission band at 630-665nm upon excitation at 560nm. Addition of metal ions Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) (1:1M ratio) cause fluorescence quenching, however addition of Al(+3) resulted in an increase in fluorescence intensity. No significant variation was observed in the fluorescence intensity caused by Al(3+) in presence of other metal ions. Therefore, the Schiff base ligand can be used for selective detection of Al(3+) ions in the presence of the other metal ions studied. PMID:25459697

  5. Metal ion binding to phospholipid bilayers evaluated by microaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric E; Hoag, Christian; Pfeifer, Zach; Lundeen, Christopher; Owens, Sarah

    2016-06-17

    Group I and II ion binding to phospholipid membranes was evaluated by affinity chromatography utilizing a new stationary phase system based on lipid bilayers supported within large-pore particles composed of Stöber silica spheres. Using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for detection, robust determination of binding selectivity within group II ions is achieved with capillary columns containing nanomole quantities of lipid and using picomoles of metal analyte. Columns with a unique lipid formulation can be prepared within three hours using a solvent-casting assembly method. The observable thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine has a significant effect on alkaline metal binding and demonstrates the dynamic nature of the supported bilayers. Of the group I ions, only lithium exhibits retention with neutral phosphatidylcholine bilayer stationary phases. A comparison of Stöber-based supports with two commercially available large-pore silicas reveals the effect that particle structure has on analyte accessibility to the bilayer surface as evaluated by retention per supported lipid mass. PMID:27189434

  6. Liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions, DFT and TD-DFT analysis of some 1,2,4-triazole Schiff Bases with high selectivity for Pb(II) and Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoutoul, Mohamed; Lamsayah, Morad; Al-blewi, Fawzia F.; Rezki, Nadjet; Aouad, Mohamed Reda; Mouslim, Messali; Touzani, Rachid

    2016-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions using some 1,2,4-triazole Schiff base derivatives as new extractants was studied. Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ were extracted from the aqueous phase into the organic phase and the extractability for each metal ion was determined by atomic absorption. Interestingly, a competitive extraction was also investigated and then examined at different pH in order to explore the effect of the different substituent groups on metal extraction. Accordingly, high selectivity towards Fe2+ (90.1%) and Pb2+ (94.3%) provided respectively by the presence of electron withdrawing group and electron donor group was attained. In addition, geometry optimizations of the ground and excited-states of the ligands in order to get better insight into the geometry and the electronic structure were carried out by means of DFT and TD-DFT calculations.

  7. Barcoded materials based on photoluminescent hybrid system of lanthanide ions-doped metal organic framework and silica via ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang; Yan, Bing

    2016-04-15

    A multicolored photoluminescent hybrid system based on lanthanide ions-doped metal organic frameworks/silica composite host has potential in display and barcode applications. By controlling the stoichiometry of the lanthanides via cation exchange, proportional various lanthanide ions are successfully introduced into metal organic frameworks, whose emission intensity is correspondingly proportional to its amount. The resulting luminescent barcodes depend on the lanthanide ions ratios and compositions. Subsequently, the lanthanide ions located in the channels of metal organic frameworks are protected from any interaction with the environment after the modification of silica on the surface. The optical and thermal stability of the hybrid materials are improved for technological application. PMID:26852345

  8. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2002-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  9. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2003-06-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize.

  10. Modeling of the mass transfer rates of metal ions across supported liquid membranes. 1: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Elhassadi, A.A.; Do, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of the transport and separation of metal ions across supported liquid membranes. The mass transfer resistance at the liquid-membrane interfaces and the interfacial chemical reactions at both the extracting side and the stripping side are taken into account in the model equations. Simple analysis of the time scale of the system shows the influence of various important parameters and their interactions on the overall transport rate. Parametric studies are also dealt with in this paper.

  11. Expressing a bacterial mercuric ion binding protein in plant for phytoremediation of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chein, Mei-Fang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Endo, Ginro; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2009-01-30

    A specific mercuric ion binding protein (MerP) originating from transposon TnMERI1 of Bacillus megaterium strain MB1 isolated from Minamata Bay displayed good adsorption capability for a variety of heavy metals. In this study, the Gram-positive MerP protein was expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis to create a model system for phytoremediation of heavy metals. Under control of an actin promoter, the transgenic Arabidpsis showed higher tolerance and accumulation capacity for mercury, cadium and lead when compared with the control plant. Results from confocal microscopy analysis also indicate that MerP was localized at the cell membrane and vesicles of plant cells. The developed transgenic plants possessing excellent metal-accumulative ability could have potential applications in decontamination of heavy metals. PMID:18538925

  12. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks as selective microporous materials for adsorption of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Abbas; Tehrani, Alireza Azhdari; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Morsali, Ali

    2016-06-14

    Four microporous lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely Ln(BTC)(H2O)(DMF)1.1 (Ln = Tb, Dy, Er and Yb, DMF = dimethylformamide, H3BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid), have been used for selective adsorption of Pb(ii) and Cu(ii). Among these MOFs, the Dy-based MOF shows better adsorption property and selectivity toward Pb(ii) and Cu(ii) ions. Adsorption isotherms indicate that sorption of Pb(ii) and Cu(ii) on MOFs is via monolayer coverage. Preconcentration is based on solid-phase extraction in which MOFs were rapidly injected into water samples and adsorption of metal ions was rapid because of good contact with analyte; then adsorbed Pb(ii) and Cu(ii) ions were analyzed by FAAS. The optimized methodology represents good linearity between 1 and 120 μg L(-1) and detection limit of 0.4 and 0.26 μg L(-1) for Pb(ii) and Cu(ii), respectively. Subsequently the method was evaluated for preconcentration of target metal ions in some environmental water samples. PMID:27171975

  13. Correlation between the limiting pH of metal ion solubility and total metal concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Apak, R.; Hizal, J.; Ustaer, C.

    1999-03-15

    As an alternative to species distribution diagrams (pM vs pH curves in aqueous solution) drawn for a fixed total metal concentration, this work has developed simple linear models for correlating the limiting pH of metal ion solubility -- in equilibrium with the least soluble amorphous metal hydroxide solid phase -- to the total metal concentration. Thus adsorptive metal removal processes in complex systems can be better designed once the limiting pH of heavy metal solubility (i.e., pH{sup *}) in such a complex environment can be envisaged by simple linear equations. pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} (M{sub t} = total metal concentration that can exist in aqueous solution in equilibrium with M(OH){sub 2(s)}) linear curves for uranyl-hydroxide, uranyl-carbonate-hydroxide, and mercuric-chloride-hydroxide simple and mixed-ligand systems and cupric-carbonate-hydroxide complexes in equilibrium with mixed hydroxide solid phases may enable the experimental chemist to distinguish true adsorption (e.g., onto hydrous oxide sorbents) from bulk precipitation removal of the metal and to interpret some anomalous metal fixation data -- usually attributed to pure adsorption in the literature -- with precipitation if the pM{sub t} at the studied pH is lower than that tolerated by pH{sup *} vs pM{sub t} curves. This easily predictable pH{sup *} corresponding to a given pM{sub t} may aid the design of desorptive mobilization experiments for certain metals as well as their adsorptive removal with the purpose of simulating metal adsorption and desorption cycles in real complex environments with changing groundwater pH.

  14. Effects of transition metal ion coordination on the collision-induced dissociation of polyalanines.

    PubMed

    Watson, Heather M; Vincent, John B; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2011-11-01

    Transition metal-polyalanine complexes were analyzed in a high-capacity quadrupole ion trap after electrospray ionization. Polyalanines have no polar amino acid side chains to coordinate metal ions, thus allowing the effects metal ion interaction with the peptide backbone to be explored. Positive mode mass spectra produced from peptides mixed with salts of the first row transition metals Cr(III), Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(I), and Cu(II) yield singly and doubly charged metallated ions. These precursor ions undergo collision-induced dissociation (CID) to give almost exclusively metallated N-terminal product ions whose types and relative abundances depend on the identity of the transition metal. For example, Cr(III)-cationized peptides yield CID spectra that are complex and have several neutral losses, whereas Fe(III)-cationized peptides dissociate to give intense non-metallated products. The addition of Cu(II) shows the most promise for sequencing. Spectra obtained from the CID of singly and doubly charged Cu-heptaalanine ions, [M + Cu - H](+) and [M + Cu](2+) , are complimentary and together provide cleavage at every residue and no neutral losses. (This contrasts with [M + H](+) of heptaalanine, where CID does not provide backbone ions to sequence the first three residues.) Transition metal cationization produces abundant metallated a-ions by CID, unlike protonated peptides that produce primarily b- and y-ions. The prominence of metallated a-ions is interesting because they do not always form from b-ions. Tandem mass spectrometry on metallated (Met = metal) a- and b-ions indicate that [b(n)  + Met - H](2+) lose CO to form [a(n)  + Met - H](2+), mimicking protonated structures. In contrast, [a(n)  + Met - H](2+) eliminate an amino acid residue to form [a(n-1)  + Met - H](2+), which may be useful in sequencing. PMID:22124980

  15. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  16. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-01

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100-1000 m2 g-1) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m2 g-1), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs.

  17. Coupled polaronic and ion transport in nanocrystalline metal oxide electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    We report new computational methods and fundamental understanding in the dynamics of coupled charge and ion transport in nanoscale metal oxides. The methods attack the multi-scale problem of simulating the collective diffusivities of ions and charge compensating e-/h+ carriers in single crystal particles, across particle-particle grain boundaries, and through networks of grains for select systems. Methods include embedded quantum mechanical clusters at the DFT and MP2 levels of theory for atomic-scale polaronic and ion transport kinetics, classical DFT-based free energy calculations for grain-scale conductivity in the framework of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism, and phase field simulation of charged particle diffusivity for conductivity at the grain network scale. This combination of approaches is one of a kind in terms of its multi-scale range, scaling, and computational efficiency. We are presently focused on coupled electron and Li+ ion transport in polymorphs of TiO2, and also in mixed valence spinel oxides, for electrode conductivity optimization and improving energy storage materials performance for Li+ batteries.

  18. Metal-organic frameworks for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Fu-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Shan; Deng, Hexiang

    2015-03-15

    Porous materials have been widely used in batteries and supercapacitors attribute to their large internal surface area (usually 100–1000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and porosity that can favor the electrochemical reaction, interfacial charge transport, and provide short diffusion paths for ions. As a new type of porous crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received huge attention in the past decade due to their unique properties, i.e. huge surface area (up to 7000 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), high porosity, low density, controllable structure and tunable pore size. A wide range of applications including gas separation, storage, catalysis, and drug delivery benefit from the recent fast development of MOFs. However, their potential in electrochemical energy storage has not been fully revealed. Herein, the present mini review appraises recent and significant development of MOFs and MOF-derived materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, to give a glimpse into these potential applications of MOFs. - Graphical abstract: MOFs with large surface area and high porosity can offer more reaction sites and charge carriers diffusion path. Thus MOFs are used as cathode, anode, electrolyte, matrix and precursor materials for lithium ion battery, and also as electrode and precursor materials for supercapacitors. - Highlights: • MOFs have potential in electrochemical area due to their high porosity and diversity. • We summarized and compared works on MOFs for lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. • We pointed out critical challenges and provided possible solutions for future study.

  19. Application of Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes of Some Heavy Metal Ions to Analysis of Skin Whitening Cosmetics Using ICP-AES

    PubMed Central

    ALqadami, Ayoub A.; Abdalla, Mohammad Abulhassan; ALOthman, Zeid A.; Omer, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive method for the determination of some heavy metals in skin whitening cosmetics creams using multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs as solid phase extraction sorbent for the preconcentration of these heavy metals prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. Different practical parameters have been thoroughly investigated and the optimum experimental conditions were employed. The developed method was then applied for the determination of arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, mercury, lead and titanium in samples of skin whitening cosmetics. The detection limits under these conditions for As, Bi, Cd, Pb, Hg and Ti were 2.4, 4.08, 0.3, 2.1, 1.8, and 1.8 ng·mL−1, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were found to be less than 2.0%. For validation, a certified reference material of NIST SRM 1570a spinach leaves was analyzed and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The recoveries for spiked samples were found to be in the range of 89.6–104.4%. PMID:23343988

  20. Low jitter metal vapor vacuum arc ion source for electron beam ion trap injections

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Glenn E.; Boyer, Craig N.; Seely, John F.; Tan, J.N.; Pomeroy, J.M.; Gillaspy, J.D.

    2005-07-15

    We describe a metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) ion source containing eight different cathodes that are individually selectable via the control electronics which does not require moving components in vacuum. Inside the vacuum assembly, the arc plasma is produced by means of a 30 {mu}s pulse (26 kV,125 A) delivering 2.4 mC of charge to the cathode sample material. The trigger jitter is minimized (<200 ns) to improve the capture efficiency of the ions which are injected into an ion trap. During a single discharge, the over-damped pulse produces an ion flux of 8.4x10{sup 9} ions/cm{sup 2}, measured by an unbiased Faraday cup positioned 20 cm from the extractor grid, at discharge rates up to 5 Hz. The electronic triggering of the discharge is via a fiber optic interface. We present the design, fabrication details, and performance of this MeVVA, recently installed on the National Institute of Standards and Technology electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

  1. Continuous spectroscopic analysis of vanadous and vanadic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.V.; Dutcher, R.A.; Fisher, M.S.; Kottle, S.; Stowe, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    Spectroscopic methods were investigated for the determination of vanadium ions in aqueous solutions arising in the production of vanadium (11) formate and its use in the LOMI (Low Oxidation-state Metal Ion) process for the chemical decontamination of systems in nuclear power plants. In the LOMI process, a dilute solution of vanadous formate and picolinic acid is used. The vanadous formate n reduces metal oxides in the scale on the equipment, causing the scale to break up and become suspended. The picolinic acid chelates these materials and makes them soluble. During the decontamination the progress is followed by analyses of the metal ions and of the radioactivity. When the values stop increasing, the decontamination is terminated. At present, it cannot be determined if the values are no longer changing due to all the scale being removed or due to the vanadous ion being spent. Infrared and ultraviolet-visible analysis were investigated as the means of analyzing for vanadium species. It was found that the complex formed by V(II) with picolinic acid could be used for colorimetric analysis for V(II) in the range of 0 {minus} 0.011 moles/liter, which encompasses the concentration range used in the LOMI process. The findings will be used to develop an on-line instrument for continuously monitoring V(II) during decontamination.

  2. Application of G criterion in metal vapor ion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Chen; Bailiang, Pan; Yi, Jin; Kun, Chen; Zhixin, Yao

    2003-09-01

    Application of G criterion to efficient operation of pulsed discharge-excited R-M transition metal vapor laser was successfully extended to univalent ionic lasing medium from neutral atomic lasing medium on the basis of analyzing the simulation results of 1.09 μm Sr + lasing process. All of the known 17 R-M transition laser lines of univalent ions follow the G criterion except one, to which an interpretation is given. Furthermore, we suggest that only 69 lines among 212 possible R-M transition laser lines predicted by S.V. Markova, which satisfy the G criterion, should be explored first.

  3. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of bare transition metal dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau J.

    This thesis contains gas phase negative ion photoelectron spectra of Mo2, MoV, CrCu, MoCu and Cu2. Spectra were taken with 488 nm and 514 nm light at a resolution of 4-5 meV. Information such as electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, anharmonicities and bond dissociation energies are reported for the ground and excited electronic states of both the anion and neutral species. Theoretical calculations at the density functional level are also reported for these species. Experiment and theory are used to analyze the bonding in these bare transition metal dimers.

  4. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  5. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  6. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  7. Coordination and valence state of transition metal ions in alkali-borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terczyńska-Madej, A.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.; Łączka, M.

    2011-10-01

    Borate glasses of the 20R 2O·80B 2O 3 type, where R = Li, Na and K, were colored by doping with transition metal ions (Co, Ni, Cr and Mn). The glasses were obtained by melting at the temperature of 1150 °C. For these glasses optical absorption in UV-VIS-NIR range were recorded. Analysis of the spectra allows to be determined the coordination and oxidation states of the doping transition metal ions. Changes of their coordination or oxidation are presented as a function of the optical basicity Λ after Duffy. Cobalt and nickel are present in examined borate glasses as divalent ions (Co 2+, Ni 2+) in octahedral coordination mainly, but the tetrahedral coordination state of cobalt is also possible. Chromium and manganese are present in the borate glasses in various oxidation state, though Cr 3+ and Mn 3+ ions in the octahedral coordination are probably dominant. A decrease of the electronegativity of the modifiers (Li → Na → K) and an increase of the glass matrix basicity cause a shift of the oxidation/reduction equilibrium towards higher valences of the transition metals (Cr 6+, Mn 3+).

  8. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field RF guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semi-conductor cathodes. However these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE) even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal's damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce non-uniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion) beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in-situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band RF guns.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, structural analysis of metal(II) complexes of N'-[(E)-3-Bromo-5-Chloro-2-hydroxybenzidene]-4-hydroxybenzohydrazide-Multisubstituted Schiff base as a F(-) and Cu(2+) ions selective chemosensor.

    PubMed

    Sundar, A; Prabhu, M; Indra Gandhi, N; Marappan, M; Rajagopal, G

    2014-08-14

    New colorimetric chemosensor, N'-[(E)-3-Bromo-5-Chloro-2-hydroxybenzidene]-4-hydroxybenzohydrazide, containing OH and NH groups as binding sites have been synthesized and characterized by spectral UV, IR, NMR and ESR. The molecular structure of ligand is determined by X-ray crystallography and it has the monoclinic space group P21/c with cell parameters a=15.1058(6), b=14.3433(6), c=17.5800(8)Å and Z=8. The electronic spectral measurements show that Co(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) complexes have tetrahedral geometry, while Cu(2+) complex has square planar geometry. Magnetic measurements show that Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes have paramagnetic behavior and Zn(2+) complex has diamagnetic behavior. Anion binding studies carried out using (1)H NMR and UV-visible spectrophotometric titrations revealed that these receptors exhibit selective recognition towards F(-) over other halide anions. The selectivity for F(-) among the halides is attributed mainly to the hydrogen-bond interaction of the receptor with F(-). Receptor (5 × 10(-5)M) shows color change from colorless to yellow in the presence of tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF, 1.5 × 10(-3)M). Moreover, F(-)-induced color changes remain the same even in the presence of large excess of Cl(-), Br(-) and I(-). The binding constant is found to be higher towards F(-) ion and this may be due to presence of OH group, which offers extra binding site. Chromogenic receptor undergoes distinct color changes from colorless to green on gradual addition of Cu(2+) can be used as colorimetric probes for spectrophotometric and visual analysis of Cu(2+) in the presence of other transition metal ions such as Co(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+). PMID:24759756

  10. Synthesis, characterization, structural analysis of metal(II) complexes of N‧-[(E)-3-Bromo-5-Chloro-2-hydroxybenzidene]-4-hydroxybenzohydrazide-Multisubstituted Schiff base as a F- and Cu2+ ions selective chemosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, A.; Prabhu, M.; Indra Gandhi, N.; Marappan, M.; Rajagopal, G.

    2014-08-01

    New colorimetric chemosensor, N‧-[(E)-3-Bromo-5-Chloro-2-hydroxybenzidene]-4-hydroxybenzohydrazide, containing OH and NH groups as binding sites have been synthesized and characterized by spectral UV, IR, NMR and ESR. The molecular structure of ligand is determined by X-ray crystallography and it has the monoclinic space group P21/c with cell parameters a = 15.1058(6), b = 14.3433(6), c = 17.5800(8) Å and Z = 8. The electronic spectral measurements show that Co2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ complexes have tetrahedral geometry, while Cu2+ complex has square planar geometry. Magnetic measurements show that Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ complexes have paramagnetic behavior and Zn2+ complex has diamagnetic behavior. Anion binding studies carried out using 1H NMR and UV-visible spectrophotometric titrations revealed that these receptors exhibit selective recognition towards F- over other halide anions. The selectivity for F- among the halides is attributed mainly to the hydrogen-bond interaction of the receptor with F-. Receptor (5 × 10-5 M) shows color change from colorless to yellow in the presence of tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF, 1.5 × 10-3 M). Moreover, F--induced color changes remain the same even in the presence of large excess of Cl-, Br- and I-. The binding constant is found to be higher towards F- ion and this may be due to presence of OH group, which offers extra binding site. Chromogenic receptor undergoes distinct color changes from colorless to green on gradual addition of Cu2+ can be used as colorimetric probes for spectrophotometric and visual analysis of Cu2+ in the presence of other transition metal ions such as Co2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+.

  11. Metal Ion Dependence of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Makaroff, Katherine; Paz, Nicholas; Aitha, Mahesh; Crowder, Michael W; Tierney, David L

    2015-06-16

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays crucial roles in disease-related physiologies and pathological processes in the human body. We report here solution studies of MMP-1, including characterization of a series of mutants designed to bind metal in either the catalytic site or the structural site (but not both). Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy of the mutants demonstrate the importance of the structural Zn(II) in maintaining both secondary and tertiary structure, while UV-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure show its presence influences the catalytic metal ion's coordination number. The mutants allow us to demonstrate convincingly the preparation of a mixed-metal analogue, Co(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1, with Zn(II) in the structural site and Co(II) in the catalytic site. Stopped-flow fluorescence of the native form, Zn(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1, and the mixed-metal Co(C)Zn(S)-MMP-1 analogue shows that the internal fluorescence of a nearby Trp residue is modulated with catalysis and can be used to monitor reactivity under a number of conditions, opening the door to substrate profiling. PMID:26018933

  12. Effect of Coulomb Explosion on Track Formation in Metals Irradiated by Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Pavlov, S.A.; Metelkin, E.V.; Zhemerev, A.V.

    2005-07-01

    The existing descriptions of the process of track formation in metals bombarded with high-energy heavy ions are usually based on the T-spike model. However, this model fails to explain high temperatures developed in some target materials (e.g., in copper). We present a comparative analysis of track formation in metals under the action of heavy ion bombardment, as described using the Coulomb explosion model and the T-spike model in various modifications. Both models are used to calculate changes in the temperatures of the electron and ion subsystems in the track region in amorphous alloy Fe{sub 85}B{sub 15}) and copper targets bombarded with identical high-energy (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. The results show that the Coulomb explosion model predicts stronger heating of the ion subsystem in the track region (with the possible formation of a melt-through zone) as compared to the T-spike model. The formation of point defects in copper as a result of the ionization losses has been also described using the two models and compared to the available experimental data. The Coulomb explosion model provides for a more adequate description of track formation as compared to the T-spike model.

  13. The two faces of metal ions: From implants rejection to tissue repair/regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Lamghari, Meriem; Barbosa, Mário A

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm of metallic ions as exclusive toxic agents is changing. During the last 60 years, knowledge about toxicological and immunological reactions to metal particles and ions has advanced considerably. Hip prostheses, namely metal-on-metal bearings, have prompted studies about excessive and prolonged exposure to prosthetic debris. In that context, the interactions of metal particles and ions with cells and tissues are mostly harmful, inducing immune responses that lead to osteolysis and implant failure. However, in the last decade, new strategies to promote immunomodulation and healing have emerged based on the unique properties of metallic ions. The atom-size and charge enable ions to interact with key macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids) that affect cellular function. Moreover, these agents are inexpensive, stable and can be integrated in biomaterials, which may open new avenues for a novel generation of medical devices. Herein, orthopedic devices are discussed as models for adverse responses to metal ions, and debated together with the potential to use metal ions-based therapies, thus bridging the gap between unmet clinical needs and cutting-edge research. In summary, this review addresses the two "faces" of metallic ions, from pathological responses to innovative research strategies that use metal ions for regenerative medicine. PMID:26851391

  14. Removal and selective recovery of heavy-metal ions from industrial waste waters. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Darnall, D.W.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.

    1989-02-01

    Accumulation of toxic metal ions in water supplies is a matter of increasingly grave concern. Primarily the undesirable by-products of mining and industrial activity, these ions can cause acute and chronic illnesses in humans and other animals. In an effort to limit further contamination, development of efficient, widely applicable, low-cost methods for removal of heavy-metal ions from waters deserves high priority. One new method that has allowed both the removal and recovery of metal ions from water has been the utilization of microorganisms such as algae. This metal-ion sorption process is based upon the natural, very strong affinity of the cell walls of algae for heavy metal ions. There appear to be distinct advantages of the immobilized algal system over other technology currently used for heavy-metal-ion cleanup from waste waters. The goals of the project were (1) to examine the effects of calcium(II) and magnesium(II) on transition metal binding to the algae, (2) to test the immobilized silica-algal polymers for removal of metal ions from electroplating plant waste waters, (3) to evaluate the effects of culturing conditions on the metal binding capacity of the resulting biomass, and (4) to investigate the mechanism of metal-ion binding to different algae.

  15. Metal ion release: also a concern for ceramic-on-ceramic couplings?

    PubMed

    Beraudi, Alina; Stea, Susanna; De Pasquale, Dalila; Bordini, Barbara; Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro; Toni, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    BIOLOX delta is the newest ceramic composite material of the BIOLOX family and its use in hip devices represents a good alternative to Metal-on-Metal or Metal-on-Polyethylene coupling. Some Metal-on-Metal hip devices have shown chromium and cobalt release, which promoted toxic effects. Furthermore, the ceramic composite contains trivalent chromium, even if strongly bound to the alumina lattice. The present study is aimed at detecting any 'in vivo' release of chromium ions from BIOLOX delta bearings in the blood, erythrocytes and urine of patients. Twenty patients implanted with total hip arthroplasty (THA) with BIOLOX delta-BIOLOX delta couplings and 21 subjects with no implanted prostheses were studied. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with dynamic reaction cell was used for analysis. In the THA group the Cr ions values were; in blood mean 0.21 µg/l (±0.09), in serum 0.21 µg/l (±0.12), in normalized erythrocytes 0.13 µg/l (±0.09), in normalized urine 0.12 µg/g creatinine (±0.13). In the control group the Cr ions values were; in blood mean 0.22 µg/l (st dev 0.14), in serum 0.17 µg/l (±0.08), in normalized erythrocytes 0.13 µg/l (±0.11), in normalized urine 0.07 µg/g creatinine (±0.08). The Lab reference values were 0.1-5.0 µg/l for blood, 0.1-0.5 µg/l for serum, 0.14-4.58 µg/l for normalised erythrocytes and 0.05-2.2 µg/l for urine. All samples in both groups resulted in chromium levels within the normal reference range and the safety of BIOLOX delta ceramics, in terms of chromium ions release, has been demonstrated. PMID:24817392

  16. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-04-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes.

  17. A photochromic sensor microchip for high-performance multiplex metal ions detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  18. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  19. A Photochromic Sensor Microchip for High-performance Multiplex Metal Ions Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Li, Fengyu; Ye, Changqing; Qin, Meng; Ran, Wei; Song, Yanlin

    2015-01-01

    Current multi-analytes chips are limited with requiring numbers of sensors, complex synthesis and compounds screen. It is expected to develop new principles and techniques to achieve high-performance multi-analytes testing with facile sensors. Here, we investigated the correlative multi-states properties of a photochromic sensor (spirooxazine), which is capable of a selective and cross-reactive sensor array for discriminated multi-analytes (11 metal ions) detection by just one sensing compound. The multi-testing sensor array performed in dark, ultraviolet or visual stimulation, corresponding to different molecular states of spirooxazine metal ions coordination. The facile photochromic microchip contributes a multi-states array sensing method, and will open new opportunities for the development of advanced discriminant analysis for complex analytes. PMID:25853794

  20. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  1. Complexation of metal ion with poly(1-vinylimidazole) resin prepared by radiation-induced polymerization with template metal ion. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Nishide, H.; Tsuchida, E.; Sasaki, T.

    1981-07-01

    Poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI) resin was prepared with Ni/sup 2 +/, CO/sup 2 +/, or Zn/sup 2 +/ as a template to study the adsorption of metal ions. The metal-1-vinylimidazole complex was copolymerized and cross-linked with 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone by ..gamma..-ray irradiation and the template metal ion was removed by treating the polymer complex with an acid. These PVI resins adsorbed metal ions more effectively than the PVI resin prepared without the template. The number of adsorption sites (As) and the stability constant (K) of Ni/sup 2 +/ complex were larger for the PVI resin prepared with the Ni ion template caused by the smaller dissociation rate constant of Ni ion from the resin. The composition of the Ni/sup 2 +/ complex in the resin remained constant. This suggests that the complexation proceeded via a one-step mechanism.

  2. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, M. ); Komarneni, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

  3. Ion collision crosssection measurements in quadrupole ion traps using a time-frequency analysis method.

    PubMed

    He, Muyi; Guo, Dan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a method for measuring ion collision crosssections (CCSs) was proposed through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories in quadrupole ion traps. A linear ion trap with added high-order electric fields was designed and simulated. With the presence of high-order electric fields and ion-neutral collisions, ion secular motion frequency within the quadrupole ion trap will be a function of ion motion amplitude, thus a function of time and ion CCS. A direct relationship was then established between ion CCS and ion motion frequency with respect to time, which could be obtained through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories (or ion motion induced image currents). To confirm the proposed theory, realistic ion trajectory simulations were performed, where the CCSs of bradykinin, angiotensin I and II, and ubiquitin ions were calculated from simulated ion trajectories. As an example, differentiation of isomeric ubiquitin ions was also demonstrated in the simulations. PMID:25319271

  4. Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

    1992-12-31

    The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

  5. Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Xiang, Hongjun E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2014-09-28

    The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

  6. State promotion and neutralization оf ions near metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    When a multiply charged ion with charge Z approaches the metal surface, a dipole is formed by the multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal. The states for such a dipole are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance and cross the states formed from metal atom. The model proposed explains the dominant population of deep bound states in collisions considered.

  7. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-01

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater. PMID:26913810

  8. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  9. A portable lab-on-a-chip system for gold-nanoparticle-based colorimetric detection of metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Zhong, Guowei; Kim, Da-Eun; Liu, Jinxia; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-09-01

    Heavy metal ions released into various water systems have a severe impact on the environment and human beings, and excess exposure to toxic metal ions through drinking water poses high risks to human health and causes life-threatening diseases. Thus, there is high demand for the development of a rapid, low-cost, and sensitive method for detection of metal ions in water. We present a portable analytical system for colorimetric detection of lead (Pb(2+)) and aluminum (Al(3+)) ions in water based on gold nanoparticle probes and lab-on-a-chip instrumentation. The colorimetric detection of metal ions is conducted via single-step assays with low limits of detection (LODs) and high selectivity. We design a custom-made microwell plate and a handheld colorimetric reader for implementing the assays and quantifying the signal readout. The calibration experiments demonstrate that this portable system provides LODs of 30 ppb for Pb(2+) and 89 ppb for Al(3+), both comparable to bench-top analytical spectrometers. It promises an effective platform for metal ion analysis in a more economical and convenient way, which is particularly useful for water quality monitoring in field and resource-poor settings. PMID:25332734

  10. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  11. Ion beam analysis and co-sputtering simulation (CO-SS) of bi-metal films produced by magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J.; Andrade, E.; Muhl, S.; Canto, C.; de Lucio, O.; Chávez, E.; Rocha, M. F.; Garcés-Medina, E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetron sputtering is widely used to deposit thin films on different types of substrates. An important application of this method is to make multicomponent thin films using co-sputtering, where two or more elements are included in the target. The thickness and elemental composition of the films depend on the experimental parameters used, the system geometry and the spatial distribution of the elements in the target. If the target is made of two spatially separate pieces of the materials, then the composition of the deposit depends on a combination of the relative areas, the sputtering yield and the angular distribution of the emission of the sputtered flux of each material. In this work, a co-sputtering simulation program, known as CO-SS, was developed to simulate the thickness and composition of metal films produced by DC magnetron sputtering (Al) and co-sputtering (Al + Ti). The CO-SS code models the angular distribution of particles ejected by sputtering from the target, where this is assumed to vary as cosn β , where n is a free parameter and β is the angle of ejection relative to the normal to the surface of the target, and the sputtering yield of each material. The program also takes into account other geometry factors such as the distance between the target and the substrate, and the size of the substrate. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) using 4He was employed to measure the thickness and the composition of the films deposited on glass cover slides in order to assess the CO-SS program. The film thickness was also measured by profilometry. The CO-SS code was found to accurately model the experimental results for both the Al and Ti/Al films. The CO-SS code is freely available for use from http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/CoSputteringSimulationCOSS/.

  12. EELS and STEM analysis of metal nitride/substrate interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, I. M.; Zhou, Z.; Rainforth, W. M.; Bleloch, A.; Ehiasarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. E.

    2010-07-01

    Nitride based protective coatings produced by physical vapour deposition offer a promising means to extend the oxidation and wear performance of γ-TiAl. Metal ion pre-etching of the substrate surface has been shown to significantly enhance the adhesion between the coating and substrate. In this study we have applied spectroscopic imaging and advanced STEM analysis to study such interfaces. For a conventional Cr cathodic arc discharge Cr ion implantation of ~6nm into the substrate was observed. For an etch using high power impulse magnetron sputtering the metal ion implantation depth was reduced to ~2-3nm. In both cases a corresponding depletion zone of Ti and Al was observed. In addition, nitrogen diffusion into the substrate during coating deposition was also revealed to a similar depth respectively.

  13. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  14. Photonic nanosensor for colorimetric detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Montelongo, Yunuen; Qasim, Malik M; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Monteiro, Michael J; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The real-time sensing of metal ions at point of care requires integrated sensors with low energy and sample consumption, reversibility, and rapid recovery. Here, we report a photonic nanosensor that reversibly and quantitatively reports on variation in the concentrations of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ions in aqueous solutions (<500 μL) in the visible region of the spectrum (λ(max) ≈ 400-700 nm). A single 6 ns laser pulse (λ = 532 nm) was used to pattern an ∼10 μm thick photosensitive recording medium. This formed periodic AgBr nanocrystal (ø ∼ 5-20 nm) concentrated regions, which produced Bragg diffraction upon illumination with a white light source. The sensor functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline allowed sensing through inducing Donnan osmotic pressure and tuning its lattice spacing. The sensor quantitatively measured Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ion concentrations within the dynamic range of 0.1-10.0 mM with limits of detection of 11.4 and 18.6 μM in under 10 min. The sensor could be reset in 3 min and was reused at least 100 times without compromising its accuracy. The plasmonic nanosensor represents a simple and label-free analytical platform with potential scalability for applications in medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. PMID:25710792

  15. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation. PMID:21460828

  16. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Monte Carlo Ion Transport Analysis Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-04-15

    Version: 00 TRIPOS is a versatile Monte Carlo ion transport analysis code. It has been applied to the treatment of both surface and bulk radiation effects. The media considered is composed of multilayer polyatomic materials.

  18. MEXAMS (METALS EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MEXAMS, the Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System, provides an enhanced capability for assessing the impact of priority pollutant metals on aquatic systems. It allows the user to consider the complex chemistry affecting the behavior of metals in conjunction with the transport ...

  19. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  20. Proton and metal ion binding to natural organic polyelectrolytes-II. Preliminary investigation with a peat and a humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize here experimental studies of proton and metal ion binding to a peat and a humic acid. Data analysis is based on a unified physico-chemical model for reaction of simple ions with polyelectrolytes employing a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Peat exhibited an apparent intrinsic acid dissociation constant of 10-4.05, and an apparent intrinsic metal ion binding constant of: 400 for cadmium ion; 600 for zinc ion; 4000 for copper ion; 20000 for lead ion. A humic acid was found to have an apparent intrinsic proton binding constant of 10-2.6. Copper ion binding to this humic acid sample occurred at two types of sites. The first site exhibited reaction characteristics which were independent of solution pH and required the interaction of two ligands on the humic acid matrix to simultaneously complex with each copper ion. The second complex species is assumed to be a simple monodentate copper ion-carboxylate species with a stability constant of 18. ?? 1984.

  1. The influence of metal artefacts on the range of ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, Oliver; Reiss, Petra

    2007-02-01

    The influence of artefacts due to metal implants on the range of ion beams is investigated, using a geometrically well-defined head and pelvic phantom together with inserts from steel, titanium and tungsten. The ranges along various beam paths including artefacts were calculated from the TPS and compared to known calculations for phantoms without any insert. In the head phantom, beams intersecting the streak artefacts lead to errors in the range of around or below 1%, which is mainly due to a cancellation of various effects. Beams through the metal or close to it show an underestimation of 3.5% of the range for tungsten. For the pelvic phantom, a large underestimation of the range is observed for a lateral path through the metal insert. In the case of tungsten and steel, range errors of -5% and -18% are observed, respectively. Such beam paths are typically used for pelvic tumours in radiotherapy with ion beams. For beams in the anterior-posterior direction through the inserts, an overestimation of ion ranges of up to 3% for titanium and 8% for steel is expected, respectively. Beam paths outside the metal insert show a large cancellation for the lateral beams (leading to errors of around 1% only) and somewhat higher errors for anterior-posterior beams (around 3% for titanium and 6% for steel). The analysis of CT data of patients with dental implants of gold as compared to patients with healthy teeth also showed a significant effect of the artefacts on the distribution of HU in the data, namely a redistribution of HU to higher and lower values as compared to patients with healthy teeth. The corresponding mean range variation was a 2.5% reduction in the data with artefacts as compared to the data without artefacts. It is concluded that beam paths through metal implants should generally be avoided in proton and ion therapy. In this case, the underestimation of ion range due to artefacts alone may amount to 3% for dental fillings and up to 5% and 18% for hip prosthesis

  2. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF MEASUREMENTS: Liquid-metal ion emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, M. D.

    1983-05-01

    This article describes and discusses the fundamental laws of ion emission from liquid-metal tips in a strong electric field. The widespread views of a liquid-metal emitter as being the smoothed tip of a Taylor cone are examined critically. The instability of a liquid metal in an electric field is discussed, and in line with this, an alternative concept is given of a sharp-tipped electrohydrodynamic emitter. The prospects for applying liquid-metal ion emitters are noted.

  3. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Fluorescent metal ion chemosensors via cation exchange reactions of complexes, quantum dots, and metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghui; Zhou, Xiangge; Xiang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Due to their wide range of applications and biological significance, fluorescent sensors have been an active research area in the past few years. In the present review, recent research developments on fluorescent chemosensors that detect metal ions via cation exchange reactions (transmetalation, metal displacement, or metal exchange reactions) of complexes, quantum dots, and metal-organic frameworks are described. These complex-based chemosensors might have a much better selectivity than the corresponding free ligands/receptors because of the shielding function of the filled-in metal ions. Moreover, not only the chemical structure of the ligands/receptors but also the identity of the central metal ions have a tremendous impact on the sensing performances. Therefore, sensing via cation exchange reactions potentially provides a new, simple, and powerful way to design fluorescent chemosensors. PMID:26375420

  5. Colorimetric Fluorescent Nanosensor Based on Hexamethylene Diisocyanate for Fluorescent Responses and Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaohui; Zhou, Yang; Li, Ruixing

    2016-03-01

    An inorganic-organic hybrid material based on magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles was synthesized for fluorescent responses and removal of heavy metal ions, in which superparamagnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles were firstly prepared and modified with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) instead of 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane (IPTES) as the organic coupling agent, and then a rhodamine derivative with spirolactam structure (Rho-en) was conjugated on the HDI functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles through isocyanate groups. Both of functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles based on IPTES and HDI were characterized by FT-IR and XPS, and the results indicated that HDI was a good alternative as chemical bridge for surface modification on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles. The inorganic-organic hybrid composites synthesized based HDI showed naked-eye color changes and fluorescent responses towards Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, which could serve as the available proofs for the qualitative analysis. Moreover, the as-obtained composites not only had excellent adsorption capability for Pb2+ and Hg2+, but also showed strong magnetic sensitivity, which could help to the removal and separation of functionalized magnetic nanocomposites after capturing the heavy metal ions. In addition, the plausible interaction mode of functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with heavy metal ions was discussed. PMID:27455720

  6. Transition metal ions at the crossroads of mucosal immunity and microbial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E.; Jellbauer, Stefan; Klaus, Suzi; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal ions are essential micronutrients for all living organisms. In mammals, these ions are often protein-bound and sequestered within cells, limiting their availability to microbes. Moreover, in response to infection, mammalian hosts further reduce the availability of metal nutrients by activating epithelial cells and recruiting neutrophils, both of which release metal-binding proteins with antimicrobial function. Microorganisms, in turn, have evolved sophisticated systems to overcome these limitations and acquire the metal ions essential for their growth. Here we review some of the mechanisms employed by the host and by pathogenic microorganisms to compete for transition metal ions, with a discussion of how evading “nutritional immunity” benefits pathogens. Furthermore, we provide new insights on the mechanisms of host-microbe competition for metal ions in the mucosa, particularly in the inflamed gut. PMID:24478990

  7. Rational design of metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.

    1998-06-01

    'This project addresses fundamental issues and requirements in developing hazardous metal ion separation technologies needed in the treatment and disposal of radioactive and chemical toxic waste. It encompasses the synthesis of new agents, followed by their characterization and evaluation, with the aim to optimize their metal ion sequestering properties for use in applied technologies. This research is focused on the following key areas: (1) basic design and synthesis of new metal ion specific sequestering ligands; (2) structural and thermodynamic investigations of these ligands and their complexes formed with the targeted metal ions; and (3) development of sequestering agents and their incorporation into systems designed to be prototypes of inexpensive and highly effective materials for hazardous metal ion decontamination. Basic studies of the sequestration of relevant toxic metals are required in order to develop processes that will treat effluents sufficiently well to allow direct release into the environment and minimize the production of secondary wastes.'

  8. Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

  9. Peculiarities and application perspectives of metal-ion implants in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzoldi, P.; Gonella, F.; Arnold, G.W.; Battaglin, G.; Bertoncello, R.

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation in insulators causes modifications in the refractive-index as a result of radiation damage, phase separation, or compound formation. As a consequence, light waveguides may be formed with interesting applications in the field of optoelectronics. Recently implantation of metals ions (e.g. silver, copper, gold, lead,...) showed the possibility of small radii colloidal particles formation, in a thin surface layer of the glass substrate. These particles exhibit an electron plasmon resonance which depends on the optical constants of the implanted metal and on the refractive-index of the glass host. The non-linear optical properties of such colloids, in particular the enhancement of optical Kerr susceptibility, suggest that the, ion implantation technique may play an important role for the production of all-optical switching devices. In this paper an analysis of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field will be presented in the framework of ion implantation in glass physics and chemistry.

  10. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in the insulating matrix. These nanocomposites have been characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as a function of the implantation dose. The experimental results are compared with a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. We conclude in that the conductivity process is due only to percolation (when the conducting elements are in geometric contact) and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible.

  11. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  12. High current liquid metal ion source using porous tungsten multiemitters.

    PubMed

    Tajmar, M; Vasiljevich, I; Grienauer, W

    2010-12-01

    We recently developed an indium Liquid-Metal-Ion-Source that can emit currents from sub-μA up to several mA. It is based on a porous tungsten crown structure with 28 individual emitters, which is manufactured using Micro-Powder Injection Molding (μPIM) and electrochemical etching. The emitter combines the advantages of internal capillary feeding with excellent emission properties due to micron-size tips. Significant progress was made on the homogeneity of the emission over its current-voltage characteristic as well as on investigating its long-term stability. This LMIS seems very suitable for space propulsion as well as for micro/nano manufacturing applications with greatly increased milling/drilling speeds. This paper summarizes the latest developments on our porous multiemitters with respect to manufacturing, emission properties and long-term testing. PMID:21111260

  13. Caging Metal Ions with Visible Light-Responsive Nanopolymersomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles that self-assemble from amphiphilic diblock copolymers, and provide an attractive system for the delivery of biological and nonbiological molecules due to their environmental compatibility, mechanical stability, synthetic tunability, large aqueous core, and hyperthick hydrophobic membrane. Herein, we report a nanoscale photoresponsive polymersome system featuring a meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged bis[(porphinato)zinc] (PZn2) fluorophore hydrophobic membrane solute and dextran in the aqueous core. Upon 488 nm irradiation in solution or in microinjected zebrafish embryos, the polymersomes underwent deformation, as monitored by a characteristic red-shifted PZn2 emission spectrum and confirmed by cryo-TEM. The versatility of this system was demonstrated through the encapsulation and photorelease of a fluorophore (FITC), as well as two different metal ions, Zn2+ and Ca2+. PMID:25518002

  14. Heterogeneous behavior of metalloproteins toward metal ion binding and selectivity: insights from molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Prerana; Chandravanshi, Monika; Mandal, Suraj Kumar; Srivastava, Ambuj; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-07-01

    About one-third of the existing proteins require metal ions as cofactors for their catalytic activities and structural complexities. While many of them bind only to a specific metal, others bind to multiple (different) metal ions. However, the exact mechanism of their metal preference has not been deduced to clarity. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate whether a cognate metal (bound to the structure) can be replaced with other similar metal ions. We have chosen seven different proteins (phospholipase A2, sucrose phosphatase, pyrazinamidase, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), plastocyanin, monoclonal anti-CD4 antibody Q425, and synaptotagmin 1 C2B domain) bound to seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), respectively). In total, 49 MD simulations each of 50 ns were performed and each trajectory was analyzed independently. Results demonstrate that in some cases, cognate metal ions can be exchanged with similar metal ions. On the contrary, some proteins show binding affinity specifically to their cognate metal ions. Surprisingly, two proteins CDO and plastocyanin which are known to bind Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), respectively, do not exhibit binding affinity to any metal ion. Furthermore, the study reveals that in some cases, the active site topology remains rigid even without cognate metals, whereas, some require them for their active site stability. Thus, it will be interesting to experimentally verify the accuracy of these observations obtained computationally. Moreover, the study can help in designing novel active sites for proteins to sequester metal ions particularly of toxic nature. PMID:26248730

  15. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively. PMID:23207854

  16. Selective removal of alkali metal cations from multiply-charged ions via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using weakly coordinating anions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Carl A; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L; Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 (-)). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations. PMID:25560986

  17. Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.

  18. A Speciation Study on the Perturbing Effects of Iron Chelators on the Homeostasis of Essential Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A number of reports have appeared in literature calling attention to the depletion of essential metal ions during chelation therapy on β-thalassaemia patients. We present a speciation study to determine how the iron chelators used in therapy interfere with the homeostatic equilibria of essential metal ions. This work includes a thorough analysis of the pharmacokinetic properties of the chelating agents currently in clinical use, of the amounts of iron, copper and zinc available in plasma for chelation, and of all the implied complex formation constants. The results of the study show that a significant amount of essential metal ions is complexed whenever the chelating agent concentration exceeds the amount necessary to coordinate all disposable iron —a frequently occurring situation during chelation therapy. On the contrary, copper and zinc do not interfere with iron chelation, except for a possible influence of copper on iron speciation during deferiprone treatment. PMID:26192307

  19. Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-μM water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

  20. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  1. High energy metal ion implantation using `Magis`, a novel, broad-beam, Marx-generator-based ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Ion energy of the beam formed by an ion source is proportional to extractor voltage and ion charge state. Increasing the voltage is difficult and costly for extraction voltage over 100 kV. Here we explore the possibility of increasing the charge states of metal ions to facilitate high-energy, broad beam ion implantation at a moderate voltage level. Strategies to enhance the ion charge state include operating in the regimes of high-current vacuum sparks and short pulses. Using a time-of-flight technique we have measured charge states as high as 7+ (73 kA vacuum spark discharge) and 4+ (14 kA short pulse arc discharge), both for copper, with the mean ion charge states about 6.0 and 2.5, respectively. Pulsed discharges can conveniently be driven by a modified Marx generator, allowing operation of ``Magis`` with a single power supply (at ground potential) for both plasma production and ion extraction.

  2. New highly sensitive and selective catalytic DNA biosensors for metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen; Li, Jing; Bruesehoff, Peter J; Pavot, Caroline M-B; Brown, Andrea K

    2003-05-01

    While remarkable progress has been made in developing sensors for metal ions such as Ca(II) and Zn(II), designing and synthesizing sensitive and selective metal ion sensors remains a significant challenge. Perhaps the biggest challenge is the design and synthesis of a sensor capable of specific and strong metal binding. Since our knowledge about the construction of metal-binding sites in general is limited, searching for sensors in a combinatorial way is of significant value. Therefore, we have been able to use a combinatorial method called in vitro selection to obtain catalytic DNA that can bind a metal ion of choice strongly and specifically. The metal ion selectivity of the catalytic DNA was further improved using a 'negative selection' strategy where catalytic DNA that are selective for competing metal ions are discarded in the in vitro selection processes. By labeling the resulting catalytic DNA with a fluorophore/quencher pair, we have made a new class of metal ion fluorescent sensors that are the first examples of catalytic DNA biosensors for metal ions. The sensors combine the high selectivity of catalytic DNA with the high sensitivity of fluorescent detection, and can be applied to the quantitative detection of metal ions over a wide concentration range and with high selectivity. The use of DNA sensors in detection and quantification of lead ions in environmental samples such as water from Lake Michigan has been demonstrated. DNA is stable, cost-effective, environmentally benign, and easily adaptable to optical fiber and microarray technology for device manufacture. Thus, the DNA sensors explained here hold great promise for on-site and real-time monitoring of metal ions in the fields of environmental monitoring, developmental biology, clinical toxicology, wastewater treatment, and industrial process monitoring. PMID:12706559

  3. Divalent Metal-Ion Complexes with Dipeptide Ligands Having Phe and His Side-Chain Anchors: Effects of Sequence, Metal Ion, and Anchor.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Robert C; Berden, Giel; Martens, Jonathan K; Oomens, Jos

    2015-09-24

    Conformational preferences have been surveyed for divalent metal cation complexes with the dipeptide ligands AlaPhe, PheAla, GlyHis, and HisGly. Density functional theory results for a full set of complexes are presented, and previous experimental infrared spectra, supplemented by a number of newly recorded spectra obtained with infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy, provide experimental verification of the preferred conformations in most cases. The overall structural features of these complexes are shown, and attention is given to comparisons involving peptide sequence, nature of the metal ion, and nature of the side-chain anchor. A regular progression is observed as a function of binding strength, whereby the weakly binding metal ions (Ba(2+) to Ca(2+)) transition from carboxylate zwitterion (ZW) binding to charge-solvated (CS) binding, while the stronger binding metal ions (Ca(2+) to Mg(2+) to Ni(2+)) transition from CS binding to metal-ion-backbone binding (Iminol) by direct metal-nitrogen bonds to the deprotonated amide nitrogens. Two new sequence-dependent reversals are found between ZW and CS binding modes, such that Ba(2+) and Ca(2+) prefer ZW binding in the GlyHis case but prefer CS binding in the HisGly case. The overall binding strength for a given metal ion is not strongly dependent on the sequence, but the histidine peptides are significantly more strongly bound (by 50-100 kJ mol(-1)) than the phenylalanine peptides. PMID:26325483

  4. Influence of metal ions on the interaction between gatifloxacin and calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-ying; Qin, Jun; Lu, Ling-ling

    2010-02-01

    To study the interaction between gatifloxacin (GT), metal ions (Cu 2+, Cd 2+, Co 2+, Mg 2+) and calf thymus DNA under condition of physiology pH, UV absorption and fluorescence methods were adopted. Result shows that metal ions and DNA are able to react with GT in ground state. In further research, by studying the influence of metal ions on binding of GT with DNA in metal ions-GT-DNA ternary system, we found that influential mechanism of Mg 2+ on the binding of GT with DNA may be different from the other three. Mg 2+ can act as a bridge in the binding of GT's carboxyl/carbonyl with DNA phosphate in certain concentration range; while Cu 2+, Cd 2+, Co 2+ can combine directly with GT by reaction between GT carboxyl/carbonyl and DNA base, and enhance the binding ability of GT with DNA. The influence extent and type depend not only on the binding site of DNA with metal ions (phosphate or base), but also the binding ability of which. The stronger the binding ability of metal ions with DNA base is, the larger their promotion to binding of GT with DNA is. The order of metal ions' influential ability on the binding of GT-DNA is identical to the binding ability order of metal ions with DNA base, that is: Cu 2+ > Cd 2+ > Co 2+ > Mg 2+.

  5. Ion thruster design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kami, S.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Questions concerning the mechanical design of a thruster are considered, taking into account differences in the design of an 8-cm and a 30-cm model. The components of a thruster include the thruster shell assembly, the ion extraction electrode assembly, the cathode isolator vaporizer assembly, the neutralizer isolator vaporizer assembly, ground screen and mask, and the main isolator vaporizer assembly. Attention is given to the materials used in thruster fabrication, the advanced manufacturing methods used, details of thruster performance, an evaluation of thruster life, structural and thermal design considerations, and questions of reliability and quality assurance.

  6. Hybrid metallic ion-exchanged waveguides for SPR biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bonnault, S.; Bucci, D.; Zermatten, P.. J.; Charette, P. G.; Broquin, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Glass substrates have been used for decades to create biosensors due to their biocompatibility, low thermal conductivity, and limited fluorescence. Among the different types of sensors, those based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) allow exploitation of the sensing lightwave at the vicinity of the sensor surface where small entities such as DNA or proteins are located. In this paper, ion-exchanged waveguides and SPR are combined to create a multianalyte optical sensor integrated onto glass. First the principle of operation is introduced, then the theoretical analysis and design of the sensing element. Simulations have been carried out using the Aperiodic Fourier Modal Method (AFMM) and a custom software that handles ion-exchange index-profiles. Fabrication and characterization processes are also presented. Finally the first experimental spectra are displayed and discussed. The sensor presents a bulk sensibility of 5000nm/RIU.

  7. Using diastereopeptides to control metal ion coordination in proteins.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Anna F A; Hemmingsen, Lars; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2008-10-28

    Here, we report a previously undescribed approach for controlling metal ion coordination geometry in biomolecules by reorientating amino acid side chains through substitution of L- to D-amino acids. These diastereopeptides allow us to manipulate the spatial orientation of amino acid side chains to alter the sterics of metal binding pockets. We have used this approach to design the de novo metallopeptide, Cd(TRIL12L(D)L16C)(3)(-), which is an example of Cd(II) bound to 3 L-Cys as exclusively trigonal CdS(3), as characterized by a combination of (113)Cd NMR and (111m)Cd PAC spectroscopy. We subsequently show that the physical properties of such a site, such as the high pK(a2) for Cd(II) binding of 15.1, is due to the nature of the coordination number and not the ligating group. Further more this approach allowed for the design of a construct, GRANDL12L(D)L16CL26AL30C, capable of independently binding 2 equivalents of Cd(II) to 2 very similar Cys sites as exclusively 3- and 4-, CdS(3) and CdS(3)O, respectively. Demonstrating that we are capable of controlling the Cd(II) coordination number in these 2 sites solely by varying the nature of a noncoordinating second coordination sphere amino acid, with D-leucine and L-alanine resulting in exclusively 3- and 4-coordinate structures, respectively. Cd(II) was found to selectively bind to the 4-coordinate CdS(3)O site, demonstrating that a protein can be designed that displays metal-binding selectivity based solely on coordination number control and not on the chemical identity of coordinating ligands. PMID:18940928

  8. Simulation and analysis of solenoidal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alderwick, A. R.; Jardine, A. P.; Hedgeland, H.; MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.

    2008-12-15

    We present a detailed analysis and simulation of solenoidal, magnetically confined electron bombardment ion sources, aimed at molecular beam detection. The aim is to achieve high efficiency for singly ionized species while minimizing multiple ionization. Electron space charge plays a major role and we apply combined ray tracing and finite element simulations to determine the properties of a realistic geometry. The factors controlling electron injection and ion extraction are discussed. The results from simulations are benchmarked against experimental measurements on a prototype source.

  9. The interaction between oxytetracycline and divalent metal ions in aqueous and mixed solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Tongaree, S; Flanagan, D R; Poust, R I

    1999-01-01

    The effects of pH, mixed solvent systems, and divalent metal ions on oxytetracycline (OTC) solubility and the interactions between OTC and metal ions in aqueous and mixed solvent systems were investigated. OTC solubility profiles were obtained for pH 4-9. The cosolvents studied were glycerin, propylene glycol, PEG 400, and 2-pyrrolidone with the following metal ions: magnesium, calcium, and zinc. OTC and its interactions with these metal ions were evaluated by solubility, NMR, circular dichroism (CD), and electron diffraction (ED) methods. At pH 5.6, no complexation occurred with these metal ions, but OTC zwitterion formed aggregates in aqueous solutions as shown by NMR spectra. The hydration of the metal ions was observed to affect OTC aggregation, with Mg+2 causing the greatest OTC aggregation. At pH 7.5, OTC aggregation and metal-OTC complexation were observed in solutions with Ca+2 and Mg+2. Zinc ion was found to decrease OTC solubility because of zincate formation, which caused anionic OTC to precipitate. Electron diffraction revealed a relationship between OTC and metal-OTC complex crystallinity and solubility behavior. The zinc-OTC complex exhibited the highest crystallinity and lowest solubility at pH 8.0. Various cosolvents generally enhanced OTC solubility, with 2-pyrrolidone having the best solubility power. In OTC-metal-2-pyrrolidone and OTC-Zn(+2)-PEG 400 systems, circular dichroism provided evidence for the formation of soluble ternary complexes. PMID:10578513

  10. Magnetic sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) for dissolved metal ion removal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A; Huang, Yuxiong; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-05-01

    Sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) is attracting a lot of attention due to its ease of production and high reactivity with organic pollutants. However, its structure is still poorly understood and its potential application in heavy metal remediation has not been explored. Herein, the structure of S-nZVI and its cadmium (Cd) removal performance under different aqueous conditions were carefully investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis suggested that sulfur was incorporated into the zerovalent iron core. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS analysis demonstrated that sulfur was also homogeneously distributed within the nanoparticles. When the concentration of Na2S2O4 was increased during synthesis, a flake-like structure (FeSx) increased significantly. S-nZVI had an optimal Cd removal capacity of 85 mg/g, which was >100% higher than for pristine nZVI. Even at pH 5, over 95% removal efficiency was observed, indicating sulfide compounds played a crucial role in metal ion removal and particle chemical stability. Oxygen impaired the structure of S-nZVI but enhanced Cd removal capacity to about 120 mg/g. Particle aging had no negative effect on removal capacity of S-nZVI, and Cd-containing mixtures remained stable in a two months experiment. S-nZVI can efficiently sequester dissolved metal ions from different contaminated water matrices. PMID:25706223

  11. Graphene oxides prepared by Hummers', Hofmann's, and Staudenmaier's methods: dramatic influences on heavy-metal-ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), an up-and-coming material rich in oxygenated groups, shows much promise in pollution management. GO is synthesised using several synthetic routes, and the adsorption behaviour of GO is investigated to establish its ability to remove the heavy-metal pollutants of lead and cadmium ions. The GO is synthesised by Hummers' (HU), Hofmann's (HO) and Staudenmaier's (ST) methodologies. Characterisation of GO is performed before and after adsorption experiments to investigate the structure-function relationship by using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with elemental detection spectroscopy is used to investigate morphological changes and heavy-metal content in the adsorbed GO. The filtrate, collected after adsorption, is analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, through which the efficiency and adsorption capacity of each GO for heavy-metal-ion removal is obtained. Spectroscopic analysis and characterisation reveal that the three types of GO have different compositions of oxygenated carbon functionalities. The trend in the affinity towards both Pb(II) and Cd(II) is HU GO>HO GO>ST GO. A direct correlation between the number of carboxyl groups present and the amount of heavy-metal ions adsorbed is established. The highest efficiency and highest adsorption capacity of heavy-metal ions is achieved with HU, in which the relative abundance of carboxyl groups is highest. The embedded systematic study reveals that carboxyl groups are the principal functionality responsible for heavy-metal-ion removal in GO. The choice of synthesis methodology for GO has a profound influence on heavy-metal-ion adsorption. A further enrichment of the carboxyl groups in GO will serve to enhance the role of GO as an adsorbent for environmental clean-up. PMID:25044516

  12. Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1999-06-16

    This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

  13. Multiheteromacrocycles that Complex Metal Ions. Sixth Progress Report, 1 May 1979-30 April 1980

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cram, D. J.

    1980-01-15

    Objective is to design synthesize, and evaluate cyclic and polycyclic host organic compounds for their abilities to complex and lipophilize guest metal ions, their complexes, and their clusters. Host organic compounds consist of strategically placed solvating, coordinating, and ion-pairing sites tied together by covalent bonds through hydrocarbon units around cavities shaped to be occupied by guest metal ions or by metal ions plus their ligands. Specificity in complexation is sought by matching the following properties of host and guest: cavity and metal ion sizes; geometric arrangements of binding sites; number of binding sites; character of binding sites; and valences. During this period, hemispherands based on an aryloxy or cyclic urea unit, spherands based on aryloxyl units only, and their complexes with alkali metals and alkaline earths were investigated. An attempt to separate {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li by gel permeation chromatography of lithiospherium chloride failed. (DLC)

  14. A fluorometric paper-based sensor array for the discrimination of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Li, Hui; Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Duan, Chun-Feng; Guan, Ya-Feng; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-04-15

    A fluorometric paper-based sensor array has been developed for the sensitive and convenient determination of seven heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. Combining with nine cross-reactive BODIPY fluorescent indicators and array technologies-based pattern-recognition, we have obtained the discrimination capability of seven different heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. After the immobilization of indicators and the enrichment of analytes, identification of the heavy-metal ions was readily acquired using a standard chemometric approach. Clear differentiation among heavy-metal ions as a function of concentration was also achieved, even down to 10(-7)M. A semi-quantitative estimation of the heavy-metal ion concentration was obtained by comparing color changes with a set of known concentrations. The sensor array was tentatively investigated in spiked tap water and sea water, and showed possible feasibility for real sample testing. PMID:23601876

  15. Interaction of lactic acid bacteria with metal ions: opportunities for improving food safety and quality.

    PubMed

    Mrvčić, Jasna; Stanzer, Damir; Solić, Ema; Stehlik-Tomas, Vesna

    2012-09-01

    Certain species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as well as other microorganisms, can bind metal ions to their cells surface or transport and store them inside the cell. Due to this fact, over the past few years interactions of metal ions with LAB have been intensively investigated in order to develop the usage of these bacteria in new biotechnology processes in addition to their health and probiotic aspects. Preliminary studies in model aqueous solutions yielded LAB with high absorption potential for toxic and essential metal ions, which can be used for improving food safety and quality. This paper provides an overview of results obtained by LAB application in toxic metal ions removing from drinking water, food and human body, as well as production of functional foods and nutraceutics. The biosorption abilities of LAB towards metal ions are emphasized. The binding mechanisms, as well as the parameters influencing the passive and active uptake are analyzed. PMID:22806724

  16. Graphene-DNAzyme Junctions: A Platform for Direct Metal Ion Detection with Ultrahigh Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Li, Le-Le; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Peiwen; Cao, Yang; Liang, Bo; Li, Xin; Lin, Yuanwei

    2015-01-01

    Many metal ions are present in biology and in the human body in trace amounts. Despite numerous efforts, metal sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (< a few picomolar) are rarely achieved. Here, we describe a platform method that integrates a Cu2+-dependent DNAzyme into graphene-molecule junctions and its application for direct detection of paramagnetic Cu2+ with femtomolar sensitivity and high selectivity. Since DNAzymes specific for other metal ions can be obtained through in vitro selection, the method demonstrated here can be applied to the detection of a broad range of other metal ions. PMID:26417425

  17. Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition

    DOEpatents

    Zuhr, Raymond A.; Holland, Orin W.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

  18. Metal ion transport quantified by ICP-MS in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Stiner, Cory A.; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Heiny, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of ICP-MS to measure metal ion content in biological tissues offers a highly sensitive means to study metal-dependent physiological processes. Here we describe the application of ICP-MS to measure membrane transport of Rb and K ions by the Na,K-ATPase in mouse skeletal muscles and human red blood cells. The ICP-MS method provides greater precision and statistical power than possible with conventional tracer flux methods. The method is widely applicable to studies of other metal ion transporters and metal-dependent processes in a range of cell types and conditions. PMID:26838181

  19. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Shi, W.

    1998-04-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and chromium ions in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of four heavy metals are 29.3 mg/g (Cu{sup 2+}), 30.73 mg/g (Zn{sup 2+}), 42.18 mg/g (Cd{sup 2+}), and 25.07 mg/g (Cr{sup 3+}), respectively. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks affected the adsorption of metal ions; the finer size of particles showed better adsorption to the ions. Temperature also plays an interesting role in the adsorption of different metal ions. Copper, zinc, and cadmium exhibited lower adsorption on sunflower stalks at higher temperature, while chromium showed the opposite phenomenon. The adsorption rates of copper, cadmium, and chromium are quite rapid. Within 60 min of operation about 60--80% of these ions were removed from the solutions.

  20. Thio Effects and an Unconventional Metal Ion Rescue in the Genomic HDV Ribozyme§

    PubMed Central

    Thaplyal, Pallavi; Ganguly, Abir; Golden, Barbara L.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Metal ion and nucleobase catalysis are important for ribozyme mechanism, but the extent to which they cooperate is unclear. A crystal structure of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme suggested that the pro-RP oxygen at the scissile phosphate directly coordinates a catalytic Mg2+ ion and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the amine of the general acid C75. Prior studies on the genomic HDV ribozyme, however, showed neither a thio effect nor metal ion rescue using Mn2+. Here, we combine experiment and theory to explore phosphorothioate substitutions at the scissile phosphate. We report significant thio effects at the scissile phosphate and metal ion rescue with Cd2+. Reaction profiles with an SP-phosphorothioate substitution are indistinguishable from those of the unmodified substrate in the presence of Mg2+ or Cd2+, supporting that the pro-SP oxygen does not coordinate metal ions. The RP-phosphorothioate substitution, however, exhibits biphasic kinetics, with the fast-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of up to 5-fold effect and the slow-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of ~1,000-fold. Moreover, the fast- and slow-reacting phases give metal ion rescues in Cd2+ of up to 10- and 330-fold, respectively. The metal ion rescues are unconventional in that they arise from Cd2+ inhibiting the oxo substrate but not the RP substrate. This metal ion rescue suggests a direct interaction of the catalytic metal ion with the pro-RP oxygen, in line with experiments on the antigenomic HDV ribozyme. Experiments without divalent ions, with mutants that interfere with Mg2+ binding, or with C75 deleted suggest that the pro-RP oxygen plays at most a redundant role in positioning C75. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) studies indicate that the metal ion contributes to catalysis by interacting with both the pro-RP oxygen and the nucleophilic 2’- hydroxyl, supporting the experimental findings. PMID:24001219

  1. The 1.3 Å resolution structure of the RNA tridecamer r(GCGUUUGAAACGC): Metal ion binding correlates with base unstacking and groove contraction

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, Youri; Bombard, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in RNA folding and activity. Elucidating the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding the RNA functions. High-resolution data are a prerequisite for a detailed structural analysis of ion binding on RNA and, in particular, the observation of monovalent cations. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the tridecamer duplex r(GCGUUUGAAACGC) crystallized under different conditions provides new structural insights on ion binding on GAAA/UUU sequences that exhibit both unusual structural and functional properties in RNA. The present study extends the repertory of RNA ion binding sites in showing that the two first bases of UUU triplets constitute a specific site for sodium ions. A striking asymmetric pattern of metal ion binding in the two equivalent halves of the palindromic sequence demonstrates that sequence and its environment act together to bind metal ions. A highly ionophilic half that binds six metal ions allows, for the first time, the observation of a disodium cluster in RNA. The comparison of the equivalent halves of the duplex provides experimental evidences that ion binding correlates with structural alterations and groove contraction. PMID:17940138

  2. METAL INTERACTIONS AT SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES: PART 3, METAL AFFINITIES IN SINGLE AND MULTIPLE ION ADSORPTION REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption reactions of both single ions and multiple ion mixtures with sulfide minerals (chalcocite, galena, pyrite, and sphalerite) were investigated in the metal concentration range of 0.0001 to 0.00001 M. Chromium (III), iron (III), barium (II), cadmium (II), copper (II), nic...

  3. Identifying alkali metal inhibitors of crystal growth: a selection criterion based on ion pair hydration energy.

    PubMed

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Alamani, Bryan G; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-21

    We show that alkali metals function as effective modifiers of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization wherein alkali-oxalate ion parings reduce the rate of crystal growth by as much as 60%. Our findings reveal a distinct trend in alkali metal efficacy that cannot be explained by colloidal theories or simple descriptors, such as ion size, but is consistent with a theoretical model that accounts for the ion pair's affinity for water. PMID:26242310

  4. Formation of metallic nanostructures on the surface of ion- exchange glass by focused electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarenko, F. E.; Zhukov, M. V.; Mukhin, I. S.; Golubok, A. O.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a new method for formation of metallic nanostructures on the surface of ion-exchange glass. The method is based on the interaction of a focused electron beam with ions in ion-exchange glass. In experiments nanostructures with different shapes were obtained, depending on the electrons irradiation conditions.

  5. Multicolour photochromism of colloidal solutions of niobate nanosheets intercalated with several kinds of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kai; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tokunaga, Motoko; Ueda, Taro; Hyodo, Takeo; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-25

    Colourless and transparent colloidal solutions of niobate nanosheets intercalated with some kinds of metal ions (M-NNS, M: metal) showed quasi-reversible photochromism. Ultraviolet light irradiation of the solutions induced a change in color while maintaining the transparency, and the color change was dependent on the metal ions. The coloured solutions were bleached by exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. This cycle could be repeated several times. PMID:26821602

  6. A crystallographic study of the binding of 13 metal ions to two related RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Ennifar, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Dumas, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Metal ions, and magnesium in particular, are known to be involved in RNA folding by stabilizing secondary and tertiary structures, and, as cofactors, in RNA enzymatic activity. We have conducted a systematic crystallographic analysis of cation binding to the duplex form of the HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site for the subtype-A and -B natural sequences. Eleven ions (K+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Sr2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Au3+ and Pt4+) and two hexammines [Co (NH3)6]3+ and [Ru (NH3)6]3+ were found to bind to the DIS duplex structure. Although the two sequences are very similar, strong differences were found in their cation binding properties. Divalent cations bind almost exclusively, as Mg2+, at ‘Hoogsteen’ sites of guanine residues, with a cation-dependent affinity for each site. Notably, a given cation can have very different affinities for a priori equivalent sites within the same molecule. Surprisingly, none of the two hexammines used were able to efficiently replace hexahydrated magnesium. Instead, [Co (NH3)4]3+ was seen bound by inner-sphere coordination to the RNA. This raises some questions about the practical use of [Co (NH3)6]3+ as a [Mg (H2O)6]2+ mimetic. Also very unexpected was the binding of the small Au3+ cation exactly between the Watson–Crick sites of a G-C base pair after an obligatory deprotonation of N1 of the guanine base. This extensive study of metal ion binding using X-ray crystallography significantly enriches our knowledge on the binding of middleweight or heavy metal ions to RNA, particularly compared with magnesium. PMID:12736317

  7. An exploratory program for using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A.W.; Dosch, R.G.; Sault, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to investigate the potential of hydrous metal oxide (HMO) ion exchangers, invented at Sandia National Laboratories, as Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. Metals known to be active in F-T synthesis (e.g. Fe, Co) were ion exchanged on hydrous metal oxide supports. Although HMO catalysts based on Zr, Nb, and Ta have been investigated in direct coal liquefaction studies, this effect focused on formulations based on the hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) system. The program has the goals of developing a catalyst with (1) high activity, (2) selectively to fuel range or other useful products, and (3) better properties for use in slurry reactors. The program has three main tasks: (1) catalyst synthesis, to develop methods for preparing catalysts having desirable F-T properties, (2) characterization, to investigate catalysts proving to have desirable properties by a variety of analytical techniques to determine correlations between activity and material properties and (3) testing to determine activity and selectivity of catalysts. This paper discussed results of activity testing of Ruhrchemie catalyst and some catalyst formulations prepared using ion exchange on hydrous titanium oxide and precipitation. For example, at 250{degree}C the Ruhrchemie catalyst converts {approximately}50% of the syngas feed to reaction products. In comparison, iron catalysts prepared by ion exchange and precipitation had conversions ranging from 20 to 50% over a temperature range of 250 to 275{degree}C of the syngas feed. In addition, results are Auger surface analysis of Ruhrchemie catalyst are presented. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Phase measurements of erythrocytes affected by metal ions with quantitative interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Shan, Yanke; Xu, Mingfei; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is an important factor in disease diagnosis, however, traditional setups as microscopes and cytometers cannot provide enough quantitative information of cellular morphology for in-depth statistics and analysis. In order to capture variations of erythrocytes affected by metal ions, quantitative interferometric microscopy (QIM) is applied to monitor their morphology changes. Combined with phase retrieval and cell recognition, erythrocyte phase images, as well as phase area and volume, can be accurately and automatically obtained. The research proves that QIM is an effective tool in cellular observation and measurement.

  9. Ion Beam Analysis of Targets Used in Controlatron Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, James C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Walla, Lisa A.; Walsh, David S.

    2009-03-10

    Controlatron neutron generators are used for testing neutron detection systems at Sandia National Laboratories. To provide for increased tube lifetimes for the moderate neutron flux output of these generators, metal hydride (ZrT{sub 2}) target fabrication processes have been developed. To provide for manufacturing quality control of these targets, ion beam analysis techniques are used to determine film composition. The load ratios (i.e. T/Zr concentration ratios) of ZrT{sub 2} Controlatron neutron generator targets have been successfully measured by simultaneously acquiring RBS and ERD data using a He{sup ++} beam energy of 10 MeV. Several targets were measured and the film thicknesses obtained from RBS measurements agreed within {+-}2% with Dektak profilometer measurements. The target fabrication process and ion beam analysis techniques will be presented.

  10. Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solution and tannery effluent by Bacillus sp. FM1.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farhana; Malik, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    The metal binding capacity of Bacillus sp. FM1 isolated from soil irrigated with tannery effluent was assessed using synthetic metal solutions and tannery wastewater. Biosorption of Cr(VI) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solutions using Bacillus was investigated as a function of pH, initial metal ion concentration and contact time. The optimum adsorption pH value observed for Cr(VI) and Cu(II) ions was 2 and 5, respectively. Metal ion uptake increased with increasing initial metal concentration but no significant difference was observed by increasing the time after 60 min. Maximum uptake capacity of chromium was estimated as 64.102 mg g(-1), and of copper to 78.125 mg g(-1). Equilibrium data were well described by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption relations. The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ion was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The application of Bacillus to remove Cr(VI) and Cu(II) in tannery effluent revealed that the biomass was capable of removing both the metal ions. However, the biosorption performance was slightly lower compared to that of synthetic metal solutions. Several factors may be responsible for this difference. However, the most important factor appears to be the presence of other contaminants such as anions, organics, and other trace metals in the effluent. PMID:22126236

  11. π-Extended dipyrrins capable of highly fluorogenic complexation with metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Filatov, Mikhail A.; Lebedev, Artem Y.; Mukhin, Sergei N.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Cheprakov, Andrei V.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis and properties of a new family of π-extended dipyrrins, capable of forming brightly fluorescent complexes with metal ions, are reported. The metal complexes posses tunable spectral bands and exhibit different emission properties depending on the mode of metal coordination. PMID:20583759

  12. Humic colloid-borne natural polyvalent metal ions: dissociation experiment.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, H; Rabung, Th; Ngo Manh, T; Kim, J I; Beck, H P

    2002-07-01

    The natural association nature of the humic colloid-borne trace elements is investigated. Rare earth elements (REE) Th and U are chosen as naturally occurring representatives and chemical homologues for actinides of different oxidation states present in nuclear waste. Tri- and tetravalent elements in two investigated Gorleben groundwaters (Gohy-532 and -2227) almost exclusively occur as humic or fulvic colloid-borne species. Their desorption behavior from colloids is examined in the unperturbed groundwater (pH approximately 8) under anaerobic conditions (Ar/1% CO2) by addition of a chelating cation exchanger resin. Particularly, the dissociation process of naturally occurring Eu(III) in the groundwater is compared with the Eu(III) desorption from its humate complex prepared with purified Aldrich humic acid in a buffered aqueous solution at pH approximately 8. The Eu(III) dissociation from the groundwater colloids is found to be considerably slower than found for the humate complex synthesized in the laboratory. This suggests that under natural aquatic conditions the Eu(III) binding in colloids is chemically different from the simple humate complexation as observed in the laboratory experiment. The colloid characterization bythe size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) indicates that natural colloid-borne trace elements are found predominantly in colloids of larger size (>15 nm in size), while Eu(III) in its humate complex is found mainly in colloids of hydrodynamic diameters <5 nm. The slower desorption kinetics and the larger colloid size suggest that the polyvalent metal ion binding in natural humic colloids is associated to polynucleation with other co-present trace metal ions. Radiotracer experiments reveal that isotopic equilibria with the naturally colloid-borne trace elements are not attained within a period of more than 100 days, indicating irreversible binding of at least a part of colloid-borne polyvalent trace

  13. Potentiometric Determination of Phytic Acid and Investigations of Phytate Interactions with Some Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Marolt, Gregor; Pihlar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Determination of correct amount (concentration) of phytic acid is of vital importance when dealing with protonation and/or metal complexation equilibria. A novel approach for precise and reliable assay of phytic acid, based on the difference between end points by potentiometric titration, has been presented. Twelve phytic acid protons are classified into three groups of acidity, which enables detection of 2 to 3 distinct equivalent points (EPs) depending on experimental conditions, e.g. counter-ion concentration. Using the differences between individual EPs enables correct phytate determination as well as identification of potential contamination and/or determination of initial protonation degree. Impact of uncertainty of phytate amount on the calculation of protonation constants has been evaluated using computer simulation program (Hyperquad2013). With the analysis of titration curves different binding sites on phytate ligand have been proposed for complexation of Ca2+ and Fe3+ ions. PMID:26085413

  14. Smoothing metallic glasses without introducing crystallization by gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Myers, Michael; Wang, Jing; Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Chu, Wei-Kan; Xie, Guoqiang; Zare, Arezoo; Lucca, Don A.

    2013-03-11

    We show that 30 keV Ar cluster ion bombardment of Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} metallic glass (MG) can remove surface mountain-like features and reduce the root mean square surface roughness from 12 nm to 0.7 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals no crystallization after cluster ion irradiation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, although damage cascades lead to local melting, the subsequent quenching rate is a few orders of magnitude higher than the critical cooling rate for MG formation, thus the melted zone retains its amorphous nature down to room temperature. These findings can be applied to obtain ultra-smooth MGs without introducing crystallization.

  15. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    DOEpatents

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  16. Metal Ion Involvement in the Allosteric Mechanism of Escherichia coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Gregory M.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) allosterically regulates pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. The enzyme is inhibited by CTP and can be further inhibited by UTP, although UTP alone has little or no influence on activity; however, the mechanism for the synergistic inhibition is still unknown. In order to determine how UTP is able to synergistically inhibit ATCase in the presence of CTP, we determined a series of X-ray structures of ATCase•nucleotide complexes. Analysis of the X-ray structures revealed that (1) CTP and dCTP bind in a very similar fashion, (2) UTP, in the presence of dCTP or CTP, binds at a site that does not overlap the CTP/dCTP site, (3) the triphosphates of the two nucleotides are parallel to each other with a metal ion, in this case Mg2+, coordinated between the β and γ phosphates of the two nucleotides. Kinetic experiments showed that the presence of a metal ion such as Mg2+ is required for synergistic inhibition. Together these results explain how the binding of UTP can enhance the binding of CTP and why UTP binds more tightly in the presence of CTP. A mechanism for the synergistic inhibition of ATCase is proposed in which the presence of UTP stabilizes the T state even more than CTP alone. These results also call into question many of the past kinetic and binding experiments of ATCase with nucleotides as the presence of metal contamination was not considered important. PMID:22906065

  17. Bioleaching of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries using Aspergillus niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horeh, N. Bahaloo; Mousavi, S. M.; Shojaosadati, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a bio-hydrometallurgical route based on fungal activity of Aspergillus niger was evaluated for the detoxification and recovery of Cu, Li, Mn, Al, Co and Ni metals from spent lithium-ion phone mobile batteries under various conditions (one-step, two-step and spent medium bioleaching). The maximum recovery efficiency of 100% for Cu, 95% for Li, 70% for Mn, 65% for Al, 45% for Co, and 38% for Ni was obtained at a pulp density of 1% in spent medium bioleaching. The HPLC results indicated that citric acid in comparison with other detected organic acids (gluconic, oxalic and malic acid) had an important role in the effectiveness of bioleaching using A. niger. The results of FTIR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis of battery powder before and after bioleaching process confirmed that the fungal activities were quite effective. In addition, bioleaching achieved higher removal efficiency for heavy metals than the chemical leaching. This research demonstrated the great potential of bio-hydrometallurgical route to recover heavy metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries.

  18. Metal-Ion Metathesis and Properties of Triarylboron-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Jie; Dai, Fangna; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2015-07-01

    An anionic metal-organic framework, H3[(Mn4Cl)3L8]⋅30H2O⋅2.5 DMF⋅5 Diox (UPC-15), was successfully prepared by the reaction of MnCl2 with tris(p-carboxylic acid)tridurylborane (H3 L) under solvothermal conditions. UPC-15 with wide-open pores (∼18.8 Å) is constructed by packing of octahedral and cuboctahedral cages, and exhibits high gas-sorption capabilities. Notably, UPC-15 shows selective adsorption of cationic dyes due to the anion framework. Moreover, the catalytic and magnetic properties were investigated, and UPC-15 can highly catalyze the cyanosilylation of aromatic aldehydes. UPC-15 exhibits the exchange of metal ions from Mn to Cu in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner to generate UPC-16, which could not be obtained by the direct solvothermal reaction of CuCl2 and H3L. UPC-16 exhibits similar properties for gas sorption, dye separation, and catalytic activity. However, the magnetic behaviors for UPC-15 and UPC-16 are distinct due to the metal-specific properties. Below 47 K, UPC-15 exhibits a ferromagnetic coupling but UPC-16 shows a dominant antiferromagnetic behavior. PMID:25929722

  19. Influence of Surface Coating on Metal Ion Release: Evaluation in Patients With Metal Allergy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Weik, Thomas; Roider, Gabriele; Summer, Burkhard; Thomsen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Nickel, chromium, and cobalt in stainless steel and Cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys may induce allergy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate surface coating regarding ion release, patch test reactivity, and arthroplasty performance. Materials and methods included patch test in 31 patients with metal allergy and 30 patients with no allergy to stainless steel and CoCrMo disks that are uncoated or coated by titanium nitride/zirconium nitride (TiN/ZrN). Assessment include atomic absorption spectrometry of released nickel, cobalt, and chromium from the disks after exposure to distilled water, artificial sweat and culture medium. Results showed that both coatings reduced the nickel and chromium release from stainless steel and CoCrMo disks and mostly the cobalt release from the disks (maximally 11.755 µg/cm(2)/5 d to 1.624 by Ti-N and to 0.442 by ZrN). Six of the 31 patients with metal allergy reacted to uncoated disks, but none reacted to the coated disks. The current authors report on exemplary patients with metal allergy who had symptom relief by revision with surface-coated arthroplasty. The authors concluded that the surface coating may prevent cutaneous and peri-implant allergic reactions. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):S24-S30.]. PMID:27219723

  20. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  1. Computational scheme for the prediction of metal ion binding by a soil fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The dissociation and metal ion binding properties of a soil fulvic acid have been characterized. Information thus gained was used to compensate for salt and site heterogeneity effects in metal ion complexation by the fulvic acid. An earlier computational scheme has been modified by incorporating an additional step which improves the accuracy of metal ion speciation estimates. An algorithm is employed for the prediction of metal ion binding by organic acid constituents of natural waters (once the organic acid is characterized in terms of functional group identity and abundance). The approach discussed here, currently used with a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, is conceptually envisaged to be compatible with computer programs available for ion binding by inorganic ligands in natural waters.

  2. Metal ion specificities for folding and cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Jennifer L.; Canny, Marella D.; Azimi, Ehsan; Pardi, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various metal ions on cleavage activity and global folding have been studied in the extended Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to probe global folding as a function of various monovalent and divalent metal ions in this ribozyme. The divalent metals ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have a relatively small variation (less than sixfold) in their ability to globally fold the hammerhead ribozyme, which contrasts with the very large difference (>10,000-fold) in apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions in single-turnover kinetic experiments. There is still a very large range (>4600-fold) in the apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions measured in high salt (2 M NaCl) conditions where the ribozyme is globally folded. These results demonstrate that the identity of the divalent metal ion has little effect on global folding of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme, whereas it has a very large effect on the cleavage kinetics. Mechanisms by which the identity of the divalent metal ion can have such a large effect on cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme are discussed. PMID:18755844

  3. Electric Double-Layer Effects Induce Separation of Aqueous Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qinghua; An, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Huijuan; Guo, Lin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-24

    Metal ion separation is crucial to environmental decontamination, chromatography, and metal recovery and recycling. Theoretical studies have suggested that the ion distributions in the electric double-layer (EDL) region depend on the nature of the ions and the characteristics of the charged electrode surface. We believe that rational design of the electrode material and device structure will enable EDL-based devices to be utilized in the separation of aqueous metal ions. On the basis of this concept, we fabricate an EDL separation (EDLS) device based on sandwich-structured N-functionalized graphene sheets (CN-GS) for selective separation of aqueous toxic heavy metal ions. We demonstrate that the EDLS enables randomly distributed soluble ions to form a coordination-driven layer and electrostatic-driven layer in the interfacial region of the CN-GS/solution. Through tuning the surface potential of the CN-GS, the effective separation of heavy metal ions (coordination-driven layer) from alkali or alkaline earth metal ions (electrostatic-driven layer) can be achieved. PMID:26481603

  4. Analysis of metal-metal contacts in RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Steffen; Voigt, Sven; Haas, Sven; Bertz, Andreas; Kaufmann, Christian; Gessner, Thomas; Akiba, Akira; Ikeda, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    This contribution reports on the analysis of metal-metal contacts of MEMS switches. A novel high aspect ratio MEMS fabrication sequence in combination with wafer level packaging is applied for fabrication of an RF MEMS switch with lateral motion. It allows for a relatively large actuation electrode area in a small package, and for high actuation force even with an actuation voltage of 5 V. The focus of this contribution is on the contact behavior. It is shown how operation conditions as like as actuation voltage, RF power, and DC bias influence the contact resistance. The power handling capability and its influence on the contacts, and the intermodulation were investigated also.

  5. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    Cyclic and acyclic polyether compounds with pendent carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, sulfonic acid, phosphinic acid and hydroxamic acid groups have been synthesized. The proton-ionizable polyethers can come with and without lipophilic groups. Two types of lipophilic di-ionizable lariat ethers have been prepared. Conformations of proton-ionizable lariat ethers have been probed. Competitive alkali metal cation transport by syn-(decyl)dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxyacetic acid and lipophilic proton-ionizable dibenzo lariat ethers in polymer-supported liquid membranes was studied. Complexation of alkali metal cations with ionized lariat ethers was studied. Condensation polymerization of cyclic and acyclic dibenzo polyethers containing pendent mono-ionizable groups with formaldehyde produces novel ion exchange resins with both ion exchange sites for metal ion complexation and polyether binding sites for metal ion recognition. Resins prepared from lariat ether dibenzo phosphonic acid monoethyl esters show strong sorption of divalent heavy metal cations with selectivity for Pb{sup 2+}.

  6. Carboxylate Ion Pairing with Alkali-Metal Ions for β-Lactoglobulin and Its Role on Aggregation and Interfacial Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Frank R; Clark, Timothy; Braunschweig, Björn; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Glas, Lena; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-30

    We report a combined experimental and computational study of the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG) in different electrolyte solutions. Vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry were used to investigate the molecular structure of BLG modified air-water interfaces as a function of LiCl, NaCl, and KCl concentrations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and thermodynamic integration provided details of the ion pairing of protein surface residues with alkali-metal cations. Our results at pH 6.2 indicate that BLG at the air-water interface forms mono- and bilayers preferably at low and high ionic strength, respectively. Results from SFG spectroscopy and ellipsometry are consistent with intimate ion pairing of alkali-metal cations with aspartate and glutamate carboxylates, which is shown to be more effective for smaller cations (Li(+) and Na(+)). MD simulations show not only carboxylate-alkali-metal ion pairs but also ion multiplets with the alkali-metal ion in a bridging position between two or more carboxylates. Consequently, alkali-metal cations can bridge carboxylates not only within a monomer but also between monomers, thus providing an important dimerization mechanism between hydrophilic surface patches. PMID:25825918

  7. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  8. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  9. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  10. Interaction between ATP, metal ions, glycine, and several minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishpon, J.; Ohara, P. J.; Lawless, J. G.; Lahav, N.

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between ATP, glycine and montmorillonite and kaolinite clay minerals in the presence of various metal cations are investigated. The adsorption of adenine nucleotides on clays and Al(OH)3 was measured as a function of pH, and glycine condensation was followed in the presence of ATP, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and either kaolinite or montmorillonite. The amounts of ATP and ADP adsorbed are found to decrease with increasing Ph, and to be considerably enhanced in experiments with Mg(2+)- and Zn(2+)-montmorillonite with respect to Na(+)-montmorillonite. The effects of divalent cations are less marked in kaolinite. Results for Al(OH)3 show the importance of adsorption at clay platelet edges at high pH. The decomposition of ATP during drying at high temperature is observed to be inhibited by small amounts of clay, vacuum, or Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions, and to be accompanied by peptide formation in the presence of glycine. Results suggest the importance of Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) in chemical evolution.

  11. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  12. Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

  13. Dual channel sensor for detection and discrimination of heavy metal ions based on colorimetric and fluorescence response of the AuNPs-DNA conjugates.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lulu; Chen, Zhengbo; Zhao, Yan; Wei, Xiangcong; Li, Yonghui; Zhang, Chi; Wei, Xinling; Hu, Xiaochen

    2016-11-15

    We have presented an extensible, facile and sensitive multidimensional sensor based on DNA-gold nanoparticle (DNA-AuNP) conjugates for heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Hg(2+), Cr(3+), Sn(4+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), and Mn(2+)) discrimination. In the presence of metal ions, the excluded effect of DNA and AuNPs with the same negative charges is disrupted, and the amount of FAM-labeled DNA adsorbed on AuNP surfaces increases, resulting in a more obvious fluorescence quenching effect. With the addition of NH2OH and HAuCl4, AuNPs grow into morphologically varied nanostructures (spherical to branched) depending on the resulting aptamer coverage, which gives rise to different colored solutions (reddish blush, purple and blue) observed by naked eyes. By simply changing the DNA sequences, three sensing elements can be easily obtained and added into this dual-channel multidimensional sensor. 9 heavy metal ions are distinguished by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and primary component analysis (PCA). A highly sensitive discrimination of metal ion targets with the detection limit as low as 50nM with 100% identification accuracy is obtained. Remarkably, Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) ions with similar catalytic performance at various concentrations (300nM, 400nM, 500nM, respectively) and the mixture of the two metal ions with different volume ratios (total metal ion concentration: 500nM) can be successfully discriminated. In addition, nine heavy metal ions are also well-distinguished in river samples, and the accuracy of discrimination of these metal ions samples reaches 100%. Therefore, it will broaden the application field of DNA-AuNP conjugates-based multidimensional sensors. PMID:27208473

  14. Injection of metallic elements into an electron-beam ion trap using a Knudsen cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, C.; Nagata, K.; Nakamura, N.; Ohtani, S.; Takahashi, S.; Tobiyama, T.; Tona, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Sakurai, M.; Kavanagh, A. P.; Currell, F. J.

    2006-06-15

    A method of injecting metallic elements into an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is described. The method is advantageous over the conventional coaxial and pulsed injection methods in two ways: (a) complicated switching of injection and extraction beams can be avoided when extracting beams of highly charged ions from the EBIT and (b) a beam of stable intensity can be achieved. This method may be applicable to any metallic elements or metallic compounds that have vapor pressures of {approx}0.1 Pa at a temperature lower than 1900 deg. C. We have employed this method for the extraction of highly charged ions of Bi, Er, Fe, and Ho.

  15. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  16. Sono-electrochemical recovery of metal ions from their aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingfeng; Fishgold, Asher; Lee, Paul; Runge, Keith; Deymier, Pierre; Keswani, Manish

    2016-11-15

    Metal recovery from aqueous waste streams is an important goal for recycling, agriculture and mining industries. The development of more effective methods of recovery have been of increasing interest. The most common methods for metal recovery include precipitation, electrochemical, ion exchange, flocculation/coagulation and filtration. In the current work, a sono-electrochemical technique employing sound field at megasonic frequency (500kHz or 1MHz) in conjunction with electrochemistry is evaluated for enhanced recovery of selected metal ions (palladium, lead and gallium) with different redox potentials from their aqueous solutions. The surface morphology and elemental composition of the metal deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The percent recovery was found to depend on the type of metal ion and the megasonic frequency used. Palladium was recovered in its metal form, while lead and gallium were oxidized during or after the recovery process. PMID:27450329

  17. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  18. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and metal ion-sensing properties of two Schiff base derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huihua; Tao, Xian; Li, Yueqin; Shen, Yingzhong; Wei, Yanhong

    2012-06-01

    Two new Schiff base derivatives {2,2'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethylene)biphenyl-4,4'-diamine} (1) and {2,2'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(salicylidene)biphenyl-4,4'-diamine} (2) were synthesized and characterized by means of elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, FT-IR, and standard spectroscopy techniques. The molecular structure of 2 has been determined by X-ray single crystal analysis. The analyses of fluorescence properties of the compounds revealed that 1 and 2 are both poorly fluorescent and display sensitive fluorescence responses to a panel of 24 monovalent, divalent, and trivalent metal ions in CH(3)CN-DMSO (9:1, v/v). Results with imine 1 showed that Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Zr(4+), Hg(2+), Cr(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), Bi(2+), Al(3+), Ce(3+), La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Nd(3+), Eu(3+) and Dy(3+) yields red shifts in emission and increases in intensity. And the greatest spectral changes for imine 2 include enhancements in emission intensity coupled with red shifts (Zr(4+), Sn(2+), Al(3+) and Zn(2+)) and strong quenching (Fe(3+)). The fluorescence enhancement mechanism of 1 and 2 for metal ions is based on: (i) CN isomerization; (ii) chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect; and (iii) excited-state intra/intermolecular proton transfer (ESPT). PMID:22387686

  20. Metal ion mediated synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers targeting tetracyclines in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guorun; Zheng, Sulian; Liu, Yumin; Xie, Wei; Wu, Aibo; Zhang, Dabing

    2009-10-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) prepared in water-containing systems are more appropriate as adsorption materials in analyte extraction from biological samples. However, water as a polar solvent involved in the synthesis of MIPs frequently disrupts non-covalent interactions, and causes non-specific binding. In this study Fe(2+) was used as mediator to prepare MIPs, targeting tetracyclines (TCs) of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC), with TC as template molecule and methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer. The subsequent binding assay indicated that Fe(2+) was responsible for substantially improved specific binding in recognition of TCs by decreasing the non-specific binding. Spectrophotometric analysis suggested the existence of the strong interactions among TC, metal ions and MAA in the mixture of methanol and water. Moreover, mass spectrometric measurements verified that Fe(2+) could bridge between TC and MAA to form a ternary complex of one TC, one Fe(2+) and four MAAs with a mass of 844.857. Furthermore, combined with molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) for sample pretreatment, HPLC-UV analysis data revealed good performance of the obtained MIPs as adsorbents. The recoveries of TC, OTC and CTC in urine samples were 80.1-91.6%, 78.4-89.3% and 78.2-86.2%, respectively. This research strategy provides an example for preparation of desirable water-compatible MIPs extracting target drugs from aqueous samples by introducing metal ion as mediator into conventional polymerization system. PMID:19726243

  1. Cytotoxicity of Metal Ions Released from Nitinol Alloys on Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, W.; Munroe, N.; Tek, V.; Gill, P. K. S.; Tang, Y.; McGoron, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Most implantable medical devices are expected to function in the body over an extended period of time. Therefore, immersion tests under simulated conditions can be useful for assessing the amount of metal ions released in situ. In this investigation, dissolved ions from as-received binary and ternary Nitinol alloys in cell culture media were periodically measured under static and dynamic conditions. Endothelial cells were grown in aliquots of culture media obtained and the effect of dissolved ions on cell proliferation and viability of endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied by cytotoxicity assays. The concentration of metal ions in the media was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  2. Plastic flow produced by single ion impacts on metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R. C.

    1998-10-30

    Single ion impacts have been observed using in situ transmission electron microscopy and video recording with a time resolution of 33 milliseconds. Gold was irradiated at 50 K and room temperature. Single ion impacts produce holes, modify existing holes, and extrude material into the initial specimen hole and holes formed by other ion impacts. The same behavior is observed at both temperatures. At both temperatures, ion impacts result in craters and ejected material. Ion impacts produce more small craters than large ones for all ion masses, while heavier mass ions produce more and larger craters than lighter mass ions. This comparison is affected by the ion energy. As the energy of an ion is increased, the probability for deposition near the surface decreases and fewer craters are formed. For a given ion mass, crater production depends on the probability for displacement cascade production in the near surface region. Crater and holes are stable at room temperature, however, ion impacts near an existing crater may cause flow of material into the crater either reshaping or annihilating it. Holes and craters result from the explosive outflow of material from the molten zone of near-surface cascades. The outflow may take the form of molten material, a solid lid or an ejected particle. The surface is a major perturbation on displacement cascades resulting from ion impacts.

  3. Metal ion levels and functional results after either resurfacing hip arthroplasty or conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potentially increased metal ion release. Patients and methods 71 patients (< 65 years old) were randomly assigned to receive either a resurfacing (R) hip arthroplasty (n = 38) or a conventional metal-on-metal (C) hip arthroplasty (n = 33). Functional outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Cobalt and chromium blood levels were analyzed preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results All functional outcome scores improved for both groups. At 12 and 24 months, the median UCLA activity score was 8 in the R patients and 7 in the C patients (p < 0.05). At 24 months, OHS was median 16 in C patients and 13 in R patients (p < 0.05). However, in spite of randomization, UCLA scores also appeared to be higher in R patients at baseline. Satisfaction was similar in both groups at 24 months. Cobalt concentrations were statistically significantly higher for R patients only at 3 and 6 months. Chromium levels remained significantly higher for R patients until 24 months. No pseudotumors were encountered in either group. One R patient was revised for early aseptic loosening and in 2 C patients a cup insert was exchanged for recurrent dislocation. Interpretation R patients scored higher on UCLA, OHS, and satisfaction at some time points; however, as for the UCLA, preoperative levels were already in favor of R. The differences, although statistically significant, were of minor clinical importance. Chromium blood levels were statistically significantly higher for R patients at all follow-up measurements, whereas for cobalt this was only observed up to 6 months. The true value of resurfacing hip arthroplasty over conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty will be determined by longer follow-up and a possible shift of balance between their

  4. Chitosan-transition metal ions complexes for selective arsenic(V) preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rakesh N; Pandey, A K; Acharya, R; Guin, R; Das, S K; Rajurkar, N S; Pujari, P K

    2013-06-15

    Chitosan is naturally occurring bio-polymer having strong affinity towards transition metal ions. Chitosan complexed with transition metal ions takes up inorganic arsenic anions from aqueous medium. In present work, As(V) sorption in the chitosan complexed with different metal ions like Cu(II), Fe(III), La(III), Mo(VI) and Zr(IV) were studied. Sorptions of As(V) in CuS embedded chitosan, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) embedded chitosan, epichlorohydrin (ECH) crosslinked chitosan and pristine chitosan were also studied. (74)As radiotracer was prepared specifically for As(V) sorption studies by irradiation of natural germanium target with 18 MeV proton beam. The sorption studies indicated that Fe(III) and La(III) complexed with chitosan sorbed 95 ± 2% As(V) from aqueous samples in the pH range of 3-9. However, Fe(III)-chitosan showed better sorption efficiency (91 ± 2%) for As(V) from seawater than La(III)-chitosan (80 ± 2%). Therefore, Fe(III)-chitosan was selected to prepare the self-supported membrane and poly(propylene) fibrous matrix supported sorbent. The experimental As(V) sorption capacities of the fibrous and self-supported Fe(III)-chitosan sorbents were found to be 51 and 109 mg g(-1), respectively. These materials were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDXRF, and used for preconcentration of As(V) in aqueous media like tap water, ground water and seawater. To quantify the As(V) preconcentrated in Fe(III)-chitosan, the samples were subjected to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using reactor neutrons. As(V) separations were carried out using a two compartments permeation cell for the self-supported membrane and flow cell using the fibrous sorbent. The total preconcentration of arsenic content was also explored by converting As(III) to As(V). PMID:23622983

  5. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  6. Biosorption of heavy metal ions to brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1998-10-01

    A fundamental study of the application of brown algae to the aqueous-phase separation of toxic heavy metals was carried out. The biosorption characteristics of cadmium and lead ions were determined with brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera, Kjellmaniella crassiforia, and Undaria pinnatifida. A metal binding model proposed by the authors was used for the description of metal binding data. The results showed that the biosorption of bivalent metal ions to brown algae was due to bivalent binding to carboxylic groups on alginic acid in brown algae.

  7. Visualizing metal ions in cells: an overview of analytical techniques, approaches, and probes

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Qin, Yan; Palmer, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the amount and defining the location of metal ions in cells and organisms are critical steps in understanding metal homeostasis and how dyshomeostasis causes or is a consequence of disease. A number of recent advances have been made in the development and application of analytical methods to visualize metal ions in biological specimens. Here, we briefly summarize these advances before focusing in more depth on probes for examining transition metals in living cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22521452

  8. Method and apparatus for providing negative ions of actinide-metal hexafluorides

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.; Reinhardt, Paul W.; Garrett, William R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel method and a novel generator, or source, for providing gaseous negative ions of selected metal hexafluorides. The method is summarized as follows: in an evacuated zone, reacting gaseous fluorine with an actinide-metal body selected from the group consisting of uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium to convert at least part of the metal to the hexafluoride state, thus producing gaseous negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions in the evacuated zone, and applying an electric field to the zone to remove the ions therefrom. The ion source comprises a chamber defining a reaction zone; means for evacuating the zone; an actinide-metal body in the zone, the metal being uranium, plutonium, neptunium, or americium; means for contacting the body with gaseous fluorine to convert at least a part thereof to the hexafluoride state; and means for applying an electric field to the evacuated zone to extract gaseous, negatively charged metal-hexafluoride ions therefrom. The invention provides unique advantages over conventional surface-ionization techniques for producing such ions.

  9. Cooperative adsorption of critical metal ions using archaeal poly-γ-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Oike, Shota; Shibata, Yuka; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Antimony, beryllium, chromium, cobalt (Co), gallium (Ga), germanium, indium (In), lithium, niobium, tantalum, the platinoids, the rare-earth elements (including dysprosium, Dy), and tungsten are generally regarded to be critical (rare) metals, and the ions of some of these metals are stabilized in acidic solutions. We examined the adsorption capacities of three water-soluble functional polymers, namely archaeal poly-γ-glutamate (L-PGA), polyacrylate (PAC), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), for six valuable metal ions (Co(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Ga(3+), In(3+), and Dy(3+)). All three polymers showed apparently little or no capacity for divalent cations, whereas L-PGA and PAC showed the potential to adsorb trivalent cations, implying the beneficial valence-dependent selectivity of anionic polyelectrolytes with multiple carboxylates for metal ions. PVA did not adsorb metal ions, indicating that the crucial role played by carboxyl groups in the adsorption of crucial metal ions cannot be replaced by hydroxyl groups under the conditions. In addition, equilibrium studies using the non-ideal competitive adsorption model indicated that the potential for L-PGA to be used for the removal (or collection) of water-soluble critical metal ions (e.g., Ga(3+), In(3+), and Dy(3+)) was far superior to that of any other industrially-versatile PAC materials. PMID:27013333

  10. Hybrid gas-metal co-implantation with a modified vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M.; Yushkov, G.Y.; Evans, P.J.; Oztarhan, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Liu, F.; MacGill, R.A.; Monteiro, O.R.; Wang, Z.

    1996-08-01

    Energetic beams of mixed metal and gaseous ion species can be generated with a vacuum arc ion source by adding gas to the arc discharge region. This could be an important tool for ion implantation research by providing a method for forming buried layers of mixed composition such as e.g. metal oxides and nitrides. In work to date, we have formed a number of mixed metal-gas ion beams including Ti+N, Pt+N, Al+O, and Zr+O. The particle current fractions of the metal-gas ion components in the beam ranged from 100% metallic to about 80% gaseous, depending on operational parameters. We have used this new variant of the vacuum arc ion source to carry out some exploratory studies of the effect of Al+O and Zr+O co-implantation on tribology of stainless steel. Here we describe the ion source modifications, species and charge state of the hybrid beams produced, and results of preliminary studies of surface modification of stainless steel by co-implantation of mixed Al/O or Zr/O ion beams. 5 figs, 21 refs.

  11. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  12. Direct insertion of metal ions into tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Linkous, C.A.; Shea, C.E.; Jaber, M.R.A. )

    1989-07-01

    A series of metal salts were reacted with aqueous solutions of the tetrasulfonated free base phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}TsPc) in an attempt to prepare the corresponding metal TsPc derivative by direct insertion instead of the usual template reaction in a urea melt. Spectrophotometric analysis showed that Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Sn{sup 2+} could be successfully inserted; higher oxidation states as well as Pb{sup 2+} caused precipitation. Reducing species such as Cr{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} reduced H{sub 2}TsPc but did not insert; Sn{sup 2+} inserted with formation of an air-sensitive intermediate species. Mg{sup 2+}, VO{sup 2+}, Pt{sup 2+}, and Hg{sup 2+} were unreactive. It is recommended that insertion may be the preferable method for synthesis of the MTsPc's listed above when air sensitivity, reaction time, and microscale are important issues in an overall synthetic scheme. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Importance of diffuse metal ion binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    RNAs are highly charged polyanionic molecules. RNA structure and function are strongly correlated with the ionic condition of the solution. The primary focus of this article is on the role of diffusive ions in RNA folding. Due to the long-range nature of electrostatic interactions, the diffuse ions can contribute significantly to RNA structural stability and folding kinetics. We present an overview of the experimental findings as well as the theoretical developments on the diffuse ion effects in RNA folding. This review places heavy emphasis on the effect of magnesium ions. Magnesium ions play a highly efficient role in stabilizing RNA tertiary structures and promoting tertiary structural folding. The highly efficient role goes beyond the mean-field effect such as the ionic strength. In addition to the effects of specific ion binding and ion dehydration, ion-ion correlation for the diffuse ions can contribute to the efficient role of the multivalent ions such as the magnesium ions in RNA folding. PMID:22010269

  14. Negative ion production by backscattering from alkali-metal surfaces bombarded by ions of hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P.J.

    1980-03-01

    Measurements have been made of the total backscattered D/sup -/ and H/sup -/ yields from thick, clean targets of Cs, Rb, K, Na, and Li, bombarded with H/sub 2//sup +/, H/sub 3//sup +/, D/sub 2//sup +/, and D/sub 3//sup +/ with incident energies from 0.15 to 4.0 keV/nucleus. All of the measurements were made at background pressures less than 10/sup -9/ Torr and the alkali-metal targets were evaporated onto a cold substrate (T = 77K) in situ to assure thick, uncontaminated targets. Measurements of the H/sup -/ yield from various transition metal targets with thin coverages of alkali-metals have also been made as a function of the surface work function. The negative ion yields are discussed in terms of the probabilities of reflection of the incident particles, of formation of the negative ion at the surface and of the survival of the negative ion leaving the surface. For each thick alkali-metal target, the negative ion yield measurements have been used in a least squares fit to determine two parameters in a theoretically derived expression for the negative ion yield. The parameters obtained from a thick Na target have been used to calculate the yield from a Cu target with thin coverage of Na (such that the surface work function is equal to thick Na).

  15. Adsorptions of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by acrylamide/maleic acid hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Gueven, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide-maleic acid (AAm/MA) hydrogels in the form of rod have been prepared by {gamma}-radiation. They have been used for adsorption of some heavy metal ions such as uranium, iron, and copper. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of maleic acid and irradiated at 3.73 kGy, maximum and minimum swellings in the aqueous solutions of the heavy metal ions have been observed with water (1480%) and the aqueous solution of iron(III) nitrate (410%), respectively. Diffusions of water and heavy metal ions onto hydrogels have been found to be of the non-Fickian type of diffusion. In experiments of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption has been found. One gram of AAa/MA hydrogels sorbed 14-86 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl acetate, 14-90 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl nitrate, 16-39 mg iron ions from solutions of iron(IV) nitrate, and 28-81 mg copper ions from solutions of copper acetate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any heavy metals ions.

  16. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yi

    2005-06-01

    In vitro selection for DNAzymes that are catalytically active with UO22+ ions as the metal cofactor has been completed. The 10th generation pool of DNA was cloned and sequenced. A total of 84 clones were sequenced and placed into families based on sequence alignments. Selected members of each family were 5-labeled with 32P and amplified using PCR. Activity assays were conducted using the isotopically labeled DNAzymes in order to determine which sequences were the most active. The secondary structures of the two most active sequences, called Clone 13 and Clone 39, were determined using the computer program Mfold. A cleavage rate of approximately 1 min-1 in the presence of 10 uM UO22+ was observed for both clones. Clone 39 was determined to be the best candidate for truncation to create a trans-cleaving DNAzyme, based on its secondary structure. An enzyme strand, called 39E, and a substrate strand, called 39DS, were designed by truncating the cis-cleaving DNAzyme. An alternative enzyme strand, called 39Ec, was also assayed with the 39DS substrate. This strand was designed so that the two binding arms were perfectly complimentary, unlike 39E, which formed three mismatched base pairs with 39DS. Both 39E and 39Ec were found to be active, with a rate of approximately 1 min-1 in the presence of 10 uM UO22+. A preliminary UO22+ binding curve was obtained for the 39Ec/39DS trans-cleaving system. The enzyme is active with UO22+ concentrations as low as 1 nM. Based on the preliminary binding curve data, the apparent UO22+ binding constant is approximately 330 nM, and kmax is approximately 1 min-1.

  17. The influence of common metal ions on the interactions of the isoflavone genistein with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Chatterjee, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of genistein with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been characterized via UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements under physiological conditions. In this study, we have investigated the effect of some common metal ions on the binding of genistein with BSA using fluorescence studies. The fluorescence data reveal that the binding affinity of genistein to BSA increases in presence of certain metal ions. The possibility of non-radiative energy transition from the donor tryptophan to the acceptor genistein has been observed in absence and presence of metal ions. The observed similarities in the values of efficiency of energy transfer (E) and the separation between the donor and acceptor (r) in both the cases may be correlated with the complexation between the genistein and metal ions, which is also observed from the UV-vis studies. The changes in enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) of the interaction were found to be -14.64 kJ mol-1 and +42.75 J mol-1 K-1 respectively. These values indicate the involvement of electrostatic interactions along with a hydrophobic association that results in a positive entropy change. CD analysis shows that there is a slight increase in the% α-helical content of BSA on binding with genistein at lower molar ratios. Warfarin and ibuprofen displacement studies in accordance with the molecular docking show that genistein binds to site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy of Metal Ion Complexes: Models for Metal Ligand Interactions and Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Weakly bound complexes of the form M^+-Lx (M=Fe, Ni, Co, etc.; L=CO2, C2H2, H2O, benzene, N2) are prepared in supersonic molecular beams by laser vaporization in a pulsed-nozzle cluster source. These species are mass analyzed and size-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Clusters are photodissociated at infrared wavelengths with a Nd:YAG pumped infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser or with a tunable infrared free-electron laser. M^+-(CO2)x complexes absorb near the free CO2 asymmetric stretch near 2349 cm-1 but with an interesting size dependent variation in the resonances. Small clusters have blue-shifted resonances, while larger complexes have additional bands due to surface CO2 molecules not attached to the metal. M^+(C2H2)n complexes absorb near the C-H stretches in acetylene, but resonances in metal complexes are red-shifted with repect to the isolated molecule. Ni^+ and Co^+ complexes with acetylene undergo intracluster cyclization reactions to form cyclobutadiene. Transition metal water complexes are studied in the O-H stretch region, and partial rotational structure can be measured. M^+(benzene) and M^+(benzene)2 ions (M=V, Ti, Al) represent half-sandwich and sandwich species, whose spectra are measured near the free benzene modes. These new IR spectra and their assignments will be discussed as well as other new IR spectra for similar complexes.

  19. Electronic states of M-DNA incorporated with divalent metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    DNA has attracted much interest as a material for nano science and technology. To unveil the intrinsic nature of DNA both in natural form and modified forms of M-DNA with a variety of divalent metal ions. From the magnetic and optical properties, it is concluded that the electronic states of natural salmon DNA is of semiconducting. Thus, only the hopping transport via excited states or impurity site like oxygens is expected. One of the efforts to introduce charge carriers into DNA, insertion of divalent metal ions, has been studied from magnetic, optical and structural aspects. It was concluded that the divalent metal ions are inserted in between the bases of a base pair, in place of hydrogen bonds, and the charge transfer from the metal ions to DNA occurs only in the case of Fe-DNA.

  20. The effect of metal ions on Staphylococcus aureus revealed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Chudobova, Dagmar; Dostalova, Simona; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Guran, Roman; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Tmejova, Katerina; Krizkova, Sona; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of heavy metal ions in resistant strains of gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus using biochemical methods and mass spectrometry. Five nitrate solutions of heavy metals (Ag(+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+)) were used to create S. aureus resistant strains. Biochemical changes of resistant strains in comparison with the non-resistant control strain of S. aureus were observed by microbiological (measuring - growth curves and inhibition zones) and spectrophotometric methods (antioxidant activity and alaninaminotransferase, aspartateaminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase activities). Mass spectrometry was employed for the qualitative analysis of the samples (changes in S. aureus protein composition) and for the identification of the strains database MALDI Biotyper was employed. Alterations, in terms of biochemical properties and protein composition, were observed in resistant strains compared to non-resistant control strain. Our results describe the possible option for the analysis of S. aureus resistant strains and may thus serve as a support for monitoring of changes in genetic information caused by the forming of resistance to heavy metals. PMID:25189671

  1. Pure ion current collection in ion sensitive probe measurement with a metal mesh guard electrode for evaluation of ion temperature in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Kawamori, Eiichirou; Nishida, Yasushi

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a new design of ion sensitive probe (ISP) that enables collection of pure ion current for accurate measurement of the perpendicular ion temperature in magnetized plasmas. The new type of ISP resolves a longstanding issue widely observed in ISP type measurements, namely, that the current-voltage characteristic is smeared by an unexpected electron current in the standard ISP model. The new ISP is equipped with a fine scale metal mesh on the sensor entrance to prevent electrons from flowing to the sensor, a phenomenon considered to be caused by the space-charge effect. The new ISP successfully measured the ion temperature of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

  2. Pure ion current collection in ion sensitive probe measurement with a metal mesh guard electrode for evaluation of ion temperature in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Kawamori, Eiichirou; Nishida, Yasushi

    2013-02-15

    This paper presents a new design of ion sensitive probe (ISP) that enables collection of pure ion current for accurate measurement of the perpendicular ion temperature in magnetized plasmas. The new type of ISP resolves a longstanding issue widely observed in ISP type measurements, namely, that the current-voltage characteristic is smeared by an unexpected electron current in the standard ISP model. The new ISP is equipped with a fine scale metal mesh on the sensor entrance to prevent electrons from flowing to the sensor, a phenomenon considered to be caused by the space-charge effect. The new ISP successfully measured the ion temperature of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

  3. Advanced analysis of metal distributions in human hair

    SciTech Connect

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Skinner, William M.

    2008-06-09

    A variety of techniques (secondary electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence) were utilized to distinguish metal contamination occurring in hair arising from endogenous uptake from an individual exposed to a polluted environment, in this case a lead smelter. Evidence was sought for elements less affected by contamination and potentially indicative of biogenic activity. The unique combination of surface sensitivity, spatial resolution, and detection limits used here has provided new insight regarding hair analysis. Metals such as Ca, Fe, and Pb appeared to have little representative value of endogenous uptake and were mainly due to contamination. Cu and Zn, however, demonstrate behaviors worthy of further investigation into relating hair concentrations to endogenous function.

  4. A comprehensive platform to investigate protein-metal ion interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; Albishri, Hassan M; Abd El-Hady, Deia; Redweik, Sabine; El Deeb, Sami; Wätzig, Hermann

    2015-03-25

    In this work, the behavior of several metal ions with different globular proteins was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Screening was conducted by applying a proper rinsing protocol developed by our group. The use of 0.1M EDTA in the rinsing solution successfully desorbs metal ions from the capillary wall. The mobility ratio was used to evaluate the precision of the method. Excellent precision for repeated runs was achieved for different protein metal ion interactions (RSD% of 0.05-1.0%). Run times were less than 6 min for all of the investigated interactions. The method has been successfully applied for the interaction study of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Pd(2+), Ir(3+), Ru(3+), Rh(3+), Pt(2+), Pt(4+), Os(3+), Au(3+), Au(+), Ag(+), Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cr(3+), V(3+), MoO4(2-) and SeO3(2-) with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and myoglobin. Different interaction values were obtained for most of the tested metal ions even for that in the same metal group. Results were discussed and compared in view of metal and semimetal group's interaction behavior with the tested proteins. The calculated normalized difference of mobility ratios for each protein-metal ion interaction and its sign (positive and negative) has been successfully used to detect the interaction and estimate further coordination of the bound metal ion, respectively. The comprehensive platform summarizes all the obtained interaction results, and is valuable for any future protein-metal ion investigation. PMID:25638307

  5. High-energy metal ion implantation for reduction of surface resistivity of alumina ceramica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushenets, V. I.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, the possibility to increase the surface conductivity of ceramic insulators through their treatment with accelerated metal ion beams produced by a MevvaV.Ru vacuum arc source is demonstrated. The increase in surface conductivity is made possible due to experimental conditions in which an insulated collector is charged by beam ions to a potential many times lower than the accelerating voltage, and hence, than the average beam ion energy. The observed effect of charge neutralization of the accelerated ion beam is presumably associated with electrons knocked out of the electrodes of the accelerating system of the source and of the walls of the vacuum chamber by the accelerated ions.

  6. Selective fluorescence sensors for detection of nitroaniline and metal Ions based on ligand-based luminescent metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zongchao; Wang, Fengqin; Lin, Xiangyi; Wang, Chengmiao; Fu, Yiyuan; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yongnan; Li, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials with high potential for applications in fluorescence sensors. In this work, two solvent-induced Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks, Zn3L3(DMF)2 (1) and Zn3L3(DMA)2(H2O)3 (2) (L=4,4‧-stilbenedicarboxylic acid), were investigated as selective sensing materials for detection of nitroaromatic compounds and metal ions. The sensing experiments show that 1 and 2 both exhibit selective fluorescence quenching toward nitroaniline with a low detection limit. In addition, 1 exhibits high selectivity for detection of Fe3+ and Al3+ by significant fluorescence quenching or enhancement effect. While for 2, it only exhibits significant fluorescence quenching effect for Fe3+. The results indicate that 1 and 2 are both promising fluorescence sensors for detecting and recognizing nitroaniline and metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  7. The abilities of selenium dioxide and selenite ion to coordinate DNA-bound metal ions and decrease oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hart, William E; Marczak, Steven P; Kneller, Andrew R; French, Robert A; Morris, Daniel L

    2013-08-01

    Several transition metals react with H2O2 and produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for oxidative damage linked to many diseases and disorders, and species that form coordination complexes with these metal ions show promise as antioxidants. The present study demonstrates that metal-mediated radical and non-radical oxidative DNA damage decreases when selenium dioxide (SeO2) and sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) are present. Radical-induced damage is associated with production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), which arises from ROS generated at or near the guanine base, and the selenium compounds reduce Fe(II)-, Cr(III)- and Cu(II)-mediated radical damage to differing degrees based on the identity of the metal ion and the order in which the metals, selenium compounds and DNA are combined. Radical damage arising from Fe(II) and Cr(III) decreases substantially when they are pre-incubated with the selenium compounds prior to adding DNA. Non-radical damage is associated with oxidation of the adenine base in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations through an ionic mechanism, and this type of damage also decreases significantly when the selenium compounds are allowed to interact with the metal ions before adding DNA. Fluorescence studies using dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) to probe ROS formation indicate that the majority of the SeO2- and SeO3(2-)-metal systems in combination with H2O2 (no DNA present) produce ROS to the same degree as the metal/H2O2 systems in the absence of the selenium compounds, suggesting that selenium-metal complexes react with H2O2 in a sacrificial manner that protects DNA from oxidative damage. PMID:23628661

  8. Biosorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by red macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wael M

    2011-09-15

    Biosorption is an effective process for the removal and recovery of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The biomass of marine algae has been reported to have high biosorption capacities for a number of heavy metal ions. In this study, four species of red seaweeds Corallina mediterranea, Galaxaura oblongata, Jania rubens and Pterocladia capillacea were examined to remove Co(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. The experimental parameters that affect the biosorption process such as pH, contact time and biomass dosage were studied. The maximum biosorption capacity of metal ions was 105.2mg/g at biomass dosage 10 g/L, pH 5 and contact time 60 min. The biosorption efficiency of algal biomass for the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial wastewater was evaluated for two successive cycles. Galaxaura oblongata biomass was relatively more efficient to remove metal ions with mean biosorption efficiency of 84%. This study demonstrated that these seaweeds constitute a promising, efficient, cheap and biodegradable sorbent biomaterial for lowering the heavy metal pollution in the environment. PMID:21798665

  9. Highly selective monitoring of metals by using ion-imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Hande, Pankaj E; Samui, Asit B; Kulkarni, Prashant S

    2015-05-01

    Ion imprinting technology is one of the most promising tools in separation and purification sciences because of its high selectivity, good stability, simplicity and low cost. It has been mainly used for selective removal, preconcentration, sensing and few miscellaneous fields. In this review article, recent methodologies in the synthesis of IIPs have been discussed. For several applications, different parameters of IIP including complexing and leaching agent, pH, relative selectivity coefficient, detection limit and adsorption capacity have been evaluated and an attempt has been made to generalize. Biomedical applications mostly include selective removal of toxic metals from human blood plasma and urine samples. Wastewater treatment involves selective removal of highly toxic metal ions like Hg(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), As(V), etc. Preconcentration covers recovery of economically important metal ions such as gold, silver, platinum and palladium. It also includes selective preconcentration of lanthanides and actinides. In sensing, various IIP-based sensors have been fabricated for detection of toxic metal ions. This review article includes almost all metal ions based on the ion-imprinted polymer. At the end, the future outlook section presents the discussion on the advancement, corresponding merits and the need of continued research in few specific areas. Graphical Abstract IIPs for the selective monitoring of metals. PMID:25663338

  10. Fast esterification of spent grain for enhanced heavy metal ions adsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzhu; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Qingwei; Yang, Zhihui; Yan, Huxiang; Wang, Yunyan

    2010-05-01

    This work describes a novel method for fast esterification of spent grain to enhance its cationic adsorption capacity. The esterification of spent grain with citric acid was achieved by using sodium hypophosphite monohydrate (NaH(2)PO(2).H(2)O) as a catalyst in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis revealed the formation of ester groups after esterification, demonstrating that spent grain was successfully esterified with citric acid. The adsorption capacity of esterified spent grain (ESG) for each metal ion was greatly improved as compared with that of raw spent grain (RSG). Typically, Pb(2+) adsorption capacity increased from 125.84mg g(-1) of RSG to 293.30mg g(-1) of ESG. This increase can be attributed to both the formation of ester linkage and the grafting of carboxyl groups on spent grain. The results suggest that a fast process for esterification of spent grain has been realized and ESG has strong ability to adsorb heavy metal ions. PMID:20110169

  11. Effect of heavy metal ions on neutrophil arachidonic acid metabolism and chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Turner, S.R.; Johnson, J.A.; Turner, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup +3/, Zn/sup +2/, Cr/sup +3/, Mn/sup +2/, and Cu/sup +2/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored both qualitatively by thin-layer chromatography of /sup 3/H-AA metabolities and quantitatively by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-Met-Leu-Phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid production. In contrast to previous reports, the data obtained using Au/sup +3/ and Cu/sup +2/ demonstrates no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  12. Effects of mono- and divalent metal ions on DNA binding and catalysis of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, Anastasia D; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Fedorova, Olga S

    2016-05-26

    Here, we used stopped-flow fluorescence techniques to conduct a comparative kinetic analysis of the conformational transitions in human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) and in DNA containing an abasic site in the course of their interaction. Effects of monovalent (K(+)) and divalent (Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Ni(2+)) metal ions on DNA binding and catalytic stages were studied. It was shown that the first step of substrate binding (corresponding to formation of a primary enzyme-substrate complex) does not depend on the concentration (0.05-5.0 mM) or the nature of divalent metal ions. In contrast, the initial DNA binding efficiency significantly decreased at a high concentration (5-250 mM) of monovalent K(+) ions, indicating the involvement of electrostatic interactions in this stage. It was also shown that Cu(2+) ions abrogated the DNA binding ability of APE1, possibly, due to a strong interaction with DNA bases and the sugar-phosphate backbone. In the case of Ca(2+) ions, the catalytic activity of APE1 was lost completely with retention of binding potential. Thus, the enzymatic activity of APE1 is increased in the order Zn(2+) < Ni(2+) < Mn(2+) < Mg(2+). Circular dichroism spectra and calculation of the contact area between APE1 and DNA reveal that Mg(2+) ions stabilize the protein structure and the enzyme-substrate complex. PMID:27063150

  13. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-07-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ˜ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi0.85Co0.15O2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  14. Ion exchange during heavy metal bio-sorption from aqueous solution by dried biomass of macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Verma, V K; Tewari, Saumyata; Rai, J P N

    2008-04-01

    In this study, potentials of oven dried biomass of Eichhornia crassipes, Valisneria spiralis and Pistia stratiotes, were examined in terms of their heavy metal (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb) sorption capacity, from individual-metal and multi-metal aqueous solutions at pH 6.0+/-0.1 (a popular pH of industrial effluent). V. spiralis was the most and E. crassipes was the least efficient for removal of all the metals. Cd, Pb and Zn were efficiently removed by all the three biomass. Cd was removed up to 98% by V. spiralis. Sorption data for Cr, Ni and Cd fitted better to Langmuir isotherm equation, while, the sorption data for Pb, Zn and Cu fitted better to Freundlich isotherm equation. In general, the presence of other metal ions did not influence significantly the targeted metal sorption capacity of the test plant biomasses. Ion exchange was proven the main mechanism involved in bio-sorption and there was a strong ionic balance between adsorbed (H(+) and M(2+)) to the released ions (Na(+) and K(+)) to and from the biomass. No significant difference was observed in the metal exchanged amount, by doubling of metal concentration (15-30 mg/l) in the solution and employing individual-metal and multi-metal solutions. PMID:17513104

  15. Property enchancement of polyimide films by way of the incorporation of lanthanide metal ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Lanthanide metal ions were incorporated into the polyimide derived from 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) and 1,3-bis(aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) in an attempt to produce molecular level metal-polymer composites. The lanthanide series of metal ions (including aluminum, scandium, and yttrium) provide discrete and stable metal ions in the 3+ oxidation state. Throughout the series there is a uniform variation in ionic size ranging from 50 pm for aluminum to a maximum of 103.4 pm for cerium and gradually decreasing again to 84.8 pm for lutetium. The high charge-to-size ratio for these ions as well as the ability to obtain large coordination numbers makes them excellent candidates for interacting with the polymer substructure. The distinct lack of solubility of simple lanthanide salts such as the acetates and halides has made it difficult to obtain metal ions distributed in the polymer framework as discrete ions or metal complexes rather than microcomposites of metal clusters. (Lanthanum nitrates are quite soluble, but the presence of the strongly oxidizing nitrate ion leads to serious degradation of the polymer upon thermal curing. This work was successful at extending the range of soluble metals salts by using chelating agents derived from the beta-diketones dipivaloylmethane, dibenzoylmethane, trifluoroacetylacetone, and hexafluoroacetylacetone. Metal acetates which are insoluble in dimethylacetamide dissolve readily in the presence of the diketones. Addition of the polyimide yields a homogeneous resin which is then cast into a clear film. Upon curing clear films were obtained with the dibenzoylmethane and trifluoroacetylacetone ligands. The dipavaloylmethane precipitates the metal during the film casting process, and hexafluoroacetylacetone gives cured films which are deformed and brittle. These clear films are being evaluated for the effect of the metal ions on the coefficient of thermal expansion, resistance to atomic oxygen, and on

  16. A sensitive electrochemical sensor using an iron oxide/graphene composite for the simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sohee; Oh, Jiseop; Kim, Dongwon; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2016-11-01

    We report an analytical assessment of an iron oxide (Fe2O3)/graphene (G) nanocomposite electrode used in combination with in situ plated bismuth (Bi) working as an electrochemical sensor for the determination of trace Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+). The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analyzer, and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the Fe2O3/G/Bi composite modified electrode were investigated. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was applied for the detection of metal ions. Due to the synergetic effect between graphene and the Fe2O3 nanoparticles, the modified electrode showed improved electrochemical catalytic activity high sensitivity toward trace heavy metal ions. Several parameters such as the preconcentration potential, bismuth concentration, preconcentration time, and pH were carefully optimized to determine the target metal ions. Under optimized conditions, the linear range of the electrode was 1-100μgL(-1) for Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+), and the detection limits were 0.11μgL(-1), 0.08μgL(-1), and 0.07μgL(-1), respectively (S/N =3). Repeatability (% RSD) was found to be 1.68% for Zn(2+), 0.92% for Cd(2+), and 1.69% for Pb(2+) for single sensor with 10 measurements and 0.89% for Zn(2+), 1.15% for Cd(2+), and 0.91% for Pb(2+) for 5 different electrodes. The Fe2O3/G/Bi composite electrode was successfully applied to the analysis of trace metal ions in real samples. The solventless thermal decomposition method applied to the simple and easy synthesis of nanocomposite electrode materials can be extended to the synthesis of nanocomposites and promising electrode materials for the determination of heavy metal ions. PMID:27591647

  17. Synthesis, composition, and ion-exchange behavior of thermally stable Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates: separation of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Premadas, A.

    1981-01-01

    Two new inorganic ion-exchange materials, Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates, have been synthesized. They are reproducible in behavior and possess excellent thermal stability. Their tentative structures have been proposed based on pH titrations, thermogravimetry, chemical analysis, ir studies, and other ion-exchange properties. Distribution studies of some metal ions have also been made on the basis of which several useful binary separations have been achieved such as Fe(III) from VO(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II); Pb(II) from Cu(II), Hg(II), and Zn(II); Ti(IV) from UO/sub 2/(II) and Ce(IV); and Mg(II) from Sr(II) and Ba(II).

  18. SUMMARY REPORT: CONTROL AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR THE METAL FINISHING INDUSTRY: ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Transfer ummary Report is one of a series of reports that summarizes a pollution control technology for the metal finishing industry. he 45-page report is intended to promote an understanding of the use of ion exchange in the metal finishing industry. The sections...

  19. Density functional study of isoguanine tetrad and pentad sandwich complexes with alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael; Steinke, Thomas; Sühnel, Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Isoguanine tetraplexes and pentaplexes contain two or more stacked polyads with intercalating metal ions. We report here the results of a density functional study of sandwiched isoguanine tetrad and pentad complexes consisting of two polyads with Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+) ions at the B3LYP level. In comparison to single polyad metal ion complexes, there is a trend towards increased non-planarity of the polyads in the sandwich complexes. In general, the pentad sandwiches have relatively planar polyad structures, whereas the tetrad complexes contain highly non-planar polyad building blocks. As in other sandwich complexes and in metal ion complexes with single polyads, the metal ion-base interaction energy plays an essential role. In iG sandwich structures, this interaction energy is slightly larger than in the corresponding guanine sandwich complexes. Because the base-base interaction energy is even more increased in passing from guanine to isoguanine, the isoguanine sandwiches are thus far the only examples where the base-base interaction energy is larger than the base-metal ion interaction energy. Stacking interactions have been studied in smaller models consisting of two bases, retaining the geometry from the complete complex structures. From the data obtained at the B3LYP and BH&H levels and with Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, one can conclude that the B3LYP method overestimates the repulsion in stacked base dimers. For the complexes studied in this work, this is only of minor importance because the direct inter-tetrad or inter-pentad interaction is supplemented by a strong metal ion-base interaction. Using a microsolvation model, the metal ion preference K(+) approximately Rb(+) > Na(+) is found for tetrad complexes. On the other hand, for pentads the ordering is Rb(+) > K(+) > Na(+). In the latter case experimental data are available that agree with this prediction. PMID:17013632

  20. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  1. Reconsideration of metal surface sputtering due to bombardment of high-energy argon ion particles: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh; Donbosco, Ferdin S.

    2016-03-01

    Some interesting aspects of metal surface sputtering phenomenon are numerically investigated in this work using the molecular dynamics approach. Along with that, we have carried out a critical analysis of the interaction potentials typically used for modeling. Two metallic surfaces, viz., copper, Cu(100), and nickel, Ni(100), are chosen for study that are bombarded by argon ions at various energies and angles of projection. The sputtering yield is calculated by performing molecular dynamics simulations, and the same is compared with experiments and theoretical predictions wherever possible. Furthermore, other interesting parameters like the kinetic energy, velocity, and scattering angle distribution for sputtered and incident atoms are presented and discussed. Through different case studies, the present work emphasizes on the importance of interaction model used for metal surface modeling for a realistic numerical reproduction of the complex metal surface sputtering process.

  2. Inhibition of transcription factor IIIA-DNA interactions by xenobiotic metal ions.

    PubMed

    Hanas, J S; Gunn, C G

    1996-03-01

    Transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a cysteine-rich regulatory protein, is the prototype for the largest known superfamily of eukaryotic transcription factors. Members of the TFIIIA superfamily contain Cys2His2 zinc finger domains responsible for nucleic acid binding. Xenobiotic metal ions, which lack known biological function, were previously used as probes for the structure and function of steroid hormone receptors which contain Cys2Cys2 zinc finger domains. Structural alterations in cysteine-rich regulatory proteins by such ions in vivo might potentiate carcinogenesis and other disease processes. In the present study cadmium and other xenobiotic metal ions were used to probe the structure and function of TFIIIA. The specific interaction of TFIIIA with the internal control region (ICR) of the 5S RNA gene, as assayed by DNase I protection, was inhibited by Cd2+ ion concentrations of > or = 0.1 microM. Aluminum ions were also found to inhibit the TFIIIA-5S RNA gene interaction, albeit at higher concentrations (> or = 5 microM). Inhibition by either metal ion was not readily reversible. Other xenobiotic metal ions, such as mercury or cesium, were not found to be inhibitory under these conditions. None of these ions at the concentrations used in this study affected the ability of DNase I to digest DNA or restriction enzymes to specifically cleave DNA. Preincubation of TFIIIA bound to 5S RNA with either Cd2+ or Al3+ resulted in subsequent DNA binding upon dilution and RNA removal, whereas preincubation of free TFIIIA with the metal ions resulted in inhibition of subsequent DNA binding. Because 5S rRNA also binds the TFIIIA zinc finger domains, these results indicate that the 5S RNA bound to TFIIIA protects the protein from metal inhibition and implicates the zinc fingers in the inhibition mechanism. The nature of the footprint inhibition indicates that the N-terminal fingers of TFIIIA are affected by the metal ions. Cd2+ and Al3+ ions also inhibited the ability of

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro. PMID:25212818

  4. Inhibition of transcription factor IIIA-DNA interactions by xenobiotic metal ions.

    PubMed Central

    Hanas, J S; Gunn, C G

    1996-01-01

    Transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a cysteine-rich regulatory protein, is the prototype for the largest known superfamily of eukaryotic transcription factors. Members of the TFIIIA superfamily contain Cys2His2 zinc finger domains responsible for nucleic acid binding. Xenobiotic metal ions, which lack known biological function, were previously used as probes for the structure and function of steroid hormone receptors which contain Cys2Cys2 zinc finger domains. Structural alterations in cysteine-rich regulatory proteins by such ions in vivo might potentiate carcinogenesis and other disease processes. In the present study cadmium and other xenobiotic metal ions were used to probe the structure and function of TFIIIA. The specific interaction of TFIIIA with the internal control region (ICR) of the 5S RNA gene, as assayed by DNase I protection, was inhibited by Cd2+ ion concentrations of > or = 0.1 microM. Aluminum ions were also found to inhibit the TFIIIA-5S RNA gene interaction, albeit at higher concentrations (> or = 5 microM). Inhibition by either metal ion was not readily reversible. Other xenobiotic metal ions, such as mercury or cesium, were not found to be inhibitory under these conditions. None of these ions at the concentrations used in this study affected the ability of DNase I to digest DNA or restriction enzymes to specifically cleave DNA. Preincubation of TFIIIA bound to 5S RNA with either Cd2+ or Al3+ resulted in subsequent DNA binding upon dilution and RNA removal, whereas preincubation of free TFIIIA with the metal ions resulted in inhibition of subsequent DNA binding. Because 5S rRNA also binds the TFIIIA zinc finger domains, these results indicate that the 5S RNA bound to TFIIIA protects the protein from metal inhibition and implicates the zinc fingers in the inhibition mechanism. The nature of the footprint inhibition indicates that the N-terminal fingers of TFIIIA are affected by the metal ions. Cd2+ and Al3+ ions also inhibited the ability of

  5. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  6. Site-specific cleavage by metal ion cofactors and inhibitors of M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kazakov, S; Altman, S

    1991-01-01

    The location of phosphate residues involved in specific centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA, the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli, was determined by analysis of induction of cleavage of RNA by metal ions. At pH 9.5, Mg2+ catalyzes cleavage of M1 RNA at five principal sites. Under certain conditions, Mn2+ and Ca2+ can each replace Mg2+ as the cofactor in the processing of precursor tRNAs by M1 RNA and P RNA, the RNA subunit of RNase P from Bacillus subtilis. These cations, as well as various metal ion inhibitors of the catalytic activity of M1 RNA, also promote cleavage of M1 RNA in a specific manner. Certain conditions that affect the catalytic activity of M1 RNA also alter the rate of metal ion-induced cleavage at the various sites. From these results and a comparison of cleavage of M1 RNA with that of a deletion mutant of M1 RNA and of P RNA, we have identified two different centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA that are important for the processing of the precursor to tRNA(Tyr) from E. coli. There is also a center for the binding of metal ions in the substrate, close to the site of cleavage by M1 RNA. Images PMID:1718000

  7. ERD studies of D-ion depth distributions after implantation into some pure metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Wilczynska, T.; Kitowski, K.; Hofman, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a report on experimental results of depth distributions of deuterium ions implanted with 25 keV energy at a fluence interval of (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2 into samples of pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh). The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium and hydrogen atoms were measured within a few hours after implantation with the use of elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis. After three months the measurements were repeated. The comparison of the obtained results in both series of studies allowed us to make an important observation of the desorption rates of implanted deuterium atoms from pure metals and diluted Pd alloys. The maximum measured concentrations of deuterium atoms in pure Zr and Ti foils with relatively small desorption rate of deuterium atoms within three months after implantation were observed. Also a very high spreading of deuterium atom distributions was observed in all the measured pure metals and alloys. It can be explained by the large diffusion coefficients of deuterium and extremely fast kinetics.

  8. Hydrogen transport through oxide metal surface under atom and ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Dvoychenkova, O.; Evsin, A.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya; Schitov, N.; Vergasov, S.; Yurkov, D.

    2014-11-01

    Both the latest and earlier achieved results on gas exchange processes on metal surfaces (including stainless steel, titanium, zirconium, tungsten with deposited aluminum oxide coating) under hydrogen atom or plasma irradiation with occasional oxygen impurity are presented in the paper. Mechanisms and regularities of these processes are discussed. It is demonstrated that surface oxide layer properties as a diffusion barrier strongly depend on external influence on the surface. In particular, it is revealed that low energy hydrogen ion irradiation could slow down hydrogen desorption from metals. Hydrogen atom or ion irradiation combined with simultaneous oxygen admixture accelerates hydrogen desorption from metals.

  9. Sub-millimeter Spectroscopy of Astrophysically Important Molecules and Ions: Metal Hydrides, Halides, and Cyanides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Flory, M. A.; Halfen, D. T.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of SOFIA, Herschel, and SAFIR, new wavelength regions will become routinely accessible for astronomical spectroscopy, particularly at submm frequencies (0.5-1.1 THz). Molecular emission dominates the spectra of dense interstellar gas at these wavelengths. Because heterodyne detectors are major instruments of these missions, accurate knowledge of transition frequencies is crucial for their success. The Ziurys spectroscopy laboratory has been focusing on the measurement of the pure rotational transitions of astrophysically important molecules in the sub-mm regime. Of particular interest have been metal hydride species and their ions, as well as metal halides and cyanides. A new avenue of study has included metal bearing molecular ions.

  10. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  11. Colorimetric photonic hydrogel aptasensor for the screening of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bao-Fen; Zhao, Yuan-Jin; Cheng, Yao; Li, Ting-Ting; Xie, Zhuo-Ying; Zhao, Xiang-Wei; Gu, Zhong-Ze

    2012-09-28

    We have developed a robust method for the visual detection of heavy metal ions (such as Hg(2+) and Pb(2+)) by using aptamer-functionalized colloidal photonic crystal hydrogel (CPCH) films. The CPCHs were derived from a colloidal crystal array of monodisperse silica nanoparticles, which were polymerized within the polyacrylamide hydrogel. The heavy metal ion-responsive aptamers were then cross-linked in the hydrogel network. During detection, the specific binding of heavy metal ions and cross-linked single-stranded aptamers in the hydrogel network caused the hydrogel to shrink, which was detected as a corresponding blue shift in the Bragg diffraction peak position of the CPCHs. The shift value could be used to estimate, quantitatively, the amount of the target ion. It was demonstrated that our CPCH aptasensor could screen a wide concentration range of heavy metal ions with high selectivity and reversibility. In addition, these aptasensors could be rehydrated from dried gels for storage and aptamer protection. It is anticipated that our technology may also be used in the screening of a broad range of metal ions in food, drugs and the environment. PMID:22936101

  12. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor based on specific oligonucleotide probes for heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan; Wu, Chao; Tan, Hui; Wu, Yan; Liao, Shuzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to enhance the capability of metal ions disturbing the orientation of liquid crystals (LCs), we designed a new label-free LC biosensor for the highly selective and sensitive detection of heavy metal ions. This strategy makes use of the target-induced DNA conformational change to enhance the disruption of target molecules for the orientation of LC leading to an amplified optical signal. The Hg(2+) ion, which possesses a unique property to bind specifically to two DNA thymine (T) bases, is used as a model heavy metal ion. In the presence of Hg(2+), the specific oligonucleotide probes form a conformational reorganization of the oligonucleotide probes from hairpin structure to duplex-like complexes. The duplex-like complexes are then bound on the triethoxysilylbutyraldehyde/N,N-dimethyl-N-octadecyl (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilyl chloride (TEA/DMOAP)-coated substrate modified with capture probes, which can greatly distort the orientational profile of LC, making the optical image of LC cell birefringent as a result. The optical signal of LC sensor has a visible change at the Hg(2+) concentration of low to 0.1 nM, showing good detection sensitivity. The cost-effective LC sensing method can translate the concentration signal of heavy metal ions in solution into the presence of DNA duplexes and is expected to be a sensitive detection platform for heavy metal ions and other small molecule monitors. PMID:23214408

  13. Predicting relative toxicity and interactions of divalent metal ions: Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence assay

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Both relative toxicity and interactions between paired metal ions were predicted with least-squares linear regression and various ion characteristics. Microtox{reg_sign} 15 min EC50s (expressed as free ion) for Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Mg(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were most effectively modeled with the constant for the first hydrolysis (K{sub H} for M{sup n+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} MOH{sup a{minus}1} + H{sup +}) although other ion characteristics were also significant in regression models. The {vert_bar}log K{sub H}{vert_bar} is correlated with metal ion affinity to intermediate ligands such as many biochemical functional groups with O donor atoms. Further, ordination of metals according to ion characteristics, e.g., {vert_bar}log K{sub H}{vert_bar} facilitated prediction of paired metal interactions. Pairing metals with strong tendencies to complex with intermediate or soft ligands such as those with O or S donor atoms resulted in strong interactions.

  14. Metal ion-dependent, reversible, protein filament formation by designed beta-roll polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Scotter, Andrew J; Guo, Meng; Tomczak, Melanie M; Daley, Margaret E; Campbell, Robert L; Oko, Richard J; Bateman, David A; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Sykes, Brian D; Davies, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Background A right-handed, calcium-dependent β-roll structure found in secreted proteases and repeat-in-toxin proteins was used as a template for the design of minimal, soluble, monomeric polypeptides that would fold in the presence of Ca2+. Two polypeptides were synthesised to contain two and four metal-binding sites, respectively, and exploit stacked tryptophan pairs to stabilise the fold and report on the conformational state of the polypeptide. Results Initial analysis of the two polypeptides in the presence of calcium suggested the polypeptides were disordered. The addition of lanthanum to these peptides caused aggregation. Upon further study by right angle light scattering and electron microscopy, the aggregates were identified as ordered protein filaments that required lanthanum to polymerize. These filaments could be disassembled by the addition of a chelating agent. A simple head-to-tail model is proposed for filament formation that explains the metal ion-dependency. The model is supported by the capping of one of the polypeptides with biotin, which disrupts filament formation and provides the ability to control the average length of the filaments. Conclusion Metal ion-dependent, reversible protein filament formation is demonstrated for two designed polypeptides. The polypeptides form filaments that are approximately 3 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length. They are not amyloid-like in nature as demonstrated by their behaviour in the presence of congo red and thioflavin T. A capping strategy allows for the control of filament length and for potential applications including the "decoration" of a protein filament with various functional moieties. PMID:17908326

  15. Process analysis using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, J I

    2006-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry, originally used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives and illegal drugs, is now frequently applied in the field of process analytics. The method combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng to pg per liter and ppb(v)/ppt(v) ranges) and relatively low technical expenditure with a high-speed data acquisition. In this paper, the working principles of IMS are summarized with respect to the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Different ionization techniques, sample introduction methods and preseparation methods are considered. Proven applications of different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) used at ISAS will be discussed in detail: monitoring of gas insulated substations, contamination in water, odoration of natural gas, human breath composition and metabolites of bacteria. The example applications discussed relate to purity (gas insulated substations), ecology (contamination of water resources), plants and person safety (odoration of natural gas), food quality control (molds and bacteria) and human health (breath analysis). PMID:16132133

  16. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS-CO-Cys). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS-CO-Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heavy metal ions such as Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  17. Interaction of metal ions with the His13-His14 sequence relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangtao; Zhao, Zhi; Lei, Xin; Zhang, Bingbing; Dai, Dongxu; Jiang, Ling

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of a series of metal ions (i.e., groups 1 and 2, first-row transition metals, and groups 11-14) with the His13-His14 sequence relevant to Alzheimer's disease has been studied using quantum chemical calculations. Metal ions prefer to occupy three coordination sites at two Nδ of the imidazole rings and one carbonyl oxygen. Simulated IR spectra reveal that vibrational frequency of C-O stretch affords a sensitive probe for understanding the interaction of His13-His14 with metal ions. The relative strength of the interaction of His13-His14 with the representative metal ions follows the order of K(+) < Ca(2+) < Zn(2+) < Cu(2+) < Fe(3+) < Al(3+), which is closely correlated with the available experimental results, providing a vivid physical picture about how metal ions bind to amyloid β-peptide. IR spectra of the [M·(His13-His14)](n+) complexes could be measured by infrared photodissociation spectroscopic technique and thus afford useful information for the understanding of structure-function relationship and the design of suitable drugs. PMID:25801452

  18. Ultrahigh-current-density metal-ion implantation and diamondlike-hydrocarbon films for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1993-09-01

    The metal-ion-implantation system used to implant metals into substrates are described. The metal vapor required for operation is supplied by drawing sufficient electron current from the plasma discharge to an anode-potential crucible so a solid, pure metal placed in the crucible will be heated to the point of vaporization. The ion-producing, plasma discharge is initiated within a graphite-ion-source body, which operates at high temperature, by using an argon flow that is turned off once the metal vapor is present. Extraction of ion beams several cm in diameter at current densities ranging to several hundred micro-A/sq cm on a target 50 cm downstream of the ion source were demonstrated using Mg, Ag, Cr, Cu, Si, Ti, V, B, and Zr. These metals were implanted into over 100 substrates (discs, pins, flats, wires). A model describing thermal stresses induced in materials (e.g. ceramic plates) during high-current-density implantation is presented. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of iron and 304-stainless-steel samples implanted with Ti or B are examined. Diamondlike-hydrocarbon coatings were applied to steel surfaces and found to exhibit good tribological performance.

  19. Transplacental passage of metal ions in women with hip resurfacing: no teratogenic effects observed.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ruth-Mary; Wallace, David; Costa, Matthew L; Krikler, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years, hip resurfacing has been performed in young, active patients, including women in their child bearing years. Current work investigating the transplacental passage of metal ions (cobalt and chromium) suggests significant passage of ions across the placenta in mothers with metal on metal hip resurfacing. In vitro studies show that cobalt and chromium can create DNA and chromosome damage in human cells. The consequences of this ion transfer on the child during fetal development and thereafter have not been fully quantified. We report on 3 patients with metal on metal hip resurfacings who had the prosthesis in situ during pregnancy. Our data show that umbilical cord blood chromium levels are under a quarter of the maternal serum levels. Cord blood cobalt levels are approximately half that of maternal blood. All 3 children are healthy. Although there was transplacental passage of ions, there was no significant effect on the child in these cases. We did not show any teratogenic effect of metal ions on the child, and this is consistent with the reported literature. PMID:22383325

  20. Alkali-Metal-Ion-Assisted Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Homocysteine Radical.

    PubMed

    Lesslie, Michael; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Lawler, John T; Siu, K W Michael; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Hopkinson, Alan C; Ryzhov, Victor

    2016-02-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) was examined in homocysteine (Hcy) thiyl radical/alkali metal ion complexes in the gas phase by combination of experimental techniques (ion-molecule reactions and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations. The experimental results unequivocally show that metal ion complexation (as opposed to protonation) of the regiospecifically generated Hcy thiyl radical promotes its rapid isomerisation into an α-carbon radical via HAT. Theoretical calculations were employed to calculate the most probable HAT pathway and found that in alkali metal ion complexes the activation barrier is significantly lower, in full agreement with the experimental data. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of a gas-phase thiyl radical thermal rearrangement into an α-carbon species within the same amino acid residue and is consistent with the solution phase behaviour of Hcy radical. PMID:26836574