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Sample records for metal salt solutions

  1. Cryochemical method for forming spherical metal oxide particles from metal salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Tinkle, M.C.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of preparing small metal oxide spheres cryochemically utilizing metal salts (e.g., nitrates) that cannot readily be dried and calcined without loss of sphericity of the particles. Such metal salts are cryochemically formed into small spheres, partially or completely converted to an insoluble salt, and dried and calcined. (Official Gazette)

  2. Laser etching of metals in neutral salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, M.; Romankiw, L. T.; Vigliotti, D. R.; von Gutfeld, R. J.

    1987-12-01

    We report new findings that relate to rapid maskless laser etching of steel and stainless steel in neutral solutions of sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, and potassium sulfate. Etch rates have been determined as a function of laser power, laser on-time, and solution concentration. The morphology of laser-etched holes obtained in these solutions was compared with holes obtained in pure water. Results indicate that some controlled melting occurs under certain laser conditions in addition to the metal dissolution process induced by the locally intense heat of the laser beam.

  3. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  4. Continuous electrolytic decarbonation and recovery of a carbonate salt solution from a metal-contaminated carbonate solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Lee, Se-Yoon; Lee, Eil-Hee; Song, Kyusuk; Song, Kee-Chan

    2009-11-15

    This work studied the characteristic changes of a continuous electrolytic decarbonation and recovery of a carbonate salt solution from a metal-contaminated carbonate solution with changes of operational variables in an electrolytic system which consisted of a cell-stacked electrolyzer equipped with a cation exchange membrane and a gas absorber. The system could completely recover the carbonate salt solution from a uranyl carbonato complex solution in a continuous operation. The cathodic feed rate could control the carbonate concentration of the recovered solution and it affected the most transient pH drop phenomenon of a well type within the gas absorber before a steady state was reached, which caused the possibility of a CO(2) gas slip from the gas absorber. The pH drop problem could be overcome by temporarily increasing the OH(-) concentration of the cathodic solution flowing down within the gas absorber only during the time required for a steady state to be obtained in the case without the addition of outside NaOH. An overshooting peak of the carbonate concentration in the recovered solution before a steady state was observed, which was ascribed to the decarbonation of the initial solution filled within the stacked cells by a redundant current leftover from the complete decarbonation of the feeding carbonate solution. PMID:19604641

  5. A novel method of non-violent dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, A. R.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique of non-violent and fast dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt (MgSO4.7H2O) at room temperature (RT) has been developed. The dissolution process is mildly exothermic but could be carried out even in a glass beaker in air under swift stirring condition. The reaction products consist of mixed salts of MgSO4 and Na2SO4 as well as Mg(OH)2 which are only mildly alkaline and hence are non-corrosive and non-hazardous unlike NaOH. A 50 mL solution having Epsom salt concentration of 2 M was found to give the optimal composition for disposal of 1 g of sodium. Supersaturated (>2.7 M), as well as dilute (<1.1 M) solutions, however, cause violent reactions and hence should be avoided. Repeated sodium dissolution in Epsom solution produced a solid waste of 4.7 g per g of sodium dissolved which is comparable with the waste (4 g) produced in 8 M NaOH solution. A 1.4 M Epsom solution sprayed with a high-pressure jet cleaner at RT in air easily removed the sodium blocked inside a metal pipe made of mild steel. The above jet also dissolved peacefully residual sodium collected on the metal tray after a sodium fire experiment. No sodium fire or explosion was observed during this campaign. The Epsom solution spray effectively neutralized the minor quantity of sodium aerosol produced during this campaign. This novel technique would hence be quite useful for draining sodium from fast breeder reactor components and bulk processing of sodium as well as for sodium fire fighting.

  6. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  7. Electrophysical methods of separation of metal cations in the moving salts solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofman, V. N.; Tuksov, I. V.; Timchenko, S. N.; Shamanin, I. V.; Poberezhnikov, A. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experiments on the excitation of the phenomenon of selective drift of solvated ions under the influence of an external "asymmetric" electric field to the circulating solution of calcium chloride and magnesium salts in a polar liquid dielectric - water are shown. The purpose of the experiments was to determine the influence of the field frequency and amplitude of the field strength on the excitation phenomenon, and the study of the operating characteristics of the testing apparatus - a dividing cell. The dependences of the separation efficiency of solvated cations from the frequency of the external field and the excitation threshold of the phenomenon from the field strength in the separation cell are defined.

  8. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  9. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  10. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  11. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  12. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  13. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  14. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  15. Behavior of Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ cations in ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount (Pacific Ocean) in aqueous solutions of metal salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. V.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Melnikov, M. E.; Lobus, N. V.; Drozdova, A. N.; Shulga, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of heavy-metal cations in ore minerals of cobalt-rich ferromanganese crusts from the Marcus Wake seamount in aqueous solutions of metal salts was studied in experiments. The Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations showed high reactivity and Ba2+ and Pb2+ showed low reactivity. It was found that Zn2+ and Cd2+ cations within the ore mineral composition are mainly absorbed (up to 66%) whereas Pb2+ and Ba2+ are chemically bound (up to 70%). Ore minerals in the crusts are characterized by sorption properties and high ionexchange capacity by these cations (1.94-2.62 mg-equiv/g). The capacity values by heavy-metal cations for ore minerals of the crusts from different areas of the Marcus Wake seamount are close to each other.

  16. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts.

    PubMed

    Zimnyakov, D A; Sevrugin, A V; Yuvchenko, S A; Fedorov, F S; Tretyachenko, E V; Vikulova, M A; Kovaleva, D S; Krugova, E Y; Gorokhovsky, A V

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka-Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5-1.5 eV and 1.6-3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction. PMID:27158654

  17. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System.

    PubMed

    Lavrynenko, O M; Pavlenko, O Yu; Shchukin, Yu S

    2016-12-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations. PMID:26847693

  18. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrynenko, O. M.; Pavlenko, O. Yu; Shchukin, Yu S.

    2016-02-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  19. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  20. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Zimnyakov, D.A.; Sevrugin, A.V.; Yuvchenko, S.A.; Fedorov, F.S.; Tretyachenko, E.V.; Vikulova, M.A.; Kovaleva, D.S.; Krugova, E.Y.; Gorokhovsky, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka–Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5–1.5 eV and 1.6–3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction. PMID:27158654

  1. Sol-gel processing with inorganic metal salt precursors

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2004-10-19

    Methods for sol-gel processing that generally involve mixing together an inorganic metal salt, water, and a water miscible alcohol or other organic solvent, at room temperature with a macromolecular dispersant material, such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) added. The resulting homogenous solution is incubated at a desired temperature and time to result in a desired product. The methods enable production of high quality sols and gels at lower temperatures than standard methods. The methods enable production of nanosize sols from inorganic metal salts. The methods offer sol-gel processing from inorganic metal salts.

  2. Salt extraction from hydrogen-sulfide scrubber solution using electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Kennedy, M.W.; McManus, D.; Nazarko, T.W.

    1995-05-01

    The buildup of undesirable sulfur compounds (sulfates and thiosulfates) reduces the scrubbing effectiveness of the LO-CAT I autocirculation sulfur recovery process from acid-gas stream. Among various processes, withdrawing and disposing of a portion of the scrubber solution and replacing this blowdown with fresh solution have been the practice in the industry. The application of the electrodialysis system to recycle the blowdown is presented. Experiments were carried out using electrodialysis to separate salts (sulfates and thiosulfates) from the LO-CAT I autocirculation scrubber solution containing organic chelating agents, iron, and various alkali-metal inorganic salts. The results indicated that the electrodialysis was successful in removing 50% of the salts from the scrubber solution with less than 8% loss of organic and 8% loss of carbonates. The fluxes of the undesired salt species were high even at low current densities (200 to 400 A/m{sup 2}).

  3. Salting-out and Salting-in in Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    The phase behavior of polyelectrolyte (PE) solutions is governed by complicated interplay involving the mixing entropy, excluded volume, chain connectivity, and electrostatic interactions. Here we study the phase behavior of PE solutions in both salt-free condition and with added salt using a liquid-state (LS) theory based thermodynamic model. The LS model accounts or the hard-core repulsion by the Canahan-Starling equation of state, correlations due to chain connectivity by the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and electrostatic correlations by the mean-spherical approximation. In comparison to the prediction from the well-known Voorn-Overbeek theory, the LS model predicts loop-type binodal curves in the salt-PE concentration diagram at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature of PE solution in salt-free case, consistent with the experimental study. The phase separated region shrinks with increasing temperature. Three scenarios of salting-out and salting-in phenomenon are predicted with addition of salts based, depending on the PE concentration.

  4. SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

  5. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  6. Extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organophosphorus compounds from concentrated aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.

    1995-07-20

    Equations describing isotherms of extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organo-phosphorus compounds over a wide range of component concentrations in aqueous and organic phases have been proposed. Constants of phase extraction and empirical parameters characterizing the influence of organic phase composition on the activity coefficients of the components have been presented.

  7. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  8. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  9. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  10. Metal speciation in salt marsh sediments: Influence of halophyte vegetation in salt marshes with different morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Raposo de Almeida, Pedro; Caçador, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes provide environmental conditions that are known to affect metal speciation in sediments. The elevational gradient along the marsh and consequent differential flooding are some of the major factors influencing halophytic species distribution and coverage due to their differential tolerance to salinity and submersion. Different species, in turn, also have distinct influences on the sediment's metal speciation, and its metal accumulation abilities. The present work aimed to evaluate how different halophyte species in two different salt marshes could influence metal partitioning in the sediment at root depth and how that could differ from bare sediments. Metal speciation in sediments around the roots (rhizosediments) of Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia fruticosa and Spartina maritima was determined by sequentially extracting operationally defined fractions with solutions of increasing strength and acidity. Rosário salt marsh generally showed higher concentrations of all metals in the rhizosediments. Metal partitioning was primarily related to the type of metal, with the elements' chemistry overriding the environment's influence on fractionation schemes. The most mobile elements were Cd and Zn, with greater availability being found in non-vegetated sediments. Immobilization in rhizosediments was predominantly influenced by the presence of Fe and Mn oxides, as well as organic complexes. In the more mature of both salt marshes, the differences between vegetated and non-vegetated sediments were more evident regarding S. fruticosa, while in the younger system all halophytes presented significantly different metal partitioning when compared to that of mudflats.

  11. Scattering by solutions of major sea salts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Lianbo; Twardowski, Michael S; Sullivan, James M

    2009-10-26

    Increased scattering by seawater relative to that by pure water is primarily due to additional fluctuation of the refractive index contributed by sea salts. Salts with different ionic weight and sizes, while barely affecting the scattering that is due to density fluctuations, have a significant effect on the scattering that is due to concentration fluctuations. And this explains the major differences of their total scattering that would be observed. Scattering by solutions of NaCl, the major sea salt, is consistently about 6.7% and 4% lower than seawater of the same mass concentration and of the same refractive index, respectively. Because of ionic interactions, the molecular scattering does not follow the simple addition rule that applies to bulk inherent optical properties, with the total less than the summation of the parts. The possible values of scattering by waters of, such as, Dead Sea or Orca Basin, which have different salt composition from seawater, are discussed. PMID:19997177

  12. Americium separations from high salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Barr; Gordon D. Jarvinen; Louis D. Schulte; Peter C. Stark; Rebecca M. Chamberlin; Kent D. Abney; Thomas E. Ricketts; Yvette E. Valdez; Richard A. Bartsch

    2000-03-01

    Americium (III) exhibits an unexpectedly high affinity for anion-exchange material from the high-salt evaporator bottoms solutions--an effect which has not been duplicated using simple salt solutions. Similar behavior is observed for its lanthanide homologue, Nd(III), in complex evaporator bottoms surrogate solutions. There appears to be no single controlling factor--acid concentration, total nitrate concentration or solution ionic strength--which accounts for the approximately 2-fold increase in retention of the trivalent ions from complex solutions relative to simple solutions. Calculation of species activities (i.e., water, proton and nitrate) in such concentrated mixed salt solutions is difficult and of questionable accuracy, but it is likely that the answer to forcing formation of anionic nitrate complexes of americium lies in the relative activities of water and nitrate. From a practical viewpoint, the modest americium removal needs (ca. 50--75%) from nitric acid evaporator bottoms allow sufficient latitude for the use of non-optimized conditions such as running existing columns filled with older, well-used Reillex HPQ. Newer materials, such as HPQ-100 and the experimental bifunctional resins, which exhibit higher distribution coefficients, would allow for either increased Am removal or the use of smaller columns. It is also of interest that one of the experimental neutral-donor solid-support extractants, DHDECMP, exhibits a similarly high level of americium (total alpha) removal from EV bottoms and is much less sensitive to total acid content than commercially-available material.

  13. CuInSe₂ thin-film solar cells with 7.72 % efficiency prepared via direct coating of a metal salts/alcohol-based precursor solution.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Son, Tae Hwa; Cho, Ara; Gwak, Jihye; Yun, Jae Ho; Shin, Keeshik; Ahn, Seoung Kyu; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Kyunghoon

    2012-09-01

    A simple direct solution coating process for forming CuInSe₂ (CIS) thin films was described, employing a low-cost and environmentally friendly precursor solution. The precursor solution was prepared by mixing metal acetates, ethanol, and ethanolamine. The facile formation of a precursor solution without the need to prefabricate nanoparticles enables a rapid and easy processing, and the high stability of the solution in air further ensures the precursor preparation and the film deposition in ambient conditions without a glove box. The thin film solar cell fabricated with the absorber film prepared by this route showed an initial conversion efficiency of as high as 7.72 %. PMID:22890958

  14. HORSMIC. Horizontal Salt Solution Mining Model

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The code HORSMIC was written to solve the problem of calculating the shape of hydrocarbon (gas or liquid) storage caverns formed by solution mining in bedded salt formations. In the past many storage caverns have been formed by vertically drilling into salt dome formations and solution mining large-aspect-ratio, vertically axisymmetric caverns. This approach is generally not satisfactory for shallow salt beds because it would result in geomechanically-unstable, pancake-shaped caverns. In order to produce a high aspect ratio cavern in the horizontal direction a more complicated strategy must be employed. This code was developed to implement such a strategy, and can be used to estimate the shape of the cavern produced by a prescribed leaching schedule. Multiple trials can then be used to investigate the effects of various pipe hole configurations in order to optimize over the cavern shape.

  15. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  16. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  17. [Use of metal salts for radioprotection of plants during radioactive pollution of the territory].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, I N; Kitsno, V E; Grisiuk, S N; Tkachenko, G M; Ivanova, E A; Saenko, K V; Gural'chuk, Zh Z

    1999-01-01

    The applying salts of some metals to radionuclide contaminated soddy-podzolic soil in the zone of Chernobyl nuclear power station or the spraying of plants by its solutions are showing the radioprotective effect (salts of iron, zinc, cobalt and manganese) and decreasing the uptake of 90Sr and 137Cs through roots (salts of zinc, manganese, boron, lithium, cobalt and copper). PMID:10366969

  18. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis R.; Braunstein, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  19. CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

    2008-01-15

    High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

  20. Electrical Conduction in Transition-Metal Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, M. A.; Grado-Caffaro, M.

    2016-04-01

    We predict that a given transition-metal salt as, for example, a K2CuCl4·2H2O-type compound, can behave as an electrical conductor in the paramagnetic case. In fact, we determine the electrical conductance in a salt of this type. This conductance is found to be quantised in agreement with previous well-known results. Related mathematical expressions in the context of superexchange interaction are obtained. In addition, we determine the corresponding (macroscopically viewed) current density and the associated electron wave functions.

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June... substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt (P-90-274), is subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  16. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  17. The Upside to Hg-DOM Associations for Water Quality: Removal of Hg from Solution Using Coagulaion with Metal-Based Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberry, Y.; Kraus, T. E.; Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Horwath, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the potential use of metal-based coagulants to remove dissolved mercury (Hg) from natural waters and provides information regarding the importance of Hg associations with the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction and metal hydroxides. Previous research indicated coagulants were not effective at removing Hg from solution; however those studies used high concentrations of Hg, which did not reflect naturally occurring concentrations of Hg. Filtered water collected from an agricultural drain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) was treated with three industrial-grade coagulants (ferric chloride, ferric sulfate, and polyaluminum chloride) to determine their efficacy in removing both inroganic (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) from the water column. The Delta suffers from elevated surface water Hg concentrations and as a result is listed as an imparied water body. Coagulants removed up to 85% of DOM from solution. In the absence of DOM, all three coagulants released IHg into solution, however in the presence of DOM the coagulants removed up to 97% of IHg and 80% of MeHg. Results suggest that the removal of Hg is mediated by DOM-coagulant interactions. There was a preferential association of IHg with the more aromatic, higher molecular weight fraction of DOM but no such relationship was found for MeHg. This study offers new fundamental insights regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant concentrations. Research using isotopically labeled Hg is providing insight into whether coagulation can remove recently added Hg (e.g. atmospheric deposition) from solution and whether once formed, the floc can remove additional Hg from the water column.

  18. Response of a salt marsh microbial community to metal contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Teixeira, Catarina; Reis, Izabela; Magalhães, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.

    2013-09-01

    Salt marshes are important sinks for contaminants, namely metals that tend to accumulate around plant roots and could eventually be taken up in a process known as phytoremediation. On the other hand, microbial communities display important roles in the salt marsh ecosystems, such as recycling of nutrients and/or degradation of organic contaminants. Thus, plants can benefit from the microbial activity in the phytoremediation process. Nevertheless, above certain levels, metals are known to be toxic to microorganisms, fact that can eventually compromise their ecological functions. In this vein, the aim of present study was to investigate, in the laboratory, the effect of selected metals (Cd, Cu and Pb) on the microbial communities associated to the roots of two salt marsh plants. Sediments colonized by Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis were collected in the River Lima estuary (NW Portugal), and spiked with each of the metals at three different Effects Range-Median (ERM) concentrations (1, 10×, 50×), being ERM the sediment quality guideline that indicates the concentration above which adverse biological effects may frequently occur. Spiked sediments were incubated with a nutritive saline solution, being left in the dark under constant agitation for 7 days. The results showed that, despite the initial sediments colonized by J. maritimus and P. australis displayed significant (p < 0.05) differences in terms of microbial community structure (evaluated by ARISA), they presented similar microbial abundances (estimated by DAPI). Also, in terms of microbial abundance, both sediments showed a similar response to metal addition, with a decrease in number of cells only observed for the higher addition of Cu. Nevertheless, both Cu and Pb, at intermediate metals levels promote a shift in the microbial community structure, with possibly effect on the ecological function of these microbial communities in salt marshes. These changes may affect plants phytoremediation

  19. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salt (P-90-274), is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salt (P-90-274), is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses... salt (P-90-274), is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  2. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O—D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O—D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O—D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O—D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O—D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O—D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O—D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We

  3. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  4. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  5. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  6. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  7. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  8. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  9. Cotton fabrics with UV blocking properties through metal salts deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Hossam E.; Bechtold, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to sunlight is important for human health as this increases the resistance to diverse pathogens, but the higher doses cause skin problems and diseases. Hence, wearing of sunlight protective fabrics displays a good solution for people working in open atmosphere. The current study offered quite simple and technically feasible ways to prepare good UV protection fabrics based on cotton. Metal salts including Zn, Cu and Ti were immobilized into cotton and oxidized cotton fabrics by using pad-dry-cure technique. Metal contents on fabrics were determined by AAS; the highest metal content was recorded for Cu-fabric and it was 360.6 mmol/kg after treatment of oxidized cotton with 0.5 M of copper nitrate. Ti contents on fabrics were ranged between 168.0 and 200.8 mmol/kg and it showed the lowest release as only 38.1-46.4% leached out fabrics after five laundry washings. Metal containing deposits were specified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. UV-transmission radiation over treated fabrics was measured and ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) was calculated. UPF was enhanced after treatment with Cu and Ti salts to be 11.6 and 14, respectively. After five washings, the amount of metal (Cu or Ti) retained indicates acceptable laundering durability.

  10. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  11. Salt-Finger Convection in a Stratified Fluid Layer Induced by Thermal and Solutal Capillary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuan F.; Chan, Cho Lik

    1996-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to different diffusion rates. Normally, when the gravitational field is reduced, salt-finger convection together with other convective motions driven by buoyancy forces will be rapidly suppressed. However, because the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number, with values varying from 10(exp 2) for aqueous salt solutions to 10 (exp 4) for liquid metals, salt-finger convection may be generated at much reduced gravity levels. In the microgravity environment, the surface tension gradient assumes a dominant role in causing fluid motion. In this paper, we report on some experimental results showing the generation of salt-finger convection due to capillary motio on the surface of a stratified fluid layer. A numerical simulation is presented to show the cause of salt-finger convection.

  12. A novel non-vacuum process for the preparation of CuIn(Se,S)2 thin-film solar cells from air-stable, eco-friendly, metal salts based solution ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Ding, Yuankui; Cheng, Jigui

    2015-01-01

    A facile solution-based non-vacuum process for deposition of CuIn(Se,S)2 (CISeS) absorber layers is presented in this work, which indicates a promising way for the low-cost applications in thin-film solar cells. Firstly, low-boiling-point solvents Monobutylamine C4H11N and Carbon disulfide CS2 are selected as the complexing and thickening agents and added into the Cu/In metal salts based solution. Thus the air-stable, eco-friendly solution ink is successfully synthesized through a simple solution synthesis route. The detailed chemical reaction mechanism and the influence of the composition of precursor solution have been discussed intensively as well. After sequential spin-coating, hot-treatment and selenization process, the high-quality CISeS films are obtained and then characterized by XRD, Raman, SEM, EDS, Metallographic microscope, Hall Effect measurement and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that the compact CISeS films with chalcopyrite α-phase possess a double-layer structure, and also incorporate with a little ordered vacancy compounds (OVCs) and Cu2-xSe impurities. The typical near stoichiometric CISeS films without Carbon residuals have superior photoelectric properties with carrier concentration of 3.46 × 1016 N cm-3 and band gap of 1.15 eV. Finally, the original first-made PV devices provide a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.25%, which can be further improved by increasing the thickness of CISeS films and/or optimizing the selenization and sulfuration technologies.

  13. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed. PMID:27192825

  14. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate...

  15. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Richmann, Michael K.

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  16. Surface viscoelasticity of concentrated salt solutions: specific ion effects.

    PubMed

    Safouane, Mahassine; Langevin, Dominique

    2009-01-12

    Herein, we study the viscoelastic response of concentrated salt solutions using surface waves excited by electrocapillarity. We show that the hydrodynamic behaviour of the solutions is similar to that of water at concentrations up to 2 m-well above the concentration C*, at which inhibition of bubble coalescence occurs in these solutions. This result excludes the occurrence of changes in the slip conditions at C*, postulated to explain this inhibition. Our study is carried out on salts that both increase and decrease the surface tension. We observe that the salt that decreases the tension does not change the surface behaviour at all, whereas the other two salts essentially produce negative contributions to the surface viscoelasticity at very high salt concentrations. The effects observed are quite large and remain to be explained. PMID:19072821

  17. Heavy Metals Contamination of Table Salt Consumed in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghali, Abdol Majid; Kobarfard, Farzad; Faeizy, Noroldin

    2010-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are the most important heavy metals which may cause health risks following consumption of contaminated foods. Table salt is one the mostly used food additive with unique place in food consumption. Although purified table salt is expected to have lower level of contamination, some Iranians still prefer to use rock salt. Use of rock salt for food purposes has been banned by Iranian health authorities. In this study, heavy metal contamination of table salt consumed in Iran has been investigated. One hundred samples of rock and refined table salts were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometeric methods for the presence of toxic heavy metals. The mean concentration of tested tracer metals including Cd, Pb, Hg and As was 0.024, 0.438, 0.021 and 0.094 μg/g, respectively. The concentrations of tested heavy metals were well below the maximum levels set by Codex. However, no statistically significant difference was found between contamination of rock salt and refined salt to heavy metals. PMID:24363718

  18. Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O [0.05 ≤x≤ 0.26] synthesized by vapor-diffusion induced hydrolysis and co-nucleation from aqueous metal salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Neilson, James R; Jeffries, Stacie M; Morse, Daniel E

    2011-02-14

    Nanoparticulate Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O (x = 0, 0.05-0.26, 1) is synthesized in a simple two-step synthesis approach. Vapor-diffusion induced catalytic hydrolysis of two molecular precursors at low temperature induces co-nucleation and polycondensation to produce bimetallic layered hydroxide salts (M = Cd, Zn) as precursor materials which are subsequently converted to Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O at 400 °C. Unlike ternary materials prepared by standard co-precipitation procedures, all products presented here containing < 30 mol% Zn(2+) ions are homogeneous in elemental composition on the micrometre scale. This measured compositional homogeneity within the samples, as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, is a testimony to the kinetic control achieved by employing slow hydrolysis conditions. In agreement with this observation, the optical properties of the materials obey Vegard's Law for a homogeneous solid solution of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)O, where x corresponds to the values determined by inductively coupled plasma analysis, even though powder X-ray diffraction shows phase separation into a cubic mixed metal oxide phase and a hexagonal ZnO phase at all doping levels. PMID:21203643

  19. Spontaneous grafting of diazonium salts: chemical mechanism on metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Alice; Lefèvre, Xavier; Jégou, Pascale; Deniau, Guy; Palacin, Serge

    2012-08-14

    The spontaneous reaction of diazonium salts on various substrates has been widely employed since it consists of a simple immersion of the substrate in the diazonium salt solution. As electrochemical processes involving the same diazonium salts, the spontaneous grafting is assumed to give covalently poly(phenylene)-like bonded films. Resistance to solvents and to ultrasonication is commonly accepted as indirect proof of the existence of a covalent bond. However, the most relevant attempts to demonstrate a metal-C interface bond have been obtained by an XPS investigation of spontaneously grafted films on copper. Similarly, our experiments give evidence of such a bond in spontaneously grafted films on nickel substrates in acetonitrile. In the case of gold substrates, the formation of a spontaneous film was unexpected but reported in the literature in parallel to our observations. Even if no interfacial bond was observed, formation of the films was explained by grafting of aryl cations or radicals on the surface arising from dediazoniation, the film growing later by azo coupling, radical addition, or cationic addition on the grafted phenyl layer. Nevertheless, none of these mechanisms fits our experimental results showing the presence of an Au-N bond. In this work, we present a fine spectroscopic analysis of the coatings obtained on gold and nickel substrates that allow us to propose a chemical structure of such films, in particular, their interface with the substrates. After testing the most probable mechanisms, we have concluded in favor of the involvement of two complementary mechanisms which are the direct reaction of diazonium salts with the gold surface that accounts for the observed Au-N interfacial bonds as well as the formation of aryl cations able to graft on the substrate through Au-C linkages. PMID:22793962

  20. Formation of ordered metal nanowire-inorganic salt composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. P.; Stetsik, A. N.; Neden', S. R.

    2007-05-01

    A new phenomenon accompanying the electrolysis of salts has been observed, whereby an ordered composite is formed under certain conditions (electrolyte composition, current density). The composite comprises an inorganic salt crystal penetrated by metal nano- and microwires. This phenomenon can serve as a basis for the technology of oriented and ordered nanowire array synthesis.

  1. Methods for predicting properties and tailoring salt solutions for industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ally, Moonis R.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory accurately and quickly predicts thermodynamic properties of concentrated aqueous salt solutions. This algorithm is much simpler and much faster than other modeling schemes and is unique because it can predict solution behavior at very high concentrations and under varying conditions. Typical industrial applications of this algorithm would be in manufacture of inorganic chemicals by crystallization, thermal storage, refrigeration and cooling, extraction of metals, emissions controls, etc.

  2. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CALCINING SALT SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Taecker, R.G.

    1961-10-31

    A method is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution into solid UO/ sub 3/, The solution is sprayed horizontally into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 3/ particles at 310 to 350 deg C by a nozzle of the coaxial air jet type at about 26 psig, Under these conditions the desired conversion takes place, and caking in the bed is avoided.

  3. Purification of diverse hemoglobins by metal salt precipitation.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Devon; Dienes, Jack; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Elmer, Jacob J

    2016-09-01

    Although donated blood is the preferred material for transfusion, its limited availability and stringent storage requirements have motivated the development of blood substitutes. The giant extracellular hemoglobin (aka erythrocruorin) of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (LtEc) has shown promise as a blood substitute, but an efficient purification method for LtEc must be developed to meet the potential large demand for blood substitutes. In this work, an optimized purification process that uses divalent and trivalent metal salts to selectively precipitate human, earthworm, and bloodworm hemoglobin (HbA, LtEc, and GdHb, respectively) from crude solutions was developed. Although several metal ions were able to selectively precipitate LtEc, Zn(2+) and Ni(2+) provided the lowest heme oxidation and highest overall yield of LtEc. In contrast, Zn(2+) was the only metal ion that completely precipitated HbA and GdHb. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis shows that metal precipitation removes several impurities to provide highly pure hemoglobin samples. Heme oxidation levels were relatively low for Zn(2+)-purified HbA and LtEc (2.4±1.3% and 5.3±2.1%, respectively), but slightly higher for Ni(2+)-purified LtEc (8.4±1.2%). The oxygen affinity and cooperativity of the precipitated samples are also identical to samples purified with tangential flow filtration (TFF) alone, indicating the metal precipitation does not significantly affect the function of the hemoglobins. Overall, these results show that hemoglobins from several different species can be highly purified using a combination of metal (Zn(2+)) precipitation and tangential flow filtration. PMID:26363116

  4. The role of electrolyte anions (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and Cl{sup {minus}}) in divalent metal (M{sup 2+}) adsorption on oxide and hydroxide surfaces in salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Criscenti, L.J.; Sverjensky, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Adsorption of divalent metal ions (M{sup 2+}) onto oxide and hydroxide surfaces from solutions of strong electrolytes has typically been inferred to take place without the involvement of the electrolyte anion. Only in situations where M{sup 2+} forms a strong enough aqueous complex with the electrolyte anion (for example, CdCl{sup +} or PbCl{sup +}) has it been frequently suggested that the metal and the electrolyte anion adsorb simultaneously. A review of experimental data for the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ca{sup 2+} onto quartz, silica, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide, corundum, {gamma}-alumina, anatase, birnessite, and magnetite, from NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, NaCl, and NaClO{sub 4} solutions over a wide range of ionic strengths (0.0001 M-1.0 M), reveals that transition and heavy metal adsorption behavior with ionic strength is a function of the type of electrolyte. In NaNO{sub 3} solutions, metal adsorption exhibits little or no dependence on the ionic strength of the solution. However, in NaCl solutions, transition and heavy metal adsorption decreases strongly with increasing ionic strength. In NaClO{sub 4} solutions, metal adsorption decreases strongly with increasing ionic strength. In NaClO{sub 4} solutions, metal adsorption exhibits little dependence on ionic strength but is often suggestive of an increase in metal adsorption with increasing ionic strength. Analysis of selected adsorption edges was carried out using the extended triple-layer model and aqueous speciation models that included metal-nitrate, metal-chloride, and metal-hydroxide complexes.

  5. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal...

  7. Thermodynamics of extraction by solutions of amines and salts of substituted ammonium bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochkin, A. V.; Sergievskii, V. V.

    1989-09-01

    Extraction systems containing amines and their salts are widely used to concentrate and separate metals. From the theoretical viewpoint, these systems are among the most complex, because of the variety of intermolecular interactions in the organic phase. The explanation and quantitative description of the observed regularities of extraction became possible only as a result of progress in the study of the thermodynamics of binary and multicomponent solutions of salts of substituted ammonium bases in non-polar organic solvents, which make it possible to distinguish the contribution of each type of interaction to the non-ideal character of the solutions. All known "anomalous" features are due to the influence of the hydration of the salts of the substituted ammonium bases on their activity. The bibliography contains 113 references.

  8. Properties of alkali-halide salt solutions about polarizable nanoparticle solutes for different ion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, Aaron; Bresme, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the distributions of various salts about large hydrophobic polarizable solutes in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The solutes are modeled as nanometer-sized cylindrical objects, a scale relevant to biomolecules and nanomaterials, and particularly high aspect ratio nanoparticles. Interactions, including image charge forces arising from the finite polarizability of the solute, between explicit solvent/ions and the solute are computed explicitly using a molecular dynamics simulation methodology we have recently introduced. Comparisons are made between several salt species and different models of the force fields for each ionic component of the salt. We find evidence that both small cations, Li+, and large anions, I-, adsorb at hydrophobic interfaces. Our results indicate that the ion structure about the solute is strongly dependent on the force field investigated, suggesting that ion selectivity is quite sensitive to the respective parameters defining the ion's size and binding energy as well as to the polarizability of the solute.

  9. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  10. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  11. Salt Effects on Surface Tethered Peptides in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Lynch, Gillian C.; Gao, Xiaolian; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    The capability to manipulate proteins/peptide fragments at liquid-solid interfaces has led to tremendous applications in detectors and biotechnology. Therefore, understanding the detailed molecular behavior of proteins and peptides tethered on a hard material surface is an interesting and important topic. The inhomogeneity presented by surfaces as well as ions in the solution plays an important role in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the tethered proteins. In this study, we perform a series of molecular dynamics simulations of a pentapeptide RHSVV, a p53 epitope, tethered on a prepared microarray surface in various salt concentrations (0 M, 0.14 M, 0.5 M, and 1M NaCl), as well as free in ionic solution (0M, 0.5M, and 1M). The conformational space the tethered peptide visits largely overlaps with the free peptide in solution. However, surface tethering as well as the salt concentration changes both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the peptide. Frequent conformational changes are observed during the simulations, and tend to be slowed down by both increasing the salt concentration and surface tethering. The local composition of ions at different salt concentrations is also compared between the tethered and free peptide. PMID:19548651

  12. Silicide coating on refractory metals in molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatemoto, K.; Ono, Y.; Suzuki, R. O.

    2005-02-01

    For better oxidation resistance of refractory metals in air, the electroless coating of silicide in the molten salt was developed in open air at 973 1173 K. The molten salt consists of NaCl, KCl, Na2SiF6 and Si powder, where the proportional reaction between Si and Si4+ ions forms Si2+ ions. Si2+ deposits on the metal substrate and forms the metal silicide. The deposited silicide layers were classified into two categories depending on the metal substrates: (1) Nb, Mo and Cr mainly formed silicon-rich disilicide (MSi2) layer. (2) Fe, Ni and Co formed silicon-poor silicide layer (MSin, n<2), such as Fe3Si. This difference was described by the diffusivity of Si through the silicide layer into the metal.

  13. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  14. Fabrication of CPA Salt Pill with Circulating Solution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, A.; Tokoi, K.; Ishisaki, Y.; Shinozaki, K.; McCammon, D.

    2008-05-01

    We report results on fabrication of a Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill. CPA is a typical paramagnetic salt used as refrigerant of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) because of its low Curie point, 4 11 mK. We made an test model of CPA salt pill by fast crystallizing method, namely circulating solution between 36°C and 15°C. The crystallizing rate was 0.5 g h-1, and 40 g of CPA crystal was obtained inside a stainless steel cylinder equipped with 160 copper wires. The cooling test was operated utilizing a commercial ADR system. We attached three thermometers and four heaters to the salt pill, in order to measure thermal conductance among different parts of the pill. It is confirmed that our salt pill was cooled down from B/ T=4 T/2 K to 64 mK at zero magnetic field. We suspect the cause of limiting the cooling temperature in the present level to be the dehydration of CPA, non-uniformity of magnetic field, and stainless steel of the pill which has large heat capacity below 0.1 K.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, thermolysis and performance evaluation studies on alkali metal salts of TABA and NTO.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, P B; Purandare, G N; Nair, J K; Talawar, M B; Mukundan, T; Asthana, S N

    2005-03-17

    The lithium (Li) and potassium (K) salts of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) and 2,4,6-trinitroanilino benzoic acid (TABA) were prepared and characterized during this work. The synthesis was carried out by addition of a solution of lithium/potassium hydroxide to the aqueous solution of NTO and TABA, respectively. The products were characterized by elemental analysis, metal content determination and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrum. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) profile indicated that Li and K salts of NTO and TABA undergo exothermic decomposition in the temperature range of 257-360 degrees C suggesting their energetic nature. The thermo gravimetric (TG) weight loss pattern revealed loss of water for Li/K salts of NTO and TABA in the temperature range of 115-155 degrees C. Sensitivity results revealed that the compounds are insensitive to impact and friction (impact sensitivity--height of 50% explosion>170 cm and friction insensitivity up to 36 kg) stimuli despite even the parent molecule of NTO salts (NTO) being HEM in the hazard category of 1.1. The FTIR spectra of the gaseous products evolved during TGA of NTO and TABA salts indicated the release of NO2. The formation of products such as LiNCO and KNCO was also observed in case of NTO salts, whereas that of CO2 and NH containing products was indicated in case of TABA salts during this study. In order to assess the performance as energetic ballistic modifiers (EBMs), NTO and TABA salts were incorporated in the ammonium perchlorate-hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (AP-HTPB) composite propellants. The potassium salts enhanced the burning rate of the propellant. The best catalytic effect was obtained with K-TABA salt, which increased the burning rate to the extent of approximately 81% as well as brought down the n-value to 0.15 (pressure 2-9 MPa). PMID:15752848

  16. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  17. Catalyst Of A Metal Heteropoly Acid Salt That Is Insoluble In A Polar Solvent On A Non-Metallic Porous Support And Method Of Making

    DOEpatents

    Wang. Yong; Peden. Charles H. F.; Choi. Saemin

    2004-11-09

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  18. Measurement of emittance of metal interface in molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, N.; Makino, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    1995-11-01

    A new technique for measuring the total normal emittance of a metal in a semi-transparent liquid has been proposed and this technique has been applied to measure the emittance of stainless steel (SUS304), nickel, and gold in molten potassium nitrate KNO{sub 3}. These emittance data are indispensable to analyzing the radiative heat transfer between a metal and a semitransparent liquid, such as a molten salt.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical...), (d), (e), and (i) are applicable to manufacturers, importers, and processors of this substance....

  20. Precious-Metal Salt Coatings for Detecting Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Louis A.; Greene, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Substrates coated with a precious-metal salt KAuCl4 have been found to be useful for detecting hydrazine vapors in air at and above a concentration of the order of 0.01 parts per million (ppm). Upon exposure to air containing a sufficient amount of hydrazine for a sufficient time, the coating material undergoes a visible change in color.

  1. PROCESS OF REMOVING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION WITH GROUP IVB METAL PHOSPHO-SILICATE COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1957-10-29

    A process for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions which contain the plutonium in minute concentrations is described. These values can be removed from an aqueous solution by taking an aqueous solution containing a salt of zirconium, titanium, hafnium or thorium, adding an aqueous solution of silicate and phosphoric acid anions to the metal salt solution, and separating, washing and drying the precipitate which forms when the two solutions are mixed. The aqueous plutonium containing solution is then acidified and passed over the above described precipi-tate causing the plutonium values to be adsorbed by the precipitate.

  2. Scaling Equations for a Biopolymer in Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Erik; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Horkay, Ferenc

    2007-12-01

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of monovalent and divalent cations on the thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions is an incompletely solved problem. In physiological conditions, combinations of these ions affect structure formation in biopolymer systems. Dynamic light scattering measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient D and the osmotic compressibility of semidilute hyaluronan solutions containing different ratios of sodium and calcium ions are compared with simple polyelectrolyte models. Scaling relationships are proposed in terms of polymer concentration and ionic strength J of the added salt. Differences in the effects of sodium and calcium ions are found to be expressed only through J.

  3. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-10-28

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached {approx}10 psi while processing {approx}1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective

  4. Analysis of frozen salt solutions with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Pavlov, S. G.; Hübers, H.-W.; Rauschenbach, I.; Jessberger, E. K.

    2010-05-01

    focusing on the major elemental composition as well as on minor elements. In general, the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal elements were clearly detectable in the LIBS spectra in the 280-900 nm region. This allowed for a good distinction between different frozen solutions. Also the oxygen and hydrogen lines gave good signal-to-noise ratios. On the other hand, in particular, sulphur, as known, is difficult to detect in this spectral range as only weak sulphur lines are apparent in this region. The experiments demonstrate the capability of LIBS for detection and identification of frozen salt solutions under Martian conditions.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of frozen salt solutions under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Susanne; Pavlov, Sergey; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Rauschenbach, Isabelle; Jessberger, Elmar K.

    focusing on the major elemental composition as well as on minor elements. In general, the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal elements were clearly detectable in the LIBS spectra in the 280-900 nm region. This allowed for a good distinction between different frozen solutions. Also the oxygen and hydrogen lines gave good signal-to-noise ratios. On the other hand, in particular, sulphur, as known, is difficult to detect in this spectral range as only weak sulphur lines are apparent in this region. The experiments demonstrate the capability of LIBS for detection and identification of frozen salt solutions under Martian conditions.

  6. Electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions of aluminum salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, J.; Rilo, E.; Segade, L.; Cabeza, O.; Varela, L. M.

    2005-03-01

    We present experimental measurements of the specific electrical conductivity (σ) in aqueous solutions of aluminum salts at different temperatures, covering all salt concentrations from saturation to infinite dilution. The salts employed were AlCl3 , AlBr3 , AlI3 , and Al(NO3)3 , which present a 1:3 relationship between the electrical charges of anion and cation. In addition, we have measured the density in all ranges of concentrations of the four aqueous electrolyte solutions at 298.15K . The measured densities show an almost linear behavior with concentration, and we have fitted it to a second order polynomial with very high degree of approximation. The measurement of the specific conductivity at constant temperature reveals the existence of maxima in the conductivity vs concentration curves at molar concentrations around 1.5M for the three halide solutions studied, and at approximately 2M for the nitrate. We present a theoretical foundation for the existence of these maxima, based on the classical Debye-Hückel-Onsager hydrodynamic mean-field framework for electrical transport and its high concentration extensions, and also a brief consideration of ionic frictional coefficients using mode-coupling theory. We also found that the calculated values of the equivalent conductance vary in an approximately linear way with the square root of the concentration at concentrations as high as those where the maximum of σ appears. Finally, and for completeness, we have measured the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity at selected concentrations from 283to353K , and performed a fit to an exponential equation of the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman type. The values of the calculated temperatures of null mobility of the four salts are reported.

  7. Transition-metal salt-containing silica nanocapsules elaborated via salt-induced interfacial deposition in inverse miniemulsions as precursor to functional hollow silica particles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhihai; Yang, Liu; Ye, Quanlin; Cui, Qinmin; Qi, Dongming; Ziener, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Aqueous core-silica shell nanocapsules were successfully prepared using liquid droplets containing transition-metal salt as templates in inverse miniemulsions. The formation of the silica shell was attributed to the interfacial deposition of silica species induced by the presence of the transition-metal salt. In addition to the control of the particle morphology, the incorporated transition-metal salts could be used to derivatize the particles and confer additional functionalities to the hollow silica particles. To demonstrate the derivatization, the magnetic hollow silica particles were prepared by converting iron salts to magnetic iron oxides by heat treatment. The particle morphology, size, and size distribution were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the particle properties strongly depend on the type and the amount of salts, the amount of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), the pH of the droplets, and the ratios of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate to aqueous HCl solution. The specific surface area and pore properties were characterized by N2 sorption measurements. The pore properties and specific surface area could be tuned by varying the amount of salt. Levels of elements and of iron oxides in the magnetic hollow particles were measured by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Iron was distributed homogenously with silicon and oxygen in the sample. The magnetization measured by a magnetic property measurement system confirmed the successful conversion of the iron salts to magnetic iron oxides. PMID:23679054

  8. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  9. Effects of metal salt mixtures on Daphnia magna reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K.E.; Christensen, G.M.; Fiandt, J.T.

    1986-02-01

    Three binary metal experiments were conducted using a complete block design; testing the chlorides of Cd, Hg, and Zn individually and in combinations of Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg on Daphnia magna reproduction. These mixtures were tested at one-half, once, and twice the 16% reproductive impairment concentration previously determined for individual metals. The Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg mixtures all showed significant reductions in reproduction at concentrations where the metal salts alone caused no significant effect.

  10. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  18. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  19. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes a method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and apparatus used in effecting the removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  20. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  1. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1988-08-26

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  2. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1990-11-13

    A method is disclosed of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 fig.

  3. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  4. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  5. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  6. Applications of molten salts in reactive metals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    Pyrochemical processes using molten salts provide a unique opportunity for the extraction and refining of many reactive and valuable metals either directly from the beneficiated ore or from other process effluent that contain reactive metal compounds. This research program is aimed at developing a process for the production and recovery of reactive and valuable metals, such as zinc, tin, lead, bismuth and silver, in a hybrid reactor combining electrolytic production of the calcium reductant and in-situ utilization of this reductant for pyrochemical reduction of the metal compounds, such as halide or oxides. The process is equally suitable for producing other low melting metals, such as cadmium and antimony. The cell is typically operated below 1000C temperature. Attempts have been made to produce silver, lead, bismuth, tin and cerium by calciothermic reduction in a molten salt media. In a separate effort, calcium has been produced by an electrolytic dissociation of lime in a calcium chloride medium. The most important characteristic of the hybrid technology is its ability to produce metals under ``zero-waste`` conditions.

  7. Application of molten salts in pyrochemical processing of reactive metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L. . Kroll Inst. for Extractive Metallurgy); Averill, W.A. . Rocky Flats Plant)

    1992-01-01

    Various mixes of chloride and fluoride salts are used as the media for conducting pyrochemical processes in the production and purification of reactive metals. These processes generate a significant amount of contaminated waste that has to be treated for recycling or disposal. Molten calcium chloride based salt systems have been used in this work to electrolytically regenerate calcium metal from calcium oxide for the in situ reduction of reactive metal oxides. The recovery of calcium is characterized by the process efficiency to overcome back reactions in the electrowinning cell. A thermodynamic analysis, based on fundamental rate theory, has been performed to understand the process parameters controlling the metal deposition, rate, behavior of the ceramic anode-sheath and influence of the back-reactions. It has been observed that the deposition of calcium is dependent on the ionic diffusion through the sheath. It has also been evidenced that the recovered calcium is completely lost through the back-reactions in the absence of a sheath. A practical scenario has also been presented where the electrowon metal can be used in situ as a reductant to reduce another reactive metal oxide.

  8. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  9. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  10. Interactions between salt marsh plants and Cu nanoparticles - Effects on metal uptake and phytoremediation processes.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Federico; Mucha, Ana Paula; Caetano, Cátia; Rodrigues, Paula; Rocha Gomes, Carlos; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) raises the probability of finding NPs in the environment. A lot of information exists already regarding interactions between plants and metals, but information regarding interactions between metallic NPs and plants, including salt marsh plants, is still lacking. This work aimed to study interactions between CuO NPs and the salt marsh plants Halimione portulacoides and Phragmites australis. In addition, the potential of these plants for phytoremediation of Cu NPs was evaluated. Plants were exposed for 8 days to sediment elutriate solution doped either with CuO or with ionic Cu. Afterwards, total metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues. Both plants accumulated Cu in their roots, but this accumulation was 4 to 10 times lower when the metal was added in NP form. For P. australis, metal translocation occurred when the metal was added either in ionic or in NP form, but for H. portulacoides no metal translocation was observed when NPs were added to the medium. Therefore, interactions between plants and NPs differ with the plant species. These facts should be taken in consideration when applying these plants for phytoremediation of contaminated sediments in estuaries, as the environmental management of these very important ecological areas can be affected. PMID:26094036

  11. Estimation of free acid content in lanthanide salt solutions used for potentiometric determination of stability constant of lanthanide complexes with organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltvai, T.I.; Tishchenko, M.A.

    1985-08-20

    This paper studies the possibility of alkalimetric titration of free acid after binding the metal ions by the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic (complexone III). The proposed method of free acid determination in lanthanide salt solutions is very simple and helps to avoid gross methodical errors in works involving determination of stability constants of lanthanide complexes.

  12. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  13. Single crystals of metal solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. F.; Austin, A. E.; Richard, N.; Griesenauer, N. M.; Moak, D. P.; Mehrabian, M. R.; Gelles, S. H.

    1974-01-01

    The following definitions were sought in the research on single crystals of metal solid solutions: (1) the influence of convection and/or gravity present during crystallization on the substructure of a metal solid solution; (2) the influence of a magnetic field applied during crystallization on the substructure of a metal solid solution; and (3) requirements for a space flight experiment to verify the results. Growth conditions for the selected silver-zinc alloy system are described, along with pertinent technical and experimental details of the project.

  14. Surface Potential of DPPC Monolayers on Concentrated Aqueous Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Casper, Clayton B; Verreault, Dominique; Adams, Ellen M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2016-03-01

    The presence and exchange of electrical charges on the surfaces of marine aerosols influence their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei and play a role in thundercloud electrification. Although interactions exist between surface-active inorganic ions and organic compounds, their role in surface charging of marine aerosols is not well understood. In this study, the surface potential of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers, a zwitterionic phospholipid found in the sea surface microlayer, is measured on concentrated (0.3-2.0 M) chloride salt solutions containing marine-relevant cations (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) to model and elucidate the electrical properties of organic-covered marine aerosols. Monovalent cations show only a weak effect on the surface potential of DPPC monolayers in the condensed phase compared to water. In contrast, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) increase the surface potential, indicating different cation binding modes and affinities for the PC headgroup. Moreover, it is found that for divalent chloride salt solutions, the PC headgroup and interfacial water molecules make the largest dipolar contribution to the surface potential. This study shows that for equal charge concentrations, divalent cations impact surface potential of DPPC monolayers more strongly than monovalents likely through changes in the PC headgroup orientation induced by their complexation along with the lesser ordering of interfacial water molecules caused by phosphate group charge screening. PMID:26761608

  15. Lead and other metals distribution in local cooking salt from the Fofi salt- spring in Akwana, Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Dim, L.A.; Kinyua, A.M.; Munyithya, J.M.; Adetunji, J. )

    1991-06-01

    Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique has been used to determine the concentrations of lead(Pb) and other heavy metals in local cooking salts (LCS) from Akwana village, Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria. The comparison of the distribution of these metals in LCS, fake salt (FS) and the usual common salts (CS) are given. Lead was found to be enriched in LCS by factor exceeding 200 times compared to the other salts. The origin of Pb contamination in the LCS is examined and its effects on the inhabitants of the village are considered.

  16. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions. PMID:26655791

  17. Identification of frozen salt solutions combining LIBS and multivariate analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Pavlov, S.; Jessberger, E.; Hübers, H.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emission spectroscopy technique and relies on evaporating material from the target by focusing radiation from a pulsed laser onto the sample surface. The generated plasma is analyzed spectroscopically and information about the elemental composition is obtained from specific atomic or ionic transitions and the associated emanating photons, which result in characteristic spectral lines. For the geochemical investigation of extraterrestrial surfaces LIBS has been suggested as a powerful analytical tool and is part of the payload on NASA's rover MSL (Mars Science Laboratory), which landed in the Gale crater on Mars in August 2012. This is the first time that LIBS is used for planetary science. In this study, salts, which are considered relevant for Martian geochemistry were investigated, including sulfates, chlorides, and perchlorates. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength, up to 220 mJ, 8 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition rate) generated the plasma at distances < 1 m. The plasma emission was detected with an echelle spectrometer with a time-gated intensified CCD enabling a continuous coverage from 280 nm to 900 nm. The salts were investigated in their pure form and in frozen salt solutions under simulated Martian atmospheric conditions with an appropriate gas mixture composed of 95.55 % Vol. CO2 at a pressure of 7 mbar. The influence of different gating parameters for time-resolved detection of the plasma was studied and parameters best suited for the LIBS analysis of ices were determined. The emission lines of metals are detectable with LIBS with high signal-to-noise ratios, which facilitates a relatively straightforward identification of the type of the cation. Due to weak excitation of the high-energy levels required for efficient radiative transitions of both sulfur and chlorine ions, their emission lines are typically weak and hardly detectable, in particular in the LIBS spectra of the ices. This

  18. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10487 - Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salts (generic). 721.10487 Section 721.10487 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10487 Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (PMNs P-04-599, P-04-600, P-04-605, and P-04-606)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.2098 Section 721.2098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.2098 Section 721.2098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.2098 Section 721.2098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.2098 Section 721.2098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  6. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  7. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  8. Collapse of sodium polyacrylate chains in calcium salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweins, R.; Huber, K.

    The sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (NaPA) precipitates in the presence of Ca^{2+}-ions. This phase behaviour can be represented by a phase diagram where the critical NaPA concentration is plotted versus the critical Ca^{2+} concentration resulting in a straight line as a phase boundary. The location of this phase boundary is influenced by the presence of an inert monovalent salt like NaCl. The present contribution focuses on the coil dimensions of NaPA chains in dilute aqueous solution corresponding to the one phase region of such a phase diagram. A variety of parameters with which the size and shape of the polyelectrolyte chains can be modulated are revealed. Approaching the phase boundary by decreasing the NaPA concentration at a constant Ca^{2+} content leads to a collapse of the NaPA chains. Combined static and dynamic light scattering suggests a compact spherical shape as the final state of this transition, both in 0.1 M NaCl and in 0.01 M NaCl. In the lower NaCl concentration, indication is presented for the existence of a cigar or pearl necklace like intermediate. Most strikingly, the collapsed chains can be reexpanded by increasing the concentration of inert NaCl at constant content of NaPA and Ca^{2+}. Clearly, excessive Na+-ions displace the Ca^{2+}-ions from the NaPA chains.

  9. Field-assisted nanopatterning of metals, metal oxides and metal salts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Fu; Miller, Glen P

    2009-02-01

    The tip-based nanofabrication method called field-assisted nanopatterning or FAN has now been extended to the transfer of metals, metal oxides and metal salts onto various receiving substrates including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, passivated gold and indium-tin oxide. Standard atomic force microscope tips were first dip-coated using suspensions of inorganic compounds in solvent. The films prepared in this manner were non-uniform and contained inorganic nanoparticles. Tip-based nanopatterning on chosen substrates was conducted under high electric field conditions. The same tip was used for both nanofabrication and imaging. Arbitrary patterns were formed with dimensions that ranged from tens of microns to sub-20 nm and were controlled by tuning the tip bias during fabrication. Most tip-based nanopatterning techniques are limited in terms of the type of species that can be deposited and the type of substrates onto which the deposition occurs. With the successful deposition of inorganic species reported here, FAN is demonstrated to be a truly versatile tip-based nanofabrication technique that is useful for the deposition of a wide variety of both organic and inorganic species including small molecules, large molecules and polymers. PMID:19417344

  10. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  11. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10487 - Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10487 Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (PMNs P-04-599, P-04-600, P-04-605, and P-04-606)...

  13. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  14. Polyimide Composites from 'Salt-Like' Solution Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Hou, Tan H.; Weiser, Erik S.; SaintClair, Terry L.

    2001-01-01

    Four NASA Langley-developed polyimide matrix resins, LaRC(TM)-IA, LaRC(TM)-IAX, LaRC(TM)-8515 and LaRC(TM)-PETI-5, were produced via a 'saltlike' process developed by Unitika Ltd. The salt-like solutions (65% solids in NMP) were prepregged onto Hexcel IM7 carbon fiber using the NASA LaRC multipurpose tape machine. Process parameters were determined and composite panels fabricated. The temperature dependent volatile depletion rates, the thermal crystallization behavior and the resin rheology were characterized. Composite molding cycles were developed which consistently yielded well consolidated, void-free laminated parts. Composite mechanical properties such as the short beam shear strength; the longitudinal and transverse flexural strength and flexural modulus; the longitudinal compression strength and modulus; and the open hole compression strength and compression after impact strength were measured at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The processing characteristics and the composite mechanical properties of the four intermediate modulus carbon fiber/polyimide matrix composites were compared to existing data on the same polyimide resin systems and IM7 carbon fiber manufactured via poly(amide acid) solutions (30-35% solids in NMP). This work studies the effects of varying the synthetic route on the processing and mechanical properties of the polyimide composites.

  15. The effect of divalent salt in chondroitin sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranghel, D.; Badita, C. R.; Radulescu, A.; Moldovan, L.; Craciunescu, O.; Balasoiu, M.

    2016-03-01

    Chondroitin-4 sulfate (CS4) is the main glycosaminoglycan extracted from bovine trachea. CS4 play an important role in osteoarthritis treatment, anticoagulant activity, reduces the degradation of cartilage matrix components, reduces necrosis and apoptosis of chondrocytes and reduces the activity of collagenase. Chondroitin sulfate is also responsible for proteoglycans degradation. Chondroitin sulfate can bind calcium ions with different affinities, depending on their sulfation position. The purpose of this study was to determine the structural properties and the influence of Ca2+ cations. We carried out measurements on CS4 solutions and mixtures of liquid CS4 with Ca2+ by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). CS4 have a mass fractal behavior and the addition of a salt (CaCl2) in CS4 solutions generates the appearance of a correlation peak due to local ordering between adjacent chains with inter-chain distances between 483 Å and 233 Å for a calcium concentration of 0.01% w/w.

  16. The Surface Structure of Concentrated Aqueous salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sloutskin,E.; Baumert, J.; Ocko, B.; Kuzmenko, I.; Checco, A.; Tamam, L.; Ofer, E.; Gog, T.; Deutsch, M.

    2007-01-01

    The surface-normal electron density profile {rho}{sub s}(z) of concentrated aqueous salt solutions of RbBr, CsCl, LiBr, RbCl, and SrCl{sub 2} was determined by x-ray reflectivity (XR). For all but RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} {rho}{sub s}(z) increases monotonically with depth z from {rho}{sub s}(z)=0 in the vapor (z<0) to {rho}{sub s}(z) = {rho}{sub b} of the bulk (z>0) over a width of a few angstroms. The width is commensurate with the expected interface broadening by thermally excited capillary waves. Anomalous (resonant) XR of RbBr reveals a depletion at the surface of Br{sup -} ions to a depth of {approx}10 A. For SrCl{sub 2}, the observed {rho}{sub s}(z)>{rho}{sub b} may imply a similar surface depletion of Cl{sup -} ions to a depth of a few angstroms. However, as the deviations of the XRs of RbBr and SrCl{sub 2} from those of the other solutions are small, the evidence for a different ion composition in the surface and the bulk is not strongly conclusive. Overall, these results contrast earlier theoretical and simulational results and nonstructural measurements, where significant surface layering of alternate, oppositely charged, ions is concluded.

  17. Evaluating Battery-like Reactions to Harvest Energy from Salinity Differences using Ammonium Bicarbonate Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Logan, Bruce E; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-05-10

    Mixing entropy batteries (MEBs) are a new approach to generate electricity from salinity differences between two aqueous solutions. To date, MEBs have only been prepared from solutions containing chloride salts, owing to their relevance in natural salinity gradients created from seawater and freshwater. We hypothesized that MEBs could capture energy using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB), a thermolytic salt that can be used to convert waste heat into salinity gradients. We examined six battery electrode materials. Several of the electrodes were unstable in AmB solutions or failed to produce expected voltages. Of the electrode materials tested, a cell containing a manganese oxide electrode and a metallic lead electrode produced the highest power density (6.3 mW m(-2) ). However, this power density is still low relative to previously reported NaCl-based MEBs and heat recovery systems. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that MEBs could indeed be used to generate electricity from AmB salinity gradients. PMID:27030080

  18. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.

    1995-01-01

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  19. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.

    1993-12-23

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500{degree}C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li-Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  20. Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh

    2006-07-01

    PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

  1. EXAFS study into the speciation of metal salts dissolved in ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Jennifer M; Ip, Chung-Man; Forrest, Gregory C H; Singh, Kuldip; Gurman, Stephen J; Ryder, Karl S; Abbott, Andrew P; Frisch, Gero

    2014-06-16

    The speciation of metals in solution controls their reactivity, and this is extremely pertinent in the area of metal salts dissolved in ionic liquids. In the current study, the speciation of 25 metal salts is investigated in four deep eutectic solvents (DESs) and five imidazolium-based ionic liquids using extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It is shown that in diol-based DESs M(I) ions form [MCl2](-) and [MCl3](2-) complexes, while all M(II) ions form [MCl4](2-) complexes, with the exception of Ni(II), which exhibits a very unusual coordination by glycol molecules. This was also found in the X-ray crystal structure of the compound [Ni(phen)2(eg)]Cl2·2eg (eg = ethylene glycol). In a urea-based DES, either pure chloro or chloro-oxo coordination is observed. In [C6mim][Cl] pure chloro complexation is also observed, but coordination numbers are smaller (typically 3), which can be explained by the long alkyl chain of the cation. In [C2mim][SCN] metal ions are entirely coordinated by thiocyanate, either through the N or the S atom, depending on the hardness of the metal ion according to the hard-soft acid-base principle. With weaker coordinating anions, mixed coordination between solvent and solute anions is observed. The effect of hydrate or added water on speciation is insignificant for the diol-based DESs and small in other liquids with intermediate or strong ligands. One of the main findings of this study is that, with respect to metal speciation, there is no fundamental difference between deep eutectic solvents and classic ionic liquids. PMID:24897923

  2. Record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.J.; Thomson, J.

    1980-12-01

    The possibility that a useful, historical record of deposition might be found in a salt marsh is investigated by considering a record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh. Evidence of salt-marsh deposition dominated by riverine runoff is presented.

  3. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  4. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR METAL IMMOBILIZATION APPLICATION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVE CAPS IN FRESH AND SALT WATER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M

    2006-11-17

    This research evaluated the removal of inorganic contaminants by a variety of amendments and mixtures of amendments in fresh and salt water. A series of removal and retention batch experiments was conducted to identify the best treatment for metal removal. Metal removal by the amendments was evaluated by calculating the partition coefficient and percent removal. Retention of metals by the amendments was evaluated in retention (desorption) studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays (e.g., OCB-750), and the biopolymer, chitosan, are very effective in removal and retention of metals in both fresh and salt water. These amendments are being evaluated further as components in the development of active caps for sediment remediation.

  5. ISOPAR L Release Rates from Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bronikowski, M

    2006-02-06

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Deactivated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour; the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed; and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the allowable concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS sent to SPF has been calculated at approximately 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher, if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 mg/L to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the Isopar{reg_sign} L release data can be treated as a percentage of initial concentration in the concentration range studied. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release is larger than at lower temperatures. In one test at 95 C essentially all of the Isopar{reg_sign} L was released in three months. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few days affected the final Isopar{reg_sign} L amount released. Short scoping tests at 95 C with solvent containing all components (Isopar

  6. ISOPAR L RELEASE RATES FROM SALTSTONE USING SIMULATED SALT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Michael Bronikowski, M; Alex Cozzi, A; Russell Eibling, R; Charles Nash, C

    2008-07-31

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability in the saltstone vault. If it is assumed that all the Isopar{reg_sign} L is released instantaneously into the vault from the curing grout before each subsequent pour, the Isopar{reg_sign} L in the vault headspace is well mixed, and each pour displaces an equivalent volume of headspace, the maximum concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the DSS to assure 25% of the lower flammable limit is not exceeded has been determined to be about 4 ppm. The amount allowed would be higher if the release from grout were significantly less. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the release of Isopar{reg_sign} L from saltstone prepared with a simulated DSS with Isopar{reg_sign} L concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. The results from the curing of the saltstone showed that the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released versus time can be treated as a percentage of initial amount present; there was no statistically significant dependence of the release rate on the initial concentration. The majority of the Isopar{reg_sign} L that was released over the test duration was released in the first few days. The release of Isopar{reg_sign} L begins immediately and the rate of release decreases over time. At higher temperatures the immediate release rate is larger than at lower temperatures. Initial curing temperature was found to be very important as slight variations during the first few hours or days had a significant effect on the amount of Isopar{reg_sign} L released. Short scoping

  7. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells. PMID:27532662

  8. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  12. A Study of Novel Hexavalent Phosphazene Salts as Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mark L. Stone; Aaron D. Wilson; Mason K. Harrup; Frederick F. Stewart

    2013-03-01

    Two novel multi-valent salts based on phosphazene chemistry have been synthesized and characterized as forward osmosis (FO) draw solutes. Commercially obtained hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene was reacted with the sodium salt of 4-ethylhydroxybenzoate to yield hexa(4-ethylcarboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene. Hydrolysis, followed by and neutralization with NaOH or LiOH, of the resulting acidic moieties yielded water soluble sodium and lithium phosphazene salts, respectively. Degrees of dissociation were determined through osmometry over the range of 0.05-0.5 m, giving degrees of 3.08-4.95 per mole, suggesting a high osmotic potential. The Li salt was found to be more ionized in solution than the sodium salt, and this was reflected in FO experiments where the Li salt gave higher initial fluxes (~ 7 L/m2h) as compared to the sodium salt (~6 L/m2h) at identical 0.07 m draw solution concentrations at 30 °C. Longer term experiments revealed no detectable degradation of the salts; however some hydrolysis of the cellulose acetate membrane was observed, presumably due to the pH of the phosphazene salt draw solution (pH = ~8).

  13. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  14. Concentration and precipitation of NaCl and KCl from salt cake leach solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasarao, K; Patsiogiannis, F.; Hryn, J.N.

    1997-02-09

    Electrodialysis was investigated for cost-effective recovery of salt from salt cake leach solutions. (Salt cake is a waste stream generated by the aluminum industry during treatment of aluminum drosses and scrap.) We used a pilot-scale electrodialysis stack of 5 membrane pairs, each with an effective area of 0.02 m{sup 2}. The diluate stream contained synthetic NaCl, KCl,mixtures of NaCl and KCl, and actual salt cake leach solutions (mainly NaCl and KCl, with small amounts of MgCl{sub 2}). We concentrated and precipitated NaCl and KCl salts from the concentrate steam when the initial diluate stream concentration was 21.5 to 28.8 wt% NaCl and KCl. We found that water transferring through the membranes was a significant factor in overall efficiency of salt recovery by electrodialysis.

  15. Inhibition of aminoglycoside acetyltransferase resistance enzymes by metal salts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D; Johnson, Brooke R; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn(2+) metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Au(3+) with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2')-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6')-Ib', AAC(6')-Ie, AAC(6')-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  16. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  17. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticles from Fungi and Metal Salts: Scope and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-02-01

    Fungi secrete enzymes and proteins as reducing agents which can be used for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles from metal salts. Large-scale production of nanoparticles from diverse fungal strains has great potential since they can be grown even in vitro. In recent years, various approaches have been made to maximize the yield of nanoparticles of varying shape, size, and stability. They have been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/TEM, zeta potential measurements, UV-vis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this review, we focus on the biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles by fungi to explore the chemistry of their formation extracellularly and intracellularly. Emphasis has been given to the potential of metal nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent to inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi, and on other potential applications.

  18. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticles from Fungi and Metal Salts: Scope and Application.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-12-01

    Fungi secrete enzymes and proteins as reducing agents which can be used for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles from metal salts. Large-scale production of nanoparticles from diverse fungal strains has great potential since they can be grown even in vitro. In recent years, various approaches have been made to maximize the yield of nanoparticles of varying shape, size, and stability. They have been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/TEM, zeta potential measurements, UV-vis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this review, we focus on the biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles by fungi to explore the chemistry of their formation extracellularly and intracellularly. Emphasis has been given to the potential of metal nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent to inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi, and on other potential applications. PMID:26909778

  19. Testing of stripping columns for the removal of benzene from aqueous radioactive salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Taylor, G.A.; Gaughan, T.P.

    1995-06-27

    Radioactive high level wastes (HLW) generated from production of special nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are held in interim storage in 51 underground, million gallon tanks. Radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) is segregated by evaporation of aqueous waste solution for interim storage in a salt matrix comprised of Na and K salts or in concentrated salt solution. The saltcake will be dissolved and {sup 137}Cs will be separated from the nonradioactive salts in solution in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Process. The cesium will be combined with other radioactive species and glass formers to be melted and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The salt solution remaining after decontamination in the ITP process will be incorporated into grout for disposal at the site`s Saltstone facility. In the ITP facility, sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) will be added to precipitate the cesium. Potassium in the waste solution also reacts with STPB and precipitates. Due to radiolytic and chemical degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate, benzene is generated. The benzene dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into water (WW) used to {open_quotes}wash{close_quotes} the precipitate to lower the soluble salt content of the slurry. Safety and processing requirements for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW dictate that the benzene concentration be reduced.

  20. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  1. Location of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinscher, J.; Bernard, P.; Contrucci, I.; Mangeney, A.; Piguet, J. P.; Bigarre, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ground failures, caving processes and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities can produce significant socio-economic damages and represent a serious risk envisaged by the mine managements and municipalities. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms governing such a geohazard and to test the potential of geophysical methods to prevent them, the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity was monitored in the Lorraine basin in northeastern France. During the experiment, a huge microseismic data set (˜50 000 event files) was recorded by a local microseismic network. 80 per cent of the data comprised unusual swarming sequences with complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events which could not be processed through standard automatic detection and location routines. Here, we present two probabilistic methods which provide a powerful tool to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics of these swarming sequences in an automatic manner. Both methods take advantage of strong attenuation effects and significantly polarized P-wave energies at higher frequencies (>100 Hz). The first location approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates for different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain the hypocentre locations. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P-wave energies and the associated polarization angles which provide very valuable information on the hypocentre location. Both methods are applied to a microseismic data set recorded during an important step of the development of the cavity, that is, before its collapse. From our results, systematic spatio-temporal epicentre migration trends are observed in the order of seconds to minutes and several tens of meters which are partially associated with cyclic behaviours. In addition, from spatio-temporal distribution of epicentre clusters we observed similar epicentre migration in the order of hours and days. All together, we

  2. Separation of heavy metals from salts in multicomponent gas by a two-stage dust collection technique.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimoto, Kaoru

    2013-06-15

    A Pb and Zn separation method from salts (Na, K, and Cl) in a simulated multicomponent gas generated by the incineration fly ash melting is studied. The heavy metals are separated using a two-stage dust collection technique. A standard reagents mixture is volatilized by heating in a lab-scale reactor to generate the simulated multicomponent gas. The volatilized salts in the gas are condensed and collected by a filter at a high temperature (600-800 °C), allowing Pb and Zn to pass through the filter as gaseous species. The gaseous heavy metals are condensed by lowering their temperature to 100 °C and collected. The metal separation is promoted by elevating the temperature used in the first-stage dust collection to 800 °C and maintaining a reductive atmosphere in the reactor. Subsequently, a sequential chemical extraction is performed on the obtained materials to evaluate the metals leaching characteristics from the materials. In the separated salts to be landfilled, a portion of toxic metals such as Pb, Cd, As, and Cr remain as water-soluble compounds. The separated Pb and Zn, to be extracted and recovered with precipitation for the metal enrichment, can be extracted using water, acid (pH 3), or CH₃COONH₄ solution (1M). PMID:23611806

  3. Students' Misconceptions in Electrochemistry: Current Flow in Electrolyte Solutions and the Salt Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Examines students' misconceptions and proposed mechanisms related to current flow in electrolyte solutions and the salt bridge. Confirms reported misconceptions and identifies several new ones. Discusses probable sources of misconceptions and some methods for preventing them. Contains 27 references. (JRH)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance in water solutions of inorganic salts in vitreous and liquid states

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, A. G. Koryavko, N. A.; Chichikov, S. A.

    2013-05-15

    Peculiarities of the behavior of water solutions of inorganic salts at temperatures of {approx}(120-150) K are examined. At these temperatures the solutions are in the vitreous state. At higher temperatures (up to 240 K) the solutions may be in metastable liquid, crystalline, or usual liquid states.

  5. Materials and methods for stabilizing nanoparticles in salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David Bruce; Zuckermann, Ronald; Buffleben, George M.

    2013-06-11

    Sequence-specific polymers are proving to be a powerful approach to assembly and manipulation of matter on the nanometer scale. Ligands that are peptoids, or sequence-specific N-functional glycine oligomers, allow precise and flexible control over the arrangement of binding groups, steric spacers, charge, and other functionality. We have synthesized short peptoids that can prevent the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in high-salt environments including divalent salt, and allow co-adsorption of a single DNA molecule. This degree of precision and versatility is likely to prove essential in bottom-up assembly of nanostructures and in biomedical applications of nanomaterials.

  6. Pesticide Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Adding Salting Out Agents

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso, Fátima; Deive, Francisco J.; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Rodríguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Phase segregation in aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of four hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs): 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate (CnC1im C1SO4, n = 2 and 4), tributylmethyl phosphonium methylsulfate (P4441 C1SO4) and methylpyridinium methylsulfate (C1Py C1SO4) and two high charge density potassium inorganic salts (K2CO3 and K2HPO4) were determined by the cloud point method at 298.15 K. The influence of the addition of the selected inorganic salts to aqueous mixtures of ILs was discussed in the light of the Hofmeister series and in terms of molar Gibbs free energy of hydration. The effect of the alkyl chain length of the cation on the methylsulfate-based ILs has been investigated. All the solubility data were satisfactorily correlated to several empirical equations. A pesticide (pentachlorophenol, PCP) extraction process based on the inorganic salt providing a greater salting out effect was tackled. The viability of the proposed process was analyzed in terms of partition coefficients and extraction efficiencies. PMID:24145747

  7. Process for recovering metals from solution utilizing metalloprotein affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, D.R.; Vincent, J.B.

    1993-11-29

    The invention relates generally to a process for recovering metals from an aqueous metal-bearing solution and, more particularly, to a process which utilizes metalloproteins immobilized on an insoluble support to remove metal ions such as the main group, transition, lanthanide, and actinide ions from the aqueous metal-ion bearing solution.

  8. Radical salts of TTF derivatives with the metal-metal bonded [Re 2Cl 8] 2- anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinheimer, Eric W.; Galán-Mascarós, José R.; Gómez-García, Carlos J.; Zhao, Hanhua; Fourmigué, Marc; Dunbar, Kim R.

    2008-11-01

    Four new salts of the radical cations of TMTSF (tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene), TMTTF (tetramethyltetrathiafulvalene), BEDT-TTF (bisethylenedithiotetrathia-fulvalene) (ET) and o-Me 2TTF ( o-4,4'-dimethyltetrathiafulvalene) with the metal-metal bonded dianion [Re 2Cl 8] 2- were synthesized, and their structures and physical properties investigated. The structures of these semiconducting salts feature one-dimensional stacking of the donor molecules interleaved with [Re 2Cl 8] 2- anions and interstitial solvent molecules.

  9. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  10. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  11. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  12. Room temperature inorganic ``quasi-molten salts`` as alkali-metal electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.; Zhang, S.; Angell, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Room temperature inorganic liquids of high ionic conductivity have been prepared by reacting Lewis acid AlCl with sulfonyl chlorides. The mechanism is not clear at this time since a crystal structure study of the 1:1 complex with CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl (T{sub m} = 30 C) is not consistent with a simple chloride transfer to create AlClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} anions. The liquid is in a state somewhere between ionic and molecular. A new term quasi-molten salt is adopted to describe this state. A comparably conducting liquid can be made using BCL{sub 3} in place of AlCl{sub 3}. Unlike their organic counterparts based on ammonium cations (e.g., pyridinium or imidazolium) which reduce in the presence of alkali metals, this inorganic class of cation shows great stability against electrochemical reduction (ca. {minus}1.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li), with the useful consequence that reversible lithium and sodium metal deposition/stripping can be supported. The electrochemical window for these quasi-salts with AlCl{sub 3} ranges up to 5.0 V, and their room temperature conductivities exceed 10{sup {minus}4} S/cm. They dissolve lithium and sodium tetrachloroaluminates up to mole fraction {approximately} 0.6 at 100 C and intermediate compositions are permanently stable at ambient. The resultant lithium or sodium salt solutions exhibit electrochemical windows of 4.5--5.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li or Na{sup +}/Na and show room temperature conductivities of 10{sup {minus}3.0}--10{sup {minus}2.5} S/cm. In preliminary charge/discharge tests, the cell Li/``quasi-ionic liquid electrolyte``/Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a discharge capacity of ca. 110 mAh/(g of cathode) and sustained 80% of the initial capacity after 60 cycles, indicating that these quasi-molten salt-based electrolytes are promising candidates for alkali-metal batteries.

  13. Concentration effect of the solutions for alumina template ac filling by metal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagminas, A.; Lichušina, S.; Kurtinaitien≐, M.; Selskis, A.

    2003-04-01

    The influence of the cMe z+ in acidic solutions of Cu, Ni, Co, and Sn salts on the amount of deposited metal, mMe, by ac electrolysis in the pores of various alumina templates grown in commonly used aluminium anodizing solutions of sulfuric, oxalic, phosphoric and chromo-boric acids was investigated. Behaviour of the porous alumina under ac voltage control manifests itself through mMe- cMe z+ parabola dependencies. The peaks of mMe- cMe z+ plots was found to be dependent on the alumina pore diameter, dp, and composition of the metal salt solution used. An increase in dp and decrease in a solution pH shifts mMe versus cMe z+ dependencies and the optimal cMe z+ toward smaller solution concentrations. From the results of the voltammetric and chronopotentiometric studies a surprisingly large value of a few seconds of the transition time for hydrogen ions discharge, occurring before the metal ion reduction at the bottom of alumina pores, was obtained. This result makes it reasonable to suggest that the amount of Me(OH) x, formed in the pore base region due to the hydrogen evolution from the acidic solutions with bulk concentration 0.1-0.2 M, is the most favourable to the deposition of metal arrays at the highest rate if 13.5≤ dp≤37.5 nm.

  14. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  15. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

    1998-06-23

    A method is described for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

  16. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup −} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  17. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-01

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and 13C-NMR chemical shift of S13CN- in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  18. Concentrations of metals in very small volumes of soil solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.

    1979-01-01

    A new method of sampling very small amounts of soil solution (0.3 g) shows that soil solutions contain high concentrations and unusual proportions of metals. In the soils studied, the solution is close in both metal proportions and total metal mass to what may be taken up annually by the growth of plants at the sites sampled. Composition of soil solution varies seasonally and with depth in soil. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  20. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in solution from a silver salt by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abid, J P; Wark, A W; Brevet, P F; Girault, H H

    2002-04-01

    A new method is proposed for the fabrication of a well-defined size and shape distribution of silver nanoparticles in solution; the method employs direct laser irradiation of an aqueous solution containing a silver salt and a surfactant in the absence of reducing agents. PMID:12119726

  1. Latent energy storage with salt and metal mixtures for solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Konstantinou, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines three design alternatives for the development of a solar dynamic heat receiver as applied to power systems operating in low earth orbit. These include a base line design used for comparison in ongoing NASA studies, a system incorporating a salt energy storage system with the salt dispersed within a metal mesh and a hybrid system incorporating both a molten salt and molten metal for energy storage. Based on a typical low earth orbit condition, designs are developed and compared to determine the effect of resultant conductivity, heat capacity and heat of fusion on system size, weight, temperature gradients, cycle turbine inlet temperature and material utilization.

  2. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  3. Temperature- and salt-responsive polyoxometalate-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hybrid macromolecules in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Yin, Panchao; Chen, Xinyue; Hu, Lang; Liu, Tianbo

    2015-11-14

    Polyoxometalate (POM) polar head groups were covalently functionalized with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) tails. The macromolecular hybrid demonstrates solution behavior of hydrophilic macroions by self-assembling into blackberry structures at room temperature. The hybrid behaves like an amphiphilic surfactant by forming a vesicular structure when the temperature is above the phase transition of PNIPAM. The reversible self-assembly is also salt-sensitive and the salt-induced smaller vesicular formation results from counterion-association. PMID:26383608

  4. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 10(7), and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  5. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seyeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-08-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo.

  6. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  7. Isoconversional Kinetics of Nonisothermal Crystallization of Salts from Solutions.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Victoria L; McCulley, Calla M; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2016-06-30

    In this study, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been applied to measure the kinetics of nonisothermal crystallization of potassium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate from unsaturated and saturated aqueous solutions. DSC data have been analyzed by an advanced isoconversional method that demonstrates that the process is represented by negative values of the effective activation energy, which varies with the progress of crystallization. The classical nucleation model can be used to predict and understand the experimentally observed variation in the effective activation energy. The saturated and unsaturated solutions have demonstrated distinctly different crystallization kinetics. It is suggested that the unsaturated solutions undergo a change in crystallization mechanism from homogeneous to heterogeneous nucleation. PMID:27305831

  8. Conformational changes of bovine plasma albumin prior to the salting-out of protein in concentrated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Sogami, M; Inouye, H; Nagaoka, S; Era, S

    1982-09-01

    By working at very low protein concentration (ca. 0.003%), it is possible to measure tryptophyl fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (F350) of bovine plasma albumin (BPA) as a function of pH under precipitating conditions (acidic concentrated salt solutions). Under such conditions, distinct changes in F350 were seen before the starting of precipitation of BPA and no further changes in F350 over the precipitating pH range. Comparison of pH-profiles monitored by F350 with those by solubility in the presence of various salts at various concentrations indicated that the change of solubility is observed after definite changes in conformation of the protein. PMID:7129758

  9. Calculating the thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of alkali metal carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, A. M.; Sergievskii, V. V.; Zhukova, T. V.

    2014-06-01

    A modified Robinson-Stokes equation with terms that consider the formation of ionic hydrates and associates is used to describe thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of electrolytes. The model is used to describe data on the osmotic coefficients of aqueous solutions of alkali metal carboxylates, and to calculate the mean ionic activity coefficients of salts and excess Gibbs energies. The key contributions from ionic hydration and association to the nonideality of solutions is determined by analyzing the contributions of various factors. Relations that connect the hydration numbers of electrolytes with the parameters of the Pitzer-Mayorga equation and a modified Hückel equation are developed.

  10. Method for removing metals from a cleaning solution

    DOEpatents

    Deacon, Lewis E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing accumulated metals from a cleaning solution is provided. After removal of the metals, the cleaning solution can be discharged or recycled. The process manipulates the pH levels of the solution as a means of precipitating solids. Preferably a dual phase separation at two different pH levels is utilized.

  11. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  12. Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiaping; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-01-01

    Copper biosorption from aqueous solutions by calcium alginate is reported in this paper. The experimental section includes potentiometric titrations of biosorbents, batch equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption, as well as fixed-bed biosorption experiments. The potentiometric titration results show that the surface charge increases with decreasing pH. The biosorption of copper strongly depends on solution pH; the metal ion binding increases from 0 to 90 percent in pH ranging from 1.5 to 5.0. In addition, a decrease in ionic strength results in an increase of copper ion removal. Kinetic studies indicate that mass transfer plays an important role in the biosorption rate. Furthermore, a fixed-bed biosorption experiment shows that calcium alginate has a significant capacity for copper ion removal. The two-pK Basic Stem model successfully represents the surface charge and equilibrium biosorption experimental data. The calculation results demonstrate that the copper removal may result from the binding of free copper and its hydroxide with surface functional groups of the biosorbents.

  13. Brazing method produces solid-solution bond between refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Brazing two refractory metals by diffusion bonding minimizes distortion and avoids excessive grain growth in the metals. This method requires the selection of an interface metal that forms intermediate low-melting eutectics or solid solutions with the metals to be brazed.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal...

  15. Redox condition in molten salts and solute behavior: A first-principles molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyo On; Morgan, Dane

    2015-10-01

    Molten salts technology is of significant interest for nuclear, solar, and other energy systems. In this work, first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) was used to model the solute behavior in eutectic LiCl-KCl and FLiBe (Li2BeF4) melts at 773 K and 973 K, respectively. The thermo-kinetic properties for solute systems such as the redox potential, solute diffusion coefficients and structural information surrounding the solute were predicted from FPMD modeling and the calculated properties are generally in agreement with the experiments. In particular, we formulate an approach to model redox energetics vs. chlorine (or fluorine) potential from first-principles approaches. This study develops approaches for, and demonstrates the capabilities of, FPMD to model solute properties in molten salts.

  16. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, David

    2000-01-01

    A method of preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A .beta.-metal .beta.-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  17. Methanol conversion over metal salts of 12-tungstophosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Moffat, J.B.

    1983-05-01

    The sodium, boron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, aluminum, and zirconium salts of 12-tungstophosphoric acid have been prepared and characterized using x-ray diffraction, mercury porosimetry, the chemisorption of ammonia, and Hammett indicators. Methanol conversion at 350/sup 0/C and a variety of residence times produced hydrocarbons ranging from C/sub 1/ to C/sub 5/ in amounts which varied with the cation. The more strongly acidic salts produced the higher yields of hydrocarbons. The maximum yield of the major product C/sub 4/ was found with the aluminum salt. The activities were related to the partial change on the oxygen atoms in the various catalysts. 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM–INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM–PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM–PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM–INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N—H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM–PAM cocrystal, while ACM–CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid–carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM–INA, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM–PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM–PPZ salt and ACM–nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM–PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine

  19. A salt-bridge structure in solution revealed by 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Domingos, Sérgio R; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-08-14

    Salt bridges are important interactions for the stability of protein conformations, but up to now it has been difficult to determine salt-bridge geometries in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm(+)) and acetate (Ac(-)) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridge formation there is a significant change in the infrared response of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), and cross peaks between them appear in the 2D-IR spectrum. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes of Gdm(+) and Ac(-), as well as the coupling between them. PMID:24676430

  20. Influence of halophytes and metal contamination on salt marsh macro-benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Caçador, I.

    2008-03-01

    Since an important fraction of the organic matter produced by salt marshes is decomposed in situ, macro-benthic communities are particularly exposed to the trace metals retained by these systems. Yet, few studies have investigated the macro-benthic communities using the between-root sediment habitat of the salt marsh halophytes (salt-tolerant plants), or the effect of trace metal pollution on its population dynamics. In the present study, samples were collected in vegetated and unvegetated sediment, in three salt marshes in the Tagus estuary, for trace metal concentration determination in the sediment and in the halophytes roots, grain size determination and macro-benthic organism identification. Data analysis revealed that the distribution of macro-benthic organisms is mainly determined by metal contamination, metal type and by the presence/absence of halophytes, not by the halophyte species. Five different associations were identified: resistant organisms were associated with the highest concentrations of lead (sediment); tolerant organisms with zinc, copper (sediment and roots) and lead (roots); cadmium in the sediment with a lack of macro-benthic life; sensitive organisms with low levels of metals except for cadmium in the roots; and macro-benthos typical of intertidal mudflats with unvegetated areas with low metal contamination.

  1. A new class of draw solutions for minimizing reverse salt flux to improve forward osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau Thi; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-12-15

    The applications of forward osmosis (FO) have been hindered because of the lack of an optimal draw solution. The reverse salt flux from the draw solution not only reduces the water flux but also increases the cost of draw solute replenishment. Therefore, in this study, Tergitol NP7 and NP9 with a long straight carbon chain and low critical micelle concentration (CMC) were coupled with highly charged ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as an innovative draw solution to minimize reverse salt diffusion in FO for the first time. The results showed that the lowest reverse salt flux of 0.067 GMH was observed when 0.1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 was used as a draw solution and deionized water was used as a feed solution in FO mode (active layer facing with the feed solution). This is due to the hydrophobic interaction between the tails of NP7 and the FO membrane, thus creating layers on the membrane surface and constricting the FO membrane pores. Moreover, 1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 is promising as an optimal draw solution for brackish water and sea water desalination. Average water fluxes of 7.68, 6.78, and 5.95 LMH were achieved when brackish water was used as a feed solution (5, 10, and 20g/L NaCl), and an average water flux of 3.81 LMH was achieved when sea water was used as a feed solution (35g/L NaCl). The diluted draw solution was recovered using a nanofiltration (NF-TS80) membrane with a high efficiency of 95% because of the high charge and large size of the draw solution. PMID:26298255

  2. Elastic properties of swollen polyelectrolyte gels in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shigeo

    2006-03-01

    The elastic relaxation responding to a uniaxially stretched poly(acrylic acid) rodlike gel in the aqueous NaCl solution was investigated. The relaxation elucidated the shear (mu) and bulk (K) moduli and the frictional coefficients (sigma) of the fully ionized gel at pH above 9 as functions of the degree of swelling, which was controlled by the NaCl concentration (C(S)) of the solution. Two gels, cross-linked chains of which consist of 500 (GelA500) and 50 (GelA50) monomeric units, were examined to investigate the effect of the chain length on the elastic behavior. The moduli of GelA500 increased with swelling at C(S) below 100 mM and decreased at C(S) above it. The mu values of both gels can be characterized by the power function of gel diameter, d as mu proportional, variantd(beta). The beta values being -1 at C(S) above 100 mM transitionally changed to 1.2 at C(S) about 100 mM. That is, the dimensionality of space for the chains to distribute, n(dim) [= (beta+5)/(beta+2) according to the conventional theory [Sasaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 102, 5694 (1995)

  3. Electrosorption of inorganic salts from aqueous solution using carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    Gabelich, Christopher J; Tran, Tri D; Suffet, I H Mel

    2002-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogels has been shown to remove various inorganic species from aqueous solutions, though no studies have shown the electrosorption behavior of multisolute systems in which ions compete for limited surface area. Several experiments were conducted to determine the ion removal capacity and selectivity of carbon aerogel electrodes, using both laboratory and natural waters. Although carbon aerogel electrodes have been treated as electrical double-layer capacitors, this study showed that ion sorption followed a Langmuir isotherm, indicating monolayer adsorption. The sorption capacity of carbon aerogel electrodes was approximately 1.0-2.0 x 10(-4) equiv/g aerogel, with ion selectivity being based on ionic hydrated radius. Monovalent ions (e.g., sodium) with smaller hydrated radii were preferentially removed from solution over multivalent ions (e.g., calcium) on a percent or molar basis. Because of the relatively small average pore size (4-9 nm) of the carbon aerogel material, only 14-42 m2/g aerogel surface area was available for ion sorption. Natural organic matter may foul the aerogel surface and limit CDI effectiveness in treating natural waters. PMID:12144279

  4. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication. PMID:26350735

  5. Results of Analysis of Macrobatch 3 Decontaminated Salt Solution Coalescer from May 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-18

    SRNL analyzed the Decontamination Salt Solution (DSS) coalescer from MCU by several analytical methods. This unit was removed from service in May 2010. The results of these analyses indicate that there is very little evidence of fouling via excessive solids, either from the leaching studies or X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  6. Effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, Philip; Seidel, Scott; Gupta, Malancha

    2015-05-15

    In this work, the effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The polymerizations of 4-vinyl pyridine and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate were studied using copper(II) chloride (CuCl{sub 2}) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) as the transition metal salts. It was found that the surface coverages of both poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) and poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) were decreased on CuCl{sub 2}, while the surface coverage of only P4VP was decreased on FeCl{sub 3}. The decreased polymer surface coverage was found to be due to quenching of the propagating radicals by the salt, which led to a reduction of the oxidation state of the metal. The identification of this reaction mechanism allowed for tuning of the effectiveness of the salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage through the adjustment of processing parameters such as the filament temperature. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the ability of transition metal salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage could be extended to the fabrication of patterned cross-linked coatings, which is important for many practical applications such as sensors and microelectronics.

  7. Ferragels: A new family of materials for remediation of aqueous metal ion solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ponder, S.M.; Ford, J.R.; Darab, J.G.; Mallouk, T.E.

    1999-07-01

    A nanoscale form of zero-valent iron, dispersed on high surface area supports, is found to reduce soluble metal ions [Cr(VI), Hg(II), Pb(II), Tc(VII)], and ReO4{sup {minus}} (as a surrogate for TcO4{sup {minus}}) to insoluble forms much faster than does unsupported zero-valent iron. The supported iron materials (Ferragels) were mixed with aqueous solutions of metal salts. In the case of technetium, alkaline salts were added to the solution to simulate Hanford tank waste. The redox reaction of Fe{sup 0} and the aqueous ions continues until the metal contaminant is removed from solution as an insoluble oxide. The rate of reduction is approximately linear with the E{sub 0} of the metal ion. The initial rates increase proportionately with increasing initial concentrations, suggesting Nernstian behavior. The material used to support the nanoscale iron, while ostensibly inert to the redox reaction, has a strong effect on the rates of reaction. This effect arises from the evenness of dispersion of the iron nanoparticles on the support surface, as well as the surface roughness, which affects the specific loading of iron. The best general support tested was a commercial resin, but this resin was unstable in the (pH 14) Hanford simulants. The best support tested for TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} removal was a poorly crystalline ZrO{sub 2} powder.

  8. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  9. pH in physiological salt solutions: direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, J; Norrie, B; Andersen, P K; Stokke, D B; Nedergaard, O A

    1990-11-01

    Calculations of pH in modified Krebs solutions by inserting PCO2 and total-CO2 in the Henderson-Hasselbalch (H.-H.) equation are obvious as the equation originally served for this purpose. An exact calculation of the relation between pH and PCO2 is complicated as the concentration of bicarbonate, the dissociation constant and the solubility of CO2 change. Furthermore, the dissociation constant in the H.-H. equation is constant only if activities are used in the equation instead of stoichiometric concentrations. We therefore investigated the influence of different carbon dioxide tensions and bicarbonate concentrations on directly measured pH of organ baths aerated with mass-spectrometric analyzed O2-CO2 gases. For reference precision buffers were used. The measured pH values differed distinctly from calculated pH values in the acidic and alkaline parts of the pH interval investigated (6.57-8.15). Measurements of actual pH with proper calibration standards therefore seem mandatory. PMID:2177306

  10. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.